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Sample records for abc membrane transporters

  1. Structural diversity of ABC transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Beek, Josy; Guskov, Albert

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a large superfamily of ATP-dependent protein complexes that mediate transport of a vast array of substrates across membranes. The 14 currently available structures of ABC transporters have greatly advanced insight into the transport mechanism and revealed a tremendous structural diversity. Whereas the domains that hydrolyze ATP are structurally related in all ABC transporters, the membrane-embedded domains, where the substrates are translocated, adopt four different unrelated folds. Here, we review the structural characteristics of ABC transporters and discuss the implications of this structural diversity for mechanistic diversity. PMID:24638992

  2. Plant ABC Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joohyun; Park, Jiyoung; Choi, Hyunju; Burla, Bo; Kretzschmar, Tobias; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    ABC transporters constitute one of the largest protein families found in all living organisms. ABC transporters are driven by ATP hydrolysis and can act as exporters as well as importers. The plant genome encodes for more than 100 ABC transporters, largely exceeding that of other organisms. In Arabidopsis, only 22 out of 130 have been functionally analyzed. They are localized in most membranes of a plant cell such as the plasma membrane, the tonoplast, chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes and fulfill a multitude of functions. Originally identified as transporters involved in detoxification processes, they have later been shown to be required for organ growth, plant nutrition, plant development, response to abiotic stresses, pathogen resistance and the interaction of the plant with its environment. To fulfill these roles they exhibit different substrate specifies by e.g. depositing surface lipids, accumulating phytate in seeds, and transporting the phytohormones auxin and abscisic acid. The aim of this review is to give an insight into the functions of plant ABC transporters and to show their importance for plant development and survival. PMID:22303277

  3. The product of the ABC half-transporter gene ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR/ABCP) is expressed in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocchi, E; Khodjakov, A; Volk, E L

    2000-01-01

    The products of the ABC gene family can be generally classified as either full-transporters of half-transporters. Full-transporters are expressed in the plasma membrane, whereas half-transporters are usually found in intracellular membranes. Recently, an ABC half-transporter, the ABCG2 gene product...... by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. This protein is highly overexpressed in several drug-resistant cell lines and localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane, instead of to intracellular membranes as seen with all other known half-transporters. Therefore, BCRP/MXR is unique among the ABC half...

  4. ABC transporters in adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyffer, Fabian; Tampé, Robert

    2015-03-01

    ABC transporters ubiquitously found in all kingdoms of life move a broad range of solutes across membranes. Crystal structures of four distinct types of ABC transport systems have been solved, shedding light on different conformational states within the transport process. Briefly, ATP-dependent flipping between inward- and outward-facing conformations allows directional transport of various solutes. The heterodimeric transporter associated with antigen processing TAP1/2 (ABCB2/3) is a crucial element of the adaptive immune system. The ABC transport complex shuttles proteasomal degradation products into the endoplasmic reticulum. These antigenic peptides are loaded onto major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and presented on the cell surface. We detail the functional modules of TAP, its ATPase and transport cycle, and its interaction with and modulation by other cellular components. In particular, we emphasize how viral factors inhibit TAP activity and thereby prevent detection of the infected host cell by cytotoxic T-cells. Merging functional details on TAP with structural insights from related ABC transporters refines the understanding of solute transport. Although human ABC transporters are extremely diverse, they still may employ conceptually related transport mechanisms. Appropriately, we delineate a working model of the transport cycle and how viral factors arrest TAP in distinct conformations. Deciphering the transport cycle of human ABC proteins is the major issue in the field. The defined peptidic substrate, various inhibitory viral factors, and its role in adaptive immunity provide unique tools for the investigation of TAP, making it an ideal model system for ABC transporters in general. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Structural biochemistry and biophysics of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermodynamics of ABC transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun C. Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT ABC transporters form the largest of all transporter families, and their structural study has made tremendous progress over recent years. However, despite such advances, the precise mechanisms that determine the energy-coupling between ATP hydrolysis and the conformational changes following substrate binding remain to be elucidated. Here, we present our thermodynamic analysis for both ABC importers and exporters, and introduce the two new concepts of differential-binding energy and elastic conformational energy into the discussion. We hope that the structural analysis of ABC transporters will henceforth take thermodynamic aspects of transport mechanisms into account as well.

  6. ABCdb: an ABC transporter database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, Y; Fichant, G

    2000-10-01

    We present the first release of a database devoted to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein domains (ABCdb). The ABC proteins are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes in Archea, Bacteria and Eucaryota where they are encoded by large families of paralogous genes. The majority of ABC domains energize the transport of compounds across the membranes. In bacteria, ABC transporters are involved in the uptake of a wide range of molecules and in mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. In eukaryotes, most of them are involved in drug resistance and in human cells, many are associated with diseases. Sequence analysis reveals that members of the ABC superfamily can be organized into sub-families and suggests that they have diverged from common ancestral forms. In this release, ABCdb includes the inventory and assembly of the ABC transporter systems of completely sequenced genomes. In addition to the protein entries, the database comprises information on functional domains, sequence motifs, predicted trans-membrane segments, and signal peptides. It also includes a classification in sub-families of the ABC systems as well as a classification of the different partners of the systems. Evolutionary trees and specific sequence patterns are provided for each sub-family. The database is endowed with a powerful query system and it was interfaced with blastP2 program for similarity searches. ABCdb has been developed in the ACeDB format, a database system developed by Jean Thierry-Mieg and Richard Durbin. ABCdb can be accessed via the World Wide Web (http://ir2lcb.cnrs-mrs.fr/ABCdb/).

  7. Bioinformatic survey of ABC transporters in dermatophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzalski, Marek; Ciesielska, Anita; Stączek, Paweł

    2016-01-15

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a very large and ubiquitous superfamily of membrane proteins. They are responsible for ATP hydrolysis driven translocation of countless substrates. Being a very old and diverse group of proteins present in all organisms they share a common feature, which is the presence of an evolutionary conservative nucleotide binding domain (NBD)--the engine that drives the transport. Another common domain is a transmembrane domain (TMD) which consists of several membrane-spanning helices. This part of protein is substrate-specific, thus it is much more variable. ABC transporters are known for driving drug efflux in many pathogens and cancer cells, therefore they are the subject of extensive studies. There are many examples of conferring a drug resistance phenotype in fungal pathogens by ABC transporters, however, little is known about these proteins in dermatophytes--a group of fungi causing superficial mycoses. So far only a single ABC transporter has been extensively studied in this group of pathogens. We analyzed available genomic sequences of seven dermatophyte species in order to provide an insight into dermatophyte ABC protein inventory. Phylogenetic studies of ABC transporter genes and their products were conducted and included ABC transporters of other fungi. Our results show that each dermatophyte genome studied possesses a great variety of ABC transporter genes. Detailed analysis of selected genes and their products indicates that relatively recent duplication of ABC transporter genes could lead to novel substrate specificity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The ABC transporters in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Ca. L. asiaticus) is a Gram-negative bacterium and the pathogen of Citrus Greening disease (Huanglongbing, HLB). As a parasitic bacterium, Ca. L. asiaticus harbors ABC transporters that play important roles in exchanging chemical compounds between Ca. L. asiaticus and its host. Here, we analyzed all the ABC transporter-related proteins in Ca. L. asiaticus. We identified 14 ABC transporter systems and predicted their structures and substrate specificities. In-depth sequence and structure analysis including multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree reconstruction, and structure comparison further support their function predictions. Our study shows that this bacterium could use these ABC transporters to import metabolites (amino acids and phosphates) and enzyme cofactors (choline, thiamine, iron, manganese, and zinc), resist to organic solvent, heavy metal, and lipid-like drugs, maintain the composition of the outer membrane (OM), and secrete virulence factors. Although the features of most ABC systems could be deduced from the abundant experimental data on their orthologs, we reported several novel observations within ABC system proteins. Moreover, we identified seven nontransport ABC systems that are likely involved in virulence gene expression regulation, transposon excision regulation, and DNA repair. Our analysis reveals several candidates for further studies to understand and control the disease, including the type I virulence factor secretion system and its substrate that are likely related to Ca. L. asiaticus pathogenicity and the ABC transporter systems responsible for bacterial OM biosynthesis that are good drug targets. PMID:22807026

  9. ABC transporters in megakaryopoiesis and platelet activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Buitrago, Lorena; Wang, Ying

    2017-08-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) is a family of transporters that facilitates the translocation of substrates across cell membrane using its ATPase subunit. These transporters have key roles in multidrug resistance, lipid homeostasis, antigen processing, immunity, cell proliferation and hematopoiesis. Some ABC transporters are selectively expressed on megakaryocyte progenitor, megakaryocyte and its cellular fragment platelet. However, the role of ABC transporters in hemostasis and thrombosis were not well explored until recently. Studies of both human genetic diseases and genetically-manipulated animal models have greatly improved our understanding of ABC transporters in regulating hematopoiesis particularly megakaryopoiesis and/or platelet activity. Human genome wide association studies (GWAS) have also unraveled the association between ABC transporters and thrombopoiesis in general population. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the recent advances in our understanding of how ABC transporters regulate megakaryopoiesis and platelet activity, the underlining mechanisms and their association with atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. Last, the emerging therapeutic targets to slow down atherosclerosis development and prevent atherothrombosis via ABC transporters or downstream pathways will also be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Importance of ABC Transporters in Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benadiba, Marcel; Maor, Yehoshua

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a huge family of ATP-dependent transmembrane proteins whose main function is exporting or importing substances or molecules through the cell membranes, plasma cell membrane, or inner membranes in organelles. They fulfill these functions by maintaining cell integrity, metabolism, and homeostasis. They are expressed in a variety of tissues as they transport numerous essential compounds including lipids and other signaling molecules. ABC transporters became widely studied since the discovery of their ability to carry a multitude of xenobiotics, including therapeutic drugs, and in light of the fact that they represent a hurdle for the treatment of resistant cancers. In contrast, the role of ABC transporters in neurological diseases like Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s, depression, schizophrenia, and epilepsy remains controversial and their mechanism of action in these pathologies remains elusive, thus hindering the implementation of therapies aimed at modulating the functions of these transporters. To date, a number of natural and synthetic compounds are known to act as inhibitors, substrates, and even inducers of these transporters, being able to modulate their expression and/or function; however, their implication as therapeutic agents is far from reaching wide clinical utilization. This review highlights the importance of overcoming the challenges posed by ABC transporters in drug development.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal ABC transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The superfamily of ABC proteins is among the largest known in nature. Its members are mainly, but not exclusively, involved in the transport of a broad range of substrates across biological membranes. Many contribute to multidrug resistance in microbial pathogens and cancer cells. The

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal ABC transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driessen Arnold JM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superfamily of ABC proteins is among the largest known in nature. Its members are mainly, but not exclusively, involved in the transport of a broad range of substrates across biological membranes. Many contribute to multidrug resistance in microbial pathogens and cancer cells. The diversity of ABC proteins in fungi is comparable with those in multicellular animals, but so far fungal ABC proteins have barely been studied. Results We performed a phylogenetic analysis of the ABC proteins extracted from the genomes of 27 fungal species from 18 orders representing 5 fungal phyla thereby covering the most important groups. Our analysis demonstrated that some of the subfamilies of ABC proteins remained highly conserved in fungi, while others have undergone a remarkable group-specific diversification. Members of the various fungal phyla also differed significantly in the number of ABC proteins found in their genomes, which is especially reduced in the yeast S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Conclusions Data obtained during our analysis should contribute to a better understanding of the diversity of the fungal ABC proteins and provide important clues about their possible biological functions.

  13. Human ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family

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    Vasiliou Vasilis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There exist four fundamentally different classes of membrane-bound transport proteins: ion channels; transporters; aquaporins; and ATP-powered pumps. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are an example of ATP-dependent pumps. ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane-bound proteins, present in all prokaryotes, as well as plants, fungi, yeast and animals. These pumps can move substrates in (influx or out (efflux of cells. In mammals, ABC transporters are expressed predominantly in the liver, intestine, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, placenta and kidney. ABC proteins transport a number of endogenous substrates, including inorganic anions, metal ions, peptides, amino acids, sugars and a large number of hydrophobic compounds and metabolites across the plasma membrane, and also across intracellular membranes. The human genome contains 49 ABC genes, arranged in eight subfamilies and named via divergent evolution. That ABC genes are important is underscored by the fact that mutations in at least I I of these genes are already known to cause severe inherited diseases (eg cystic fibrosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy [X-ALD]. ABC transporters also participate in the movement of most drugs and their metabolites across cell surface and cellular organelle membranes; thus, defects in these genes can be important in terms of cancer therapy, pharmacokinetics and innumerable pharmacogenetic disorders.

  14. Functional analysis of candidate ABC transporter proteins for sitosterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, C; Elliott, J I; Sardini, A

    2002-01-01

    Two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, ABCG5 and ABCG8, have recently been associated with the accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the sterol storage disease sitosterolemia. These two 'half-transporters' are assumed to dimerize to form the complete sitosterol transporter which reduces...... the absorption of sitosterol and related molecules in the intestine by pumping them back into the lumen. Although mutations altering ABCG5 and ABCG8 are found in affected patients, no functional demonstration of sitosterol transport has been achieved. In this study, we investigated whether other ABC transporters......-specific ABC transporters have acquired specificity to exclude sitosterol and related sterols like cholesterol presumably because the abundance of cholesterol in the membrane would interfere with their action; in consequence, specific transporters have evolved to handle these sterols....

  15. The peroxisomal ABC transporter family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Visser, Wouter F.; van Roermund, Carlo W. T.; Kemp, Stephan; Waterham, Hans R.

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the current state of knowledge about the ABCD family of peroxisomal half adenosine-triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. ABCDs are predicted to be present in a variety of eukaryotic organisms, although at present, only ABCDs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae,

  16. The ABCs of membrane transporters in health and disease (SLC series): introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hediger, Matthias A; Clémençon, Benjamin; Burrier, Robert E; Bruford, Elspeth A

    2013-01-01

    The field of transport biology has steadily grown over the past decade and is now recognized as playing an important role in manifestation and treatment of disease. The SLC (solute carrier) gene series has grown to now include 52 families and 395 transporter genes in the human genome. A list of these genes can be found at the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) website (see www.genenames.org/genefamilies/SLC). This special issue features mini-reviews for each of these SLC families written by the experts in each field. The existing online resource for solute carriers, the Bioparadigms SLC Tables (www.bioparadigms.org), has been updated and significantly extended with additional information and cross-links to other relevant databases, and the nomenclature used in this database has been validated and approved by the HGNC. In addition, the Bioparadigms SLC Tables functionality has been improved to allow easier access by the scientific community. This introduction includes: an overview of all known SLC and "non-SLC" transporter genes; a list of transporters of water soluble vitamins; a summary of recent progress in the structure determination of transporters (including GLUT1/SLC2A1); roles of transporters in human diseases and roles in drug approval and pharmaceutical perspectives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transportomics: screening for substrates of ABC transporters in body fluids using vesicular transport assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumpochova, Petra; Sapthu, Sunny; Brouwers, Jos F.; de Haas, Marcel; de Vos, Ric; Borst, Piet; van de Wetering, Koen

    2012-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) genes encode the largest family of transmembrane proteins. ABC transporters translocate a wide variety of substrates across membranes, but their physiological function is often incompletely understood. We describe a new method to study the substrate spectrum of ABC

  18. Current advances on ABC drug transporters in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckenbach, Till; Fischer, Stephan; Sturm, Armin

    2014-09-01

    Most members of the large ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family are transporters involved in substrate translocation across biological membranes. In eukaryotes, ABC proteins functioning as drug transporters are located in the plasma membrane and mediate the cellular efflux of a wide range of organic chemicals, with some transporters also transporting certain metals. As the enhanced expression of ABC drug transporters can confer multidrug resistance (MDR) to cancers and multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) to organisms from polluted habitats, these ABC family members are also referred to as MDR or MXR proteins. In mammals, ABC drug transporters show predominant expression in tissues involved in excretion or constituting internal or external body boundaries, where they facilitate the excretion of chemicals and their metabolites, and limit chemical uptake and penetration into "sanctuary" sites of the body. Available knowledge about ABC proteins is still limited in teleost fish, a large vertebrate group of high ecological and economic importance. Using transport activity measurements and immunochemical approaches, early studies demonstrated similarities in the tissue distribution of ABC drug transporters between teleosts and mammals, suggesting conserved roles of the transporters in the biochemical defence against toxicants. Recently, the availability of teleost genome assemblies has stimulated studies of the ABC family in this taxon. This review summarises the current knowledge regarding the genetics, functional properties, physiological function, and ecotoxicological relevance of teleostean ABC transporters. The available literature is reviewed with emphasis on recent studies addressing the tissue distribution, substrate spectrum, regulation, physiological function and phylogenetic origin of teleostean ABC transporters. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ABC transporters in the CNS - an inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, A M S; Bauer, B

    2011-04-01

    In the present review we provide a summary of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our review is focused on transporters of the ABC A, B, C, D, and G families that have been detected in the cells of the neurovascular unit/blood-brain barrier including brain capillary endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons, as well as in other brain cells, such as microglia, oligodendrocytes, and choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this review, we provide an overview, organized by ABC family, of transporter expression, localization, and function. We summarize recent findings on ABC transporter regulation in the CNS and address the role of ABC transporters in CNS diseases including brain cancer, seizures/epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we discuss new therapeutic strategies focused on ABC transporters in CNS disease.

  20. Structural basis for the mechanism of ABC transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beis, Konstantinos

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are primary transporters that couple the energy stored in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the movement of molecules across the membrane. ABC transporters can be divided into exporters and importers; importers mediate the uptake of essential nutrients into cells and are found predominantly in prokaryotes whereas exporters transport molecules out of cells or into organelles and are found in all organisms. ABC exporters have been linked with multi-drug resistance in both bacterial and eukaryotic cells. ABC transporters are powered by the hydrolysis of ATP and transport their substrate via the alternating access mechanism, whereby the protein alternates between a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is accessible from the outside of the membrane, outward-facing and one in which it is inward-facing. In this mini-review, the structures of different ABC transporter types in different conformations are presented within the context of the alternating access mechanism and how they have shaped our current understanding of the mechanism of ABC transporters. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  1. ABC and MFS transporters from Botrytis cinerea involved in sensitivity to fungicides and natural toxic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.

    2003-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters are two major classes of proteins involved in drug resistance. ABC transporter proteins are primary transporters that use the energy generated by ATP hydrolysis to transport drugs over membranes, while MFS transport

  2. ABC transporter research: going strong 40 years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoulou, Frederica L; Kerr, Ian D

    2015-10-01

    In most organisms, ABC transporters constitute one of the largest families of membrane proteins. In humans, their functions are diverse and underpin numerous key physiological processes, as well as being causative factors in a number of clinically relevant pathologies. Advances in our understanding of these diseases have come about through combinations of genetic and protein biochemical investigations of these transporters and the power of in vitro and in vivo investigations is helping to develop genotype-phenotype understanding. However, the importance of ABC transporter research goes far beyond human biology; microbial ABC transporters are of great interest in terms of understanding virulence and drug resistance and industrial biotechnology researchers are exploring the potential of prokaryotic ABC exporters to increase the capacity of synthetic biology systems. Plant ABC transporters play important roles in transport of hormones, xenobiotics, metals and secondary metabolites, pathogen responses and numerous aspects of development, all of which are important in the global food security area. For 3 days in Chester, this Biochemical Society Focused Meeting brought together researchers with diverse experimental approaches and with different fundamental questions, all of which are linked by the commonality of ABC transporters. © 2015 Authors.

