WorldWideScience

Sample records for abdominal ct findings

  1. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Suk Keu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin, E-mail: kimhyejin@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho, E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young, E-mail: aykim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu, E-mail: mglee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon, E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  2. CT findings in abdominal actinomycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Jae; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Moon Gyu; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Auh, Yong Ho

    1999-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis is a chronic, progressive, suppurative disease with a favorable response to intravenous treatment with penicillin. In many instances, however, its clinical and radiological findings may overlap with those of other inflammatory and neoplastic conditions, and the familiarity with the various radiological features can thus avoid diagnostic delays. The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss the CT findings of abdominal actinomycosis

  3. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young; Ha, Hong Il

    2013-01-01

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  4. Extra-appendiceal findings in pediatric abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark; Delgado, Jorge; Mahboubi, Soroosh [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Much has been written regarding the incidence, types, importance and management of abdominal CT incidental findings in adults, but there is a paucity of literature on incidental findings in children. We sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of extra-appendiceal and incidental findings in pediatric abdominal CT performed for suspected appendicitis. A retrospective review was performed of abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis in a pediatric emergency department from July 2010 to June 2012. Extra-appendiceal findings were recorded. Any subsequent imaging was noted. Extra-appendiceal findings were divided into incidental findings of doubtful clinical significance, alternative diagnostic findings potentially providing a diagnosis other than appendicitis explaining the symptoms, and incidental findings that were abnormalities requiring clinical correlation and sometimes requiring further evaluation but not likely related to the patient symptoms. One hundred sixty-five children had abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis. Seventy-seven extra-appendiceal findings were found in 57 (34.5%) patients. Most findings (64 of 77) were discovered in children who did not have appendicitis. Forty-one of these findings (53%) could potentially help explain the patient's symptoms, while 30 of the findings (39%) were abnormalities that were unlikely to be related to the symptoms but required clinical correlation and sometimes further work-up. Six of the findings (8%) had doubtful or no clinical significance. Extra-appendiceal findings are common in children who undergo abdominal CT in the setting of suspected appendicitis. A significant percentage of these patients have findings that help explain their symptoms. Knowledge of the types and prevalence of these findings may help radiologists in the planning and interpretation of CT examinations in this patient population. (orig.)

  5. CT findings of benign omental lesions following abdominal cancer surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Yun; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jin Han; Kwon, Hee Jin; Ha, Dong Ho; Oh, Jong Young [Diagnostic Radiology, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The greater omentum is the largest peritoneal fold and can be the origin of primary pathologic conditions, as well as a boundary and conduit for disease processes. Most diseases involving the omentum manifest with nonspecific and overlapping features on computed tomography (CT). In particular, varying benign disease processes of traumatic, inflammatory, vascular, or systemic origin can occur in the omentum during the follow-up period after surgery for intra-abdominal malignancy. It can be challenging for radiologists due to various spectrum of CT findings. Thus, we reviewed the CT findings of various benign omental lesions after surgery for intra-abdominal malignancy.

  6. Postoperative findings following the Whipple procedure : determination of prevalence and morphologic abdominal CT features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortele, KJ; Lemmerling, M; de Hemptinne, B; De Vos, M; De Bock, G; Kunnen, M

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine characteristic CT findings following the Whipple procedure and to evaluate the usefulness of CT in re-dieting tumor recurrence. Eighty-four postoperative abdominal CT scans and medical records of 43 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Perioperative

  7. Evaluation of abdominal CT in the initial treatment of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shinsuke; Ishii, Takashi; Kuwata, Katsuya; Yoneyama, Chihiro; Kitamura, Kazuya; Sasaki, Yoshifumi; Kamachi, Masahiro; Nishiguchi, Hiroyasu.

    1986-01-01

    During the last four years 102 patients with abdominal trauma were examined by CT for preoperative evaluation in our hospital. In 35 patients (34 %), the CT scans revealed no abnormal findings. They were all managed conservatively except for one case of perforated small bowel. In 67 patients (66 %) CT revealed evidences of substantial abdominal or retroperitoneal trauma. In 30 of them CT findings were confirmed by surgery. Hepatic injury is usually easily recognized by CT. CT is also useful for the detection of renal or splenic injuries. The majority of those parenchymatous organ injuries were successfully managed with conservative therapy, despite apparent traumatic lesions revealed by CT. Repeat CT scans is proved to be very useful to follow the changes of these traumatic lesions. In conclusion, application of abdominal CT is extremely useful for the initial decision making in treatment of patients with abdominal trauma and for the follow-up observation of injured lesions. (author)

  8. Abdominal wall hernias: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Rosas, George de Queiroz; Mota, Marcos Alexandre; Akisue, Sandra R. Tsukada; Galvao Filho, Mario de Melo.

    2005-01-01

    Abdominal hernias are a common clinical problem Clinical diagnosis of abdominal hernias can sometimes be challenging, particularly in obese patients or patients with previous abdominal surgery. CT scan of the abdomen allows visualization of hernias and their contents and the differentiation from other masses of the abdominal wall such as tumors, hematomas and abscesses. Moreover, CT may identify complications such as incarceration, bowel obstruction, volvulus and strangulation. This study illustrates the CT scan findings observed in different types of abdominal wall hernias. (author)

  9. Abdominal imaging findings in gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicek, Kristina T; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; De Petris, Giovanni D; Johnson, C Daniel

    2015-02-01

    To describe the abdominal imaging findings of patients with gastrointestinal Basidiobolus ranarum infection. A literature search was performed to compile the abdominal imaging findings of all reported worldwide cases of gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis (GIB). In addition, a retrospective review at our institution was performed to identify GIB cases that had imaging findings. A radiologist aware of the diagnosis reviewed the imaging findings in detail. Additional information was obtained from the medical records. A total of 73 GIB cases have been published in the medical literature. The most common abdominal imaging findings were masses in the colon, the liver, or multiple sites and bowel wall thickening. Initially, many patients were considered to have either a neoplasm or Crohn disease. We identified 7 proven cases of GIB at our institution, of which 4 had imaging studies (4 computed tomography [CT] examinations, 4 abdominal radiographs, and an upper gastrointestinal study). Imaging studies showed abnormalities in all 4 cases. Three-fourths of our study patients had an abdominal mass at CT. Two of 3 masses involved the kidneys and included urinary obstruction. All masses showed an inflammatory component with adjacent soft tissue stranding, with or without abscess formation. Radiologists should consider GIB when a patient from an arid climate presents with abdominal pain, weight loss, and an inflammatory abdominal mass on CT. Abdominal masses of the colon or liver, bowel wall thickening, and abscesses are the most common imaging findings.

  10. Emergency CT in blunt abdominal trauma of multiple injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnunen, J.; Kivioja, A.; Poussa, K.; Laasonen, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple injury patients with blunt abdominal trauma (n = 110) were examined by abdominal CT. An i.v., but not peroral, contrast medium was used, thereby eliminating the delay caused by administering peroral contrast medium and any subsequent delay in making the diagnoses and beginning operative treatment. Eighteen patients underwent emergency laparotomy after the initial CT examination. The preoperative CT findings were compared to the laparotomy findings. CT revealed all but one of the severe parenchymal organ lesions requiring surgery. The one liver laceration that went undetected had caused hemoperitoneum, which was diagnosed by CT. The bowel and mesenteric lesions presented as intra-abdominal blood, and the hemoperitoneum was discovered in every patient with these lesions. Fourteen patients also initially had positive abdominal CT findings; 10 of them underwent an additional abdominal CT within 3 days, but the repeat studies did not reveal any lesions in need of surgery. Omission of the oral contrast medium did not jeopardize making the essential diagnoses, but it did save time. (orig.)

  11. CT diagnosis of abdominal ectopic pheochromocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuping; Zhao Zhiying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the value of CT in diagnosis of abdominal ectopic pheochromocytoma. Methods: CT findings of 5 cases surgically and pathologically proved with ectopic pheochromocytoma were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Soft tissue mass with light asymmetry enhancement was found between the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena ca-va in one case. 1 case was completely cystic with light enhancement of the cystwall located in front of the left side of the abdominal aorta. 1 case of large solid mass occurred between the renal hilum and the tail of pancreas, with irregular shape, unclear boundary, central necrosis, calcification and obviously enhancement at the solid part. 2 cases showed as oval soft lump with even density, moderate strengthening located before the abdominal aorta. Paroxysmal hypertension occurred in 3 cases and didn't in 2 cases. Hypertension happened in 1 case during the operation because of stimulation. Blood pressure appeared in 1 case during and after operation. Blood and urinary catecholamine increased significantly in 4 cases. Conclusion: Ectopic pheochromocytoma mainly located surround the abdominal aorta with diverse CT performance. It is helpful for diagnosing when finding a lesion locates at the specified sites combined with typical clinical presentation. CT can not only depict small tumor, but also can show the relationship with surrounding structure, and it provides important information for the operation and prognosis. (authors)

  12. Common and uncommon CT findings in rupture and impending rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.Z.; Ling, L.; Ettles, D.F.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid imaging evaluation and diagnosis of rupture and impending rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is imperative. This article describes the imaging findings of rupture, impending rupture, and other abdominal aortic abnormalities. It is important not to overlook AAA as the consequences can be life threatening. All patients who had open or endovascular repair of AAA rupture over 6 years (2008–2012) were identified from our departmental database. The computed tomography (CT) images of 99 patients were reviewed for relevant findings. The mean age of the patients was 65 years and 85% were male

  13. CT of abdominal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Kenji; Ito, Masatoshi; Ito, Hisao; Yamaura, Harutsugu

    1981-01-01

    CT findings in 33 patients who had an abdominal tumor were evaluated. CT revealed a tumor in 31 cases. The organ from which the tumor originated was correctly diagnosed in 18 patients. Whether the tumor was solid or cystic was correctly predicted in 28 patients. The diagnosis malignant or benign nature of tumor was correct, incorrect and impossible, in 23, 3, and five patiens, respectively. (Kondo, M.)

  14. Assessing the prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal and pelvic CT findings in senior patients presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabousi, Abdullah; Patlas, Michael N; Meshki, Malek; Monteiro, Sandra; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal and pelvic CT findings for patients 65 years of age and older, when compared with all other scanned adult Emergency Department (ED) patients, at a single tertiary care hospital. Our hypothesis was that there is an increased prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal/pelvic CT findings in senior patients. A research ethics board-approved retrospective review of all adult patients who underwent an emergency CT of the abdomen and pelvis for acute nontraumatic abdominal and/or pelvic signs and symptoms was performed. Two thousand one hundred two patients between October 1, 2011, and September 30, 2013, were reviewed. Six hundred thirty-one patients were included in the 65 group (209 men and 253 women; mean age 77.6, age range 65-99). Overall, there were more positive CT findings for patients 65 group (257 positive cases, 55.6 %), which was a statistically significant difference (p 65 group, there were no statistically significant differences in the clinical/surgical relevance of the positive CT findings between the two groups. The findings of our retrospective study therefore refute our hypothesis that there is an increased prevalence of positive abdominal CT findings in patients >65. This may be related to ED physicians at our institution being more hesitant to order CT examinations for the younger population, presumably due to radiation concerns. However, older patients in our series were more likely to present with complicated appendicitis, and a lower threshold for ordering CT examinations of the abdomen and pelvis in this patient population should therefore be considered.

  15. CT findings at lupus mesenteric vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, S.F.; Lee, T.Y.; Cheng, T.T.; Ng, S.H.; Lai, H.M.; Cheng, Y.F.; Tsai, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of early CT findings of lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV) and to assess the utility of CT in the management of this uncommon entity. Methods: Abdominal CT was performed within 1-4 days (average 2.2 days) of the onset of severe abdominal pain and tenderness in 15 women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Prompt high-dose i.v. corticosteroid in 11 patients after the CT diagnosis of LMV was made. CT was performed after abdominal symptoms subsided. Results: Eleven cases revealed CT features suggestive of LMV including conspicuous prominence of mesentric vessels with palisade pattern or comb-like appearance (CT comb sign) supplying focal or diffuse dilated bowel loops (n=11), ascites with slightly increased peritoneal enhancement (n=11), small bowel wall thickening (n=10) with double halo or target sign (n=8). Follow-up CT before high-dose steroid therapy revealed complete or marked resolution of the abnormal CT findings. Conclusion: CT is helpful for confirming the diagnosis of LMV, especially the comb sign which may be an early sign. Bowel ischemia due to LMV is less ominous than previously expected, and the abnormal CT findings were reversible when early diagnosis and prompt i.v. steroid therapy could be achieved. (orig.)

  16. CT findings at lupus mesenteric vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, S.F. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Lee, T.Y. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Cheng, T.T. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Rheumatology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Ng, S.H. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Lai, H.M. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Rheumatology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Cheng, Y.F. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Tsai, C.C. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of early CT findings of lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV) and to assess the utility of CT in the management of this uncommon entity. Methods: Abdominal CT was performed within 1-4 days (average 2.2 days) of the onset of severe abdominal pain and tenderness in 15 women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Prompt high-dose i.v. corticosteroid in 11 patients after the CT diagnosis of LMV was made. CT was performed after abdominal symptoms subsided. Results: Eleven cases revealed CT features suggestive of LMV including conspicuous prominence of mesentric vessels with palisade pattern or comb-like appearance (CT comb sign) supplying focal or diffuse dilated bowel loops (n=11), ascites with slightly increased peritoneal enhancement (n=11), small bowel wall thickening (n=10) with double halo or target sign (n=8). Follow-up CT before high-dose steroid therapy revealed complete or marked resolution of the abnormal CT findings. Conclusion: CT is helpful for confirming the diagnosis of LMV, especially the comb sign which may be an early sign. Bowel ischemia due to LMV is less ominous than previously expected, and the abnormal CT findings were reversible when early diagnosis and prompt i.v. steroid therapy could be achieved. (orig.).

  17. CT of abdominal abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobkin, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The imaging search for a suspected abdominal abscess is common in hospitalized patients, especially after recent abdominal surgery. This paper examines the role of CT in the detection, localization, and treatment of abdominal abscess. The accuracy, limitations, and technical aspects of CT in this clinical setting are discussed. The diagnosis of an abscess is based on the demonstration of a circumscribed abnormal fluid collection. Although percutaneous aspiration with gram stain and culture is usually indicated to differentiate abscess from other fluid collections, the CT-based detection of extraluminal gas bubbles makes the diagnosis of an abscess highly likely. CT is compared with conventional radiographic studies, US, and radio-nuclide imaging. Specific CT and clinical features of abscesses in the following sites are emphasized: subphrenic space, liver, pancreas, kidneys, psoas muscle, appendix, and colonic diverticula. Most abdominal abscesses can be successfully treated with percutaneous drainage techniques. The techniques, results, and limitations of percutaneous abscess drainage are reviewed

  18. CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monill, J.; Pernas, J.; Montserrat, E.; Perez, C.; Clavero, J.; Martinez-Noguera, A.; Guerrero, R.; Torrubia, S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms. We reviewed CT imaging findings in 11 patients (seven men, four women; mean age 62 years) with plasma cell neoplasms and abdominal involvement. Helical CT of the entire abdomen and pelvis was performed following intravenous administration of contrast material. Images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists. Diagnoses were made from biopsy, surgery and/or clinical follow-up findings. Multiple myeloma was found in seven patients and extramedullary plasmacytoma in four patients. All patients with multiple myeloma had multifocal disease with involvement of perirenal space (4/7), retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes (3/7), peritoneum (3/7), liver (2/7), subcutaneous tissues (2/7) and kidney (1/7). In three of the four patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma, a single site was involved, namely stomach, vagina and retroperitoneum. In the fourth patient, a double site of abdominal involvement was observed with rectal and jejunal masses. Plasma cell neoplasm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of single or multiple enhancing masses in the abdomen or pelvis. Abdominal plasma cell neoplasms were most frequently seen as well-defined enhancing masses (10/11). (orig.)

  19. CT diagnosis of concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Jiansong; Wei Tiemin; Wang Zufei; Zhao Zhongwei; Tu Jianfei; Fan Xiaoxi; Xu Min

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CT findings of concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma. Methods: CT findings of 11 cases with concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma proved by surgery were identified retrospectively. Results: The main special signs included: (1) Free air in 4 cases, mainly around injured small bowel or under the diaphragm, or in the retroperitoneal space or and in the lump. (2) High density hematoma between the intestines or in the bowel wall (4 cases). (3) Bowel wall injury sign, demonstrated as low density of the injured intestinal wall, attenuated locally but relatively enhanced in neighbor wall on enhanced CT. (4) Lump around the injured bowel wall with obvious ring-shaped enhancement (4 cases). Other signs included: (1) Free fluid in the abdominal cavity or between the intestines with blurred borders. (2) Bowel obstruction. Conclusion: CT is valuable in diagnosing concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma. (authors)

  20. Postmortem abdominal CT: Assessing normal cadaveric modifications and pathological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, P.; Carlier, R.; Roffi, F.; Ezra, J.; Chaillot, P.F.; Duchat, F.; Huynh-Charlier, I.; Lorin de la Grandmaison, G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the interest of postmortem non-enhanced computer tomography (CT) for abdominal lesions in a forensic context of suspicions death and to list the different radiological cadaveric modifications occurring normally at abdominal stage, which must be known by non forensic radiologists in case of any postmortem exam. Materials and methods: 30 cadavers have been submitted to a body CT-scan without injection of contrast material. CT exams were reviewed by two independent radiologists and radiological findings were compared with forensic autopsy data. Results: False positive CT findings included physiological postmortem transudates misdiagnosed with intra-abdominal bleedings, and putrefaction gas misdiagnosed with gas embolism, aeroporty, aerobily, digestive parietal pneumatosis. Incidentalomas without any role in death process were also reported. False negative CT findings included small contusions, vascular thromboses, acute infarcts foci, non radio-opaque foreign bodies. Normal cadaveric modifications were due to livor mortis and putrefaction, and are seen quickly (some hours) after death. Conclusion: The non forensic radiologist should be familiar with the normal abdominal postmortem features in order to avoid misdiagnoses, and detect informative lesions which can help and guide the forensic practitioner or the clinical physician.

  1. Abdominal and pelvic CT in cases of suspected abuse: can clinical and laboratory findings guide its use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Strouse, Peter J.; Mohr, Bethany A.; Khalatbari, S.; Myles, Jamie D.

    2011-01-01

    Incomplete history and concern for occult injury in suspected child abuse occasionally results in CT screenings of the abdomen and pelvis. At our institution, we noted that these exams were infrequently positive. To identify clinical or laboratory criteria that may predict intra-abdominal injury and guide the use of abdominal and pelvic CT in this population. This retrospective review involved 68 children older than 36 months who had a CT of the abdomen/pelvis for suspected abuse. CT results and patient charts were reviewed for physical exam and historical and laboratory variables. CTs were positive in 16% of patients (11/68). Hypoactive/absent bowel sounds (P = 0.01, specificity = 94.7%) and AST and ALT values greater than twice normal (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003 respectively, NPV = 93.6%) were significantly associated with positive CTs. Multiple abnormal physical exam or laboratory findings were also significantly associated with positive CTs (P = 0.03 and P = 0.002 respectively, specificity = 91.3% and NPV = 93.6% respectively). CTs of the abdomen and pelvis are infrequently positive in cases of suspected abuse. To reduce radiation exposure, CTs should only be ordered if there are findings indicating that they may be positive. In our population, these findings include absent/hypoactive bowel sounds, LFTs greater than twice normal and ≥2 abnormal labs or physical exam findings. (orig.)

  2. Abdominal and pelvic CT in cases of suspected abuse: can clinical and laboratory findings guide its use?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mohr, Bethany A. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Khalatbari, S.; Myles, Jamie D. [University of Michigan, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Incomplete history and concern for occult injury in suspected child abuse occasionally results in CT screenings of the abdomen and pelvis. At our institution, we noted that these exams were infrequently positive. To identify clinical or laboratory criteria that may predict intra-abdominal injury and guide the use of abdominal and pelvic CT in this population. This retrospective review involved 68 children older than 36 months who had a CT of the abdomen/pelvis for suspected abuse. CT results and patient charts were reviewed for physical exam and historical and laboratory variables. CTs were positive in 16% of patients (11/68). Hypoactive/absent bowel sounds (P = 0.01, specificity = 94.7%) and AST and ALT values greater than twice normal (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003 respectively, NPV = 93.6%) were significantly associated with positive CTs. Multiple abnormal physical exam or laboratory findings were also significantly associated with positive CTs (P = 0.03 and P = 0.002 respectively, specificity = 91.3% and NPV = 93.6% respectively). CTs of the abdomen and pelvis are infrequently positive in cases of suspected abuse. To reduce radiation exposure, CTs should only be ordered if there are findings indicating that they may be positive. In our population, these findings include absent/hypoactive bowel sounds, LFTs greater than twice normal and {>=}2 abnormal labs or physical exam findings. (orig.)

  3. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5{+-}3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9{+-}1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9{+-}1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment.

  4. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5±3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9±1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9±1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment

  5. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jung Wook [Inje Univ. Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer.

  6. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jung Wook

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer

  7. Acute bowel ischemia: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelelli, Giuseppe; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Memeo, Maurizio; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Rotondo, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Acute bowel ischemia represents one of the most dramatic abdominal emergencies and, despite the fact it is more and more frequently observed in clinical practice, its mortality rate remains very high. In recent years Computed Tomography (CT) has proved to be a valid diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with acute abdominal syndrome and in the visualization of early signs of bowel ischemia. This paper reviews the aetiological and pathophysiological aspects as well as a broad spectrum of CT findings of this clinical condition

  8. Postoperative findings following the Whipple procedure: determination of prevalence and morphologic abdominal CT features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortele, K.J.; Lemmerling, M.; Bock, G. de; Kunnen, M. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gent (Belgium); Hemptinne, B. de [Department of Digestive Surgery, University Hospital Gent (Belgium); Vos, M. de [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Gent (Belgium)

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine characteristic CT findings following the Whipple procedure and to evaluate the usefulness of CT in predicting tumor recurrence. Eighty-four postoperative abdominal CT scans and medical records of 43 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Perioperative histopathologic examinations revealed malignancy in 32 patients (74.4 %). Time interval between surgery and CT varied from 13 days to 6 years and 7 months. Common postoperative findings were unopacified anastomotic bowel loops in the porta hepatis (n = 69 scans), perivascular cuffing (n = 42 scans), pneumobilia (n = 40 scans), dilated intrahepatic bile ducts (n = 22 scans), reactive lymphadenopathy (n = 21 scans), and transient fluid collections (n = 20 scans). Postoperative complications were detected on 17 CT scans (20.2 %): generalized ascites (n = 8 patients), deep abscesses (n = 3 patients), wound abscess (n = 1 patient), pancreatitis (n = 1 patient), and pseudomembranous colitis (n = 1 patient). Tumor recurrence appeared in 15 patients (46.8 %) after a mean postoperative period of 11 months (1 month to 3 years): local (9 of 15), regional lymph nodes (9 of 15), and liver metastasis (8 of 15). Detection of generalized ascites more than 30 days after surgery was associated with tumor recurrence in 6 of 6 patients (100 %). Diffuse ascites (> 30 days after surgery) behaved as an early predictive sign of tumor recurrence. In our series CT accuracy for detecting recurrent tumor with CT was 93.5 %. No predilection site for disease recurrence could be determined. (orig.)

  9. Abdominal wall hernias: computed tomography findings; Hernias da parede abdomino-pelvica: aspectos tomograficos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Rosas, George de Queiroz; Mota, Marcos Alexandre; Akisue, Sandra R. Tsukada; Galvao Filho, Mario de Melo[Hospital e Maternidade Sao Luiz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de US/TC/RMN]. E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br

    2005-07-15

    Abdominal hernias are a common clinical problem Clinical diagnosis of abdominal hernias can sometimes be challenging, particularly in obese patients or patients with previous abdominal surgery. CT scan of the abdomen allows visualization of hernias and their contents and the differentiation from other masses of the abdominal wall such as tumors, hematomas and abscesses. Moreover, CT may identify complications such as incarceration, bowel obstruction, volvulus and strangulation. This study illustrates the CT scan findings observed in different types of abdominal wall hernias. (author)

  10. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ruiting

    2004-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  11. CT identification of abdominal injuries in abused pre-school-age children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Kan, J.H.; Greeley, Christopher S.; Piercey, Lisa M.; Yu, Chang

    2011-01-01

    Although the abdominopelvic CT findings of abdominal trauma in children have been described, little has been written about the subset of children who are victims of abuse. Our purpose is to describe abdominopelvic injuries in abused pre-school-age children as identified on CT. An IRB-approved retrospective review of our institutional child abuse registry was performed. Searching a 14-year period, we identified 84 children ≤ 5 years of age with medically diagnosed abuse who underwent CT. We reviewed imaging studies, operative reports, autopsy findings and patient outcomes. Consensus review of the CT examinations was performed by CAQ-certified pediatric radiologists, and findings were categorized as normal or by injury types (solid organ versus bowel). The injuries were analyzed in light of existing literature on pediatric accidental and non-accidental injuries. Of the 84 children, 35 (41.7%) had abdominal injuries. Abdominal injuries included liver (15), bowel (13), mesentery (4), spleen (6), kidneys (7), pancreas (4) and adrenal glands (3). Of these children, 26% (9/35) required surgical intervention for bowel, mesenteric and pancreatic injuries. Another 9/35 children died, not as a result of abdominal injuries but as a direct result of inflicted intracranial injuries. Our data indicate that abdominal injuries in abused children present in a pattern similar to that of children with accidental abdominal trauma, underscoring the need for vigilance and correlative historical and clinical data to identify victims of abuse. Mortality in abused children with intra-abdominal injury was frequently related to concomitant head injury. (orig.)

  12. CT identification of abdominal injuries in abused pre-school-age children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Greeley, Christopher S. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of Pediatrics, Houston, TX (United States); Piercey, Lisa M. [Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Although the abdominopelvic CT findings of abdominal trauma in children have been described, little has been written about the subset of children who are victims of abuse. Our purpose is to describe abdominopelvic injuries in abused pre-school-age children as identified on CT. An IRB-approved retrospective review of our institutional child abuse registry was performed. Searching a 14-year period, we identified 84 children {<=} 5 years of age with medically diagnosed abuse who underwent CT. We reviewed imaging studies, operative reports, autopsy findings and patient outcomes. Consensus review of the CT examinations was performed by CAQ-certified pediatric radiologists, and findings were categorized as normal or by injury types (solid organ versus bowel). The injuries were analyzed in light of existing literature on pediatric accidental and non-accidental injuries. Of the 84 children, 35 (41.7%) had abdominal injuries. Abdominal injuries included liver (15), bowel (13), mesentery (4), spleen (6), kidneys (7), pancreas (4) and adrenal glands (3). Of these children, 26% (9/35) required surgical intervention for bowel, mesenteric and pancreatic injuries. Another 9/35 children died, not as a result of abdominal injuries but as a direct result of inflicted intracranial injuries. Our data indicate that abdominal injuries in abused children present in a pattern similar to that of children with accidental abdominal trauma, underscoring the need for vigilance and correlative historical and clinical data to identify victims of abuse. Mortality in abused children with intra-abdominal injury was frequently related to concomitant head injury. (orig.)

  13. Dynamic CT in the abdominal organ, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kunihiko

    1980-01-01

    By utilizing a 4.5-second CT (computed tomography) scanner which allows sequential scans the changes of the iodine concentration in abdominal organs can be observed as dynamics reflected in CT number. The abdominal dynamic CT was performed as following method. After performing the preliminary scan 50ml of 60% meglumine iothalamate was rapidly injected intravenously by hands. The sequential scanning was initiated when a half dose of contrast medium was injected. In completion of the 4 sequential scans under arrested respiration the conventional post contrast scanning was performed. The analysis of 112 cases dynamically studied by CT came to the following conclusion. CT number of the abdominal aorta was greatest on the 1st or 2nd scan of the sequential scans (7.5 - 20.5 seconds after initiation of injection). Following this peak formation, CT number of the abdominal aorta declined rapidly due to both prompt diffusion of contrast medium into the extravascular space and dilution by the intravascular fluid. Iodine concentration of the abdominal aorta during the peak period was calculated as 11.3 mg/ml by the present method, being theoretically sufficient for delineation of the vessels smaller than medium size. In the patients with impaired renal function, several characteristic patterns were noted on the dynamics of contrast medium within the abdominal organs. The abdominal dynamic CT was felt to be promissing for evaluation of the renal function. (author)

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... CT scan, an experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with ...

  15. Dynamic CT in the abdominal organ, 2. Dynamics in the abdominal malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, K [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-03-01

    The potential role of the abdominal dynamic CT in malignant tumors was evaluated. Among total of 112 cases dynamically studied included were, 22 cases of abdominal malignancies, renal cell carcinoma in 7, hepatocellular carcinoma in 7, metastatic liver tumor in 5, renal pelvic carcinoma in 2, and pancreatic cystadenocarcinoma in one. The results led to the following advantages of the abdominal dynamic CT over conventional CT. (1) The tumor thrombus and the lymphnode involvement could be better demonstrated. (2) The tumor vessels and the tumor stain could be depicted. (3) The extent of the tumor in the parenchyma could be better appreciated. The more invasive catheter angiography would likely to be replaced by the abdominal dynamic CT in the selected case.

  16. CT findings in gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Suki; McHugh, Kieran; Ledermann, Sarah; Pierro, Agostino

    2007-01-01

    We describe the CT findings in an initially asymptomatic boy aged 2 years 9 months with a gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. The findings consisted of an unusual configuration of the gastrostomy tubing on an abdominal radiograph and upper gastrointestinal study indicating the possibility of transcolic PEG placement, which was confirmed with limited section CT. This well-known and major complication following a common procedure may be recognized on plain abdominal radiography, but it has not to our knowledge been documented previously on CT in a child. (orig.)

  17. CT findings in gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Suki [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); St. George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Ledermann, Sarah [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Pierro, Agostino [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    We describe the CT findings in an initially asymptomatic boy aged 2 years 9 months with a gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. The findings consisted of an unusual configuration of the gastrostomy tubing on an abdominal radiograph and upper gastrointestinal study indicating the possibility of transcolic PEG placement, which was confirmed with limited section CT. This well-known and major complication following a common procedure may be recognized on plain abdominal radiography, but it has not to our knowledge been documented previously on CT in a child. (orig.)

  18. Many unexpected abdominal findings on staging computed tomography in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmsted, Kim; Nørring, Keld; Laustrup, Lene Collatz

    2011-01-01

    ; an issue that was previously studied in relation to CT colonography, but not in relation to staging CT with intravenous contrast in CRC patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the number and significance of such unexpected findings on staging CTs in CRC patients.......Computed tomography (CT) was proven to be superior to preoperative abdominal ultrasound in the preoperative setting for detection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC). The higher sensitivity of CT has resulted in a number of unexpected abdominal findings of varying importance...

  19. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Sands, Daniel Z.; Edlow, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  20. Outcome of Blunt Abdominal Traumas with Stable Hemodynamic and Positive FAST Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behboodi, Firooz; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Masjedi, Navid; Shojaie, Reza; Sadri, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) is a highly effective first screening tool for initial classification of abdominal trauma patients. The present study was designed to evaluate the outcome of patients with blunt abdominal trauma and positive FAST findings. The present prospective cross-sectional study was done on patients over 7 years old with normal abdominal examination, positive FAST findings, and available abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan findings. The frequency of need for laparotomy as well as its probable risk factors were calculated. 180 patients were enrolled (mean age: 28.0 ± 11.5 years; 76.7% male). FAST findings were confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan in only 124 (68.9%) cases. Finally, 12 (6.6%) patients needed laparotomy. Mean age of those in need of laparotomy was significantly higher than others (36.75 ± 11.37 versus 27.34 ± 11.37, p = 0.006). Higher grading of spleen (p = 0.001) and hepatic (p = 0.038) ruptures increased the probability of need for laparotomy. 68.9% of the positive FAST findings in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and stable hemodynamics was confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan and only 6.6% needed laparotomy. Simultaneous presence of free fluid and air in the abdominal area, old age, and higher grading o solid organ injuries were factors that had a significant correlation with need for laparotomy.

  1. CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespear, Jonathan S; Shaaban, Akram M; Rezvani, Maryam

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications. CT findings suggesting acute cholecystitis should be interpreted with caution and should probably serve as justification for further investigation with abdominal ultrasound. CT has a relatively high negative predictive value, and acute cholecystitis is unlikely in the setting of a negative CT. Complications of acute cholecystitis have a characteristic CT appearance and include necrosis, perforation, abscess formation, intraluminal hemorrhage, and wall emphysema.

  2. Pitfalls in diagnosing colon cancer on abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, E; Eifer, M; Kopylov, U; Belsky, V; Raskin, S; Konen, E; Amitai, M M

    2017-10-01

    To assess the frequency of undetected colon cancer on conventional abdominal CT and to evaluate the imaging features that are characteristic of those cancers. The present study included consecutive patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer at colonoscopy (2006-2015) who also underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed for various reasons within a year prior to the colonoscopy. The frequency of undetected lesions was evaluated for the original CT interpretations ("original readers"). Two radiologists ("study readers"), blinded to the tumour location, independently performed interpretations oriented for colon cancer detection. The study readers analysed the imaging features of detected tumours (tumour shape, length, maximal wall thickness, free fluid, fat stranding, vascular engorgement, stenosis, and lymphadenopathy). Imaging features of the cancers undetected by the original readers were evaluated. The study included 127 patients. The original readers' frequency of undetected cancer was 25/127 (19.7%). Each study reader could not identify the cancer in 8/127 (6.3%) patients. Imaging features associated with undetected cancers by the original readers included the absence of fat stranding (p=0.007, p=0.003), absence of vascular engorgement (pColon cancer is undetected in 20% of abdominal CT examinations in patients subsequently proven to have colon cancer at colonoscopy. The absence of fat stranding, vascular engorgement, or lymphadenopathy, and an average tumour length of 3.3 cm are contributing factors for failure of detection. Radiologists' training should emphasis these findings as it may improve cancer detection, and clinicians should be aware of the limitations of abdominal CT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell; Geijer, Håkan

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  6. Outcome of Blunt Abdominal Traumas with Stable Hemodynamic and Positive FAST Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firooz Behboodi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST is a highly effective first screening tool for initial classification of abdominal trauma patients. The present study was designed to evaluate the outcome of patients with blunt abdominal trauma and positive FAST findings. Methods: The present prospective cross-sectional study was done on patients over 7 years old with normal abdominal examination, positive FAST findings, and available abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT scan findings. The frequency of need for laparotomy as well as its probable risk factors were calculated. Results: 180 patients were enrolled (mean age: 28.0 ± 11.5 years; 76.7% male. FAST findings were confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan in only 124 (68.9% cases. Finally, 12 (6.6% patients needed laparotomy. Mean age of those in need of laparotomy was significantly higher than others (36.75 ± 11.37 versus 27.34 ± 11.37, p = 0.006. Higher grading of spleen (p = 0.001 and hepatic (p = 0.038 ruptures increased the probability of need for laparotomy. Conclusion: 68.9% of the positive FAST findings in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and stable hemodynamics was confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan and only 6.6% needed laparotomy. Simultaneous presence of free fluid and air in the abdominal area, old age, and higher grading o solid organ injuries were factors that had a significant correlation with need for laparotomy.

  7. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) interpretation: discrepancy rates among experienced radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abujudeh, Hani H.; Boland, Giles W.; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Rabiner, Pavel; Thrall, James H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Halpern, Elkarn F.; Gazelle, G.S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Institute for Technology Assessment, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    To assess the discrepancy rate for the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations among experienced radiologists. Ninety abdominal and pelvic CT examinations reported by three experienced radiologists who specialize in abdominal imaging were randomly selected from the radiological database. The same radiologists, blinded to previous interpretation, were asked to re-interpret 60 examinations: 30 of their previous interpretations and 30 interpreted by others. All reports were assessed for the degree of discrepancy between initial and repeat interpretations according to a three-level scoring system: no discrepancy, minor, or major discrepancy. Inter- and intrareader discrepancy rates and causes were evaluated. CT examinations included in the investigation were performed on 90 patients (43 men, mean age 59 years, SD 14, range 19-88) for the following indications: follow-up/evaluation of malignancy (69/90, 77%), pancreatitis (5/90, 6%), urinary tract stone (4/90, 4%) or other (12/90, 13%). Interobserver and intraobserver major discrepancy rates were 26 and 32%, respectively. Major discrepancies were due to missed findings, different opinions regarding interval change of clinically significant findings, and the presence of recommendation. Major discrepancy of between 26 and 32% was observed in the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT examinations. (orig.)

  8. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) interpretation: discrepancy rates among experienced radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abujudeh, Hani H.; Boland, Giles W.; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Rabiner, Pavel; Thrall, James H.; Halpern, Elkarn F.; Gazelle, G.S.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the discrepancy rate for the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations among experienced radiologists. Ninety abdominal and pelvic CT examinations reported by three experienced radiologists who specialize in abdominal imaging were randomly selected from the radiological database. The same radiologists, blinded to previous interpretation, were asked to re-interpret 60 examinations: 30 of their previous interpretations and 30 interpreted by others. All reports were assessed for the degree of discrepancy between initial and repeat interpretations according to a three-level scoring system: no discrepancy, minor, or major discrepancy. Inter- and intrareader discrepancy rates and causes were evaluated. CT examinations included in the investigation were performed on 90 patients (43 men, mean age 59 years, SD 14, range 19-88) for the following indications: follow-up/evaluation of malignancy (69/90, 77%), pancreatitis (5/90, 6%), urinary tract stone (4/90, 4%) or other (12/90, 13%). Interobserver and intraobserver major discrepancy rates were 26 and 32%, respectively. Major discrepancies were due to missed findings, different opinions regarding interval change of clinically significant findings, and the presence of recommendation. Major discrepancy of between 26 and 32% was observed in the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT examinations. (orig.)

  9. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Lameris, Wytze; Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2009-01-01

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  10. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  11. CT of hemodynamically unstable abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petridis, A.; Pilavaki, M.; Vafiadis, E.; Palladas, P.; Finitsis, S.; Drevelegas, A.

    1999-01-01

    This article is an appraisal of the use of CT in the management of patients with unstable abdominal trauma. We examined 41 patients with abdominal trauma using noncontrast dynamic CT. In 17 patients a postcontrast dynamic CT was also carried out. On CT, 25 patients had hemoperitoneum. Thirteen patients had splenic, 12 hepatic, 6 pancreatic, 8 bowel and mesenteric, 12 renal and 2 vascular injuries. Seven patients had retroperitoneal and 2 patients adrenal hematomas. All but five lesions (three renal, one pancreatic, and one splenic) were hypodense when CT was performed earlier than 8 h following the injury. Postcontrast studies (n = 17), revealed 4 splenic, 3 hepatic, 1 pancreatic, 3 renal, and 2 bowel and mesenteric injuries beyond what was found on noncontrast CT. Surgical confirmation (n = 21) was obtained in 81.81 % of splenic, 66.66 % of hepatic, 83.33 % of pancreatic, 100 % of renal, 100 % of retroperitoneal, and 85.71 % of bowel and mesenteric injuries. The majority of false diagnoses was obtained with noncontrast studies. Computed tomography is a remarkable method for evaluation and management of patients with hemodynamically unstable abdominal trauma, but only if it is revealed in the emergency room. Contrast injection, when it could be done, revealed lesions that were not suspected on initial plain scans. (orig.)

  12. Intra-abdominal fat area measurement using chest CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Hiroshi; Midorikawa, Shigeo; Hashimoto, Kouji; Ishii, Akira; Saitou, Kumi; Andou, Tomonori; Kitamura, Naoko; Sakuma, Koutarou

    2007-01-01

    Intra-abdominal fat obesity, which is linked with the metabolic syndrome, is usually characterized by measuring intra-abdominal fat area at the umbilical level of abdominal CT scan. In recent year, the chances of chest CT scanning are increased, as lung cancer screening survey or individual medical examination. Thus, we presented a method of measuring the areas of intra-abdominal fat and subcutaneous fat at the lower slice of chest CT scan. Fat areas found with this method were significantly correlated with those obtained at the umbilical level. (author)

  13. Experimental study of abdominal CT scanning exposal doses adjusted on the basis of pediatric abdominal perimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Wenzhou; Zhu Gongsheng; Zeng Lingyan; Yin Xianglin; Yang Fuwen; Liu Changsheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To optimize the abdominal helical CT scanning parameters in pediatric patients and to reduce its radiation hazards. Methods: 60 canines were evenly grouped into 4 groups on the basis of pediatric abdominal perimeter, scanned with 110,150,190 and 240 mAs, and their qualities of canine CT images were analyzed. 120 pediafric patients with clinic suspected abdominal diseases were divided into 4 groups on the basis of abdominal perimeter, scanned by optimal parameters and their image qualities were analyzed. Results: After CT exposure were reduced, the percentages of total A and B were 90.9 % and 92.0 % in experimental canines and in pediatric patients, respectively. Compared with conventional CT scanning, the exposure and single slice CT dose index weighted (CTDIw) were reduced to 45.8%-79.17%. Conclusion: By adjusted the pediatric helical CT parameters basedon the of pediatric abdominal perimeter, exposure of patient to the hazards of radiation is reduced. (authors)

  14. CT of hemodynamically unstable abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petridis, A.; Pilavaki, M.; Vafiadis, E.; Palladas, P.; Finitsis, S.; Drevelegas, A. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital ``G. Papanikolaou,`` Thessaloniki (Greece)

    1999-03-01

    This article is an appraisal of the use of CT in the management of patients with unstable abdominal trauma. We examined 41 patients with abdominal trauma using noncontrast dynamic CT. In 17 patients a postcontrast dynamic CT was also carried out. On CT, 25 patients had hemoperitoneum. Thirteen patients had splenic, 12 hepatic, 6 pancreatic, 8 bowel and mesenteric, 12 renal and 2 vascular injuries. Seven patients had retroperitoneal and 2 patients adrenal hematomas. All but five lesions (three renal, one pancreatic, and one splenic) were hypodense when CT was performed earlier than 8 h following the injury. Postcontrast studies (n = 17), revealed 4 splenic, 3 hepatic, 1 pancreatic, 3 renal, and 2 bowel and mesenteric injuries beyond what was found on noncontrast CT. Surgical confirmation (n = 21) was obtained in 81.81 % of splenic, 66.66 % of hepatic, 83.33 % of pancreatic, 100 % of renal, 100 % of retroperitoneal, and 85.71 % of bowel and mesenteric injuries. The majority of false diagnoses was obtained with noncontrast studies. Computed tomography is a remarkable method for evaluation and management of patients with hemodynamically unstable abdominal trauma, but only if it is revealed in the emergency room. Contrast injection, when it could be done, revealed lesions that were not suspected on initial plain scans. (orig.) With 6 figs., 5 tabs., 20 refs.

  15. CT findings in ileo-caval thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, T.; Distelmaier, W.; Koester, O.

    1982-01-01

    Thrombosis of a large vein can be demonstrated by CT. The thrombosed vein has a hyperdense lumen, with a somewhat increased diameter which does not opacify after intravenous contrast injection, but which shows a narrow hyperdense margin. Collateral vesels in the pelvic or paravertebral plexus and dilated veins in the abdominal skin are indirect evidence of ileo-caval thrombosis. CT can also demonstrate the cranial extent of a caval thrombosis. Venous thrombosis demonstrated by CT is an important additional finding in the pre-operative examination of the abdomen. (orig.) [de

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel ...

  17. Blunt bowel and mesenteric trauma: role of clinical signs along with CT findings in patients' management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firetto, Maria Cristina; Sala, Francesco; Petrini, Marcello; Lemos, Alessandro A; Canini, Tiberio; Magnone, Stefano; Fornoni, Gianluca; Cortinovis, Ivan; Sironi, Sandro; Biondetti, Pietro R

    2018-04-27

    Bowel and/or mesentery injuries represent the third most common injury among patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Delayed diagnosis increases morbidity and mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of clinical signs along with CT findings as predictors of early surgical repair. Between March 2014 and February 2017, charts and CT scans of consecutive patients treated for blunt abdominal trauma in two different trauma centers were reread by two experienced radiologists. We included all adult patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis with CT findings of blunt bowel and/or mesenteric injury (BBMI). We divided CT findings into two groups: the first included three highly specific CT signs and the second included six less specific CT signs indicated as "minor CT findings." The presence of abdominal guarding and/or abdominal pain was considered as "clinical signs." Reference standards included surgically proven BBMI and clinical follow-up. Association was evaluated by the chi-square test. A logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and confidence intervals (CI). Thirty-four (4.1%) out of 831 patients who sustained blunt abdominal trauma had BBMI at CT. Twenty-one out of thirty-four patients (61.8%) underwent surgical repair; the remaining 13 were treated conservatively. Free fluid had a significant statistical association with surgery (p = 0.0044). The presence of three or more minor CT findings was statistically associated with surgery (OR = 8.1; 95% CI, 1.2-53.7). Abdominal guarding along with bowel wall discontinuity and extraluminal air had the highest positive predictive value (100 and 83.3%, respectively). In patients without solid organ injury (SOI), the presence of free fluid along with abdominal guarding and three or more "minor CT findings" is a significant predictor of early surgical repair. The association of bowel wall discontinuity with extraluminal air warrants exploratory laparotomy.

  18. Primary epiploic appendagitis: US and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, E.; Ripolles, T.; Martinez, M.J.; Morote, V.; Rosello-Sastre, E.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective review is presented of seven cases of epiploic appendagitis, with surgical confirmation in one case. The main clinico-analytical data and the US and CT findings are described, as well as the histopathologic features in the sole case that underwent surgical resection. We also calculated the frequency of this entity in patients undergoing emergency abdominal US on clinical suspicion of diverticulitis. In all seven cases the clinico-analytical evidence was nonspecific (localized acute abdominal pain and slight leukocytosis), mimicking in six cases the clinical presentation of sigmoid diverticulitis and in one case that of acute appendicitis. US imaging findings were characteristic: a hyperechoic mass localized under the point of maximum pain, adjacent to the anterior peritoneal wall and fixed during deep breathing. In none of the cases did color Doppler US show flow. CT findings were also typical and showed a mass with a peripheral hyperattenuated rim surrounding an area of fatty attenuation. Overall 7.1 % of patients investigated to exclude sigmoid diverticulitis finally showed findings of primary epiploic appendagitis. Primary epiploic appendagitis thus shows characteristic US and CT findings that allow its diagnosis and follow-up. This entity is much more frequent than previously reported, especially in patients referred for US to exclude sigmoid diverticulitis. (orig.)

  19. Adult polysplenia syndrome.CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastia, M.C.; Hernandez, D.; Garriga, V.; Alvarez-Castells, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of polysplenia in a 55-year-old patient that was diagnosed incidentally by CT. Chest X-ray disclosed a hooked prominence of the azygos vein over right hilum, left bronchial isomerism and the absence of the inferior vena cava in an X-ray of the right side. The abdominal CT findings included multiple spleens and stomach in upper right quadrant, centrally located liver and gallbladder, intestinal malrotation, interrupted inferior vena cava continued in the azygos system, and short pancreas. Echocardiography revealed mitral stenosis not associated with cardiac malformation. (Author)

  20. Is direct radiologist supervision of abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, V. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom); Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom); Halligan, S. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.halligan@imperial.ac.uk; Anderson, J.M. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom); Hugill, J. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom); Leonard, A. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of direct radiological supervision of patients attending for abdominal CT by assessing the frequency of protocol alteration subsequent to radiologist review of the images obtained. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective questionnaire-based observational study was performed of 187 consecutive patients undergoing abdominal CT. The CT protocol was determined by a radiologist in advance, with reference to the request form. Any subsequent change in the prescribed study that was contingent on radiologist review of the images obtained was documented on the questionnaire. Comparison was made with a second (control) group of 100 patients undergoing cranial CT. RESULTS: A protocol change was undertaken following radiologist review of the CT images of 17 (9%) of the group undergoing abdominal CT, compared with 14 (14%) of the group undergoing cranial CT. In the abdominal CT group, further scanning was performed for lesion characterization, to guide a subsequent interventional procedure, because of inadequate anatomical coverage or to evaluate an unexpected lung tumour. There was no significant difference in proportions between the two groups (p=0.23). CONCLUSION: When abdominal and cranial CT studies were compared, there was no significant difference in the proportion of studies requiring a change in the prescribed protocol following radiologist review of the images obtained. There was no evidence to suggest that abdominal CT was any less suited to protocol.

  1. Computed tomography findings of early abdominal postoperative complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissin, R.; Osadchy, A.; Gayer, G.

    2007-01-01

    Various surgical approaches are used for different abdominal pathological conditions. Postoperative complications occur not infrequently and vary according to the type of the surgery and the clinical context. Nowadays, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) provides superb anatomic detail and diagnostic accuracy for various intraabdominal pathological processes, even if clinically unsuspected, and it thus has become an essential diagnostic tool for evaluating postoperative insults. Other advantages of abdominal MDCT include its accessibility and its speed, which allow scanning of uncooperative, marginally stable patients. Computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous (PC) drainage of postoperative collections is another advantage of CT. Therefore, although CT requires transportation of a critically ill, postoperative patient, it is recommended in any suspicious clinical setting because several conditions require prompt management and a correct diagnosis is crucial. In assessing a patient for suspected postoperative complications, several points should be taken into consideration, including the relevant clinical and laboratory data, the surgical findings, the type of the surgery, the time elapsed since surgery, and the operative technique (either open laparotomy of laparoscopic procedure). (author)

  2. CT diagnosis of unsuspected pneumothorax after blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, S.D. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.; Brett, C.M.

    1983-11-01

    Review of abdominal CT scans for evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma yielded 35 cases of pneumothorax, 10 of which had not been diagnosed before CT by clinical examination of plain radiographs. Of the 10 cases initially diagnosed on CT, seven required tube thoracostomy for treatment of the pneumothorax. CT detection of pneumothorax is especially important if mechanical assisted ventilation or general anesthesia is used. Demonstration of pneumothorax requires viewing CT scans of the upper abdomen (lower thorax) at lung windows in addition to the usual soft-tissue windows.

  3. CT diagnosis of unsuspected pneumothorax after blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, S.D.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.; Brett, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Review of abdominal CT scans for evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma yielded 35 cases of pneumothorax, 10 of which had not been diagnosed before CT by clinical examination of plain radiographs. Of the 10 cases initially diagnosed on CT, seven required tube thoracostomy for treatment of the pneumothorax. CT detection of pneumothorax is especially important if mechanical assisted ventilation or general anesthesia is used. Demonstration of pneumothorax requires viewing CT scans of the upper abdomen (lower thorax) at lung windows in addition to the usual soft-tissue windows

  4. Imaging findings of abdominal extraosseous plasma cell neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Sin; Byun, Jae Ho; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Ah Young; Shin, Yong Moon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Moon Gyu; Bae, Kyung Soo

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal extraosseous plasma cell neoplasm. From April 2000 to January 2005, eight patients (four men, four women; mean age, 50.6 years) with pathologically proved, extraosseous plasma cell neoplasm involving the abdominal organs were included in this study. The diagnoses were based on consensus agreement between two radiologists who retrospectively reviewed CT, ultrasonography, and enteroclysis findings. We evaluated the findings by focusing on the location, size, margin, and enhancement pattern of the lesion, and lymphadenopathy on each image. There were multiple myeloma in four patients and extramedullary plasmacytoma in the remaining four. Involved abdominal organs were the liver (n = 4), spleen (n 4), lymph node (n = 3), stomach (n = 1), small bowel (n = 1), and colon (n 1). The hepatic involvement of plasma cell neoplasm presented as a homogeneous, well-defined, solitary mass (n = 1), multiple nodules (n = 1), and hepatomegaly (n = 2). Its involvement of the spleen and lymph node appeared as splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, respectively. Its involvement of the gastrointestinal tract including the stomach, small bowel, and colon, presented as a homogeneous, diffuse wall thickening or mass in the gastrointestinal tract. Abdominal extraosseous plasma cell neoplasm involves occasionally the liver, spleen, and lymph node, and rarely the gastrointestinal tract. When we encounter a well-defined, homogeneous lesion of the abdominal organs in patients diagnosed or suspected as having plasma cell neoplasm, we should consider its involvement of the abdominal organs

  5. Fat deposition in the urinary bladder wall: Incidental finding on abdominal computed tomography: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Ho; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Ahn, Sung Eun; Park, Seong Jin; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    In a computed tomography (CT) scan, fat deposition in the urinary bladder wall is seen as a linear hypoattenuating band surrounded by soft tissue density. It is uncommon, but is often seen in normal cases. However, there is no report of fat deposition in the urinary bladder wall in Korea. The authors encountered a 62-year-old male patient who showed an incidental hypoattenuating band in the urinary bladder wall on abdominal CT. The patient showed no clinical signs related to fat deposition in the urinary bladder wall. When the patient's previous abdominal CT was retrospectively reviewed, the same CT finding was seen. This linear hypoattenuating band within the urinary bladder wall should be considered as a normal CT finding, although it is uncommon.