  3. ABC Transporters in Cancer Stem Cells: Beyond Chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begicevic, Romana-Rea; Falasca, Marco

    2017-11-08

    The efficacy of chemotherapy is one of the main challenges in cancer treatment and one of the major obstacles to overcome in achieving lasting remission and a definitive cure in patients with cancer is the emergence of cancer resistance. Indeed, drug resistance is ultimately accountable for poor treatment outcomes and tumour relapse. There are various molecular mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance, such as the change in the activity of membrane transporters primarily belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In addition, it has been proposed that this common feature could be attributed to a subpopulation of slow-cycling cancer stem cells (CSCs), endowed with enhanced tumorigenic potential and multidrug resistance. CSCs are characterized by the overexpression of specific surface markers that vary in different cancer cell types. Overexpression of ABC transporters has been reported in several cancers and more predominantly in CSCs. While the major focus on the role played by ABC transporters in cancer is polarized by their involvement in chemoresistance, emerging evidence supports a more active role of these proteins, in which they release specific bioactive molecules in the extracellular milieu. This review will outline our current understanding of the role played by ABC transporters in CSCs, how their expression is regulated and how they support the malignant metabolic phenotype. To summarize, we suggest that the increased expression of ABC transporters in CSCs may have precise functional roles and provide the opportunity to target, particularly these cells, by using specific ABC transporter inhibitors.

  4. ABC Transporters in Cancer Stem Cells: Beyond Chemoresistance

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    Romana-Rea Begicevic

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of chemotherapy is one of the main challenges in cancer treatment and one of the major obstacles to overcome in achieving lasting remission and a definitive cure in patients with cancer is the emergence of cancer resistance. Indeed, drug resistance is ultimately accountable for poor treatment outcomes and tumour relapse. There are various molecular mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance, such as the change in the activity of membrane transporters primarily belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter family. In addition, it has been proposed that this common feature could be attributed to a subpopulation of slow-cycling cancer stem cells (CSCs, endowed with enhanced tumorigenic potential and multidrug resistance. CSCs are characterized by the overexpression of specific surface markers that vary in different cancer cell types. Overexpression of ABC transporters has been reported in several cancers and more predominantly in CSCs. While the major focus on the role played by ABC transporters in cancer is polarized by their involvement in chemoresistance, emerging evidence supports a more active role of these proteins, in which they release specific bioactive molecules in the extracellular milieu. This review will outline our current understanding of the role played by ABC transporters in CSCs, how their expression is regulated and how they support the malignant metabolic phenotype. To summarize, we suggest that the increased expression of ABC transporters in CSCs may have precise functional roles and provide the opportunity to target, particularly these cells, by using specific ABC transporter inhibitors.

  5. Transportomics: screening for substrates of ABC transporters in body fluids using vesicular transport assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumpochova, P; Sapthu, S.; Brouwers, J.F.H.M.; de Haas, M.; de Vos, R.; Borst, P.; van de Wetering, K.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) genes encode the largest family of transmembrane proteins. ABC transporters translocate a wide variety of substrates across membranes, but their physiological function is often incompletely understood. We describe a new method to study the substrate spectrum

  6. Comparison of mechanistic transport cycle models of ABC exporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Rose-Sperling, Dania; Hellmich, Ute A; Stockner, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters, ubiquitous in all kingdoms of life, carry out essential substrate transport reactions across cell membranes. Their transmembrane domains bind and translocate substrates and are connected to a pair of nucleotide binding domains, which bind and hydrolyze ATP to energize import or export of substrates. Over four decades of investigations into ABC transporters have revealed numerous details from atomic-level structural insights to their functional and physiological roles. Despite all these advances, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanistic principles of ABC transporter function remains elusive. The human multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1, also referred to as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is one of the most intensively studied ABC exporters. Using ABCB1 as the reference point, we aim to compare the dominating mechanistic models of substrate transport and ATP hydrolysis for ABC exporters and to highlight the experimental and computational evidence in their support. In particular, we point out in silico studies that enhance and complement available biochemical data. "This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain." Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Export of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using ABC transporter with an attached lipase ABC transporter recognition domain (LARD

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    Moon Yuseok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter secretes the protein through inner and outer membranes simultaneously in gram negative bacteria. Thermostable lipase (TliA of Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1 is secreted through the ABC transporter. TliA has four glycine-rich repeats (GGXGXD in its C-terminus, which appear in many ABC transporter-secreted proteins. From a homology model of TliA derived from the structure of P. aeruginosa alkaline protease (AprA, lipase ABC transporter domains (LARDs were designed for the secretion of fusion proteins. Results The LARDs included four glycine-rich repeats comprising a β-roll structure, and were added to the C-terminus of test proteins. Either Pro-Gly linker or Factor Xa site was added between fusion proteins and LARDs. We attached different length of LARDs such as LARD0, LARD1 or whole TliA (the longest LARD to three types of proteins; green fluorescent protein (GFP, epidermal growth factor (EGF and cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP. These fusion proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli together with ABC transporter of either P. fluorescens or Erwinia chrysanthemi. Export of fusion proteins with the whole TliA through the ABC transporter was evident on the basis of lipase enzymatic activity. Upon supplementation of E. coli with ABC transporter, GFP-LARDs and EGF-LARDs were excreted into the culture supernatant. Conclusion The LARDs or whole TliA were attached to C-termini of model proteins and enabled the export of the model proteins such as GFP and EGF in E. coli supplemented with ABC transporter. These results open the possibility for the extracellular production of recombinant proteins in Pseudomonas using LARDs or TliA as a C-terminal signal sequence.

  8. Yeast ABC transporters in lipid trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Banerjee, Atanu

    2016-08-01

    Throughout its evolution, the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily has experienced a rapid expansion in its substrate repertoire and functions. Of the diverse functions that these pumps offer, their drug transport properties have attracted considerable attention primarily owing to their clinical significance. Despite this fact, emerging evidence suggests that physiological substrates of transporters also affect the overall functioning of an organism. Lipids, as substrates of ABC transporters, constitute one feature found in all representative groups of the living kingdom. Due to the importance of lipid species in the cellular physiology of an organism, their proper distribution within cells is crucial. This fact is well exemplified by the vast number of medical conditions that have been caused as a result of perturbations in ABC transporter-mediated lipid transport in higher organisms. In yeasts, apart from providing transport functions, ABC transporters also coordinate regulatory networks with lipids. This review focuses on yeast ABC transporters involved in the transport of lipids and briefly discusses the integration of their regulatory network with that of the lipid species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Asymmetric switching in a homodimeric ABC transporter: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Aittoniemi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are a large family of membrane proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including multidrug and tumor resistance and ion channel regulation. Advances in the structural and functional understanding of ABC transporters have revealed that hydrolysis at the two canonical nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs is co-operative and non-simultaneous. A conserved core architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic ABC exporters has been established, as exemplified by the crystal structure of the homodimeric multidrug exporter Sav1866. Currently, it is unclear how sequential ATP hydrolysis arises in a symmetric homodimeric transporter, since it implies at least transient asymmetry at the NBSs. We show by molecular dynamics simulation that the initially symmetric structure of Sav1866 readily undergoes asymmetric transitions at its NBSs in a pre-hydrolytic nucleotide configuration. MgATP-binding residues and a network of charged residues at the dimer interface are shown to form a sequence of putative molecular switches that allow ATP hydrolysis only at one NBS. We extend our findings to eukaryotic ABC exporters which often consist of two non-identical half-transporters, frequently with degeneracy substitutions at one of their two NBSs. Interestingly, many residues involved in asymmetric conformational switching in Sav1866 are substituted in degenerate eukaryotic NBS. This finding strengthens recent suggestions that the interplay of a consensus and a degenerate NBS in eukaroytic ABC proteins pre-determines the sequence of hydrolysis at the two NBSs.

  10. Hematopoietic stem cells exhibit a specific ABC transporter gene expression profile clearly distinct from other stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, L.; Bergevoet, S.M.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Jansen, J.H.; Reijden, B.A. van der; Raymakers, R.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters protect cells against unrelated (toxic) substances by pumping them across cell membranes. Earlier we showed that many ABC transporters are highly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compared to more committed progenitor cells. The ABC

  11. The ABC transporter MalFGK2 sequesters the MalT transcription factor at the membrane in the absence of cognate substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Richet, Evelyne; Davidson, Amy L.; Joly, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    MalK, the cytoplasmic component of the maltose ABC transporter from Escherichia coli is known to control negatively the activity of MalT, the activator of the maltose regulon, through complex formation. Here we further investigate this regulatory process by monitoring MalT activity and performing fluorescence microscopy analyses under various conditions. We establish that, under physiological conditions, the molecular entity that interacts with MalT is not free MalK, but the maltose transport...

  12. Inventory, assembly and analysis of Bacillus subtilis ABC transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, Y; Fichant, G; Denizot, F

    1999-04-02

    We have undertaken the inventory and assembly of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter systems in the complete genome of Bacillus subtilis. We combined the identification of the three protein partners that compose an ABC transporter (nucleotide-binding domain, NBD; membrane spanning domain, MSD; and solute-binding protein, SBP) with constraints on the genetic organization. This strategy allowed the identification of 86 NBDs in 78 proteins, 103 MSD proteins and 37 SBPs. The analysis of transcriptional units allows the reconstruction of 59 ABC transporters, which include at least one NBD and one MSD. A particular class of five dimeric ATPases was not associated to MSD partners and is assumed to be involved either in macrolide resistance or regulation of translation elongation. In addition, we have detected five genes encoding ATPases without any gene coding for MSD protein in their neighborhood and 11 operons that encode only the membrane and solute-binding proteins. On the bases of similarities, three ATP-binding proteins are proposed to energize ten incomplete systems, suggesting that one ATPase may be recruited by more than one transporter. Finally, we estimate that the B. subtilis genome encodes for at least 78 ABC transporters that have been split in 38 importers and 40 extruders. The ABC systems have been further classified into 11 sub-families according to the tree obtained from the NBDs and the clustering of the MSDs and the SBPs. Comparisons with Escherichia coli show that the extruders are over-represented in B. subtilis, corresponding to an expansion of the sub-families of antibiotic and drug resistance systems. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. An ABC-transporter and an outer membrane lipoprotein participate in posttranslational activation of type VI secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabona, Maria G.; Silverman, Julie M.; Sall, Khady M.; Boyer, Frédéric; Couté, Yohann; Poirel, Jessica; Grunwald, Didier; Mougous, Joseph D.; Elsen, Sylvie; Attree, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of injecting protein toxins into other bacterial cells through one of its three type VI secretion systems (T6SS). The activity of this T6SS is tightly regulated on the posttranslational level by phosphorylation-dependent and -independent pathways. The phosphorylation-dependent pathway consists of a Thr kinase/phosphatase pair (PpkA/PppA) that acts on a forkhead domain-containing protein Fha1, and a periplasmic protein, TagR, that positively regulates PpkA. In the present work, we biochemically and functionally characterize three additional proteins of the phosphorylation-dependent regulatory cascade that controls T6S activation: TagT, TagS and TagQ. We show that similar to TagR, these proteins act upstream of the PpkA/PppA checkpoint and influence phosphorylation of Fha1 and export of Hcp1 and Tse1. Localization studies demonstrate that TagQ is an outer membrane lipoprotein and TagR is associated with the outer membrane. Consistent with their homology to lipoprotein outer membrane localization (Lol) components, TagT and TagS form a stable inner membrane complex with ATPase activity. However, we find that outer membrane association of T6SS lipoproteins TagQ and TssJ1, and TagR, is unaltered in a ΔtagTS background. Notably, we found that TagQ is indispensible for anchoring of TagR to the outer membrane fraction. As T6S-dependent fitness of P. aeruginosa requires TagT, S, R and Q, we conclude that these proteins likely participate in a trans-membrane signaling pathway that promotes H1-T6SS activity under optimal environmental conditions. PMID:22765374

  14. An ABC transporter and an outer membrane lipoprotein participate in posttranslational activation of type VI secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabona, Maria G; Silverman, Julie M; Sall, Khady M; Boyer, Frédéric; Couté, Yohann; Poirel, Jessica; Grunwald, Didier; Mougous, Joseph D; Elsen, Sylvie; Attree, Ina

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of injecting protein toxins into other bacterial cells through one of its three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs). The activity of this T6SS is tightly regulated on the posttranslational level by phosphorylation-dependent and -independent pathways. The phosphorylation-dependent pathway consists of a Threonine kinase/phosphatase pair (PpkA/PppA) that acts on a forkhead domain-containing protein, Fha1, and a periplasmic protein, TagR, that positively regulates PpkA. In the present work, we biochemically and functionally characterize three additional proteins of the phosphorylation-dependent regulatory cascade that controls T6S activation: TagT, TagS and TagQ. We show that similar to TagR, these proteins act upstream of the PpkA/PppA checkpoint and influence phosphorylation of Fha1 and, apparatus assembly and effector export. Localization studies demonstrate that TagQ is an outer membrane lipoprotein and TagR is associated with the outer membrane. Consistent with their homology to lipoprotein outer membrane localization (Lol) components, TagT and TagS form a stable inner membrane complex with ATPase activity. However, we find that outer membrane association of T6SS lipoproteins TagQ and TssJ1, and TagR, is unaltered in a ΔtagTS background. Notably, we found that TagQ is indispensible for anchoring of TagR to the outer membrane fraction. As T6S-dependent fitness of P. aeruginosa requires TagT, S, R and Q, we conclude that these proteins likely participate in a trans-membrane signalling pathway that promotes H1-T6SS activity under optimal environmental conditions. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. ABC transporters in fish species: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eFerreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette (ABC proteins were first recognized for their role in multidrug resistance (MDR in chemotherapeutic treatments, which is a major impediment for the successful treatment of many forms of malignant tumors in humans. These proteins, highly conserved throughout vertebrate species, were later related to cellular detoxification and accounted as responsible for protecting aquatic organisms from xenobiotic insults in the so-called multixenobiotic resistance mechanism (MXR. In recent years, research on these proteins in aquatic species has highlighted their importance in the detoxification mechanisms in fish thus it is of extreme added value to continue these studies. Several transporters have been pointed out as relevant in the ecotoxicological context associated to the transport of xenobiotics, such as P-glycoproteins (Pgps, multidrug-resistance-associated proteins (MRPs 1-5 and breast resistance associated protein (BCRP. In mammals, several nuclear receptors have been identified as mediators of phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and ABC transporters. In aquatic species, knowledge on co-regulation of detoxification mechanism is scarce and needs to be addressed. The interaction of emergent contaminants, with chemosensitizer potential, with ABC transporters in aquatic organisms can compromise detoxification processes and have population effects and should be studied in more detail. This review intends to summarize the recent advances in research on MXR mechanisms in fish species, focusing in 1 regulation and functioning of ABC proteins; 2 cooperation with phase I and II biotransformation enzymes; and 3 ecotoxicological relevance and information on emergent pollutants with ability to modulate ABC transporters expression and activity. Several lines of evidence are clear suggesting the important role of these transporters in detoxification mechanisms and must be further investigated in fish.

  16. ABC transporters : Lessons from a bacterial oligopeptide uptake system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeven, Mark Koop

    2006-01-01

    ABC transporters are proteins that are involved in the uptake of nutrients and excretion of harmful substances in biological cells. Defects in human ABC transporters can result in severe diseases. Too high ABC transporter activity can lead to non-responsiveness of cancercells to chemotherapy, and

  17. Loss of AtPDR11, a plasma membrane-localized ABC transporter, confers paraquat tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jing; Xu, Ping; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2012-03-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. However, no paraquat transporter has been isolated in plants. Here, we describe paraquat-tolerant mutant pqt24-1, isolated from an activation-tagging library on the basis of its tolerance to 2 μm paraquat in the seedling stage. Molecular analysis revealed that the T-DNA was inserted in the 13th exon of At1g66950, which encodes AtPDR11, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. As a result, AtPDR11 was knocked out in the mutant. Loss-of-function mutations of AtPDR11 led to reduced paraquat accumulation in plant cells. In addition, the AtPDR11 protein was specifically localized in the plasmalemma, suggesting AtPDR11 as a potential transporter of paraquat. This conclusion was supported by kinetic analysis of paraquat import. Further studies showed that the transcript level of AtPDR11 could be strongly induced by paraquat and other abiotic stresses including H(2) O(2) , indicating possible up-regulation of AtPDR11 expression by oxidative stress signaling. Thus, our data suggest that paraquat is an opportunistic substrate of AtPDR11 and the enhanced paraquat tolerance of pqt24-1 is due to reduced uptake of paraquat into plant cells. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. The ABC gene family in arthropods: comparative genomics and role in insecticide transport and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermauw, Wannes; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    About a 100 years ago, the Drosophila white mutant marked the birth of Drosophila genetics. The white gene turned out to encode the first well studied ABC transporter in arthropods. The ABC gene family is now recognized as one of the largest transporter families in all kingdoms of life. The majority of ABC proteins function as primary-active transporters that bind and hydrolyze ATP while transporting a large diversity of substrates across lipid membranes. Although extremely well studied in vertebrates for their role in drug resistance, less is known about the role of this family in the transport of endogenous and exogenous substances in arthropods. The ABC families of five insect species, a crustacean and a chelicerate have been annotated in some detail. We conducted a thorough phylogenetic analysis of the seven arthropod and human ABC protein subfamilies, to infer orthologous relationships that might suggest conserved function. Most orthologous relationships were found in the ABCB half transporter, ABCD, ABCE and ABCF subfamilies, but specific expansions within species and lineages are frequently observed and discussed. We next surveyed the role of ABC transporters in the transport of xenobiotics/plant allelochemicals and their involvement in insecticide resistance. The involvement of ABC transporters in xenobiotic resistance in arthropods is historically not well documented, but an increasing number of studies using unbiased differential gene expression analysis now points to their importance. We give an overview of methods that can be used to link ABC transporters to resistance. ABC proteins have also recently been implicated in the mode of action and resistance to Bt toxins in Lepidoptera. Given the enormous interest in Bt toxicology in transgenic crops, such findings will provide an impetus to further reveal the role of ABC transporters in arthropods. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Abc1: a new ABC transporter from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davis, K; Nielsen, O

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated the abc1 gene from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Sequence analysis suggests that the Abc1 protein is a member of the ABC superfamily of transporters and is composed of two structurally homologous halves, each consisting of a hydrophobic region of six transmembrane...... domains and a hydrophilic region containing one ATP-binding site. The abc1 gene appears to be expressed under all growth conditions but gene disruption experiments indicate that it is not essential for growth. The sequence of the abc1 gene has been deposited in the EMBL data library under the Accession...

  20. Transport mechanism of acyl-CoA into peroxisomes by a peroxisomal ABC transporter, ABCD1

    OpenAIRE

    Agustina, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Transport mechanism of acyl-CoA into peroxisomes by a peroxisomal ABC protein, ABCD1 ABCD1, belonging to the ABC protein subfamily D, is aperoxisomal membrane protein and involves in the transport of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-CoA into peroxisomes. Its mutation causes X-linked adrenoleukodystophy; an inborn error of peroxisomal VLCFA ??-oxidation. It has been reported that COMATOSE, a homolog of human ABCD1 in plant possess acyl-CoA thioesterase (ACOT) activity and t...

  1. Functional analysis of candidate ABC transporter proteins for sitosterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, C; Elliott, J I; Sardini, A

    2002-01-01

    Two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, ABCG5 and ABCG8, have recently been associated with the accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the sterol storage disease sitosterolemia. These two 'half-transporters' are assumed to dimerize to form the complete sitosterol transporter which reduces the ab...

  2. Diversity of ABC transporter genes across the plant kingdom and their potential utility in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Thomas S; Rempe, Caroline S; Davitt, Jack; Staton, Margaret E; Peng, Yanhui; Soltis, Douglas Edward; Melkonian, Michael; Deyholos, Michael; Leebens-Mack, James H; Chase, Mark; Rothfels, Carl J; Stevenson, Dennis; Graham, Sean W; Yu, Jun; Liu, Tao; Pires, J Chris; Edger, Patrick P; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Yinlong; Zhu, Ying; Carpenter, Eric; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Stewart, C Neal

    2016-05-31

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene superfamily is ubiquitous among extant organisms and prominently represented in plants. ABC transporters act to transport compounds across cellular membranes and are involved in a diverse range of biological processes. Thus, the applicability to biotechnology is vast, including cancer resistance in humans, drug resistance among vertebrates, and herbicide and other xenobiotic resistance in plants. In addition, plants appear to harbor the highest diversity of ABC transporter genes compared with any other group of organisms. This study applied transcriptome analysis to survey the kingdom-wide ABC transporter diversity in plants and suggest biotechnology applications of this diversity. We utilized sequence similarity-based informatics techniques to infer the identity of ABC transporter gene candidates from 1295 phylogenetically-diverse plant transcriptomes. A total of 97,149 putative (approximately 25 % were full-length) ABC transporter gene members were identified; each RNA-Seq library (plant sample) had 88 ± 30 gene members. As expected, simpler organisms, such as algae, had fewer unique members than vascular land plants. Differences were also noted in the richness of certain ABC transporter subfamilies. Land plants had more unique ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG transporter gene members on average (p plant groups (p plant groups. An increase in the number of gene family members present in the ABCB, ABCC, and ABCD transporter subfamilies may indicate an expansion of the ABC transporter superfamily among green land plants, which include all crop species. The striking difference between the number of ABCA subfamily transporter gene members between ferns and other plant taxa is surprising and merits further investigation. Discussed is the potential exploitation of ABC transporters in plant biotechnology, with an emphasis on crops.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of the Colletotrichum acutatum ABC Transporter CaABC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyoung Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungi tolerate exposure to various abiotic stresses, including cytotoxic compounds and fungicides, via their ATP-driven efflux pumps belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. To clarify the molecular basis of interaction between the fungus and various abiotic stresses including fungicides, we constructed a cDNA library from germinated conidia of Colletotrichum acutatum, a major anthracnose pathogen of pepper (Capsicum annum L.. Over 1,000 cDNA clones were sequenced, of which single clone exhibited significant nucleotide sequence homology to ABC transporter genes. We isolated three fosmid clones containing the C. acutatum ABC1 (CaABC1 gene in full-length from genomic DNA library screening. The CaABC1 gene consists of 4,059 bp transcript, predicting a 1,353-aa protein. The gene contains the typical ABC signature and Walker A and B motifs. The 5′-flanking region contains a CAAT motif, a TATA box, and a Kozak region. Phylogenetic and structural analysis suggested that the CaABC1 is a typical ABC transporter gene highly conserved in various fungal species, as well as in Chromista, Metazoans, and Viridiplantae. We also found that CaABC1 was up-regulated during conidiation and a minimal medium condition. Moreover, CaABC1 was induced in iprobenfos, kresoxim-methyl, thiophanate-methyl, and hygromycin B. These results demonstrate that CaABC1 is necessary for conidiation, abiotic stress, and various fungicide resistances. These results will provide the basis for further study on the function of ABC transporter genes in C. acutatum.

  4. A multidrug ABC transporter with a taste for salt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Velamakanni

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available LmrA is a multidrug ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter from Lactococcus lactis with no known physiological substrate, which can transport a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents and toxins from the cell. The protein can functionally replace the human homologue ABCB1 (also termed multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein MDR1 in lung fibroblast cells. Even though LmrA mediates ATP-dependent transport, it can use the proton-motive force to transport substrates, such as ethidium bromide, across the membrane by a reversible, H(+-dependent, secondary-active transport reaction. The mechanism and physiological context of this reaction are not known.We examined ion transport by LmrA in electrophysiological experiments and in transport studies using radioactive ions and fluorescent ion-selective probes. Here we show that LmrA itself can transport NaCl by a similar secondary-active mechanism as observed for ethidium bromide, by mediating apparent H(+-Na(+-Cl(- symport. Remarkably, LmrA activity significantly enhances survival of high-salt adapted lactococcal cells during ionic downshift.The observations on H(+-Na(+-Cl(- co-transport substantiate earlier suggestions of H(+-coupled transport by LmrA, and indicate a novel link between the activity of LmrA and salt stress. Our findings demonstrate the relevance of investigations into the bioenergetics of substrate translocation by ABC transporters for our understanding of fundamental mechanisms in this superfamily. This study represents the first use of electrophysiological techniques to analyze substrate transport by a purified multidrug transporter.

  5. A Critical View on ABC Transporters and Their Interacting Partners in Auxin Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Markus; Aryal, Bibek; di Donato, Martin; Hao, Pengchao

    2017-10-01

    Different subclasses of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been implicated in the transport of native variants of the phytohormone auxin. Here, the putative, individual roles of key members belonging to the ABCB, ABCD and ABCG families, respectively, are highlighted and the knowledge of their assumed expression and transport routes is reviewed and compared with their mutant phenotypes. Protein-protein interactions between ABC transporters and regulatory components during auxin transport are summarized and their importance is critically discussed. There is a focus on the functional interaction between members of the ABCB family and the FKBP42, TWISTED DWARF1, acting as a chaperone during plasma membrane trafficking of ABCBs. Further, the mode and relevance of functional ABCB-PIN interactions is diagnostically re-evaluated. A new nomenclature describing precisely the most likely ABCB-PIN interaction scenarios is suggested. Finally, available tools for the detection and prediction of ABC transporter interactomes are summarized and the potential of future ABC transporter interactome maps is highlighted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Identification of ABC transporters acting in vitamin B12metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Megan K; Fritz, Julie-Anne; Jia, Dongxin; Scheuchner, Deborah; Snyder, Floyd F; Stanislaus, Avalyn; Curle, Jared; Li, Liang; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Mains, Paul E; Gravel, Roy A

    2017-12-01

    Vitamin B 12 (cobalamin, Cbl) is a micronutrient essential to human health. Cbl is not utilized as is but must go through complex subcellular and metabolic processing to generate two cofactor forms: methyl-Cbl for methionine synthase, a cytosolic enzyme; and adenosyl-Cbl for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, a mitochondrial enzyme. Some 10-12 human genes have been identified responsible for the intracellular conversion of Cbl to cofactor forms, including genes that code for ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters acting at the lysosomal and plasma membranes. However, the gene for mitochondrial uptake is not known. We hypothesized that ABC transporters should be candidates for other uptake and efflux functions, including mitochondrial transport, and set out to screen ABC transporter mutants for blocks in Cbl utilization using the nematode roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. Thirty-seven mutant ABC transporters were screened for the excretion of methylmalonic acid (MMA), which should result from loss of Cbl transport into the mitochondria. One mutant, wht-6, showed elevated MMA excretion and reduced [ 14 C]-propionate incorporation, pointing to a functional block in methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. In contrast, the wht-6 mutant appeared to have a normal cytosolic pathway based on analysis of cystathionine excretion, suggesting that cytosolic methionine synthase was functioning properly. Further, the MMA excretion in wht-6 could be partially reversed by including vitamin B 12 in the assay medium. The human ortholog of wht-6 is a member of the G family of ABC transporters. We propose wht-6 as a candidate for the transport of Cbl into mitochondria and suggest that a member of the corresponding ABCG family of ABC transporters has this role in humans. Our ABC transporter screen also revealed that mrp-1 and mrp-2 mutants excreted lower MMA than wild type, suggesting they were concentrating intracellular Cbl, consistent with the cellular efflux defect proposed for the mammalian MRP1 ABC

  7. The predicted ABC transporter AbcEDCBA is required for type IV secretion system expression and lysosomal evasion by Brucella ovis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teane M A Silva

    Full Text Available Brucella ovis is a major cause of reproductive failure in rams and it is one of the few well-described Brucella species that is not zoonotic. Previous work showed that a B. ovis mutant lacking a species-specific ABC transporterabcBA was attenuated in mice and was unable to survive in macrophages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of this ABC transporter during intracellular survival of B. ovis. In HeLa cells, B. ovis WT was able to survive and replicate at later time point (48 hpi, whereas an ΔabcBA mutant was attenuated at 24 hpi. The reduced survival of the ΔabcBA mutant was associated with a decreased ability to exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, suggesting a failure to establish a replicative niche. The ΔabcBA mutant showed a reduced abundance of the Type IV secretion system (T4SS proteins VirB8 and VirB11 in both rich and acid media, when compared to WT B. ovis. However, mRNA levels of virB1, virB8, hutC, and vjbR were similar in both strains. These results support the notion that the ABC transporter encoded by abcEDCBA or its transported substrate acts at a post-transcriptional level to promote the optimal expression of the B. ovis T4SS within infected host cells.

  8. Transcriptome-based identification of ABC transporters in the western tarnished plant bug lygus hesperus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a large superfamily of proteins that mediate diverse physiological functions by coupling ATP hydrolysis with substrate transport across lipid membranes. In insects, these proteins play roles in metabolism, development, eye pigmentation, and xenobiotic cle...

  9. The yeast ABC transporter Pdr18 (ORF YNR070w) controls plasma membrane sterol composition, playing a role in multidrug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrito, Tânia R.; Teixeira, Miguel C.; Singh, Ashutosh; Prasad, Rajendra; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The action of multidrug efflux pumps in MDR (multidrug resistance) acquisition has been proposed to partially depend on the transport of physiological substrates which may indirectly affect drug partition and transport across cell membranes. In the present study, the PDR18 gene [ORF (open reading frame) YNR070w], encoding a putative PDR (pleiotropic drug resistance) transporter of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, was found to mediate plasma membrane sterol incorporation in yeast. The physiological role of Pdr18 is demonstrated to affect plasma membrane potential and is proposed to underlie its action as a MDR determinant, conferring resistance to the herbicide 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). The action of Pdr18 in yeast tolerance to 2,4-D, which was found to contribute to reduce [14C]2,4-D intracellular accumulation, may be indirect, given the observation that 2,4-D exposure deeply affects the sterol plasma membrane composition, this effect being much stronger in a Δpdr18 background. PDR18 activation under 2,4-D stress is regulated by the transcription factors Nrg1, controlling carbon source availability and the stress response, and, less significantly, Yap1, involved in oxidative stress and MDR, and Pdr3, a key regulator of the yeast PDR network, consistent with a broad role in stress defence. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that Pdr18 plays a role in plasma membrane sterol incorporation, this physiological trait contributing to an MDR phenotype. PMID:21831043

  10. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters: expression and clinical value in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dréan, Antonin; Rosenberg, Shai; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Goli, Larissa; Nadaradjane, Aravindan Arun; Guehennec, Jérémy; Schmitt, Charlotte; Verreault, Maïté; Bielle, Franck; Mokhtari, Karima; Sanson, Marc; Carpentier, Alexandre; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2018-03-08

    ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters) regulate traffic of multiple compounds, including chemotherapeutic agents, through biological membranes. They are expressed by multiple cell types and have been implicated in the drug resistance of some cancer cells. Despite significant research in ABC transporters in the context of many diseases, little is known about their expression and clinical value in glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed expression of 49 ABC transporters in both commercial and patient-derived GBM cell lines as well as from 51 human GBM tumor biopsies. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort as a training dataset and our cohort as a validation dataset, we also investigated the prognostic value of these ABC transporters in newly diagnosed GBM patients, treated with the standard of care. In contrast to commercial GBM cell lines, GBM-patient derived cell lines (PDCL), grown as neurospheres in a serum-free medium, express ABC transporters similarly to parental tumors. Serum appeared to slightly increase resistance to temozolomide correlating with a tendency for an increased expression of ABCB1. Some differences were observed mainly due to expression of ABC transporters by microenvironmental cells. Together, our data suggest that the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents may be misestimated in vitro if they are the targets of efflux pumps whose expression can be modulated by serum. Interestingly, several ABC transporters have prognostic value in the TCGA dataset. In our cohort of 51 GBM patients treated with radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, ABCA13 overexpression is associated with a decreased progression free survival in univariate (p ABC transporters is: (i) detected in GBM and microenvironmental cells and (ii) better reproduced in GBM-PDCL. ABCA13 expression is an independent prognostic factor in newly diagnosed GBM patients. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate whether ABCA13 expression can be

  11. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters in normal and pathological lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmer-Bosscha Hetty

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP are highly expressed in bronchial epithelium. This review aims to give new insights in the possible functions of ABC molecules in the lung in view of their expression in different cell types. Furthermore, their role in protection against noxious compounds, e.g. air pollutants and cigarette smoke components, will be discussed as well as the (malfunction in normal and pathological lung. Several pulmonary drugs are substrates for ABC transporters and therefore, the delivery of these drugs to the site of action may be highly dependent on the presence and activity of many ABC transporters in several cell types. Three ABC transporters are known to play an important role in lung functioning. Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene can cause cystic fibrosis, and mutations in ABCA1 and ABCA3 are responsible for respectively Tangier disease and fatal surfactant deficiency. The role of altered function of ABC transporters in highly prevalent pulmonary diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have hardly been investigated so far. We especially focused on polymorphisms, knock-out mice models and in vitro results of pulmonary research. Insight in the function of ABC transporters in the lung may open new ways to facilitate treatment of lung diseases.

  12. Polymorphism in ABC transporter genes of Dirofilaria immitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangadurai Mani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilaria immitis, a filarial nematode, causes dirofilariasis in dogs, cats and occasionally in humans. Prevention of the disease has been mainly by monthly use of the macrocyclic lactone (ML endectocides during the mosquito transmission season. Recently, ML resistance has been confirmed in D. immitis and therefore, there is a need to find new classes of anthelmintics. One of the mechanisms associated with ML resistance in nematodes has been the possible role of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters in reducing drug concentrations at receptor sites. ABC transporters, mainly from sub-families B, C and G, may contribute to multidrug resistance (MDR by active efflux of drugs out of the cell. Gene products of ABC transporters may thus serve as the targets for agents that may modulate susceptibility to drugs, by inhibiting drug transport. ABC transporters are believed to be involved in a variety of physiological functions critical to the parasite, such as sterol transport, and therefore may also serve as the target for drugs that can act as anthelmintics on their own. Knowledge of polymorphism in these ABC transporter genes in nematode parasites could provide useful information for the process of drug design. We have identified 15 ABC transporter genes from sub-families A, B, C and G, in D. immitis, by comparative genomic approaches and analyzed them for polymorphism. Whole genome sequencing data from four ML susceptible (SUS and four loss of efficacy (LOE pooled populations were used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping. Out of 231 SNPs identified in those 15 ABC transporter genes, 89 and 75 of them were specific to the SUS or LOE populations, respectively. A few of the SNPs identified may affect gene expression, protein function, substrate specificity or resistance development and may be useful for transporter inhibitor/anthelmintic drug design, or in order to anticipate resistance development. Keywords: Dirofilaria immitis

  13. ABC Transport Proteins in Cardiovascular Disease-A Brief Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Toni; Benndorf, Ralf A

    2017-04-06

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular diseases due to their involvement in cholesterol homeostasis, blood pressure regulation, endothelial function, vascular inflammation, as well as platelet production and aggregation. In this regard, ABC transporters, such as ABCA1, ABCG5 and ABCG8, were initially found to be responsible for genetically-inherited syndromes like Tangier diseases and sitosterolemia. These findings led to the understanding of those transporter's function in cellular cholesterol efflux and thereby also linked them to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Subsequently, further ABC transporters, i.e., ABCG1, ABCG4, ABCB6, ABCC1, ABCC6 or ABCC9, have been shown to directly or indirectly affect cellular cholesterol efflux, the inflammatory response in macrophages, megakaryocyte proliferation and thrombus formation, as well as vascular function and blood pressure, and may thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of CVD and its complications. Furthermore, ABC transporters, such as ABCB1, ABCC2 or ABCG2, may affect the safety and efficacy of several drug classes currently in use for CVD treatment. This review will give a brief overview of ABC transporters involved in the process of atherogenesis and CVD pathology. It also aims to briefly summarize the role of ABC transporters in the pharmacokinetics and disposition of drugs frequently used to treat CVD and CVD-related complications.

  14. ABC-B transporter genes in Dirofilaria immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Che, Hua; Mani, Thangadurai; Keller, Kathy; Prichard, Roger K

    2016-08-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is a filarial nematode causing infection and heartworm disease in dogs and other canids, cats, and occasionally in humans. Prevention with macrocyclic lactones (ML) is recommended during the mosquito transmission season. Recently, ML resistance has been reported. ABC-B transporter genes are thought to be involved in the mechanism of ML resistance in other nematodes. This study aimed to identify all the ABC-B transporter genes in D. immitis using as a reference the nDi.2.2 D. immitis whole genome, which is not completely annotated. Using bioinformatic tools and PCR amplification on pooled D. immitis genomic DNA and on pooled cDNA, nine ABC transporter genes including one pseudogene were characterized. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses allowed identification of three P-glycoproteins (Pgps) (Dim-pgp-3 Dim-pgp-10, Dim-pgp-11), of two ABC-B half transporter genes (one ortholog of Cel-haf-4 and Cel-haf-9; and one ortholog of Cel-haf-1 and Cel-haf-3), of one ABC half transporter gene (ortholog of Cel-haf-5) that contained an ABC-C motif, and of one additional half transporter that would require functional study for characterization. The number of ABC-B transporter genes identified was lower than in Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus. Further studies are needed to understand their possible role in ML resistance in D. immitis. These ABC transporters constitute a base for ML resistance investigation in D. immitis and advance our understanding of the molecular biology of this parasite. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in pathogenesis and multidrug resistance of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiopoulos, I.

    2003-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane proteins that utilise the energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP to drive the transport of compounds over biological membranes. They are members of one of the largest protein families to date, present in both pro- and eukaryotic

  16. Polymorphism in ABC transporter genes of Dirofilaria immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Thangadurai; Bourguinat, Catherine; Prichard, Roger K

    2017-08-01

    Dirofilaria immitis, a filarial nematode, causes dirofilariasis in dogs, cats and occasionally in humans. Prevention of the disease has been mainly by monthly use of the macrocyclic lactone (ML) endectocides during the mosquito transmission season. Recently, ML resistance has been confirmed in D. immitis and therefore, there is a need to find new classes of anthelmintics. One of the mechanisms associated with ML resistance in nematodes has been the possible role of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in reducing drug concentrations at receptor sites. ABC transporters, mainly from sub-families B, C and G, may contribute to multidrug resistance (MDR) by active efflux of drugs out of the cell. Gene products of ABC transporters may thus serve as the targets for agents that may modulate susceptibility to drugs, by inhibiting drug transport. ABC transporters are believed to be involved in a variety of physiological functions critical to the parasite, such as sterol transport, and therefore may also serve as the target for drugs that can act as anthelmintics on their own. Knowledge of polymorphism in these ABC transporter genes in nematode parasites could provide useful information for the process of drug design. We have identified 15 ABC transporter genes from sub-families A, B, C and G, in D. immitis, by comparative genomic approaches and analyzed them for polymorphism. Whole genome sequencing data from four ML susceptible (SUS) and four loss of efficacy (LOE) pooled populations were used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Out of 231 SNPs identified in those 15 ABC transporter genes, 89 and 75 of them were specific to the SUS or LOE populations, respectively. A few of the SNPs identified may affect gene expression, protein function, substrate specificity or resistance development and may be useful for transporter inhibitor/anthelmintic drug design, or in order to anticipate resistance development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  17. Frequent down-regulation of ABC transporter genes in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidenko, Rita; Razanauskas, Deividas; Daniunaite, Kristina; Lazutka, Juozas Rimantas; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins responsible for the efflux of a wide variety of substrates, including steroid metabolites, through the cellular membranes. For better characterization of the role of ABC transporters in prostate cancer (PCa) development, the profile of ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed in PCa and noncancerous prostate tissues (NPT). TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) human ABC transporter plates were used for the gene expression profiling in 10 PCa and 6 NPT specimens. ABCB1 transcript level was evaluated in a larger set of PCa cases (N = 78) and NPT (N = 15) by real-time PCR, the same PCa cases were assessed for the gene promoter hypermethylation by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of eight ABC transporter genes (ABCA8, ABCB1, ABCC6, ABCC9, ABCC10, ABCD2, ABCG2, and ABCG4) was significantly down-regulated in PCa as compared to NPT, and only two genes (ABCC4 and ABCG1) were up-regulated. Down-regulation of ABC transporter genes was prevalent in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative cases. A detailed analysis of ABCB1 expression confirmed TLDA results: a reduced level of the transcript was identified in PCa in comparison to NPT (p = 0.048). Moreover, the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative PCa cases showed significantly lower expression of ABCB1 in comparison to NPT (p = 0.003) or the fusion-positive tumors (p = 0.002). Promoter methylation of ABCB1 predominantly occurred in PCa and was rarely detected in NPT (p < 0.001). The study suggests frequent down-regulation of the ABC transporter genes in PCa, especially in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative tumors. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1689-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  18. The Yeast ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Ycf1p Enhances the Recruitment of the Soluble SNARE Vam7p to Vacuoles for Efficient Membrane Fusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasser, Terry L.; Lawrence, Gus; Karunakaran, Surya; Brown, Christopher; Fratti, Rutilio A.