  6. Nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial infections following laparoscopic surgery: CT imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpato, Richard [Cassiano Antonio de Moraes University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Campi de Castro, Claudio [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Department of Radiology, Cerqueira Cesar, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hadad, David Jamil [Cassiano Antonio de Moraes University Hospital, Nucleo de Doencas Infecciosas, Department of Internal Medicine, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Silva Souza Ribeiro, Flavya da [Laboratorio de Patologia PAT, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Filho, Ezequiel Leal [UNIMED Diagnostico, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Marcal, Leonardo P. [The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To identify the distribution and frequency of computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial (RGM) infection after laparoscopic surgery. A descriptive retrospective study in patients with RGM infection after laparoscopic surgery who underwent CT imaging prior to initiation of therapy. The images were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus, who evaluated the skin/subcutaneous tissues, the abdominal wall, and intraperitoneal region separately. The patterns of involvement were tabulated as: densification, collections, nodules (≥1.0 cm), small nodules (<1.0 cm), pseudocavitated nodules, and small pseudocavitated nodules. Twenty-six patients met the established criteria. The subcutaneous findings were: densification (88.5 %), small nodules (61.5 %), small pseudocavitated nodules (23.1 %), nodules (38.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (15.4 %), and collections (26.9 %). The findings in the abdominal wall were: densification (61.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (3.8 %), and collections (15.4 %). The intraperitoneal findings were: densification (46.1 %), small nodules (42.3 %), nodules (15.4 %), and collections (11.5 %). Subcutaneous CT findings in descending order of frequency were: densification, small nodules, nodules, small pseudocavitated nodules, pseudocavitated nodules, and collections. The musculo-fascial plane CT findings were: densification, collections, and pseudocavitated nodules. The intraperitoneal CT findings were: densification, small nodules, nodules, and collections. (orig.)

  7. Nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial infections following laparoscopic surgery: CT imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpato, Richard; Campi de Castro, Claudio; Hadad, David Jamil; Silva Souza Ribeiro, Flavya da; Filho, Ezequiel Leal; Marcal, Leonardo P.

    2015-01-01

    To identify the distribution and frequency of computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial (RGM) infection after laparoscopic surgery. A descriptive retrospective study in patients with RGM infection after laparoscopic surgery who underwent CT imaging prior to initiation of therapy. The images were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus, who evaluated the skin/subcutaneous tissues, the abdominal wall, and intraperitoneal region separately. The patterns of involvement were tabulated as: densification, collections, nodules (≥1.0 cm), small nodules (<1.0 cm), pseudocavitated nodules, and small pseudocavitated nodules. Twenty-six patients met the established criteria. The subcutaneous findings were: densification (88.5 %), small nodules (61.5 %), small pseudocavitated nodules (23.1 %), nodules (38.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (15.4 %), and collections (26.9 %). The findings in the abdominal wall were: densification (61.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (3.8 %), and collections (15.4 %). The intraperitoneal findings were: densification (46.1 %), small nodules (42.3 %), nodules (15.4 %), and collections (11.5 %). Subcutaneous CT findings in descending order of frequency were: densification, small nodules, nodules, small pseudocavitated nodules, pseudocavitated nodules, and collections. The musculo-fascial plane CT findings were: densification, collections, and pseudocavitated nodules. The intraperitoneal CT findings were: densification, small nodules, nodules, and collections. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasonographic and CT findings of hepatosplenic tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Un Hyeon; Lee, Jeong Seok; Ko, Kang Seok; Park, Byung Ran; Yang, Dong Cheol; Im, Ju Hyeon; Kang, In Young

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the ultrasonographic and CT findings of hepatosplenic tuberculosis Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the ultrasonographic and CT findings of confirmed hepatosplenic tuberculosis in 12 patients. Six were men and six were women ; their average age was 41, and most were in their twenties. Lesions of the liver and spleen, as well as associated findings such as abdominal tuberculosis and other organ involvement of tuberculosis were analyzed. Results : There were three cases of hepatic tuberculosis, seven of splenic tuberculosis, and two of hepatosplenic involvement of tuberculosis. On the basis of the ultrasonographic and CT findings, hepatosplenic tuberculosis was classified as one of two patterns : miliary or micronodular, ormacronodular. The micronodular type was more common (9/12 cases) being characterized by innumerable micronodules,and with easy coalescence in the liver and spleen in five of the nine cases. The macronodular type of low density mass was noted in the other three patients. Splenomegaly was noted in 12 cases and hepatomegaly in ten. Pulmonary tuberculosis-including the miliary type(n=5)-was noted in eight patients. Associated abdominal tuberculosis such as lymphadenopathy with central low density and peripheral rim enhancement (n=6), tuberculous peritonitis(n=3),highly attenuated ascites(n=6), adrenal tuberculosis(n=1), renal tuberculosis(n=1), ovarian abscess(n=1), psoasabscess(n=1), and systemic tuberculosis such as central nervous system tuberculoma(n=2), cervical lymphadenopathy(n=4) and tuberculous spondylitis(n=1) were noted. Conclusion : Ultrasonography and CT were valuable in the detection and diagnosis of hepatosplenic tuberculosis

  9. Ultrasonographic and CT findings of hepatosplenic tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Un Hyeon; Lee, Jeong Seok; Ko, Kang Seok; Park, Byung Ran; Yang, Dong Cheol; Im, Ju Hyeon [Kwangju Christian Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, In Young [Kwangju Green Cross Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the ultrasonographic and CT findings of hepatosplenic tuberculosis Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the ultrasonographic and CT findings of confirmed hepatosplenic tuberculosis in 12 patients. Six were men and six were women ; their average age was 41, and most were in their twenties. Lesions of the liver and spleen, as well as associated findings such as abdominal tuberculosis and other organ involvement of tuberculosis were analyzed. Results : There were three cases of hepatic tuberculosis, seven of splenic tuberculosis, and two of hepatosplenic involvement of tuberculosis. On the basis of the ultrasonographic and CT findings, hepatosplenic tuberculosis was classified as one of two patterns : miliary or micronodular, ormacronodular. The micronodular type was more common (9/12 cases) being characterized by innumerable micronodules,and with easy coalescence in the liver and spleen in five of the nine cases. The macronodular type of low density mass was noted in the other three patients. Splenomegaly was noted in 12 cases and hepatomegaly in ten. Pulmonary tuberculosis-including the miliary type(n=5)-was noted in eight patients. Associated abdominal tuberculosis such as lymphadenopathy with central low density and peripheral rim enhancement (n=6), tuberculous peritonitis(n=3),highly attenuated ascites(n=6), adrenal tuberculosis(n=1), renal tuberculosis(n=1), ovarian abscess(n=1), psoasabscess(n=1), and systemic tuberculosis such as central nervous system tuberculoma(n=2), cervical lymphadenopathy(n=4) and tuberculous spondylitis(n=1) were noted. Conclusion : Ultrasonography and CT were valuable in the detection and diagnosis of hepatosplenic tuberculosis.

  10. Quantifying the usefulness of CT in evaluating seniors with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Lawrence M.; Klippel, Allen P.; Bavolek, Rebecca A.; Ross, Laura M.; Scherer, Tara M.; Banet, Gerald A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: (1) Determine if older patients with abdominal pain who receive emergency department (ED) abdominal CT have changes in diagnosis and/or disposition more often than similar patients without CT; (2) compare physician confidence in diagnosis and disposition for patients with versus without CT; (3) document factors that most influence physician's decision to order abdominal CT in this population. Methods: ED patients 60 years of age or older, with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain were enrolled over a 6-week period. Physicians documented a preliminary and final ED diagnosis and disposition, along with pre- and post-evaluation confidence levels. Decision to order CT, along with clinical information most influencing that decision, was noted. Physician confidence levels and percent change in diagnosis and disposition were compared for patients with versus without CT. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients comprised study sample. Abdominal CT rate was 59% (95%CI, 50-67%). CT was associated with an increased change in diagnosis (46%; 95%CI, 4-58% versus 29%; 95%CI, 16-42%), but no change in disposition between patients with versus without CT. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower for EPs who ordered a CT than for those who did not (p < 0.001). Patient history most influenced ordering CT, whereas prior lab/imaging results most influenced not ordering CT. Conclusion: Patients with CT had a change in diagnosis more often than those without. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower in CT group. Percent change in disposition did not differ between groups. Physicians most often ordered CT based on history and did not order CT when other diagnostic evaluation supported a specific diagnosis

  11. Automated segmentation and recognition of abdominal wall muscles in X-ray torso CT images and its application in abdominal CAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Kamiya, N.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H.; Chen, H.; Yokoyama, R.; Hoshi, H.

    2007-01-01

    The information of abdominal wall is very important for the planning of surgical operation and abdominal organ recognition. In research fields of computer assisted radiology and surgery and computer-aided diagnosis, the segmentation and recognition of the abdominal wall muscles in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. Due to the complexity of the abdominal wall structure and indistinctive in CT images, the automated segmentation of abdominal wall muscles is a difficult issue and has not been solved completely. We propose an approach to segment the abdominal wall muscles and divide it into three categories (front abdominal muscles including rectus abdominis; left and right side abdominal muscles including external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles) automatically. The approach, first, makes an initial classification of bone, fat, and muscles and organs based on the CT number. Then a layer structure is generated to describe the 3-D anatomical structures of human torso by stretching the torso region onto a thin-plate for easy recognition. The abdominal wall muscles are recognized on the layer structures using the spatial relations to the skeletal structure and CT numbers. Finally, the recognized regions are mapped back to the 3-D CT images using an inverse transformation of the stretching process. This method is applied to 20 cases of torso CT images and evaluations are based on visual comparison of the recognition results and the original CT images by an expert in anatomy. The results show that our approach can segment and recognize abdominal wall muscle regions effectively. (orig.)

  12. Thoracic CT findings at hypovolemic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G.; Catalano, O.; Grassi, R.; Scialpi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and discuss the thoracic CT features of hypovolemic shock. Material and Methods: From a group of 18 patients with signs of hypovolemia on contrast-enhanced abdominal CT, 11 were selected for our study as having also undergone a complete chest examination. Pulse rate, blood pressure, trauma score value, Glasgow coma scale value, surgical result, and final outcome were retrospectively evaluated. The CT features analyzed were: decreased cardiac volume, reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta, aortic branches and caval venous system, increased enhancement of the aorta, and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions. Results: All 11 subjects presented severe injuries and hemodynamic instability; 7 were stable enough to undergo surgery; only 1 of the 11 survived. Two patients showed none of the features of thoracic hypovolemia. All the other patients presented at least two signs: reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta in 7 cases; decreased volume of the cardiac chambers and increased aortic enhancement in 6; decreased caliber of the aortic vessels in 4; decreased caliber of the caval veins in 3; and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions in 3. Conclusions: In patients with hypovolemia, CT may show several thoracic findings in addition to abdominal ones. Knowledge of these features is important for distinguishing them from traumatic injuries. (orig.)

  13. Abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis: Radiological findings and changes after therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jeong-Hee [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr; Yoon, Seong Eon [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eugene K. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Park, Seong Ho [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Hwan [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate imaging findings of abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and changes after steroid therapy. Methods and materials: This study included nine AIP patients with abdominal extrapancreatic lesions, which were determined by retrospective radiological review. CT (initial and follow-up, n = 9) and MR imaging (initial, n = 5) were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus to determine imaging characteristics (i.e., size, number, attenuation or signal intensity, and contrast enhancement of the lesions, and the presence of overlying capsule retraction) and evaluate changes with steroid therapy of abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with AIP. Results: The most common abdominal extrapancreatic lesion associated with AIP was retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) in six patients. In five patients, CT and MR imaging revealed single or multiple, round- or wedge-shaped, hypoattenuating or hypointense, enhancing lesions in the renal cortex or pelvis. Other lesions included a geographic, ill-defined, hypoattenuating lesion with or without overlying capsule retraction in the liver in two and bile duct dilatation with or without bile duct wall thickening in four. Over a follow-up period of 6-81 months, CT exams of eight patients demonstrated partial or complete improvement of the abdominal extrapancreatic lesions, albeit their improvement in general lagged behind that of the pancreatic lesion. Conclusion: On CT or MR imaging, the abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with AIP are various in the retroperitoneum, liver, kidneys and bile ducts, and are reversible with steroid therapy.

  14. CT findings of perihepatic tuberculous abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Lee, Jong Tae; Chung, Jae Joon; Park, Su Mi; Kim, Myeong Jin; Yoo, Hyung Sik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of perihepatic tuberculous abscesses. The CT scans of 11 patients (6 females and 5 males) with 14 pathologically proven perihepatic tuberculous abscess were retrospectively evaluated in terms of the morphological characteristics of the abscesses and changes in other abdominal organs and at other sites. A total of 14 absceses were noted in 11 patients. Six (43%) were in the right subphrenic space, three (21%) in the right perihepatic space, three (21%) in the left subphrenic space, and two (14%) in the left perihepatic space. The right side was predominant. The abscesses ranged in size from 1 to 10 (mean, 5) cm in diameter, with a wall thickness of 2-7 (mean, 3) mm. Of the 14 abscesses, 13 were oval, and one spherical. CT findings were as follows : a smooth abscess margin with even wall thickness in seven of the eleven patients (64%); calcification of the wall in two (18%); internal septa in seven (64%); localized fluid collection in nine (82%); lymphadenopathy in five (45%); and peritoneal enhancement in seven (64%). Lesions suggesting tuberculous infection coexisted at other sites in eight patients. These included the lung in six patients (55%), the neck in three (27%), an axilla in two (18%), the liver in two (18%), the spleen in one (9%), and the gastroin-testinal tract in one (9%). CT scanning is useful for establishing the diagnosis of perihepatic tuberculous abscesses by evaluating the morphological characteristics of the mass and by observing changes in other abdominal organs and at other sites.

  15. CT findings of perihepatic tuberculous abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Lee, Jong Tae; Chung, Jae Joon; Park, Su Mi; Kim, Myeong Jin; Yoo, Hyung Sik

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of perihepatic tuberculous abscesses. The CT scans of 11 patients (6 females and 5 males) with 14 pathologically proven perihepatic tuberculous abscess were retrospectively evaluated in terms of the morphological characteristics of the abscesses and changes in other abdominal organs and at other sites. A total of 14 absceses were noted in 11 patients. Six (43%) were in the right subphrenic space, three (21%) in the right perihepatic space, three (21%) in the left subphrenic space, and two (14%) in the left perihepatic space. The right side was predominant. The abscesses ranged in size from 1 to 10 (mean, 5) cm in diameter, with a wall thickness of 2-7 (mean, 3) mm. Of the 14 abscesses, 13 were oval, and one spherical. CT findings were as follows : a smooth abscess margin with even wall thickness in seven of the eleven patients (64%); calcification of the wall in two (18%); internal septa in seven (64%); localized fluid collection in nine (82%); lymphadenopathy in five (45%); and peritoneal enhancement in seven (64%). Lesions suggesting tuberculous infection coexisted at other sites in eight patients. These included the lung in six patients (55%), the neck in three (27%), an axilla in two (18%), the liver in two (18%), the spleen in one (9%), and the gastroin-testinal tract in one (9%). CT scanning is useful for establishing the diagnosis of perihepatic tuberculous abscesses by evaluating the morphological characteristics of the mass and by observing changes in other abdominal organs and at other sites

  16. Asymptomatic renal cell carcinoma incidentally detected by abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Fumio; Miyake, Noriaki; Tsujimura, Haruhiro; Nakajima, Mikio; Akiyama, Hajime

    1987-01-01

    Four cases of renal cell carcinoma that were incidentally detected by abdominal CT are reported. Abdominal CT was performed during gastro-intestinal examination in two patients and for suspected liver disease in the other two. No patient had symptoms of renal cell carcinoma, or hematuria. In all cases, the histopathological diagnosis was renal cell carcinoma of a low stage. (author)

  17. Abdominal lymphadenopathy in tuberculosis and lymphoma: Differentiation with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Yong Moon; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung; Song, Chi Sung; Yang, Seoung Oh

    1993-01-01

    Tuberculosis and lymphoma, these 2 dieases can present with lymphadenopathy in anywhere of the body. Therefore differentiation of tuberculosis from lymphoma is often difficult. CT scans of 17 patients with tuberculosis and 23 patients with lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the efficacy of CT scans in differentating adenopathy between tuberculosis and lymphoma. All the patients underwent abdominal CT scans with contrast enhancement before treatment. The size, internal architecture, distribution of lymph nodes, and associated findings on CT scans were analyzed. As compared with lymphoma, tuberculous lymphadenopathy showed 1) female preponderance (65%), 2) predilection for percolative lymph nodes (47%), 3) internal low attenuation in lymph nodes (82%), 4) cold abscess formation (24%). Characteristics of lymphoma on CT scans include 1) male preponderance (78%), 2) conglomeration of lymph nodes (39%), 3) homogeneous internal lymph node structure (83%). These results suggest that evaluation of the cahracteristics of lymphadenopathy on CT scans is helpful for differentiating between tuberculousis and lymphoma

  18. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincek, B.

    2002-01-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  19. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  20. Clinical and CT imaging features of abdominal fat necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jinkun; Bai Renju

    2013-01-01

    Fat necrosis is a common pathological change at abdominal cross-sectional imaging, and it may cause abdominal pain, mimic pathological change of acute abdomen, or be asymptomatic and accompany other pathophysiologic processes. Fat necrosis is actually the result of steatosis by metabolism or mechanical injury. Common processes that are present in fat necrosis include epiploic appendagitis, infarction of the greater omentum, pancreatitis, and fat necrosis related to trauma or ischemia. As a common fat disease, fat necrosis should be known by clinicians and radiologists. Main content of this text is the clinical symptoms and CT findings of belly fat necrosis and related diseases. (authors)

  1. CT diagnosis of abdominal abscess in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin; Yang Zhiyong

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate CT in the diagnosis of abdominal abscess in children. Methods: Analysis of CT manifestations in 23 cases proved by operation and needle aspiration. Causes: acute appendicitis 13 cases, ascending colon perforation 1 case, Meckel diverticulitis 2 cases, cause obscured 7 cases. Bolus injection of contrast medium was given in 19 cases. Results: The CT value had no relationship to the course of disease and type of bacteria, amount of abscess had positive relevance relative with course of illness. Air-fluid level or scattered gas bubbles was seen in abscesses in 52%; little calcified plague was present in 22%. All cases presented nonhomogeneous thick wall enhancement after one week of illness. Conclusion: The characteristic CT features of intra-abdominal abscess were the presence of air and little calcified plague shadow; a large air-fluid level was indicative of fistula, while the absence of air in the abscess can not exclude fistula

  2. CT findings in children with Meckel diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Doug E.; Donnelly, Lane F.; Kim, Yong-Woo

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 0.04% of the general population will present with a complication related to Meckel diverticulum. The classic teaching is that symptomatic children with Meckel diverticulum present with painless rectal bleeding and are evaluated with a radionuclide scan. Our subjective experience is that we see children with Meckel diverticulum who present with abdominal pain and are evaluated by CT. We reviewed the findings on CT in children with pathologically proven Meckel diverticulum to identify characteristic patterns of presentation. Databases were searched (2004-2008) for all children who had a pathologic diagnosis of Meckel diverticulum and a CT scan performed prior to surgery. Demographics, pathology, and CT features were reviewed. CT features reviewed included: soft-tissue stranding, abnormal calcifications, bowel obstruction, free air, free peritoneal fluid, cystic mass, intussusception, obvious lead point, location, and whether a normal appendix was identified. The frequency of Meckel diverticulum encountered on CT scans was compared to that found during the same period of time on technetium pertechnetate studies. The review identified 16 subjects (mean age 9.5 years, M:F 9:7). CT findings included: soft-tissue stranding in nine (56%), small-bowel obstruction (SBO) in nine (56%), intussusception in three (19%), free fluid in ten (63%), cystic mass in four (25%), calcification in none (0%), free air in one (6%), and no abnormalities in two (13%). A normal appendix was identified in only five children (31%). There were three basic patterns of presentation of abnormalities: SBO only in five, intussusception with SBO in three, or cystic mass with inflammatory stranding in four (one with SBO). Also, 2.3 times more Meckel diverticulum was encountered on CT than on technetium pertechnetate studies. Meckel diverticulum is currently more commonly encountered in children on CT performed for abdominal pain than on technetium pertechnetate studies. There are three

  3. Nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial infections following laparoscopic surgery: CT imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Richard; de Castro, Claudio Campi; Hadad, David Jamil; da Silva Souza Ribeiro, Flavya; Filho, Ezequiel Leal; Marcal, Leonardo P

    2015-09-01

    To identify the distribution and frequency of computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial (RGM) infection after laparoscopic surgery. A descriptive retrospective study in patients with RGM infection after laparoscopic surgery who underwent CT imaging prior to initiation of therapy. The images were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus, who evaluated the skin/subcutaneous tissues, the abdominal wall, and intraperitoneal region separately. The patterns of involvement were tabulated as: densification, collections, nodules (≥1.0 cm), small nodules (<1.0 cm), pseudocavitated nodules, and small pseudocavitated nodules. Twenty-six patients met the established criteria. The subcutaneous findings were: densification (88.5%), small nodules (61.5%), small pseudocavitated nodules (23.1 %), nodules (38.5%), pseudocavitated nodules (15.4%), and collections (26.9%). The findings in the abdominal wall were: densification (61.5%), pseudocavitated nodules (3.8%), and collections (15.4%). The intraperitoneal findings were: densification (46.1%), small nodules (42.3%), nodules (15.4%), and collections (11.5%). Subcutaneous CT findings in descending order of frequency were: densification, small nodules, nodules, small pseudocavitated nodules, pseudocavitated nodules, and collections. The musculo-fascial plane CT findings were: densification, collections, and pseudocavitated nodules. The intraperitoneal CT findings were: densification, small nodules, nodules, and collections. • Rapidly growing mycobacterial infection may occur following laparoscopy. • Post-laparoscopy mycobacterial infection CT findings are densification, collection, and nodules. • Rapidly growing mycobacterial infection following laparoscopy may involve the peritoneal cavity. • Post-laparoscopy rapidly growing mycobacterial intraperitoneal infection is not associated with ascites or lymphadenopathy.

  4. Serial CT Findings of Paragonimus Infested Dogs and the Micro-CT Findings of the Worm Cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyun Ju; Hong, Sung Tae; Shen, Cheng Hua; Chung, Doo Hyun; Son, Kyu Ri; Chang, Jung Min; Eo, Hong

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the serial CT findings of Paragonimus westermani infected dogs and the microscopic structures of the worm cysts using Micro-CT. This study was approved by the committee on animal research at our institution. Fifteen dogs infected with P. westermani underwent serial contrast-enhanced CT scans at pre-infection, after 10 days of infection, and monthly thereafter until six months for determining the radiologic-pathologic correlation. Three dogs (one dog each time) were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. After fixation of the lungs, both multi-detector CT and Micro-CT were performed for examining the worm cysts. The initial findings were pleural effusion and/or subpleural groundglass opacities or linear opacities at day 10. At day 30, subpleural and peribronchial nodules appeared with hydropneumothorax and abdominal or chest wall air bubbles. Cavitary change and bronchial dilatation began to be seen on CT scan at day 30 and this was mostly seen together with mediastinal lymphadenopathy at day 60. Thereafter, subpleural ground-glass opacities and nodules with or without cavitary changes were persistently observed until day 180. After cavitary change of the nodules, the migratory features of the subpleural or peribronchial nodules were seen on all the serial CT scans. Micro-CT showed that the cyst wall contained dilated interconnected tubular structures, which had communications with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus. The CT findings of paragonimiasis depend on the migratory stage of the worms. The worm cyst can have numerous interconnected tubular channels within its own wall and these channels have connections with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus

  5. CT findings in recurrent pyogenic cholangitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Hye; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Dong Ho

    1991-01-01

    Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis is characterized clinically by recurrent attacks of right upper abdominal pain, fever and jaundice, and pathologically by chronic inflammation of the bile ducts with or without pigment bile duct stones. We analyzed the CT findings of 33 cases with recurrent pyogenic cholangitis. Twenty-four cases were confirmed by operation, and 9 cases were diagnosed clinically and cholangiographically. The CT findings of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis were dilatation of the intrahepatic ducts (n = 30), dilatation of the extrahepatic ducts (n = 24) intrahepatic stones (n = 16), extrahepatic stones (n = 12), stricture of the bile ducts (n = 10), wall enhancement of the bile ducts (n = 8), gallstones (n = 8), segmental atrophy of the liver (n = 7), pneumobilia (n = 4), abscess (n = 3), and segmental enhancement (n = 1) of the liver. A CT is considered helpful when sectional imaging is needed, but sonographic findings are equivocal or not confirmative; space-occupying lesions complicated with recurrent pyogenic cholangitis: hepatic resection is planned; and imaging guidance is needed for complex drainage procedures

  6. CT diagnosis of intraperitoneal bladder rupture with blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Fanbin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT examination in the diagnosis of intraperitoneal bladder rupture (IPBR) caused by blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: All CT and clinical data of 9 patients with IPBR were reviewed retrospectively. Results: IPBR was detected on CT scans in all 9 patients. CT findings of IPBR included low -attenuation free intraperitoneal fluid collections in the lateral paravesical fossae, the pericolic space, the culde-sac of the pelvis, Morison's pouch, the peri-hepatic space, the perisplenic space and interspace of bowel loops in 9 cases with a lower CT density compared with pure blood. The disruption of the bladder wall was located by CT scan in 5 cases: high-attenuation bladder wall with focal defect in 3 cases and a tear drop-like deformity of the bladder in 2 cases. Other CT findings supporting the diagnosis of IPBR included an underfilled bladder in 8 cases, bladder contusion in 4 cases, and blood clots within the bladder in 6 cases. Conclusion: The presence of intraperitoneal fluid with a CT density less than that of pure blood strongly suggests extravasated urine in the trauma. Intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal rupture can be distinguished based on location of extravasated urine seen on CT scans. The precise localization of the ruptured bladder wall may be demonstrated by CT scan, which is valuable for surgical treatment

  7. Ketamine-associated CT findings of damage in liver and gall and urinary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Keyun; Wang Lijuan; Wang Jiajun; Cheng Kuishan; Chen Aidi; Xu Dasheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the image signs of damage e in urinary system and liver and gall system and diagnostic value of CT findings in abuse of ketamine. Methods: With ethics committee approval, a retrospective analysis of 10 patients with a history of taking K powder (1 to 10 years) was done with abdominal CT scan and enhanced scan data to analysis the imaging findings of ketamine-related abdominal organ damage. Results: CT images of the 10 patients showed different degrees of reduced bladder capacity, bladder wall thickening range of 3∼14 mm. Of which the wall were thickened on both sides with the waist-shaped in 5 patients. Bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureterosis was found in 3 cases with uniform wall thickening of both ureters. 4 cases of renal multi-lesion papillary necrosis was found, of which 2 patients showed multi-lesion ischemic changes in renal parenchyma in both kidneys. Expansion of the common bile duct appeared in 3 cases, of which 2 cases with merger intrahepatic bile duct dilation. Conclusion: CT findings of ketamine associated abdominal organ injuries in the bladder and renal may have certain characteristics. It is helpful to make diagnosis with the combination of favorable clinical data and medical history. (authors)

  8. Abdominal CT predictors of fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Amitasha; Afghani, Elham [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Division of Gastroenterology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Singh, Vikesh K. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Division of Gastroenterology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Pathology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ali, Sumera; Raman, Siva P.; Fishman, Elliot K. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Andersen, Dana K. [National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); Makary, Martin A. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zaheer, Atif [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-05-01

    To determine which abdominal CT findings predict severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pre-operative abdominal CTs of 66 patients (mean age 52 ± 12 years, 53 % males) with painful CP who underwent the Whipple procedure (n = 32), Frey procedure (n = 32) or pancreatic head biopsy (n = 2), between 1/2003-3/2014, were evaluated. CT was evaluated for parenchymal calcifications, intraductal calculi, main pancreatic duct dilation (>5 mm), main pancreatic duct stricture, and abnormal side branch(es). The surgical histopathology was graded for fibrosis. CT findings were evaluated as predictors of severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief using regression and area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. Thirty-eight (58 %) patients had severe fibrosis. Parenchymal calcification(s) were an independent predictor of severe fibrosis (p = 0.03), and post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1-year (p = 0.04). Presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications had higher predictive accuracy for severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s) (AUC 0.88 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). The predictive accuracy of >10 versus 1-10 parenchymal calcifications increased after adjusting for all other CT findings (AUC 0.89 vs. 0.63, p = 0.01). Parenchymal calcification(s) independently predict severe fibrosis and are significantly associated with post-operative pain relief in CP. The presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications is a better predictor of severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s). (orig.)

  9. Abdominal CT predictors of fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Amitasha; Afghani, Elham; Singh, Vikesh K.; Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen; Ali, Sumera; Raman, Siva P.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Andersen, Dana K.; Makary, Martin A.; Zaheer, Atif

    2015-01-01

    To determine which abdominal CT findings predict severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pre-operative abdominal CTs of 66 patients (mean age 52 ± 12 years, 53 % males) with painful CP who underwent the Whipple procedure (n = 32), Frey procedure (n = 32) or pancreatic head biopsy (n = 2), between 1/2003-3/2014, were evaluated. CT was evaluated for parenchymal calcifications, intraductal calculi, main pancreatic duct dilation (>5 mm), main pancreatic duct stricture, and abnormal side branch(es). The surgical histopathology was graded for fibrosis. CT findings were evaluated as predictors of severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief using regression and area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. Thirty-eight (58 %) patients had severe fibrosis. Parenchymal calcification(s) were an independent predictor of severe fibrosis (p = 0.03), and post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1-year (p = 0.04). Presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications had higher predictive accuracy for severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s) (AUC 0.88 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). The predictive accuracy of >10 versus 1-10 parenchymal calcifications increased after adjusting for all other CT findings (AUC 0.89 vs. 0.63, p = 0.01). Parenchymal calcification(s) independently predict severe fibrosis and are significantly associated with post-operative pain relief in CP. The presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications is a better predictor of severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s). (orig.)

  10. Postoperative CT findings of aortic aneurysm and dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Su Ok; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Mi Young; Moon, Hi Eun; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Hong Sup; Kim, Ho Kyun; Han, Chang Yul

    1995-01-01

    To assess the postoperative CT findings of aortic aneurysms or dissections treared by resection-and graft replacement or continuous-suture graft-inclusion technique. We reviewed postoperative follow-up CT findings of 14 patients, 19 cases. There were 8 patients (10 cases) of aortic aneurysm and 6 patients (9 cases) of aortic dissection which involved the thoracic aorta in 9 patients (13 cases) and abdominal aorta in 5 patients (6 cases). The interval of follow-up after operation was from 9 days to 2 year 9 months. On CT scans, we analyzed the appearance of graft materials, differences of CT findings between two surgical techniques, and normal or abnormal postoperative CT findings. Most of grafts appeared as hyperdense ring on precontrast scan, and all of them were not separated from aortic lumen on postcontrast scan. On CT findings of patients who were operated by continuous-suture graft-inclusion technique, perigraft thrombus was concentrically located with sharp demarcation by native aortic wall and its density was homogeneous, but in cases of those operated by resection-and graft replacement, perigraft hematoma was eccentrically located with indistinct margin and its density was heterogeneous and native aortic wall could not be delineated. In patients without complication, perigraft thrombus or hematoma (15 cases), perigraft calcification (11 cases), residual intimal flap (6 cases), graft deformity (4 cases), perigraft air (2 cases) and reconstructed vessels (1 cases) were noted. And in one patient with complication, perigraft flow was noted with more increased perigraft hematoma. Precise knowledge of the differences of CT findings between two surgical techniques and normal postoperative CT findings is crucial to evaluated the postoperative CT findings in aortic aneurysm and dissection

  11. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumors: CT findings and clinicopathological correlations in 13 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouli, Malik [Department of Radiology, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulines, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Viala, Juliette [Department of Radiology, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulines, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulines, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Fizazi, Karim [Department of Medicine, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulines, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Duvillard, Pierre [Department of Histopathology, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulines, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Vanel, Daniel [Department of Radiology, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 Rue Camille Desmoulines, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: vanel@igr.fr

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: We report computed tomography (CT) findings in 13 patients with a primary abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor. Materials and methods: 13 cases (12 men, 1 woman, mean age = 24.8 years) were found in our hospital database between 1991 and 2003. Clinical, CT and histopathological features were studied retrospectively. Results: Peritoneal involvement was the most common feature. In 10 cases, several lobulated peritoneal soft tissue masses (with a mean of four masses per patient) were seen. Two patients had diffused irregular peritoneal carcinomatosis without any distinct peritoneal masses. One patient had a solitary mass in the pelvic space. The main sites of peritoneal involvement were the pelvic space (n 7), omentum (n = 5), retroperitoneal space (n = 4), small bowel mesentery (n = 3), paracolic gutter (n = 2 on the right and n = 1 on the left), transverse colon mesentery (n = 1), peri-splenic space (n = 1), peri-hepatic space (n 1). The soft tissue masses were often bulky (mean 6 cm, range 1-28 cm), lobulated and heterogeneous with hypodense areas (in 73% of cases). In six cases, moderate ascites was seen. In one case of pelvic involvement, unilateral hydronephrosis was seen. Adenopathies were present in seven cases at the time of the diagnosis (at intraperitoneal, retroperitoneal and pelvic sites in six patients and in the groin in one patient). Five patients had liver metastases (four lesions per case excepted one patient with 30 metastases). Associated thoracic metastases were seen in three patients. The diagnosis was confirmed with four CT-guided percutaneous biopsies. Conclusion: Although CT features are nonspecific, the diagnosis of desmoplastic small round cell tumor may be suspected in young men with multiple bulky heterogeneous peritoneal soft tissue masses. Imaging is useful for staging and also to guide biopsies.

  12. CT findings of peritoneal mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Young Hoon; Oh, Yeon Hee; Kim, Hong; Kim, Jung Sik; Woo, Seong Ku; Kim, Ok Bae; Joo, Yang Goo

    1990-01-01

    The peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare neoplasm which arises from the peritoneal lining of the abdomen, tending to spread along the peritoneal cavity and to invade abdominal organs. Authors report the CT findings of 4 patients with histologically proven peritoneal mesothelioma seen at Dongsan Medical Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University. None of them had a history of exposure to asbestos and no clear etiologic factor could be determined in any patient. CT showed peritoneal and mesenteric thickenings in all cases, omental thickenings in 3 cases, peritoneal nodules, mesenteric masses or omental masses in 2 cases each other, bowel wall involvement in 1 case, and disproportionally small ascites in 2 cases. Distant hematogenous metastases to the liver and retroperitoneal lymph nodes were seen in 1 case. Our experience with 4 peritoneal mesotheliomas as well as a review of the recent imaging literature shows excellent correlation between computed tomography and the operitoneoscopic findings

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging of Injuries from Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Pictorial Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian

    2010-04-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma can cause multiple internal injuries. However, these injuries are often difficult to accurately evaluate, particularly in the presence of more obvious external injuries. Computed tomography (CT) imaging is currently used to assess clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma. CT can provide a rapid and accurate appraisal of the abdominal viscera, retroperitoneum and abdominal wall, as well as a limited assessment of the lower thoracic region and bony pelvis. This paper presents examples of various injuries in trauma patients depicted in abdominal CT images. We hope these images provide a resource for radiologists, surgeons and medical officers, as well as a learning tool for medical students.

  14. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.-K., E-mail: leewk33@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Cazzato, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Duddalwar, V.A. [Department of Radiology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chang, S.D. [Department of Medical Imaging, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  15. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-K.; Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C.; Cazzato, R.L.; Duddalwar, V.A.; Chang, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis : plain radiographic and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Dae; Park, Jeong Hee; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Heo, Tae Haeng; Park, Dong Rib [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate the plain radiographic and CT findings of the necrotizing fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic findings of 4 cases with necrotizing fasciitis. Three cases were proven pathologically. We evaluated pattern and extent of the gas shadows in plain films. CT findings were analysed, with emphasis on : (a) gas pattern, (b) extent, (c) location and involved site, (d) associated focal abscess, and (e) swelling of the adjacent muscles. On plain radiographs, four cases showed streaky or mottled gas densities in the pelvis, three cases in the perineum, one case in the abdomen, and two cases in the thigh. On CT images, gas pattern was mottled and streaky appearance with swelling of the adjacent muscles. Gas shadows located in the extraperitoneal space in four cases, fascial layer in four cases, and subcutaneous layer in four cases. There were gas shadows in pelvic wall, perineum, abdominal wall, buttock, thigh, and scrotum. Focal low density lesion suggestive of focal abscess was not visualized. Plain radiography is useful for early diagnosis of the necrotizing fasciitis and CT is very useful for detection of precise location and extent of the disease. CT is also useful for differentiation of necrotizing fasciitis from focal abscess and cellulitis.

  17. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacknoff, R.; Novelline, R.A.; Wittenberg, J.; Waltman, A.C.; De Luca, S.A.; Rhea, J.T.; Lawrason, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening condition requiring immediate diagnosis and surgery. In a series of 23 consecutive patients scanned by CT for suspected ruptured AAA, CT proved 100% accurate. In seven patients with surgically or pathologically proved ruptured AAA, CT demonstrated a similar distribution of hemorrhage into the perirenal space and to a lesser degree into the anterior and posterior pararenal spaces. The 16 true-negative examinations included ten in patients with unruptured AAA and six in patients with other diseases. The authors conclude that patients in stable condition with suspected ruptured AAA should be examined by CT

  18. Role of multidetector abdominal CT in the evaluation of abnormalities in polyarteritis nodosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhal, M.; Gupta, P.; Sharma, A.; Lal, A.; Rathi, M.; Khandelwal, N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To identify arterial and end-organ abnormalities on abdominal computed tomography (CT) in patients with polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). Materials and methods: A prospective study comprising 27 consecutive patients with PAN was conducted from 2007 to 2013. Departmental ethics committee approval was obtained. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT comprising an arterial and a portal venous phase. Images were assessed for arterial irregularity, aneurysms, stenosis, and occlusion. End-organ changes, including infarcts, haematoma, and bowel involvement, were also recorded. Results: A positive CT was recorded in 15 patients including eight females. The mean age was 32 years. The most common abnormalities were aneurysms seen in 12 patients. The renal artery was the most common site of aneurysms (n=9). The hepatic (n=3), superior mesenteric (n=3) and splenic arteries (n=1) were also involved. Contour irregularity was noted in four patients involving the hepatic, splenic, and superior mesenteric arteries. Stenosis/occlusion was also noted in seven patients. The most common end-organ abnormality was infarct (n=9), followed by bowel wall thickening (n=3), and perinephric haematoma (n=2). Conclusion: A combination of arterial and end-organ abnormalities on abdominal CT enables an accurate diagnosis of PAN in occult cases and may obviate the need for angiography and, sometimes, biopsy. - Highlights: • A combination of findings on CT allows a diagnosis of PAN. • Specific findings include arterial and end organ abnormalities. • The most common abnormalities on CTA and CT are aneurysms and infarcts.

  19. Post-operative abdominal CT scanning in extrahepatic biliary atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, D L; Mulcahy, P F; Letourneau, J G; Dehner, L P

    1989-07-01

    A retrospective review of the abdominal CT scans of 26 children with extrahepatic biliary atresia was performed, and the results were correlated with available surgical and pathologic data. Associated congenital anomalies or acquired abnormalities were identified in these patients. Congenital anomalies included polysplenia, venous anomalies and bowel stenosis. Acquired abnormalities developed secondary to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, intrahepatic biliary duct dilatation, and hepatic ischemia. Despite frequent episodes of ascending cholangitis in these children, no hepatic abscesses were identified by CT or by pathologic examination. In conclusion, abdominal CT scanning of children with extrahepatic biliary atresia can define congenital and acquired abnormalities and provide important anatomic data for the surgeons before liver transplantation. (orig.).

  20. CT findings in isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesner, Walter; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Ji, Hoon; Khurana, Bharti; Ros, Pablo R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the CT features of ischemic proctosigmoiditis in correlation with clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. Our study included seven patients with isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis. Patients were identified by a retrospective review of all histopathologic records of colonoscopic biopsies performed during a time period of 4 years. All patients presented with left lower abdominal quadrant pain, bloody stools, and leukocytosis, and four patients had fever at the time of presentation. Four of seven patients suffered from diarrhea, one of seven was constipated and two of seven had normal stool consistency. The CT examinations were reviewed by two authors by consensus and compared with clinical and histopathologic results as well as with the initial CT diagnosis. The CT showed a wall thickening confined to the rectum and sigmoid colon in seven of seven patients, stranding of the pararectal fat in four of seven, and stranding of the perisigmoidal fat in one of seven patients. There were no enlarged lymph nodes, but five of seven patients showed coexistent diverticulosis and in three of these patients CT findings were initially misinterpreted as sigmoid diverticulitis. Endoscopies and histopathologic analyses of endoscopic biopsies confirmed non-transmural ischemic proctosigmoiditis in all patients. Isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis often presents with unspecific CT features and potentially misleading clinical and laboratory findings. In an elderly patient or a patient with known cardiovascular risk factors the diagnosis of ischemic proctosigmoiditis should be considered when wall thickening confined to the rectum and sigmoid colon is seen that is associated with perirectal fat stranding. (orig.)

  1. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  2. CT-guided percutaneous aspiration and drainage of postoperative abdominal fluid collections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marano, I.; Mainenti, P.P.; Selva, G.; Cannavale, M.; Sodano, A.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report the personal techniques and the results of CT-guided percutaneous drainage of postoperative abdominal fluid collections. CT-guided percutaneous drainage offers many advantages over surgery: it is less invasive, can be repeated and requires no anesthesia, there are not surgery-related risks and lower morbidity and mortality rates. Moreover, subsequent hospitalization is shorter and costs are consequently reduced. The authors conclude that CT-guided percutaneous drainage is the method of choice in the treatment of postoperative abdominal fluid collections [it

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIG CT for upper abdominal pathology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIG. 14. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • March 2007. ORIG. Abstract. Background. Current practice at our institution for routine abdominal. CT includes coverage from the diaphragm to the symphysis pubis and therefore includes pelvic organs. Limited upper abdominal imaging exists in other modalities, and tailoring the ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging of Injuries from Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Pictorial Essay

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd. Aziz, Azian

    2010-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma can cause multiple internal injuries. However, these injuries are often difficult to accurately evaluate, particularly in the presence of more obvious external injuries. Computed tomography (CT) imaging is currently used to assess clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma. CT can provide a rapid and accurate appraisal of the abdominal viscera, retroperitoneum and abdominal wall, as well as a limited assessment of the lower thoracic region and bony pelvis. T...

  5. CT angiography. Abdominal CT using intravenous aortography for contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, J; Nakauma, Y; Egawa, J; Kawamura, M [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-04-01

    To obtain imaging effects close to those of abdominal aortography and investigate a technique with little invasion to patients, intravenous aortography was applied to contrast enhancement (CE) in abdominal CT, and its usefulness was discussed. Intravenous aortography could clearly visualize lesions with rich neovascularity such as hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. Differing from a drip infusion method, this method has complexities in its technique that contrast medium is injected at once, blood circulation time which is represented by the time between the injection and the time when the patients feel bitterness (10 - 12 seconds) must be measured before CE, and scanning begins 2 seconds before the patients feel bitterness. However, the invasion to patients due to this method is slight, and the capacity of this method to visualize neovascularity is superior to CE by a drip infusion method. Therefore, qualitative diagnosis by CT will be improved by using this method together with a drip infusion method.

  6. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  7. Abdominal wall hernias: imaging with spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabile Ianora, A.A.; Midiri, M.; Vinci, R.; Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography is an accurate method of identifying the various types of abdominal wall hernias, especially if they are clinically occult, and of distinguishing them from other diseases such as hematomas, abscesses and neoplasia. In this study we examined the CT images of 94 patients affected by abdominal wall hernias observed over a period of 6 years. Computed tomography clearly demonstrates the anatomical site of the hernial sac, the content and any occlusive bowel complications due to incarceration or strangulation. Clinical diagnosis of external hernias is particularly difficult in obese patients or in those with laparotic scars. In these cases abdominal imaging is essential for a correct preoperative diagnosis and to determine the most effective treatment. (orig.)

  8. Computed tomographic findings of abdominal complications of Crohn's disease - pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissin, R.; Hertz, M.; Osadchy, A.; Novis, B.; Gayer, G.

    2005-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, transmural, inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract (CIT) most often affecting the terminal ileum and colon. Diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea, and weight loss are the most common clinical symptoms. Abdominal complications of CD, both intestinal and extraintestinal, are frequent and variable. The most common intestinal complications include ileocolitis with external or internal fistulas and abscess formation, strictures, and bowel obstruction. Less common are free perforation, intussusception, and malignancy. The extraintestinal complications include nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, fatty liver, portal vein gas, and thromboembolic events. Nowadays, computed tomography (CT) provides superb anatomic detail and diagnostic accuracy of various intra-abdominal pathological processes, and it thus has become an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation and management of patients wit known CD for the assessment of bowel wall involvement, the mesenteric extent of the disease, and inn-abdominal complications. In addition, as CT is frequently performed to evaluate patients with acute abdomen, it may encounter clinically unsuspected complications in patients with CD. This article reviews the CT features of various intra-abdominal complications of CD. (author)

  9. Analysis of the association between periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, after blunt abdominal trauma, and elevated central venous pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hung; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Lee, Chae Kyeong; Ku, Kwan Min; Lee, Sung Woo; Kim, Miu Woon; Ahn, Woo Sub; Yoon, Ji Young

    1999-01-01

    To assess the causes of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. From among 812 patients who underwent abdominal CT after blunt abdominal trauma, we retrospectively analysed the findings in 124 with evidence of periportal low attenuation. Among these, hepatic injury was noted in only 87. The presence or absence, and extent of hepatic injury, and of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, were carefully evaluated. In each case, the ratio of the transverse diameter of the inferior vena cava(IVC) to the aorta at the level of the right adrenal gland provided an indirect measurement of central venous pressure ; for control purposes, the ratio was also obtained in 21 non-traumatic patients with no abnormal abdominal CT findings. Of the 87 patients with hepatic injury, 46 showed no periportal low attenuation, and average value of the ratio between the IVC and aorta was 1.16±0.12, while the remaining 41 patients showed periportal low attenuation with a ratio of 1.51±0.21(p<0.05). In the 37 patients with periportal low attenuation but no evidence of concomitant hepatic injury, the average ratio was 1.52±0.25, while in 21 non-traumatic patients it was 1.15±0.16. For resuscitation, all patients had received 0.5-5.0 litre of IV fluid therapy before CT, and at the time of CT, were normotensive. Rapidly elevated central venous pressure following massive IV infusion therapy in patients with blunt abdominal trauma can be one of the causes of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT

  10. Analysis of the association between periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, after blunt abdominal trauma, and elevated central venous pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hung; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Lee, Chae Kyeong; Ku, Kwan Min; Lee, Sung Woo; Kim, Miu Woon; Ahn, Woo Sub [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ji Young [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    To assess the causes of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. From among 812 patients who underwent abdominal CT after blunt abdominal trauma, we retrospectively analysed the findings in 124 with evidence of periportal low attenuation. Among these, hepatic injury was noted in only 87. The presence or absence, and extent of hepatic injury, and of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, were carefully evaluated. In each case, the ratio of the transverse diameter of the inferior vena cava(IVC) to the aorta at the level of the right adrenal gland provided an indirect measurement of central venous pressure ; for control purposes, the ratio was also obtained in 21 non-traumatic patients with no abnormal abdominal CT findings. Of the 87 patients with hepatic injury, 46 showed no periportal low attenuation, and average value of the ratio between the IVC and aorta was 1.16{+-}0.12, while the remaining 41 patients showed periportal low attenuation with a ratio of 1.51{+-}0.21(p<0.05). In the 37 patients with periportal low attenuation but no evidence of concomitant hepatic injury, the average ratio was 1.52{+-}0.25, while in 21 non-traumatic patients it was 1.15{+-}0.16. For resuscitation, all patients had received 0.5-5.0 litre of IV fluid therapy before CT, and at the time of CT, were normotensive. Rapidly elevated central venous pressure following massive IV infusion therapy in patients with blunt abdominal trauma can be one of the causes of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT.

  11. Percutaneous Transhepatic Drainage of Inaccessible Abdominal Abscesses Following Abdominal Surgery Under Real-Time CT-Fluoroscopic Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 ± 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 ± 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  12. Fat necrosis after abdominal surgery: A pitfall in interpretation of FDG-PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Tima; Lotan, Eyal; Klang, Eyal; Nissan, Johnatan; Goldstein, Jeffrey; Goshen, Elinor; Ben-Haim, Simona; Apter, Sara; Chikman, Bar

    2018-06-01

    We describe FDG-PET/CT findings of postoperative fat necrosis in patients following abdominal surgery, and evaluate their changes in size and FDG uptake over time. FDG-PET/CT scans from January 2007-January 2016 containing the term 'fat necrosis' were reviewed. Lesions meeting radiological criteria of fat necrosis in patients with prior abdominal surgery were included. Forty-four patients, 30 males, mean age 68.4 ± 11.0 years. Surgeries: laparotomy (n=37; 84.1 %), laparoscopy (n=3; 6.8 %), unknown (n=4; 9.1 %). CTs of all lesions included hyperdense well-defined rims surrounding a heterogeneous fatty core. Sites: peritoneum (n=34; 77 %), omental fat (n=19; 43 %), subcutaneous fat (n=8; 18 %), retroperitoneum (n=2; 5 %). Mean lesion long axis: 33.6±24.9 mm (range: 13.0-140.0). Mean SUVmax: 2.6±1.1 (range: 0.6-5.1). On serial CTs (n=34), lesions decreased in size (p=0.022). Serial FDG-PET/CT (n=24) showed no significant change in FDG-avidity (p=0.110). Mean SUVmax did not correlate with time from surgery (p=0.558) or lesion size (p=0.259). Postsurgical fat necrosis demonstrated characteristic CT features and may demonstrate increased FDG uptake. However, follow-up of subsequent imaging scans showed no increases in size or FDG-avidity. Awareness of this entity is important to avoid misinterpretation of findings as recurrent cancer. • Postsurgical fat necrosis may mimic cancer in FDG-PET/CT. • Follow-up of fat necrosis showed no increase in FDG intensity. • CT follow-up showed a decrease in lesion size. • FDG uptake did not correlate with time lapsed from surgery.

  13. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F.; Mentha, G.

    1998-01-01

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.)

  14. Abdominal organ motion measured using 4D CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandner, Edward D.; Wu, Andrew; Chen, Hungcheng; Heron, Dwight; Kalnicki, Shalom; Komanduri, Krishna; Gerszten, Kristina; Burton, Steve; Ahmed, Irfan; Shou, Zhenyu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To measure respiration-induced abdominal organ motion using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning and to examine the organ paths. Methods and Materials: During 4D CT scanning, consecutive CT images are acquired of the patient at each couch position. Simultaneously, the patient's respiratory pattern is recorded using an external marker block taped to the patient's abdomen. This pattern is used to retrospectively organize the CT images into multiple three-dimensional images, each representing one breathing phase. These images are analyzed to measure organ motion between each phase. The displacement from end expiration is compared to a displacement limit that represents acceptable dosimetric results (5 mm). Results: The organs measured in 13 patients were the liver, spleen, and left and right kidneys. Their average superior to inferior absolute displacements were 1.3 cm for the liver, 1.3 cm for the spleen, 1.1 cm for the left kidney, and 1.3 cm for the right kidney. Although the organ paths varied among patients, 5 mm of superior to inferior displacement from end expiration resulted in less than 5 mm of displacement in the other directions for 41 of 43 organs measured. Conclusions: Four-dimensional CT scanning can accurately measure abdominal organ motion throughout respiration. This information may result in greater organ sparing and planning target volume coverage

  15. The role of whole body spiral CT in the primary work-up of polytrauma patients - comparison with conventional radiography and abdominal sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, T.; Schlippenbach, J. von; Wolf, K.J.; Stahel, P.F.; Ertel, W.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of routine 'whole body spiral CT' in the primary work-up of polytrauma patients for injuries of the thorax, abdomen and spine, and to compare the results with those of conventional radiography of the chest and spine and abdominal ultrasound. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive polytrauma patients underwent contrast-enhanced single slice spiral CT (5 mm collimation) from the vertex to the floor of the pelvis as part of the primary work-up after emergency room admission. Overlapping high resolution sections and sagittal reformations of the spine were obtained. Reports of additional chest radiographs (n=43), abdominal ultrasound examinations (n=47) and spine radiographs (n=36) performed in the emergency room were available for retrospective comparison. The 'final diagnoses', which served as the standard of reference, were taken from the patients' records using all information that became available until discharge or death, such as findings from further imaging, surgery and autopsy. Results: CT showed 109 (97%) of 112 thoracic and abdominal soft-tissue injuries. Relevant injuries missed were an early splenic laceration and an early pelvic hematoma, both of which became clinically apparent several hours later. There were 4 false positive CT findings. Conventional chest radiography demonstrated only 20% of thoracic and sonography 22% of abdominal injuries. Chest radiography and sonography produced 2 false-positive findings each. CT showed 66 (87%) of 76 vertebral fractures including all 19 unstable ones. CT missed 5 anterior vertebral body and 5 spinous/transverse process fractures. Conventional radiography found 71% of vertebral fractures including only 50% of the unstable one. (orig.)

  16. Unsupervised quantification of abdominal fat from CT images using Greedy Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Chirag; Dallal, Ahmed H.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Patel, Aalpen; Moore, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Adipose tissue has been associated with adverse consequences of obesity. Total adipose tissue (TAT) is divided into subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Intra-abdominal fat (VAT), located inside the abdominal cavity, is a major factor for the classic obesity related pathologies. Since direct measurement of visceral and subcutaneous fat is not trivial, substitute metrics like waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) are used in clinical settings to quantify obesity. Abdominal fat can be assessed effectively using CT or MRI, but manual fat segmentation is rather subjective and time-consuming. Hence, an automatic and accurate quantification tool for abdominal fat is needed. The goal of this study is to extract TAT, VAT and SAT fat from abdominal CT in a fully automated unsupervised fashion using energy minimization techniques. We applied a four step framework consisting of 1) initial body contour estimation, 2) approximation of the body contour, 3) estimation of inner abdominal contour using Greedy Snakes algorithm, and 4) voting, to segment the subcutaneous and visceral fat. We validated our algorithm on 952 clinical abdominal CT images (from 476 patients with a very wide BMI range) collected from various radiology departments of Geisinger Health System. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on such a large and diverse clinical dataset. Our algorithm obtained a 3.4% error for VAT segmentation compared to manual segmentation. These personalized and accurate measurements of fat can complement traditional population health driven obesity metrics such as BMI and WC.

  17. Integrated circuit detector technology in abdominal CT: added value in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsbach, Fabian; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Rätzer, Susan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to assess the effect of an integrated circuit (IC) detector for abdominal CT on image quality. In the first study part, an abdominal phantom was scanned with various extension rings using a CT scanner equipped with a conventional discrete circuit (DC) detector and on the same scanner with an IC detector (120 kVp, 150 effective mAs, and 75 effective mAs). In the second study part, 20 patients were included who underwent abdominal CT both with the IC detector and previously at similar protocol parameters (120 kVp tube current-time product and 150 reference mAs using automated tube current modulation) with the DC detector. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection. Image quality in the phantom was higher for images acquired with the IC compared with the DC detector. There was a gradually increasing noise reduction with increasing phantom sizes, with the highest (37% in the largest phantom) at 75 effective mAs (p < 0.001). In patients, noise was overall significantly (p = 0.025) reduced by 6.4% using the IC detector. Similar to the phantom, there was a gradual increase in noise reduction to 7.9% in patients with a body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or lower (p = 0.008). Significant correlation was found in patients between noise and abdominal diameter in DC detector images (r = 0.604, p = 0.005), whereas no such correlation was found for the IC detector (r = 0.427, p = 0.060). Use of an IC detector in abdominal CT improves image quality and reduces image noise, particularly in overweight and obese patients. This noise reduction has the potential for dose reduction in abdominal CT.

  18. Computerized abdominal tomography in Wilson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchikura, Keiko; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Akihisa; Ono, Yasuhiko

    1986-05-01

    Cranial and abdominal computerized tomography (CT) was performed in a 10-year-old boy with Wilson's disease complicated by liver cirrhosis. Abdominal CT showed diffuse high density areas over the whole part of the liver propably due to copper sediments, although there was no abnormal cranial CT findings. Decreased high density area of the liver was seen 60 days after the administration of D-penicillamine, suggesting the excretion of copper from the liver. Abdominal CT, as well as cranial CT, may be of help to diagnose Wilson's disease and evaluate therapeutic effects. (Namekawa, K.).

  19. CT diagnosis of abdominal lymph node metastases in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T; Nakamura, H; Choi, S; Morimoto, K; Kawamoto, S; Hori, S; Tokunaga, K; Yoskioka, H; Kuroda, C

    1985-08-01

    CT scanning is useful for diagnosing abdominal lymph node metastasis. Using this technique, histologically confirmed abdominal lymph node metastases were detected in nine of 49 patients (33 autopsy cases and 16 laparotomy cases) with hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatoma). Among the 49 patients, three had periportal (6.1%), six peripancreatic (12.2.%) and six para-aortic adenopathies (12.2%). Two of the patients had adenopathy at all three sites. Retrospectively, CT detected two periportal, four peripancreatic and all six para-aortic adenopathies. Most of the hepatomas with adenopathy showed infiltrative growth; tumour thrombosis of the portal vein was a common complication.

  20. Comparison of CT and anatomic pathological findings of the abdomen in HIV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Witt, H.; Jautzke, G.; Ruf, B.

    1990-01-01

    In a retrospective study the results of abdominal computed tomography (CT) from 48 patients, who died of the complications of HIV infection, were compared with those obtained at autopsy. The CT diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy in 39 cases (81.3%). In nine patients CT results did not correlate with the postmortal findings. This was caused by lack of cooperation, cachexia and the time between the last CT study and the death of the patients. Nevertheless, CT with its standardised imaging planes is an important method for diagnosing and monitoring HIV-related diseases of the abdomen. (orig.) [de

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1998-05-01

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 64 refs.

  2. Optimization of individualized abdominal scan protocol with 64-slice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Minxia; Zhao Xinming; Song Junfeng; Zhou Chunwu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore an individualized abdominal scan protocol with a 64-slice CT scanner. Methods: From Sep. 2010 to Nov. 2010, one hundred consecutive patients, who underwent twice non-contrast-enhanced abdominal CT scans within 3 months, were enrolled in this study. For each patient, the tube current of 274 eff. mAs and 207 eff. mAs were applied respectively in the first and second abdominal scan. The imaging qualities of the two scans were evaluated retrospectively by 3 reviewers. All the individual variants,including height, weight, body mass index (BMI), the maximum transverse diameter, the anteroposterior diameter and the average maximum diameter of abdomen were recorded. A five-point scale was used for grading the image noise of eight organs, including abdominal aorta, portal vein, liver, spleen, gallbladder, pancreas, renal cortex and renal medulla. Diagnostic acceptability of CT images at three anatomic levels,including porta hepatis, pancreas and the upper pole of renal, was also evaluated by using a five-point scale. The noise value of abdominal aorta was defined as the standard deviation (SD) of CT values of aorta at the level of porta hepatis. Scatter diagram and Pearson correlation analysis were used for evaluating the linear relationship between the individual variants and the noise value of abdominal aorta, and multivariate linear regression analysis was used for evaluating the relevance between the individual variants and the noise value of aorta. Results: In this patients group, the average height was (164.6 ± 7.5) cm,the average weight was (64.3 ± 11.0) kg, the BMI was (23.7 ±3.3) kg/m 2 , the maximum transverse diameter of abdomen was (29.8 ± 2.3) cm, the anteroposterior diameter of abdomen was (23.1 ± 2.9) cm, and the average maximum diameter of abdomen was (26.5 ± 2.5) cm. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant positive linear correlation between the noise value of abdominal aorta (1 1.7 ± 3.0) and patients' weight (r=0

  3. Perforated appendicitis: accuracy of CT diagnosis and correlation of CT findings with the length of hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, H.A.; Afzal, S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of CT findings in the differentiation of perforated from nonperforated appendicitis and correlate CT diagnosis with the length of hospital stay. The study included 70 patients who presented with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and underwent preoperative CT scan followed by appendectomy. Patients were divided into two groups of having perforated and nonperforated appendicitis on the basis of CT scan findings. The surgical and pathological reports combined were considered the reference standard for the diagnosis of perforated appendicitis. Various CT scan findings and average duration of hospital stay in days was compared by t-test. Twenty-six (37%) of 70 patients had perforated appendicitis. It was correctly identified on pre-operative CT scan in 18 patients. There were 18 true positive diagnoses, 43 true negative diagnoses, 1 false positive diagnosis and 8 false negative diagnoses which yielded a sensitivity of 69%, specificity of 97%, positive predictive value of 94% and negative predictive value of 84%. Mean length of hospital stay in perforated group was 6.3 days and 2.9 days in nonperforated group. Severe periappendiceal inflammation, periappendiceal and or abdominopelvic fluid and abscess were significantly associated with perforated appendicitis and with a significant longer hospital stay (p <.001). CT scan is 69% sensitive and 97% specific for the diagnosis of perforated appendicitis and constellation of CT findings can be used to select patients with perforated appendicitis for initial non-operative management. Presence of CT signs of significant appendiceal inflammation is independent predictor of longer hospital stay. (author)

  4. Focused abdominal CT scan for acute appendicitis in children: can it help in need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, W.; Ali, S.; Arshad, M.; Nadeem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the focused abdominal CT scan [FACT] in clinically equivocal cases of acute appendicitis in paediatric population. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Radiology Department of Aga Khan Hospital, from August 2007 to November 2008. A total of 84 patients (42 males and 42 females) with clinically equivocal signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis referred to radiology department for CT evaluation were studied. CT findings were compared with histopathology and clinical follow-up. Results: The sensitivity of focused CT for acute appendicitis was 91%; specificity was 69% and accuracy of 76% while PPV and NPV were 58%, 94% respectively. Conclusion: Focused unenhanced CT is a quick, accurate and non invasive modality for the assessment of clinically equivocal cases of acute appendicitis for ruling out patients and reducing negative appendectomies. (author)

  5. The CT frequencies of various non-traumatic acute abdominal emergencies in hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis patients and the general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergün, Tarkan; Lakadamyal, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the frequency of non-traumatic acute abdominal emergencies in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (peritoneal dialysis (PD) and haemodialysis (HD)) patients and in the general population as diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: The abdominal CT findings of ESRD patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal pain during the years 2001–2010 have been retrospectively evaluated. Thirty-three HD (14 females, 19 males, mean age: 62 ± 10.5) and 22 PD patients (12 females, 10 males, mean age: 59 ± 9.4) with acute abdominal pathology based on their CT scans have been included into the study. In addition, 127 individuals (68 females, 59 males, mean age: 40.7 ± 12.8) with normal renal functions who presented with non-traumatic acute abdominal pain diagnosed with an acute abdominal pathology based on their CT scans have been prospectively evaluated during the years 2009–2010. Results: While the most frequent etiology in PD patients was peritonitis (45.4%), acute pancreatitis (13.6%) and perforation (18.1), and in HD patients it was nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (18.1%) and spontaneous intraabdominal bleeding (21.2%). The basic causes of acute abdomen in the general population were ureteral stone (34.6%) and appendicitis (18.1%). Conclusions: The causes of acute abdominal pain in ESRD patients is significantly different when compared to the general population. And within this special patient population the etiology of acute abdomen differs depending on the renal replacement therapy modality they are receiving. Thus, the causes of acute abdomen in PD patients are mostly peritonitis, acute pancreatitis, and perforation, while being mostly nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia and spontaneous intraabdominal bleeding in patients receiving HD therapy.

  6. Characteristic MR and CT imaging findings of hepatobiliary paragonimiasis and their pathologic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chunyan; Hu, Yajun; Chen, Weixia [Dept of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan Univ., Sichuan (China)], e-mail: wxchen25@126.com

    2012-06-15

    Background: Hepatobiliary paragonimiasis (HP) is not commonly encountered and may be confused with hepatobiliary tumors; however, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of HP allow this entity to be distinguished from other diseases. Purpose: To present the CT and MRI findings in patients with HP and to describe some specific imaging findings along with their pathological correlations. Material and Methods: Imaging and clinical findings of 21 patients (9 boys/men and 12 girls/women; age range 3-67 years; mean age 40 years) who were diagnosed with HP were retrospectively evaluated. Among these patients, 16 underwent CT examination only, two had MR examination only, and three underwent both CT and MR. All patients underwent surgery, and the HP diagnosis was confirmed by the surgical and histopathologic results. Results: Chronic abdominal pain or back pain was reported by 14 patients, severe abdominal pain with acute onset was reported by one patient, and six patients were asymptomatic and were discovered incidentally. Peripheral eosinophilia was present in 14 patients (14/21, 66.7%), and abnormal liver function tests were found in 16 patients (16/21, 76.2%). Of the 19 patients who underwent CT imaging, 17 patients showed multiple mixed hypodense lesions or multiple cysts with inlaying septation with separate irregular rims or circular enhancement on post-contrast CT images. Tunnel-shaped micro abscesses and necrotic cavities were found in the lesions of 12 of those 17 patients. The other two patients showed smaller cystic masses. MRI showed faveolate T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense areas in the liver parenchyma with rim or peripheral enhancement. Nodular or circular hyperintense materials were found scattered in the lesions on T1-weighted imaging. Conclusion: CT and MRI can reveal the radiological-pathological features of HP. Together with laboratory findings, MRI and CT findings may provide diagnostic clues, especially in endemic

  7. Characteristic MR and CT imaging findings of hepatobiliary paragonimiasis and their pathologic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chunyan; Hu, Yajun; Chen, Weixia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hepatobiliary paragonimiasis (HP) is not commonly encountered and may be confused with hepatobiliary tumors; however, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of HP allow this entity to be distinguished from other diseases. Purpose: To present the CT and MRI findings in patients with HP and to describe some specific imaging findings along with their pathological correlations. Material and Methods: Imaging and clinical findings of 21 patients (9 boys/men and 12 girls/women; age range 3-67 years; mean age 40 years) who were diagnosed with HP were retrospectively evaluated. Among these patients, 16 underwent CT examination only, two had MR examination only, and three underwent both CT and MR. All patients underwent surgery, and the HP diagnosis was confirmed by the surgical and histopathologic results. Results: Chronic abdominal pain or back pain was reported by 14 patients, severe abdominal pain with acute onset was reported by one patient, and six patients were asymptomatic and were discovered incidentally. Peripheral eosinophilia was present in 14 patients (14/21, 66.7%), and abnormal liver function tests were found in 16 patients (16/21, 76.2%). Of the 19 patients who underwent CT imaging, 17 patients showed multiple mixed hypodense lesions or multiple cysts with inlaying septation with separate irregular rims or circular enhancement on post-contrast CT images. Tunnel-shaped micro abscesses and necrotic cavities were found in the lesions of 12 of those 17 patients. The other two patients showed smaller cystic masses. MRI showed faveolate T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense areas in the liver parenchyma with rim or peripheral enhancement. Nodular or circular hyperintense materials were found scattered in the lesions on T1-weighted imaging. Conclusion: CT and MRI can reveal the radiological-pathological features of HP. Together with laboratory findings, MRI and CT findings may provide diagnostic clues, especially in endemic

  8. Abdominal imaging in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawei; Wang Wei; Yuan Chunwang; Jia Cuiyu; Zhao Xuan; Zhang Tong; Ma Daqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate abdominal imaging in AIDS. Methods: The imaging examinations (including US, CT and MR) of 6 patients with AIDS associated abdominal foci were analysed retrospectively. All the cases were performed US, and CT scan, of which 4 performed enhanced CT scan and 1 with MR. Results: Abdominal tuberculosis were found in 4 patients, including abdominal lymph nodes tuberculosis (3 cases) and pancreatic tuberculosis (1 case). The imaging of lymph nodes tuberculosis typically showed enlarged peripheral tim enhancement with central low-attenuation on contrast-enhanced CT. Pancreatic tuberculosis demonstrated low-attenuation area in pancreatic head and slightly peripheral enhancement. Disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma was seen in 1 case: CT and MRI scan demonstrated tumour infiltrated along hepatic portal vein and bronchovascular bundles. Pelvic tumor was observed in 1 case: CT scan showed large mass with thick and irregular wall and central low attenuation liquefacient necrotic area in the pelvic cavity. Conclusion: The imaging findings of AIDS with abdominal foci is extraordinarily helpful to the diagnosis of such disease. Tissue biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis. (authors)

  9. Gallbladder visualization on CT shortly after abdominal angiography with iodixanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Ryusuke; Goto, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Toshiya; Kaizu, Toshihide; Ichikawa, Taro; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Onda, Masahiko

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen patients underwent CT examination shortly after abdominal angiography with iodixanol. Gallbladder opacification was observed in 13 patients in the absence of clinical evidence of renal impairment. Among them, 2 patients showed a strong opacification on CT. There was no significant relationship between visualization of the gallbladder and the total dose of contrast medium. Gallbladder opacification on CT examination shortly after angiography shows that the hepatobiliary tract is important in the excretion of iodixanol. (author)

  10. Computed tomographic findings of abdominal complications of Crohn's disease - pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Hertz, M. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Osadchy, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Novis, B. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Gastroenterology, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Gayer, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Assaf Harode Medical Center, Zrifin, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2005-02-15

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, transmural, inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract (CIT) most often affecting the terminal ileum and colon. Diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea, and weight loss are the most common clinical symptoms. Abdominal complications of CD, both intestinal and extraintestinal, are frequent and variable. The most common intestinal complications include ileocolitis with external or internal fistulas and abscess formation, strictures, and bowel obstruction. Less common are free perforation, intussusception, and malignancy. The extraintestinal complications include nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, fatty liver, portal vein gas, and thromboembolic events. Nowadays, computed tomography (CT) provides superb anatomic detail and diagnostic accuracy of various intra-abdominal pathological processes, and it thus has become an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation and management of patients wit known CD for the assessment of bowel wall involvement, the mesenteric extent of the disease, and inn-abdominal complications. In addition, as CT is frequently performed to evaluate patients with acute abdomen, it may encounter clinically unsuspected complications in patients with CD. This article reviews the CT features of various intra-abdominal complications of CD. (author)

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIG CT for upper abdominal pathology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CT scan contributes to the final diagnosis in organ-specific upper- abdominal ..... planes to encase the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery, the superior ... men, and possibly pelvis, to evaluate for extrahepatic disease.15 In one.

  12. Clinical significance of pulmonary nodules detected on abdominal CT in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, Micheal; Lee, Edward Y.; Zurakowski, David

    2015-01-01

    The clinical significance of a pulmonary nodule that is detected incidentally on CT studies in children is unknown. In addition, there is limited information regarding the management of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules discovered on abdominal CT studies in children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of incidental pulmonary nodules detected on abdominal CT studies in children. This was a retrospective study performed following institutional review board approval. Abdominal CT reports in patients younger than 18 years of age from July 2004 to June 2011 were reviewed for the terms ''nodule,'' ''nodular'' or ''mass'' in reference to the lung bases. The study population included those pediatric patients in whom pulmonary nodules were initially detected on abdominal CT studies. The largest pulmonary nodules detected on CT studies were evaluated for their features (size, shape, margin, attenuation, location, and presence of calcification and cavitation). Follow-up CT studies and clinical records were reviewed for demographic information, history of underlying malignancies and the clinical outcome of the incidental pulmonary nodules. Comparison of malignant versus benign pulmonary nodules was performed with respect to the size of the nodule, imaging features on CT, and patient history of malignancy using the Student's t-test and Fisher exact test. Youden J-index in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off size for suggesting a high risk of malignancy of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Pulmonary nodules meeting inclusion criteria were detected in 62 (1.2%) of 5,234 patients. The mean age of patients with nodules was 11.2 years (range: 5 months-18 years). Thirty-one patients (50%) had follow-up CT studies and two of these patients (6%) were subsequently found to have malignant pulmonary nodules. Both of these

  13. Clinical significance of pulmonary nodules detected on abdominal CT in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Micheal; Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Anesthesiology and Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The clinical significance of a pulmonary nodule that is detected incidentally on CT studies in children is unknown. In addition, there is limited information regarding the management of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules discovered on abdominal CT studies in children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of incidental pulmonary nodules detected on abdominal CT studies in children. This was a retrospective study performed following institutional review board approval. Abdominal CT reports in patients younger than 18 years of age from July 2004 to June 2011 were reviewed for the terms ''nodule,'' ''nodular'' or ''mass'' in reference to the lung bases. The study population included those pediatric patients in whom pulmonary nodules were initially detected on abdominal CT studies. The largest pulmonary nodules detected on CT studies were evaluated for their features (size, shape, margin, attenuation, location, and presence of calcification and cavitation). Follow-up CT studies and clinical records were reviewed for demographic information, history of underlying malignancies and the clinical outcome of the incidental pulmonary nodules. Comparison of malignant versus benign pulmonary nodules was performed with respect to the size of the nodule, imaging features on CT, and patient history of malignancy using the Student's t-test and Fisher exact test. Youden J-index in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off size for suggesting a high risk of malignancy of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Pulmonary nodules meeting inclusion criteria were detected in 62 (1.2%) of 5,234 patients. The mean age of patients with nodules was 11.2 years (range: 5 months-18 years). Thirty-one patients (50%) had follow-up CT studies and two of these patients (6%) were subsequently found to have malignant pulmonary nodules. Both of these

  14. Relationship between abdominal fat area measured by screening abdominal fat CT and metabolic syndrome in asymptomatic Korean individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Woong; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, MyoungJi Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between abdominal fat as assessed by abdominal fat CT and metabolic syndrome (MS), especially in asymptomatic Korean individuals. Retrospectively, a medical record analysis was performed in a total of 111 patients with screening abdominal fat CT. The data such as visceral fat (VF), subcutaneous fat (SF) and VF/SF were elicited by abdominal fat CT, and we analyzed the relationship of VF, SF, and VF/SF with MS and cardiovascular risk factors. In males, VF and SF had a positive correlation with many cardiovascular risk factors and MS, but VF was superior to SF. In females, VF, but not SF, had a positive correlation with some cardiovascular risk factors and MS. The cut-off values of VF and SF to predict MS, which were calculated by drawing receiver operating characteristic curves, were as follows: the cut-off value of VF in men: 136.50 cm{sup 2}, the cut-off value of SF in men: 159.50 cm{sup 2}, and the cut-off value of VF in women: 134.50 cm{sup 2}. In conclusion, VF accumulation was the best predictor of MS and it had a positive correlation with cardiovascular risk factors in both sexes. SF also had a significant association with MS, especially in men, although it was not superior to VF.

  15. Relationship between abdominal fat area measured by screening abdominal fat CT and metabolic syndrome in asymptomatic Korean individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dae Woong; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between abdominal fat as assessed by abdominal fat CT and metabolic syndrome (MS), especially in asymptomatic Korean individuals. Retrospectively, a medical record analysis was performed in a total of 111 patients with screening abdominal fat CT. The data such as visceral fat (VF), subcutaneous fat (SF) and VF/SF were elicited by abdominal fat CT, and we analyzed the relationship of VF, SF, and VF/SF with MS and cardiovascular risk factors. In males, VF and SF had a positive correlation with many cardiovascular risk factors and MS, but VF was superior to SF. In females, VF, but not SF, had a positive correlation with some cardiovascular risk factors and MS. The cut-off values of VF and SF to predict MS, which were calculated by drawing receiver operating characteristic curves, were as follows: the cut-off value of VF in men: 136.50 cm"2, the cut-off value of SF in men: 159.50 cm"2, and the cut-off value of VF in women: 134.50 cm"2. In conclusion, VF accumulation was the best predictor of MS and it had a positive correlation with cardiovascular risk factors in both sexes. SF also had a significant association with MS, especially in men, although it was not superior to VF

  16. Abdominal spiral CT in children: which radiation exposure is required?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wormanns, D.; Diederich, S.; Lenzen, H.; Ludwig, K.; Papke, Karsten; Hagedorn, Claudia; Heindel, Walter [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Lange, P.; Link, T.M. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Dept. of Radiology, Technical Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    We decided to test to what extent dose reduction is possible in abdominal spiral computed tomography (CT) in young children without loss of anatomic diagnostic information. A retrospective study was performed of 30 abdominal CT examinations of children aged 3 months to 7 years. These were divided into two groups: group A with reduced radiation exposure (tube current 50 mA, CT dose index CTDI{sub FDA} {<=}0.83 mGy) and group B with standard radiation exposure (tube current {>=}100 mA, CTDI{sub FDA} {>=}1.66 mGy). Image quality was assessed using a four-part scale ('excellent', 'good', 'sufficient', 'poor') on visual image impression and visibility of 32 anatomical details. Five experienced radiologists read the CT scans independently who were blinded to the examination parameters. Differences in ranked data were evaluated with Wilcoxon's rank sum test. No difference between groups A and B was observed in visual image impression. Detail visibility was significantly lower in group A, but the differences were limited to right upper quadrant structures (portal vein, common bile duct, pancreatic head, adrenals) and to arterial branches. Significant differences in visibility rated as 'poor' were only found for the hepatic, splenic and renal arteries; all other structures showed no difference between groups A and B. A protocol with reduced radiation exposure (50 mA, CTDI{sub FDA} {<=}0.83 mGy) allowed the demonstration of most anatomic structures in abdominal spiral CT in young children. For the precise demonstration of small details (e.g. structures of the right upper quadrant), a protocol with standard radiation exposure ({>=}100 mAs) was superior. (orig.)

  17. Abdominal fat volume estimation by stereology on CT: a comparison with manual planimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manios, G E; Mazonakis, M; Voulgaris, C; Karantanas, A; Damilakis, J

    2016-03-01

    To deploy and evaluate a stereological point-counting technique on abdominal CT for the estimation of visceral (VAF) and subcutaneous abdominal fat (SAF) volumes. Stereological volume estimations based on point counting and systematic sampling were performed on images from 14 consecutive patients who had undergone abdominal CT. For the optimization of the method, five sampling intensities in combination with 100 and 200 points were tested. The optimum stereological measurements were compared with VAF and SAF volumes derived by the standard technique of manual planimetry on the same scans. Optimization analysis showed that the selection of 200 points along with the sampling intensity 1/8 provided efficient volume estimations in less than 4 min for VAF and SAF together. The optimized stereology showed strong correlation with planimetry (VAF: r = 0.98; SAF: r = 0.98). No statistical differences were found between the two methods (VAF: P = 0.81; SAF: P = 0.83). The 95% limits of agreement were also acceptable (VAF: -16.5%, 16.1%; SAF: -10.8%, 10.7%) and the repeatability of stereology was good (VAF: CV = 4.5%, SAF: CV = 3.2%). Stereology may be successfully applied to CT images for the efficient estimation of abdominal fat volume and may constitute a good alternative to the conventional planimetric technique. Abdominal obesity is associated with increased risk of disease and mortality. Stereology may quantify visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat accurately and consistently. The application of stereology to estimating abdominal volume fat reduces processing time. Stereology is an efficient alternative method for estimating abdominal fat volume.

  18. SU-F-I-33: Estimating Radiation Dose in Abdominal Fat Quantitative CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X; Yang, K; Liu, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) in abdominal fat quantitative CT with another dose estimate D{sub size,L} that also takes into account scan length. Methods: This study complied with the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. At our institution, abdominal fat CT is performed with scan length = 1 cm and CTDI{sub vol} = 4.66 mGy (referenced to body CTDI phantom). A previously developed CT simulation program was used to simulate single rotation axial scans of 6–55 cm diameter water cylinders, and dose integral of the longitudinal dose profile over the central 1 cm length was used to predict the dose at the center of one-cm scan range. SSDE and D{sub size,L} were assessed for 182 consecutive abdominal fat CT examinations with mean water-equivalent diameter (WED) of 27.8 cm ± 6.0 (range, 17.9 - 42.2 cm). Patient age ranged from 18 to 75 years, and weight ranged from 39 to 163 kg. Results: Mean SSDE was 6.37 mGy ± 1.33 (range, 3.67–8.95 mGy); mean D{sub size,L} was 2.99 mGy ± 0.85 (range, 1.48 - 4.88 mGy); and mean D{sub size,L}/SSDE ratio was 0.46 ± 0.04 (range, 0.40 - 0.55). Conclusion: The conversion factors for size-specific dose estimate in AAPM Report No. 204 were generated using 15 - 30 cm scan lengths. One needs to be cautious in applying SSDE to small length CT scans. For abdominal fat CT, SSDE was 80–150% higher than the dose of 1 cm scan length.

  19. Capability of abdominal 320-detector row CT for small vasculature assessment compared with that of 64-detector row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Maeda, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yoshiharu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Konishi, Minoru [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Kanda, Tomonori; Onishi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Keiko; Koyama, Hisanobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To compare the capability of 320-detector row CT (area-detector CT: ADCT) with step-and-shoot scan protocol for small abdominal vasculature assessment with that of 64-detector row CT with helical scan protocol. Materials and methods: Total of 60 patients underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT for preoperative assessment. Of all, 30 suspected to have lung cancer underwent ADCT using step-and-shoot scan protocol. The other 30 suspected to have renal cell carcinoma underwent 64-MDCT using helical scan protocol. Two experienced radiologists independently assessed inferior epigastric, hepatic subsegmental (in the segment 8), mesenteric marginal (Griffith point) and inferior phrenic arteries by using 5-point visual scoring systems. Kappa analysis was used for evaluation of interobserver agreement. To compare the visualization capability of the two systems, the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the scores for each of the arteries. Results: Overall interobserver agreements for both systems were almost perfect ({kappa} > 0.80). Visualization scores for inferior epigastric and mesenteric arteries were significantly higher for ADCT than for 64-detector row CT (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found for hepatic subsegmental and inferior phrenic arteries. Conclusion: Small abdominal vasculature assessment by ADCT with step-and-shoot scan protocol is potentially equal to or better than that by 64-detector row CT with helical scan protocol.

  20. Capability of abdominal 320-detector row CT for small vasculature assessment compared with that of 64-detector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Konishi, Minoru; Kanda, Tomonori; Onishi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Keiko; Koyama, Hisanobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the capability of 320-detector row CT (area-detector CT: ADCT) with step-and-shoot scan protocol for small abdominal vasculature assessment with that of 64-detector row CT with helical scan protocol. Materials and methods: Total of 60 patients underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT for preoperative assessment. Of all, 30 suspected to have lung cancer underwent ADCT using step-and-shoot scan protocol. The other 30 suspected to have renal cell carcinoma underwent 64-MDCT using helical scan protocol. Two experienced radiologists independently assessed inferior epigastric, hepatic subsegmental (in the segment 8), mesenteric marginal (Griffith point) and inferior phrenic arteries by using 5-point visual scoring systems. Kappa analysis was used for evaluation of interobserver agreement. To compare the visualization capability of the two systems, the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the scores for each of the arteries. Results: Overall interobserver agreements for both systems were almost perfect (κ > 0.80). Visualization scores for inferior epigastric and mesenteric arteries were significantly higher for ADCT than for 64-detector row CT (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found for hepatic subsegmental and inferior phrenic arteries. Conclusion: Small abdominal vasculature assessment by ADCT with step-and-shoot scan protocol is potentially equal to or better than that by 64-detector row CT with helical scan protocol.

  1. Gastro-duodenal perforations: conventional plain film, US and CT findings in 166 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Roberto; Romano, Stefania; Pinto, Antonio; Romano, Luigia

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Gastro-duodenal perforations may be suspected in patients with history of ulceration, who present with acute pain and abdominal wall rigidity, but radiological findings in these cases may be unable to confirm a clinical diagnosis. The aim of our study was to report our experience in the diagnosis of gastro-duodenal perforation by conventional radiography, US and CT examinations. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 166 consecutive patients who presented in the last 2 years to our institutions with symptoms of acute abdomen and submitted to surgery at the Emergency Unit of the ''A.Cardarelli'' Hospital of Naples with a surgical finding of perforated gastro-duodenal ulcer. The evidence of free intraperitoneal air on abdominal plain film was considered as a direct or suggestive finding of perforation. Evidence of intraperitoneal free fluid and/or reduced intestinal peristalsis at sonographic examination were considered indirect signs of gastro-duodenal perforation. Evidence of free peritoneal gas at CT was considered as a direct evidence of gastro-duodenal perforation. Results: Twenty patients underwent immediate surgery with no preoperative imaging evaluation, in 10 of them the site of perforation was found in a juxta-pyloric region and in the others at level of duodenum. In 146 patients submitted to serial radiological investigations before surgery, the site of perforation was in 56 (38.3%) duodenal, in 52 (35.6%) juxta-pyloric, in 28 (19.1%) gastric and in 10 (6.8%) pyloric. The cause of perforation was in all cases gastric or duodenal ulceration, in seven cases involving pancreatic parenchyma. In 110 (75.4%) patients with direct findings of perforation, in 94 cases (85.5%) the correct diagnosis was established on abdominal plain film, in two (1.8%) with radiographic and sonographic examinations and in 14 (12.7%) on CT findings. In 36 (24,6%) patients with no direct findings of perforation, only 24 (16,4%) of them

  2. Gastro-duodenal perforations: conventional plain film, US and CT findings in 166 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Roberto; Romano, Stefania E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Pinto, Antonio; Romano, Luigia

    2004-04-01

    Introduction: Gastro-duodenal perforations may be suspected in patients with history of ulceration, who present with acute pain and abdominal wall rigidity, but radiological findings in these cases may be unable to confirm a clinical diagnosis. The aim of our study was to report our experience in the diagnosis of gastro-duodenal perforation by conventional radiography, US and CT examinations. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 166 consecutive patients who presented in the last 2 years to our institutions with symptoms of acute abdomen and submitted to surgery at the Emergency Unit of the ''A.Cardarelli'' Hospital of Naples with a surgical finding of perforated gastro-duodenal ulcer. The evidence of free intraperitoneal air on abdominal plain film was considered as a direct or suggestive finding of perforation. Evidence of intraperitoneal free fluid and/or reduced intestinal peristalsis at sonographic examination were considered indirect signs of gastro-duodenal perforation. Evidence of free peritoneal gas at CT was considered as a direct evidence of gastro-duodenal perforation. Results: Twenty patients underwent immediate surgery with no preoperative imaging evaluation, in 10 of them the site of perforation was found in a juxta-pyloric region and in the others at level of duodenum. In 146 patients submitted to serial radiological investigations before surgery, the site of perforation was in 56 (38.3%) duodenal, in 52 (35.6%) juxta-pyloric, in 28 (19.1%) gastric and in 10 (6.8%) pyloric. The cause of perforation was in all cases gastric or duodenal ulceration, in seven cases involving pancreatic parenchyma. In 110 (75.4%) patients with direct findings of perforation, in 94 cases (85.5%) the correct diagnosis was established on abdominal plain film, in two (1.8%) with radiographic and sonographic examinations and in 14 (12.7%) on CT findings. In 36 (24,6%) patients with no direct findings of perforation, only 24

  3. The comparative study of CT guided and ultrasound guided percutaneous ethanol injection in the treatment of intra-abdominal cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heping; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei; Zhuang Wenquan; Huang Yulian; Chen Jianye

    2005-01-01

    Objective: An comparative study of the interventional approach of CT guided and ultiasound guided percutaneous ethanol injection(PEI) in the treatment of intra-abdominal cyst. Methods: CT guided PEI was performed in the treatment of intra-abdominal cyst in 38 patients while ultrasound guided PEI was performed in 45 cases. Results: The puncture procedure of CT guided PEI was totally performed 83 times in treating 56 intra-abdominal cysts in 38 patients and CT guided PEI was unsuccessful in 6 patients. The puncture procedure of ultrasound guided PEI were performed 87 times in treating 71 intra-abdominal cysts in 55 patients and ultrasound guided PEI only failed only in 1 patient. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided PEI is superior to CT guided PEI in the treatment of intra-abdominal cyst. (authors)

  4. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tania Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanes, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mario Flores, E-mail: marlivermelho@globo.com [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas (IIER), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  5. CT features for the detection of bowel perforation sites by blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jae Woo; Kim, Mi Young; Suh, Chang Hae; Cho, Young Up

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the CT criteria useful for the diagnosis of the site of bowel perforation in patients with this or mesenteric injury caused by blunt abdominal trauma. CT findings of 26 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were retrospectively analyzed by two observers who were unaware of operative findings, and the results of their analysis were compared with those findings. Twenty cases of bowel perforation found at the jejunum (8), ileum (9), and colon (3), and six cases of mesenteric injuries were confirmed by operation. We evaluated CT findings of 1) segmental bowel wall thickening, b) focal mesenteric fat infiltration, c) loculated fluid collection and d) extraluminal air adjacent to the bowel, and in addition analyzed the locations of ascites and free air, and the associated injuries of solid organs. The most common finding at the site of bowel perforation was segmental bowel wall thickening (17 cases), followed by focal mesenteric fat infiltration (12 cases), loculated fluid (12 cases) and extraluminal air ajacent to the bowel (9 cases). Segmental bowel wall thickening was present at 34 sites, and the perforations were confirmed at 17 of these(50%). Focal mesenteric fat infiltration was present at 19 sites;the perforations were proven at 12(63%). Loculated fluid collections were confirmed at 12/20 sites(60%), and extraluminal air adjacent to the bowel at 9/12(75%). The positive predictive value of criteria a, b, d, c) was 100%, and the positive predictive values of a, b, c) and a, d) were 60 and 67%, respectively. We observed ascites in 16 cases and intraperitoneal free air in 8 cases, the locations of ascites and free air did not, however, significantly correlate with the perforation sites. Extraluminal air adjacent to the bowel was the most specific criterion, and segmental bowel wall thickening was the most sensitive criterion. of all criteria, the finding 'a, b, c, d' most accurately predicted the site of bowel perforation

  6. Recent advances of CT in the diagnosis of abdominal malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Y [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-08-01

    Advantages and limitations of CT in the diagnosis of abdominal malignancies are discussed in liver, pancreas, adrenal gland and recurrent tumor. As to hepatocellular carcinoma, main tumors were clearly demonstrated in 83%, equivocally in 9% and negatively in 8%. Rapid injection of contrast material was useful in dividing hepatic masses into hyper- and hypovascular tumors. Sensitivity of pancreatic cancer was high enough, but CT was of limited value in detecting a resectable one. CT was highly effective in diagnosis of adrenal tumors and recurrent tumors.

  7. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice; Sebbane, Mustapha; Molinari, Nicolas; Riou, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10 -6 ) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10 -6 ) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  8. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Sebbane, Mustapha [Department of Emergency Medicine, CHU Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Molinari, Nicolas [Department of Medical Information and Statistics, CHU Montpellier (France); Riou, Bruno [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP, Department of Emergency Medicine and Surgery, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10{sup -6}) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10{sup -6}) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  9. Non-emergency small bowel obstruction: assessment of CT findings that predict need for surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Swati D.; Shin, David S.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Shin, Lewis; Jeffrey, R.B. [Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-05-15

    To identify CT findings predictive of surgical management in non-emergency small bowel obstruction (SBO). Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT of 129 patients with non-emergency SBO were evaluated for small bowel luminal diameter, wall thickness, presence of the small bowel faeces sign (intraluminal particulate matter in a dilated small bowel) and length, transition point, submucosal oedema, mesenteric stranding, ascites and degree of obstruction (low grade partial, high grade partial and complete obstruction). Medical records were reviewed for age, gender, management and history of abdominal surgery, abdominal malignancy, or SBO. Statistical analyses were performed with Stata Release 9.2. Degree of obstruction was the only predictor of need for surgery. Whereas 18.0% of patients with low-grade partial obstruction (n = 50) underwent surgery, 32.5% of patients with high-grade partial obstruction (n = 77) and 100% of patients with complete obstruction (n = 2) required surgery (P = 0.004). The small bowel faeces sign was inversely predictive of surgery (P = 0.018). In non-emergency SBO patients with contrast-enhanced CT imaging, grade of obstruction predicts surgery, while the small bowel faeces sign inversely predicts need for surgery. (orig.)

  10. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra; Dlugy, Elena; Freud, Enrique; Kessler, Ada; Horev, Gadi

    2002-01-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two. Conclusions: US

  11. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Centre, Kfar Saba (Israel); Dlugy, Elena [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Schneider Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Freud, Enrique [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sapir Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kessler, Ada [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sourasky Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Horev, Gadi [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Schneider Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2002-02-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two

  12. Differential Aging Signals in Abdominal CT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Nikita V; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Ferrucci, Luigi; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2017-12-01

    Changes in the composition of body tissues are major aging phenotypes, but they have been difficult to study in depth. Here we describe age-related change in abdominal tissues observable in computed tomography (CT) scans. We used pattern recognition and machine learning to detect and quantify these changes in a model-agnostic fashion. CT scans of abdominal L4 sections were obtained from Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) participants. Age-related change in the constituent tissues were determined by training machine classifiers to differentiate age groups within male and female strata ("Younger" at 50-70 years old vs "Older" at 80-99 years old). The accuracy achieved by the classifiers in differentiating the age cohorts was used as a surrogate measure of the aging signal in the different tissues. The highest accuracy for discriminating age differences was 0.76 and 0.72 for males and females, respectively. The classification accuracy was 0.79 and 0.71 for adipose tissue, 0.70 and 0.68 for soft tissue, and 0.65 and 0.64 for bone. Using image data from a large sample of well-characterized pool of participants dispersed over a wide age range, we explored age-related differences in gross morphology and texture of abdominal tissues. This technology is advantageous for tracking effects of biological aging and predicting adverse outcomes when compared to the traditional use of specific molecular biomarkers. Application of pattern recognition and machine learning as a tool for analyzing medical images may provide much needed insight into tissue changes occurring with aging and, further, connect these changes with their metabolic and functional consequences. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Cost reduction in abdominal CT by weight-adjusted dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Tobarra, Eva; Sierra, Consuelo

    2009-06-01

    To analyze the influence of contrast dose adjusted by weight vs. fixed contrast dose in the attenuation and cost of abdominal computed tomography (CT). A randomised, consecutive, parallel group study was conducted in 151 patients (74 men and 77 women, age range 22-67 years), studied with the same CT helical protocol. A dose at 1.75 ml/kg was administered in 101 patients while 50 patients had a fixed dose of 120 ml of same non-ionic contrast material (320 mg/ml). Mean enhancements were measured at right hepatic lobe, superior abdominal aorta and inferior cava vein. Statistical analysis was weight-stratified (81 kg). Aortic attenuation was significantly superior (p61 kg in dose-adjusted group, presented higher hepatic attenuation, being statistically significant in those >81 kg (p80 kg, there was an over cost of euro 10.7 per patient. An injection volume of 1.75 ml/kg offers an optimal diagnostic quality with a global savings of euro 1.34 per patient.

  14. Image mottle in abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, J F; Huda, W; Ros, P R; Litwiller, A L

    1999-04-01

    To investigate image mottle in conventional CT images of the abdomen as a function of radiographic technique factors and patient size. Water-filled phantoms simulating the abdomens of adult (32 cm in diameter) and pediatric (16 cm in diameter) patients were used to investigate image mottle in CT as a function of x-ray tube potential and mAs. CT images from 39 consecutive patients with noncontrast liver scans and 49 patients with iodine contrast scans were analyzed retrospectively. Measurements were made of the mean liver parenchyma Hounsfield unit value and the corresponding image mottle. For a given water phantom and x-ray tube potential, image mottle was proportional to the mAs-0.5. Increasing the phantom diameter from 16 cm (pediatric) to 32 cm increased the mottle by a factor of 2.4, and increasing the x-ray tube potential from 80 kVp to 140 kVp reduced the mottle by a factor of 2.5. All patients were scanned at 120 kVp, with no correlation between patient size and the x-ray tube mAs. The mean mottle level was 7.8 +/- 2.2 and 10.0 +/- 2.5 for the noncontrast and contrast studies, respectively. An increase in patient diameter of 3 cm would require approximately 65% more mAs to maintain the same level of image mottle. The mottle in abdominal CT images may be controlled by adjusting radiographic technique factors, which should be adjusted to take into account the size of the patient undergoing the examination.

  15. Proposed protocol for realization of abdominal CT in patients admitted to the emergency room for trauma in HSJD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Cascante, Lizbeth

    2013-01-01

    A protocol is established for computed tomography in trauma patients treated in emergency of Hospital San Juan de Dios. A literature review is conducted on abdominal CT protocols in specialized databases. The criteria, scanning, parameters and delay time are established for realization of abdominal CT in patients with traumatic emergencies in HSJD. Taking the thickness of the sections, the thickness of the sections in reconstruction, the quantities of contrast and the speed of injection in patients, have been standardized for the realization of abdominal CT in HSJD. Computed tomography should be preferably performed of routine in portal phase and the late from 5 minutes in patients with abdominal trauma, contributing in this phase as much information regarding the extent of abdominal injury [es

  16. CT Findings of Small Bowel Anisakiasis: Analysis of Four Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wee Kyoung; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jung, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Min Yeong

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to describe the CT findings of small bowel anisakiasis with the pathologic correlation. Four patients with surgically and pathologically proven small bowel anisakiasis were included in this retrospective study. They were three men and one woman and their ages ranged from 28 to 43 years (mean age: 38 years). We evaluated their clinical, CT and histological findings. All the patients had a history of ingesting raw fish within 24 hours from the time of symptom onset. They complained of abdominal pain (n=4), nausea (n=4), vomiting (n=2) and diarrhea (n=1). Physical examination revealed tenderness (n=4), rebound tenderness (n=4) and increased bowel sounds (n=3). Leukocytosis was noted in all the patients on the laboratory examination. None of the patients showed eosinophilia. The CT findings were segmental small bowel wall thickening with preserved layering (n=4), focal segmental luminal narrowing with proximal dilatation (n=4), peritoneal thickening (n=3), mesenteric or omental infiltration (n=4) and varying degrees of ascites (n=4). On the histopathologic examination, they revealed an infiltration of eosinophils (n=4) in all layers of the bowel wall with severe edema. The larvae were found on surgico-pathologic examination in all the cases. The CT findings may be helpful to make the specific diagnosis of small bowel anisakiasis in a patient with the clinical findings of an acute abdomen and a history of eating raw fish

  17. CT Findings of Small Bowel Anisakiasis: Analysis of Four Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wee Kyoung; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Soo; Jung, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Min Yeong [Hanyang University Guri Hospital, College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to describe the CT findings of small bowel anisakiasis with the pathologic correlation. Four patients with surgically and pathologically proven small bowel anisakiasis were included in this retrospective study. They were three men and one woman and their ages ranged from 28 to 43 years (mean age: 38 years). We evaluated their clinical, CT and histological findings. All the patients had a history of ingesting raw fish within 24 hours from the time of symptom onset. They complained of abdominal pain (n=4), nausea (n=4), vomiting (n=2) and diarrhea (n=1). Physical examination revealed tenderness (n=4), rebound tenderness (n=4) and increased bowel sounds (n=3). Leukocytosis was noted in all the patients on the laboratory examination. None of the patients showed eosinophilia. The CT findings were segmental small bowel wall thickening with preserved layering (n=4), focal segmental luminal narrowing with proximal dilatation (n=4), peritoneal thickening (n=3), mesenteric or omental infiltration (n=4) and varying degrees of ascites (n=4). On the histopathologic examination, they revealed an infiltration of eosinophils (n=4) in all layers of the bowel wall with severe edema. The larvae were found on surgico-pathologic examination in all the cases. The CT findings may be helpful to make the specific diagnosis of small bowel anisakiasis in a patient with the clinical findings of an acute abdomen and a history of eating raw fish

  18. Venous variants and anomalies on routine abdominal multi-detector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Zafer; Ulusan, Serife; Oguzkurt, Levent; Tokmak, Naime

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to determine the types and prevalence rates of anatomic variations of the hepatic veins, portal vein, inferior vena cava and renal veins, and to establish statistical correlations between various anomalies and frequency differences between male and female using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: One thousand one hundred and twenty patients (588 men, 532 women) were evaluated with routine abdominal CT. Frequencies of different variants were noted and compared, and correlations between three categories of variation were tested. Results: In total, 1261 abdominal vein variants and anomalies were identified in 756 (67.5%) of 1120 patients. Six hundred and forty-two hepatic vein variants were detected in 468 (41.8%) patients. One or more inferior right hepatic veins were identified in 356 (31.8%) individuals, and tributary hepatic veins were detected in 147 (13.1%) patients. Portal vein variations and anomalies were observed in 307 (27.4%) cases. The most frequent of these was trifurcation (139 patients, 12.4%). A total of 311 inferior vena cava and renal vein variants were identified in 258 (23%) cases. Six patients (0.5%) exhibited inferior vena cava anomalies, 62 (5.5%) had circumaortic renal veins, 53 (4.7%) had retroaortic renal veins, and 210 (18.8%) had multiple renal veins. Conclusion: The prevalence of abdominal vein variations is high, and routine abdominal CT demonstrates these abnormalities very well. The data suggest that hepatic vein variants and multiple right renal veins are more frequent in women than in men, and that hepatic vein variation is correlated with portal vein variation

  19. Venous variants and anomalies on routine abdominal multi-detector row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Zafer [Baskent University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey)]. E-mail: koczafer@gmail.com; Ulusan, Serife [Baskent University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Oguzkurt, Levent [Baskent University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Tokmak, Naime [Baskent University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    Objective: This study aims to determine the types and prevalence rates of anatomic variations of the hepatic veins, portal vein, inferior vena cava and renal veins, and to establish statistical correlations between various anomalies and frequency differences between male and female using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: One thousand one hundred and twenty patients (588 men, 532 women) were evaluated with routine abdominal CT. Frequencies of different variants were noted and compared, and correlations between three categories of variation were tested. Results: In total, 1261 abdominal vein variants and anomalies were identified in 756 (67.5%) of 1120 patients. Six hundred and forty-two hepatic vein variants were detected in 468 (41.8%) patients. One or more inferior right hepatic veins were identified in 356 (31.8%) individuals, and tributary hepatic veins were detected in 147 (13.1%) patients. Portal vein variations and anomalies were observed in 307 (27.4%) cases. The most frequent of these was trifurcation (139 patients, 12.4%). A total of 311 inferior vena cava and renal vein variants were identified in 258 (23%) cases. Six patients (0.5%) exhibited inferior vena cava anomalies, 62 (5.5%) had circumaortic renal veins, 53 (4.7%) had retroaortic renal veins, and 210 (18.8%) had multiple renal veins. Conclusion: The prevalence of abdominal vein variations is high, and routine abdominal CT demonstrates these abnormalities very well. The data suggest that hepatic vein variants and multiple right renal veins are more frequent in women than in men, and that hepatic vein variation is correlated with portal vein variation.

  20. Abdominal fat volume estimation by stereology on CT: a comparison with manual planimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manios, G.E.; Mazonakis, M.; Damilakis, J. [University of Crete, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Voulgaris, C.; Karantanas, A. [University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2016-03-15

    To deploy and evaluate a stereological point-counting technique on abdominal CT for the estimation of visceral (VAF) and subcutaneous abdominal fat (SAF) volumes. Stereological volume estimations based on point counting and systematic sampling were performed on images from 14 consecutive patients who had undergone abdominal CT. For the optimization of the method, five sampling intensities in combination with 100 and 200 points were tested. The optimum stereological measurements were compared with VAF and SAF volumes derived by the standard technique of manual planimetry on the same scans. Optimization analysis showed that the selection of 200 points along with the sampling intensity 1/8 provided efficient volume estimations in less than 4 min for VAF and SAF together. The optimized stereology showed strong correlation with planimetry (VAF: r = 0.98; SAF: r = 0.98). No statistical differences were found between the two methods (VAF: P = 0.81; SAF: P = 0.83). The 95 % limits of agreement were also acceptable (VAF: -16.5 %, 16.1 %; SAF: -10.8 %, 10.7 %) and the repeatability of stereology was good (VAF: CV = 4.5 %, SAF: CV = 3.2 %). Stereology may be successfully applied to CT images for the efficient estimation of abdominal fat volume and may constitute a good alternative to the conventional planimetric technique. (orig.)

  1. Relationship between sudden natural death and abdominal fat evaluated on postmortem CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaichi, Y; Sakane, H; Higashibori, H; Honda, Y; Tatsugami, F; Baba, Y; Iida, M; Awai, K

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the association between sudden natural death and abdominal fat using postmortem computed tomography (CT) scans. Postmortem CT images at the umbilical level of 241 subjects were used to measure abdominal areas of subcutaneous- and visceral fat, the rate of visceral fat and the waist circumference. Of the study subjects, 174 died of sudden natural death (130 men and 44 women), and 67 died of different causes (46 men and 21 women). All were between 40 and 75 years of age. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent abdominal parameters associated with sudden natural death. By univariate analysis, the areas of subcutaneous and visceral fat were significantly larger in sudden natural death than who died of different causes (subcutaneous fat, odds ratio [OR] = 1.004, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.000-1.007, p  = 0.03; visceral fat, OR = 1.008, 95% CI = 1.003-1.013, p  fat was an independent factor associated with the risk of sudden natural death (OR = 1.008, 95% CI = 1.002-1.015, p  = 0.02). Postmortem CT revealed that sudden natural death was related to abdominal fat deposits.