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole contains five ATP-binding cassette class C (ABCC) transporters, including Ycf1p, a family member that was originally characterized as a Cd2+ transporter. Ycf1p has also been found to physically interact with a wide array of proteins, including factors that regulate vacuole homeostasis. In this study, we examined the role of Ycf1p and other ABCC transporters in the regulation of vacuole homotypic fusion. We found that deletion of YCF1 attenuated in vitro vacuole fusion by up to 40% relative to wild-type vacuoles. Plasmid-expressed wild-type Ycf1p rescued the deletion phenotype; however, Ycf1p containing a mutation of the conserved Lys-669 to Met in the Walker A box of the first nucleotide-binding domain (Ycf1pK669M) was unable to complement the fusion defect of ycf1Δ vacuoles. This indicates that the ATPase activity of Ycf1p is required for its function in regulating fusion. In addition, we found that deleting YCF1 caused a striking decrease in vacuolar levels of the soluble SNARE Vam7p, whereas total cellular levels were not altered. The attenuated fusion of ycf1Δ vacuoles was rescued by the addition of recombinant Vam7p to in vitro experiments. Thus, Ycf1p contributes in the recruitment of Vam7p to the vacuole for efficient membrane fusion. PMID:23658021

  19. ABC transporters in the liver fluke Opisthorchis felineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A; Ershov, Nikita I; Pirozhkova, Darya S; Pakharukov, Yuri V; Pakharukova, Maria Y

    2017-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters) are essential components of normal cellular physiological machinery in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic species, including parasites. Some ABC transporters, e.g., P-glycoproteins, are involved in the efflux of toxins and xenobiotics from the cell. At present, nothing is known about ABC transporter genes in epidemiologically important liver flukes from the Opisthorchiidae family, including European liver fluke Opisthorchis felineus. Opisthorchiasis caused by O. felineus is a serious public health problem on the territory of Russia and other Eastern European countries. ABC drug transporters are attractive objects of research on molecular markers of resistance and on ways to potentiate sensitivity to anthelmintics through suppression of the transporters themselves with specific inhibitors. Here we aimed at the identification of ABC transporters in the O. felineus transcriptome and identification of P-glycoproteins. In addition, our aim was to assess ABC transcript abundance in the RNA-seq data, to study the mRNA expression of P-glycoprotein genes by Droplet Digital PCR throughout the life cycle of O. felineus, and to test the gene induction in response to xenobiotics or anthelminthic agents. We found 23 nucleotide sequences encoding ABC transporters belonging to different subfamilies, including four sequences of P-glycoproteins. According to the transcript abundance in the RNA-seq data, one of P-glycoproteins (P4) has the highest expression among all ABC genes in the adult worm. P-glycoproteins showed substantially differential mRNA expression throughout the fluke life cycle, with high expression in the adult worms. Putative activity of P-glycoproteins as xenobiotic efflux pumps was found to be linked to the excretory system of O. felineus and to be inhibited by verapamil or tariquidar. Thus, ABC drug transporters in the liver fluke O. felineus are functionally active, indicating that ABC drug transporters are likely

  20. Genome-wide identification, characterization and phylogenetic analysis of 50 catfish ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikai Liu

    Full Text Available Although a large set of full-length transcripts was recently assembled in catfish, annotation of large gene families, especially those with duplications, is still a great challenge. Most often, complexities in annotation cause mis-identification and thereby much confusion in the scientific literature. As such, detailed phylogenetic analysis and/or orthology analysis are required for annotation of genes involved in gene families. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene superfamily is a large gene family that encodes membrane proteins that transport a diverse set of substrates across membranes, playing important roles in protecting organisms from diverse environment.In this work, we identified a set of 50 ABC transporters in catfish genome. Phylogenetic analysis allowed their identification and annotation into seven subfamilies, including 9 ABCA genes, 12 ABCB genes, 12 ABCC genes, 5 ABCD genes, 2 ABCE genes, 4 ABCF genes and 6 ABCG genes. Most ABC transporters are conserved among vertebrates, though cases of recent gene duplications and gene losses do exist. Gene duplications in catfish were found for ABCA1, ABCB3, ABCB6, ABCC5, ABCD3, ABCE1, ABCF2 and ABCG2.The whole set of catfish ABC transporters provide the essential genomic resources for future biochemical, toxicological and physiological studies of ABC drug efflux transporters. The establishment of orthologies should allow functional inferences with the information from model species, though the function of lineage-specific genes can be distinct because of specific living environment with different selection pressure.

  1. Purification and biochemical characterisation of the yeast ABC transporter Pdr11p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laub, Katrine Rude

    Sterols constitute an essential lipid class in eukaryotic membranes where intracellular distributions are highly regulated. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae sterol uptake has been attributed to the two plasma membrane-localised ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, Aus1p and Pdr11p...... understanding of their action and molecular functioning, it is helpful to focus on homogeneous preparations of membrane proteins reconstituted into model membranes like detergent micelles, liposomes, and nanodiscs. In the present study, I report the first successful expression, purification, and reconstitution...

  2. Energy Coupling Efficiency in the Type I ABC Transporter GlnPQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycklama A Nijeholt, Jelger A; Vietrov, Ruslan; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K; Poolman, Bert

    2018-03-16

    Solute transport via ATP binding cassette (ABC) importers involves receptor-mediated substrate binding, which is followed by ATP-driven translocation of the substrate across the membrane. How these steps are exactly initiated and coupled, and how much ATP it takes to complete a full transport cycle, are subject of debate. Here, we reconstitute the ABC importer GlnPQ in nanodiscs and in proteoliposomes and determine substrate-(in)dependent ATP hydrolysis and transmembrane transport. We determined the conformational states of the substrate-binding domains (SBDs) by single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. We find that the basal ATPase activity (ATP hydrolysis in the absence of substrate) is mainly caused by the docking of the closed-unliganded state of the SBDs onto the transporter domain of GlnPQ and that, unlike glutamine, arginine binds both SBDs but does not trigger their closing. Furthermore, comparison of the ATPase activity in nanodiscs with glutamine transport in proteoliposomes shows that the stoichiometry of ATP per substrate is close to two. These findings help understand the mechanism of transport and the energy coupling efficiency in ABC transporters with covalently linked SBDs, which may aid our understanding of Type I ABC importers in general. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  4. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Insight into Two ABC Transporter Families Involved in Lantibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Clemens

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides, which contain (methyl-lanthionine-rings are called lantibiotics. They are produced by several Gram-positive bacteria and are mainly active against these bacteria. Although these are highly potent antimicrobials, some human pathogenic bacteria express specific ABC transporters that confer resistance and counteract their antimicrobial activity. Two distinct ABC transporter families are known to be involved in this process. These are the Cpr- and Bce-type ABC transporter families, named after their involvement in cationic peptide resistance in Clostridium difficile, and bacitracin efflux in Bacillus subtilis, respectively. Both resistance systems differentiate to each other in terms of the proteins involved. Here, we summarize the current knowledge and describe the divergence as well as the common features present in both the systems to confer lantibiotic resistance.

  6. Regulation of ABC transporters blood-brain barrier: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David S

    2015-01-01

    The brain capillary endothelial cells that constitute the blood-brain barrier express multiple ABC transport proteins on the luminal, blood-facing, plasma membrane. These transporters function as ATP-driven efflux pumps for xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites. High expression of these ABC transporters at the barrier is a major obstacle to the delivery of therapeutics, including chemotherapeutics, to the CNS. Here, I review the signals that alter ABC transporter expression and transport function with an emphasis on P-glycoprotein, Mrp2, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), the efflux transporters for which we have the most detailed picture of regulation. Recent work shows that transporter protein expression can be upregulated in response to inflammatory and oxidative stress, therapeutic drugs, diet, and persistent environmental pollutants; as a consequence, drug delivery to the brain is reduced (potentially bad and ugly). In contrast, basal transport activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP can be reduced through complex signaling pathways that involve events in and on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Targeting these signaling events provides opportunities to rapidly and reversibly increase brain accumulation of drugs that are substrates for the transporters (potentially good). The clinical usefulness of targeting signaling to reduce efflux transporter activity and improve drug delivery to the CNS remains to be established. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Almind Knudsen, Lina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in colonic pathophysiology as they had recently been related to colorectal cancer (CRC) development. METHODS: Literature search was conducted on PubMed using combinations of the following terms: ABC transporters, ATP binding cassette....../Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes...... translocation from one side to the other of the cell membrane lipid bilayer by ABC transporters affecting inflammatory response and/or function of tight junctions, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. Also, diet and microbes give rise to molecules which are potential substrates for the ABC transporters...

  8. Structural basis for antibacterial peptide self-immunity by the bacterial ABC transporter McjD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bountra, Kiran; Hagelueken, Gregor; Choudhury, Hassanul G; Corradi, Valentina; El Omari, Kamel; Wagner, Armin; Mathavan, Indran; Zirah, Séverine; Yuan Wahlgren, Weixiao; Tieleman, D Peter; Schiemann, Olav; Rebuffat, Sylvie; Beis, Konstantinos

    2017-10-16

    Certain pathogenic bacteria produce and release toxic peptides to ensure either nutrient availability or evasion from the immune system. These peptides are also toxic to the producing bacteria that utilize dedicated ABC transporters to provide self-immunity. The ABC transporter McjD exports the antibacterial peptide MccJ25 in Escherichia coli Our previously determined McjD structure provided some mechanistic insights into antibacterial peptide efflux. In this study, we have determined its structure in a novel conformation, apo inward-occluded and a new nucleotide-bound state, high-energy outward-occluded intermediate state, with a defined ligand binding cavity. Predictive cysteine cross-linking in E. coli membranes and PELDOR measurements along the transport cycle indicate that McjD does not undergo major conformational changes as previously proposed for multi-drug ABC exporters. Combined with transport assays and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a novel mechanism for toxic peptide ABC exporters that only requires the transient opening of the cavity for release of the peptide. We propose that shielding of the cavity ensures that the transporter is available to export the newly synthesized peptides, preventing toxic-level build-up. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  9. Hepatic ABC transporters and triglyceride metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, John S; Chung, Soonkyu; Shelness, Gregory S

    2012-06-01

    Elevated plasma triglyceride and reduced HDL concentrations are prominent features of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Individuals with Tangier disease also have elevated plasma triglyceride concentrations and very low HDL, resulting from mutations in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), an integral membrane protein that facilitates nascent HDL particle assembly. Past studies attributed the inverse relationship between plasma HDL and triglyceride to intravascular lipid exchange and catabolic events. However, recent studies also suggest that hepatic signaling and lipid mobilization and secretion may explain how HDL affects plasma triglyceride concentrations. Hepatocyte-specific ABCA1 knockout mice have markedly reduced plasma HDL and a two-fold increase in triglyceride due to failure to assemble nascent HDL particles by hepatocytes, causing increased catabolism of HDL apolipoprotein A-I and increased hepatic production of triglyceride-enriched VLDL. In-vitro studies suggest that nascent HDL particles may induce signaling to decrease triglyceride secretion. Inhibition of microRNA 33 expression in nonhuman primates augments hepatic ABCA1, genes involved in fatty acid oxidation, and decreases expression of lipogenic genes, causing increased plasma HDL and decreased triglyceride levels. New evidence suggests potential mechanisms by which hepatic ABCA1-mediated nascent HDL formation regulates VLDL-triglyceride production and contributes to the inverse relationship between plasma HDL and triglyceride.

  10. ABC transporters in Arthropods: genomic comparison and role in insecticide transport and resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dermauw, W.; Van Leeuwen, T.

    2014-01-01

    About a 100 years ago, the Drosophila white mutant marked the birth of Drosophila genetics. The white gene turned out to encode the first well studied ABC transporter in arthropods. The ABC gene family is now recognized as one of the largest transporter families in all kingdoms of life. The majority

  11. ABC transporter genes and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jesper; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Møller, Holger Jon

    2012-01-01

    Alterations of pancreatic β-cell cholesterol content may contribute to β-cell dysfunction. Two important determinants of intracellular cholesterol content are the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters A1 (ABCA1) and -G1 (ABCG1). Whether genetic variation in ABCA1 and ABCG1 predicts risk of type 2...... diabetes in the general population is unknown....

  12. ABC transporters of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, L.H.

    2002-01-01

    A TP- b inding c assette (ABC) transporters belong to one of the largest protein families known. They play a role in numerous vital processes in the cell and are characterised by their

  13. ABC transporters van Botrytis cinerea in biotische en abiotische interacties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, H.

    2005-01-01

    Op 29 november 2004 promoveerde Henk-jan Schoonbeek aan Wageningen Universiteit op het proefschrift getiteld 'ABC transporters from Botrytis cinerea in biotic and abiotic interactions'. Promotor was Prof. dr. ir. P.J.G.M. de Wit en co-promotor was dr.ir. M.A. de Waard, leerstoelgroep Fytopathologie,

  14. ABC transporters from Botrytis cinerea in biotic and abiotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, H.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis cinereais the causal agent of grey mould disease on a wide variety of crop plants. It is relatively insensitive to natural and synthetic fungitoxic compounds. This thesis describes how ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters contribute to protection by actively

  15. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression and localization in sea urchin development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Lauren E; Hamdoun, Amro

    2012-06-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane proteins that regulate intracellular concentrations of myriad compounds and ions. There are >100 ABC transporter predictions in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, including 40 annotated ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG "multidrug efflux" transporters. Despite the importance of multidrug transporters for protection and signaling, their expression patterns have not been characterized in deuterostome embryos. Sea urchin embryos expressed 20 ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG transporter genes in the first 58 hr of development, from unfertilized egg to early prism. We quantified transcripts of ABCB1a, ABCB4a, ABCC1, ABCC5a, ABCC9a, and ABCG2b, and found that ABCB1a mRNA was 10-100 times more abundant than other transporter mRNAs. In situ hybridization showed ABCB1a was expressed ubiquitously in embryos, while ABCC5a was restricted to secondary mesenchyme cells and their precursors. Fluorescent protein fusions showed localization of ABCB1a on apical cell surfaces, and ABCC5a on basolateral surfaces. Embryos use many ABC transporters with predicted functions in cell signaling, lysosomal and mitochondrial homeostasis, potassium channel regulation, pigmentation, and xenobiotic efflux. Detailed characterization of ABCB1a and ABCC5a revealed that they have different temporal and spatial gene expression profiles and protein localization patterns that correlate to their predicted functions in protection and development, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tonoplast-localized Abc2 transporter mediates phytochelatin accumulation in vacuoles and confers cadmium tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Zhai, Zhiyang; Jobe, Timothy O; Akmakjian, Garo Z; Song, Won-Yong; Limbo, Oliver; Russell, Matthew R; Kozlovskyy, Volodymyr I; Martinoia, Enrico; Vatamaniuk, Olena K; Russell, Paul; Schroeder, Julian I

    2010-12-24

    Phytochelatins mediate tolerance to heavy metals in plants and some fungi by sequestering phytochelatin-metal complexes into vacuoles. To date, only Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hmt1 has been described as a phytochelatin transporter and attempts to identify orthologous phytochelatin transporters in plants and other organisms have failed. Furthermore, recent data indicate that the hmt1 mutant accumulates significant phytochelatin levels in vacuoles, suggesting that unidentified phytochelatin transporters exist in fungi. Here, we show that deletion of all vacuolar ABC transporters abolishes phytochelatin accumulation in S. pombe vacuoles and abrogates (35)S-PC(2) uptake into S. pombe microsomal vesicles. Systematic analysis of the entire S. pombe ABC transporter family identified Abc2 as a full-size ABC transporter (ABCC-type) that mediates phytochelatin transport into vacuoles. The S. pombe abc1 abc2 abc3 abc4 hmt1 quintuple and abc2 hmt1 double mutant show no detectable phytochelatins in vacuoles. Abc2 expression restores phytochelatin accumulation into vacuoles and suppresses the cadmium sensitivity of the abc quintuple mutant. A novel, unexpected, function of Hmt1 in GS-conjugate transport is also shown. In contrast to Hmt1, Abc2 orthologs are widely distributed among kingdoms and are proposed as the long-sought vacuolar phytochelatin transporters in plants and other organisms.

  17. ABC Transporters and the Alzheimer’s Disease Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eWolf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is considered the disease of the 21st century. With a 10-fold increase in global incidence over the past 100 years, AD is now reaching epidemic proportions and by all projections, AD patient numbers will continue to rise. Despite intense research efforts, AD remains a mystery and effective therapies are still unavailable. This represents an unmet need resulting in clinical, social, and economic problems.Over the last decade, a new AD research focus has emerged: ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. In this article, we provide an overview of the ABC transporters ABCA1, ABCA2, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1, Mrp1 (ABCC1 and BCRP (ABCG2, all of which are expressed in the brain and have been implicated in AD. We summarize recent findings on the role of these five transporters in AD, and discuss their potential to serve as therapeutic targets.

  18. Putative ABC transporter responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of the membrane fraction of Acetobacter aceti revealed the presence of several proteins that were produced in response to acetic acid. A 60-kDa protein, named AatA, which was mostly induced by acetic acid, was prepared; aatA was cloned on the basis of its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. AatA, consisting of 591 amino acids and containing ATP-binding cassette (ABC) sequences and ABC signature sequences, belonged to the ABC transporter superfamily. The aatA mutation with an insertion of the neomycin resistance gene within the aatA coding region showed reduced resistance to acetic acid, formic acid, propionic acid, and lactic acid, whereas the aatA mutation exerted no effects on resistance to various drugs, growth at low pH (adjusted with HCl), assimilation of acetic acid, or resistance to citric acid. Introduction of plasmid pABC101 containing aatA under the control of the Escherichia coli lac promoter into the aatA mutant restored the defect in acetic acid resistance. In addition, pABC101 conferred acetic acid resistance on E. coli. These findings showed that AatA was a putative ABC transporter conferring acetic acid resistance on the host cell. Southern blot analysis and subsequent nucleotide sequencing predicted the presence of aatA orthologues in a variety of acetic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The fermentation with A. aceti containing aatA on a multicopy plasmid resulted in an increase in the final yield of acetic acid.

  19. [Peroxisomal ABC transporters and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geillon, Flore; Trompier, Doriane; Gondcaille, Catherine; Lizard, Gérard; Savary, Stéphane

    2012-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease associated with mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which encodes for a peroxisomal ABC transporter. Thanks to the efforts of the ELA foundation and to the recent successes of gene therapy published in Science in 2009, X-ALD is better known but still remains poorly understood. The exact role of ABCD1 and its homologs, as well as the exact link between the biochemical and metabolic peroxisomal defects and the clinical symptoms of the disease remain to be elucidated. This review summarizes the knowledge concerning the subfamily D of the ABC transporter family and concerning X-ALD, the most frequent peroxisomal disorder. © 2012 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  20. Specificity of the second binding protein of the peptide ABC-transporter (Dpp) of Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, Y; Toldra, F; Renault, P; Poolman, B

    2003-01-01

    The genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 revealed the presence of a putative peptide-binding protein-dependent ABC-transporter (Dpp). The genes for two peptide-binding proteins (dppA and dppP) precede the membrane components, which include two transmembrane protein genes (dppB and dppC) and

  1. How to move an amphipathic molecule across a lipid bilayer: different mechanisms for different ABC transporters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoulou, Frederica L; Carrier, David J; Schaedler, Theresia A; Baldwin, Stephen A; Baker, Alison

    2016-06-15

    Import of β-oxidation substrates into peroxisomes is mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters belonging to subfamily D. In order to enter the β-oxidation pathway, fatty acids are activated by conversion to fatty acyl-CoA esters, a reaction which is catalysed by acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs). Here, we present evidence for an unusual transport mechanism, in which fatty acyl-CoA substrates are accepted by ABC subclass D protein (ABCD) transporters, cleaved by the transporters during transit across the lipid bilayer to release CoA, and ultimately re-esterified in the peroxisome lumen by ACSs which interact with the transporter. We propose that this solves the biophysical problem of moving an amphipathic molecule across the peroxisomal membrane, since the intrinsic thioesterase activity of the transporter permits separate membrane translocation pathways for the hydrophobic fatty acid moiety and the polar CoA moiety. The cleavage/re-esterification mechanism also has the potential to control entry of disparate substrates into the β-oxidation pathway when coupled with distinct peroxisomal ACSs. A different solution to the movement of amphipathic molecules across a lipid bilayer is deployed by the bacterial lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) flippase, PglK, in which the hydrophilic head group and the hydrophobic polyprenyl tail of the substrate are proposed to have distinct translocation pathways but are not chemically separated during transport. We discuss a speculative alternating access model for ABCD proteins based on the mammalian ABC transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and compare it to the novel mechanism suggested by the recent PglK crystal structures and biochemical data. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Gahan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field.