  2. The role of whole body spiral CT in the primary work-up of polytrauma patients - comparison with conventional radiography and abdominal sonography; Die Rolle der Ganzkoerper-Spiral-CT bei der Primaerdiagnostik polytraumatisierter Patienten - Vergleich mit konventioneller Radiographie und Abdomensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, T.; Schlippenbach, J. von; Wolf, K.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Charite - Campus Benjamin Franklin (Germany); Stahel, P.F.; Ertel, W. [Klinik fuer Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Charite - Campus Benjamin Franklin (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of routine 'whole body spiral CT' in the primary work-up of polytrauma patients for injuries of the thorax, abdomen and spine, and to compare the results with those of conventional radiography of the chest and spine and abdominal ultrasound. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive polytrauma patients underwent contrast-enhanced single slice spiral CT (5 mm collimation) from the vertex to the floor of the pelvis as part of the primary work-up after emergency room admission. Overlapping high resolution sections and sagittal reformations of the spine were obtained. Reports of additional chest radiographs (n=43), abdominal ultrasound examinations (n=47) and spine radiographs (n=36) performed in the emergency room were available for retrospective comparison. The 'final diagnoses', which served as the standard of reference, were taken from the patients' records using all information that became available until discharge or death, such as findings from further imaging, surgery and autopsy. Results: CT showed 109 (97%) of 112 thoracic and abdominal soft-tissue injuries. Relevant injuries missed were an early splenic laceration and an early pelvic hematoma, both of which became clinically apparent several hours later. There were 4 false positive CT findings. Conventional chest radiography demonstrated only 20% of thoracic and sonography 22% of abdominal injuries. Chest radiography and sonography produced 2 false-positive findings each. CT showed 66 (87%) of 76 vertebral fractures including all 19 unstable ones. CT missed 5 anterior vertebral body and 5 spinous/transverse process fractures. Conventional radiography found 71% of vertebral fractures including only 50% of the unstable one. (orig.)

  3. Adductor muscle pyo-myositis simulating appendicitis: CT and MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coumbaras, M.; Le Hir, P.; Jomaah, N.; Arrive, L.; Tubiana, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Pyo-myositis is a primary bacterial infection of skeletal muscle. This infection tends to occur in the large muscles of the lower extremity. Pyo-myositis of the proximal muscles of the thigh can simulate acute abdominal disease. Early diagnosis improves the outcome. Delayed diagnosis may lead to septicemia and shock. We report the CT and MRI findings in a patient with pyo-myositis of the proximal muscles of the thigh. (authors)

  4. Effects of dual-energy CT with non-linear blending on abdominal CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Sulan; Wang, Chaoqin; Jiang, Xiao Chen; Xu, Ge

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether non-linear blending technique for arterial-phase dual-energy abdominal CT angiography (CTA) could improve image quality compared to the linear blending technique and conventional 120 kVp imaging. This study included 118 patients who had accepted dual-energy abdominal CTA in the arterial phase. They were assigned to Sn140/80 kVp protocol (protocol A, n = 40) if body mass index (BMI) < 25 or Sn140/100 kVp protocol (protocol B, n = 41) if BMI ≥ 25. Non-linear blending images and linear blending images with a weighting factor of 0.5 in each protocol were generated and compared with the conventional 120 kVp images (protocol C, n = 37). The abdominal vascular enhancements, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and radiation dose were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test, independent t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Mean vascular attenuation, CNR, SNR and subjective image quality score for the non-linear blending images in each protocol were all higher compared to the corresponding linear blending images and 120 kVp images (p values ranging from < 0.001 to 0.007) except for when compared to non-linear blending images for protocol B and 120 kVp images in CNR and SNR. No significant differences were found in image noise among the three kinds of images and the same kind of images in different protocols, but the lowest radiation dose was shown in protocol A. Non-linear blending technique of dual-energy CT can improve the image quality of arterial-phase abdominal CTA, especially with the Sn140/80 kVp scanning.

  5. Effects of dual-energy CT with non-linear blending on abdominal CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Sulan; Wang, Chaoqin; Jiang, Xiao Chen; Xu, Ge [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)

    2014-08-15

    To determine whether non-linear blending technique for arterial-phase dual-energy abdominal CT angiography (CTA) could improve image quality compared to the linear blending technique and conventional 120 kVp imaging. This study included 118 patients who had accepted dual-energy abdominal CTA in the arterial phase. They were assigned to Sn140/80 kVp protocol (protocol A, n = 40) if body mass index (BMI) < 25 or Sn140/100 kVp protocol (protocol B, n = 41) if BMI ≥ 25. Non-linear blending images and linear blending images with a weighting factor of 0.5 in each protocol were generated and compared with the conventional 120 kVp images (protocol C, n = 37). The abdominal vascular enhancements, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and radiation dose were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test, independent t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Mean vascular attenuation, CNR, SNR and subjective image quality score for the non-linear blending images in each protocol were all higher compared to the corresponding linear blending images and 120 kVp images (p values ranging from < 0.001 to 0.007) except for when compared to non-linear blending images for protocol B and 120 kVp images in CNR and SNR. No significant differences were found in image noise among the three kinds of images and the same kind of images in different protocols, but the lowest radiation dose was shown in protocol A. Non-linear blending technique of dual-energy CT can improve the image quality of arterial-phase abdominal CTA, especially with the Sn140/80 kVp scanning.

  6. Role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the management of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Jin; Lee, Jin Soo; Cheong, Moon Hyun; Byun, Sung Su; Hyun, In Young [Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    We present a case of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to salmonella enteritidis. F-18 FDG PET/CT was performed to diagnosis and during follow-up after antibiotic treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the best diagnostic imaging modality in infected aortic lesions. In this case, a combination of CT and FDG PET/CT provided accurate information for the diagnosis of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm. Moreover, FDG PET/CT made an important contribution of monitoring disease activity during antibiotic treatment.

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or anxious or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist ... If the contrast material is swallowed, you may find the taste mildly unpleasant; however, most patients can ...

  8. Predicting hollow viscus injury in blunt abdominal trauma with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagvan, Savitha; Turai, Matthew; Holden, Andrew; Ng, Alexander; Civil, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma is controversial. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen is commonly used but has limitations, especially in excluding hollow viscus injury in the presence of solid organ injury. To determine whether CT reports alone could be used to direct operative treatment in abdominal trauma, this study was undertaken. The trauma database at Auckland City Hospital was accessed for patients who had abdominal CT and subsequent laparotomy during a five-year period. The CT scans were reevaluated by a consultant radiologist who was blinded to operative findings. The CT findings were correlated with the operative findings. Between January 2002 and December 2007, 1,250 patients were evaluated for blunt abdominal injury with CT. A subset of 78 patients underwent laparotomy, and this formed the study group. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scan in predicting hollow viscus injury was 55.33 and 92.06 % respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 61.53 and 89.23 % respectively. Presence of free fluid in CT scan was sensitive in diagnosing hollow viscus injury (90 %). Specific findings for hollow viscus injuries on CT scan were free intraperitoneal air (93 %), retroperitoneal air (100 %), oral contrast extravasation (100 %), bowel wall defect (98 %), patchy bowel enhancement (97 %), and mesenteric abnormality (94 %). CT alone cannot be used as a screening tool for hollow viscus injury. The decision to operate in hollow viscus injury has to be based on mechanism of injury and clinical findings together with radiological evidence.

  9. A new technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilincer, Abidin; Akpinar, Erhan; Uenal, Emre; Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Akata, Deniz; Oezmen, Mustafa [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Erbil, Buelent [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Kaynaroglu, Volkan [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of General Surgery, Ankara (Turkey)

    2017-08-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant (RLQ) in adults with acute appendicitis. 168 patients (age range, 18-78 years) were included who underwent contrast-enhanced CT for suspected appendicitis performed either using compression to the RLQ (n = 71) or a standard protocol (n = 97). Outer diameter of the appendix, appendiceal wall thickening, luminal content and associated findings were evaluated in each patient. Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher's and Pearson's chi-squared tests were used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference in the mean outer diameter (MOD) between compression CT scans (10.6 ± 1.9 mm) and standard protocol (11.2 ± 2.3 mm) in patients with acute appendicitis (P = 1). MOD was significantly lower in the compression group (5.2 ± 0.8 mm) compared to the standard protocol (6.5 ± 1.1 mm) (P < 0.01) in patients without appendicitis. A cut-off value of 6.75 mm for the outer diameter of the appendix was found to be 100% sensitive in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis for both groups. The specificity was higher for compression CT technique (67.7 vs. 94.9%). Normal appendix diameter was significantly smaller in the compression-CT group compared to standard-CT group, increasing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal compression CT. (orig.)

  10. A new technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilincer, Abidin; Akpinar, Erhan; Uenal, Emre; Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Akata, Deniz; Oezmen, Mustafa; Erbil, Buelent; Kaynaroglu, Volkan

    2017-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant (RLQ) in adults with acute appendicitis. 168 patients (age range, 18-78 years) were included who underwent contrast-enhanced CT for suspected appendicitis performed either using compression to the RLQ (n = 71) or a standard protocol (n = 97). Outer diameter of the appendix, appendiceal wall thickening, luminal content and associated findings were evaluated in each patient. Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher's and Pearson's chi-squared tests were used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference in the mean outer diameter (MOD) between compression CT scans (10.6 ± 1.9 mm) and standard protocol (11.2 ± 2.3 mm) in patients with acute appendicitis (P = 1). MOD was significantly lower in the compression group (5.2 ± 0.8 mm) compared to the standard protocol (6.5 ± 1.1 mm) (P < 0.01) in patients without appendicitis. A cut-off value of 6.75 mm for the outer diameter of the appendix was found to be 100% sensitive in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis for both groups. The specificity was higher for compression CT technique (67.7 vs. 94.9%). Normal appendix diameter was significantly smaller in the compression-CT group compared to standard-CT group, increasing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal compression CT. (orig.)

  11. CT-SPECT fusion to correlate radiolabeled monoclonal antibody uptake with abdominal CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, E.L.; Noz, M.E.; Sanger, J.J.; Megibow, A.J.; Maguire, G.Q.

    1989-01-01

    To enhance the information provided by computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed with radiolabeled, anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the authors performed fusion of these types of images from eight subjects with suspected colorectal adenocarcinoma. Section thickness and pixel size of the two studies were matched, coordinates of corresponding points from each study were identified, and CT sections were translated, rotated, and reprojected to match the corresponding SPECT scans. The CT-SPECT fusion enabled identification of anatomic sites of tumor-specific MoAb accumulation in four cases, showed non-specific MoAb accumulation in two, and helped confirm information only suggested by the two studies separately in one

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus : abdominal radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Cheon; Cho, On Koo; Lee, Yong Joo; Bae, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Ko, Byung Hee [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown etiology. Its main pathology is vasculitis and serositis, due to deposition of the immune complex or antibodies. Most findings are nonspecific ; abdominal manifestations include enteritis, hepatomegaly, pancreatic enlargement, serositis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, nephritis, interstitial cystitis, and thrombophlebitis. We described radiologic findings of various organ involvement of SLE; digestive system, serosa, reticuloendothelial system, urinary system, and venous system. Diagnosis of SLE was done according to the criteria of American Rheumatism Association. Understanding of the variable imaging findings in SLE may be helpful for the early detection of abdominal involvement and complications.

  13. Abdominal CT findings of delayed postoperative complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Osadchy, A. [Sapir Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Kfar Saba (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Gayer, G. [Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Zrifin (Israel)

    2007-10-15

    Despite progress in surgical techniques and modern medical treatment, postoperative complications occur not infrequently and vary according to type of surgery, clinical setting, and time elapsed since surgery. In general, they can be divided into early and delayed complications. Delayed postoperative complications can be classified as specific and nonspecific. The common nonspecific delayed complications are incisional hernia and postoperative bowel obstruction. Bowel obstruction can be further categorized as obstruction related to benign or neoplastic etiology, the latter occurring in oncology patients in whom the primary surgery was related to an underlying abdominal neoplasm. Gossypiboma is another, fortunately rare, postoperative complication. Specific complications appear after specific operations and include the following: Splenosis - following splenectomy. Retained gallstones and spilled gallstones - following cholecystectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Dropped appendicolith and stump appendicitis - following appendectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Obturation obstruction by a bezoar - following gastric surgery. Afferent loop syndrome (ALS) - following Bilroth II gastrectomy. (author)

  14. Role of CT in the Diagnosis of Nonspecific Abdominal Pain: A Multicenter Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jonathan D; Reisner, Andrew T; Binder, William D; Zaheer, Atif; Gunn, Martin L; Linnau, Ken F; Miller, Chad M; Tramontano, Angela C; Herring, Maurice S; Dowling, Emily C; Halpern, Elkan F; Donelan, Karen; Gazelle, G Scott; Pandharipande, Pari V

    2017-03-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether specific patient and physician factors-known before CT-are associated with a diagnosis of nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) after CT in the emergency department (ED). We analyzed data originally collected in a prospective multicenter study. In the parent study, we identified ED patients referred to CT for evaluation of abdominal pain. We surveyed their physicians before and after CT to identify changes in leading diagnoses, diagnostic confidence, and admission decisions. In the current study, we conducted a multiple regression analysis to identify whether the following were associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP: patient age; patient sex; physicians' years of experience; physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence; and physicians' pre-CT admission decision if CT had not been available. We analyzed patients with and those without a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP separately. For the sensitivity analysis, we excluded patients with different physicians before and after CT. In total, 544 patients were included: 10% (52/544) with a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP and 90% (492/544) with a pre-CT diagnosis other than NSAP. The leading diagnoses changed after CT in a large proportion of patients with a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP (38%, 20/52). In regression analysis, we found that physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence was inversely associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP in patients with a pre-CT diagnosis other than NSAP (p = 0.0001). No other associations were significant in both primary and sensitivity analyses. With the exception of physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence, the factors evaluated were not associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP.

  15. A case of severe sepsis presenting marked decrease of neutrophils and interesting findings on dynamic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Isamu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Hayashi, Hironori; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Fushida, Sachio; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2015-05-28

    In a patient with severe sepsis, we sometimes observe immediate decrease of the counts of white blood cells (WBCs) and neutrophils, which is known as an indicator for poor prognosis. We observed marked decrease of white blood cells and neutrophils on blood examination and interesting findings on dynamic CT. Here, we present the case of a patient with severe postoperative sepsis occurring after major abdominal surgery and we discuss the mechanism of such clinical presentations. A 60-year-old man received pancreatoduodenectomy with colectomy for pancreatic cancer. He developed a high fever on postoperative day 3. We observed marked decrease of WBCs and neutrophils on blood examination. We also observed slight swelling of the liver, inhomogeneous enhancement of liver parenchyma in arterial phase, and periportal low density in the Glisson capsule in portal phase, without any findings indicating infectious complications on dynamic CT. WBCs and neutrophils increased above normal range in just 6 hours. Blood culture examination performed while the patient had a high fever was positive for Aeromonas hydrophila. After receiving intensive care, he promptly recovered from severe sepsis. The CT findings disappeared on second dynamic CT examination performed 3 days after the first examination. We treated a patient with severe sepsis after major abdominal surgery who presented very rapid change of the counts of WBCs and neutrophils and interesting CT findings in the liver. We rescued him from a critical situation by prompt and intensive treatment. Research is needed to accumulate and analyze data from more patients who present a similar clinical course to better understand their pathophysiological conditions.

  16. CT findings of posterior pararenal effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Kim, Sonn Yong

    1990-01-01

    The posterior pararenal space(PPS) is a potential space between the posterior renal fascia and the transversalis fascia. We reviewed 12 cases of posterior pararenal effusion. The causes of the effusion were retroperitoneal hemorrhage due to trauma(7 cases) or rupture of renal tumor(1 case), pancreatitis(2 cases), urinoma (1 case) and amebic colitis of the cecum(1 case). The CT findings of the effusion were semilunar fluid density in the dependant portion of the PPS(9/12), partial obliteration of the PPS extending to the flank stripe(2/12), and total obliteration of the PPS extending to the anterior abdominal wall(1/12). The effusion in the ipsilateral perirenal space and thickening of the ipsilateral posterior renal fascia were combined in all cases. The effusion in the ipsilateral anterior pararenal space was associated in 11 cases of 12. The effusion in the PPS is not uncommon findings of retroperitoneal hemorrhage or effusion, but usually related with perirenal or anterior pararenal effusion with no clinical significance

  17. Malrotation with midgut volvulus: CT findings of bowel infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aidlen, Jeremy; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Jaramillo, Diego; Doody, Daniel P.

    2005-01-01

    Midgut volvulus, the most common serious complication of malrotation, can be diagnosed using conventional contrast fluoroscopy, US or CT. CT is a quick and comprehensive examination in the evaluation of complex acute abdominal pathology in children. Contrast-enhanced CT can readily help the radiologist recognize perfusion abnormalities of the bowel, which is vital for reducing morbidity and mortality in affected children. Our case emphasizes and demonstrates additional CT features of bowel infarction in a child with a proven malrotation with midgut volvulus. (orig.)

  18. Malrotation with midgut volvulus: CT findings of bowel infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidlen, Jeremy [University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Worchester (United States); Anupindi, Sudha A.; Jaramillo, Diego [Massachusetts General Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Doody, Daniel P. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Midgut volvulus, the most common serious complication of malrotation, can be diagnosed using conventional contrast fluoroscopy, US or CT. CT is a quick and comprehensive examination in the evaluation of complex acute abdominal pathology in children. Contrast-enhanced CT can readily help the radiologist recognize perfusion abnormalities of the bowel, which is vital for reducing morbidity and mortality in affected children. Our case emphasizes and demonstrates additional CT features of bowel infarction in a child with a proven malrotation with midgut volvulus. (orig.)

  19. Cost reduction in abdominal CT by weight-adjusted dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Tobarra, Eva; Sierra, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the influence of contrast dose adjusted by weight vs. fixed contrast dose in the attenuation and cost of abdominal computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: A randomised, consecutive, parallel group study was conducted in 151 patients (74 men and 77 women, age range 22-67 years), studied with the same CT helical protocol. A dose at 1.75 ml/kg was administered in 101 patients while 50 patients had a fixed dose of 120 ml of same non-ionic contrast material (320 mg/ml). Mean enhancements were measured at right hepatic lobe, superior abdominal aorta and inferior cava vein. Statistical analysis was weight-stratified ( 81 kg). Results: Aortic attenuation was significantly superior (p 61 kg in dose-adjusted group, presented higher hepatic attenuation, being statistically significant in those >81 kg (p 80 kg, there was an over cost of Euro 10.7 per patient. Conclusions: An injection volume of 1.75 ml/kg offers an optimal diagnostic quality with a global savings of Euro 1.34 per patient.

  20. F 18 FDG PET/CT Findings of Spontaneous Mesenteric Fibromatosis in a Patient with Gardner's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Myung Hee; Jeong, Young Jin; Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Yim, Chang Yeol

    2011-01-01

    Gardner's syndrome (GS), a variant of familial adenomatous polyposis, is an autosomal dominant disease. Originally, Gardner described a syndrome consisting of hereditary intestinal polyposis With osteomas and multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions. The syndrome was later modified by the addition of other features, such as dental abnormalities, abdominal fibromatosis, and a number of malignant tumors. the principal cutaneous lesions that have been described in GS are epidermoid cysts. Other cutaneous lesions include fibromas, lipomas, leiomyomas, neurofibromas, and pigmented skin lesions. Fibromatoses are histologically benign, but locally aggressive fibrous tumors consisting of mature fibroblasts within an extensive collagen matrix. Most cases are sporadic, but there is a clear association with familial adenomatous polyposis and GS, suggesting a link with a mutation of the APC gene on chromosome 5q22. Fibromatosis occurs in 3.5%-29% of patients with GS, and is more likely to be multiple and to involve the mesentery and abdominal wall rather than being an isolated form. Clinically, fibromatosis presents as a painless firm soft tissue mass. Most cases of fibromatosis are believed to be precipitated by surgical trauma, however, a few cases of spontaneous occurrence have been reported. In our patient, no history of abdominal surgery or trauma was present. In addition, an abdominal CT obtained 2 years ago revealed no abnormality. Although the radiological features of fibromatosis on CT or MR have been described in the literature, F 18 FDG PET or PET/CT findings are rarely reported. The F 18 FDG uptake in patients with fibromatosis ranged from low to moderate grade and was generally heterogenous with a few tiny foci of relatively intense uptake or relatively homogenous. The areas of higher FDG metabolism are likely to represent more cellular and mitotically active areas. Mesenteric fibromatosis has similar findings to extra abdominal lesions.

  1. Frequency and significance of thoracic injuries detected on abdominal trauma CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareli, G.S.; Rhea, J.T.; Novelline, R.A.; Lawrason, N.; Sacknoff, R.; Oser, A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have noted that in multiple trauma patients chest injuries inapparent on initial chest radiographs may be detected at abdominal CT. In an ongoing series of 112 patients to date, 50 chest injuries were detected in 33 patients (29%). The injuries included 15 bilateral hemothoraces, seven unilateral hemothoraces, seven posttraumatic atrelectasis, seven lung contusions, five pneumothoraces, four rib factures, two thoracic spine fractures, two chest wall emphysema, and one mediastinal emphysema. In 24 of the 33 patients (72%) the injury was not seen on the initial chest radiographs; in seven patients treatment of the chest injury was required. The authors have included screening cuts of the middle and upper chest as part of their abdominal CT protocol

  2. Automated estimation of abdominal effective diameter for body size normalization of CT dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Phillip M

    2013-06-01

    Most CT dose data aggregation methods do not currently adjust dose values for patient size. This work proposes a simple heuristic for reliably computing an effective diameter of a patient from an abdominal CT image. Evaluation of this method on 106 patients scanned on Philips Brilliance 64 and Brilliance Big Bore scanners demonstrates close correspondence between computed and manually measured patient effective diameters, with a mean absolute error of 1.0 cm (error range +2.2 to -0.4 cm). This level of correspondence was also demonstrated for 60 patients on Siemens, General Electric, and Toshiba scanners. A calculated effective diameter in the middle slice of an abdominal CT study was found to be a close approximation of the mean calculated effective diameter for the study, with a mean absolute error of approximately 1.0 cm (error range +3.5 to -2.2 cm). Furthermore, the mean absolute error for an adjusted mean volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) using a mid-study calculated effective diameter, versus a mean per-slice adjusted CTDIvol based on the calculated effective diameter of each slice, was 0.59 mGy (error range 1.64 to -3.12 mGy). These results are used to calculate approximate normalized dose length product values in an abdominal CT dose database of 12,506 studies.

  3. CT findings of infant epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojoh, Hiroatsu; Kataoka, Kenkichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Shozo; Tomita, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    CT diagnosis of infantile epilepsy was evaluated. High incidence of abnormal CT findings in infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome was same as in other reports. Comparison between CT findings and neurological complications and that between CT findings and electroencephalogram findings revealed a stronger relationship existing in the former. This suggested that CT is more useful as a measure to detect underlying diseases which are due to organic change of the brain to cause epilepsy, rather than as that to disclose epileptic primary lesions of functional change. (Ueda, J.)

  4. Analysis of local concentration in stomach fold pattern by using abdominal X-ray CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shigeto; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi; Mekada, Yoshito; Mori, Kensaku; Nawano, Shigeru

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a method for analysis of stomach folds pattern in abdominal X-ray CT images. Many stomach cancers have local concentration of folds at cancer lesions. Therefore, in stomach diagnosis, it is very important to evaluate quantitatively such fold concentration. In this paper, a method for calculation of concentration index for line figure on a curved surface is proposed first. Then, using this method a processing procedure for detection of stomach cancer from an abdominal X-ray CT image is developed. In the experiment using practical X-ray CT images, it is shown that by the proposed procedure, higher values of concentration index are obtained at cancer area. (author)

  5. Preoperative evaluation of the abdominal aortic aneurysm using spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chisuwa, Hisanao; Nishimaki, Keiji; Arai, Masayuki; Honda, Haruyasu; Urata, Koichi; Miyagawa, Yusuke; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Mikio; Okamoto, Kohei.

    1995-01-01

    Six patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were studied with three-dimensionally reconstructed CT angiography (3D-CTA) in order to evaluate its usefulness as a diagnostic tool for vascular surgery patients. Images of the intravenously contrasted abdominal aorta were obtained with spiral scan during a single breath hold. The images of the abdominal aorta and its major branches were three-dimensionally reconstructed with a shaded surface display mode. The three-dimensional image reconstruction was successful in all the six cases and performed without difficulties. Shaded surface display presented a deficit to depict the aortic wall with mural thrombus. However, multidirectional display of the abdominal aorta and its branches facilitated interpretation of the anatomical details of the lesions and planning of surgical repair. 3D-CTA is an alternative to conventional aortography for preoperative diagnosis of AAA. Moreover it was shown to be noninvasive, easy to proceed. It presented good angiographical resolution that can be used as a precise diagnostic tool in vascular surgery. (author)

  6. The in vivo relationship between cross-sectional area and CT dose index in abdominal multidetector CT with automatic exposure control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeson, S; Alvey, C M; Golding, S J, E-mail: stuart.meeson@nds.ox.ac.u [Radiology Group, Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    The relationship between patient cross-sectional area and both volume CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product was explored for abdominal CT in vivo, using a 16 multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanner with automatic exposure control. During a year-long retrospective survey of patients with MDCT for symptoms of abdominal sepsis, cross-sectional areas were estimated using customised ellipses at the level of the middle of vertebra L3. The relationship between cross-sectional area and the exposure parameters was explored. Scans were performed using a LightSpeed 16 (GE Healthcare Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) operated with tube current modulation. From a survey of 94 patients it was found that the CTDI increased with the increase in patient cross-sectional area. The relationship was logarithmic rather than linear, with a least-squares fit to the data (R{sup 2} = 0.80). For abdominal CT the cross-sectional area gave a measure of patient size based on the region of the body to be exposed. Exposure parameters increased with increasing cross-sectional area and the greater radiation exposure of larger patients was partly a consequence of their size. Given increasing obesity levels we believe that cross-sectional area and scan length should be added to future dose surveys, allowing patient size to be considered as a factor of relevance when examining population doses.

  7. A new technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınçer, Abidin; Akpınar, Erhan; Erbil, Bülent; Ünal, Emre; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Kaynaroğlu, Volkan; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa

    2017-08-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant (RLQ) in adults with acute appendicitis. 168 patients (age range, 18-78 years) were included who underwent contrast-enhanced CT for suspected appendicitis performed either using compression to the RLQ (n = 71) or a standard protocol (n = 97). Outer diameter of the appendix, appendiceal wall thickening, luminal content and associated findings were evaluated in each patient. Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher's and Pearson's chi-squared tests were used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference in the mean outer diameter (MOD) between compression CT scans (10.6 ± 1.9 mm) and standard protocol (11.2 ± 2.3 mm) in patients with acute appendicitis (P = 1). MOD was significantly lower in the compression group (5.2 ± 0.8 mm) compared to the standard protocol (6.5 ± 1.1 mm) (P appendicitis. A cut-off value of 6.75 mm for the outer diameter of the appendix was found to be 100% sensitive in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis for both groups. The specificity was higher for compression CT technique (67.7 vs. 94.9%). Normal appendix diameter was significantly smaller in the compression-CT group compared to standard-CT group, increasing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal compression CT. • Normal appendix diameter is significantly smaller in compression CT. • Compression could force contrast material to flow through the appendiceal lumen. • Compression CT may be a CT counterpart of graded compression US.

  8. The optimal parameter for radiation dose in pediatric low dose abdominal CT: cross-sectional dimensions versus body weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yoon Young; Goo, Hyun Woo

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the best parameter between cross-sectional dimensions and body weight in pediatric low dose abdominal CT. One hundred and thirty six children consecutively underwent weight-based abdominal CT. The subjects consisted of group 1 (79 children, weight range 10.0-19.9 kg) and group 2 (57 children, weight range 20.0-39.9 kg). Abdominal cross-sectional dimensions including circumference, area, anteroposterior diameters and transverse diameters were calculated. Image noise (standard deviation of CT density) was measured by placing a region of interest in the posterior segment of the right hepatic lobe on a CT image at the celiac axis. The measured image noise was correlated with the cross-sectional abdominal dimensions and body weight for subjects in each group. In group 1 subjects,area, circumference, transverse diameter, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order(γ = 0.63, 0.62, 0.61, 0.51, and 0.49; ρ < 0.0001). In group 2 subjects, transverse diameter, circumference, area, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order (γ = 0.83, 0.82, 0.78, 0.71, and 0.71; ρ < 0.0001). Cross-sectional dimensions such as area, circumference, and transverse diameter showed a higher positive correlation with image noise than body weight for pediatric low dose abdominal CT

  9. Abdominal tuberculosis. On-going challenge to gastroenterologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Mahgoub; Osuba, Abimbola

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to record the observations and experience on the diagnosis and management of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) and to highlight the difficulties in the diagnosis and management of this condition. Two hundred consecutive patients attending the Gastroenterology Department of the King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between May 1991 and May 2001, suspected with abdominal TB were investigated. A detailed clinical history and physical examination were obtained. Data of 75 confirmed cases of abdominal TB were analyzed. The most common presenting symptoms were anorexia (84%), abdominal pain (84%) and weight loss (72%). Abdominal tenderness was the most common clinical finding, followed by ascites and abdominal mass (42%). The chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 24 patients (32%). Computed tomographic (CT) scanning revealed abnormalities in all 51 patients who underwent the procedure, while positive findings were observed by abdominal ultrasound in 66% of the tested patients. Histopathological examination of patients showed tuberculosis granuloma, while acid fast bacilli were seen in 34%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by microbiological methods in 60% of patients. The most common presenting symptoms were anorexia (84%), abdominal pain (84%) and weight loss (72%). Abdominal tenderness was the most common clinical finding, followed by ascites and abdominal mass (42%). The chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 24 patients (32%). Computed tomographic (CT) scanning revealed abnormalities in all 51 patients who underwent the procedure, while positive findings were observed by abdominal ultrasound in 66% of the tested patients. Histopathological examination of patients showed tuberculous granuloma, while acid fast bacilli were seen in 34%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by microbiological methods in 60% of patients. A high index of clinical suspicion is

  10. Acute Appendagitis Presenting with Features of Appendicitis: Value of Abdominal CT Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhpreet Dubb

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute appendagitis in a patient who presented initially with typical features of acute appendicitis. The diagnosis of acute appendagitis was made on pathognomonic signs on computed tomography (CT scan. Abdominal pain is a common surgical emergency. CT is not always done if there are clear features of acute appendicitis. The rare but important differential diagnosis of acute appendagitis must be borne in mind when dealing with patients with suspected acute appendicitis. A CT scan of the abdomen may avoid unnecessary surgery in these patients.

  11. Multi-site abdominal tuberculosis mimics malignancy on ~(18)F-FDG PET/CT:Report of three cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission/computed tomography( 18 F-FDG PET/CT)imaging,an established procedure for evaluation of malignancy,shows an increased 18 F-FDG uptake in inflammatory conditions.We present three patients with abdominal pain and weight loss.Conventional imaging studies indicated that abdominal neoplasm and 18 F-FDG PET/CT for assessment of malignancy showed multiple lesions with intense 18 FFDG uptake in abdomen of the three cases.However,the three patients were finally diagnosed wit...

  12. CT findings of adrenal schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.-M.; Lei, P.-F.; Chen, M.-N.; Lv, X.-F.; Ling, Y.-H.; Cai, P.-Q.; Gao, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To analyse the computed tomography (CT) imaging features of patients with adrenal schwannoma. Materials and methods: Eight cases of adrenal schwannoma confirmed by histopathology were included in this study. All eight patients had undergone multiphase CT examinations. The features of the adrenal schwannoma in the CT images were analysed retrospectively in detail, including size, shape, margin, radiodensity, calcification, and enhancement pattern. Results: There were six male and two female patients, with a median age of 44.5 years (range, 25–52 years). Two patients complained of right flank pain, and two with left upper abdominal discomfort, while the remaining patients were diagnosed by routine ultrasound examinations. On unenhanced CT images, all cases of adrenal schwannoma were well circumscribed, rounded or oval, heterogeneous masses with cystic components, with two cases exhibiting calcification, and three cases with septa. On enhanced CT images, all cases displayed mild heterogeneous enhancement of the tumour during the arterial phase, and progressive enhancement during the portal venous phase and equilibrium phase. Conclusion: Adrenal schwannoma commonly presents as a well-defined unilateral mass with cystic degeneration, septa, and a characteristic progressive contrast-enhancement pattern on multiphase enhanced scans. - Highlights: • Adrenal schwannomas were extremely rare, and eight cases' medical data of this disease were collected in this study. • They usually presented a well-defined unilateral mass with cystic degeneration and sepations. • They manifested characteristic progressive contrast enhancement pattern on enhanced CT images.

  13. Dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT: use of iterative reconstruction techniques across different CT platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Otrakji, Alexi; Padole, Atul; Lim, Ruth; Nimkin, Katherine; Westra, Sjirk; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Gee, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Dose reduction in children undergoing CT scanning is an important priority for the radiology community and public at large. Drawbacks of radiation reduction are increased image noise and artifacts, which can affect image interpretation. Iterative reconstruction techniques have been developed to reduce noise and artifacts from reduced-dose CT examinations, although reconstruction algorithm, magnitude of dose reduction and effects on image quality vary. We review the reconstruction principles, radiation dose potential and effects on image quality of several iterative reconstruction techniques commonly used in clinical settings, including 3-D adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-3D), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), iDose, sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). We also discuss clinical applications of iterative reconstruction techniques in pediatric abdominal CT. (orig.)

  14. Dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT: use of iterative reconstruction techniques across different CT platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Otrakji, Alexi; Padole, Atul; Lim, Ruth; Nimkin, Katherine; Westra, Sjirk; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Gee, Michael S. [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Dose reduction in children undergoing CT scanning is an important priority for the radiology community and public at large. Drawbacks of radiation reduction are increased image noise and artifacts, which can affect image interpretation. Iterative reconstruction techniques have been developed to reduce noise and artifacts from reduced-dose CT examinations, although reconstruction algorithm, magnitude of dose reduction and effects on image quality vary. We review the reconstruction principles, radiation dose potential and effects on image quality of several iterative reconstruction techniques commonly used in clinical settings, including 3-D adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-3D), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), iDose, sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). We also discuss clinical applications of iterative reconstruction techniques in pediatric abdominal CT. (orig.)

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, ... still, are very nervous or anxious or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  17. The wandering spleen: CT findings and possible pitfalls in diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ely, A.; Zissin, R.; Copel, L.; Vasserman, M.; Hertz, M.; Gottlieb, P.; Gayer, G

    2006-11-15

    Aim: To report the CT features of wandering spleen, a rare condition which can be incidentally detected as an abdominal or pelvic mass or can present with torsion, causing an acute abdomen. Materials and methods: The CT studies of seven patients, two children and five adults, with wandering spleen were reviewed. CT was performed urgently in three patients for acute abdomen, and electively in four. Results: CT findings of wandering spleen included absence of the spleen in its normal position and a mass located elsewhere in the abdomen or pelvis, i.e. an ectopic spleen, enhancing homogeneously in four cases and failing partially or completely to enhance in the other three, indicating infarction. A 'whirl' appearance representing the twisted splenic pedicle was seen in the three cases with torsion. Urgent splenectomy confirmed infarction secondary to torsion. Conclusion: The possible diagnosis of wandering spleen should be kept in mind when CT shows the spleen to be absent from its usual position and a mass is found elsewhere in the abdomen or pelvis. When, in addition, a 'whirl' or partial or no enhancement of this mass are seen in a case presenting with acute abdomen, torsion of a wandering spleen is a likely diagnosis.

  18. The neurolytic celiac plexus block using CT guidance through anterior abdominal approach to control the cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jie; Yang Ning; Liu Wei; Jin Zhengyu; Zhao Yupei; Cai Lixing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of neurolytic celiac plexus block (Ncb) using CT guidance through anterior abdominal approach. Methods: The clinical data of 24 patients who were given NCPB because of the suffering of upper abdominal and back pain caused by pancreatic carcinoma and other cancer in advanced stage were retrospectively analyzed. The therapeutic effect was evaluated with complete pain relief and partial pain relief. Results: The effective rate and complete pain relief rate in short period ( 3 months) were 71.4% and 14.3% respectively. No severe complications occurred. Conclusion: NCPB guided by CT through anterior abdominal approach is an effective, safe and simple method to control the upper abdominal and back pain caused by cancer

  19. Liver trauma from penetrating injuries. Miscellanea, personal series, clinical and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzano, A.; Nocera, V.; De Rosa, A.; Vigliotti, A.; Rossi, E.; Carbone, M.; Gatta, G.

    2000-01-01

    Penetrating liver wounds are related to many causes and rank second after blunt abdominal and liver trauma. In this report are examined the clinical and radiological findings of personal series of patients with penetrating trauma, especially by firearms and stab and cut wounds. It will also tried to define the diagnostic workup of these traumas, which is especially based on CT signs of liver damage and associated changes and which is of basic importance for following treatment, both surgical or conservative. In the last seven years it was retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of penetrating liver trauma. The patients were 19 men and 12 women, ranging in age 18 to 73 (mean 42), with penetrating liver injuries from firearms (16 patients) and stab (9 cases) wounds; 6 patients had injuries from different cases. Abdominal CT was carried out in emergency with the CT Angiography (CTA) technique in all patients. In the patients with suspected chest and abdomen involvement CT was performed from the mid-chest for accurate assessment of diaphragm and lung bases and to exclude associated pleuropulmonary damage. Penetrating liver wounds were caused by firearms in 70% of cases, by stabbing in 12% and, in the extant 18%, by other cases such as home accidents, road and work traumas, and liver biopsy. In this series, the liver was most frequently involved, especially by firearms wounds; in the 16 cases the most frequent injuries were hemorrhagic tears. It was found bullets in the liver in 6 cases. In one case of home accident the patient wounded himself while slicing bread with a long knife, which cut into the anterior abdominal wall and tore the anterior liver capsule, as seen at CTA. Penetrating wounds to liver and abdomen are less frequent than those to the chest. In the past decade the use of CT has changed the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to such injuries completely, decreasing the resort to explorative laparotomy and hepatorrhaphy. Indeed, CT provides a clear picture of

  20. Abdominal and pelvic lymph node involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: CT manifestations in Chinese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ning; Liu Ying; Chen Yu; Lin Dongmei; Shi Mulan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT manifestations of abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes in non- Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) of Chinese patients, and to investigate their correlation with pathology subtypes. Methods: The CT images of 241 patients with enlargement of abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes involved by NHL were reviewed. Of them, 96 patients whose clinical and imaging data fulfilled the requirement for analysis were included. According to the Clinical Schema for the Lymphoid System, patients were divided into 3 subtypes, indolent lymphoma (IL; n=31), aggressive lymphoma (AL; n=61), very aggressive lymphoma (VAL; n=2), and unclassified lymphoma (UCL; n=2), respectively. Abdominal and pelvic CT scans were undertaken in 46 patients, abdominal CT only in 47 cases, and pelvic CT only in 3 cases. CT with iv contrast administration was obtained in 80 patients. Anatomic sites involved were nominated as retroperitoneal (i.e. paraaortic), abdominal (including paracardiac, gastrohepatic, hepatic hilar, and mesenteric etc), retrocrural, diaphragmatic, common iliac, internal iliac, external iliac, and inguinal nodes, respectively. Size, number, discreteness, and density of the nodal lesions were analyzed, and correlated with pathology subtypes. The minimal dimension of the largest node was measured. Results: (1) Size: Most of the nodes were ≤2 cm in size, 60.5% (219/362 sites) in IL and AL, 56.6% (77/136 sites) in IL, and 62.8%(142/226 sites) in AL, respectively. There was no statistical significant difference of the nodal size between IL and AL in each location (χ 2 =0.341, P=0.559). (2) Number: Mesentery had the largest number of node involvement (6.5 vs 5 nodes on an median, IL vs AL), with retroperitoneum placed second (4 vs 4 nodes, IL vs AL. (3) Discreteness: Most of the nodes were discrete with an incidence of 77.1% (279/362 sites, IL and AL), and 74.3% (101/136 sites) in IL, 78.8% (178/226 sites) in AL, respectively. No statistical significant discrepancy was found between

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may ... still, are very nervous or anxious or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to ...

  2. Tuberculous spondylodiscitis in a patient with a sickle-cell disease: CT findings

    OpenAIRE

    Krupniewski, Leszek; Palczewski, Piotr; Gołębiowski, Marek; Kosińska-Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Although sickle-cell anemia (SCA) is common in black Americans, Sub-Saharan Africa and in the Mediterranean area, the disease is rare in the temperate climate zone. The manifestations of the disease are related mainly to the production of abnormal hemoglobin that leads to organ ischemia and increased susceptibility to infection caused by functional asplenia. Case Report: The authors present CT findings in a 39-year-old black woman diagnosed due to abdominal pain, lymphaden...

  3. CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Gab Choul; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer. Of the 1468 patients with primary lung cancer between 1990 and 2000, 13 patients who had metastasis to the small intestine were collected. Of these 13 patients, nine who underwent CT scan were included for analysis. The pathologic diagnoses of primary lung cancer in these nine patients were squamous cell carcinoma in six, adenocarcinoma in two, and large cell carcinoma in one. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the site and patterns (intraluminal mass/bowel wall thickening/bowel implants) of metastatic masses, and the presence or absence of complication such as intussusception, obstruction, or perforation of the small bowel. The medical records of the patients were also reviewed retrospectively for evaluation of presenting abdominal symptom and time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer. Metastatic lesions were distributed throughout the small intestine: the duodenum in five, the jejunum in four, the ileum in six, and both jejunum and ileum in one patient. The size of metastatic masses of small bowel ranged from 1.3 cm to 5.0 cm (mean size, 2.6 cm) On CT, the small bowel was involved with intraluminal masses (mean size, 3.4 cm) in eight patients, diffuse wall thickening (mean thickness, 1.6 cm) in five, and bowel implants (mean size, 2.2 cm) in two. Complications occurred in seven patients, including intussusceptions without obstruction in two patients and with obstruction in two, obstruction without intussusceptions in two, and bowel perforation in one. Of 9 patients, 6 had at least one symptom referable to the small bowel including abdominal pain in 4, anemia in 3, vomiting in 1, and jaundice in 1. Lung cancer and small bowel lesions were detected simultaneously in four patients and the time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer ranged from 10 days to 30 months (median interval, 54 days) in patients. CT helps in defining the extent and

  4. CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Gab Choul; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer. Of the 1468 patients with primary lung cancer between 1990 and 2000, 13 patients who had metastasis to the small intestine were collected. Of these 13 patients, nine who underwent CT scan were included for analysis. The pathologic diagnoses of primary lung cancer in these nine patients were squamous cell carcinoma in six, adenocarcinoma in two, and large cell carcinoma in one. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the site and patterns (intraluminal mass/bowel wall thickening/bowel implants) of metastatic masses, and the presence or absence of complication such as intussusception, obstruction, or perforation of the small bowel. The medical records of the patients were also reviewed retrospectively for evaluation of presenting abdominal symptom and time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer. Metastatic lesions were distributed throughout the small intestine: the duodenum in five, the jejunum in four, the ileum in six, and both jejunum and ileum in one patient. The size of metastatic masses of small bowel ranged from 1.3 cm to 5.0 cm (mean size, 2.6 cm) On CT, the small bowel was involved with intraluminal masses (mean size, 3.4 cm) in eight patients, diffuse wall thickening (mean thickness, 1.6 cm) in five, and bowel implants (mean size, 2.2 cm) in two. Complications occurred in seven patients, including intussusceptions without obstruction in two patients and with obstruction in two, obstruction without intussusceptions in two, and bowel perforation in one. Of 9 patients, 6 had at least one symptom referable to the small bowel including abdominal pain in 4, anemia in 3, vomiting in 1, and jaundice in 1. Lung cancer and small bowel lesions were detected simultaneously in four patients and the time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer ranged from 10 days to 30 months (median interval, 54 days) in patients. CT helps in defining the extent and

  5. Automated tube potential selection for standard chest and abdominal CT in follow-up patients with testicular cancer: comparison with fixed tube potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Winklehner, Anna; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Eberli, Daniel [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Urology, Zurich (Switzerland); Knuth, Alexander [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate prospectively, in patients with testicular cancer, the radiation dose-saving potential and image quality of contrast-enhanced chest and abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection. Forty consecutive patients with testicular cancer underwent contrast-enhanced arterio-venous chest and portal-venous abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection (protocol B; tube potential 80-140 kVp), which is based on the attenuation of the CT topogram. All had a first CT at 120 kVp (protocol A) using the same 64-section CT machine and similar settings. Image quality was assessed; dose information (CTDI{sub vol}) was noted. Image noise and attenuation in the liver and spleen were significantly higher for protocol B (P < 0.05 each), whereas attenuation in the deltoid and erector spinae muscles was similar. In protocol B, tube potential was reduced to 100 kVp in 18 chest and 33 abdominal examinations, and to 80 kVp in 5 abdominal CT examinations; it increased to 140 kVp in one patient. Image quality of examinations using both CT protocols was rated as diagnostic. CTDI{sub vol} was significantly lower for protocol B compared to protocol A (reduction by 12%, P < 0.01). In patients with testicular cancer, radiation dose of chest and abdominal CT can be reduced with automated tube potential selection, while image quality is preserved. (orig.)

  6. Abdominal endometriosis: Ultrasonographic findings (report of two cases)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Beum; Kim, Yong Goo; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang [Chung Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    Endometriosis in the abdominal wall is a rare condition that most commonly occurs in the physiological scar of the umbilicus and in surgical scars of pelvic operation. The ultrasonographic findings are often non-specific, but with scrutinized physical examination and history, correct diagnosis can be made. We report ultrasonographic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis in two cases, both of which were related to previous cesarian section scar

  7. Neuroblastoma: computed tomographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Choon Sik; Ahn, Chang Su; Kim, Myung Jun; Oh, Ki Keun

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristic CT findings of neuroblastoma, we studied neuroblastomas. We analysed CT findings of available 25 cases among pathologically proved 51 neuroblastomas from Jan. 1983 to Sept. 1990. The most frequent site of origin is adrenal gland (40%) and the second is retroperitoneum (32%) and the third ismediastinum (16%). Characteristic CT findings are as follows: Calcifications within the tumor is detected in 86% of abdominal neuroblastomas and 50% of mediastinal origin. Hemorrhagic and necrotic changes within the tumor is noted at 86% in the tumor of abdominal origin and 25% in mediastinal neuroblastomas. Contrast enhanced study showed frequently seperated enhanced appearance with/without solid contrast enhancement. Encasements of major great vessels such as aorta and IVC with/without displacement by metastatic lymph nodes or tumor are frequently seen in 90% of abdominal neuroblastomas. Multiple lymphadenopathy are detected in 95% of abdominal neuroblastomas and 25% of mediastinal neuroblastomas. The most common organ or contiguous direct invasion is kidney in 6 cases and the next one is liver but intraspinal canal invasion is also noted in 2 cases. We concluded that diagnosis of neuroblastoma would be easily obtained in masses of pediatric group from recognition of above characteristic findings

  8. CT and US demonstration of gastrointestinal involvement in children with rheumatoid purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin; Li Lin; Wang Chunxiang; Zhao Bin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of CT and US in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal involvement in children with rheumatoid purpura. Methods: Abdominal CT and US findings in 14 cases of clinical and laboratory confirmed of rheumatoid purpura were analyzed. There were 9 males and 5 females with the age ranged from 6 months to 14 years. All patients was hospitalized because of acute abdominal emergency, and the clinical presentations included paroxysm of abdomen pain, vomiting, without skin rashes and subcutaneous hemorrhage. CT examination was done in 7 cases, and contrast enhancement was performed in 1 case. Abdominal ultrasound was done in 9 cases. Both CT and US were done in 2 cases. Results: All patients demonstrated multiple or single areas of bowel-wall thickening, localized intraluminal narrowing, mesenteric edema, and liquid in abdominal cavity by CT and ultrasound. Conclusion: Abdominal CT and US examination have important values in differential diagnosis of acute abdominal disorders in children patients with rheumatoid purpura. Before appearing skin rashes, classical picture can help for the diagnosis and clinical treatment. Abdominal CT and US examination can also find the intussusception, bowel obstruction, and perforation in rheumatoid purpura

  9. Distribution of pleural effusion associated with ascites on abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, In Young; Park, Chan Sup; Yeon, Jae Woo; Jeon, Yong Sun; Choi, Sung Kyu; Chung, Won Kyun [Inha Univ. Hospital, Songnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To determine through an analysis of the location of pleural effusion associated with ascites, as seen on abdominal CT scan, differences in the distribution of pleural effusion according to the etiology and distribution of ascites. We retrospectively evaluated 77 consecutive patients in whom abdominal CT scan revealed pleural effusion associated with ascites. Patients with history of surgery or trauma and those with clinically and radiologically diagnosed lung or pleural diseases were excluded. We compared the location of pleural effusion with the etiology and distribution of ascites. Forty-two patients were suffering from hepatobiliary diseases, mainly right dominant pleural effusion (26/42, 62%). Fourteen had intraperitoneal carcinomatosis with no significant difference between the frequency of right dominant (5/14, 36%) and of left dominant (6/14, 43%) pleural effusion. Eleven patients had pancreatic diseases, with mainly left dominant pleural effusion (6/11, 55%). Patients with right dominant ascites usually had right dominant pleural effusion (22/24, 92%) and those with left dominant ascites had left dominant pleural effusion (9/10, 90%). Ascites-associated pleural effusion correlated with the anatomical location of the etiology of ascites; its laterality was, in addition, usually the same as that of ascites.

  10. Distribution of pleural effusion associated with ascites on abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, In Young; Park, Chan Sup; Yeon, Jae Woo; Jeon, Yong Sun; Choi, Sung Kyu; Chung, Won Kyun

    1997-01-01

    To determine through an analysis of the location of pleural effusion associated with ascites, as seen on abdominal CT scan, differences in the distribution of pleural effusion according to the etiology and distribution of ascites. We retrospectively evaluated 77 consecutive patients in whom abdominal CT scan revealed pleural effusion associated with ascites. Patients with history of surgery or trauma and those with clinically and radiologically diagnosed lung or pleural diseases were excluded. We compared the location of pleural effusion with the etiology and distribution of ascites. Forty-two patients were suffering from hepatobiliary diseases, mainly right dominant pleural effusion (26/42, 62%). Fourteen had intraperitoneal carcinomatosis with no significant difference between the frequency of right dominant (5/14, 36%) and of left dominant (6/14, 43%) pleural effusion. Eleven patients had pancreatic diseases, with mainly left dominant pleural effusion (6/11, 55%). Patients with right dominant ascites usually had right dominant pleural effusion (22/24, 92%) and those with left dominant ascites had left dominant pleural effusion (9/10, 90%). Ascites-associated pleural effusion correlated with the anatomical location of the etiology of ascites; its laterality was, in addition, usually the same as that of ascites

  11. CT findings of the thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Yun Hwan; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Woun Kyun; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1987-01-01

    In 14 cases of normal and abnormal thymus proved surgically and histopathologically in korea University Hae Wha Hospital during recent 6 years, the clinical and CT findings were analyzed. 1. Of 14 cases, 2 cases were normal thymus, 5 cases were thymic hyperplasia, 4 cases were benign thymoma, 2 case were malignant thymoma and 1 case was thymic cyst. 2. Of 14 cases, 10 cases were associated with myasthenia gravis, and 7 of these 10 cases were 3rd to 5th decades females. Among 10 cases with myasthenia gravis. 5 cases were thymic hyperplasia, 1 case was benign thymoma, 2 cases were malignant thymoma, and 2 cases were normal thymus. 3. All 5 thymic hyperplasia were associated with myasthenia gravis. CT findings of thymic hyperplasia were normal in 4 cases and increased lobe thickness in 1 case. 4. Of 4 cases of benign thymoma, only 1 case was associated with myasthenia gravis, and all 4 cases were positive findings in CT scan. CT findings of benign thymoma were round or oval soft tissue mass in anterior mediastinum, and 1 case had punctuate calcifications. 5. Of 2 cases of malignant thymoma, all 2 cases were associated with myasthenia gravis and positive findings in CT scan. CT findings of malignant thymoma were anterior mediastinal soft tissue mass with obliteration of the normal fat planes surrounding great vessels. SVC compression, and pleural tumor implants. 6. CT yielded significant diagnostic information of differential diagnosis between thymoma and thymoma hyperplasia in myasthenia gravis patients. Also CT was highly sensitive test in detection of thymoma and determined the extent and invasiveness of thymoma.