  3. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, Linda J; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G

    2010-12-16

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field.

  4. A burst of ABC genes in the genome of the polyphagous spider mite Tetranychus urticae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dermauw, W.; Osborne, E.J.; Clark, R.M.; Grbić, M.; Tirry, L.; Van Leeuwen, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) gene superfamily is widespread across all living species. The majority of ABC genes encode ABC transporters, which are membrane-spanning proteins capable of transferring substrates across biological membranes by hydrolyzing ATP. Although ABC transporters

  5. Transmembrane Domain Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Impair Expression and Transport Activity of ABC Transporter ABCG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstedt, Noora; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Koenderink, Jan B; Kidron, Heidi

    2017-08-01

    To study the function and expression of nine naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphisms (G406R, F431L, S441N, P480L, F489L, M515R, L525R, A528T and T542A) that are predicted to reside in the transmembrane regions of the ABC transporter ABCG2. The transport activity of the variants was tested in inside-out membrane vesicles from Sf9 insect and human derived HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCG2. Lucifer Yellow and estrone sulfate were used as probe substrates of activity. The expression levels and cellular localization of the variants was compared to the wild-type ABCG2 by western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. All studied variants of ABCG2 displayed markedly decreased transport in both Sf9-ABCG2 and HEK293-ABCG2 vesicles. Impaired transport could be explained for some variants by altered expression levels and cellular localization. Moreover, the destructive effect on transport activity of variants G406R, P480L, M515R and T542A is, to our knowledge, reported for the first time. These results indicate that the transmembrane region of ABCG2 is sensitive to amino acid substitution and that patients harboring these ABCG2 variant forms could suffer from unexpected pharmacokinetic events of ABCG2 substrate drugs or have an increased risk for diseases such as gout where ABCG2 is implicated.

  6. Functional expression and characterization of plant ABC transporters in Xenopus laevis oocytes for transport engineering purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Deyang; Veres, Dorottya; Belew, Zeinu Mussa

    2016-01-01

    Transport engineering in bioengineering is aimed at efficient export of the final product to reduce toxicity and feedback inhibition and to increase yield. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters with their highly diverse substrate specificity and role in cellular efflux are potentially...... suitable in transport engineering approaches, although their size and high number of introns make them notoriously difficult to clone. Here, we report a novel in planta “exon engineering” strategy for cloning of full-length coding sequence of ABC transporters followed by methods for biochemical...... provided will hopefully contribute to more successful transport engineering in synthetic biology....

  7. Obstacles to Brain Tumor Therapy: Key ABC Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juwina Wijaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The delivery of cancer chemotherapy to treat brain tumors remains a challenge, in part, because of the inherent biological barrier, the blood–brain barrier. While its presence and role as a protector of the normal brain parenchyma has been acknowledged for decades, it is only recently that the important transporter components, expressed in the tightly knit capillary endothelial cells, have been deciphered. These transporters are ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters and, so far, the major clinically important ones that functionally contribute to the blood–brain barrier are ABCG2 and ABCB1. A further limitation to cancer therapy of brain tumors or brain metastases is the blood–tumor barrier, where tumors erect a barrier of transporters that further impede drug entry. The expression and regulation of these two transporters at these barriers, as well as tumor derived alteration in expression and/or mutation, are likely obstacles to effective therapy.

  8. Changes in metabolism affect expression of ABC transporters through ERK5 and depending on p53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkahla, Sana; Haq Khan, Abrar Ul; Gitenay, Delphine; Alexia, Catherine; Gondeau, Claire; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Orecchioni, Stefania; Talarico, Giovanna; Bertolini, Francesco; Cartron, Guillaume; Hernandez, Javier; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Gonzalez, Martin Villalba

    2018-01-02

    Changes in metabolism require the efflux and influx of a diverse variety of metabolites. The ABC superfamily of transporters regulates the exchange of hundreds of substrates through the impermeable cell membrane. We show here that a metabolic switch to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), either by treating cells with dichloroacetate (DCA) or by changing the available substrates, reduced expression of ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCC5 and ABCG2 in wild-type p53-expressing cells. This metabolic change reduced histone changes associated to active promoters. Notably, DCA also inhibited expression of these genes in two animal models in vivo . In contrast, OXPHOS increased the expression of the same transporters in mutated (mut) or null p53-expressing cells. ABC transporters control the export of drugs from cancer cells and render tumors resistant to chemotherapy, playing an important role in multiple drug resistance (MDR). Wtp53 cells forced to perform OXPHOS showed impaired drug clearance. In contrast mutp53 cells increased drug clearance when performing OXPHOS. ABC transporter promoters contain binding sites for the transcription factors MEF2, NRF1 and NRF2 that are targets of the MAPK ERK5. OXPHOS induced expression of the MAPK ERK5. Decreasing ERK5 levels in wtp53 cells increased ABC expression whereas it inhibited expression in mutp53 cells. Our results showed that the ERK5/MEF2 pathway controlled ABC expression depending on p53 status.

  9. Identification of Residues in the Lipopolysaccharide ABC Transporter That Coordinate ATPase Activity with Extractor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Brent W; Owens, Tristan W; Orabella, Matthew J; Davis, Rebecca M; May, Janine M; Trauger, Sunia A; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2016-10-18

    The surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), creating a permeability barrier against toxic molecules, including many antimicrobials. To assemble LPS on their surface, Gram-negative bacteria must extract newly synthesized LPS from the inner membrane, transport it across the aqueous periplasm, and translocate it across the outer membrane. The LptA to -G proteins assemble into a transenvelope complex that transports LPS from the inner membrane to the cell surface. The Lpt system powers LPS transport from the inner membrane by using a poorly characterized ATP-binding cassette system composed of the ATPase LptB and the transmembrane domains LptFG. Here, we characterize a cluster of residues in the groove region of LptB that is important for controlling LPS transport. We also provide the first functional characterization of LptFG and identify their coupling helices that interact with the LptB groove. Substitutions at conserved residues in these coupling helices compromise both the assembly and function of the LptB 2 FG complex. Defects in LPS transport conferred by alterations in the LptFG coupling helices can be rescued by changing a residue in LptB that is adjacent to functionally important residues in the groove region. This suppression is achieved by increasing the ATPase activity of the LptB 2 FG complex. Taken together, these data identify a specific binding site in LptB for the coupling helices of LptFG that is responsible for coupling of ATP hydrolysis by LptB with LptFG function to achieve LPS extraction. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is synthesized at the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and transported across several compartments to the cell surface, where it forms a barrier that protects these organisms from antibiotics. The LptB 2 FG proteins form an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that uses energy from ATP hydrolysis in the cytoplasm to facilitate extraction of LPS from the outer face of the

  10. Energy Coupling Factor-Type ABC Transporters for Vitamin Uptake in Prokaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, Guus B.; Dosz-Majsnerowska, Maria; ter Beek, Josy; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2012-01-01

    Energy coupling factor (ECF) transporters are a subgroup of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters involved in the uptake of vitamins and micronutrients in prokaryotes. In contrast to classical ABC importers, ECF transporters do not make use of water-soluble substrate binding proteins or domains

  11. Structural and mechanistic insights into ABC-type ECF transporters for vitamin uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dosz-Majsnerowska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift gaat over de relatie tussen de structuur en het mechanisme van ABC-type ECF transporters voor vitamines, uit de bacterie Lactococcus lactis. Energy-Coupling Factor (ECF) transporters vormen een subgroep van de ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters en zijn betrokken bij de opname

  12. ABC transporters from Aspergillus nidulans are involved in protection against cytotoxic agents and antibiotic production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade, A.C.; Nistelrooy, van J.G.M.; Peery, R.B.; Skatrud, P.L.; Waard, de M.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of atrC and atrD (ABC transporters C and D), two novel ABC transporter-encoding genes from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, and provides evidence for the involvement of atrD in multidrug transport and antibiotic production. BLAST analysis of the

  13. Tuning the drug efflux activity of an ABC transporter in vivo by in vitro selected DARPin binders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A Seeger

    Full Text Available ABC transporters use the energy from binding and hydrolysis of ATP to import or extrude substrates across the membrane. Using ribosome display, we raised designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins against detergent solubilized LmrCD, a heterodimeric multidrug ABC exporter from Lactococcus lactis. Several target-specific DARPin binders were identified that bind to at least three distinct, partially overlapping epitopes on LmrD in detergent solution as well as in native membranes. Remarkably, functional screening of the LmrCD-specific DARPin pools in L. lactis revealed three homologous DARPins which, when generated in LmrCD-expressing cells, strongly activated LmrCD-mediated drug transport. As LmrCD expression in the cell membrane was unaltered upon the co-expression of activator DARPins, the activation is suggested to occur at the level of LmrCD activity. Consistent with this, purified activator DARPins were found to stimulate the ATPase activity of LmrCD in vitro when reconstituted in proteoliposomes. This study suggests that membrane transporters are tunable in vivo by in vitro selected binding proteins. Our approach could be of biopharmaceutical importance and might facilitate studies on molecular mechanisms of ABC transporters.

  14. Nucleotide dependent packing differences in helical crystals of the ABC transporter MsbA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Andrew; Mulligan, Sheila; Carragher, Bridget; Chang, Geoffrey; Milligan, Ronald A

    2009-03-01

    Bacterial ATP binding cassette (ABC) exporters fulfill a wide variety of transmembrane transport roles and are homologous to the human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein. Recent X-ray structures of the exporters MsbA and Sav1866 have begun to describe the conformational changes that accompany the ABC transport cycle. Here we present cryo-electron microscopy structures of MsbA reconstituted into a lipid bilayer. Using ATPase inhibitors, we captured three nucleotide transition states of the transporter that were subsequently reconstituted into helical arrays. The enzyme-substrate complex (trapped by ADP-aluminum fluoride or AMPPNP) crystallized in a different helical lattice than the enzyme-product complex (trapped by ADP-vanadate). Approximately 20A resolution maps were calculated for each state and revealed MsbA to be a dimer with a large channel between the membrane spanning domains, similar to the outward facing crystal structures of MsbA and Sav1866. This suggests that while there are likely structural differences between the nucleotide transition states, membrane embedded MsbA remains in an outward facing conformation while nucleotide is bound.

  15. Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horster, M

    2000-12-01

    Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters are organized into transporter families that are functional in several epithelial organs, namely, in kidney, lung, pancreas, intestine, and salivary gland. Family members (subtypes) are developmentally expressed in plasma membranes in temporospatial patterns that are 1) similar for one subtype within different organs, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) in lung and kidney; 2) different between subtypes within the same organ, like the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in lung; and 3) apparently matched among members of different transporter families, as alpha-ENaC with AQP1 and -4 in lung and with AQP2 in kidney. Finally, comparison of temporal expression patterns in early embryonic development of transporters from different families [e.g., cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ENaC, and outer medullary potassium channel] suggests regulatory activating or inactivating interactions in defined morphogenic periods. This review focuses on embryonic patterns, at the mRNA and immunoprotein level, of the following transporter entities expressed in epithelial cell plasma membranes: ENaC; the chloride transporters CFTR, ClC-2, bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter, Cl/OH, and Cl/HCO(3); the sodium glucose transporter-glucose transporter; the sodium/hydrogen exchanger; the sodium-phosphate cotransporter; the ATPases; and AQP. The purpose of this article is to relate temporal and spatial expression patterns in embryonic and in early postnatal epithelia to developmental changes in organ structure and function.

  16. Transmembrane Domain Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Impair Expression and Transport Activity of ABC Transporter ABCG2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjostedt, N.; Heuvel, J.J.M.W. van den; Koenderink, J.B.; Kidron, H.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the function and expression of nine naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphisms (G406R, F431L, S441N, P480L, F489L, M515R, L525R, A528T and T542A) that are predicted to reside in the transmembrane regions of the ABC transporter ABCG2. METHODS: The transport activity of the

  17. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  18. Membrane transport mechanism 3D structure and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a molecular view of membrane transport by means of numerous biochemical and biophysical techniques. The rapidly growing number of atomic structures of transporters in different conformations and the constant progress in bioinformatics have recently added deeper insights.   The unifying mechanism of energized solute transport across membranes is assumed to consist of the conformational cycling of a carrier protein to provide access to substrate binding sites from either side of a cellular membrane. Due to the central role of active membrane transport there is considerable interest in deciphering the principles of one of the most fundamental processes in nature: the alternating access mechanism.   This book brings together particularly significant structure-function studies on a variety of carrier systems from different transporter families: Glutamate symporters, LeuT-like fold transporters, MFS transporters and SMR (RND) exporters, as well as ABC-type importers.   The selected examples im...

  19. Investigation of the quaternary structure of an ABC transporter in living cells using spectrally resolved resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deo Raj

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has become an important tool to study proteins inside living cells. It has been used to explore membrane protein folding and dynamics, determine stoichiometry and geometry of protein complexes, and measure the distance between two molecules. In this dissertation, we use a method based on FRET and optical micro-spectroscopy (OptiMiS) technology, developed in our lab, to probe the structure of dynamic (as opposed to static) protein complexes in living cells. We use this method to determine the association stoichiometry and quaternary structure of an ABC transporter in living cells. Specifically, the transporter we investigate originates from the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative bacterium with several virulence factors, lipopolysaccharides being one of them. This pathogen coexpresses two unique forms of lipopolysaccharides on its surface, the A- and B-bands. The A-band polysaccharides, synthesized in the cytoplasm, are translocated into the periplasm through an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter consisting of a transmembranar protein, Wzm, and a nucleotide-binding protein, Wzt. In P. aeruginosa, all of the biochemical studies of A-band LPS are concentrated on the stages of the synthesis and ligation of polysaccharides (PSs), leaving the export stage involving ABC transporter unexplored. The mode of PS export through ABC transporters is still unknown. This difficulty is due to the lack of information about sub-unit composition and structure of this bi-component ABC transporter. Using the FRET-OptiMiS combination method developed by our lab, we found that Wzt forms a rhombus-shaped homo-tetramer which becomes a square upon co-expression with Wzm, and that Wzm forms a square-shaped homo-tetramer both in the presence and absence of Wzt. Based on these results, we propose a structural model for the double-tetramer complex formed by the bi-component ABC transporter in living cells. An understanding of the

  20. ABC transporters in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae: insights into evolution and pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Fabiana Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters represent one of the largest superfamilies of active membrane transport proteins (MTPs with a highly conserved ATPase domain that binds and hydrolyzes ATP, supplying energy for the uptake of a variety of nutrients and for the extrusion of drugs and metabolic wastes. The complete genomes of a non-pathogenic (J and pathogenic (7448 strain of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, as well as of a pathogenic (53 strain of Mycoplasma synoviae have been recently sequenced. A detailed study revealed a high percentage of CDSs encoding MTPs in M. hyopneumoniae strains J (13.4%, 7448 (13.8%, and in M. synoviae 53 (11.2%, and the ABC systems represented from 85.0 to 88.6% of those CDSs. Uptake systems are mainly involved in cell nutrition and some might be associated with virulence. Exporter systems include both drug and multidrug resistant systems (MDR, which may represent mechanisms of resistance to toxic molecules. No relation was found between the phylogeny of the ATPase domains and the lifestyle or pathogenicity of Mycoplasma, but several proteins, potentially useful as targets for the control of infections, were identified.

  1. The ABC family of multidrug transporters in microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, H.W; Konings, W.N

    1998-01-01

    Multidrug transporters are membrane proteins that are able to expel a broad range of toxic molecules from the cell. In humans, the overexpression of the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and the multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1 (MRP) is a principal cause of resistance of cancers

  2. Inhibition of the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    High body burdens of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in infants and young children have led to increased concern over their potential impact on human development. PBDE exposure can alter the expression of genes involved in thyroid homeostasis, including those of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which mediate cellular xenobiotic efflux. However, little information exists on how PBDEs interact with ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the interactions of 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and its hydroxylated metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with P-gp and BCRP, using human MDR1- and BCRP-expressing membrane vesicles and stably transfected NIH-3T3-MDR1 and MDCK-BCRP cells. In P-gp membranes, BDE-47 did not affect P-gp activity; however, 6-OH-BDE-47 inhibited P-gp activity at low µM concentrations (IC50 = 11.7 µM). In BCRP membranes, BDE-47 inhibited BCRP activity; however, 6-OH-BDE-47 was a stronger inhibitor [IC50 = 45.9 µM (BDE-47) vs. IC50 = 9.4 µM (6-OH-BDE-47)]. Intracellular concentrations of known P-gp and BCRP substrates [(3H)-paclitaxel and (3H)-prazosin, respectively] were significantly higher (indicating less efflux) in NIH-3T3-MDR1 and MDCK-BCRP cells in the presence of 6-OH-BDE-47, but not BDE-47. Collectively, our results indicate that the BDE-47 metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 is an inhibitor of both P-gp and BCRP efflux activity.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  4. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  5. ATP binding and hydrolysis disrupt the high-affinity interaction between the heme ABC transporter HmuUV and its cognate substrate-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasem-Abdullah, Hiba; Perach, Michal; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Lewinson, Oded

    2017-09-01

    Using the energy of ATP hydrolysis, ABC transporters catalyze the trans-membrane transport of molecules. In bacteria, these transporters partner with a high-affinity substrate-binding protein (SBP) to import essential micronutrients. ATP binding by Type I ABC transporters (importers of amino acids, sugars, peptides, and small ions) stabilizes the interaction between the transporter and the SBP, thus allowing transfer of the substrate from the latter to the former. In Type II ABC transporters (importers of trace elements, e.g. vitamin B 12 , heme, and iron-siderophores) the role of ATP remains debatable. Here we studied the interaction between the Yersinia pestis ABC heme importer (HmuUV) and its partner substrate-binding protein (HmuT). Using real-time surface plasmon resonance experiments and interaction studies in membrane vesicles, we find that in the absence of ATP the transporter and the SBP tightly bind. Substrate in excess inhibits this interaction, and ATP binding by the transporter completely abolishes it. To release the stable docked SBP from the transporter hydrolysis of ATP is required. Based on these results we propose a mechanism for heme acquisition by HmuUV-T where the substrate-loaded SBP docks to the nucleotide-free outward-facing conformation of the transporter. ATP binding leads to formation of an occluded state with the substrate trapped in the trans-membrane translocation cavity. Subsequent ATP hydrolysis leads to substrate delivery to the cytoplasm, release of the SBP, and resetting of the system. We propose that other Type II ABC transporters likely share the fundamentals of this mechanism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Expression pattern of the human ABC transporters in pluripotent embryonic stem cells and in their derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Zsuzsa; Lőrincz, Réka; Szebényi, Kornélia; Péntek, Adrienn; Varga, Nóra; Likó, István; Várady, György; Szakács, Gergely; Orbán, Tamás I; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Agota