  12. CT findings of the thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Yun Hwan; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Woun Kyun; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-02-15

    In 14 cases of normal and abnormal thymus proved surgically and histopathologically in korea University Hae Wha Hospital during recent 6 years, the clinical and CT findings were analyzed. 1. Of 14 cases, 2 cases were normal thymus, 5 cases were thymic hyperplasia, 4 cases were benign thymoma, 2 case were malignant thymoma and 1 case was thymic cyst. 2. Of 14 cases, 10 cases were associated with myasthenia gravis, and 7 of these 10 cases were 3rd to 5th decades females. Among 10 cases with myasthenia gravis. 5 cases were thymic hyperplasia, 1 case was benign thymoma, 2 cases were malignant thymoma, and 2 cases were normal thymus. 3. All 5 thymic hyperplasia were associated with myasthenia gravis. CT findings of thymic hyperplasia were normal in 4 cases and increased lobe thickness in 1 case. 4. Of 4 cases of benign thymoma, only 1 case was associated with myasthenia gravis, and all 4 cases were positive findings in CT scan. CT findings of benign thymoma were round or oval soft tissue mass in anterior mediastinum, and 1 case had punctuate calcifications. 5. Of 2 cases of malignant thymoma, all 2 cases were associated with myasthenia gravis and positive findings in CT scan. CT findings of malignant thymoma were anterior mediastinal soft tissue mass with obliteration of the normal fat planes surrounding great vessels. SVC compression, and pleural tumor implants. 6. CT yielded significant diagnostic information of differential diagnosis between thymoma and thymoma hyperplasia in myasthenia gravis patients. Also CT was highly sensitive test in detection of thymoma and determined the extent and invasiveness of thymoma.

  13. Radiographic evaluation of foals and ponies with abdominal disorders. 2. Findings in 60 patients with acute abdominal discomfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhards, H.; Klein, H.J.; Offeney, F.

    1990-01-01

    A diagnostic approach based on clinical and radiographic examinations for evaluation of young foals and small ponies with acute abdominal discomfort is presented. Standing right to left lateral abdominal radiographs were taken of 54 foals and 6 ponies using a previously described technique. Interpretation of the radiographs was in conjuction with all clinical and laboratory findings and patient management. Using this approach, the site and cause of acute abdominal discomfort could be diagnosed accurately in 55 of 60 (91%) patients as confirmed by clinical, surgical or PM findings. Typical radiographs and photographs taken at surgery or at PM examination are presented. Typical radiographic findings, their interpretation and possible underlying gastrointestinal diseases are listed. It is concluded that the incorporation of standing lateral abdominal radiography in the clinical evaluation of foals and ponies with acute abdominal diseases gives findings of high diagnostic significance and should contribute to clinical decision-making, and that abdominal radiography can replace data from rectal palpation in foals and ponies

  14. CT findings of inoperable lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, S.B.; Black, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    CT is useful in the evaluation of patients with newly diagnosed or highly suspected lung cancer. The principal role of CT is to screen those patients with metastatic disease beyond the hili from an attempt at curative thoracotomy. While CT is regarded as very sensitive, it is not considered highly specific, and thus a surgical procedure is usually recommended for definitive diagnosis of most ''positive'' CT findings. However, the authors demonstrate a few characteristic CT findings that are highly predictive of unresectable metastatic disease. These CT findings include massive mediastinal lymphadenopathy, diffuse mediastinal infiltration, pericardial involvement, vascular encasement, and advanced chest wall invasion

  15. Colonic polyp detection method from 3D abdominal CT images based on local intensity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, M.; Nakada, Y.; Kitasaka, T.; Mori, K.; Suenaga, Y.; Takayama, T.; Takabatake, H.; Mori, M.; Natori, H.; Nawano, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a detection method of colonic polyps from 3D abdominal CT images based on local intensity analysis. Recently, virtual colonoscopy (VC) has widely received attention as a new colon diagnostic method. VC is considered as a less-invasive inspection method which reduces patient load. However, since the colon has many haustra and its shape is long and convoluted, a physician has to change the viewpoint and the viewing direction of the virtual camera of VC many times while diagnosis. Additionally, there is a risk to overlook lesions existing in blinded areas caused by haustra. This paper proposes an automated colonic polyp detection method from 3D abdominal CT images. Colonic polyps are located on the colonic wall. Their CT values are higher than those of colonic lumen regions and lower than those of fecal materials tagged by an X-ray opaque contrast agent. CT values inside polyps which exist outside the tagged fecal materials tend to gradually increase from outward to inward (blob-like structure). CT values inside polyps that exist inside the tagged fecal materials tend to gradually decrease from outward to inward (inv-blob-like structure). We employ the blob and the inv-blob structure enhancement filters based on the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix to detect polyps using intensity characteristic of polyps. Connected components with low output values of the enhancement filter are eliminated in false positive reduction process. Small connected components are also eliminated. We applied the proposed method to 44 cases of abdominal CT images. Sensitivity for polyps of 6 mm or larger was 80% with 4.7 false positives per case. (orig.)

  16. CT findings in Reye syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kil Woo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choo, In Wook; Bae, Sang Hoon

    1990-01-01

    We present here the CT findings in 10 patients with Reye syndrome. Acute findings is diffuse cerebral swelling with or without parenchymal low density. The cerebral swelling gradually changed to atrophy. The parenchymal low density predisposes in Lt temporoparietal area. Contrast enhanced CT scan showed no additional finding, except 1 case. The hemorrhagic infarction which has not been reported previously was seen in 1 case and resulted in the most prominent sequela. The sequelae were developed in all atrophic cases. So, the brain CT may be useful in monitoring cerebral swelling, determining treatment plan in acute stage, and in presenting prognosis and sequelae on fellow up CT

  17. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Claudia; Ramirez, Angie; Varela, Rodolfo; Godoy, Fabian; Vargas, Rafael; Forero, Jorge; Rojas, Andres; Roa, Carmen; Céspedes, Carlos; Ramos, Jose; Cabrera, Marino; Calderon, Andres

    2017-05-01

    Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group)], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  18. CT and MR imaging in patients with localized acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Acute abdominal pain (AAP) is one of the most common causes for admissions to emergency departments. Clinical presentation, physical and laboratory examinations are often inconclusive and, therefore, imaging evaluation is required. Ultrasonography is efficient in the evaluation of gallbladder and gynecologic conditions and it is considered the first-line examination in many centres. Plain radiography and barium studies are often falsely normal or non-specific, especially in the most common conditions related with rightsided AAP and their use has significantly decreased. CT is a rapid and accurate imaging modality in the diagnosis of common (appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, duodenal ulcer perforation) or uncommon (mesenteric adenitis, liver abscess, cholangitis etc) conditions associated with right-sided AAP. CT may demonstrate a number of either specific or sensitive imaging findings for the confident diagnosis of diseases manifested with AAP. Moreover, CT has the advantage to suggest alternative diagnoses, if the suspected clinical diagnosis is unconfirmed. Different examination protocols and different strategies for the application of oral-rectal-intravenous contrast agents have been proposed to balance diagnostic accuracy to time effectiveness and radiation dose. MRI is suggested for AAP related to biliary abnormalities or to gynecologic diseases and it may be used as a complementary examination in pregnant patients. Imaging evaluation is an indispensable part in the diagnostic work up of most patients with AAP. CT has gained widespread acceptance, as offering more accurate and confident diagnosis and its use has changed management of the patients in 28-60% of the cases

  19. Cholestrol granuloma of the breast incidentally detected on dynamic abdominal CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Lee, Eun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A breast cholesterol granuloma is an uncommon nodular breast lesion. We incidentally detected a persistently enhancing breast mass on the dynamic abdominal computed tomography (CT) of a 78-year-old woman. The mass decreased in diameter over 50 days following a core needle biopsy. This report is the first to describe the dynamic-enhanced CT features of a breast cholesterol granuloma.

  20. Tuberculous spondylodiscitis in a patient with a sickle-cell disease: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupniewski, Leszek; Palczewski, Piotr; Gołębiowski, Marek; Kosińska-Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Although sickle-cell anemia (SCA) is common in black Americans, Sub-Saharan Africa and in the Mediterranean area, the disease is rare in the temperate climate zone. The manifestations of the disease are related mainly to the production of abnormal hemoglobin that leads to organ ischemia and increased susceptibility to infection caused by functional asplenia. The authors present CT findings in a 39-year-old black woman diagnosed due to abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy and fever. CT of the thorax and abdomen demonstrated changes in the liver, spleen, and skeletal system suggestive of SCA complicated with spondylodiscitis in the thoracic spine. Hepatomegaly and small calcified spleen are typical findings in older homozygotic patients with SCA. The lesions in the skeleton may be related either to intramedullary hematopoiesis or osteonecrosis and osteomyelitis. In the latter case, diffuse osteosclerosis and H-shaped vertebrae are most typical. Tuberculous spondylodiscitis is characterized by the location in the thoracic region, preferential involvement of anterior elements, relative sparing of intervertebral discs, and cold abscesses

  1. Tuberculous spondylodiscitis in a patient with a sickle-cell disease: CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupniewski, Leszek; Palczewski, Piotr; Gołębiowski, Marek; Kosińska-Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Although sickle-cell anemia (SCA) is common in black Americans, Sub-Saharan Africa and in the Mediterranean area, the disease is rare in the temperate climate zone. The manifestations of the disease are related mainly to the production of abnormal hemoglobin that leads to organ ischemia and increased susceptibility to infection caused by functional asplenia. The authors present CT findings in a 39-year-old black woman diagnosed due to abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy and fever. CT of the thorax and abdomen demonstrated changes in the liver, spleen, and skeletal system suggestive of SCA complicated with spondylodiscitis in the thoracic spine. Hepatomegaly and small calcified spleen are typical findings in older homozygotic patients with SCA. The lesions in the skeleton may be related either to intramedullary hematopoiesis or osteonecrosis and osteomyelitis. In the latter case, diffuse osteosclerosis and H-shaped vertebrae are most typical. Tuberculous spondylodiscitis is characterized by the location in the thoracic region, preferential involvement of anterior elements, relative sparing of intervertebral discs, and cold abscesses.

  2. A case of megadolichobasilar anomaly complicated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Sumio; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Ogata, Jun; Ito, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Haruhiko

    1985-01-01

    A 41 year-old hypertensive male was admitted because of progressing left hemiparesis and dysarthria. CT demonstrated hyperdense mass with partial contast enhancement, extending from the level of lower pons to that of suprasellar cistern. Reconstructed imaging of CT showed a huge mass lesion, in which a wide curvilinear hyperdensity was demonstrated by contrast enhancement. Cerebral angiography revealed markedly elongated and dilated basilar and carotid arteries. From these findings, the prepontine hyperdense mass lesion was diagnosed as megadolichobasilar anomaly with marked wall thickening. Findings of abdominal aortic angiography and abdominal CT suggested the presence of marked atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. Six months after initial admission, neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated and CT showed dilatation of the 3rd and lateral ventricles, suggesting the development of hydrocephalus due to compression of the aqueduct by the megadolichobasilar anomaly. Magnetic resonance imaging at this time demonstrated more details of the lesion and the deformity of the brain stem, which was not detected by conventional CT. Complications of vascular anomalies other than intracranial vasculature, such as aortic aneurysm, have also been repoted. After the introduction of CT, demonstration of a long, wide, curvilinear structure with abnormal density in the prepontine region has been reported to be diagnostic for the megadolichobasilar anomaly. This patient has had hypertension for 10 years, which probably due to chronic nephritis. He had no definite findings for angitis, but had abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. From these findings, atherosclerosis of large vessels may have played one of the roles in the pathogenesis of this anomaly in the present case. (J.P.N.)

  3. Kaposi sarcoma and lymphadenopathy syndrome: limitations of abdominal CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Abrams, D.I.; Volberding, P.; Lewis, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed in 31 patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), three patients with classic KS, and 12 patients with the newly described lymphadenopathy syndrome (LNS). The frequency, distribution, and appearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were similar in the AIDS-related KS and LNS groups. Rectal and perirectal disease was identified in 86% of homosexual men studied; rectal KS could not be distinguished from proctitis on CT criteria alone. No CT abnormalities were seen in patients with classic KS. The CT demonstration of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or pelvic adenopathy or of rectal or perirectal disease in patients with AIDS-related KS is not necessarily indicative of widespread involvement with the disease

  4. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ochoa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  5. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  6. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  7. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle I. Miano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US or computed tomography (CT studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results: 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4] compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]. Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7] and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]. The proportion of

  8. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  9. CT scan findings in focal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Eiki; Mihara, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Kunimitsu; Yamashita, Kenji; Asakura, Tetsuhiko

    1980-01-01

    In 80 cases of focal epilepsy, excluding such cases as late onset after the age of 30 and traumatic or expansive lesions, the epileptogenic foci have been studied by comparing the CT findings with the seizure types and the EEG findings. The results were as follows: (1) Abnormal CT findings were observed in 36% of the patients. (2) These findings were classified into 4 large groups: localized cerebral atrophy, localized low density, localized high density with contrast enhancement and diffuse cerebral atrophy. (3) The incidence of CT abnormality was higher in the cases with continuous and localized EEG abnormality than in the cases with other types of EEG abnormality. In 48% of the cases, the location of the abnormal CT findings coincided with their EEG foci. (4) In the cases of temporal lobe epilepsy without abnormal CT images, the print-out data compared with the bilateral promised temporal regions, before and after contrast enhancement. The EMI-No. of the medial temporal focus increased more than that of the contralateral side in 3 cases out of 4 after contrast-media injection. (5) Moreover, for the purpose of comparing the CT findings on general seizures with those in focal seizures, we have studied 80 cases of general seizures. In the cases of the general seizures, abnormal CT findings were observed in only 16%. These abnormal findings were diffuse in 5 cases, localized in 6 cases, and combined in 3 cases. (author)

  10. Energy Limits in Second Generation High-pitch Dual Source CT - Comparison in an Upper Abdominal Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Beeres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study was to find out how much energy is applicable in second-generation dual source high-pitch computed tomography (CT in imaging of the abdomen. Materials and Methods: We examined an upper abdominal phantom using a Somatom Definition Flash CT-Scanner (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany. The study protocol consisted of a scan-series at 100 kV and 120 kV. In each scan series we started with a pitch of 3.2 and reduced it in steps of 0.2, until a pitch of 1.6 was reached. The current was adjusted to the maximum the scanner could achieve. Energy values, image noise, image quality, and radiation exposure were evaluated. Results: For a pitch of 3.2 the maximum applicable current was 142 mAs at 120 kV and in 100 kV the maximum applicable current was 114 mAs. For conventional abdominal imaging, current levels of 200 to 260 mAs are generally used. To achieve similar current levels, we had to decrease the pitch to 1.8 at 100 kV - at this pitch we could perform our imaging at 204 mAs. At a pitch of 2.2 in 120 kV we could apply a current of 206 mAs. Conclusion: We conclude our study by stating that if there is a need for a higher current, we have to reduce the pitch. In a high-pitch dual source CT, we always have to remember where our main focus is, so we can adjust the pitch to the energy we need in the area of the body that has to be imaged, to find answers to the clinical question being raised.

  11. Evaluation of adverse events and imaging quality in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using generic CT contrast developed in South Korea: A multicenter prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Sung; Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Micheal Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Lee, Soo Rim; Hwang, Seong Su; Lim, Yeon Soo; Park, Jeong Mi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical safety and usefulness of the Prosure®300 in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT. This prospective study was approved by our center's Institutional Review Board. This study included 727 patients in four hospitals who underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using Prosure®300 from December 2010 to June 2011. Adverse events were classified into minor and major adverse events. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between adverse events and patient gender, age, underlying disease, and amount of injected contrast agent. Two radiologists independently evaluated imaging quality as poor, insufficient, sufficient, good, or very good. One hundred seventy-six out of 727 patients complained of adverse events, but most of them were minor adverse events. Five patients complained of dyspnea and one patient had hoarseness, but recovered without treatment. The rate of adverse events was significantly higher in men (p = 0.011), and a greater amount of injected contrast agent was related to a higher rate of adverse events (p = 0.000). Imaging quality was evaluated as 'good' or 'very good' in all cases. Prosure®300, a generic CT contrast agent developed in South Korea, can be used in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT

  12. Evaluation of adverse events and imaging quality in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using generic CT contrast developed in South Korea: A multicenter prospective observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, You Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Micheal Yong; Rha, Sung Eun [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Rim [Dept. of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Seong Su [Dept. of Radiology, St. Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yeon Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Mi [Dept. of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical safety and usefulness of the Prosure®300 in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT. This prospective study was approved by our center's Institutional Review Board. This study included 727 patients in four hospitals who underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using Prosure®300 from December 2010 to June 2011. Adverse events were classified into minor and major adverse events. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between adverse events and patient gender, age, underlying disease, and amount of injected contrast agent. Two radiologists independently evaluated imaging quality as poor, insufficient, sufficient, good, or very good. One hundred seventy-six out of 727 patients complained of adverse events, but most of them were minor adverse events. Five patients complained of dyspnea and one patient had hoarseness, but recovered without treatment. The rate of adverse events was significantly higher in men (p = 0.011), and a greater amount of injected contrast agent was related to a higher rate of adverse events (p = 0.000). Imaging quality was evaluated as 'good' or 'very good' in all cases. Prosure®300, a generic CT contrast agent developed in South Korea, can be used in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT.

  13. Radiological findings of dissecting aneurysm -a correlative study of CT with angiography-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Tae Yeong; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyup; Han, Man Chung

    1987-01-01

    This study comprised 16 patients with aortic dissecting aneurysm who were admitted to Seoul National University Hospital from May 1984 to January 1987. CT findings in 16 cases of aortic dissecting aneurysm were correlated with angiographic findings retrospectively. The results were analysed. 1. Number of male was 11 and that of female was 5. Male patients in fifties were most common and 4 in number. 13 patients had hypertension or history of hypertension among 14 patients. There were one case of Marfan's syndrome, preeclampsia and Takayasu's arteritis respectively. 2. There were 5 cases of DeBakey type I, 1 case of type II and 9 cases of types III dissecting aneurysm. Type III was most common. 3. CT confirmed as superior vena cava which was not identified whether it was superior vena cava or unopacified false lumen by angiography in one case. Regarding distal extent, authors defined A whose extent was proximal to diaphragm and B beyond it for convenience sake. There was one false negative case in CT among 16 cases which was diagnosed as dissecting aneurysm type IIIB by angiography and confirmed as type III surgically. One case was diagnosed as type IB by CT and as type IIIB by angiography and confirmed as type I surgically. Extent was more accurate in CT than angiography. One case was diagnosed as type II by CT but misdiagnosed as right atrial tumor by angiography. 4. Diagnostic sensitivities of CT and angiography in this study were 94% (15/16) respectively. CT was more advantageous in hemothorax, hemopericardium, hemomediastinum, unopacified false lumen, aortic wall calcification and getting information about mediastinum. In angiography aortic regurgitation and tear site and involvement of abdominal vessels could be observed

  14. Radiological findings of dissecting aneurysm -a correlative study of CT with angiography-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Tae Yeong; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyup; Han, Man Chung [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    This study comprised 16 patients with aortic dissecting aneurysm who were admitted to Seoul National University Hospital from May 1984 to January 1987. CT findings in 16 cases of aortic dissecting aneurysm were correlated with angiographic findings retrospectively. The results were analysed. 1. Number of male was 11 and that of female was 5. Male patients in fifties were most common and 4 in number. 13 patients had hypertension or history of hypertension among 14 patients. There were one case of Marfan's syndrome, preeclampsia and Takayasu's arteritis respectively. 2. There were 5 cases of DeBakey type I, 1 case of type II and 9 cases of types III dissecting aneurysm. Type III was most common. 3. CT confirmed as superior vena cava which was not identified whether it was superior vena cava or unopacified false lumen by angiography in one case. Regarding distal extent, authors defined A whose extent was proximal to diaphragm and B beyond it for convenience sake. There was one false negative case in CT among 16 cases which was diagnosed as dissecting aneurysm type IIIB by angiography and confirmed as type III surgically. One case was diagnosed as type IB by CT and as type IIIB by angiography and confirmed as type I surgically. Extent was more accurate in CT than angiography. One case was diagnosed as type II by CT but misdiagnosed as right atrial tumor by angiography. 4. Diagnostic sensitivities of CT and angiography in this study were 94% (15/16) respectively. CT was more advantageous in hemothorax, hemopericardium, hemomediastinum, unopacified false lumen, aortic wall calcification and getting information about mediastinum. In angiography aortic regurgitation and tear site and involvement of abdominal vessels could be observed.

  15. Evaluation of reduced-dose CT for acute non-traumatic abdominal pain: evaluation of diagnostic accuracy in comparison to standard-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Bongers, Malte Niklas; Zinsser, Dominik; Schabel, Christoph; Wichmann, Julian L; Arshid, Rami; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2018-01-01

    Background Patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain often undergo abdominal computed tomography (CT). However, abdominal CT is associated with high radiation exposure. Purpose To evaluate diagnostic performance of a reduced-dose 100 kVp CT protocol with advanced modeled iterative reconstruction as compared to a linearly blended 120 kVp protocol for assessment of acute, non-traumatic abdominal pain. Material and Methods Two radiologists assessed 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series of 112 consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic pain (onset diagnostic confidence. Both 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series were quantitatively evaluated regarding radiation dose and image noise. Comparative statistics and diagnostic accuracy was calculated using receiver operating curve (ROC) statistics, with final clinical diagnosis/clinical follow-up as reference standard. Results Image quality was high for both series without detectable significant differences ( P = 0.157). Image noise and artifacts were rated low for both series but significantly higher for 100 kVp ( P ≤ 0.021). Diagnostic accuracy was high for both series (120 kVp: area under the curve [AUC] = 0.950, sensitivity = 0.958, specificity = 0.941; 100 kVp: AUC ≥ 0.910, sensitivity ≥ 0.937, specificity = 0.882; P ≥ 0.516) with almost perfect inter-rater agreement (Kappa = 0.939). Diagnostic confidence was high for both dose levels without significant differences (100 kVp 5, range 4-5; 120 kVp 5, range 3-5; P = 0.134). The 100 kVp series yielded 26.1% lower radiation dose compared with the 120 kVp series (5.72 ± 2.23 mSv versus 7.75 ± 3.02 mSv, P diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  16. [Liver trauma due to penetrating lesions: miscellanea, personal case series, clinical and CT findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, A; Nocera, V; De Rosa, A; Rossi, E; Carbone, M; Gatta, G; Vitale, L; Vigliotti, A

    2000-12-01

    Penetrating liver wounds are related to many causes and rank second after blunt abdominal and liver trauma. We will report the clinical and radiological findings of our personal series of patients with penetrating trauma, especially by firearms and stab and cut wounds. We will also try to define the diagnostic workup of these traumas, which is especially based on CT signs of liver damage and associated changes and which is of basic importance for following treatment, both surgical or conservative. In the last seven years we retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of penetrating liver trauma. The patients were 19 men and 12 women, ranging in age 18 to 73 (mean 42), with penetrating liver injuries from firearms (16 patients) and stab (9 cases) wounds; 6 patients had injuries from different causes. Abdominal CT was carried out in emergency with the CT Angiography (CTA) technique in all patients. In the patients with suspected chest and abdomen involvement CT was performed from the mid-chest for accurate assessment of diaphragm and lung bases and to exclude associated pleuropulmonary damage. Penetrating liver wounds were caused by firearms in 70% of cases, by stabbing in 12% and, in the extant 18%, by other causes such as home accidents, road and work traumas, and liver biopsy. In our series, the liver was most frequently involved, especially by firearms wounds; in our 16 cases the most frequent injuries were hemorrhagic tears. We found bullets in the liver in 6 cases. In one case of home accident the patient wounded himself while slicing bread with a long knife, which cut into the anterior abdominal wall and tore the anterior liver capsule, as seen at CTA. Penetrating wounds to liver and abdomen are less frequent than those to the chest. In the past decade the use of CT has changed the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to such injuries completely, decreasing the resort to explorative laparotomy and hepatorrhaphy. Indeed, CT provides a clear picture of the extent and

  17. Automatic blood vessel based-liver segmentation using the portal phase abdominal CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklad, Ahmed S.; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Iinuma, Gen

    2018-02-01

    Liver segmentation is the basis for computer-based planning of hepatic surgical interventions. In diagnosis and analysis of hepatic diseases and surgery planning, automatic segmentation of liver has high importance. Blood vessel (BV) has showed high performance at liver segmentation. In our previous work, we developed a semi-automatic method that segments the liver through the portal phase abdominal CT images in two stages. First stage was interactive segmentation of abdominal blood vessels (ABVs) and subsequent classification into hepatic (HBVs) and non-hepatic (non-HBVs). This stage had 5 interactions that include selective threshold for bone segmentation, selecting two seed points for kidneys segmentation, selection of inferior vena cava (IVC) entrance for starting ABVs segmentation, identification of the portal vein (PV) entrance to the liver and the IVC-exit for classifying HBVs from other ABVs (non-HBVs). Second stage is automatic segmentation of the liver based on segmented ABVs as described in [4]. For full automation of our method we developed a method [5] that segments ABVs automatically tackling the first three interactions. In this paper, we propose full automation of classifying ABVs into HBVs and non- HBVs and consequently full automation of liver segmentation that we proposed in [4]. Results illustrate that the method is effective at segmentation of the liver through the portal abdominal CT images.

  18. Cone beam CT for organs motion evaluation in pediatric abdominal neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazmy, Mohamed Soliman; Khafaga, Yasser; Mousa, Amr; Khalil, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: To quantify the organ motion relative to bone in different breathing states in pediatric neuroblastoma using cone beam CT (CBCT) for better definition of the planning margins during abdominal IMRT. Methods and materials: Forty-two datasets of kV CBCT for 9 pediatric patients with abdominal neuroblastoma treated with IMRT were evaluated. Organs positions on planning CT scan were considered the reference position against which organs and target motions were evaluated. The position of the kidneys and the liver was assessed in all scans. The target movement was evaluated in four patients who were treated for gross residual disease. Results: The mean age of the patients was 4.1 ± 1.6 years. The range of target movement in the craniocaudal direction (CC) was 5 mm. In the CC direction, the range of movement was 10 mm for the right kidney, and 8 mm for the left kidney. Similarly, the liver upper edge range of motion was 11 mm while the lower edge range of motion was 13 mm. Conclusions: With the use of daily CBCT we may be able to reduce the PTV margin. If CBCT is not used daily, a wider margin is needed.

  19. Reducing abdominal CT radiation dose with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique in children: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorona, Gregory A. [The Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Allegheny General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ceschin, Rafael C.; Clayton, Barbara L.; Sutcavage, Tom; Tadros, Sameh S.; Panigrahy, Ashok [The Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The use of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm has been shown to reduce radiation doses in adults undergoing abdominal CT studies while preserving image quality. To our knowledge, no studies have been done to validate the use of ASIR in children. To retrospectively evaluate differences in radiation dose and image quality in pediatric CT abdominal studies utilizing 40% ASIR compared with filtered-back projection (FBP). Eleven patients (mean age 8.5 years, range 2-17 years) had separate 40% ASIR and FBP enhanced abdominal CT studies on different days between July 2009 and October 2010. The ASIR studies utilized a 38% mA reduction in addition to our pediatric protocol mAs. Study volume CT dose indexes (CTDI{sub vol}) and dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. A consistent representative image was obtained from each study. The images were independently evaluated by two radiologists in a blinded manner for diagnostic utility, image sharpness and image noise. The average CTDI{sub vol} and DLP for the 40% ASIR studies were 4.25 mGy and 185.04 mGy-cm, compared with 6.75 mGy and 275.79 mGy-cm for the FBP studies, representing 37% and 33% reductions in both, respectively. The radiologists' assessments of subjective image quality did not demonstrate any significant differences between the ASIR and FBP images. In our experience, the use of 40% ASIR with a 38% decrease in mA lowers the radiation dose for children undergoing enhanced abdominal examinations by an average of 33%, while maintaining diagnostically acceptable images. (orig.)

  20. Reducing abdominal CT radiation dose with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique in children: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorona, Gregory A.; Ceschin, Rafael C.; Clayton, Barbara L.; Sutcavage, Tom; Tadros, Sameh S.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The use of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm has been shown to reduce radiation doses in adults undergoing abdominal CT studies while preserving image quality. To our knowledge, no studies have been done to validate the use of ASIR in children. To retrospectively evaluate differences in radiation dose and image quality in pediatric CT abdominal studies utilizing 40% ASIR compared with filtered-back projection (FBP). Eleven patients (mean age 8.5 years, range 2-17 years) had separate 40% ASIR and FBP enhanced abdominal CT studies on different days between July 2009 and October 2010. The ASIR studies utilized a 38% mA reduction in addition to our pediatric protocol mAs. Study volume CT dose indexes (CTDI vol ) and dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. A consistent representative image was obtained from each study. The images were independently evaluated by two radiologists in a blinded manner for diagnostic utility, image sharpness and image noise. The average CTDI vol and DLP for the 40% ASIR studies were 4.25 mGy and 185.04 mGy-cm, compared with 6.75 mGy and 275.79 mGy-cm for the FBP studies, representing 37% and 33% reductions in both, respectively. The radiologists' assessments of subjective image quality did not demonstrate any significant differences between the ASIR and FBP images. In our experience, the use of 40% ASIR with a 38% decrease in mA lowers the radiation dose for children undergoing enhanced abdominal examinations by an average of 33%, while maintaining diagnostically acceptable images. (orig.)

  1. CT findings of exophageal perforation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jeong Nam; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-01

    To determine which CT findings are useful for the early disgnosis of esophageal perforation, and on the basis of these findings, to assess the accuracy of prediction of the perforation site. A review of medical records indicated that between January 1995 and December 2001, 36 patients with esophageal perforation were admitted to our hospital. Thirteen of these [M:F=8:5, age; 28-69 (mean, 52.4) years], who had undergone CT chest scanning, were included in this study. The causes of esophageal perforation were trauma (n=5), infectious diseases (n=4), Boerhaave syndrome (n=1), lung cancer (n=1), esophageal cancer (n=1), and idiopathic. Two chest radiologists unaware of the clinical findings reviewed the CT scans and predicted whether the upper or lower esophagus was perforated. The most common CT finding was extraluminal air at the posterior mediastinum (n=11), while other findings included pulmonary consolidation (n=10), pleural effusion (n=7), discontinuity of the esophageal wall (n=6) and subcutaneous emphysema (n=4), fluid collection around the esophagus (n-4), esophageal wall thickening (n=4), pneumothorax (n=2), and lung abscess (n=2). The perforation site was accurately predicted in 76.9% of cases (10/13). The CT findings which help the diagnosis of esophageal perforation, and prediction of the sites at which it occurs, are extraluminal air of fluid collection, focal defect of the esophageal wall, and esophageal wall thickening.

  2. CT findings of exophageal perforation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Jeong Nam; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Hahm, Chang Kok

    2002-01-01

    To determine which CT findings are useful for the early disgnosis of esophageal perforation, and on the basis of these findings, to assess the accuracy of prediction of the perforation site. A review of medical records indicated that between January 1995 and December 2001, 36 patients with esophageal perforation were admitted to our hospital. Thirteen of these [M:F=8:5, age; 28-69 (mean, 52.4) years], who had undergone CT chest scanning, were included in this study. The causes of esophageal perforation were trauma (n=5), infectious diseases (n=4), Boerhaave syndrome (n=1), lung cancer (n=1), esophageal cancer (n=1), and idiopathic. Two chest radiologists unaware of the clinical findings reviewed the CT scans and predicted whether the upper or lower esophagus was perforated. The most common CT finding was extraluminal air at the posterior mediastinum (n=11), while other findings included pulmonary consolidation (n=10), pleural effusion (n=7), discontinuity of the esophageal wall (n=6) and subcutaneous emphysema (n=4), fluid collection around the esophagus (n-4), esophageal wall thickening (n=4), pneumothorax (n=2), and lung abscess (n=2). The perforation site was accurately predicted in 76.9% of cases (10/13). The CT findings which help the diagnosis of esophageal perforation, and prediction of the sites at which it occurs, are extraluminal air of fluid collection, focal defect of the esophageal wall, and esophageal wall thickening

  3. CT findings of orbital inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Min; Shin, Hyun Joon; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients with orbital inflammatory disease (OIDs) were retrospectively reviewed in order to analyze detailed CT findings which might aid in differentiating OIDs. This study comprised 18 pseudotumors, 5 thyroid ophthalmopathies, and 6 cases of orbital cellulitis. CT scans of the pseudotumors showed various findings such as exophthalmos, scleritis, myositis of the extraocular muscle (MOM), and bone lesion. Bone lesions of the pseudo tumors, which have been rarely reported, were present in 7 cases in our series. Bilateral exophthalmos, myositis, and retrobulbar fat deposition were readily detected by CT in thyroid ophthalmopathy, and, in addition, we found bone erosions involving the orbital apices in 2 cases. In orbital cellulitis, extraorbital soft tissue swelling and lateral displacement of the medial rectus muscle in cases with ethmoiditis were the most conspicuous features. In summary, because of the overlapping CT findings in OIDs, careful examination of CT findings regarding the mode of EOM involvement and the presence or absence of scleritis or sinusitis might help narrow down the differential diagnosis. A pseudotumor with bone lesions could be mistaken as a malignant lesion, and therefore it is necessary to correlate clinical features with CT findings for an accurate diagnosis

  4. CT findings of slilcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dong Hee; Kim, Kun Il; Son, Hyun Ju; Ro, Young Jin; Jung, Doo Young; Park, Jae Yeong; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1996-01-01

    To describe chest radiographic and CT findings of silicosis, and to compare their findings. Ten coal miners and six stonemasons were included in this study. All were male and their mean age was 53.1. The mean duration of dust exposure was 15.2 years(range, 5-30 years) in coal miners and 25.3 years(range, 15-35 years) in stonemasons. Chest radiographs(n=16), conventional CT scans(n=4), and high resolution CT(HRCT) scans(n=13) were evaluated. Parenchymal abnormalities were interpreted on the basis of ILO standard films(1980) in chest radiographs and on the basis of CAP(College of American Pathologists, 1979) in CT(HRCT) films. Chest radiographs revealed large opacities(n=8), small opacities(n=6), and normal findings(n=2). Type r(n=4) and category 1/1(n=2) were most common for small opacities, while for large opacities, category B(n=4) and category c(n=4) were most common. These small and large opacities were located predominantly in the area of the upper and middle lung. Associated findings were emphysema(n=7), eggshell nodal calcifications(n=3), pneumothorax(n=3), C-P angle blunting(n=4), and pleural thickening(n=1). CT scans revealed micronodules(n=16), nodules(n=3), and progressive massive fibrosis(PMF, n=8). All these lesions were located in the upper and middle lungs, especially in the central portion of the posterior lung. PMF showed diffuse and homogenous(n=3) and puntate(n=2) calcifications, cavitations(n=5), air bronchograms(n=3), and necrosis(n=1). Peripheral paracicatrical emphysema was associated with PMF(n=8). Other findings were pneumothorax(n=4), emphysema(n=10), hilar and mediastinal nodal enlargement(n=11) bronchial wall thick- enings(n=6), bronchiectasis(n=1), pleural thickening(n=7), parenchymal fibrosis(n=1), and pulmonary tuberculosis(n=2). Small and large opacities in chest radiographs and micronodules, nodules, and PMFs in CT (HRCT) films were located predominately in the upper and middle lungs, especially in the central portion of the

  5. Computed tomography of pediatric abdominal masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kook, Shin Ho; Ko, Eun Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Suh, Jung Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    Ultrasonography is a very useful diagnostic modality for evaluation of the pediatric abdominal masses, due to faster, cheaper, and no radiation hazard than CT. But CT has more advantages in assessing precise anatomic location, and extent of the pathologic process, and also has particular value in defining the size, relation of the mass to surrounding organs and detection of lymphadenopathy. We analyzed CT features of 35 cases of pathologically proven pediatric abdominal masses for recent 2 years at Ewha Woman's University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1.The most common originating site was kidney (20 cases, 57.1%); followed by gastrointestinal (5 cases, 14.3%), nonrenal retroperitoneal (4 cases, 11.4%), hepatobiliary (3 cases, 8.6%), and genital (3 cases, 8.6%) in order of frequency. 2.The most common mass was hydronephrosis (11 cases, 31.4%), Wilms' tumor (7 cases, 20.0%), neuroblastoma, choledochal cyst, periappendiceal abscess (3 cases, 8.6%, respectively), ovarian cyst (2 cases, 5.7%) were next in order of frequency. 3.Male to female ratio was 4:5 and choledochal cyst and ovarian cyst were found only in females. The most prevalent age group was 1-3 year old (12 cases, 34.3%). 4.With CT, the diagnosis of hydronephrosis was easy in all cases and could evaluate of its severity, renal function and obstruction site with high accuracy. 5.Wilms' tumor and neuroblastoma were relatively well differentiated by their characteristic CT features; such as location, shape, margin, middle cross, calyceal appearance and calcification, etc. 6.Ovarian and mensentric cysts had similar CT appearance. 7.In other pediatric abdominal masses, CT provided excellent information about anatomic detail, precise extent of tumor and differential diagnostic findings. So, CT is useful imaging modality for the demonstration and diagnosis of abdominal mass lesions in pediatric patients.

  6. CT findings of colonic diverticulitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shigeru; Ohba, Satoru; Mizutani, Masaru

    1998-01-01

    Although colonic diverticulitis has no indication for operation, but in some mistaken cases were operated with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We evaluated the CT findings of colonic diverticulitis about 19 cases and of asymptomatic colonic diverticula about 15 cases retrospectively. Diagnosis was confirmed of barium enema and operation. CT are complementary methods of examination that can delineated the range of thickening of the colon and the extension of inflammatory changes around the colon. We also believe that CT findings of colonic diverticulitis are useful for differentiating from a diagnosis of appendicitis. (author)

  7. CT and {sup 18F}DG PET/CT findings of esophageal squamous cell papillomatosis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Chang; Park, Won Kyu; Lee, Jae Kyo; Kim, Kum Rae; Hwang, Mi Soo [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    Esophageal squamous cell papillomatosis is a rare disorder that is usually found incidentally on an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy examination or autopsy. A 70-year-old woman presented with a two-month history of dysphagia and abdominal discomfort. A chest CT scan showed diffuse marked thickening of the esophageal wall along the entire length and multiple small enhancing polypoid projections in the distal esophagus. Diffuse circumferential FDG uptake in the entire esophagus was seen on [{sup 18}F] FDG PET/CT. Squamous papillomatosis was diagnosed by an endoscopic biopsy. We report a case of extensive esophageal papillomatosis with imaging features on CT and [{sup 18}F] FDG PET/CT, with a review of the clinical literature.

  8. CT findings of exophytic hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Cho, June Sik; Kim, Hyung Lyul; Lee, Chung Keun; Kim, Dae Hong; Rhee, Byung Chull [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-15

    We retrospectively evaluated the characteristic computed tomographic(CT) findings in nine patients with exohepatic hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) pathologically prove by surgery(n=2) or percutaneous needle biopsy(n=7). The CT findings of exphepatic HCC were correlated with clinical findings and compared with those of usual HCC. Lesions were in the left lobe(n=7) and right lobe(n=2) of the liver. All lesions showed a well-marginated hypodense mass with capsular enhancement on enhanced CT scan. The patterns of capsular enhancement were complete in five and partial in four case. The portal vein thrombosis was seen only in one case. There was no difference between exohepatic HCC and usual HCC in clinical findings such as increased {alpha}-fetoprotein({alpha}-FP), positive hepatitis B surface antigen(HBsAg), and underlying liver cirrhosis. In conclusion, the CT findings of exohepatic HCC were a well-defined hyperdense mass with complete or partial capsular enhancement and these findings may be useful in differentiation from the tumors of adjacent organs.

  9. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D.; Zaidi, Habib; Platon, Alexandra [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Community, Primary Care and Emergency Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Perneger, Thomas [University Hospital of Geneva, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. (orig.)

  10. Metastatic tumor of the pancreas: helical CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soon Jin; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo Keun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Choi, Sang Hee; Jang, Hyun Jung; Lee, Ji Yeon

    2000-01-01

    To analyze the helical computed tomographic (CT) findings of distant metastatic tumors to the pancreas and to determine the differential points between these and primary pamcreatic carcinomas. We sruveyed 22 patients with metastatic tumor of the pancreas, proven on the basis of clinical and pathological findings. Seventeen patients were men, and five were women, and their ages ranged between 36 and 83 years. Their primary conditions were lung cancer (n=3D15), rectal cancer (n=3D2), melanoma of the foot, chondrosarcoma of the sacrum, cervical cancer, leiomyosarcoma of the uterus, and extragonadal choriocarcinoma of the mediastinum. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal helical CT findings, analysing the number, location, size and attenuation of masses, as well as secondary change, which included dilatation of the pancreatic and biliary ducts and invasion of peripancreatic tissue or vessels. We also evaluated the differential findings of primary pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients had a solitary focal mass, while in five, two masses were present. Among the 22 patients, low-density nodular masses were present in 21; in the other, in whom multiple metastasis from chondrosarcoma had occurred, there was dense calcification. The size of metastatic masses varied, ranging from 0.6 to 6 cm in diameter. The pancreatic duct proximal to the mass was dilated in ten cases, while the bile duct was dilated in six. The metastatic masses masses demonstrated no peripancreatic or vascular invasion, though they showed a discrete margin and contour bulging. Single metastasis to the pancreas was most common, and metastatic masses had a discrete margin, with contour bulging. There was no peripancreatic or vascular invasion. If the metastasis involved a single low-attenuated mass, however, with pancreatic or biliary dilatation, it was difficult to differentiate this from primary pancreatic cancer. (author)

  11. Whole-body MSCT of patients after polytrauma: abdominal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehrl, B.; Sadick, M.; Diehl, S.; Dueber, C.; Obertacke, U.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this retrospective study was to evaluate the spectrum of abdominal injuries and the reliability of computed tomography-based diagnosis in patients after polytrauma. Material and methods: CT findings and clinical reports for 177 patients after polytrauma were evaluated with regard to abdominal injuries. Clinical patient reports at the time of discharge from the hospital were utilized as the standard of reference. Abdominal injuries resulting from an accident, frequent additional traumas and following therapeutic procedures were recorded. In the case of discrepancies in the reports, the CT scans were viewed retrospectively. Results: In 30 out of 177 patients, 42 abdominal injuries were detected. 69% of the injuries were caused by traffic accidents while 31% resulted from falls. Liver and spleen injuries were the most common. 50% of the cases were treated surgically, and the other half of the cases underwent non-surgical conservative therapy. Massive chest traumas, pelvic injuries, cerebral traumas and injuries to extremities were commonly associated with abdominal injuries. Evaluation of the discrepancies in the clinical reports showed that injury to the pancreas and the small intestine were not successfully detected on CT, thus resulting in a false negative diagnosis. Early stages of organ parenchyma laceration were also initially misdiagnosed on CT. (orig.)

  12. CT findings in patients with cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Kimiichi

    1982-01-01

    Clinical findings and CT findings in 73 cases of cerebral palsy were studied. The causes of cerebral palsy were presumed to be as follows: abnormal cerebral development (36%), asphyxial delivery (34%), and immature delivery (19%), etc. CT findings were abnormal in 58% of the 73 cases, 83% of the spastic tetraplegia patients and all of the spastic hemiplegia patients showed abnormal CT findings. All the patients with spastic monoplegia presented normal CT findings. In 75% of the spastic hemiplegia cases, the CT abnormalities were due to cerebral parenchymal abnormality such as porencephaly and regional low absorption. In cases of spastic tetraplegia, cerebral parenchymal abnormality was found only in 10%. Cortical atrophy was found only in 15 of the 73 cases, whereas central atrophy was found in 36 cases. (Ueda, J.)

  13. CT findings of renal abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jun; Kim, Mi Young; Woo, Jung Ju; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Won Hong; Jeon, Jeong Dong; Jeon, Woo Ki; Han, Chang Yul

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine characteristic CT findings in renal abscess. Twenty cases of renal abscess were retrospectively analyzed for CT findings relating to the shape and extent of the abscess, change of nephrogram, peripheral rim enhancement, wedge-shaped enhancement on delayed scans, enlargement of the kidney involved and associated findings. Seven patients had a renal abscess at the right kidney, nine at the lift kidney and two bilaterally. The abscesses were round in 18 cases and finger-like in two. Rim enhancement around renal abscess was seen in four cases (20%). Changes in the nephrogram around the abscess were seen in 12 cases (60%). In all six patients who had undergone delayed postcontrast scans, wedge-shaped enhancement was shown around the abscess (100%). In the observation of the extent of renal abscesses, 14 cases were within the kidney, six cases extended the beyond renal capsule, and two were loculated in the renal fascia itself. Renal enlargement was seen in nine cases (45%). These results suggest that CT findings such as delayed wedge-shaped enhancement, change of nephrogram, peripheral rim enhancement, renal enlargement, and associated findings are valuable for diagnosis, and that CT also gives information concerning the extent, evolution and complication of a renal abscess

  14. Unusual finding in pediatric Churg-Strauss: renal lesions on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldan, Jorge; McCauley, Roy; Pilichowska, Monica; Milner, Lawrence; Lopez-Benitez, Jorge M.

    2011-01-01

    After a 19-year-old female experienced several weeks of unrelieved fevers, an abdominal CT revealed multiple low-attenuation renal lesions. As the differential included lymphoma, infections and infarcts, a core biopsy of the kidney was performed, which revealed changes consistent with Churg-Strauss syndrome. (orig.)

  15. Unusual finding in pediatric Churg-Strauss: renal lesions on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldan, Jorge; McCauley, Roy [Tufts Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Pilichowska, Monica [Tufts Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Milner, Lawrence [Tufts Medical Center, Department of Nephrology, Boston, MA (United States); Lopez-Benitez, Jorge M [Tufts Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    After a 19-year-old female experienced several weeks of unrelieved fevers, an abdominal CT revealed multiple low-attenuation renal lesions. As the differential included lymphoma, infections and infarcts, a core biopsy of the kidney was performed, which revealed changes consistent with Churg-Strauss syndrome. (orig.)

  16. Oral contrast for CT in patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal and pelvic pain: what should be its current role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Ania Z; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Positive oral contrast agents, including barium suspensions and water-soluble iodinated solutions, have traditionally been used in conjunction with the CT evaluation of patients with abdominal and pelvic pain. Due to continued advancements in CT technology, and due to increasing obesity and correspondingly a general increase in the intra-abdominal and intra-pelvic fat separating bowel loops in North American patients and in patients in other parts of the world over the past few decades, the ability of radiologists to accurately evaluate the cause of acute symptoms has substantially improved. Recent research and evolving imaging society guidelines/systematic reviews increasingly support performing CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis without the need for positive oral contrast in these types of adult patient populations, in most clinical situations. Increased patient throughput, patient preference, patient safety, and most importantly, retention of high diagnostic accuracy, are reasons for this recent change in practice to routinely omit the use of enteric contrast agents for the majority of patients presenting with acute abdominal and pelvic pain whom are undergoing emergency CT.

  17. Upper abdominal teratomas in infants: radiological findings and importance of the vascular anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Jonathan; Mazrani, Waseem; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Jones, Niall; Kiely, Edward M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Surgery Department, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Pathology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Primary upper abdominal teratomas are extremely rare tumours, most commonly arising in infants. The radiological literature relating to them is sparse. Surgical resection is difficult due to distortion of the vascular anatomy. To reassess the value of preoperative imaging with specific reference to the presence/absence of typical features of teratoma, anatomical location and adjacent vascular anatomy. The histopathology database was used to identify infants with upper abdominal teratoma. Pathological, surgical and radiological data were reviewed. The search of the database identified 12 infants (10 girls, 2 boys) with an abdominal/retroperitoneal teratoma during the period 1993 to 2006. All teratomas were benign. In the majority of infants, typical radiological features of teratoma were demonstrated (fat, calcium). Identification of the major abdominal vessels on CT scan (most commonly the inferior vena cava) was not possible in all infants. Distortion (and commonly encasement) of the adjacent major abdominal vessels was usually evident. Upper abdominal teratomas in infants have typical radiological features. Preoperative delineation of the major vascular anatomy is often imprecise. Significant distortion of vascular anatomy was present in all infants and awareness of this feature impacts on surgical planning. (orig.)

  18. Upper abdominal teratomas in infants: radiological findings and importance of the vascular anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Jonathan; Mazrani, Waseem; McHugh, Kieran; Jones, Niall; Kiely, Edward M.; Sebire, Neil J.

    2008-01-01

    Primary upper abdominal teratomas are extremely rare tumours, most commonly arising in infants. The radiological literature relating to them is sparse. Surgical resection is difficult due to distortion of the vascular anatomy. To reassess the value of preoperative imaging with specific reference to the presence/absence of typical features of teratoma, anatomical location and adjacent vascular anatomy. The histopathology database was used to identify infants with upper abdominal teratoma. Pathological, surgical and radiological data were reviewed. The search of the database identified 12 infants (10 girls, 2 boys) with an abdominal/retroperitoneal teratoma during the period 1993 to 2006. All teratomas were benign. In the majority of infants, typical radiological features of teratoma were demonstrated (fat, calcium). Identification of the major abdominal vessels on CT scan (most commonly the inferior vena cava) was not possible in all infants. Distortion (and commonly encasement) of the adjacent major abdominal vessels was usually evident. Upper abdominal teratomas in infants have typical radiological features. Preoperative delineation of the major vascular anatomy is often imprecise. Significant distortion of vascular anatomy was present in all infants and awareness of this feature impacts on surgical planning. (orig.)

  19. CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia: correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Young Goo; Park, Un Sup [College of Medicine, Chungang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia and to correlate them with pathologic findings to help differentiating from lung cancer. We evaluated radiologic and pathologic findings of five patients with solitary pulmonary nodule which were confirmed as focal organizing pneumonia pathologically. On CT scan, focal organizing pneumonia had irregular margin contacting the pleura in all five cases. The shape of the nodules were spherical to wedge or elliptical and the size from 3.5cm to 5.5cm(average 4.2 cm) in largest diameter. On postcontrast CT scan, all nodules showed enhancement and four cases showed central low density components. Two nodules contained air within the nodule. In four cases, pleural changes such as effusion and/or focal thickening were noted. No lymphadenopathy was found in all cases. Pathologically, the enhancing portion on CT showed findings of organizing pneumonia such as granulation tissue with fibroblast proliferation in alveolar space and interstitial thickening. The central low density areas on CT were due to ischemic necrosis, abscess and exudate, transudate and infiltration of foamy histiocyte. The possibility of focal organizing pneumonia should be considered when peripherally located solitary pulmonary nodule had enhancing component with no combined lymphadenopathy on CT scan.

  20. CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia: correlation with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Young Goo; Park, Un Sup

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia and to correlate them with pathologic findings to help differentiating from lung cancer. We evaluated radiologic and pathologic findings of five patients with solitary pulmonary nodule which were confirmed as focal organizing pneumonia pathologically. On CT scan, focal organizing pneumonia had irregular margin contacting the pleura in all five cases. The shape of the nodules were spherical to wedge or elliptical and the size from 3.5cm to 5.5cm(average 4.2 cm) in largest diameter. On postcontrast CT scan, all nodules showed enhancement and four cases showed central low density components. Two nodules contained air within the nodule. In four cases, pleural changes such as effusion and/or focal thickening were noted. No lymphadenopathy was found in all cases. Pathologically, the enhancing portion on CT showed findings of organizing pneumonia such as granulation tissue with fibroblast proliferation in alveolar space and interstitial thickening. The central low density areas on CT were due to ischemic necrosis, abscess and exudate, transudate and infiltration of foamy histiocyte. The possibility of focal organizing pneumonia should be considered when peripherally located solitary pulmonary nodule had enhancing component with no combined lymphadenopathy on CT scan

  1. Abdominal multi-organ CT segmentation using organ correlation graph and prediction-based shape and location priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Toshiyuki; Linguraru, Marius George; Hori, Masatoshi; Summers, Ronald M; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The paper addresses the automated segmentation of multiple organs in upper abdominal CT data. We propose a framework of multi-organ segmentation which is adaptable to any imaging conditions without using intensity information in manually traced training data. The features of the framework are as follows: (1) the organ correlation graph (OCG) is introduced, which encodes the spatial correlations among organs inherent in human anatomy; (2) the patient-specific organ shape and location priors obtained using OCG enable the estimation of intensity priors from only target data and optionally a number of untraced CT data of the same imaging condition as the target data. The proposed methods were evaluated through segmentation of eight abdominal organs (liver, spleen, left and right kidney, pancreas, gallbladder, aorta, and inferior vena cava) from 86 CT data obtained by four imaging conditions at two hospitals. The performance was comparable to the state-of-the-art method using intensity priors constructed from manually traced data.

  2. Is dual-phase abdominal CT necessary for the optimal detection of metastases from renal cell carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Y.; Liew, S.; Taylor, M.B.; Bonington, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether dual-phase abdominal computed tomography (CT) detected more metastases than portal-phase CT alone in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and methods: Audit committee approval was obtained. A retrospective audit was undertaken in 100 patients who underwent both arterial and portal phase CT. The CT images were independently reviewed by two consultant radiologists. The presence of metastases in the liver, pancreas, and contralateral kidney were recorded for each phase of contrast enhancement. Results: Metastases were identified in the liver in 27 patients, pancreas in 12, and contralateral kidney in 23 patients. Nine of the 27 (33%) liver metastases, three of the 12 (25%) pancreatic metastases, and two of the 23 (9%) renal metastases were only detected in the arterial phase, whilst four of the 27 (15%) liver metastases, three of the 12 (25%) pancreatic metastases, and two of the 23 (9%) renal metastases were only detected in the portal phase. Nine patients (9%) had metastases only visualized in the arterial phase, and six (6%) only in the portal phase. Detection of metastases only visible in the arterial phase led to a change of management in two patients (2%). Conclusion: The audit results support our current standard of dual-phase abdominal CT for optimal detection of RCC metastases.

  3. How to differentiate acute pelvic inflammatory disease from acute appendicitis? A decision tree based on CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Hentour, Kim; Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emmanuelle; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice [Lapeyronie Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier (France); Molinari, Nicolas [UMR 5149 IMAG, CHU, Department of Medical Information and Statistics, Montpellier (France)

    2018-02-15

    To construct a decision tree based on CT findings to differentiate acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) from acute appendicitis (AA) in women with lower abdominal pain and inflammatory syndrome. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and informed consent was waived. Contrast-enhanced CT studies of 109 women with acute PID and 218 age-matched women with AA were retrospectively and independently reviewed by two radiologists to identify CT findings predictive of PID or AA. Surgical and laboratory data were used for the PID and AA reference standard. Appropriate tests were performed to compare PID and AA and a CT decision tree using the classification and regression tree (CART) algorithm was generated. The median patient age was 28 years (interquartile range, 22-39 years). According to the decision tree, an appendiceal diameter ≥ 7 mm was the most discriminating criterion for differentiating acute PID and AA, followed by a left tubal diameter ≥ 10 mm, with a global accuracy of 98.2 % (95 % CI: 96-99.4). Appendiceal diameter and left tubal thickening are the most discriminating CT criteria for differentiating acute PID from AA. (orig.)

  4. How to differentiate acute pelvic inflammatory disease from acute appendicitis? A decision tree based on CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hentour, Kim; Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emmanuelle; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice; Molinari, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    To construct a decision tree based on CT findings to differentiate acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) from acute appendicitis (AA) in women with lower abdominal pain and inflammatory syndrome. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and informed consent was waived. Contrast-enhanced CT studies of 109 women with acute PID and 218 age-matched women with AA were retrospectively and independently reviewed by two radiologists to identify CT findings predictive of PID or AA. Surgical and laboratory data were used for the PID and AA reference standard. Appropriate tests were performed to compare PID and AA and a CT decision tree using the classification and regression tree (CART) algorithm was generated. The median patient age was 28 years (interquartile range, 22-39 years). According to the decision tree, an appendiceal diameter ≥ 7 mm was the most discriminating criterion for differentiating acute PID and AA, followed by a left tubal diameter ≥ 10 mm, with a global accuracy of 98.2 % (95 % CI: 96-99.4). Appendiceal diameter and left tubal thickening are the most discriminating CT criteria for differentiating acute PID from AA. (orig.)

  5. animal trial on imaging appearances of abdominally retained gauze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Longxia; An Ningyu; Yin Hui; Wang Xiangdong; Li Jia; Bai Ying

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging appearances of abdominally retained crumpled gauze with US, CT and MRI and the changes with time. Methods: Eight rabbits were operated and crumpled gauze was put into in their abdominal cavity. US , plain and enhanced CT and MRI scan were performed on the day of operation, and 1 to 7 weeks after operation. The imaging appearances were compared with operation findings. Pathologic examination was done simultaneously. Results: Abdominally retained crumpled gauze was instantly adhesive with omentum and neighboring intestines tightly. Fibro-connective tissue membrane was produced at the adhesion site gradually, spreading out to enclose the crumpled gauze. The enclosure was finished completely in 3 to 4 weeks. Thickened membrane also invaded into the spaces within the gauze. The crumpled gauze was eventually infected. These changes could be revealed on US, CT or MRI scans. The US appearance exhibited a hyper echoic arc zone with broad clean acoustic shadow behind. It appeared as a soft tissue mass to CT and MRI scans. In early stage CT scan could easily show the gas within the crumpled gauze. CT and MRI enhanced scans showed only the enhanced membrane and no enhancement of the crumpled gauze. Conclusion: US, CT and MRI have quite characteristic appearances of the abdominally retained crumpled gauze, especially when combined imaging techniques were employed, which can lead to a correct diagnosis together with a history of operation

  6. Prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings on CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Archana [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); St. Christopher' s Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hellinger, Jeffrey C. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); New York Cardiovascular Institute at Lenox Hill Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Servaes, Sabah; Keller, Marc S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schwartz, Mathew C. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Levine Children' s Hospital, Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Epelman, Monica [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging/Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2017-03-15

    CT angiography is gaining broader acceptance in the evaluation of children with known or suspected congenital heart disease. These studies include non-cardiovascular structures such as the mediastinum, lung parenchyma and upper abdominal organs. It is important to inspect all these structures for potential abnormalities that might be clinically important and, in some cases, may impact care plans. To determine the prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings in CT angiography of children with congenital heart disease. During 28 months, 300 consecutive children (170 males; mean age: 7.1 years, age range: 6 h-26 years), referred from a tertiary pediatric cardiology center, underwent clinically indicated CT angiography to evaluate known or suspected congenital heart disease. Slightly more than half (n = 169) of the patients were postoperative or post-intervention. Examinations were retrospectively reviewed, and non-cardiovascular findings were recorded and tabulated by organ system, congenital heart disease and operative procedure in conjunction with outcomes from medical charts. Non-cardiovascular findings were identified in 83% (n = 250 / 300) of the studies for a total of 857 findings. In 221 patients (n = 73.7% of 300) a total of 813 non-cardiovascular findings were clinically significant, while in 9.7% (n = 29 / 300) of patients, 5.1% (n = 44 / 857) of the findings were nonsignificant. In 38.3% (n = 115 / 300) of patients with significant non-cardiovascular pathology, the findings were unexpected and directly impacted patient care plans. Commonly involved organs with non-cardiovascular findings were the lungs with 280 non-cardiovascular findings in 176 / 300 (58.7%) of patients, the airway with 139 non-cardiovascular findings in 103 / 300 (34.3%) of patients and the liver with 108 non-cardiovascular findings in 72 / 300 (24.0%) of patients. Syndromic associations were noted in 22% (n = 66 / 300) of the patients. Non-cardiovascular findings are common in children with

  7. Prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings on CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Archana; Hellinger, Jeffrey C.; Servaes, Sabah; Keller, Marc S.; Schwartz, Mathew C.; Epelman, Monica

    2017-01-01

    CT angiography is gaining broader acceptance in the evaluation of children with known or suspected congenital heart disease. These studies include non-cardiovascular structures such as the mediastinum, lung parenchyma and upper abdominal organs. It is important to inspect all these structures for potential abnormalities that might be clinically important and, in some cases, may impact care plans. To determine the prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings in CT angiography of children with congenital heart disease. During 28 months, 300 consecutive children (170 males; mean age: 7.1 years, age range: 6 h-26 years), referred from a tertiary pediatric cardiology center, underwent clinically indicated CT angiography to evaluate known or suspected congenital heart disease. Slightly more than half (n = 169) of the patients were postoperative or post-intervention. Examinations were retrospectively reviewed, and non-cardiovascular findings were recorded and tabulated by organ system, congenital heart disease and operative procedure in conjunction with outcomes from medical charts. Non-cardiovascular findings were identified in 83% (n = 250 / 300) of the studies for a total of 857 findings. In 221 patients (n = 73.7% of 300) a total of 813 non-cardiovascular findings were clinically significant, while in 9.7% (n = 29 / 300) of patients, 5.1% (n = 44 / 857) of the findings were nonsignificant. In 38.3% (n = 115 / 300) of patients with significant non-cardiovascular pathology, the findings were unexpected and directly impacted patient care plans. Commonly involved organs with non-cardiovascular findings were the lungs with 280 non-cardiovascular findings in 176 / 300 (58.7%) of patients, the airway with 139 non-cardiovascular findings in 103 / 300 (34.3%) of patients and the liver with 108 non-cardiovascular findings in 72 / 300 (24.0%) of patients. Syndromic associations were noted in 22% (n = 66 / 300) of the patients. Non-cardiovascular findings are common in children with

  8. CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    1992-01-01

    The CT findings of the acute cerebral infarction are well known. However the CT findings of early stroke within 24 hours of the onset have not been sufficiently reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate early acute cerebral infarction on CT within 24 hours after ictus. The early and accurate CT diagnosis could lead to the appropriate therapy and improved outcome of the patients. Authors retrospectively analyzed 16 patients with early acute cerebral infarction. Acute cerebral infarction was confirmed by follow-up CT in 11 patients, SPECT in 4 patients, and MRI in 1 patient. The CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction include effacement of cortical sulci or cistern (n = 16, 100%), hyperattenuation of MCA (n = 3), obscuration of lentiform nucleus (n = 6), loss of insular ribbon (n = 6) and subtle low density in hemisphere (n = 5). The most frequent finding was effacement of cortical sulci in our study, and it was thought to be the most important sign of early acute cerebral infarction

  9. CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    The CT findings of the acute cerebral infarction are well known. However the CT findings of early stroke within 24 hours of the onset have not been sufficiently reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate early acute cerebral infarction on CT within 24 hours after ictus. The early and accurate CT diagnosis could lead to the appropriate therapy and improved outcome of the patients. Authors retrospectively analyzed 16 patients with early acute cerebral infarction. Acute cerebral infarction was confirmed by follow-up CT in 11 patients, SPECT in 4 patients, and MRI in 1 patient. The CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction include effacement of cortical sulci or cistern (n = 16, 100%), hyperattenuation of MCA (n = 3), obscuration of lentiform nucleus (n = 6), loss of insular ribbon (n = 6) and subtle low density in hemisphere (n = 5). The most frequent finding was effacement of cortical sulci in our study, and it was thought to be the most important sign of early acute cerebral infarction.

  10. Intraperitoneal ectopic infestation of parasites invading through gastrointestinal tract : CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Rha, Sung Eun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae Chul [Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hwa; Ham, Soo Youn [Ulsan Univ. Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of parasitic ectopic infestation in the peritoneal cavity, a transitional route for parasites invading the gastrointestinal tract, to migrate to various target organs. CT scans of nine patients with pathologically(n=8) or serologically(n=1) proven intraperitoneal involvement of parasitic infestation were retrospectively reviewed. The primary causes of parasitic infestation in nine patients were Paragonimus westermani(n=5), Sparganosis(n=2), and hepatic fascioliasis(n=2). We analyzed the CT findings with regard to the sites and patterns of lesions in the peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal track, as well as in other solid organs. The clinical features of these patients were also evaluated. The clinical symptoms and signs were chronic abdominal pain and general weakness in seven patients, while peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed in four. The CT features of these nine patients included multiseptated cystic masses of 2-6cm, diameter (mean 4.1{+-}1.7cm) in the omentum or mesentery in six(67%), omental or mesenteric infiltration in seven(78%), focal peritoneal thickening in seven(78%), 1ymphadenopathy in five(56%), and ascites in four(44%). In six of the nine patients, the gastrointestinal tract(stomach in four, colon in one, both stomach and colon in one) was concomitantly involved with focal wall thickening. Branching patterns of hypoattenuating lesions were noted in the liver of three patients; two of these had hepatic fascioliasis and one had paragonimiasis. Ectopic parasitic infestation in the peritoneal cavity manifests as mass formation, adjacent gastrointestinal wall thickening, and focal peritonitis. An understanding of these image features is important for both early diagnosis and adequate treatment.

  11. Intraperitoneal ectopic infestation of parasites invading through gastrointestinal tract : CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Rha, Sung Eun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho; Choi, Byung Ihn; Shim, Jae Chul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Jong Hwa; Ham, Soo Youn

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of parasitic ectopic infestation in the peritoneal cavity, a transitional route for parasites invading the gastrointestinal tract, to migrate to various target organs. CT scans of nine patients with pathologically(n=8) or serologically(n=1) proven intraperitoneal involvement of parasitic infestation were retrospectively reviewed. The primary causes of parasitic infestation in nine patients were Paragonimus westermani(n=5), Sparganosis(n=2), and hepatic fascioliasis(n=2). We analyzed the CT findings with regard to the sites and patterns of lesions in the peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal track, as well as in other solid organs. The clinical features of these patients were also evaluated. The clinical symptoms and signs were chronic abdominal pain and general weakness in seven patients, while peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed in four. The CT features of these nine patients included multiseptated cystic masses of 2-6cm, diameter (mean 4.1±1.7cm) in the omentum or mesentery in six(67%), omental or mesenteric infiltration in seven(78%), focal peritoneal thickening in seven(78%), 1ymphadenopathy in five(56%), and ascites in four(44%). In six of the nine patients, the gastrointestinal tract(stomach in four, colon in one, both stomach and colon in one) was concomitantly involved with focal wall thickening. Branching patterns of hypoattenuating lesions were noted in the liver of three patients; two of these had hepatic fascioliasis and one had paragonimiasis. Ectopic parasitic infestation in the peritoneal cavity manifests as mass formation, adjacent gastrointestinal wall thickening, and focal peritonitis. An understanding of these image features is important for both early diagnosis and adequate treatment

  12. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, Aisling; Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A.; Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children's hospital admission reports were rated higher

  13. Pseudomembranous colitis: CT findings in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blickman, J.G.; Boland, G.W.L.; Cleveland, R.H.; Bramson, R.T.; Lee, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrum of nodular haustral thickening and an 'accordion' pattern have been reported as specific features of pseudomembranous colitis (PMC) in adults. A retrospective review of nine patients with PMC was performed to assess whether this spectrum of CT findings also occurred in children. In four girls and five boys, CT scans were performed within 3 days of a positive stool toxin assay for Clostridium difficile. Documented CT abnormalities included nodular haustral thickening, the 'accordion' pattern, colonic wall thickening, ascites, and pericolonic edema. These results were then correlated as to their impact on the clinical outcome. Circumferential colon wall thickening was identified in 7/9 (78%) patients (mean thickening 14.5 mm). Nodular haustral thickening was identified in 4/9 (44%) and the 'accordion' pattern in 2/9 (22%). Other findings included pericolonic edema in 3/9 (33%) and ascites in 1/9 (11%). Wall thickening was confined to the left colon and rectum in 2/9 (22%), to the right colon in 2/9 (22%), and involved the whole colon in 3/9 (33%). Although CT findings associated with PMC in children may be suggestive for this diagnosis, CT is less specific than laboratory and clinical findings. (orig.)

  14. Pseudomembranous colitis: CT findings in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blickman, J.G. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Boland, G.W.L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Cleveland, R.H. [The Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Bramson, R.T. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, M.J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    A spectrum of nodular haustral thickening and an `accordion` pattern have been reported as specific features of pseudomembranous colitis (PMC) in adults. A retrospective review of nine patients with PMC was performed to assess whether this spectrum of CT findings also occurred in children. In four girls and five boys, CT scans were performed within 3 days of a positive stool toxin assay for Clostridium difficile. Documented CT abnormalities included nodular haustral thickening, the `accordion` pattern, colonic wall thickening, ascites, and pericolonic edema. These results were then correlated as to their impact on the clinical outcome. Circumferential colon wall thickening was identified in 7/9 (78%) patients (mean thickening 14.5 mm). Nodular haustral thickening was identified in 4/9 (44%) and the `accordion` pattern in 2/9 (22%). Other findings included pericolonic edema in 3/9 (33%) and ascites in 1/9 (11%). Wall thickening was confined to the left colon and rectum in 2/9 (22%), to the right colon in 2/9 (22%), and involved the whole colon in 3/9 (33%). Although CT findings associated with PMC in children may be suggestive for this diagnosis, CT is less specific than laboratory and clinical findings. (orig.)

  15. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  16. CT findings of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kigami, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Kuroda, Yasumasa

    1992-01-01

    CT scans in 11 cases of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) were reviewed. Peripheral dense opacities suggesting air-space consolidation were the most peculiar findings seen in 9 patients on CT, but 7 on chest radiographs. Five patients showed broad plate-like opacities parallel to the pleura, which were the results of resolution from the periphery of the consolidation. Diffuse interstitial opacities suggesting alveolitis were the predominant finding in 3 patients, one of which also had peripheral air-space consolidation. Follow-up CT showed no residual abnormality except one who had DIP concomitant with CEP. CT scans are useful tool for both diagnosis and follow-up of CEP. (author)

  17. A tool for validating MRI-guided strategies: a digital breathing CT/MRI phantom of the abdominal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Summers, Paul; Gianoli, Chiara; Bellomi, Massimo; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as the elected image modality for organ motion quantification and management in image-guided radiotherapy. However, the lack of validation tools is an open issue for image guidance in the abdominal and thoracic organs affected by organ motion due to respiration. We therefore present an abdominal four-dimensional (4D) CT/MRI digital phantom, including the estimation of MR tissue parameters, simulation of dedicated abdominal MR sequences, modeling of radiofrequency coil response and noise, followed by k-space sampling and image reconstruction. The phantom allows the realistic simulation of images generated by MR pulse sequences with control of scan and tissue parameters, combined with co-registered CT images. In order to demonstrate the potential of the phantom in a clinical scenario, we describe the validation of a virtual T1-weighted 4D MRI strategy. Specifically, the motion extracted from a T2-weighted 4D MRI is used to warp a T1-weighted breath-hold acquisition, with the aim of overcoming trade-offs that limit T1-weighted acquisitions. Such an application shows the applicability of the digital CT/MRI phantom as a validation tool, which should be especially useful for cases unsuited to obtain real imaging data.

  18. Routine chest and abdominal high-pitch CT: An alternative low dose protocol with preserved image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacker, Nadja A.; Mader, Caecilia; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radiation dose and image quality of the high-pitch dual source computer tomography (DSCT) for routine chest and abdominal scans. Methods: 130 consecutive patients (62 female, 68 male, median age 55 years) were included. All patients underwent 128-slice high-pitch DSCT (chest n = 99; abdomen n = 84) at a pitch of 3.2. Two observers independently rated image quality using a 4-point score (1: excellent to 4: non-diagnostic). Image noise was measured and operational radiation dose quantities were recorded. An additional group of 132 patients (chest, n = 80; abdomen n = 52) scanned with standard-pitch CT matched for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) served as control group. Results: Interobserver agreement for image quality rating was good (k = 0.74). Subjective image quality of high-pitch CT was diagnostic in all patients (median score chest; 2, median score abdomen: 2). Image noise of high-pitch CT was comparable to standard-pitch for the chest (p = 0.32) but increased in the abdomen (p < 0.0001). For high-pitch CT radiation dose was 4.4 ± 0.9 mSv (chest) and 6.5 ± 1.2 mSv (abdomen). These values were significantly lower compared to standard-pitch CT (chest: 5.5 ± 1.2 mSv; abdomen: 11.3 ± 3.8 mSv). Conclusion: Based on the technical background high-pitch dual source CT may serve as an alternative scan mode for low radiation dose routine chest and abdominal CT.

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a ... is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  20. Anterior abdominal wall leiomyoma arising de novo in a fertile women: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Je Young; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Hwang, Ji Young; Kim, Han Myun; Shin, Mi Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal wall leiomyoma arising de novo is very rare, hence the reported imaging findings of this disease are also rare. We reported the case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with an abdominal wall mass without antecedent gynecological surgeries. The initial abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed thickening of the left rectus abdominis and the loss of intervening fat between the rectus abdominis and the lateral abdominal muscles. After 8 months, the follow-up contrast-enhanced CT and ultrasonography (US) showed a lentiform-shaped mass with isodensity to the adjacent muscles. The US-guided biopsy was consistent with leiomyoma

  1. Anterior abdominal wall leiomyoma arising de novo in a fertile women: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Je Young; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Hwang, Ji Young; Kim, Han Myun; Shin, Mi Kyung [Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Abdominal wall leiomyoma arising de novo is very rare, hence the reported imaging findings of this disease are also rare. We reported the case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with an abdominal wall mass without antecedent gynecological surgeries. The initial abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed thickening of the left rectus abdominis and the loss of intervening fat between the rectus abdominis and the lateral abdominal muscles. After 8 months, the follow-up contrast-enhanced CT and ultrasonography (US) showed a lentiform-shaped mass with isodensity to the adjacent muscles. The US-guided biopsy was consistent with leiomyoma.

  2. EEG and CT findings of infant partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Kumanomido, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Makoto; Ueoka, Kiyotaka

    1981-01-01

    Examination of EEG and cranial CT were performed in 19 cases of partial seizures with elementary symptomatology (PSES), 6 cases of partial seizures with complex symptomatology (PSCS), and 17 cases of benign focal pilepsy of childhood with Rolandic spikes (BFECRS). The results were as follows. 1) In 16 of 19 cases of PSES (84%), various abnormal CT findings such as localized cerebral atrophy (7 cases), localized cerebral atrophy complicated with porencephaly (4 cases), porencephaly alone (2 cases), and diffuse cerebral atrophy (3 cases) were found. 2) Of 6 cases of PSCS localized cerebral atrophy was found in 3 cases, porencephaly in one case, and localized calcification in one case. Normal CT findings were obtained in one case. 3) In comparison of EEG findings with CT findings in 25 cases of partial seizures CT findings correlated with the basic waves rather than the paroxysmal ones. 4) The fact that CT findings in patients with BFECRS were mostly normal suggests the functional origin of the seizures. 5) CT was valuable in partial seizures for detecting underlying disorders and predicting the prognosis. (Ueda, J.)

  3. CT findings of pancreatic carcinoma. Evaluation with the combined method of early enhancement CT and high dose enhancement CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shigeki; Endo, Tokiko; Isomura, Takayuki; Ishigaki, Takeo; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Senda, Kouhei.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were studied with the combined method of early enhancement CT and high dose enhancement CT in 72 carcinomas. Common Findings were change in pancreatic contour, abnormal attenuation in a tumor and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. The incidence of abnormal attenuation and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct and bile duct was constant regardless of tumor size. The finding of hypoattenuation at early enhancement CT was most useful for demonstrating a carcinoma. However, this finding was negative in ten cases, five of which showed inhomogenous hyperattenuation at high dose enhancement CT. The detection of change in pancreatic contour and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct was most frequent at high dose enhancement CT. The finding of change in pancreatic contour and/or abnormal attenuation in a tumor could be detected in 47 cases at plain CT, 66 at early enhancement CT and 65 at high dose enhancement CT. Since the four cases in which neither finding was detected by any CT method showed dilatated main pancreatic duct, there was no case without abnormal CT findings. This combined CT method will be a reliable diagnostic technique in the imaging of pancreatic carcinoma. (author)

  4. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  5. CT findings in epileptic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Nobuo; Kimura, Shigeru; Watanabe, Jun; Haneda, Satoshi; Takebe, Yukinao

    1981-01-01

    CT findings in 43 children with generalized seizures (grand mal seizures) (GM group) and in 50 children with partial seizures (P group), classified according to clinical seizure type, were studied. 1) CT abnormalities were demonstrated in 19% (8/43) in GM group and in 40% (20/50) in P group, including localized CT abnormalities in 9.3% (4/43) and in 34% (17/50) respectively. CT abnormalities were found more frequently in cases with abnormal past histories and/or mental defects (MD) than in those without them. 2) In P group, localized CT abnormalities and generalized brain atrophy were observed in 13 and 7 cases respectively. In 40 cases with focal epileptic discharges (FED) in EEG, localized CT abnormalities were demonstrated in 23% (9/40). The sites of localized CT abnormalities corresponded in 73% (11/15) to the sites of focal suppression in EEG (i.e., slowing, low amplitude and lazy pattern) regardless of FED. 3) The bicaudate cerebro-ventricular index (B-CVI) in 19 cases in the normal control group over 2 years of age was 10.0 +- 1.2 (mean +- SD). Ventricular narrowing (VN), with B-CVI less than 8.2 (mean - 1.5 SD), was observed in 5, 17 and 27% in control, GM and P groups respectively, indicating more frequently in epileptic children than in normal controls. Seizures were well controlled in 85% (11/13) in VN group and in 70% (26/36) in normal ventricular group. Brain atrophy in CT findings to inspection was ascertained in all cases by measuring B-CVI. (author)

  6. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma in the clinical evaluation of children with blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ishay, Offir; Daoud, Mai; Peled, Zvi; Brauner, Eran; Bahouth, Hany; Kluger, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric care, the role of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) remains ill defined. The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of FAST for detecting free peritoneal fluid in children. The trauma registry of a single level I pediatric trauma center was queried for the results of FAST examination of consecutive pediatric (blunt trauma patients over a period of 36 months, from January 2010 to December 2012. Demographics, type of injuries, FAST results, computerized tomography (CT) results, and operative findings were reviewed. During the study period, 543 injured pediatric patients (mean age 8.2 ± 5 years) underwent FAST examinations. In 95 (17.5 %) FAST was positive for free peritoneal fluid. CT examination was performed in 219 (40.3 %) children. Positive FAST examination was confirmed by CT scan in 61/73 (83.6 %). CT detected intra-peritoneal fluid in 62/448 (13.8 %) of the patients with negative FAST results. These findings correspond to a sensitivity of 50 %, specificity of 88 %, positive predictive value (PPV) of 84 %, and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 58 %. In patients who had negative FAST results and no CT examination (302), no missed abdominal injury was detected on clinical ground. FAST examination in the young age group (tool to discriminate injured children in need of further imaging evaluation.

  7. Radiological findings of chronic granulomatous disease of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Chronic granulomatous disease(CGD) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by recurrent pyogenic infections of the respiratory tract, skin, and soft tissue. The aim of this study is to describe the radiological findings of CGD. We retrospectively analyzed radiological findings of 11 patients of CGD, which were diagnosed by nitroblue tetrazolium test. We analyzed the pattern of pneumonia on chest radiograph in all infants. Three cases of chest CT and one case of digital subtraction angiography were performed. According to infant's symptom, abdominal ultrasonography(n = 8), abdominal CT(n = 5), simple bone radiography(n = 2), and brain CT (n = 1) were performed. Repeated infiltration(100%), mass-like consolidation(73%), hilar or mediastinal lymph node largement(64%), scattered nodules(55%), cavity formation(27%), and pleural effusion(27%) were found on the chest radiographs(n = 11) and CT(n = 3). On the abdominal imagings(n = 8), there were hepatosplenomegaly(n = 6), calcification in the liver(n = 2) and kidney(n = 1), hepatic granuloma(n = 1) and renal abscess(n = 1). Two patients had osteomyelitis. There were findings of meningitis on brain CT(n 1). We believe that the combinations of these radiological findings may suggest the diagnosis of CGD in patients with history of reccurent infection.

  8. CT findings of pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yukio; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Sato, Toru; Kuribayashi, Sachio

    2006-01-01

    For the treatment for pulmonary hypertension (PH), the differential diagnosis of its causal diseases is essential. To determine whether X-ray CT is useful for differentiating PH, we reviewed CT findings of 53 patients (18 men and 35 women, mean age of 44.9) given a diagnosis of PH, consisting of 25 with primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), 18 with chronic pulmonary embolism (cPE), 6 with Eisenmenger syndrome, 5 cases of collagen diseases, 2 of acute PE, and 1 of cor pulmonale. The intrapulmonary distribution of CT findings (ground glass opacity [GGO], mosaic attenuation, striation and/or infiltration, and interlobular septal thickening) were reviewed and scored on a 4-point scale (grade 0: no findings, 1: involving one third of the lung, 2: involving one-two thirds, and 3: diffuse distribution) by two radiologists who reached a consensus. PPH showed preferentially diffuse distribution of GGO as compared with cPE (p<0.05). However, there was no apparent relationship between the pulmonary vascular resistance and the distribution of GGO in PPH cases. The mosaic attenuation pattern was more frequent in cPE (43%) than PPH (12%; p<0.05). Striation and/or infiltration was observed in 36% of cPE, but only 4% of PPH. Interlobular septal thickening was seen in 16% of PPH, and 0% in cPE. Evaluation of CT findings is useful to differentiate PH. (author)

  9. Computed tomography and nonoperative treatment for blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shinsuke; Ishi, Takashi; Kamachi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine if computed tomography (CT) could reliably assist physical examination in the initial assessment of blunt abdominal trauma, and also to examine how various abdominal injuries were managed with the guidance of CT. A total of 255 patients underwent emergency abdominal CT following blunt abdominal trauma over a period of seven years. One hundred and fifty two patients had abnormal CT scans, including 58 hepatic, 36 renal, 25 splenic and 9 pancreatic injuries as well as 67 patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and 21 patients with free abdominal air. A comparative study on the detection of pneumoperitoneum revealed CT to be far superior to plain radiography. One hundred and three patients had normal CT scans, all of whom were managed nonoperatively, except for three false-negative cases and two nontherapeutic cases. The patients with injury to the parenchymal organs were given nonoperative treatment if they had stable vital signs and no evidence of associated injuries demanding immediate surgery and the majority of these patients were managed well nonoperatively. CT was thus found to be a useful adjunct in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, since in a rapid and noninvasive fashion, CT accurately defined the extent of parenchymal organ injury and also disclosed any other abdominal injuries. (author)

  10. Computed tomography and nonoperative treatment for blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Shinsuke; Ishi, Takashi; Kamachi, Masahiro [Saiseikai Shiga Hospital, Shiga (Japan); Takahashi, Toshio

    1990-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine if computed tomography (CT) could reliably assist physical examination in the initial assessment of blunt abdominal trauma, and also to examine how various abdominal injuries were managed with the guidance of CT. A total of 255 patients underwent emergency abdominal CT following blunt abdominal trauma over a period of seven years. One hundred and fifty two patients had abnormal CT scans, including 58 hepatic, 36 renal, 25 splenic and 9 pancreatic injuries as well as 67 patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and 21 patients with free abdominal air. A comparative study on the detection of pneumoperitoneum revealed CT to be far superior to plain radiography. One hundred and three patients had normal CT scans, all of whom were managed nonoperatively, except for three false-negative cases and two nontherapeutic cases. The patients with injury to the parenchymal organs were given nonoperative treatment if they had stable vital signs and no evidence of associated injuries demanding immediate surgery and the majority of these patients were managed well nonoperatively. CT was thus found to be a useful adjunct in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, since in a rapid and noninvasive fashion, CT accurately defined the extent of parenchymal organ injury and also disclosed any other abdominal injuries. (author).

  11. CT in predicting abdominal cocoon in patients on peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terebus Loock, M.; Lubrano, J.; Courivaud, C.; Bresson Vautrin, C.; Kastler, B.; Delabrousse, E.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) signs of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) as predictive factors for the evolution to abdominal cocoon (AC). Materials and methods: Clinical features and CT signs of 90 patients on PD were retrospectively reviewed. According to the clinical features, they were divided into three groups (asymptomatic, moderate, or severe). Clinical results were correlated with previously reported CT signs of EPS, i.e., peritoneal thickening, peritoneal calcifications, loculated fluids, small bowel faeces sign, small bowel obstruction, clustered bowel loops, pseudo sac, signs of bowel ischaemia or necrosis. AC was defined at CT by the association of clustered bowel loops and a pseudo sac. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test and the t-test. Results: Although demonstrated in symptomatic patients (p = 0.041), the occurrence of AC was not correlated with the severity of the symptoms (p = 0.16). Among the CT signs, the presence of loculated fluids (p = 0.011), a small bowel faeces sign (p = 0.002); and small bowel obstruction (p = 0.0001) were found to be statistically correlated with the appearance of an AC. Moreover, the association of loculated fluids, small bowel faeces sign, small bowel obstruction was extremely sensitive and specific in the development of AC (sensitivity = 67%, specifity = 100%, positive predictive value = 100%, negative predictive value = 96%). Conclusion: CT should be carried out in every symptomatic patient on PD. Indeed, the association of loculated fluid, small bowel faeces sign, and small bowel obstruction enables the prediction of the development of AC, which is likely to curtail PD and require surgery.

  12. CT images of gossypiboma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee

    1994-01-01

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment

  13. CT images of gossypiboma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee [College of Medicine, Kon-Kuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment.

  14. Improvement of CT-based treatment planning models of abdominal targets using static exhale imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten Haken, R.K.; Balter, J.M.; Lam, K.L.; McGinn, C.J.; Lawrence, T.S.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: CT based models of the patient that do not account for the motion of ventilation may not accurately predict the shape and position of critical abdominal structures. Without knowledge of the patient's ventilatory status during the CT scan, a planning target volume margin for the entire range of ventilation is required both inferior and superior to abdominal target volumes to ensure coverage. Also, dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) estimates may be uncertain. Respiratory gating technology for imaging and treatment is not yet widely available. The purpose of the current study is to explore an intermediate step to improve the veracity of the patient model and reduce the treated volume by acquiring the CT data with the patients holding their breath at normal exhale. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The ventilatory time courses of diaphragm movement for 15 patients (with no special breathing instructions) were measured using digitized movies from the fluoroscope during simulation. On repeat simulations, the reproducibility of the diaphragm position at exhale was determined. A clinical protocol was developed for treatment based on exhale CT models. CT scans were acquired at normal exhale using a spiral scanner. Typical volumes were acquired using 5 mm slice thickness and a 1:1 pitch. The scan volume was divided into 2-3 segments, to allow the patient to breathe in between. Margins were placed about intrahepatic target volumes based on the ventilatory excursion inferior to the target, and on only the reproducibility of exhale position superior to the target. RESULTS: The average patient's diaphragm was located within 2 mm of the average exhale position for 50% of the typical ventilatory cycle. For inhale, this value was reduced to 10%, and for mid ventilation, 15%. The reproducibility of exhale position over multiple breathing cycles was 2 mm (2σ), as opposed to 4 mm for inhale. Combining the variation of exhale position and the

  15. CT-findings in ARDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, P; Greene, R; Kott, M M; Hall, T; Vanderslice, L

    1987-08-01

    The CT features of 28 patients with ARDS are described. Diffuse lung consolidation, multifocal patchy involvement and lobar or segmental disease were observed. Large lung cysts as well as small cysts producing a 'swiss-cheese' appearance of the parenchyma, were detected. These findings were not regularly appreciated on chest radiographs. The overall mortality of our 28 patients was 72.7% (22 out 28). Patients with lung cysts showed a trend toward higher mortality (87.5% or 13 out 16). Other unexpected findings were basilar lung abscesses and an empyema. In 15 out of 28 patients, CT scans provided additional information, not obvious on bedside chest radiographs and led to a change in management in five patients.

  16. Studies on CT findings and operation findings for acute appendicitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakibara, Kenichi; Andoh, Shigemitsu; Karamatsu, Syouji; Urakami, Toshihiko; Tsuji, Hideki; Kobayashi, Tohru; Okahira, Kihiro

    1995-01-01

    Pediatric CT findings of acute appendicitis were reviewed retrospectively. The subjects were 29 patients (15 boys and 14 girls with an average age of 8.2 years), consisting of 17 with necrotic, 8 with phlegmonous inflammatory, and 4 with catarrhal appendicitis. CT findings were compared with the degree of inflammation. CT revealed abscess in 64.7%, 12.5%, and 0% for necrotic, phlegmonous inflammatory, and catarrhal types, respectively, and 41.4% for all types. An enlarged appendicitis was shown on CT in 86.2% (25/29). Fecalithes were shown on CT in 67.7% (19/29), which was associated with necrotic and phlegmonous inflammatory types, but not with catarrhal type. The other CT findings included thickened paramesocolon of the right lower abdomen, undefined wall of the inner side of the cecum. Inflammation was relatively slight in cases of catarrhal appendicitis, Nine patients less than 5 years of age had phlegmonous inflammatory or necrotic appendicitis. CT allowed definitive diagnosis of appendicitis in 2 of 3 patients with necrotic type. Ct was considered to be very useful in the diagnosis of appendicitis. (N.K.)

  17. CT finding of emphysematous gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Won; Juhn, Jae Ryang; Cha, Seong Sook; Eun, Tchoong Kie; Chung, Duck Hwan [Inje Medical College Paik HospitalYonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare entity of infectious gastritis caused by gas-forming organisms and only 32 cases have been reported. CT is helpful in the diagnosis particularly in mild cases that there is only a small amount of gas. Typical CT findings of emphysematous gastritis are gas bubbles within the irregular thickened gastric wall and dilated stomach filled with secretions, debris and a large amount of gas. We report a case that was diagnosed by CT and operation.

  18. CT finding of emphysematous gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Won; Juhn, Jae Ryang; Cha, Seong Sook; Eun, Tchoong Kie; Chung, Duck Hwan

    1988-01-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare entity of infectious gastritis caused by gas-forming organisms and only 32 cases have been reported. CT is helpful in the diagnosis particularly in mild cases that there is only a small amount of gas. Typical CT findings of emphysematous gastritis are gas bubbles within the irregular thickened gastric wall and dilated stomach filled with secretions, debris and a large amount of gas. We report a case that was diagnosed by CT and operation.

  19. CT findings of peritoneal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Sook; Park, Mi Sook; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Soon Yong

    1989-01-01

    CT findings in 137 patients with peritoneal cacinomatosis were reviewed to determine the CT signs of peritoneal malignancy. CT of the 20 liver cirrhosis and 17 tuberculous peritonitis were also reviewed to define the differential point between benign and malignant peritoneal change. The results were as follows. 1. The most common primary malignancy encountered in peritoneal carcinomatosis was stomach Ca.(50.4%), followed by pancreas Ca, hepatoma, colon Ca. and ovarian Ca. 2. Ascites was the most common CT feature of peritoneal malignancy, present in 99 cases (72.3%). The amount of ascites was voluminous, grade III in 70% of cases and showed high density ascites with average 23 Hounsfield units. 3. Greater omentum involvement was noted in 88 patients, peritoneum in 71 patients and mesentery in 65% patients. There was no correlation of the primary malignancy type with the incidence or pattern of the above mentioned site. 4. Bowel wall thickenings were observed in 51 patients, among which transverse colon was most frequently involved. 5. Mean attenuation value of ascites in liver cirrhosis was 10.7 HU, which was much lower than that of peritoneal carcinomatosis. 6. Even though intraperitoneal findings in Tbc. Peritonitis showed tendency of relatively small amount of ascites with more predominant mesenteric change, but, the findings of high density ascites, change of peritoneum and omentum etc. were very similar to those of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Therefore, based on only intraperitoneal change, differential diagnosis between them was difficult. 7. False negatives in CT diagnosis of peritoneal carcinomatosis occurred in 7 cases. There were tiny nodular changes in intraperitoneal cavity without ascites on operative findings

  20. Do we really rely on fast for decision-making in the management of blunt abdominal trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jeffrey W; Falco, Mark H; Chopko, Michael S; Flynn, William J; Wiles Iii, Charles E; Guo, Weidun Alan

    2015-05-01

    The Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma examination (FAST) is currently taught and recommended in the ATLS(®), often as an addendum to the primary survey for patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Although it is non-invasive and rapidly performed at bedside, the utility of FAST in blunt abdominal trauma has been questioned. We designed this study to examine our hypothesis that FAST is not an efficacious screening tool for identifying intra-abdominal injuries. We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients with confirmatory diagnosis of blunt abdominal injuries with CT and/or laparotomy for a period of 1.5 years (from 7/2009 to 11/2010). FAST was performed by ED residents and considered positive when free intra-abdominal fluid was visualized. Abdominal CT, or exploratory laparotomy findings were used as confirmation of intra-abdominal injury. A total of 1671 blunt trauma patients were admitted to and evaluated in the Emergency Department during a 1½ year period and 146 patients were confirmed intra-abdominal injuries by CT and/or laparotomy. Intraoperative findings include injuries to the liver, spleen, kidneys, and bowels. In 114 hemodynamically stable patients, FAST was positive in 25 patients, with a sensitivity of 22%. In 32 hemodynamically unstable patients, FAST was positive in 9 patients, with a sensitivity of 28%. A free peritoneal fluid and splenic injury are associated with a positive FAST on univariate analysis, and are the independent predictors for a positive FAST on multiple logistic regression. FAST has a very low sensitivity in detecting blunt intraabdominal injury. In hemodynamically stable patients, a negative FAST without a CT may result in missed intra-abdominal injuries. In hemodynamically unstable blunt trauma patients, with clear physical findings on examination, the decision for exploratory laparotomy should not be distracted by a negative FAST. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of 'fine' focal spot imaging in CT abdominal angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Lawrence Chia Wei; Devapalasundaram, Ashwini; Ardley, Nicholas [Monash Health, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Lau, Kenneth K. [Monash Health, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Monash University, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences, Victoria (Australia); Buchan, Kevin [Phillips Healthcare, Clinical Science, PO Box 312, Mont Albert, Victoria (Australia); Huynh, Minh [RMIT University, School of Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the efficacy of fine focal spot imaging in calcification beam-hardening artefact reduction and vessel clarity on CT abdominal angiography (CTAA). Adult patients of any age and gender who presented for CTAA were included. Thirty-nine patients were examined with a standard focal spot size (SFSS) of 1 x 1 mm in the first 3 months while 31 consecutive patients were examined with a fine focal spot size (FFSS) of 1 x 0.5 mm in the following 3 months. Vessel clarity and calcification beam-hardening artefacts of the abdominal aorta, celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery, inferior mesenteric artery, renal arteries, and iliac arteries were assessed using a 5-point grading scale by two blinded radiologists randomly. Cohen's Kappa test indicated that on average, there was substantial agreement among reviewers for vessel wall clarity and calcification artefact grading. Mann-Whitney test showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups, with FFSS performing significantly better for vessel clarity (U, 6481.50; p < 0.001; r, 0.73) and calcification artefact reduction (U, 1916; p < 0.001; r, 0.77). Fine focus CT angiography produces images with better vessel wall clarity and less vessel calcification beam-hardening artefact. (orig.)

  2. Correlations of CT and EEG findings in brain affections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, B.; Nevsimalova, S.; Kvicala, V.

    1984-01-01

    The results were compared of electroencephalography (EEG) and computerized tomography (CT) examinations of 250 patients with different brain affections. In intracranial expansive processes the pre-operative CT findings were positive in 100% cases, the EEG findings in 89.7% of cases. In severe traumatic affections the EEG and CT findings were positive in all cases, in mild injuries and post-traumatic conditions the EEG findings were more frequently positive than the CT. In focal and diffuse vascular affections the EEG and CT findings were consistent, in transitory ischemic conditions the EEG findings were more frequently positive. In inflammatory cerebral affections and in paroxymal diseases the EEG findings were positive more frequently than the CT. The same applies for demyelinating and degenerative affections. Findings of other authors were confirmed to the effect that CT very reliably reveals morphological changes in cerebral tissue while EEG records the functional state of the central nervous system and its changes. The two methods are complementary. (author)

  3. CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Jung Eun; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Man Chung

    1995-01-01

    The fungus aspergillus can cause a variety of pulmonary disorders. Aspergilloma is a noninvasive aspergillus colonization of virtually any type of preexisting pulmonary cavity or cystic space. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is serious, usually fatal infection in patients being treated with immunosuppressants or who have chronic debilitating disease. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is characterized clinically by asthma, blood and sputum eosinophilia and positive immunologic reaction to aspergillus antigen. Awareness of the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis is important in making the diagnosis of aspergillus-caused pulmonary disorders. In this pictorial essay, we illustrated various radiological findings of pulmonary aspergillosis focused on CT findings correlated with gross pathologic specimens

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  5. Clinical and CT findings of Klebsiella liver abscess: comparison with non-Klebsiella liver abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Young Geun; Kim, Man Deuk; Yoon, Sang Wook; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Mun; Lee, Eun Ja

    2003-01-01

    To analyse the clinical features and CT findings of pyogenic liver abscess due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, and to compare the findings with those of cases in which abscesses were caused by other pathogens. Twenty-one cases of pyogenic liver abscess were assigned to either the Klebsiella or the non-Klebsiella group, and the patients' past medical history and intra-abdominal abnormalities such as calculus or malignancy were reviewed. Laboratory data such as alkaline phosphatase (ALT), SGOT and SGPT levels were analyzed, and on the basis of the CT findings, decisions were reached as to (a) whether abscesses were single or multiple contiguous or discontiguous, uniloculated or multiloculated; and (b) the presence or absence of gas, hepatic parenchymal enhancement, peripheral rim enhancement, and extrahepatic abnormality. For statistical analysis, fisher's exact test was used. Among 21 abscesses, Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common pathogen (n=11). The others were Pseudomonas (n=3), E.coli (n=2), Enterococcus (n=2), G. (+) cocci (n=2) and polymicrobial (n=1). Diabetes mellitus was more common among patients in the Klebsiella group, among whom a multiloculated single cavity was a frequent finding. Five patients in the non-Klebsiella group experienced biliary tract obstruction, which was not demonstrated in the Klebsiella group. Hepatic parenchymal enhancement was more common in the non-Klebsiella group. In case of pyogenic liver disease, especially where diabates mellitus is involved, Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major pathogen. Significant CT findings of Klebsiella liver abscess included a multiloculated single cavity, rare biliary tract obstruction, and little hepatic parenchymal enhancement

  6. Unenhanced Computed Tomography to Visualize Hollow Viscera and/or Mesenteric Injury After Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Single-Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Yang; Wei, Ming-Tian; Jin, Cheng-Wu; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zi-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    To identify and describe the major features of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images of blunt hollow viscera and/or mesenteric injury (BHVI/MI) and to determine the value of unenhanced CT in the diagnosis of BHVI/MI. This retrospective study included 151 patients who underwent unenhanced CT before laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma between January 2011 and December 2013. According to surgical observations, patients were classified as having BHVI/MI (n = 73) or not (n = 78). Sensitivity, specificity, P values, and likelihood ratios were calculated by comparing CT findings between the 2 groups. Six significant CT findings (P tool for BHVI/MI after blunt abdominal trauma. Six key features on CT were correlated with BHVI/MI.

  7. Primary congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report with perinatal serial follow-up imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sang Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Jeong-Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms in neonates and infants are rare and are usually associated with infection, vasculitis, connective tissue disorder, or iatrogenic trauma such as umbilical catheterization. An idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm is the least common category and there are few descriptions of the imaging features. We present the antenatal and postnatal imaging findings of an idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm including the findings on US, MRI and CT. (orig.)

  8. Pulmonary CT findings in acute mercury vapour exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Sato, Kimihiko; Heianna, Jyouiti; Hirano, Yoshinori; Omachi, Kohiti; Izumi, Jyunichi; Watarai, Jiro

    2001-01-01

    AIM: We describe the pulmonary computed tomography (CT) findings in acute mercury poisoning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Initial (n= 8) and follow-up (n= 6) chest CT examinations in eight patients exposed to mercury vapour while cutting pipes in a sulphuric acid plant were reviewed. Of the eight patients, two were asymptomatic and had normal CT results, two were asymptomatic but had abnormalities on CT, and four had both acute symptoms and positive CT results. The patients were all men whose ages ranged from 37 to 54 years (mean, 49 years). RESULTS: Poorly defined nodules were present in five of six patients with positive CT findings, present alone in two patients or as part of a mixed pattern in three. They were random in distribution. Alveolar consolidation (n= 3) and areas of ground-glass opacity (n= 4) were observed and were more prominent in the most severely affected patients with the highest blood and urine level of mercury, predominantly in the upper and/or middle zone. These abnormal findings on CT resolved with (n= 1) or without (n= 5) steroid therapy. Pathological findings (n= 1) demonstrated acute interstitial changes predominantly with oedema. CONCLUSION: We report CT findings in eight patients acutely exposed to mercury vapour. The pulmonary injury was reversible on CT in these cases. Hashimoto, M. (2001)

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  10. CT findings of subdural hematomas: as a special references of atypical CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Whi Yul; Chung, Tae Sub; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Kim, Ki Whang; Park, Chang Yun [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Subdural hematomas (SDH) are relatively common and the typical CT findings according to the age of them are well established. The CT findings of 82 patients with SDHs were reviewed and compared with the operative findings. The results were as follow: 1. The most common cause of SDHs was the direct trauma which was noted in 60 cases (73.2%). 2. The atypical CT findings of the mixed density were seen in 19 cases (23.2%), including acute SDH 7 cases (20%), subacute SDH 5 cases (41.7%), and chronic SDH 7 cases (20%). 3. The possible causes of the mixed density in acute SDH were unclotted blood in early stage of hematoma development or serum extruded during the early phase of clot retraction. But the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid within subdural space due to an arachnoid tear could not be excluded. 4. The possible causes of the mixed density in subacute and chronic SDH were serum extruded during the hematoma resolution and rebleeding. 5. Wall enhancement of hematomas was noted in 3 cases (25%) of subacute SDHs and 15 cases (42.9%) of chronic SDHs. 6. Most of SDHs was crescentic in shape, but lenticular in 4 cases (4.9%). Midline shift and compression of ventricles were proportional to the maximum thickness of SDHs. There were seen ipsilateral dilatation of ventricles in 9 cases (11.0%) and brain edema in 11 cases (13.4%)

  11. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won; Cho, Hyeun Cha

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory

  12. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeun Cha [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory.

  13. Blunt renal trauma: comparison of contrast-enhanced CT and angiographic findings and the usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitase, M.; Mizutani, M.; Tomita, H.; Kono, T.; Sugie, C.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced CT and the usefulness of super selective embolization therapy in the management of arterial damage in patients with severe blunt renal trauma. Patients and Methods: Nine cases of severe renal trauma were evaluated. In all cases, we compared contrast enhanced CT findings with angiographic findings, and performed transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in six of them with microcoils and gelatin sponge particles. Morphological changes in the kidney and site of infarction after TAE were evaluated on follow-up CT Chronological changes in blood biochemistry findings after injury, degree of anemia and renal function were investigated. Adverse effects or complications such as duration of hematuria, fever, abdominal pain, renovascular hypertension and abscess formation were also evaluated. Results: The CT finding of extravasation was a reliable sign of active bleeding and useful for determining the indication of TAE. In all cases, bleeding was effectively controlled with super selective embolization. There was minimal procedure-related loss of renal tissue. None of the patients developed abscess, hypertension or other complications. Conclusions: In blunt renal injury, contrast-enhanced CT was useful for diagnosing arterial hemorrhage. Arterial bleeding may produce massive hematoma and TAE was a useful treatment for such cases. By using selective TAE for a bleeding artery, it was possible to minimize renal parenchymal damage, with complications of TAE rarely seen. (author)

  14. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivit, Carlos J.

    2008-01-01

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of radiation doses between newborns and 6-y-old children undergoing head, chest and abdominal CT examinations-A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, N.; Aoyama, T.; Koyama, S.; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C.; Fujii, K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography (CT) were investigated for various types of recent CT scanners with newborn and 6-y-old phantoms in which silicon-photodiode dosemeters were implanted at various organ positions. In the head, chest and abdominal CT for the newborn phantom, doses for organs within the scan region were 21-40, 3-8 and 3-12 mGy, respectively. The corresponding doses for the child phantom were 20-37, 2-11 and 4-17 mGy, respectively. In the head, chest and abdominal CT, the effective doses were respectively 2.1-3.3, 2.0-6.0 and 2.2-10.0 mSv for the newborn, and 1.0-2.0, 1.2-6.6 and 2.9-11.8 mSv for the child. Radiation doses for the newborn were at the same levels as those for the child, excepting effective doses in head CT for the newborn, which were 1.8 times higher than those for the child. (authors)

  16. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Benedeti, Augusto César Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility.