    2014-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have key roles in various physiological functions as well as providing chemical defense and stress tolerance in human tissues. In this study, we have examined the expression pattern of all ABC proteins in pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and in their differentiated progenies. We paid special attention to the cellular expression and localization of multidrug transporter ABC proteins. Stem cell differentiation was carried out without chemical induction or cell sorting, and specialized cell types were separated mechanically. Cellular features regarding pluripotency and tissue identity, as well as ABC transporter expression were studied by flow cytomtery, immuno-microscopy, and qPCR-based low-density arrays. Pluripotent hESCs and differentiated cell types (cardiomyocytes, neuronal cells, and mesenchymal stem cells) were distinguished by morphology, immunostaining markers, and selected mRNA expression patterns. We found that the mRNA expression levels of the 48 human ABC proteins also clearly distinguished the pluripotent and the respective differentiated cell types. When multidrug and lipid transporter ABC protein expression was examined by using well characterized specific antibodies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the protein expression data corresponded well to the mRNA expression results. Moreover, the cellular localization of these important human ABC transporter proteins could be established in the pluripotent and differentiated hESC derived samples. These studies provide valuable information regarding ABC protein expression in human stem cells and their differentiated offspring. The results may also help to obtain further information concerning the specialized cellular functions of selected ABC transporters. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  7. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: very long-chain fatty acid metabolism, ABC half-transporters and the complicated route to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, Stephan; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2007-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal membrane located ABC half-transporter named ALDP. Mutations in ALDP result in elevated levels of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and reduced VLCFA beta-oxidation in peroxisomes. The

  8. Current Understanding of Interactions between Nanoparticles and ABC Transporters in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Deng, Xudong; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Jun

    2018-03-14

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) remains as a obstacle for effective cancer therapy. Nanoparticles (NPs)-based delivery systems are promising to overcome MDR, but only a few of them have been accepted for clinical treatment, due to characteristics such as insufficient transportation and potential toxicity. In this respect, mounting attention has been attracted towards interactions between NPs and ABC transporters, which hold a key role in the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancer and NP toxicity. In this review article, current knowledge on the involvement of ABC transporters in MDR and their inhibitors is provided. More importantly, recent literatures about the interactions between NPs and ABC transporters are summarized here. Organic and inorganic NPs inhibit the function of ABC transporters based on distinct mechanisms. The effects of organic NPs are caused by several excipients like surfactants, polymers, lipids and cyclodextrin, whereas inorganic NPs act as substrates of ABC transporters and competitively inhibit the efflux of drugs. Based on these interesting phenomena, a more thorough understanding of the specific mechanisms is necessary and essential in the hope to develop more efficient NPs to overcome MDR and decrease environmental toxicity of NPs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/41n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Vaquer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2 trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology

  10. Enterococcus faecalis Uses a Phosphotransferase System Permease and a Host Colonization-Related ABC Transporter for Maltodextrin Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Nicolas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Joyet, Philippe; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Blancato, Víctor S; Repizo, Guillermo D; Henry, Céline; Pikis, Andreas; Thompson, John; Magni, Christian; Hartke, Axel; Deutscher, Josef

    2017-05-01

    Maltodextrin is a mixture of maltooligosaccharides, which are produced by the degradation of starch or glycogen. They are mostly composed of α-1,4- and some α-1,6-linked glucose residues. Genes presumed to code for the Enterococcus faecalis maltodextrin transporter were induced during enterococcal infection. We therefore carried out a detailed study of maltodextrin transport in this organism. Depending on their length (3 to 7 glucose residues), E. faecalis takes up maltodextrins either via MalT, a maltose-specific permease of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS), or the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter MdxEFG-MsmX. Maltotriose, the smallest maltodextrin, is primarily transported by the PTS permease. A malT mutant therefore exhibits significantly reduced growth on maltose and maltotriose. The residual uptake of the trisaccharide is catalyzed by the ABC transporter, because a malT mdxF double mutant no longer grows on maltotriose. The trisaccharide arrives as maltotriose-6″-P in the cell. MapP, which dephosphorylates maltose-6'-P, also releases P i from maltotriose-6″-P. Maltotetraose and longer maltodextrins are mainly (or exclusively) taken up via the ABC transporter, because inactivation of the membrane protein MdxF prevents growth on maltotetraose and longer maltodextrins up to at least maltoheptaose. E. faecalis also utilizes panose and isopanose, and we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that in contrast to maltotriose, its two isomers are primarily transported via the ABC transporter. We confirm that maltodextrin utilization via MdxEFG-MsmX affects the colonization capacity of E. faecalis , because inactivation of mdxF significantly reduced enterococcal colonization and/or survival in kidneys and liver of mice after intraperitoneal infection. IMPORTANCE Infections by enterococci, which are major health care-associated pathogens, are difficult to treat due to their increasing resistance to clinically

  11. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui

    2008-01-01

    with enhanced ability of biofilm-formation generated via transposon Tn917 mutagenesis of L. monocytogenes 4b G. In this mutant, a Tn917 insertion has disrupted the coding region of the gene encoding a putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease identical to Lmof2365_1771 (a putative ABC...... regulation of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes 4b G. The immediate gene upstream of lm.G_1771 encoded an ATP-binding protein. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that these two genes were organized into an operon and that their proteins formed an export ABC transporter. Here, we report...... the characterization of the mutant and identification of a novel ABC transporter that functions in negative regulation of biofilm formation in L. monocytogenes....

  12. The multidrug-resistant phenotype associated with overexpression of the new ABC half-transporter, MXR (ABCG2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Brangi, M; Hudson, E

    2000-01-01

    Mechanisms of drug resistance other than P-glycoprotein are of increasing interest as the list of newly identified members of the ABC transport family has grown. We sought to characterize the phenotype of the newly discovered ABC transporter encoded by the mitoxantrone resistance gene, MXR, also...... that the ABC half-transporter, MXR, is a potent, new mechanism for conferring multiple drug resistance. Definition of its mechanism of transport and its role in clinical oncology is required....

  13. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared

  14. Multi-Drug Resistance ABC Transporter Inhibition Enhances Murine Ventral Prostate Stem/Progenitor Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Mugdha D; Jackson, Courtney M; Felix, Carina L; Jones, Anthony J; Goodrich, David W; Foster, Barbara A; Huss, Wendy J

    2015-05-15

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR)-ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 participate in the efflux of steroid hormones, estrogens, and androgens, which regulate prostate development and differentiation. The role of MDR-ABC efflux transporters in prostate epithelial proliferation and differentiation remains unclear. We hypothesized that MDR-ABC transporters regulate prostate differentiation and epithelium regeneration. Prostate epithelial differentiation was studied using histology, sphere formation assay, and prostate regeneration induced by cycles of repeated androgen withdrawal and replacement. Embryonic deletion of Abcg2 resulted in a decreased number of luminal cells in the prostate and increased sphere formation efficiency, indicating an imbalance in the prostate epithelial differentiation pattern. Decreased luminal cell number in the Abcg2 null prostate implies reduced differentiation. Enhanced sphere formation efficiency in Abcg2 null prostate cells implies activation of the stem/progenitor cells. Prostate regeneration was associated with profound activation of the stem/progenitor cells, indicating the role of Abcg2 in maintaining stem/progenitor cell pool. Since embryonic deletion of Abcg2 may result in compensation by other ABC transporters, pharmacological inhibition of MDR-ABC efflux was performed. Pharmacological inhibition of MDR-ABC efflux enhanced prostate epithelial differentiation in sphere culture and during prostate regeneration. In conclusion, Abcg2 deletion leads to activation of the stem/progenitor cells and enhances differentiating divisions; and pharmacological inhibition of MDR-ABC efflux leads to epithelial differentiation. Our study demonstrates for the first time that MDR-ABC efflux transporter inhibition results in enhanced prostate epithelial cell differentiation.

  15. Identification of ABC transporter genes of Fusarium graminearum with roles in azole tolerance and/or virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Abou Ammar

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is a plant pathogen infecting several important cereals, resulting in substantial yield losses and mycotoxin contamination of the grain. Triazole fungicides are used to control diseases caused by this fungus on a worldwide scale. Our previous microarray study indicated that 15 ABC transporter genes were transcriptionally upregulated in response to tebuconazole treatment. Here, we deleted four ABC transporter genes in two genetic backgrounds of F. graminearum representing the DON (deoxynivalenol and the NIV (nivalenol trichothecene chemotypes. Deletion of FgABC3 and FgABC4 belonging to group I of ABC-G and to group V of ABC-C subfamilies of ABC transporters, respectively, considerably increased the sensitivity to the class I sterol biosynthesis inhibitors triazoles and fenarimol. Such effects were specific since they did not occur with any other fungicide class tested. Assessing the contribution of the four ABC transporters to virulence of F. graminearum revealed that, irrespective of their chemotypes, deletion mutants of FgABC1 (ABC-C subfamily group V and FgABC3 were impeded in virulence on wheat, barley and maize. Phylogenetic context and analyses of mycotoxin production suggests that FgABC3 may encode a transporter protecting the fungus from host-derived antifungal molecules. In contrast, FgABC1 may encode a transporter responsible for the secretion of fungal secondary metabolites alleviating defence of the host. Our results show that ABC transporters play important and diverse roles in both fungicide resistance and pathogenesis of F. graminearum.

  16. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  17. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  18. The AbcA Transporter of Staphylococcus aureus Affects Cell Autolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader-Fischer, Gesine; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    2001-01-01

    Increased production of penicillin-binding protein PBP 4 is known to increase peptidoglycan cross-linking and contributes to methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The pbp4 gene shares a 400-nucleotide intercistronic region with the divergently transcribed abcA gene, encoding an ATP-binding cassette transporter of unknown function. Our study revealed that methicillin stimulated abcA transcription but had no effects on pbp4 transcription. Analysis of abcA expression in mutants defective for global regulators showed that abcA is under the control of agr. Insertional inactivation of abcA by an erythromycin resistance determinant did not influence pbp4 transcription, nor did it alter resistance to methicillin and other cell wall-directed antibiotics. However, abcA mutants showed spontaneous partial lysis on plates containing subinhibitory concentrations of methicillin due to increased spontaneous autolysis. Since the autolytic zymograms of cell extracts were identical in mutants and parental strains, we postulate an indirect role of AbcA in control of autolytic activities and in protection of the cells against methicillin. PMID:11158733

  19. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Cheol-Hee

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein.

  20. Glycolysis inhibition inactivates ABC transporters to restore drug sensitivity in malignant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Nakano

    Full Text Available Cancer cells eventually acquire drug resistance largely via the aberrant expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Because cancer cells produce ATP mostly through glycolysis, in the present study we explored the effects of inhibiting glycolysis on the ABC transporter function and drug sensitivity of malignant cells. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA suppressed ATP production in malignant cells, and restored the retention of daunorubicin or mitoxantrone in ABC transporter-expressing, RPMI8226 (ABCG2, KG-1 (ABCB1 and HepG2 cells (ABCB1 and ABCG2. Interestingly, although side population (SP cells isolated from RPMI8226 cells exhibited higher levels of glycolysis with an increased expression of genes involved in the glycolytic pathway, 3BrPA abolished Hoechst 33342 exclusion in SP cells. 3BrPA also disrupted clonogenic capacity in malignant cell lines including RPMI8226, KG-1, and HepG2. Furthermore, 3BrPA restored cytotoxic effects of daunorubicin and doxorubicin on KG-1 and RPMI8226 cells, and markedly suppressed subcutaneous tumor growth in combination with doxorubicin in RPMI8226-implanted mice. These results collectively suggest that the inhibition of glycolysis is able to overcome drug resistance in ABC transporter-expressing malignant cells through the inactivation of ABC transporters and impairment of SP cells with enhanced glycolysis as well as clonogenic cells.

  1. The therapeutic potential of targeting ABC transporters to combat multi-drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugde, Piyush; Biswas, Riya; Merien, Fabrice; Lu, Jun; Liu, Dong-Xu; Chen, Mingwei; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Most disseminated cancers remain fatal despite the availability of a variety of conventional and novel treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and biologically targeted therapy. A major factor responsible for the failure of chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). The overexpression of various ABC transporters in cancer cells can efficiently remove the anticancer drug from the cell, thus causing the drug to lose its effect. Areas covered: In this review, we summarised the ongoing research related to the mechanism, function, and regulation of ABC transporters. We integrated our current knowledge at different levels from molecular biology to clinical trials. We also discussed potential therapeutic strategies of targeting ABC transporters to reverse MDR in cancer cells. Expert opinion: Involvement of various ABC transporters to cancer MDR lays the foundation for developing tailored therapies that can overcome MDR. An ideal MDR reversal agent should have broad-spectrum ABC-transporter inhibitory activity, be potent, have good pharmacokinetics, have no trans-stimulation effects, and have low or no toxicity. Alternatively, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems containing both the cytotoxic drug and reversing agent may represent a useful approach to reversing MDR with minimal off-target toxicity.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lixia; Song, Tianxue; He, Rongjun; Zeng, Yang; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2017-04-26

    ABC transporter superfamily is one of the largest and ubiquitous groups of proteins. Because of their role in detoxification, insect ABC transporters have gained more attention in recent years. In this study, we annotated ABC transporters from a newly sequenced sweetpotato whitefly genome. Bemisia tabaci Q biotype is an emerging global invasive species that has caused extensive damages to field crops as well as ornamental plants. A total of 55 ABC transporters containing all eight described subfamilies (A to H) were identified in the B. tabaci Q genome, including 8 ABCAs, 3 ABCBs, 6 ABCCs, 2 ABCDs, 1 ABCE, 3 ABCFs, 23 ABCGs and 9 ABCHs. In comparison to other species, subfamilies G and H in both phloem- and blood-sucking arthropods are expanded. The temporal expression profiles of these 55 ABC transporters throughout B. tabaci developmental stages and their responses to imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, were investigated using RNA-seq analysis. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of 24 ABC transporters (44% of the total) representing all eight subfamilies was confirmed by the quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, mRNA expression levels estimated by RT-qPCR and RNA-seq analyses were significantly correlated (r = 0.684, p ABC transporters in B. tabaci. The identification of these ABC transporters, their temporal expression profiles during B. tabaci development, and their response to a neonicotinoid insecticide lay the foundation for functional genomic understanding of their contribution to the invasiveness of B. tabaci.

  3. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  4. Plant ABC transporters enable many unique aspects of a terrestrial plant's lifestyle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Jae-Ung; Song, Won-Yong; Hong, Daewoong

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial plants have two to four times more ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes than other organisms, including their ancestral microalgae. Recent studies found that plants harboring mutations in these transporters exhibit dramatic phenotypes, many of which are related to developmental...

  5. Functional Diversity of Tandem Substrate-Binding Domains in ABC Transporters from Pathogenic Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulyani, Faizah; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Vujicic - Zagar, Andreja; Guskov, Albert; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter GInPQ is an essential uptake system for amino acids in gram-positive pathogens and related nonpathogenic bacteria. The transporter has tandem substrate-binding domains (SBDs) fused to each transmembrane domain, giving rise to four SBDs per functional

  6. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  7. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  8. The human ABC transporter pseudogene family: Evidence for transcription and gene-pseudogene interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehler, Armin P; Hellum, Marit; Wenzel, Jürgen J; Kaminski, Ellen; Haug, Kari Bente Foss; Kierulf, Peter; Kaminski, Wolfgang E

    2008-04-11

    Pseudogenes are an integral component of the human genome. Little attention, however, has so far been paid to the phenomenon that some pseudogenes are transcriptionally active. Recently, we demonstrated that the human ortholog of the rodent testis-specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Abca17 is a ubiquitously transcribed pseudogene (ABCA17P). The aim of the present study was to establish a complete inventory of all ABC transporter pseudogenes in the human genome and to identify transcriptionally active ABC transporter pseudogenes. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that a regulatory interdependency exists between ABC transporter pseudogenes and their parental protein coding equivalents. Systematic bioinformatic analysis revealed the existence of 22 ABC transporter pseudogenes within the human genome. We identified two clusters on chromosomes 15 and 16, respectively, which harbor almost half of all pseudogenes (n = 10). Available information from EST and mRNA databases and RT-PCR expression profiling indicate that a large portion of the ABC transporter pseudogenes (45%, n = 10) are transcriptionally active and some of them are expressed as alternative splice variants. We demonstrate that both pseudogenes of the pseudoxanthoma elasticum gene ABCC6, ABCC6P1 and ABCC6P2, are transcribed. ABCC6P1 and ABCC6 possess near-identical promoter sequences and their tissue-specific expression profiles are strikingly similar raising the possibility that they form a gene-pseudogene dual transcription unit. Intriguingly, targeted knockdown of the transcribed pseudogene ABCC6P1 resulted in a significant reduction of ABCC6 mRNA expression levels. The human genome contains a surprisingly small number of ABC transporter pseudogenes relative to other known gene families. They are unevenly distributed across the chromosomes. Importantly, a significant portion of the ABC transporter pseudogenes is transcriptionally active. The downregulation of ABCC6 mRNA levels by targeted

  9. The human ABC transporter pseudogene family: Evidence for transcription and gene-pseudogene interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haug Kari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudogenes are an integral component of the human genome. Little attention, however, has so far been paid to the phenomenon that some pseudogenes are transcriptionally active. Recently, we demonstrated that the human ortholog of the rodent testis-specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter Abca17 is a ubiquitously transcribed pseudogene (ABCA17P. The aim of the present study was to establish a complete inventory of all ABC transporter pseudogenes in the human genome and to identify transcriptionally active ABC transporter pseudogenes. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that a regulatory interdependency exists between ABC transporter pseudogenes and their parental protein coding equivalents. Results Systematic bioinformatic analysis revealed the existence of 22 ABC transporter pseudogenes within the human genome. We identified two clusters on chromosomes 15 and 16, respectively, which harbor almost half of all pseudogenes (n = 10. Available information from EST and mRNA databases and RT-PCR expression profiling indicate that a large portion of the ABC transporter pseudogenes (45%, n = 10 are transcriptionally active and some of them are expressed as alternative splice variants. We demonstrate that both pseudogenes of the pseudoxanthoma elasticum gene ABCC6, ABCC6P1 and ABCC6P2, are transcribed. ABCC6P1 and ABCC6 possess near-identical promoter sequences and their tissue-specific expression profiles are strikingly similar raising the possibility that they form a gene-pseudogene dual transcription unit. Intriguingly, targeted knockdown of the transcribed pseudogene ABCC6P1 resulted in a significant reduction of ABCC6 mRNA expression levels. Conclusion The human genome contains a surprisingly small number of ABC transporter pseudogenes relative to other known gene families. They are unevenly distributed across the chromosomes. Importantly, a significant portion of the ABC transporter pseudogenes is transcriptionally active

  10. The Role of Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic ABC Transporter Family in Failure of Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awady, Raafat; Saleh, Ekram; Hashim, Amna; Soliman, Nehal; Dallah, Alaa; Elrasheed, Azza; Elakraa, Ghada

    2016-01-01

    Over the years chemotherapy failure has been a vital research topic as researchers have been striving to discover reasons behind it. The extensive studies carried out on chemotherapeutic agents confirm that resistance to chemotherapy is a major reason for treatment failure. "Resistance to chemotherapy," however, is a comprehensive phrase that refers to a variety of different mechanisms in which ATP-binding cassette (ABC) mediated efflux dominates. The ABC is one of the largest gene superfamily of transporters among both eukaryotes and prokaryotes; it represents a variety of genes that code for proteins, which perform countless functions, including drug efflux - a natural process that protects cells from foreign chemicals. Up to date, chemotherapy failure due to ABC drug efflux is an active research topic that continuously provides further evidence on multiple drug resistance (MDR), aiding scientists in tackling and overcoming this issue. This review focuses on drug resistance by ABC efflux transporters in human, viral, parasitic, fungal and bacterial cells and highlights the importance of the MDR permeability glycoprotein being the mutual ABC transporter among all studied organisms. Current developments and future directions to overcome this problem are also discussed.

  11. The role of ABC transporters of the blood-brain barrier in opioid tolerance development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Środa-Pomianek

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Opioids constitute an important group of drugs used in chronic pain treatment, e.g. cancer pain. Unfortunately, the development of the organism’s tolerance to the analgesic activity of opioids, the tendency to develop addictions and undesirable side effects are the main causes reducing opioid efficiency in chronic pain treatment. Among many mechanisms connected to emerging of opioid resistance the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters present at the blood-brain barrier may play an important role. These transporter proteins, especially P-glycoprotein (ABCB1, MDR1, affect pharmacokinetics of many drugs and xenobiotics that are their substrates. ABC transporters reduce cellular uptake of drugs and/or increase their export from brain tissue to blood. Substrate specificity of P-glycoprotein is extremely wide and comprises many structurally and functionally unrelated compounds. What is interesting, substrate specificity of P-glycoprotein overlaps to a great extent the specificity of the isoforms of cytochrome P450 involved in drug metabolism. In the present review, the ABC proteins-mediated transport of opioids was discussed as well as the mechanisms of transport regulation. Cellular metabolism of various opioid drugs and the role of ABC transporters in their absorption, distribution and elimination were also described.