  17. CT scan findings in cerebral paragonimiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udaka, Fukashi; Okuda, Bungo; Okada, Masako; Okae, Shunji; Kameyama, Masakuni

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography was performed on 5 patients with chronic cerebral paragonimiasis. CT showed solitary or multiple, amorphous, round, or oval calcifications, and ventricular enlargement in all 5 cases. A large low-density area is also found in 4 of the 5 cases. These CT findings are compatible with previously reported findings of simple X-ray films of the skull, pneumoencephalography, and pathological studies. (author)

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  19. CT findings of thymic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Ho Son; Lee, Sang Jin; Hwang, Mi Soo; Cho, Kil Ho; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan

    1991-01-01

    A CT scan can make accurate diagnoses of most thymic masses by assessing their size, shape, and internal architecture and is especially effective in detecting pleural implants, mediastinal involvement, and pulmonary parenchymal invasion in malignant thymoma. The authors analyzed the CT findings of 10 histologically-proven thymic masses from 1983 to 1990 in Yeungnam University Hospital. There were 10 cases of thymic masses in the anterior mediastinum consisting of 6 benign, 3 invasive thymomas, and one thymolipoma, while myasthenia gravis was associated with 2 cases of benign thymomas and with one case of invasive thymomas. The CT findings of the benign thymomas (6 cases) were well-defined, bordered, round-or oval-shaped masses with a well-preserved fat plane between the thymic mass and mediastinal great vessels, with no evidence of pleural implants and lung parenchymal invasion. The CT findings of the invasive thymomas (3 cases) were irregular, marginated lobular masses with obliteration of the fat plane between the thymic mass and surrounding great vessels, with evidence of local invasion such as extension to A-P window and mass effect to bronchus. Irregular pleural thickening due to pleural metastasis, multiple metastatic lung parenchymal nodules, and multiple mediastinal lymph node enlargement were also seen in the invasive thymomas. One case of thymolipoma showed an approximately 20cm-size, well-defined fat density mass containing internal septations

  20. CT findings of thymic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ho Son; Lee, Sang Jin; Hwang, Mi Soo; Cho, Kil Ho; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-05-15

    A CT scan can make accurate diagnoses of most thymic masses by assessing their size, shape, and internal architecture and is especially effective in detecting pleural implants, mediastinal involvement, and pulmonary parenchymal invasion in malignant thymoma. The authors analyzed the CT findings of 10 histologically-proven thymic masses from 1983 to 1990 in Yeungnam University Hospital. There were 10 cases of thymic masses in the anterior mediastinum consisting of 6 benign, 3 invasive thymomas, and one thymolipoma, while myasthenia gravis was associated with 2 cases of benign thymomas and with one case of invasive thymomas. The CT findings of the benign thymomas (6 cases) were well-defined, bordered, round-or oval-shaped masses with a well-preserved fat plane between the thymic mass and mediastinal great vessels, with no evidence of pleural implants and lung parenchymal invasion. The CT findings of the invasive thymomas (3 cases) were irregular, marginated lobular masses with obliteration of the fat plane between the thymic mass and surrounding great vessels, with evidence of local invasion such as extension to A-P window and mass effect to bronchus. Irregular pleural thickening due to pleural metastasis, multiple metastatic lung parenchymal nodules, and multiple mediastinal lymph node enlargement were also seen in the invasive thymomas. One case of thymolipoma showed an approximately 20cm-size, well-defined fat density mass containing internal septations.

  1. Clear cell sarcoma of the abdominal wall with peritoneal sarcomatosis: CT features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate, J.M.; Fernandez, A.; Torrubia, S.; Villanueva, A.; Monill, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma, also called malignant melanoma of soft parts, is an uncommon neoplasm that involves tendons or aponeuroses of the lower extremity. The CT features of a clear cell sarcoma arising from the abdominal wall with later peritoneal dissemination are described. Peritoneal sarcomatosis from soft tissue sarcomas is a very rare condition previously unreported in the radiologic literature. Metastases to peritoneal surfaces must therefore be considered a possible site for systemic dissemination of soft tissue sarcomas. (orig.)

  2. Adult abdominal hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  3. Radiation dose reduction on multidetector abdominal CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qifeng; Peng Yun; Duan Xiaomin; Sun Jihang; Yu Tong; Han Zhonglong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility to reduce radiation doses on pediatric multidetector abdominal CT using the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique (ASIR) associated with automated tube current modulation technique (ATCM). Methods: Thirty patients underwent abdominal CT with ATCM and the follow-up scan with ATCM cooperated with 40% ASIR. ATCM was used with age dependent noise index (NI) settings: NI = 9 for 0-5 year old and NI = 11 for > 5 years old for simple ATCM group, NI = 11 for 0-5 year old and NI = 15 for > 5 years old for ATCM cooperated with 40% ASIR group (AISR group). Two radiologists independently evaluated images for diagnostic quality and image noise with subjectively image quality score and image noise score using a 5-point scale. Interobserver agreement was assessed by Kappa test. The volume CT dose indexes (CTDIvol) for the two groups were recorded. Statistical significance for the CTDIvol value was analyzed by pair-sample t test. Results: The average CTDIvol for the ASIR group was (1.38 ± 0.64) mGy, about 60% lower than (3.56 ± 1.23) mGy for the simple ATCM group, and the CTDIvol of two groups had statistically significant differences. (t = 33.483, P < 0.05). The subjective image quality scores for the simple ATCM group were 4.43 ± 0.57 and 4.37 ±0.61, Kappa = 0.878, P < 0.01 (ASIR group: 4.70 ± 0.47 and 4.60 ± 0.50, Kappa = 0.783, P < 0.01), by two observers. The image noise score for the simple ATCM group were 4.03 ±0.56 and 3.83 ±0.53, Kappa = 0.572, P < 0.01 (ASIR group: 4.20 ± 0.48 and 4.10 ± 0.48, Kappa = 0.748, P < 0.01), by two observers. All images had acceptable diagnostic image quality. Conclusion: Lower radiation dose can be achieved by elevating NI with ASIR in pediatric CT abdominal studies, while maintaining diagnostically acceptable images. (authors)

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  5. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Aisling [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Program for Patient Safety and Quality, Boston, MA (United States); Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children

  6. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  7. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: leandrocleite@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Departmento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2016-07-15

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  8. CT and MR imaging findings of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis: correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuto, R.; Kiyosue, H.; Komatsu, E.; Matsumoto, S.; Mori, H. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kawano, K. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of First Surgery; Kondo, Y.; Yokoyama, S. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of First Pathology

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate CT and MRI findings in xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) and to correlate the imaging findings with various pathologic parameters. The study included 13 patients with histopathologically confirmed XGC. The CT (n=13) and MRI (n=5) obtained in these patients were evaluated retrospectively. On CT, low-attenuation areas in the wall of XGC correlated with foam and inflammatory cells or necrosis and/or abscess in XGC. Areas of iso- to slightly high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, showing slight enhancement at early phase and strong enhancement at last phase on dynamic study, corresponded with areas of abundant xanthogranulomas. Areas with very high signal intensity on T2-weighted images without enhancement corresponded with necrosis and/or abscesses. Luminal surface enhancement (LSE) of gallbladder wall represented preservation of the epithelial layer. The early-enhanced areas of the liver bed on dynamic CT and MR images corresponded with accumulation of inflammatory cells and abundant fibrosis. Our results indicate that CT and MRI findings correlate well with the histopathologic findings of XGC.

  9. Mesenteric vascular occlusion: Comparison of ancillary CT findings between arterial and venous occlusions and independent CT findings suggesting life-threatening events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Yon Cheong; Wu, Cheng Hsien; Wang, Li Jen; Chen, Huan Wu; Lin, Being Chuan; Huang, Chen Chih

    2013-01-01

    To compare the ancillary CT findings between superior mesenteric artery thromboembolism (SMAT) and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT), and to determine the independent CT findings of life-threatening mesenteric occlusion. Our study was approved by the institution review board. We included 43 patients (21 SMAT and 22 SMVT between 1999 and 2008) of their median age of 60.0 years, and retrospectively analyzed their CT scans. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, management, surgical pathology diagnosis, and outcome. We compared CT findings between SMAT and SMVT groups. Multivariate analysis was conducted to determine the independent CT findings of life-threatening mesenteric occlusion. Of 43 patients, 24 had life-threatening mesenteric occlusion. Death related to mesenteric occlusion was 32.6%. A thick bowel wall (p < 0.001), mesenteric edema (p < 0.001), and ascites (p = 0.009) were more frequently associated with SMVT, whereas diminished bowel enhancement (p = 0.003) and paralytic ileus (p = 0.039) were more frequent in SMAT. Diminished bowel enhancement (OR = 20; p = 0.007) and paralytic ileus (OR = 16; p = 0.033) were independent findings suggesting life-threatening mesenteric occlusion. The ancillary CT findings occur with different frequencies in SMAT and SMVT. However, the independent findings indicating life-threatening mesenteric occlusion are diminished bowel wall enhancement and paralytic ileus.

  10. Quantitative X-ray CT analysis of calcification of the abdominal aorta and its relationship to obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinagawa, Toshio; Hiraiwa, Yoshio; Mizuno, Seio; Kusunoki, Norio; Nitta, Yu; Matsubara, Takao; Iwainaka, Yoichi; Konishi, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of abdominal aorta calcification by X-ray CT is useful method for non-invasive diagnosis of atherosclerosis. We recently examined the relationship between the X-ray CT measurement of abdominal aorta calcification and the degree of obesity. For this purpose, the body mass index (BMI) and the subcutaneous fat thickness (determined by X-ray CT at the umbilical level) were analyzed in relation to the abdominal aorta calcification index (ACI) in 845 patients (453 males and 392 females aged 40-79 years). Patients with BMI under 20 were classified as 'lean', those with BMI between 20-26 as 'normal' and those with BMI over 26 as 'obese'. 1. Among males, the ACI was highest in lean individuals and lowest in obese individuals. The difference in ACI between lean and obese males was significant in the middle aged group (40-65 years). Among females, no relationship was observed between the degree of obesity and ACI. 2. Among males, ACI was higher in individuals with low subcutaneous fat thickness and lower in individuals with greater subcutaneous fat thickness. The difference was significant in the middle aged group. Among females, no relationship was observed between the two parameters. 3. When the visceral fat to subcutaneous fat ratio (V/S) in 85 males and females aged 60-69 years was analyzed in relation to ACI, ACI tended to decrease as the V/S increased, in both males and females. 4. Relationships between BMI and subcutaneous fat thickness, between BMI and lipids and between lipids and ACI were also analyzed. (author)

  11. The correlation of preoperative CT, MR imaging, and clinical staging (FIGO) with histopathology findings in primary cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepens, E.; Corthouts, B.; Beeck, B.O. de; Parizel, P.M.; De Schepper, A.M.; Tjalma, W.; Marck, E. van

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the preoperative findings of abdominal/pelvic CT and MRI with the preoperative clinical International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) staging and postoperative pathology report in patients with primary cancer of the cervix. Thirty-six patients with surgical-pathological proven primary cancer of the cervix were retrospectively studied for preoperative staging by clinical examination, CT, and MR imaging. Studied parameters for preoperative staging were the presence of tumor, tumor extension into the parametrial tissue, pelvic wall, adjacent organs, and lymph nodes. The CT was performed in 32 patients and MRI (T1- and T2-weighted images) in 29 patients. The CT and MR staging were based on the FIGO staging system. Results were compared with histological findings. The group is consisted of stage 0 (in situ):1, Ia:1, Ib:8, IIa:2, IIb:12, IIIa:4, IVa:6, and IVb:2 patients. The overall accuracy of staging for clinical examination, CT, and MRI was 47, 53, and 86%, respectively. The MRI incorrectly staged 2 patients and did not visualize only two tumors; one was an in situ (stage-0) and one stage-Ia (microscopic) disease. The MRI is more accurate than CT and they are both superior to clinical examination in evaluating the locoregional extension and preoperative staging of primary cancer of the cervix. (orig.)

  12. The value of the abdominal radiograph in the assessment of the acute abdomen- work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, R.; Kew, J.; Davies, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The value of the abdominal radiograph in the assessment of the acute abdomen was evaluated for those patients who also had abdominal ultrasound and/or CT. The value of each modality in patient management is reviewed. Retrospective review of 52 consecutive patients presented to a tertiary hospital emergency department with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal radiographs (AXR) and abdominal ultrasound (US) and / or computed tomography (CT) within 24 hours of presentation was undertaken. There were 37 males and 15 females. The mean age was 53 years (range 18-95y). Abdominal radiographs were reviewed by two radiologists.Two patients had two separate admissions one week apart. There were 35 normal abdominal radiographs. 19 studies showed clinically relevant abnormalities. Of the normal group, 14 out of 21 patients had abnormal findings on CT and 8 out of 16 had abnormal US examinations. Of the 19 patients with abnormal AXR, 17 out of 19 patients had abnormal CT and 2 out of 5 had abnormal ultrasound examinations. There were 5 cases where both CT scan and US was performed. The positive and negative predictive value for AXR vs CT scan was 89% and 33% respectively and for AXR vs US scan was 40% and 50% respectively. For patients with normal AXR and abnormal CT, there was only one case (a non calcified abdominal aortic aneurysm) which might have required immediate surgical intervention. The preliminary results suggest that the abnormal radiograph is sensitive in the detection of relevant abnormalities in the acute abdomen in the context of appropriate clinical selection. Both CT and ultrasound provide additional diagnostic accuracy for some indications.A further 50 patients are being reviewed and the combined results will be presented. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Benedeti, Augusto Cesar Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge, E-mail: fernando@fatesa.edu.br [Faculdade de Tecnologia em Saude (FATESA), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Departmento de Radiologia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departmento de Medicina Clinica; Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras; Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Objective: To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Materials and Methods: Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Results: Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. Conclusion: In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility. (author)

  14. Computed tomographic evaluation of abdominal fat in minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinhwa; Jung, Joohyun; Lee, Hyeyeon; Chang, Dongwoo; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Mincheol

    2011-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) exams were conducted to determine the distribution of abdominal fat identified based on the CT number measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) and to measure the volume of the abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat in minipigs. The relationship between the CT-based fat volumes of several vertebral levels and the entire abdomen and anthropometric data including the sagittal abdominal diameter and waist circumference were evaluated. Moreover, the total fat volumes at the T11, T13, L3, and L5 levels were compared with the total fat volume of the entire abdomen to define the landmark of abdominal fat distribution. Using a single-detector CT, six 6-month-old male minipigs were scanned under general anesthesia. Three radiologists then assessed the HU value of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat by drawing the region of interest manually at the T11, T13, L1, L3, and L5 levels. The CT number and abdominal fat determined in this way by the three radiologists was found to be correlated (intra-class coefficient = 0.9). The overall HU ranges for the visceral and subcutaneous fat depots were -147.47 to -83.46 and -131.62 to -90.97, respectively. The total fat volume of the entire abdomen was highly correlated with the volume of abdominal fat at the T13 level (r = 0.97, p abdominal adipose tissue measured at the T13 level using CT is a strong and reliable predictor of total abdominal adipose volume.

  15. CT findings of normal pancreatic tail: variety of morphology and location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hye Seung; Son, San Hoo; Moon, Gae Hyuk; Kim, Hu Ho; Gong Jae Chul; Yang Jae Boum [Inchon Christian Hospital, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mee Sook [Jaesung Hospital. (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-01

    To determine the morphology and location of normal pancreatic tail, as seen on abdominal CT. A hundred and one patients without pancreatic disease underwent CT scanning. We then determined how to relate the location of the pancreatic tail with the splenic hilum, left kidney, and pancreatic body. We compared the thickness of the tail with that of the body and analysed of the morphology of the tail. Seventy-seven percent of all pancreatic tails were located below the splenic hilum, with 59% of this proportion located 1 to 2 cm below. Fifty percent of tails were located at the level of the uppermost quarter of the left kidney, and a further 27% at the level of the second quarter; 75 % were located in the ventrolateral portion of this kidney and 23% in the ventral portion. In 48% of patients, the pancreatic tail and body were the same thickness, and in a further 48 %, the tail was thicker than the body. In 34% of patients, the tail showed focal bulging, and in another 32%, it tapered smoothly. Forty seven percent of tails were located below the pancreatic body and a further 37% were found at the same level as the body. Abdominal CT scans showed differing morphology and location of the pancreatic tail. The recognition of these variations will diminish speculation as to their true nature. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs.

  16. CT and MRI findings in cerebral hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, U.; Parlak, M.; Kilic, E.; Sivri, Z.; Sadikoglu, M.Y.; Tuncel, E.

    1995-01-01

    CT is the primary modality for the diagnosis. Two forms of cerebral hydatid cysts have been reported on the basis of CT appearances: unilocular and multilocular. Demonstration of the cyst wall is important for the diagnosis. MRI is superior to CT for demonstrating the cyst capsule and perifocal oedema. We retrospectively reveiwed the CT and MRI findings of 6 surgically proven cases of cerebral hydatid cyst and compared the two modalities on the basis of their demonstration of findings helpful in the diagnosis, such as the capsule and perifocal oedema. In 1 case CT showed the capsule. In 2 cases MRI showed a hypointense capsule around the cyst on T2-weighted images. While CT is the modality of choice, in clinical practice MRI is superior for demonstrating the cyst capsule, which is a helpful finding in the diagnosis and can be used in inconclusive cases. (orig.)

  17. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Straatman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery. An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutive patients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed. Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 % patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days. One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative day CRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001. CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  18. CT findings of orbital langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Gina; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bokyung Kim; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Choo, In Wook

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the orbit. Orbital CT scans of six children with pathologically proven LCH were retrospectively analyzed. Follow-up CT (n=3D5) and MR (n=3D1) imaging findings were also reviewed. Initial CT scans revealed varying degree of bone destruction with soft-tissue masses, and on nonenhanced images the mean attenuation value was 44 Hounsfield units (HU). All masses showed mild to moderate enhancement with a mean attenuation value of 74 HU. The bony margins abutting onto soft tissue masses were irregular but clearly demarcated. No evidence of calcification or periosteal reaction was noted. Suprasellar mass and rib involvement was noted in one patient and hepatosplenomegaly in two. Follow-up CT and MR images showed that the soft tissue masses were almost completely resolved, with bone remodeling and reossification. A soft tissue mass with irregular but clearly demarcated bone destruction is thought to be a characteristic finding of LCH involving the orbit. Follow-up images after treatment showed bone remodeling and reossification. (author)

  19. Pitfall of ultrasonographic diagnosis in abdominal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Yoo, H.S.; Kim, K. W.; Lee, J. T.; Park, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is generally diagnosed using conventional barium studies, however recent diagnostic modalities such as ultrasonography and CT scan are widely applicated in conjunction with conventional studies for the search of lymph node presentation and associated extra-intestinal organs. It is important to differentiate intra-abdominal tuberculosis from metastatic or lymphomatous disease clinically. And it might be especially of worth to find out if there is any differential point between tuberculosis and other lymph nodal disease entities when we meet similar findings on imaging modalities. Authors have tried to evaluate ultrasonographic findings in conjunction with other studies in nine cases of abdominal tuberculosis which showed mainly extra-intestinal and/or lymph nodal involvement

  20. Utility of abdominal computed tomography in geriatric patients on warfarin with a fall from standing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bahl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Geriatric head trauma resulting from falls has been extensively studied both in the presence and absence of blood thinners. In this population, however, the prevalence and extent of abdominal injury resulting from falls are much less defined. Aim: We aim to evaluate the utility of abdominal computed tomography (CT imaging in geriatric patients on Warfarin with a recent history of fall. Setting and Design: A retrospective analysis was completed of consecutive geriatric patients who presented to a Level 1 Trauma Center emergency department after fall from standing while taking Warfarin. Methods: Inclusion criteria included age 65 years or older and fall while taking Warfarin. Incomplete medical records were excluded from the study. Data collection included the type of anticoagulant medications, demographics, physical examination, laboratories, CT/X-ray findings if ordered, and final diagnosis on admission. Categorical variables were examined using Pearson's Chi-square where appropriate (expected frequency >5, or Fisher's Exact test. Continuous variables were examined using nonparametric Wilcoxon rank tests. Results: Eight hundred and sixty-three charts were reviewed. One hundred and thirty-one subjects met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 83 years. Nearly 39.6% of patients were male. A total of 48 patients had abdominal CT imaging. Seven of the 131 patients (5.3% had an abdominal injury. Abdominal tenderness was predictive of injury, with 4 of 7 cases with abdominal injury demonstrating abdominal tenderness versus only 10 of 124 cases without abdominal injury demonstrating tenderness (P = 0.003. Abdominal CTs were ordered in 11 of 19 cases of patients that exhibited head trauma yet none of these patients were shown to have sustained abdominal trauma (P = 0.08. There was no association between international normalized ratio level and presence of abdominal injury (P = 0.99. Conclusions: A small percentage of elderly fall patients on

  1. Computer-aided assessment of regional abdominal fat with food residue removal in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Caturegli, Giorgio; Davatzikos, Christos; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    Separate quantification of abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat regions is essential to understand the role of regional adiposity as risk factor in epidemiological studies. Fat quantification is often based on computed tomography (CT) because fat density is distinct from other tissue densities in the abdomen. However, the presence of intestinal food residues with densities similar to fat may reduce fat quantification accuracy. We introduce an abdominal fat quantification method in CT with interest in food residue removal. Total fat was identified in the feature space of Hounsfield units and divided into subcutaneous and visceral components using model-based segmentation. Regions of food residues were identified and removed from visceral fat using a machine learning method integrating intensity, texture, and spatial information. Cost-weighting and bagging techniques were investigated to address class imbalance. We validated our automated food residue removal technique against semimanual quantifications. Our feature selection experiments indicated that joint intensity and texture features produce the highest classification accuracy at 95%. We explored generalization capability using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with variable k. Losses in accuracy and area under ROC curve between maximum and minimum k were limited to 0.1% and 0.3%. We validated tissue segmentation against reference semimanual delineations. The Dice similarity scores were as high as 93.1 for subcutaneous fat and 85.6 for visceral fat. Computer-aided regional abdominal fat quantification is a reliable computational tool for large-scale epidemiological studies. Our proposed intestinal food residue reduction scheme is an original contribution of this work. Validation experiments indicate very good accuracy and generalization capability. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Evaluation of CT findings for diagnosis of pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas-Jimenez, J.; Alonso-Charterina, S.; Fernandez-Latorre, F.; Gil-Sanchez, S.; Sanchez-Paya, J.; Lloret-Llorens, M.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography studies are usually used to assess patients with pleural effusions, and radiologists should be aware of the significance of different CT findings for the diagnosis of the effusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CT findings for etiological diagnosis of pleural effusions. Contrast-enhanced CT of the chest of 211 patients with pleural effusion of definite diagnosis were evaluated. The CT images were evaluated for the presence and extent of pleural effusion, thickening or nodules, extrapleural fat and other changes in the mediastinum or lung. The CT scans were read by two independent observers and correlation between them was evaluated. Comparison of CT findings between benign and malignant effusions, between exudates and transudates, and between empyemas and the other parapneumonic effusions were carried out. Kappa values for most CT findings were >0.85. Loculation, pleural thickening, pleural nodules, and extrapleural fat of increased density were only present in exudative effusions. Multiple pleural nodules and nodular pleural thickening were the only pleural findings limited to malignant pleural effusions. The signs were also more frequently seen in empyemas than in other parapneumonic effusions. Computed tomography findings can help to distinguish between transudates and exudates. Although there is some overlap between benign and malignant pleural effusions, pleural nodules and nodular pleural thickening were present almost exclusively in the latter. Although differences between CT findings of empyemas and the other parapneumonic effusions exist, there is no finding which can definitely differentiate between them. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of CT findings with upper GI series and surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo; Suh, Soo Jhi; Kim, Soon Yong [School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-09-15

    The authors made comparative studies of CT findings with upper GI series and surgical findings in 20 cases of histologically proven gastric cancers. The identification of chickening of gastric wall and local and remote metastasis by CT was thought to be great value in treatment planning and prediction of prognosis of the patients. The results were as follows: 1. Of 20 cases, 19 cases demonstrated thickening of gastric wall. Among 3 cases suggested as early cancer on upper GI series, 2 cases demonstrated thickened gastric wall on CT and it was proved to be advanced cancer at surgery. 2. Out of 8 cases showed no definite metastasis on CT, 4 cases had malignant infiltration histologically in the regional lymph nodes. But they were less than 1.5 cm in diameter. 3. The frequency order of remote metastasis found by CT was pancreas, liver, left adrenal gland and lung in organs and retroperitoneal, retrocrural and regional nodes in lymph nodes.

  4. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden.

  5. Dose monitoring using the DICOM structured report: assessment of the relationship between cumulative radiation exposure and BMI in abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, J.; Lanzman, R.S.; Meineke, A.; Heusch, P.; Sawicki, L.M.; Antoch, G.; Kröpil, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To perform a systematic, large-scale analysis using the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine structured report (DICOM-SR) to assess the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and radiation exposure in abdominal CT. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of DICOM-SR of 3121 abdominal CT examinations between April 2013 and March 2014 was performed. All examinations were conducted using a 128 row CT system. Patients (mean age 61 ± 15 years) were divided into five groups according to their BMI: group A <20 kg/m 2 (underweight), group B 20–25 kg/m 2 (normal weight), group C 25–30 kg/m 2 (overweight), group D 30–35 kg/m 2 (obese), and group E > 35 kg/m 2 (extremely obese). CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose–length product (DLP) were compared between all groups and matched to national diagnostic reference values. Results: The mean CTDI vol and DLP were 5.4 ± 2.9 mGy and 243 ± 153 mGy·cm in group A, 6 ± 3.6 mGy and 264 ± 179 mGy• cm in group B, 7 ± 3.6 mGy and 320 ± 180 mGy• cm in group C, 8.1 ± 5.2 mGy and 375 ± 306 mGy• cm in group D, and 10 ± 8 mGy and 476 ± 403 mGy• cm in group E, respectively. Except for group A versus group B, CTDI vol and DLP differed significantly between all groups (p<0.05). Significantly more CTDI vol values exceeded national diagnostic reference values in groups D and E (2.1% and 6.3%) compared to group B (0.5%, p<0.05). Conclusion: DICOM-SR is a comprehensive, fast, and reproducible way to analyse dose-related data at CT. It allows for automated evaluation of radiation dose in a large study population. Dose exposition is related to the patient's BMI and is increased by up to 96% for extremely obese patients undergoing abdominal CT. - Highlights: • DICOM-SR was used to implement automatic CT-dose monitoring. • DICOM-SR allowed for a fast and comprehensive analysis of CT dose data. • Radiation exposure for abdominal CT was increased by up to 96% for

  6. Upper abdominal gadoxetic acid-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI for the detection of gastric cancer: Comparison with two-dimensional multidetector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.M.; Kim, S.H.; Lee, S.J.; Lee, M.W.; Choi, D.; Kim, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of gastric cancer in comparison with that of two-dimensional (2D) multidetector row computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: The study included 189 patients with 170 surgically confirmed gastric cancers and 19 patients without gastric cancer, all of whom underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, and multidetector contrast-enhanced abdominal CT imaging. Two observers independently analysed three sets of images (CT set, conventional MRI set, and combined conventional and DW MRI set). A five-point scale for likelihood of gastric cancer was used. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were evaluated. Quantitative [apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) analyses with Mann–Whitney U-test were conducted for gastric cancers and the nearby normal gastric wall. Results: The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer were significantly higher on combined conventional and DW MRI set (77.8–78.3%; 75.3–75.9%) than the CT imaging set (67.7–71.4%; 64.1–68.2%) or the conventional MRI set (72–73%; 68.8–70%; p < 0.01). In particular, for gastric cancers with pT2 and pT3, the combined conventional and DW MRI set (91.6–92.6%) yielded significantly higher sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer than did the CT imaging set (76.8–81.1%) by both observers (p < 0.01). The mean ADC of gastric cancer lesions (1 ± 0.23 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s) differed significantly from that of normal gastric wall (1.77 ± 0.25 × 10 −3  mm 2 /s; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Abdominal MRI with DW imaging was more sensitive for the detection of gastric cancer than 2D-multidetector row CT or conventional MRI alone. - Highlights: • The sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer is high on abdominal MR imaging. • DW imaging is helpful for

  7. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis: high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Stein, A.; Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) of the lung is a very rare disease. There are obvious discrepancies in the literature concerning the appearance of LAM on CT scans of the lung. This study adds the imaging findings of 11 patients and demonstrates how the imaging findings changed over time in four patients. Twenty-two CT examinations, and radiographs that had been obtained close to the CT examinations, of 11 patients with LAM confirmed by open lung biopsy were retrospectively evaluated with particular attention to the size of cystic lesions and wall thickness. Furthermore the CT scans were analysed for the type of pulmonary infiltration process and its distribution, presence or absence of pleural effusion, pneumothorax and lymph node enlargement. Clinical and CT follow-up studies were available in four patients. The CT scans revealed an increase in the interstitial pattern in all patients. Architectural distortion was seen in two patients and cystic lesions were present in all. The size of the cysts varied from small lesions to bullous emphysema. The cystic lesions revealed a wall thickness up to 2 mm but a wall was not perceptible in all. Pneumothorax was seen in only two patients; pleural effusion was seen in two patients. CT examination of patients with LAM reveals neither a uniform nor a pathognomonic appearance. In the early stages of LAM or in cases with interstitial changes the differential diagnosis of centrilobular emphysema or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis seems to be more difficult than most authors believe. (orig.) (orig.)

  8. New scoring system for intra-abdominal injury diagnosis after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaee, Majid; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Yaseri, Mehdi; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Sabzghabaei, Anita; Malekirastekenari, Ali

    2014-01-01

    An accurate scoring system for intra-abdominal injury (IAI) based on clinical manifestation and examination may decrease unnecessary CT scans, save time, and reduce healthcare cost. This study is designed to provide a new scoring system for a better diagnosis of IAI after blunt trauma. This prospective observational study was performed from April 2011 to October 2012 on patients aged above 18 years and suspected with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) admitted to the emergency department (ED) of Imam Hussein Hospital and Shohadaye Hafte Tir Hospital. All patients were assessed and treated based on Advanced Trauma Life Support and ED protocol. Diagnosis was done according to CT scan findings, which was considered as the gold standard. Data were gathered based on patient's history, physical exam, ultrasound and CT scan findings by a general practitioner who was not blind to this study. Chi-square test and logistic regression were done. Factors with significant relationship with CT scan were imported in multivariate regression models, where a coefficient (β) was given based on the contribution of each of them. Scoring system was developed based on the obtained total β of each factor. Altogether 261 patients (80.1% male) were enrolled (48 cases of IAI). A 24-point blunt abdominal trauma scoring system (BATSS) was developed. Patients were divided into three groups including low (scoretool for BAT detection and has the potential to reduce unnecessary CT scan and cut unnecessary costs.

  9. Automated extraction of metastatic liver cancer regions from abdominal contrast CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Junki; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Kimura, Shouta; Hasegawa, Junichi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Nawano, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, automated extraction of metastatic liver cancer regions from abdominal contrast X-ray CT images is investigated. Because even in Japan, cases of metastatic liver cancers are increased due to recent Europeanization and/or Americanization of Japanese eating habits, development of a system for computer aided diagnosis of them is strongly expected. Our automated extraction procedure consists of following four steps; liver region extraction, density transformation for enhancement of cancer regions, segmentation for obtaining candidate cancer regions, and reduction of false positives by shape feature. Parameter values used in each step of the procedure are decided based on density and shape features of typical metastatic liver cancers. In experiments using practical 20 cases of metastatic liver tumors, it is shown that 56% of true cancers can be detected successfully from CT images by the proposed procedure. (author)

  10. CT findings in silicosis due to denim sandblasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, Fatih; Akgun, Metin; Araz, Omer; Onbas, Omer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the findings of CT performed on denim sandblasters with silicosis. Fifty consecutive male patients with silicosis were evaluated. Their clinical data and pulmonary function tests (PFT) were obtained. The CT findings were recorded and the correlations between CT nodular profusion score and the other parameters were assessed. The diagnoses of the patients were classified as accelerated silicosis (n = 43) and acute silicosis (n = 7). The most common CT finding was centrilobular nodules. Twenty-three patients had complicated silicosis based on pleural involvement and presence of progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). Lymphadenopathy (LAP) was positive in 50% of the patients, with calcification in 24%. The CT grade was highly correlated with the clinical data such as exposure duration and PFT. Our findings suggest that the clinical manifestation of silicosis in denim sandblasters is severe. Although the duration of exposure is shorter the rate of complicated silicosis patients with pleural involvement was unexpectedly higher in the cases. Because the most common radiological appearance was nodules and the CT grading of the nodules was highly correlated with the clinical data, nodule grading may be used in the management of such cases. (orig.)

  11. A randomized, controlled trial of routine early abdominal computed tomography in patients presenting with non-specific acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sala, E.; Watson, C.J.E.; Beadsmoore, C.; Groot-Wassink, T.; Fanshawe, T.R.; Smith, J.C.; Bradley, A.; Palmer, C.R.; Shaw, A.; Dixon, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effect of an initial early computed tomography (CT) examination versus standard practice (SP) on the length of hospital stay, diagnostic accuracy, and mortality of adults presenting with acute abdominal pain. Materials and methods: Two hundred and five adults presenting with acute abdominal pain were randomized to undergo an early CT examination or current SP, which comprised supine abdominal and erect chest radiography. One hundred and ninety-eight patients (99 in each arm) were included in the analysis. The primary endpoint was the duration of inpatient stay; secondary endpoints were diagnostic certainty and mortality. Results: There was no significant difference in the length of hospital stay between the two arms (p = 0.20). At randomization 36% (35 of 96) of CT patients and 49% (48 of 98) of SP patients were correctly diagnosed; 24 h after randomization the correct diagnosis had been established in 84% of CT patients and 73% of SP patients. This refinement in diagnostic certainty was significantly better in the CT group (p < 0.001). There was no difference in mortality between the two trial arms (p = 0.31). Conclusion: Early abdominal CT in patients with acute abdominal pain improves diagnostic certainty, but does not reduce the length of hospital stay and 6 month mortality

  12. CT findings following diphenylhydantoin intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, W.K.; Beck, U.; Hirsch, W.; Kiel Univ.

    1985-01-01

    CT findings in three female epileptic patients are presented. The patients were treated with toxic doses of the anticonvulsant diphenylhydantoin, leading to irreversible ataxia of varying severity. CT shows cerebellar atrophy, including discernible sulci, a dilated 4th ventricle, basal cisterns, and subarachnoid space. These effects of severe DPH toxicity are in the differential diagnosis from the ''idiopathic'' and other toxic and systemic atrophies, as well as from the dysontogenetic lesions of the cerebellum. (orig.)

  13. CT findings in primary pulmonary lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinale, Luciano; Allasia, Marco; Cataldi, Aldo; Ferraris, Fabrizio; Fava, Cesare; Parvis, Guido

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the CT findings of pathologically confirmed primary pulmonary lymphomas. Materials and methods. The CT examinations of 11 patients with pathologically proven primary pulmonary lymphoma (9 BALT lymphomas and 2 non-BALT lymphomas) were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists. Evaluated findings included morphology (consolidation, mass, nodule), number and distribution of lesions. Other CT findings such as air bronchogram, lymphadenopathy atelectasis and pleural effusion were also assessed. Results. Pulmonary lesions were depicted as air-space consolidation (pneumonia-like) in 5 patients (45%), tumour-like rounded opacity in 4 (36%), and nodules in 4 (36%). Multiple and bilateral long lesions were seen in 3 patients (27%). Air bronchogram was present in 7 patients (63%), lymphadenopathy in 3 (27%), atelectasis in 4 (36%) and pleural effusion in only 1 (9%). Conclusions. Our results agree with previous studies regarding lesion patterns and their relative frequency. A smaller number of nodules and of multiple lesions were found compared with some previous studies. The most frequent pattern was airspace consolidation [it

  14. Selective Nonoperative Management of Penetrating Abdominal Solid Organ Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriades, Demetrios; Hadjizacharia, Pantelis; Constantinou, Costas; Brown, Carlos; Inaba, Kenji; Rhee, Peter; Salim, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and safety of selective nonoperative management in penetrating abdominal solid organ injuries. Background: Nonoperative management of blunt abdominal solid organ injuries has become the standard of care. However, routine surgical exploration remains the standard practice for all penetrating solid organ injuries. The present study examines the role of nonoperative management in selected patients with penetrating injuries to abdominal solid organs. Patients and Methods: Prospective, protocol-driven study, which included all penetrating abdominal solid organ (liver, spleen, kidney) injuries admitted to a level I trauma center, over a 20-month period. Patients with hemodynamic instability, peritonitis, or an unevaluable abdomen underwent an immediate laparotomy. Patients who were hemodynamically stable and had no signs of peritonitis were selected for further CT scan evaluation. In the absence of CT scan findings suggestive of hollow viscus injury, the patients were observed with serial clinical examinations, hemoglobin levels, and white cell counts. Patients with left thoracoabdominal injuries underwent elective laparoscopy to rule out diaphragmatic injury. Outcome parameters included survival, complications, need for delayed laparotomy in observed patients, and length of hospital stay. Results: During the study period, there were 152 patients with 185 penetrating solid organ injuries. Gunshot wounds accounted for 70.4% and stab wounds for 29.6% of injuries. Ninety-one patients (59.9%) met the criteria for immediate operation. The remaining 61 (40.1%) patients were selected for CT scan evaluation. Forty-three patients (28.3% of all patients) with 47 solid organ injuries who had no CT scan findings suspicious of hollow viscus injury were selected for clinical observation and additional laparoscopy in 2. Four patients with a “blush” on CT scan underwent angiographic embolization of the liver. Overall, 41 patients (27

  15. New scoring system for intra-abdominal injury diagnosis after blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojaee Majid

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: An accurate scoring system for intra-abdominal injury (IAI based on clinical manifestation and examination may decrease unnecessary CT scans, save time, and reduce healthcare cost. This study is designed to provide a new scoring system for a better diagno- sis of IAI after blunt trauma. Methods: This prospective observational study was performed from April 2011 to October 2012 on patients aged above 18 years and suspected with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT admitted to the emergency department (ED of Imam Hussein Hospital and Shohadaye Hafte Tir Hospital. All patients were assessed and treated based on Advanced Trauma Life Support and ED protocol. Diagnosis was done according to CT scan findings, which was considered as the gold standard. Data were gathered based on patient's history, physical exam, ultrasound and CT scan findings by a general practitioner who was not blind to this study. Chisquare test and logistic regression were done. Factors with significant relationship with CT scan were imported in multivariate regression models, where a coefficient (β was given based on the contribution of each of them. Scoring system was developed based on the obtained total βof each factor. Results: Altogether 261 patients (80.1% male were enrolled (48 cases of IAI. A 24-point blunt abdominal trauma scoring system (BATSS was developed. Patients were divided into three groups including low (score<8, moderate (8≤score<12 and high risk (score≥12. In high risk group immediate laparotomy should be done, moderate group needs further assessments, and low risk group should be kept under observation. Low risk patients did not show positive CT-scans (specificity 100%. Conversely, all high risk patients had positive CT-scan findings (sensitivity 100%. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated a close relationship between the results of CT scan and BATSS (sensitivity=99.3%. Conclusion: The present scoring system furnishes a

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), injuries ...

  17. Sponge retention within the abdominal cavity: presentation forms and radiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor Santovena, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.; Diaz Riudavets, M.C.; Rodriguez Delgado, L.E.; Torres Diaz, M.; Pitti Reyes, S.; Toledo Trujillo, F.

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of surgical sponge retention within the abdominal cavity has been estimated to range between 1:1000 and 1:5000. This study deals with the radiological, ultrasonographic (US) and computed tomographic (CT) findings, with and without radiolabeling, in four cases in which sponges were retained in the abdominal cavity for different lengths of time, each of which followed a different course. (Author)

  18. CFD Modelling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Hemodynamic Loads Using a Realistic Geometry with CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Soudah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS, abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT, and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m3 and a kinematic viscosity of 4×10-3 Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index (β, saccular index (γ, deformation diameter ratio (χ, and tortuosity index (ε and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  19. CT manifestations of pancreatic tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Risheng; Zheng Ji'ai; Li Rongfen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the CT manifestations and diagnostic value in the pancreatic tuberculosis(PTB)with review of the literatures. Methods: All cases of PTB proved by surgery or biopsy were examined with plain and enhanced CT scans. Results: The CT findings in one case with multiple-nodular type of PTB were diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with multiple, nodular, and low-density lesions; The nodular lesions had peripheral enhancement. 7 cases of local type of PTB encroached on pancreatic head. 4 cases showed local soft tissue masses with multiple flecked calcifications in 2 cases and mild enhancement in one case; Cystic masses was found in 2 cases, with mural calcification in 1 case and multi-loculated cystic mass in 1 case, respectively; Massive pancreatic head calcification was demonstrated in one case. In these 8 cases of PTB, the lesion extended out of pancreas in 4 cases, including abdominal tuberculous lymph nodes, tuberculous peritonitis, and hepatosplenic tuberculosis. Conclusion: CT findings of PTB were various but had some characteristics. Pancreatic masses with multiple flecked calcification or mild enhancement could suggest the diagnosis. Abdominal tuberculosis accompanied with the pancreatic lesion, especially tuberculous lymph nodes, was highly suggestive of the diagnosis of PTB

  20. CT findings following diphenylhydantoin intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baier, W.K.; Beck, U.; Hirsch, W.

    1985-05-01

    CT findings in three female epileptic patients are presented. The patients were treated with toxic doses of the anticonvulsant diphenylhydantoin, leading to irreversible ataxia of varying severity. CT shows cerebellar atrophy, including discernible sulci, a dilated 4th ventricle, basal cisterns, and subarachnoid space. These effects of severe DPH toxicity are in the differential diagnosis from the ''idiopathic'' and other toxic and systemic atrophies, as well as from the dysontogenetic lesions of the cerebellum.

  1. The Use of CT Scan in Hemodynamically Stable Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma : Look before You Leap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nellensteijn, David R.; Greuter, Marcel J.; el Moumni, Moustafa; Hulscher, Jan B.

    We set out to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomographic (CT) scans in relation to the radiation dose, tumor incidence, and tumor mortality by radiation for hemodynamically stable pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injury. We focused on the changes in management because of new

  2. CT presentations of colorectal cancer with chronic schistosomiasis: A comparative study with pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei, E-mail: zhangwei976@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University, No. 389, Xincun Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200065 (China); Wang, Pei-Jun, E-mail: peijunwang_tongji@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University, No. 389, Xincun Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200065 (China); Shen, Xing, E-mail: shenxing1997@163.com [Department of Radiology, Traditional Chinese Hospital, No. 189, Chaoyangxi Road, Kun Shan 215300, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Guo-liang, E-mail: glwang1960@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University, No. 389, Xincun Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200065 (China); Zhao, Xiao-hu, E-mail: tiger1968@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University, No. 389, Xincun Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200065 (China); Seema, S.F., E-mail: saaaamaaaa@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University, No. 389, Xincun Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200065 (China); Zheng, Shao-qiang, E-mail: shaoqiangzh@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University, No. 389, Xincun Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200065 (China); Li, Ming-hua, E-mail: minghuali@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University, No. 389, Xincun Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200065 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: To clarify pathological basis of computed tomography (CT) presentations of colorectal cancer (CRC) with schistosomiasis for the purpose of improving the accuracy of CT diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the condition. Materials and methods: 130 patients (87 male and 43 female; age range 49-86 years, mean 71.1) were selected whose diagnoses were pathologically confirmed as CRC with schistosomiasis. All the patients underwent abdominal plain CT and contrast enhanced scanning. The location, morphology, size, calcification features and enhancement modalities (patterns) were evaluated and compared with the pathological findings by two radiologists in a blind way. Results: CT showed that in 130 patients, the tumors occurred in the large intestine, among which 109 (83.9%) were solitary and 21 (16.1%) were multifocal. The intestinal wall was irregularly thickened in 123 patients, with soft tissue masses in 7 patients. Linear, spotty and small patchy calcifications were seen in 104 (80.0%) patients, with unclear margins in 96 patients. The tumors were markedly unevenly enhanced in 92 patients. Pathological examination revealed adenocarcinoma in 114 patients and in 104 patients, calcified Shistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) ova inside the tumors, 15 patients were mucinous adenocarcinoma, and one patient was that of adenosquamous carcinoma. Conclusion: Irregular thickening of the intestinal wall, soft tissue masses, multiple S. japonicum ova calcifications inside the tumor with obscured margins and multiple intestinal masses in some patients are important CT features of CRC with schistosomiasis.

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed ... soft tissues and blood vessels. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. CT ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation ... Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a diagnostic imaging test used to help detect diseases of ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  17. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis: high-resolution CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, J.; Stein, A.; Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Roentgendiagnostik; Viel, K.; Dietrich, C.F. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik II; Schneider, M. [Zentrum fuer Pathologie, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) of the lung is a very rare disease. There are obvious discrepancies in the literature concerning the appearance of LAM on CT scans of the lung. This study adds the imaging findings of 11 patients and demonstrates how the imaging findings changed over time in four patients. Twenty-two CT examinations, and radiographs that had been obtained close to the CT examinations, of 11 patients with LAM confirmed by open lung biopsy were retrospectively evaluated with particular attention to the size of cystic lesions and wall thickness. Furthermore the CT scans were analysed for the type of pulmonary infiltration process and its distribution, presence or absence of pleural effusion, pneumothorax and lymph node enlargement. Clinical and CT follow-up studies were available in four patients. The CT scans revealed an increase in the interstitial pattern in all patients. Architectural distortion was seen in two patients and cystic lesions were present in all. The size of the cysts varied from small lesions to bullous emphysema. The cystic lesions revealed a wall thickness up to 2 mm but a wall was not perceptible in all. Pneumothorax was seen in only two patients; pleural effusion was seen in two patients. CT examination of patients with LAM reveals neither a uniform nor a pathognomonic appearance. In the early stages of LAM or in cases with interstitial changes the differential diagnosis of centrilobular emphysema or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis seems to be more difficult than most authors believe. (orig.) (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 21 refs.

  18. Actinomycosis of the Gallbladder Mimicking Carcinoma: a Case Report with US and CT Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Han; Kim, Seong Hyun; Cho, Mee Yon; Rhoe, Byoung Seon; Kim, Myung Soon [Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Actinomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when sonography and computed tomography findings show a mass engulfing the stone in the gallbladder and extensive pericholecystic infiltration with extension to neighboring abdominal wall muscle. A ctinomycosis is a chronic suppurative and granulomatous disease that is characterized by the formation of multiple abscesses, draining sinuses, abundant granulation and dense fibrous tissue. The disease is most frequently caused by Actinomyces israelii. These organisms are gram-positive anaerobic bacteria, and are considered opportunistic pathogens associated with infection, trauma or surgery. These events allow them to cross mucosal barriers as these organisms are normally present in healthy individuals, especially in the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. In abdominopelvic actinomycosis, aggressive perilesional infiltration with a tendency to cross fascial planes or boundaries and extend to the abdominal wall has been well described as an important radiologic finding. Actinomycosis of the gallbladder is an extremely rare disease; only 21 cases have been reported in the English literature. Moreover, a diagnosis of actinomycosis of the gallbladder is difficult because this condition can be confused with carcinoma. We report here on a rare case of actinomycosis of the gallbladder that presented as a mass by sonography and computed tomography (CT)

  19. Actinomycosis of the Gallbladder Mimicking Carcinoma: a Case Report with US and CT Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Han; Kim, Seong Hyun; Cho, Mee Yon; Rhoe, Byoung Seon; Kim, Myung Soon

    2007-01-01

    Actinomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when sonography and computed tomography findings show a mass engulfing the stone in the gallbladder and extensive pericholecystic infiltration with extension to neighboring abdominal wall muscle. A ctinomycosis is a chronic suppurative and granulomatous disease that is characterized by the formation of multiple abscesses, draining sinuses, abundant granulation and dense fibrous tissue. The disease is most frequently caused by Actinomyces israelii. These organisms are gram-positive anaerobic bacteria, and are considered opportunistic pathogens associated with infection, trauma or surgery. These events allow them to cross mucosal barriers as these organisms are normally present in healthy individuals, especially in the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. In abdominopelvic actinomycosis, aggressive perilesional infiltration with a tendency to cross fascial planes or boundaries and extend to the abdominal wall has been well described as an important radiologic finding. Actinomycosis of the gallbladder is an extremely rare disease; only 21 cases have been reported in the English literature. Moreover, a diagnosis of actinomycosis of the gallbladder is difficult because this condition can be confused with carcinoma. We report here on a rare case of actinomycosis of the gallbladder that presented as a mass by sonography and computed tomography (CT)

  20. Recurrent dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans with pulmonary metastases presenting twelve years after initial diagnosis: 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Sudhir; Sharma, Punit; Jain, Tarun Kumar; Sahoo, Manas Kumar; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a rare cutaneous tumor that is locally aggressive and has a high rate of recurrence after surgical excision. The tumor grows slowly, typically over years. On rare occasions, metastasis to distant sites (especially the lung) or regional lymph nodes may occur. Here, we present F-FDG PET/CT imaging findings of a 52-year-old man with a local recurrence of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans in the anterior abdominal wall with metastases to bilateral lungs.

  1. Traumatic rupture of the diaphragm: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Tae; Kim, Sung Jin; Cha, Sang Hoon; Park, Kil Sun; Kim, Jin Hee; Yim, Se Hwan

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of the known CT signs of the traumatic rupture of the diaphragm. CT scans and chest radiographs were retrospectively reviewed in 13 patients who had diaphragmatic rupture confirmed by surgery. On chest radiographs the elevation of the diaphragm was evaluated. On CT, 1) discontinuity of the diaphragm, 2) lack of depiction of the diaphragm surrounding the herniated intraabdominal organs (absent diaphragm sign), and 3) fat seen lateral to the diaphragm (fat sign) were evaluated. Chest radiographs showed the elevation of the diaphragm in 11 patients (85%). CT scan showed absent diaphragm sign in 11 patients (85%), discontinuity of the diaphragm in 8 (62%), and fat sign in 7 (54%). All of 12 patients who had the left diaphragmatic rupture had one or more of the above findings. Discontinuity of the diaphragm, absent diaphragm sign, and fat sign may be helpful CT findings in the diagnosis of the traumatic rupture of the left diaphragm

  2. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Romina J.; Villavicencio, Roberto L.; Oxilia, Hector G.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: As scarce information is available, in this research we have tried to describe the imaging findings of the Burkitt's lymphoma. Retrospective analysis of the clinical and imaging presentation of a 4 years old boy, is given. Biopsy confirmed the BL. Different imaging techniques were combined. The X-rays were negative. The US revealed a moderate hepatomegaly with multiple hypoechoic nodules and free fluid in the abdominal cavity. The CT showed the hepatomegaly as well as solid nodules in great number and different sizes(due to the densitometric behaviour and to post contrast enhancement), a scarce amount of ascites and a density increase of the mesentery fat. The MRI characterized and revealed in detail the US and the CT findings. The Burkitt's lymphoma is a rare entity; several methods are needed to approach the diagnosis. It represents a great clinical and imaging challenge. (author)

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist can ... scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional ... advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. ...

  5. Immersive Virtual Reality for Visualization of Abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A; Bodenheimer, Robert E

    2013-03-28

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two-dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  6. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  7. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Improvement of CT-based treatment-planning models of abdominal targets using static exhale imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, James M.; Lam, Kwok L.; McGinn, Cornealeus J.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: CT-based models of the patient that do not account for the motion of ventilation may not accurately predict the shape and position of critical abdominal structures. Respiratory gating technology for imaging and treatment is not yet widely available. The purpose of the current study is to explore an intermediate step to improve the veracity of the patient model and reduce the treated volume by acquiring the CT data with the patients holding their breath at normal exhale. Methods and Materials: The ventilatory time courses of diaphragm movement for 15 patients (with no special breathing instructions) were measured using digitized movies from the fluoroscope during simulation. A subsequent clinical protocol was developed for treatment based on exhale CT models. CT scans (typically 3.5-mm slice thickness) were acquired at normal exhale using a spiral scanner. The scan volume was divided into two to three segments, to allow the patient to breathe in between. Margins were placed about intrahepatic target volumes based on the ventilatory excursion inferior to the target, and on only the reproducibility of exhale position superior to the target. Results: The average patient's diaphragm remained within 25% of the range of ventilatory excursion from the average exhale position for 42% of the typical breathing cycle, and within 25% of the range from the average inhale position for 15% of the cycle. The reproducibility of exhale position over multiple breathing cycles was 0.9 mm (2σ), as opposed to 2.6 mm for inhale. Combining the variation of exhale position and the uncertainty in diaphragm position from CT slices led to typical margins of 10 mm superior to the target, and 19 mm inferior to the target, compared to margins of 19 mm in both directions under our prior protocol of margins based on free-breathing CT studies. For a typical intrahepatic target, these smaller volumes resulted in a 3.6% reduction in V eff for the liver. Analysis of portal films shows proper

  9. Periportal halo on CT: spectrum of causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpacchio, Mariano; Baltazar, Alberto D.; Santamarina, Mario G.; Casetta, Liliana; Cione, Rodrigo; Sanchez, Gimena; Vallejos, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: A periportal hypodense halo is a relatively frequent CT finding. This halo is attributed to the presence of edema or ecstatic lymphatic channels. In our series we illustrate the CT appearance of periportal edema and analyze its causes. Material and Methods: In a retrospective study we analyze a 78 patients series who showed periportal edema on e.v. contrast-enhanced abdominal CTs. The different causes of hepatic periportal edema (demonstrated on CT exams), were established by clinical, laboratory, surgical and anatomo-pathologic correlation. Results: In this study, 49 cases were diagnosed as having congestive heart failure (62,8%), 14 patients had viral hepatitis (18%), 5 patients had recently undergone orthotopic liver transplantation (6.4%), 3 patients had a diagnosis of infectious cholangitis (3.8%), 3 patients had abdominal trauma (3.8%), 2 patients had neoplastic disease (2.6%) and 2 patients had toxic hepatitis (2.6%). Conclusion: Periportal edema is a frequent and nonspecific finding associated with systemic diseases as well as liver specific entities. The integration of CT findings and clinical picture of periportal edema leads to a confident diagnosis of the main cause in most patients. (author)

  10. Relationship between CT findings and electroencephalograms of children with cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Yoshiaki; Nakano, Masao; Soumiya, Kyoichi; Ito, Masamitsu; Asano, Seiji; Tsukimura, Yasuharu.

    1983-01-01

    Electroencephalograms and CT findings of 43 infants with cerebral palsy were evaluated. Nineteen of them (44%) had abnormal findings of CT. The incidences of epileptic attacks and abnormal electroencephalograms were 33% and 84% in each group, respectively, with no differences between a normal-CT group and an abnormal-CT one. In electroencephalograms, positive spikes did not correlate with abnormal CT findings, but abnormal basal waves, particularly, low voltage dysrhythmia did well. Lazy activity also correlated with the abnormal CT findings. (Ueda, J.)

  11. Assessment of clinical image quality in paediatric abdominal CT examinations: dependency on the level of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) and the type of convolution kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Joel; Baath, Magnus; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ledenius, Kerstin; Caisander, Haakan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different combinations of convolution kernel and the level of Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR TM ) on diagnostic image quality as well as visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations. Thirty-five paediatric patients with abdominal pain with non-specified pathology undergoing abdominal CT were included in the study. Transaxial stacks of 5-mm-thick images were retrospectively reconstructed at various ASiR levels, in combination with three convolution kernels. Four paediatric radiologists rated the diagnostic image quality and the delineation of six anatomical structures in a blinded randomised visual grading study. Image quality at a given ASiR level was found to be dependent on the kernel, and a more edge-enhancing kernel benefited from a higher ASiR level. An ASiR level of 70 % together with the Soft TM or Standard TM kernel was suggested to be the optimal combination for paediatric abdominal CT examinations. (authors)

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  13. CT fluoroscopy-assisted puncture of thoracic and abdominal masses: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Johannes; Kickuth, Ralph; Laufer, Ulf; Schilling, Esther Maria; Adams, Stephan; Liermann, Dieter

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the benefit of real-time guidance of interventional punctures by means of computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF) compared with the conventional sequential acquisition guidance. In a prospective randomized trial, 75 patients underwent either CTF-guided (group A, n = 50) or sequential CT-guided (group B, n = 25) punctures of thoracic (n = 29) or abdominal (n = 46) masses. CTF was performed on the CT machine (Somatom Plus 4 Power, Siemens Corp., Forchheim, Germany) equipped with the C.A.R.E. Vision application (tube voltage 120 kV, tube current 50 mA, rotational time 0.75 s, slice thickness 10 mm, 8 frames/s). The average procedure time showed a statistically significant difference between the two study groups (group A: 564 s, group B 795 s, P = 0.0032). The mean total mAs was 7089 mAs for the CTF and 4856 mAs for the sequential image-guided intervention, respectively. The sensitivity was 71% specificity 100% positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 60% for the CTF-guided puncture, and 68, 100, 100 and 50% for sequential CT, respectively. CTF guidance realizes a time-saving but increases the radiation exposure dosage.

  14. Unusual computed tomography findings and complications in acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio, Glaucia Andrade e Silva; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe and illustrate unusual computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with acute appendicitis. We reviewed the charts of 200 patients with clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis who were submitted to abdominal CT before surgery. Patients with unusual presentation or complications were selected for illustrating the main CT findings. Unusual complications of acute appendicitis were related to anomalous position of the appendix, contiguity to intraperitoneal organs such as the liver, gall bladder, annexes and the bladder and continuous use of anti inflammatory or antibiotics during the diagnostic process. We concluded that CT is a useful diagnostic tool in patients with complicated or unusual presentation acute appendicitis. The first step towards diagnosis in these cases i to have in mind the hypothesis of appendicitis in patients with acute abdominal pain. (author)

  15. CT aspects in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in the abdominal and urogenital areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Fischer, H.J.; Uhlenbrock, D.

    1983-01-01

    The morphologic aspect of abdominal tuberculosis are evaluated by C.T. The necrotising tuberculosis of the genitourinary tract presents course cystic lesions of fluid density. Similar morphologic criteria are seen in ileocoecal tuberculosis. The peritoneal tuberculosis is characterized by large soft tissue masses of a high density which can be found in nearly all areas of the abdomen. The increased morbidity of tuberculosis in peoble from foreign countries living in the Federal Republic of Germany is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  16. Choroidal osteoma: US and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Park, Sang Woo [Armed Forces Kwangju Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Hun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate US and CT features of choroidal osteoma. US and CT scans of seven cases of choroidal osteoma occurring in six patients were retrospectively analyzed. We analysed US and CT findings with particular attention to the location, size, and shape of calcification associated with choroidal osteoma, and sought the possible cause of the tumor, if any. None of six patients had any possible cause related to choroidal osteoma. All of seven cases of choroidal osteoma were manifested as calcified mass which were located in the posterior wall of the eyeball near the juxtapapillary region. Calcification ranged in size from 1 to 2 cm and had curvilinear shape. Both US and CT were equally useful to evaluate choroidal osteoma. By depicting the characteristic calcification, US and CT are useful imaging modalities in evaluating choroidal osteoma.

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ... preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic ... and properly administer radiation treatments for tumors as well as monitor response to chemotherapy. top of page ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for tumors as well as monitor response to chemotherapy. top of page How should I prepare? You ... of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... GI) contrast exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as ...

  1. US and CT Findings of Splenic Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Young; Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Han, Jong Kyu [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by the larvae of the cestode worms Echinococcus. In humans, the most commonly affected organ is the liver, the next second common organ is the lung. The third common affected organ is the spleen. In the case of splenic hydatid cyst, most cysts remain clinically silent and are diagnosed incidentally or when complications occur. We experienced a case of splenic hydatid cyst in a 28-year-old man. The patient complained of abdominal pain for 1 month. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a cystic lesion with daughter cysts in the spleen. The CT imaging also showed a cystic lesion with daughter cysts. We diagnosed it as a splenic hydatid cyst which was confirmed by pathology after surgery

  2. US and CT Findings of Splenic Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Young; Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Han, Jong Kyu

    2009-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by the larvae of the cestode worms Echinococcus. In humans, the most commonly affected organ is the liver, the next second common organ is the lung. The third common affected organ is the spleen. In the case of splenic hydatid cyst, most cysts remain clinically silent and are diagnosed incidentally or when complications occur. We experienced a case of splenic hydatid cyst in a 28-year-old man. The patient complained of abdominal pain for 1 month. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a cystic lesion with daughter cysts in the spleen. The CT imaging also showed a cystic lesion with daughter cysts. We diagnosed it as a splenic hydatid cyst which was confirmed by pathology after surgery

  3. Postoperative CT in pancreas transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, F.E.; Harper, S.J.F.; Callaghan, C.J.; Shaw, A.; Godfrey, E.M.; Bradley, J.A.; Watson, C.J.E.; Pettigrew, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To examine the usage and value of computed tomography (CT) following simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplantation. Materials and methods: Indications for postoperative CT, key findings, and their influence on management were determined by retrospective analysis. Results: Ninety-eight patients underwent 313 CT examinations. Common indications for the examinations included suspected intra-abdominal collection (31.1%) and elevated serum amylase/lipase (24.1%). CT findings most frequently showed non-specific mild inflammation (27.6%), a normal scan (17.1%) and fluid collections (16.3%). High capillary blood glucose (CBG) was associated with resultant CT demonstration of graft vascular abnormalities, but otherwise, particular clinical indications were not associated with specific CT findings. Conclusion: Clinical findings in patients with SPK transplants are non-specific. The pattern of abnormalities encountered is significantly different to those seen in native pancreatic disease and demands a tailored protocol. CT enables accurate depiction of vascular abnormalities and fluid collections, thus reducing the number of surgical interventions that might otherwise be required. Elevated CBG should prompt urgent CT to exclude potentially reversible vascular complications. - Highlights: • The value of CT following simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation was assessed. • 313 CT scans were performed on 98 patients between January 2005 and August 2010. • Elevated blood glucose was associated with CT findings of graft vascular anomalities. • CT was particularly useful in directing operative versus non-operative intervention.

  4. CT finding of secondary aorto-enteric fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacchini, Simona; Nicoletti, Roberto; Ghio, Domenica; Martinenghi, Carlo Maria Andrea; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Chiesa, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of our study was to review CT finding concerning secondary aorto-enteric fistulae (AEF). In particular, we aimed to evaluate signs of contrast medium extravasation from the aortic graft into the bowel (active bleeding), in correlation with clinical and surgical reports. Materials and methods. Clinical and CT findings were retrospectively evaluated in 13 surgically proven cases of AEF. All patients underwent spiral CT examination with biphasic contrast technique, before and 30 and 80 seconds after intravenous injection of 120-150 ml of contrast medium (Ultravist 370; flow rate 2.5-3 ml/sec). Late scans (240 seconds) were also acquired on surgical anastomoses. We used 3 mm (arterial phase) and 5 mm (venous phase slices. Results. At surgery, all patients presented a communication between the bowel and the aortic graft. At CT examination, all 13 patients presented one or more CT signs indicating AEF (perigraft soft tissue, perigraft fluid, ectopic air or bowel wall thickening). Moreover, in 6 out of 13 patients, contrast medium extravasation from the aortic graft into the small bowel (active bleeding) was detected with CT. Detection of active bleeding was possible because CT examinations were performed without oral administration of contrast medium. Conclusions. CT is easily and readily available and provides an accurate evaluation of the aorta and surrounding retroperitoneal tissues. In our study we were able to identify the CT sign of active bleeding in more than a half of the patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding (66%). Hence, we suggest that patients undergo CT examination without oral contrast medium administration in order to better appreciate the presence of active bleeding [it

  5. Characteristic findings of metrizamide CT cisternography in epidermoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Toya, Sh.; Ohtani, M.; Kawase, T.; Takenaka, N.; Okui, Sh.; Miyahara, Y.; Shiga, H.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic findings of metrizamide CT cisternography in two cases of epidermoid are reported. The main finding was a 'cauliflower-like' appearance and was thought to be caused by the irregular interstices of epidermoids. Metrizamide CT cisternography may be helpful in making a diagnosis of an epidermoid. (Author)

  6. Utility of intravenous nonionic contrast media for abdominal CT in patients with renal dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, B.M.; Alpern, M.B.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.; Swanson, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of a nonionic contrast medium (NICM) for CT enhancements in patients with renal dysfunction were evaluated. Thirty consecutive patients referred for abdominal CT with a serum creatinine (SCr) level over 5 mg/dL or a SCr level of 2-5 mg/dL and another risk factor (e.g., diabetes, single kidney) received NICM. Each was matched with a control who received the same 150-mL bolus of a conventional medium. No adverse reactions or significant alterations in SCr values were found in the NICM patients. No significant differences between the patient groups were found in blinded subjective image quality ratings or measured attenuation values of a parenchymal organs and vascular structures (with the exception of less renal enhancement in the NICM patients, reflecting their renal dysfunction). Use of an NICM is a safe and effective method for contrast medium-enhanced CT in patients with renal dysfunction

  7. Localized Castleman's disease: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zuhua; Yang Guangzhao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT and MRI findings of localized Castleman's disease (LCD). Methods: The CT (n=7) and MRI (n=2) appearance of LCD (n=7) confirmed by pathology and operation were retrospectively analyzed. Results Hyaline-vascular type(n=6) and plasma cell type (n=1) were confirmed by pathology in LCD (n=7). They were located in middle mediastinum (n=2), hilum pulmonis (n=l), posterior mediastinum (n=3), retro-peritoneum (n=1). Hyaline-vascular type focuses in CT scanning were manifested as round shape soft tissue masses, with homogeneous density, integrity envelope, distinct margin, and chaperonage arborizing and spot calcification. Marked persistent enhancement was apparent on contrast CT. MRI findings of hyaline-vascular type (n=2) was slightly isointense or hyperintense on T 1 WI, homogeneous hyperintense on T 2 WI, similar enhancement with CT after contrast. Plasma cell type focus were unhomogeneous density with abnormity necrosis, media and unhomogeneous enhancement after contrast. Conclusion: Marked persistent enhancement of LCD would be helpful to diagnosis and differential diagnosis in Castleman's disease. (authors)

  8. Whole-body MSCT of patients after polytrauma: abdominal injuries; Ganzkoerper-MSCT beim Polytrauma: Abdominelle Verletzungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrl, B.; Sadick, M.; Diehl, S.; Dueber, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie (Germany); Obertacke, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Zentrum fuer Orthopaedie und Traumatologie (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: The goal of this retrospective study was to evaluate the spectrum of abdominal injuries and the reliability of computed tomography-based diagnosis in patients after polytrauma. Material and methods: CT findings and clinical reports for 177 patients after polytrauma were evaluated with regard to abdominal injuries. Clinical patient reports at the time of discharge from the hospital were utilized as the standard of reference. Abdominal injuries resulting from an accident, frequent additional traumas and following therapeutic procedures were recorded. In the case of discrepancies in the reports, the CT scans were viewed retrospectively. Results: In 30 out of 177 patients, 42 abdominal injuries were detected. 69% of the injuries were caused by traffic accidents while 31% resulted from falls. Liver and spleen injuries were the most common. 50% of the cases were treated surgically, and the other half of the cases underwent non-surgical conservative therapy. Massive chest traumas, pelvic injuries, cerebral traumas and injuries to extremities were commonly associated with abdominal injuries. Evaluation of the discrepancies in the clinical reports showed that injury to the pancreas and the small intestine were not successfully detected on CT, thus resulting in a false negative diagnosis. Early stages of organ parenchyma laceration were also initially misdiagnosed on CT. (orig.)

  9. Squalene aspiration pneumonia : thin-section CT and histopathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Gong, Gyung Yub; Lim, Tae Hwan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the thin-section computed tomography (CT) findings and histopathologic findings of squalene aspiration pneumonia. Thin-section CT scans were obtained from nine patients with proven exogenous lipoid pneumonia resulting from aspiration of squalene (derived from shark liver oil). The condition was diagnosed by biopsy (n=3), bronchoalveolar lavage(n=4), or sputum cytology and clinical history (n=2) of squalene use was confirmed in all patients. Specimens of transbronchial lung biopsy were also reviewed and compared with thin-section CT findings. On the basis of these results, we concluded that squalene aspiration pneumonia can be reliably diagnosed by thin-section CT findings particularly when the appropriate history is known. (author). 19 refs., 3 figs

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including but not limited to some liver, kidney, pancreatic, uterine or ... Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  11. Comparative analysis of the radiation shield effect in an abdominal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon-Chil; Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Joon-Seok; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lim, Chang-Seon

    2014-01-01

    This study measured and compared the dose on the eyeballs and the thyroid with and without the use of a shield by applying the abdominal examination protocol used in an actual examination to a 64-channel computed tomography (CT) scan. A dummy phantom manufactured from acryl was used to measure the dose to the eyeballs and the thyroid of a patient during a thoraco-abdominal CT scan. The dose was measured using three dosimeters (optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) and photoluminescence dosimeter (PLD)) attached to the surfaces of three parts (left and right eyeballs and thyroid) in a phantom with and without the use of a shield for the eyeballs and the thyroid. Two types of shields (1-mm barium shielding sheet and 1-mm tungsten shielding sheet) were used for the measurements. The goggles and the lead shield, which are normally used in clinical practice, were used to compare the shield ratios of the shields. According to the results of the measurements made by using the OSLD, the shield ratios of the barium and the tungsten sheets were in the range of 34 - 36%. The measurements made by using the TLD showed that the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 6.25% higher than that of the tungsten sheet. When the PLD was used for the measurement, the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 33.34%, which was equivalent to that of the tungsten sheet. These results confirmed that the cheap barium sheet had a better shielding effect than the expensive tungsten sheet.

  12. A case of probable mixed-infection with Clonorchis sinensis and Fasciola sp.: CT and parasitological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Yun-Sik; Yun, Ji Hye; Kim, Jeong Ju; Choi, Won Hyung; Oh, In Hwan; Song, Hyun Ouk; Chu, Jong Phil

    2010-06-01

    We report here a human case probably mixed-infected with Clonorchis sinensis and Fasciola sp. who was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) scan, serological findings, and/or fecal examination. The patient was a 43-year-old Korean female and was admitted to Kyung Hee University Hospital with the complaints of fever and abdominal pain. On admission, marked eosinophilia was noted in her peripheral blood. CT scan showed specific lesions for clonorchiasis and fascioliasis in the liver, along with lesions suggestive of amebic abscess. Micro-ELISA revealed positive results for the 2 helminthic infections. Eggs of C. sinensis and trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica were observed in the stool. Treatment with praziquantel followed by metronidazole and tinidazole reduced abnormalities in the liver and eosinophilia. This is the first case report of a possible co-infection with 2 kinds of liver flukes in the Republic of Korea.

  13. Radiological signs of extra nodal abdominal involvements in lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carro, A.I.; Alegre, N.; Cervera, J.L.; Montero, A.I.

    1998-01-01

    To assess abdominal CT images in lymphoma patients for the study of extra nodal abdominal involvement. Ninety-two patients diagnosed as having lymphoma were studied retrospectively. All the patients underwent abdominopelvic CT with oral and intravenous contrast (except in one patient who was allergic). In every case, the diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy or radiological follow-up after treatment had been completed. Fifty-two patients (56.5%) presented infiltration of extra nodal organs. The organs most frequently involved were liver and spleen, followed by the gastrointestinal tract, the musculoskeletal system and the genitourinary tract. The findings in this study coincide with those reported elsewhere with the exception of the splenic involvement the incidence of which was lower in the present series. (Author) 17 refs

  14. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as ... injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of ...

  16. Chest CT findings of toxocariasis: Correlation with laboratory results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, J.H.; Lee, I.J.; Kim, J.-H.; Kim, D.-G.; Hwang, H.J.; Koh, S.H.; Lee, K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess the relationship between chest computed tomography (CT) findings of patients with toxocariasis and levels of serological markers. Materials and methods: A total of 38 cases of patients diagnosed with toxocariasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), CT, and serological markers were retrospectively reviewed. The presence of nodule with or without ground-glass opacity (GGO) halo, consolidation, focal GGO, pleural effusion, and lymphadenopathy at chest CT were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed with the Fisher's exact test. Results: The most common chest CT findings were nodule (n = 12, 31.6%) and focal GGO (n = 12, 31.6%). In patients with normal eosinophil levels, focal GGO (n = 9, 37.5%) was the most common finding. In contrast, nodule with a GGO halo (n = 7, 50%) was the most common finding in the eosinophilia group. Nodule with a GGO halo was more common in the eosinophilia group, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.017). Nodule was more common in the eosinophilia group, and focal GGO was more common in the normal eosinophil group. Conclusion: The most common chest CT findings in toxocariasis were nodule with or without GGO halo, and focal GGO. In the eosinophilia group, nodule with a GGO halo was significantly more frequent. Other CT findings did not show a statistically significant relationship with serological markers

  17. Renal streaky artifact during contrast-enhanced abdominal and pelvic CT: Comparison of high versus low osmolality contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Hong; Kim, Jong Chul; Lee, Chung Keun; Shin, Kyoung Suk

    1994-01-01

    Introduction of low osmolality contrast agent(LOCA) has allowed safer, more comfortable contrast-enhanced CT examination, but there has been significant increase in image degradation when evaluating the kidneys due to streaky artifact. The authors reviewed findings of contrast- enhanced abdominal and pelvic computed tomography(CT) to know the difference of renal streaky artifact between a high osmolality contrast agent (HOCA) and LOCA. This study included two hundred contrast-enhanced CT in 200 patients, 100 performed with HOCA(meglumine ioglicate, 150 ml) and 100 performed with LOCA (iopromide,150 ml). The severity of renal streaky artifact was compared between HOCA and LOCA groups. Of the scans performed with HOCA, 40 had no artifact, 52 had grade I artifact, 6 had grade II artifact, and 2 had grade III artifact. Of the scans preformed with LOCA, 23 had no artifact, 44 had grade I artifact, 29 had grade II artifact, and 4 had grade III artifact. There was significant difference in the degree of the streaky artifact depending upon the osmolality of the contrast media used(by χ 2 -test, P=.0001). The results of this study revealed a statistically significant increased incidence of artifacts and distortions of renal image with LOCA when compared with HOCA

  18. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Mody, Rajen J.; Strouse, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function. (orig.)

  19. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vanderbilt University Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mody, Rajen J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of abdominal trauma by computed tomography and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Yun; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-06-15

    Out of 75 patients who were admitted to our hospital because of abdominal trauma and were undergone the procedures such as ultrasonography and/or CT scan within 24 hours of abdominal trauma due to suspected abdominal organ injury. We analyzed the results of 38 patients who were confirmed of diagnosis by operation, follow-up CT scan or ultrasonography. We analyzed the results of 38 patients who were confirmed of diagnosis by operation, follow-up CT scan or ultrasonography. 1. In the abdominal organ injury, solid organ injury consists of 8 cases of spleen laceration, 1 of splenic subcapsular hematoma, 7 of hepatic laceration, 7 of pancreas laceration, 3 of renal laceration, and 3 of subcapsular hematoma of kidney. 2. In addition, there were 7 bowel and/or mesenteric laceration, 2 diaphragmatic hernia, and 1 urethral rupture. 3. 2 cases of retroperitoneal hematoma and 1 case in which hemo peritoneum occurred without abdominal organ injury were confirmed by follow-up CT or ultrasonography. 4. In all of the 4 patients with multiple organ injury, pancreatic laceration was associated. 5. In abdominal trauma patients, ultrasonography or CT can be used to survey rapidly the entire abdomen for possible associated injury, and be of great help to clinicians in identifying the patients who need immediate surgery or in minimizing the incidence of unnecessary emergency abdominal exploration.

  1. Evaluation of abdominal trauma by computed tomography and ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Do Yun; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik

    1986-01-01

    Out of 75 patients who were admitted to our hospital because of abdominal trauma and were undergone the procedures such as ultrasonography and/or CT scan within 24 hours of abdominal trauma due to suspected abdominal organ injury. We analyzed the results of 38 patients who were confirmed of diagnosis by operation, follow-up CT scan or ultrasonography. We analyzed the results of 38 patients who were confirmed of diagnosis by operation, follow-up CT scan or ultrasonography. 1. In the abdominal organ injury, solid organ injury consists of 8 cases of spleen laceration, 1 of splenic subcapsular hematoma, 7 of hepatic laceration, 7 of pancreas laceration, 3 of renal laceration, and 3 of subcapsular hematoma of kidney. 2. In addition, there were 7 bowel and/or mesenteric laceration, 2 diaphragmatic hernia, and 1 urethral rupture. 3. 2 cases of retroperitoneal hematoma and 1 case in which hemo peritoneum occurred without abdominal organ injury were confirmed by follow-up CT or ultrasonography. 4. In all of the 4 patients with multiple organ injury, pancreatic laceration was associated. 5. In abdominal trauma patients, ultrasonography or CT can be used to survey rapidly the entire abdomen for possible associated injury, and be of great help to clinicians in identifying the patients who need immediate surgery or in minimizing the incidence of unnecessary emergency abdominal exploration.

  2. Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: chest CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Helena Ribeiro; Zanetti, Glaucia; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ranke, Felipe Mussi von [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina e Apoio Diagnostico; Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Diagnostico por Imagem; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Souza, Carolina Althoff [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the findings on chest CTs in 16 patients (8 men and 8 women) with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving patients ranging from 2 to 72 years of age. The evaluation of the CT scans was independently performed by two observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. The inclusion criteria were presence of abnormalities on the CT scans, and the diagnosis was confirmed by anatomopathological examination of the papillomatous lesions. Results: The most common symptoms were hoarseness, cough, dyspnea, and recurrent respiratory infections. The major CT findings were nodular formations in the trachea, solid or cavitated nodules in the lung parenchyma, air trapping, masses, and consolidation. Nodular formations in the trachea were observed in 14 patients (87.5%). Only 2 patients had lesions in lung parenchyma without tracheal involvement. Only 1 patient had no pulmonary dissemination of the disease, showing airway involvement only. Solid and cavitated lung nodules were observed in 14 patients (87.5%) and 13 (81.2%), respectively. Masses were observed in 6 patients (37.5%); air trapping, in 3 (18.7%); consolidation in 3 (18.7%); and pleural effusion, in 1 (6.3%). Pulmonary involvement was bilateral in all cases. Conclusions: The most common tomography findings were nodular formations in the trachea, as well as solid or cavitated nodules and masses in the lung parenchyma. Malignant transformation of the lesions was observed in 5 cases. (author)

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, ... Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ... Ultrasound - Abdomen X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract X-ray ( ...

  4. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT findings of pulmonary cryptococcosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Si-yun, E-mail: wang_shuxia@outlook.com [Department of PET Center, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Chen, Gang, E-mail: cgggh@outlook.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Luo, Dong-lan, E-mail: 695532870@qq.com [Department of Pathology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Shao, Dan, E-mail: shaodan501@outlook.com [Department of PET Center, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Liu, En-tao, E-mail: GDGH2015@gmail.com [Department of PET Center, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Sun, Taotao, E-mail: sunmoodsdaisy@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of PET Center, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Wang, Shu-Xia, E-mail: wsyggh@outlook.com [Department of PET Center, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary cryptococcosis is an uncommon cause of pulmonary nodules in non-AIDS patients. This study reports the {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) findings of 42 patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-CT findings of 42 patients with histologically proven pulmonary cryptococcosis was conducted. All patients underwent PET/CT and CE-CT in the same session. The CT diagnosis was based on the location, morphological features, and enhancement of lesions. The PET/CT findings were recorded, and clinical data and surgical and histopathological findings were collected. Results: The results of the PET scans revealed that 37 (88%) of 42 patients showed higher FDG uptake, and 5 (12%) patients demonstrated lower FDG uptake than the mediastinal blood pool. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of pulmonary cryptococcosis ranged from 1.4 to 13.0 (average: 5.7 ± 3.3, median 4.9). A single nodular pattern was the most prevalent pattern observed and was found in 29 (69%) patients. This pattern was followed by scattered nodular (n = 4, 10%), clustered nodular (n = 3, 7%), mass-like (n = 3, 7%), and bronchopneumonic (n = 3, 7%) patterns. The most frequent pattern of immunocompetent patients was the single nodular pattern (29 of 33, 88%). Immunocompromised patients most frequently pattern exhibited mass-like (3 of 9, 33%) and bronchopneumonic (3 of 9, 33%) patterns. Conclusion: Pulmonary cryptococcosis most commonly appears as single nodules in immunocompetent patients. Mass-like and bronchopneumonic patterns were common in immunocompromised patients. In 88% of patients, lung lesions showed high FDG uptake, thus mimicking a possible malignant condition.

  5. CT findings of the patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Shiro; Ohshima, Kazuki; Ohsawa, Takehiko.

    1996-01-01

    CT scans were obtained in 45 patients with bronchial asthma including 23 patients during asthmatic attack. CT findings were as follows. 1) In all cases, thickening of bronchial wall throughout from central to peripheral bronchi and without tapering and/or slight swelling of bronchovascular bundles were observed. 2) Characteristics findings in 23 patients with asthmatic attack, lobular and multilobular high attenuation area were observed in 17 patients (74%) and nonhomogeneous attenuation in lung fields were noticed in 13 patients (57%). 3) Multiple centrilobular sized high attenuation area were observed in 23 patients, but it was difficult to differenciation whether these findings were due to tiny nodules or to small vessels. In conclusion, further studies are needed to know which pathomorphological and/or pathophysiological conditions are underlying these CT findings. (author)

  6. Craniofacial and temporal bone CT findings in cleidocranial dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Guido E.; Caruso, Paul A.; Curtin, Hugh D.; Small, Juan E.; Jyung, Robert W.; Troulis, Maria J.

    2008-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a multistructural polyostotic genetic disorder that results from mutation of the CBFA1 gene. Hearing loss is a frequent finding in CCD. We describe the CT craniofacial findings in CCD and provide a comprehensive discussion of the CT temporal bone findings in these patients. (orig.)

  7. CT findings of tuberculous lymphadenifis in parotid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changfu; Wang Binjie; Zhang Heping; Jin Haiying; Nie Peng; Chang Liang; Wei Haigang; Zou Ling

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the CT findings of tuberculous lymphadenitis in parotid gland, so as to improve the diagnostic accuracy of tuberculosis of parotid gland. Methods: Nine cases with tuberculous lymphadenitis in parotid gland confirmed by surgical pathology and acid-fast bacilli after preoperative spiral CT plain scan and two phases dynamic enhancement scan were retrospectively analyzed. Imaging findings of CT were reviewed and compared with surgical pathology. Results: Seven of the 9 cases of tuberculosis of the parotid gland occurred in the left side, and 2 in the right side, and superficial lobe involvement occurred in 8 cases and deep lobe in 1 case. The lesion was classified as tumour type (8 cases) and infiltration type (1 case). In turnout type, the number of lesion was from 1 to 4, and the size was from 2.7 to 5.3 cm in diameter. One case of infiltration type measured 3.4 cm in diameter. On CT plain scan, the lesions showed homogeneous slight high-density with regular edge in 5 cases and irregular low-density in 4 cases, and 2 of them with partly blurred edge. On CT enhanced scan, uniform moderate enhancement was seen in 3 cases, circular enhancement in 4 cases, inhomogeneous enhancement in 1 case, and lace-like enhancement in 1 case. Local infiltration occurred in 6 cases. Lymphadenovarix in the same side of lesion occurred in 2 cases. Conclusion: CT findings of tuberculous lymphadenitis in parotid gland present diversification, which correlate well with pathological changes. Understanding of characteristic CT findings of tuberculous lymphadenitis in parotid gland is helpful for differential diagnosis, but final diagnosis still depends on pathology and acid-fast bacilli. (authors)

  8. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with noted pulmonary CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Souji; Tsukada, Atsuko; Furuya, Tatsutaka

    1984-10-01

    CT was performed in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Much more definitive pulmonary findings were obtained by CT than by the conventional chest x-ray examination and pulmonary function test. CT findings disclosed pulmonary lesions extremely similar to those in cases of progressive systemic sclerosis. Pulmonary CT was considered useful in examining pulmonary lesions for MCTD.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL IMAGE QUALITY IN PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: DEPENDENCY ON THE LEVEL OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASiR) AND THE TYPE OF CONVOLUTION KERNEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Joel; Båth, Magnus; Ledenius, Kerstin; Caisander, Håkan; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different combinations of convolution kernel and the level of Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™) on diagnostic image quality as well as visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations. Thirty-five paediatric patients with abdominal pain with non-specified pathology undergoing abdominal CT were included in the study. Transaxial stacks of 5-mm-thick images were retrospectively reconstructed at various ASiR levels, in combination with three convolution kernels. Four paediatric radiologists rated the diagnostic image quality and the delineation of six anatomical structures in a blinded randomised visual grading study. Image quality at a given ASiR level was found to be dependent on the kernel, and a more edge-enhancing kernel benefitted from a higher ASiR level. An ASiR level of 70 % together with the Soft™ or Standard™ kernel was suggested to be the optimal combination for paediatric abdominal CT examinations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Iohexol for contrast enhancement of bowel in pediatric abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smevik, B.; Westvik, J.

    1990-01-01

    Abdominal CT scans from 160 examinations performed on pediatric patients using iohexol 2 percent as contrast medium for bowel enhancement were evaluated retrospectively. When diluted with a beverage of the child's choice, iohexol has a neutral taste and cannot be detected, and 139 out of 142 patients drank the full amount of dilute contrast offered to them. The enhancement of bowel in the area of interest was graded as good (58%), reasonable (23%), or poor (19%). The contrast medium was prepared from leftovers from our angiocardiography studies. We conclude that the use of water-soluble contrast medium in a low concentration is a safe and cost-effective way of facilitating ingesion of sufficient amounts of the medium in oncologic pediatric patients undergoing cytotoxic and/or radiation treatment. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative analysis of calcification of the abdominal aorta by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Kubota, Kazuo; Ito, Kengo; Ono, Shuichi; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1983-01-01

    Of the abdominal aorta, the relationship between the calcification index (C.I.) obtained from CT films and the atheromatous surface involved (S.I.) obtained from autopsy specimens was studied. The relations of C.I. to hypertension and hyperlipidemia were also analyzed. The coefficient of correlation between C.I. and S.I. was 0.83 (p< 0.001). Compared with a non-hypertensive group, the hypertensives showed a higher C.I., and such a difference was great in the male patients in their 50s and females in their 60s and 70s. The male patients with hyperlipidemia did not show definite differences in C.I. from the non-hyperlipidemia group, but the female patients in their 60s and 70s showed significantly higher values. (Chiba, N.)

  12. Endobronchial metastasis: CT findings and its usefulness in bronchoscopic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Ji Ho; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Seong Min; Huh Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Jang, Tae Weon

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of bronchial abnormalities in patients with endobronchial metastasis from extrapulmonary tumors, and to correlate these with the bronchoscopic findings. The authors retrospectively reviewed the CT and bronchoscopic findings of 17 patients (M:F =3D 9:8; mean age, 56 years) with histologically proven endobronchial metastasis from extrapulmonary primary tumors. Carcinoma of the uterine cervix (n=3D5) was the most common primary site for endobronchial metastasis. CT findings of bronchial abnormalities with associated peribronchial and lung parenchymal lesions were analyzed and compared with the bronchoscopic findings. Among the 17 patients, 20 sites of bronchial abnormalities were visualized bronchoscopically. CT findings of bronchial abnormalities were smooth narrowing (n=3D11), occlusion (n=3D3), intraluminal mass (n=3D4), and normal (n=3D2). Peribronchial lesions (lymph node enlargement or parenchymal mass) were found in 12 cases. Bronchoscopy revealed bronchial narrowing due to a mucosal nodule or intraluminal polypoid mass in 16 cases, and total obstruction of the bronchus in four. With regard to the identification of bronchial abnormalities, the findings of CT and of bronchoscopy agreed in 17 cases and disagreed in three. While bronchoscopy was advantageous for detecting early mucosal abnormality, CT effectively evaluated the extent of a lesion beyond the stenosis or bronchial obstruction. CT was also useful for predicting the causes of bronchial abnormalities. CT is relatively accurate in evaluating bronchial abnormalities, and in patients with endobronchial metastases may be used as a complementary procedure to bronchoscopy for evaluating the extent of the lesion. (author)

  13. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with noted pulmonary CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Souji; Tsukada, Atsuko; Furuya, Tatsutaka

    1984-01-01

    CT was performed in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Much more definitive pulmonary findings were obtained by CT than by the conventional chest x-ray examination and pulmonary function test. CT findings disclosed pulmonary lesions extremely similar to those in cases of progressive systemic sclerosis. Pulmonary CT was considered useful in examining pulmonary lesions for MCTD. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Usefulness and limit of CT diagnosis on appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchiki, Megumi; Takanashi, Toshiyasu; Yamaguchi, Koichi.

    1997-01-01

    CT was performed in 104 patients with abdominal pain suspected appendicitis. CT showed positive finding (abnormal appendix, appendicolith, pericecal inflammatory change, fluid collection, LN swelling, abscess) and complication of appendicitis clearly. CT diagnosis showed high accuracy than clinical diagnosis. CT proved its usefulness especially only CT imaging showed the correct diagnosis. On the other hand, diverticulitis and terminal ileitis common diagnostic disease of appendicitis showed similar clinical appearance and CT image, caused to be difficult to diagnose correctly. In the cases showing similar image to appendicitis or atypical image, CT also proved its limit of the diagnosis on appendicitis. (author)

  15. CT findings in patient with skull fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Han Gi; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    CT scan has been inevitable method for patient with head trauma. CT scans of 94 cases, which were confirmed skull fracture by plain film, were reviewed for better and useful dealing of CT. The results were as follows: 1. Car accident was the most frequent cause of head injury. 2. No evidence of intracranial abnormality in CT scan of skull fractures on plane film was 45.7%, and alert mentality was 46.8% of skull fracture on skull fracture on simple film. 3. Detection rate on CT scan to skull fractures was 27.7%, but detection rate to depression fractures of skull fracture was 70.2%. 4. Mortality rate of patients with skull fracture was 10.6%. 5. Associated CT findings were pneumocephalus on CT scan 3.2%, contusion of edema 4.2%, epidural hematoma 16.0%, subdural hematoma 17.0%, subdural hygroma 2.1%, intracerebral hemorrhage 4.9%, and subarachnoid hemorrhage 2.0%.

  16. Radiofrequency ablation of rabbit liver. Correlation between dual CT findings and pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Masashi; Rikimaru, Yuya; Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shyoki; Miyachi, Hideo; Yamada, Syogo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present the time-related imaging findings and correlative pathologic findings of radiofrequency pulse-irradiated regions of the liver. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation was performed in 22 rabbit livers with 15-gauge RF probes inserted percutaneously. Regions were imaged with dual-phase CT at 3 days (n=6), 2 weeks (n=6), 4 weeks (n=6), and 12 weeks (n=4) after RF ablation. At 3 days, the regions showed a two-zone structure on plain CT and peripheral enhancement. The regions presented a three-zone structure on pathological study. Hepatocytes appeared as acidophilic bodies, and nuclei were pyknotic at the inner necrotic zone. The middle whitish zone showed enlarged sinusoids. The marginal zone was a regenerative band. At 2 weeks, the two-zone structure was obscured on unenhanced CT. The region showed a two-zone structure on pathological study. At the inner zone, acidophilic degeneration had progressed, however, cell structure remained. The marginal zone showed fibrous tissue bundles. At 12 weeks, the region was obscured on plain CT. Nuclei and cell structures had disappeared almost completely at the inner zone. Collagen fiber had replaced the marginal zone. Zone structural CT findings reflect the pathological findings and time-related changes after RF ablation. Peripheral enhancement in the arterial phase reflects the granulation tissue layer, and its time-related decrease reflects replacement by fibrous tissue. (author)

  17. Analysis of discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings in 60 patients with herniated nucleus pulposus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun; Kim, Kab Tae; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1987-01-01

    The herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is a major cause of low back pain and sciatica. High resolution computed tomography is the most accurate diagnostic tool to define a HNP, because it provides a complete in vivo analysis of bony framework of lumbar spine as well as the supporting soft tissue structures and neural elements. But the discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings is often confusing. From May 1983 to August 1986, sixty patients with HNP who had both CT and surgical intervention at Pusan National University Hospital were analyzed. The feasibility of the neurologic examination on HNP and the effect of HNP on nerve root were evaluated on the basis of CT findings. The results were as follows : 1. Thirty-four cases (56.7%) of clinical impression were matched to CT findings in determining level of HNP and affected nerve root. 2. In evaluation of affected level, there was high trend to cause discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings in multiple disc involvement than in single involvement. 3. There was no correlation between degree of nerve root compression determined by CT and pattern of neurologic signs (motor weakness, sensory deficit, and reflex change)

  18. Analysis of discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings in 60 patients with herniated nucleus pulposus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun; Kim, Kab Tae; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan(Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    The herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is a major cause of low back pain and sciatica. High resolution computed tomography is the most accurate diagnostic tool to define a HNP, because it provides a complete in vivo analysis of bony framework of lumbar spine as well as the supporting soft tissue structures and neural elements. But the discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings is often confusing. From May 1983 to August 1986, sixty patients with HNP who had both CT and surgical intervention at Pusan National University Hospital were analyzed. The feasibility of the neurologic examination on HNP and the effect of HNP on nerve root were evaluated on the basis of CT findings. The results were as follows : 1. Thirty-four cases (56.7%) of clinical impression were matched to CT findings in determining level of HNP and affected nerve root. 2. In evaluation of affected level, there was high trend to cause discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings in multiple disc involvement than in single involvement. 3. There was no correlation between degree of nerve root compression determined by CT and pattern of neurologic signs (motor weakness, sensory deficit, and reflex change)

  19. Irreversible JPEG 2000 compression of abdominal CT for primary interpretation: assessment of visually lossless threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Bo Hyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Hyuk Jung; Hahn, Seokyung

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the visually lossless threshold for Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compression of contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) images, 100 images were compressed to four different levels: a reversible (as negative control) and irreversible 5:1, 10:1, and 15:1. By alternately displaying the original and the compressed image on the same monitor, six radiologists independently determined if the compressed image was distinguishable from the original image. For each reader, we compared the proportion of the compressed images being rated distinguishable from the original images between the reversible compression and each of the three irreversible compressions using the exact test for paired proportions. For each reader, the proportion was not significantly different between the reversible (0-1%, 0/100 to 1/100) and irreversible 5:1 compression (0-3%). However, the proportion significantly increased with the irreversible 10:1 (95-99%) and 15:1 compressions (100%) versus reversible compression in all readers (P < 0.001); 100 and 95% of the 5:1 compressed images were rated indistinguishable from the original images by at least five of the six readers and all readers, respectively. Irreversibly 5:1 compressed abdominal CT images are visually lossless and, therefore, potentially acceptable for primary interpretation. (orig.)

  20. A Method for the Automatic Exposure Control in Pediatric Abdominal CT: Application to the Standard Deviation Value and Tube Current Methods by Using Patient's Age and Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Ken; Akiyama, Shinji; Nambu, Atushi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hasebe, Yuusuke

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to apply the pediatric abdominal CT protocol of Donnelly et al. in the United States to the pediatric abdominal CT-AEC. Examining CT images of 100 children, we found that the sectional area of the hepatic portal region (y) was strongly correlated with the body weight (x) as follows: y=7.14x + 84.39 (correlation coefficient=0.9574). We scanned an elliptical cone phantom that simulates the human body using a pediatric abdominal CT scanning method of Donnelly et al. in, and measured SD values. We further scanned the same phantom under the settings for adult CT-AEC scan and obtained the relationship between the sectional areas (y) and the SD values. Using these results, we obtained the following preset noise factors for CT-AEC at each body weight range: 6.90 at 4.5-8.9 kg, 8.40 at 9.0-17.9 kg, 8.68 at 18.0-26.9 kg, 9.89 at 27.0-35.9 kg, 12.22 at 36.0-45.0 kg, 13.52 at 45.1-70.0 kg, 15.29 at more than 70 kg. From the relation between age, weight and the distance of liver and tuber ischiadicum of 500 children, we obtained the CTDI vol values and DLP values under the scanning protocol of Donnelly et al. Almost all of DRL from these values turned out to be smaller than the DRL data of IAEA and various countries. Thus, by setting the maximum current values of CT-AEC to be the Donnelly et al.'s age-wise current values, and using our weight-wise noise factors, we think we can perform pediatric abdominal CT-AEC scans that are consistent with the same radiation safety and the image quality as those proposed by Donnelly et al.

  1. Noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II: spectrum of imaging findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has evolved into an effective imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in selected patients. Two distinct advantages over other noninvasive cardiac imaging methods include its ability to directly evaluate the coronary arteries and to provide a unique opportunity to evaluate for alternative diagnoses by assessing the extracardiac structures, such as the lungs and mediastinum, particularly in patients presenting with the chief symptom of acute chest pain. Some centers reconstruct a small field of view (FOV) cropped around the heart but a full FOV (from skin to skin in the area irradiated) is obtainable in the raw data of every scan so that clinically relevant noncardiac findings are identifiable. Debate in the scientific community has centered on the necessity for this large FOV. A review of noncardiac structures provides the opportunity to make alternative diagnoses that may account for the patient\\'s presentation or to detect important but clinically silent problems such as lung cancer. Critics argue that the yield of biopsy-proven cancers is low and that the follow-up of incidental noncardiac findings is expensive, resulting in increased radiation exposure and possibly unnecessary further testing. In this 2-part review we outline the issues surrounding the concept of the noncardiac read, looking for noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part I focused on the pros and cons for and against the practice of identifying noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II illustrates the imaging spectrum of cardiac CT appearances of benign and malignant noncardiac pathology.

  2. Computer tomography in refined diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysms: comparison of outcomes of radiation therapies Versus surgical and morphological studies of resected abdominal aortic fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, L.B.; Platonova, A.G.; Demidov, I.N.; Emel'yanova, L.N.

    1998-01-01

    The results of computed tomography (CT) was compared with ultrasonographic and angiographic finding in 168 patients. All data of radiation diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) were compared with those of operations and morphological studies of the resected fragments of the aortic parts changed due to aneurysms. These comparisons provided a detailed characterization of the potentialities of CT performed on a third-generation unit in the presurgical diagnosis of this abnormally. At the same time, detailed XCT finding (semiotics of AAA and their complications) are given. The study shows benefits of the refined AAA by applying routine CT. The paper gives a diagnostic algorithm of using radiation studies (ultrasonography, CT, angiography) in the diagnosis of AAA. Third-generation CT units widely used in clinical practice are shown to provide necessary and complete information on the magnitude of AAA

  3. Imaging findings of pulmonary vascular disorders in portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Kenichi; Takahashi, Koji; Furuse, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and compare the imaging findings of hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of five patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome and four patients with portopulmonary hypertension. We evaluated chest radiographs, chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans, 99m Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) lung perfusion scans, and pulmonary angiograms. In patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome, the presence of peripheral pulmonary vascular dilatation was detected by chest radiograph, chest CT scan, and pulmonary angiogram, especially the basilar segment. 99m Tc-MAA lung perfusion scan showed extrapulmonary tracer distribution (brain, thyroid, and kidney), which revealed pulmonary right-left shunting. In patients with portopulmonary hypertension, chest radiographs and chest CT scans showed the classic findings of primary pulmonary hypertension. In patients with both disorders, extrahepatic features of portal hypertension including ascites, splenomegaly, and portosystemic collateral vessels were seen on abdominal CT. In conclusion, chest radiographs and CT in hepatopulmonary syndrome usually showed peripheral pulmonary vascular dilatation, whereas those in portopulmonary hypertension showed central pulmonary artery dilatation. The extrahepatic features of portal hypertension might be helpful for the diagnosis of both disorders. (author)

  4. CT findings and serum ca 125 levels in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma: report of 11 new cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebapci, Mahmut; Adapinar, Baki [Department of Radiology, Osmangazi University School of Medicine, 26480, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Vardareli, Eser [Department of Gastroenterology, Osmangazi University School of Medicine, 26480, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Acikalin, Mustafa [Department of Pathology, Osmangazi University School of Medicine, 26480, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to review and reappraise the clinical and CT features of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM), and to discuss differential diagnosis. The history, clinical, and laboratory data, and imaging studies of 11 patients with a histologically proven diagnosis of MPM, were retrospectively reviewed. Our patients consisted of 7 women and 4 men, with a median age of 48 years (age range 40-55 years). There was a definite history of significant asbestos exposure in 6 patients. Abdominal swelling (9 of 11) was the most common presenting symptom. The mean serum CA-125 (normal value 1.2-32 U/ml) level was 230 U/ml (range 19-1000 U/ml). The most common radiological findings were extensive or moderate amounts ascites (11 of 11), irregular or nodular peritoneal thickening (11 of 11), omental involvement (10 of 11), mesentery involvement (9 of 11), pleural thickening, plaques or calcification (7 of 11), pleural effusion (6 of 11), and bowel wall thickening (5 of 11). Two patients had large upper abdominal masses. Computed tomography findings of MPM are nonspecific and inadequate to pinpoint specific diagnosis. The diagnosis requires histological demonstration which is commonly made by an image or laparoscopic-guided biopsy. Pleural changes suggesting asbestosis combined with CT findings and high CA-125 levels can suggest, but are not diagnostic of, mesothelioma. Suggesting the diagnosis of MPM is important because histological and immunohistochemical tests are needed for diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  5. CT findings and serum ca 125 levels in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma: report of 11 new cases and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebapci, Mahmut; Adapinar, Baki; Vardareli, Eser; Acikalin, Mustafa

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review and reappraise the clinical and CT features of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM), and to discuss differential diagnosis. The history, clinical, and laboratory data, and imaging studies of 11 patients with a histologically proven diagnosis of MPM, were retrospectively reviewed. Our patients consisted of 7 women and 4 men, with a median age of 48 years (age range 40-55 years). There was a definite history of significant asbestos exposure in 6 patients. Abdominal swelling (9 of 11) was the most common presenting symptom. The mean serum CA-125 (normal value 1.2-32 U/ml) level was 230 U/ml (range 19-1000 U/ml). The most common radiological findings were extensive or moderate amounts ascites (11 of 11), irregular or nodular peritoneal thickening (11 of 11), omental involvement (10 of 11), mesentery involvement (9 of 11), pleural thickening, plaques or calcification (7 of 11), pleural effusion (6 of 11), and bowel wall thickening (5 of 11). Two patients had large upper abdominal masses. Computed tomography findings of MPM are nonspecific and inadequate to pinpoint specific diagnosis. The diagnosis requires histological demonstration which is commonly made by an image or laparoscopic-guided biopsy. Pleural changes suggesting asbestosis combined with CT findings and high CA-125 levels can suggest, but are not diagnostic of, mesothelioma. Suggesting the diagnosis of MPM is important because histological and immunohistochemical tests are needed for diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  6. CT features of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kwon, Tae Ahn; Kim, Yeon Kil; Kim, Young Ok; Song, Kyung Sup [The Catholic Univ. of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD). We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of 14 symptomatic patients with peritonitis after CAPD. Diffuse abdominal pain was present in 11, fever in two, and abdominal mass with vomiting in one. The mean duration of CAPD ranged from 10 months to 5 years(mean : 3.9 years). On abdominal CT, we evaluated the presence and location of ascites, bowel wall thickening, cocoon formation, the pattern of enhancement of peritoneal thickening, the presence of calcifications in the peritoneum, and mesenteric and omental change. On enhanced CT, multiloculated ascites was observed in all cases(n=14) ; it was located mainly in the pelvic cavity with small multi-loculated fluid collections in the peritoneal cavity(n=13), including the lesser sac(n=3). In one patient, ascites was located in the space between the greater omentum and anterior peritoneal surface. CT showed ileus in 12 cases, small bowel wall thickening in 11, and cocoon formation in five. Uneven but smooth thickening of the peritoneum, with contrast enhancement, was seen in eight cases, and in five of these, peritoneal thickening was more prominent in the anterior peritoneum. Other findings included reticular opacity in two cases, hematoma of the rectus muscle in one, and umbilical hernia in one. Multiloculated fluid collection, ileus, small bowel wall thickening, uneven but smooth peritoneal thickening, and cocoon formation appear to be CT features of CAPD peritonitis.

  7. CT features of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kwon, Tae Ahn; Kim, Yeon Kil; Kim, Young Ok; Song, Kyung Sup

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD). We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of 14 symptomatic patients with peritonitis after CAPD. Diffuse abdominal pain was present in 11, fever in two, and abdominal mass with vomiting in one. The mean duration of CAPD ranged from 10 months to 5 years(mean : 3.9 years). On abdominal CT, we evaluated the presence and location of ascites, bowel wall thickening, cocoon formation, the pattern of enhancement of peritoneal thickening, the presence of calcifications in the peritoneum, and mesenteric and omental change. On enhanced CT, multiloculated ascites was observed in all cases(n=14) ; it was located mainly in the pelvic cavity with small multi-loculated fluid collections in the peritoneal cavity(n=13), including the lesser sac(n=3). In one patient, ascites was located in the space between the greater omentum and anterior peritoneal surface. CT showed ileus in 12 cases, small bowel wall thickening in 11, and cocoon formation in five. Uneven but smooth thickening of the peritoneum, with contrast enhancement, was seen in eight cases, and in five of these, peritoneal thickening was more prominent in the anterior peritoneum. Other findings included reticular opacity in two cases, hematoma of the rectus muscle in one, and umbilical hernia in one. Multiloculated fluid collection, ileus, small bowel wall thickening, uneven but smooth peritoneal thickening, and cocoon formation appear to be CT features of CAPD peritonitis

  8. Point Organ Radiation Dose in Abdominal CT: Effect of Patient Off-Centering in an Experimental Human Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Khawaja, Ranish Deedar; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Lira, Diego; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Primak, Andrew; Xu, George; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2017-08-01

    To determine the effect of patient off-centering on point organ radiation dose measurements in a human cadaver scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol. A human cadaver (88 years, body-mass-index 20 kg/m2) was scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol on 128-slice dual source MDCT (Definition Flash, Siemens). A total of 18 scans were performed using two scan protocols (a) 120 kV-200 mAs fixed-mA (CTDIvol 14 mGy) (b) 120 kV-125 ref mAs (7 mGy) with automatic exposure control (AEC, CareDose 4D) at three different positions (a) gantry isocenter, (b) upward off-centering and (c) downward off-centering. Scanning was repeated three times at each position. Six thimble (in liver, stomach, kidney, pancreas, colon and urinary bladder) and four MOSFET dosimeters (on cornea, thyroid, testicle and breast) were placed for calculation of measured point organ doses. Organ dose estimations were retrieved from dose-tracking software (eXposure, Radimetrics). Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance. There was a significant difference between the trends of point organ doses with AEC and fixed-mA at all three positions (p 92% for both protocols; p < 0.0001). For both protocols, the highest mean difference in point doses was found for stomach and lowest for colon. Measured absorbed point doses in abdominal CT vary with patient-centering in the