  12. The role of ABCG-type ABC transporters in phytohormone transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Lorenzo; Kang, Joohyun; Ko, Donghwi; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) integrate endogenous and exogenous signals thus synchronizing plant growth with environmental and developmental changes. Similar to animals, phytohormones have distinct source and target tissues, hence controlled transport and focused targeting are required for their functions. Many evidences accumulated in the last years about the regulation of long-distance and directional transport of phytohormones. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters turned out to play major roles in routing phytohormones not only in the plant body but also towards the outer environment. The ABCG-type proteins ABCG25 and ABCG40 are high affinity abscisic acid (ABA) transporters. ABCG14 is highly co-expressed with cytokinin biosynthesis and is the major root-to-shoot cytokinin transporter. Pleiotropic drug resistance1 (PDR1) from Petunia hybrida transports strigolactones (SLs) from the root tip to the plant shoot but also outside to the rhizosphere, where SLs are the main attractants to mycorrhizal fungi. Last but not least, ABCG36 and ABCG37 possibly play a dual role in coumarine and IBA transport. © 2015 Authors.

  13. The abcEDCBA-Encoded ABC Transporter and the virB Operon-Encoded Type IV Secretion System of Brucella ovis Are Critical for Intracellular Trafficking and Survival in Ovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auricelio A Macedo

    Full Text Available Brucella ovis infection is associated with epididymitis, orchitis and infertility in rams. Most of the information available on B. ovis and host cell interaction has been generated using murine macrophages or epithelial cell lines, but the interaction between B. ovis and primary ovine macrophages has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the B. ovis abcEDCBA-encoded ABC transporter and the virB operon-encoded Type IV Secretion System (T4SS during intracellular survival of B. ovis in ovine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutant strains were unable to survive in the intracellular environment when compared to the WT B. ovis at 48 hours post infection (hpi. In addition, these mutant strains cannot exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, and their vacuoles do not acquire the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin, which takes place in the WT B. ovis containing vacuole. Higher levels of nitric oxide production were observed in macrophages infected with WT B. ovis at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains. Conversely, higher levels of reactive oxygen species were detected in macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the WT strain. Our results demonstrate that B. ovis is able to persist and multiply in ovine macrophages, while ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutations prevent intracellular multiplication, favor phagolysosome fusion, and impair maturation of the B. ovis vacuole towards an endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment.

  14. Backbone NMR resonance assignments of the nucleotide binding domain of the ABC multidrug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis in its ADP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmich, Ute A; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Glaubitz, Clemens; Wöhnert, Jens

    2012-04-01

    LmrA from Lactococcus lactis is a multidrug transporter and a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. ABC transporters consist of a transmembrane domain (TMD) and a nucleotide binding domain (NBD). The NBD contains the highly conserved signature motifs of this transporter superfamily. In the case of LmrA, the TMD and the NBD are expressed as a single polypeptide. LmrA catalyzes the extrusion of hydrophobic compounds including antibiotics from the cell membrane at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. ATP binds to the NBD, where binding and hydrolysis induce conformational changes that lead to the extrusion of the substrate via the TMD. Here, we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone chemical shift assignments of the isolated 263 amino acid containing NBD of LmrA in its ADP bound state.

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  16. A wheat ABC transporter contributes to both grain formation and mycotoxin tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium fungi which acts as a disease virulence factor, aiding fungal pathogenesis of cereals spikelets and spread of the economically important Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease. Previously, a fragment of a wheat ABC transporter gene was shown to be...

  17. Genetic variation in ABC transporter A1 contributes to HDL cholesterol in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2004-01-01

    Homozygosity for mutations in ABC transporter A1 (ABCA1) causes Tangier disease, a rare HDL-deficiency syndrome. Whether heterozygosity for genetic variation in ABCA1 also contributes to HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in the general population is presently unclear. We determined whether mutations...

  18. Gangliosides do not affect ABC transporter function in human neuroblastoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Klappe, Karin; Kamps, Willem; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    Previous studies have indicated a role for glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) in multidrug resistance (MDR), either related to turnover of ceramide (Cer) or generation of gangliosides, which modulate apoptosis and/or the activity of ABC transporters. This study challenges the hypothesis that

  19. Influence of detergents on the activity of the ABC transporter LmrA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Infed, Nacera; Hanekop, Nils; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    The ABC transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis has been intensively studied and a role in multidrug resistance was proposed. Here, we performed a comprehensive detergent screen to analyze the impact of detergents for a successful solubilization, purification and retention of functional properties

  20. Phosphorylation is required for the pathogen defense function of the Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter accumulates at sites of pathogen detection, where it is involved in defense against multiple pathogens. Perception of PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors initiates recruitment of PEN3 and also leads to PEN3 phosphorylation at multiple amino acid residues. Whet...

  1. Tissue-Specific Transcript Profiling for ABC Transporters in the Sequestering Larvae of the Phytophagous Leaf Beetle Chrysomela populi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretscher, René R.; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Background Insects evolved ingenious adaptations to use extraordinary food sources. Particularly, the diet of herbivores enriched with noxious plant secondary metabolites requires detoxification mechanisms. Sequestration, which involves the uptake, transfer, and concentration of occasionally modified phytochemicals into specialized tissues or hemolymph, is one of the most successful detoxification strategies found in most insect orders. Due to the ability of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) carriers to transport a wide range of molecules including phytochemicals and xenobiotics, it is highly likely that they play a role in this sequestration process. To shed light on the role of ABC proteins in sequestration, we describe an inventory of putative ABC transporters in various tissues in the sequestering juvenile poplar leaf beetle, Chrysomela populi. Results In the transcriptome of C. populi, we predicted 65 ABC transporters. To link the proteins with a possible function, we performed comparative phylogenetic analyses with ABC transporters of other insects and of humans. While tissue-specific profiling of each ABC transporter subfamily suggests that ABCB, C and G influence the plant metabolite absorption in the gut, ABCC with 14 members is the preferred subfamily responsible for the excretion of these metabolites via Malpighian tubules. Moreover, salicin, which is sequestered from poplar plants, is translocated into the defensive glands for further deterrent production. In these glands and among all identified ABC transporters, an exceptionally high transcript level was observed only for Cpabc35 (Cpmrp). RNAi revealed the deficiency of other ABC pumps to compensate the function of CpABC35, demonstrating its key role during sequestration. Conclusion We provide the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of the ABC family in a phytophagous beetle species. RNA-seq data from different larval tissues propose the importance of ABC pumps to achieve a homeostasis of plant

  2. Tissue-specific transcript profiling for ABC transporters in the sequestering larvae of the phytophagous leaf beetle Chrysomela populi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja S Strauss

    Full Text Available Insects evolved ingenious adaptations to use extraordinary food sources. Particularly, the diet of herbivores enriched with noxious plant secondary metabolites requires detoxification mechanisms. Sequestration, which involves the uptake, transfer, and concentration of occasionally modified phytochemicals into specialized tissues or hemolymph, is one of the most successful detoxification strategies found in most insect orders. Due to the ability of ATP-binding cassette (ABC carriers to transport a wide range of molecules including phytochemicals and xenobiotics, it is highly likely that they play a role in this sequestration process. To shed light on the role of ABC proteins in sequestration, we describe an inventory of putative ABC transporters in various tissues in the sequestering juvenile poplar leaf beetle, Chrysomela populi.In the transcriptome of C. populi, we predicted 65 ABC transporters. To link the proteins with a possible function, we performed comparative phylogenetic analyses with ABC transporters of other insects and of humans. While tissue-specific profiling of each ABC transporter subfamily suggests that ABCB, C and G influence the plant metabolite absorption in the gut, ABCC with 14 members is the preferred subfamily responsible for the excretion of these metabolites via Malpighian tubules. Moreover, salicin, which is sequestered from poplar plants, is translocated into the defensive glands for further deterrent production. In these glands and among all identified ABC transporters, an exceptionally high transcript level was observed only for Cpabc35 (Cpmrp. RNAi revealed the deficiency of other ABC pumps to compensate the function of CpABC35, demonstrating its key role during sequestration.We provide the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of the ABC family in a phytophagous beetle species. RNA-seq data from different larval tissues propose the importance of ABC pumps to achieve a homeostasis of plant-derived compounds and

  3. Tissue-specific transcript profiling for ABC transporters in the sequestering larvae of the phytophagous leaf beetle Chrysomela populi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Anja S; Wang, Ding; Stock, Magdalena; Gretscher, René R; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Insects evolved ingenious adaptations to use extraordinary food sources. Particularly, the diet of herbivores enriched with noxious plant secondary metabolites requires detoxification mechanisms. Sequestration, which involves the uptake, transfer, and concentration of occasionally modified phytochemicals into specialized tissues or hemolymph, is one of the most successful detoxification strategies found in most insect orders. Due to the ability of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) carriers to transport a wide range of molecules including phytochemicals and xenobiotics, it is highly likely that they play a role in this sequestration process. To shed light on the role of ABC proteins in sequestration, we describe an inventory of putative ABC transporters in various tissues in the sequestering juvenile poplar leaf beetle, Chrysomela populi. In the transcriptome of C. populi, we predicted 65 ABC transporters. To link the proteins with a possible function, we performed comparative phylogenetic analyses with ABC transporters of other insects and of humans. While tissue-specific profiling of each ABC transporter subfamily suggests that ABCB, C and G influence the plant metabolite absorption in the gut, ABCC with 14 members is the preferred subfamily responsible for the excretion of these metabolites via Malpighian tubules. Moreover, salicin, which is sequestered from poplar plants, is translocated into the defensive glands for further deterrent production. In these glands and among all identified ABC transporters, an exceptionally high transcript level was observed only for Cpabc35 (Cpmrp). RNAi revealed the deficiency of other ABC pumps to compensate the function of CpABC35, demonstrating its key role during sequestration. We provide the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of the ABC family in a phytophagous beetle species. RNA-seq data from different larval tissues propose the importance of ABC pumps to achieve a homeostasis of plant-derived compounds and offer a basis for

  4. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  5. Congruence ABC implies ABC

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenberg, Jordan S.

    2000-01-01

    The ABC conjecture of Masser and Oesterle' states that if (a,b,c) are coprime integers with a + b + c = 0, then sup(|a|,|b|,|c|) 0. Oesterle' has observed that if the ABC conjecture holds for all (a,b,c) with 16 | abc, then the full ABC conjecture holds. We extend that result to show that, for every integer N, the "congruence ABC conjecture" that ABC holds for all (a,b,c) with N|abc implies the full ABC conjecture.

  6. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; van Opstal, Edward J.; Alink, Gerrit M.; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2013-06-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size 45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size 50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  7. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.bhattacharjee@wur.nl [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Opstal, Edward J. van; Alink, Gerrit M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands); Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size {approx}45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size {approx}50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  8. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; Opstal, Edward J. van; Alink, Gerrit M.; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size ∼45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size ∼50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  9. Evidence for an ABC-Type Riboflavin Transporter System in Pathogenic Spirochetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Biddy, Brent A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial transporter proteins are involved in the translocation of many essential nutrients and metabolites. However, many of these key bacterial transport systems remain to be identified, including those involved in the transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2). Pathogenic spirochetes lack riboflavin biosynthetic pathways, implying reliance on obtaining riboflavin from their hosts. Using structural and functional characterizations of possible ligand-binding components, we have identified an ABC-type riboflavin transport system within pathogenic spirochetes. The putative lipoprotein ligand-binding components of these systems from three different spirochetes were cloned, hyperexpressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. Solutions of all three of the purified recombinant proteins were bright yellow. UV-visible spectra demonstrated that these proteins were likely flavoproteins; electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography confirmed that they contained riboflavin. A 1.3-Å crystal structure of the protein (TP0298) encoded by Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete, demonstrated that the protein’s fold is similar to the ligand-binding components of ABC-type transporters. The structure also revealed other salient details of the riboflavin binding site. Comparative bioinformatics analyses of spirochetal genomes, coupled with experimental validation, facilitated the discovery of this new ABC-type riboflavin transport system(s). We denote the ligand-binding component as riboflavin uptake transporter A (RfuA). Taken together, it appears that pathogenic spirochetes have evolved an ABC-type transport system (RfuABCD) for survival in their host environments, particularly that of the human host. PMID:23404400

  10. The mitochondrial transporter ABC-me (ABCB10), a downstream target of GATA-1, is essential for erythropoiesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, B B; Liesa, M; Elorza, A A; Qiu, W; Haigh, S E; Richey, L; Mikkola, H K; Schlaeger, T M; Shirihai, O S

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial transporter ATP binding cassette mitochondrial erythroid (ABC-me/ABCB10) is highly induced during erythroid differentiation by GATA-1 and its overexpression increases hemoglobin production rates in vitro. However, the role of ABC-me in erythropoiesis in vivo is unknown. Here we report for the first time that erythrocyte development in mice requires ABC-me. ABC-me−/− mice die at day 12.5 of gestation, showing nearly complete eradication of primitive erythropoiesis and lack of hemoglobinized cells at day 10.5. ABC-me−/− erythroid cells fail to differentiate because they exhibit a marked increase in apoptosis, both in vivo and ex vivo. Erythroid precursors are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress and ABC-me in the heart and its yeast ortholog multidrug resistance-like 1 have been shown to protect against oxidative stress. Thus, we hypothesized that increased apoptosis in ABC-me−/− erythroid precursors was caused by oxidative stress. Within this context, ABC-me deletion causes an increase in mitochondrial superoxide production and protein carbonylation in erythroid precursors. Furthermore, treatment of ABC-me−/− erythroid progenitors with the mitochondrial antioxidant MnTBAP (superoxide dismutase 2 mimetic) supports survival, ex vivo differentiation and increased hemoglobin production. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that ABC-me is essential for erythropoiesis in vivo. PMID:22240895

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-06-30

    A non-agglomerated and nanocrystalline-sized powder was successfully produced using ethylene glycol nitrate methods. The LSFT powder prepared using this method exhibits well dispersed and nano-sized particles about 100-200 nm. The density of LSFT sintered at 1300 C was about 90% of the theoretical density at which is 100 C less than that of the previous LSFT which was sintered at 1400 C. The sample sintered at 1400 C exhibited the evidence of a liquid phase at the grain boundaries and 2nd phase formation which probably caused low mechanical stability. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature. The LSFT-CGO specimens were cut from the as sintered bars and used for the evaluation of Mechanical Properties after polishing. The effect of strain rate on the flexural strength of the LSFT-CGO test specimens was studied. Three strain rates 6, 60 and 600 {micro}m/ min were chosen for this study. It is observed from the results that with increasing cross head speed the membrane takes higher loads to fail. A reduction in the strength of the membrane was observed at 1000 C in N{sub 2}. Two different routes were investigated to synthesis GDC using either formate or carbonate precursors. The precursor and CGO particle morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal decomposition behaviors of Ce(Gd)(HCOO){sub 3} and Ce(Gd)(CO{sub 3})(OH) were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a rate of 3 C/min in air. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the precursor and CGO were collected and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured. Conductivity measurements were made by AC impedance spectroscopy on sintered disks in air using platinum electrodes.

  13. Evolution of mal ABC transporter operons in the Thermococcales and Thermotogales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten J Peter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mal genes that encode maltose transporters have undergone extensive lateral transfer among ancestors of the archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus. Bacterial hyperthermophiles of the order Thermotogales live among these archaea and so may have shared in these transfers. The genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima bears evidence of extensive acquisition of archaeal genes, so its ancestors clearly had the capacity to do so. We examined deep phylogenetic relationships among the mal genes of these hyperthermophiles and their close relatives to look for evidence of shared ancestry. Results We demonstrate that the two maltose ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter operons now found in Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus (termed mal and mdx genes, respectively are not closely related to one another. The Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus mal genes are most closely related to bacterial mal genes while their respective mdx genes are archaeal. The genes of the two mal operons in Tt. maritima are not related to genes in either of these archaeal operons. They are highly similar to one another and belong to a phylogenetic lineage that includes mal genes from the enteric bacteria. A unique domain of the enteric MalF membrane spanning proteins found also in these Thermotogales MalF homologs supports their relatively close relationship with these enteric proteins. Analyses of genome sequence data from other Thermotogales species, Fervidobacterium nodosum, Thermosipho melanesiensis, Thermotoga petrophila, Thermotoga lettingae, and Thermotoga neapolitana, revealed a third apparent mal operon, absent from the published genome sequence of Tt. maritima strain MSB8. This third operon, mal3, is more closely related to the Thermococcales' bacteria-derived mal genes than are mal1 and mal2. F. nodosum, Ts. melanesiensis, and Tt. lettingae have only one of the mal1-mal2 paralogs. The mal2 operon from an unknown species of Thermotoga appears to

  14. Functional analysis of ABC transporter genes from Botrytis cinerea identifies BcatrB as a transporter of eugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, H.; Nistelrooy, van J.G.M.; Waard, de M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of multiple ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter genes from the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea in protection against natural fungitoxic compounds was studied by expression analysis and phenotyping of gene-replacement mutants. The

  15. Role of ABC transporters in veterinary medicine: pharmaco-toxicological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkel, Guillermo; Ballent, Mariana; Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian

    2018-01-31

    Unlike physicians, veterinary practitioners must deal with a number of animal species with crucial differences in anatomy, physiology and metabolism. Accordingly, the pharmacokinetic behaviour, the clinical efficacy and the adverse or toxic effects of drugs may differ across domestic animals. Moreover, the use of drugs in food-producing species may impose a risk for humans due to the generation of chemical residues in edible products, a major concern for public health and consumer's safety. As is clearly known in human beings, the ATP binding cassette (ABC) of transport proteins may influence the bioavailability and elimination of numerous drugs and other xenobiotics in domestic animals as well. A number of drugs, currently available in the veterinary market, are substrates of one or more transporters. Therefore, significant drug-drug interactions among ABC substrates may have unpredictable pharmaco-toxicological consequences in different species of veterinary interest. In this context, different investigations revealed the major relevance of P-gp and other transport proteins, like breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), in both companion and livestock animals. Undoubtedly, the discovery of the ABC transporters and the deep understanding of their physiological role in the different species introduced a new paradigm into the veterinary pharmacology. This review focus on the expression and function of the major transport proteins expressed in species of veterinary interest, and their impact in drug disposition, efficacy and toxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. ABC transporters and xenobiotic defense systems in early life stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Christian; Segner, Helmut; Fent, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of oviparous fish, in contrast to (ovo) viviparous species, develop in the aquatic environment, and therefore need solute transport systems at their body surfaces for maintaining internal homeostasis and defending against potentially harmful substances. We hypothesized that solute transporters undergo changes in tissue distribution from the embryo to the larval stage. We therefore studied the mRNA profiles of eight ABC transporters (abcb1a, abcb1b, abcc1, abcc2, abcc3, abcc4, abcc5, abcg2) and three solute carriers (oatp1d, putative oatp2 putative, mate1) in different body regions (head, yolk sac epithelium, abdominal viscera, skin/muscles) of developing rainbow trout. Additionally, we investigated mRNA levels of phase I (cyp1a, cyp3a) and phase II (gstp, putative ugt1, putative ugt2) biotransformation enzymes. The study covered the developmental period from the eleuthero-embryo stage to the first-feeding larval stage (1-20days post-hatch, dph). At 1dph, transcripts of abcc2, abcc4, abcg2, cyp3a, gstp, putative mate1, and putative oatp2 occurred primarily in the yolk sac epithelium, whereas at later stages expression of these genes was predominantly observed in the abdominal viscera. The functional activity of ABC transporters in fish early life stages was assessed by rhodamine B accumulation assays. Finally, we investigated the potential impact of xenobiotics (clotrimazole, clofibric acid) on the ABC and biotransformation systems of trout early life stages. While clofibric acid had no effect, clotrimazole lead to an increased rhodamine B accumulation. The results provide evidence that the transition from the eleuthero-embryo to the larval stage is accompanied by a major alteration in tissue expression of ABC transporters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictive Structure and Topology of Peroxisomal ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoletti, Pierre; Raas, Quentin; Gondcaille, Catherine; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    The peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transporters, which are called ABCD1, ABCD2 and ABCD3, are transmembrane proteins involved in the transport of various lipids that allow their degradation inside the organelle. Defective ABCD1 leads to the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids and is associated with a complex and severe neurodegenerative disorder called X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Although the nucleotide-binding domain is highly conserved and characterized within the ABC transporters family, solid data are missing for the transmembrane domain (TMD) of ABCD proteins. The lack of a clear consensus on the secondary and tertiary structure of the TMDs weakens any structure-function hypothesis based on the very diverse ABCD1 mutations found in X-ALD patients. Therefore, we first reinvestigated thoroughly the structure-function data available and performed refined alignments of ABCD protein sequences. Based on the 2.85  Å resolution crystal structure of the mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB10, here we propose a structural model of peroxisomal ABCD proteins that specifies the position of the transmembrane and coupling helices, and highlight functional motifs and putative important amino acid residues. PMID:28737695

  18. Predictive Structure and Topology of Peroxisomal ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Andreoletti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette (ABC transporters, which are called ABCD1, ABCD2 and ABCD3, are transmembrane proteins involved in the transport of various lipids that allow their degradation inside the organelle. Defective ABCD1 leads to the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids and is associated with a complex and severe neurodegenerative disorder called X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD. Although the nucleotide-binding domain is highly conserved and characterized within the ABC transporters family, solid data are missing for the transmembrane domain (TMD of ABCD proteins. The lack of a clear consensus on the secondary and tertiary structure of the TMDs weakens any structure-function hypothesis based on the very diverse ABCD1 mutations found in X-ALD patients. Therefore, we first reinvestigated thoroughly the structure-function data available and performed refined alignments of ABCD protein sequences. Based on the 2.85  Å resolution crystal structure of the mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB10, here we propose a structural model of peroxisomal ABCD proteins that specifies the position of the transmembrane and coupling helices, and highlight functional motifs and putative important amino acid residues.

  19. Discovery of an auto-regulation mechanism for the maltose ABC transporter MalFGK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Bao

    Full Text Available The maltose transporter MalFGK(2, together with the substrate-binding protein MalE, is one of the best-characterized ABC transporters. In the conventional model, MalE captures maltose in the periplasm and delivers the sugar to the transporter. Here, using nanodiscs and proteoliposomes, we instead find that MalE is bound with high-affinity to MalFGK2 to facilitate the acquisition of the sugar. When the maltose concentration exceeds the transport capacity, MalE captures maltose and dissociates from the transporter. This mechanism explains why the transport rate is high when MalE has low affinity for maltose, and low when MalE has high affinity for maltose. Transporter-bound MalE facilitates the acquisition of the sugar at low concentrations, but also captures and dissociates from the transporter past a threshold maltose concentration. In vivo, this maltose-forced dissociation limits the rate of transport. Given the conservation of the substrate-binding proteins, this mode of allosteric regulation may be universal to ABC importers.

  20. Control of Insulin Granule Formation and Function by the ABC Transporters ABCG1 and ABCA1 and by Oxysterol Binding Protein OSBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed Saad; Harris, Megan T; Kreutzberger, Alex J B; Inouye, Candice M; Doyle, Catherine A; Castle, Anna M; Arvan, Peter; Castle, J David

    2018-03-14

    In pancreatic β cells, insulin granule membranes are enriched in cholesterol and are both recycled and newly generated. Cholesterol's role in supporting granule membrane formation and function is poorly understood. A TP b inding c assette transporters ABCG1 and ABCA1 regulate intracellular cholesterol and are important for insulin secretion. RNAi-induced depletion in cultured pancreatic β cells shows that ABCG1 is needed to stabilize newly made insulin granules against lysosomal degradation; ABCA1 is also involved but to a lesser extent. Both transporters are also required for optimum glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, likely via complementary roles. Exogenous cholesterol addition rescues knockdown-induced granule loss (ABCG1) and reduced secretion (both transporters). Another cholesterol transport protein, oxysterol binding protein (OSBP) appears to act proximally as a source of endogenous cholesterol for granule formation. Its knockdown caused similar defective stability of young granules and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, neither of which were rescued with exogenous cholesterol. Dual knockdowns of OSBP and ABC transporters support their serial function in supplying and concentrating cholesterol for granule formation. OSBP knockdown also decreased proinsulin synthesis consistent with a proximal ER defect. Thus, membrane cholesterol distribution contributes to insulin homeostasis at production, packaging and export levels through the actions of OSBP and ABCs G1 and A1. © 2018 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  1. Brain barriers and functional interfaces with sequential appearance of ABC efflux transporters during human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgård, Kjeld; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Holst, Camilla B.

    2017-01-01

    Adult brain is protected from entry of drugs and toxins by specific mechanisms such as ABC (ATP-binding Cassette) efflux transporters. Little is known when these appear in human brain during development. Cellular distribution of three main ABC transporters (ABCC1, ABCG2, ABCB1) was determined...... at blood-brain barriers and interfaces in human embryos and fetuses in first half of gestation. Antibodies against claudin-5 and-11 and antibodies to α-fetoprotein were used to describe morphological and functional aspects of brain barriers. First exchange interfaces to be established, probably at 4......-5 weeks post conception, are between brain and embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF) and between outer surface of brain anlage and primary meninx. They already exclude α-fetoprotein and are immunopositive for both claudins, ABCC1 and ABCG2. ABCB1 is detectable within a week of blood vessels first...

  2. ABC Transporter Subfamily D: Distinct Differences in Behavior between ABCD1–3 and ABCD4 in Subcellular Localization, Function, and Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the largest families of membrane-bound proteins and transport a wide variety of substrates across both extra- and intracellular membranes. They play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. To date, four ABC transporters belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 and ABCD4 are localized to peroxisomes and lysosomes, respectively. ABCD1 and ABCD2 are involved in the transport of long and very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) or their CoA-derivatives into peroxisomes with different substrate specificities, while ABCD3 is involved in the transport of branched chain acyl-CoA into peroxisomes. On the other hand, ABCD4 is deduced to take part in the transport of vitamin B12 from lysosomes into the cytosol. It is well known that the dysfunction of ABCD1 results in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, a severe neurodegenerative disease. Recently, it is reported that ABCD3 and ABCD4 are responsible for hepatosplenomegaly and vitamin B12 deficiency, respectively. In this review, the targeting mechanism and physiological functions of the ABCD transporters are summarized along with the related disease. PMID:27766264

  3. ABC Transporter Subfamily D: Distinct Differences in Behavior between ABCD1-3 and ABCD4 in Subcellular Localization, Function, and Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Morita, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the largest families of membrane-bound proteins and transport a wide variety of substrates across both extra- and intracellular membranes. They play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. To date, four ABC transporters belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1-3 and ABCD4 are localized to peroxisomes and lysosomes, respectively. ABCD1 and ABCD2 are involved in the transport of long and very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) or their CoA-derivatives into peroxisomes with different substrate specificities, while ABCD3 is involved in the transport of branched chain acyl-CoA into peroxisomes. On the other hand, ABCD4 is deduced to take part in the transport of vitamin B 12 from lysosomes into the cytosol. It is well known that the dysfunction of ABCD1 results in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, a severe neurodegenerative disease. Recently, it is reported that ABCD3 and ABCD4 are responsible for hepatosplenomegaly and vitamin B 12 deficiency, respectively. In this review, the targeting mechanism and physiological functions of the ABCD transporters are summarized along with the related disease.

  4. ABC Transporter Subfamily D: Distinct Differences in Behavior between ABCD1–3 and ABCD4 in Subcellular Localization, Function, and Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Kawaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are one of the largest families of membrane-bound proteins and transport a wide variety of substrates across both extra- and intracellular membranes. They play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. To date, four ABC transporters belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 and ABCD4 are localized to peroxisomes and lysosomes, respectively. ABCD1 and ABCD2 are involved in the transport of long and very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA or their CoA-derivatives into peroxisomes with different substrate specificities, while ABCD3 is involved in the transport of branched chain acyl-CoA into peroxisomes. On the other hand, ABCD4 is deduced to take part in the transport of vitamin B12 from lysosomes into the cytosol. It is well known that the dysfunction of ABCD1 results in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, a severe neurodegenerative disease. Recently, it is reported that ABCD3 and ABCD4 are responsible for hepatosplenomegaly and vitamin B12 deficiency, respectively. In this review, the targeting mechanism and physiological functions of the ABCD transporters are summarized along with the related disease.

  5. Interaction of BDE-47 and its Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP: Considerations for Human Exposure and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp; also known as MDR1, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; also known as ABCG2), are membrane-bound proteins that mediate the cellular efflux of xenobiotics as an important defense against chemic...

  6. Membrane Transporters for Bilirubin and Its Conjugates: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Čvorović

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bilirubin is a highly-hydrophobic tetrapyrrole which binds to plasma albumin. It is conjugated in the liver to glucuronic acid, and the water-soluble glucuronides are excreted in urine and bile. The membrane transporters of bilirubin diglucuronide are well-known. Still undefined are however the transporters performing the uptake of bilirubin from the blood into the liver, a process known to be fast and not rate-limited. The biological importance of this process may be appraised by considering that in normal adults 200–300 mg of bilirubin are produced daily, as a result of the physiologic turnover of hemoglobin and cellular cytochromes. Nevertheless, research in this field has yielded controversial and contradicting results. We have undertaken a systematic review of the literature, believing in its utility to improve the existing knowledge and promote further advancements.Methods: We have sourced the PubMed database until 30 June 2017 by applying 5 sequential searches. Screening and eligibility criteria were applied to retain research articles reporting results obtained by using bilirubin molecules in membrane transport assays in vitro or by assessing serum bilirubin levels in in vivo experiments.Results: We have identified 311 articles, retaining 44, reporting data on experimental models having 6 incremental increases of complexity (isolated proteins, membrane vesicles, cells, organ fragments, in vivo rodents, and human studies, demonstrating the function of 19 membrane transporters, encoded by either SLCO or ABC genes. Three other bilirubin transporters have no gene, though one, i.e., bilitranslocase, is annotated in the Transporter Classification Database.Conclusions: This is the first review that has systematically examined the membrane transporters for bilirubin and its conjugates. Paradoxically, the remarkable advancements in the field of membrane transport of bilirubin have pointed to the elusive mechanism(s enabling

  7. ABC Transporter for Corrinoids in Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1†

    OpenAIRE

    Woodson, Jesse D.; Reynolds, April A.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2005-01-01

    We report evidence for the existence of a putative ABC transporter for corrinoid utilization in the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1. Results from genetic and nutritional analyses of Halobacterium showed that mutants with lesions in open reading frames (ORFs) Vng1370G, Vng1371Gm, and Vng1369G required a 105-fold higher concentration of cobalamin for growth than the wild-type or parent strain. The data support the conclusion that these ORFs encode orthologs of the b...

  8. Molecular insights into the mechanism of ATP-hydrolysis by the NBD of the ABC-transporter HlyB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanekop, N; Zaitseva, J; Jenewein, S; Holland, I B; Schmitt, L

    2006-02-13

    The ABC-transporter HlyB is a central element of the Type I protein secretion machinery, dedicated to export the E. coli toxin HlyA in a single step across the two membranes of the cell envelope. Here, we discuss recent insights into the structure and the mechanism of ATP-hydrolysis by the NBD of HlyB. Combining structural and biochemical data, we have suggested that substrate-assisted catalysis (SAC), but not general base catalysis, is responsible for ATP-hydrolysis in this NBD and might also operate in other NBDs. Finally, the implications and advantages of SAC are discussed in the context of ATP-induced dimerization of the NBDs.

  9. Alzheimer's and ABC transporters--new opportunities for diagnostics and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahnke, Jens; Langer, Oliver; Krohn, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Much has been said about the increasing number of demented patients and the main risk factor 'age'. Frustratingly, we do not know the precise pattern and all modulating factors that provoke the pathologic changes in the brains of affected elderly. We have to diagnose early to be able to stop the progression of diseases that irreversibly destroy brain substance. Familiar AD cases have mislead some researchers for almost 20 years, which has unfortunately narrowed the scientific understanding and has, thus, lead to insufficient funding of independent approaches. Therefore, basic researchers hardly have been able to develop causative treatments and clinicians still do not have access to prognostic and early diagnostic tools. During the recent years it became clear that insufficient Aβ export, physiologically facilitated by the ABC transporter superfamily at the brain's barriers, plays a fundamental role in disease initiation and progression. Furthermore, export mechanisms that are deficient in affected elderly are new targets for activation and, thus, treatment, but ideally also for prevention. In sporadic AD disturbed clearance of β-amyloid from the brain is so far the most important factor for its accumulation in the parenchyma and vessel walls. Here, we review findings about the contribution of ABC transporters and of the perivascular drainage/glymphatic system on β-amyloid clearance. We highlight their potential value for innovative early diagnostics using PET and describe recently described, effective ABC transporter-targeting agents as potential causative treatment for neurodegenerative proteopathies/dementias. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Oxidative Stress on ABC Transporters: Contribution to Epilepsy Pharmacoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpreet Kaur Grewal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder affecting around 1%–2% of population worldwide and its treatment includes use of antiepileptic drugs to control seizures. Failure to respond to antiepileptic drug therapy is a major clinical problem and over expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters is considered one of the major reasons for pharmacoresistance. In this review, we have summarized the regulation of ABC transporters in response to oxidative stress due to disease and antiepileptic drugs. Further, ketogenic diet and antioxidants were examined for their role in pharmacoresistance. The understanding of signalling pathways and mechanism involved may help in identifying potential therapeutic targets and improving drug response.

  11. The Crystal Structure of the YknZ Extracellular Domain of ABC Transporter YknWXYZ from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Xu

    Full Text Available Bacillus possesses the peptide toxin Sporulation-Delaying Protein (SDP, which can kill cells within a biofilm to support continued growth, thereby delaying the onset of biofilm sporulation. The four-component transporter YknWXYZ acts as a major SDP efflux pump to protect cells against the endogenous SDP toxin, for which YknYZ is a non-canonical ATP-binding cassette (ABC-type transporter. YknYZ consists of the following two components: (1 an individual protein (YknY and (2 a respective permease (YknZ. To date, the crystal structure, molecular function, and mechanism of action of the integral membrane protein YknZ remain to be elucidated. In this study, to characterize the structural and biochemical roles of YknZ in the functional assembly of YknWXYZ, we predicted and overexpressed the YknZ extracellular domain. We determined the crystal structure of B. amyloliquefaciens YknZ at a resolution of 2.0 Å. The structure revealed that the YknZ extracellular region exhibits significant structural similarity with the MacB periplasmic domain, which is a non-canonical ABC-type transporter in the tripartite macrolide-specific efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. We also found that the YknZ extracellular domain can directly bind to an extracellular component of YknX. This structural and biochemical study provides insights into the assembly of YknWXYZ, which may be relevant to understanding cannibalistic peptide toxin resistance in Bacillus and controlling bacterial growth.

  12. Mercury toxicokinetics of the healthy human term placenta involve amino acid transporters and ABC transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straka, Elisabeth; Ellinger, Isabella; Balthasar, Christina; Scheinast, Matthias; Schatz, Jasmin; Szattler, Tamara; Bleichert, Sonja; Saleh, Leila; Knöfler, Martin; Zeisler, Harald; Hengstschläger, Markus; Rosner, Margit; Salzer, Hans; Gundacker, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • It is known that MeHg is able to pass the placenta and to affect fetal brain development. • Uptake and efflux transporters were examined in human primary trophoblast cells and BeWo cells. • Involvement in mercury transfer was assessed by measurement of cellular mercury content upon siRNA mediated gene knockdown. • Localization of transporters was determined by immunofluorescence microscopy. • LAT1 and rBAT at the apical membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast (STB) are involved in MeHg uptake. • MRP1 located at basal membrane of STB mediates mercury efflux. - Abstract: Background: The capacity of the human placenta to handle exogenous stressors is poorly understood. The heavy metal mercury is well-known to pass the placenta and to affect brain development. An active transport across the placenta has been assumed. The underlying mechanisms however are virtually unknown. Objectives: Uptake and efflux transporters (17 candidate proteins) assumed to play a key role in placental mercury transfer were examined for expression, localization and function in human primary trophoblast cells and the trophoblast-derived choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo. Methods: To prove involvement of the transporters, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) and exposed cells to methylmercury (MeHg). Total mercury contents of cells were analyzed by Cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Localization of the proteins in human term placenta sections was determined via immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: We found the amino acid transporter subunits L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and rBAT (related to b 0,+ type amino acid transporter) as well as the efflux transporter multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP)1 to be involved in mercury kinetics of trophoblast cells (t-test P < 0.05). Conclusion: The amino acid transporters located at the apical side of the syncytiotrophoblast (STB) manage uptake of MeHg. Mercury conjugated to glutathione (GSH) is

  13. Computer-Aided Recognition of ABC Transporters Substrates and Its Application to the Development of New Drugs for Refractory Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couyoupetrou, Manuel; Gantner, Melisa E; Di Ianni, Mauricio E; Palestro, Pablo H; Enrique, Andrea V; Gavernet, Luciana; Ruiz, Maria E; Pesce, Guido; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E; Talevi, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the introduction of more than 15 third generation antiepileptic drugs to the market from 1990 to the moment, about one third of the epileptic patients still suffer from refractory to intractable epilepsy. Several hypotheses seek to explain the failure of drug treatments to control epilepsy symptoms in such patients. The most studied one proposes that drug resistance might be related with regional overactivity of efflux transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily at the blood-brain barrier and/or the epileptic foci in the brain. Different strategies have been conceived to address the transporter hypothesis, among them inhibiting or down-regulating the efflux transporters or bypassing them through a diversity of artifices. Here, we review scientific evidence supporting the transporter hypothesis along with its limitations, as well as computer-assisted early recognition of ABC transporter substrates as an interesting strategy to develop novel antiepileptic drugs capable of treating refractory epilepsy linked to ABC transporters overactivity.

  14. Live cell FRET microscopy: homo- and heterodimerization of two human peroxisomal ABC transporters, the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP, ABCD1) and PMP70 (ABCD3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Merle; Verrier, Sophie E; Ohlenbusch, Andreas; Schäfer, Annika; Söling, Hans-Dieter; Wouters, Fred S; Gärtner, Jutta

    2007-09-14

    The adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) and the 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein (PMP70) are half-ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the mammalian peroxisome membrane. Mutations in the gene encoding ALDP result in a devastating neurodegenerative disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) that is associated with elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids because of impaired peroxisomal beta-oxidation. The interactions of peroxisomal ABC transporters, their role in the peroxisomal membrane, and their functions in disease pathogenesis are poorly understood. Studies on ABC transporters revealed that half-transporters have to dimerize to gain functionality. So far, conflicting observations are described for ALDP. By the use of in vitro methods (yeast two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation assays) on the one hand, it was shown that ALDP can form homodimers as well as heterodimers with PMP70 and ALDR, while on the other hand, it was demonstrated that ALDP and PMP70 exclusively homodimerize. To circumvent the problems of artificial interactions due to biochemical sample preparation in vitro, we investigated protein-protein interaction of ALDP in its physiological environment by FRET microscopy in intact living cells. The statistical relevance of FRET data was determined in two different ways using probability distribution shift analysis and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. We demonstrate in vivo that ALDP and PMP70 form homodimers as well as ALDP/PMP70 heterodimers where ALDP homodimers predominate. Using C-terminal deletion constructs of ALDP, we demonstrate that the last 87 C-terminal amino acids harbor the most important protein domain mediating these interactions, and that the N-terminal transmembrane region of ALDP has an additional stabilization effect on ALDP homodimers. Loss of ALDP homo- or heterodimerization is highly relevant for understanding the disease mechanisms of X-ALD.

  15. Simulation of the coupling between nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains in the ABC transporter BtuCD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob; Kandt, C.; Peters, Günther H.j.

    2007-01-01

    binding domains and the shared role of ATP in ABC transporters. The rearrangements in the cytoplasmic gate region do not provide enough space for B12 to diffuse from the transporter pore into the cytoplasm, which could suggest that peristaltic forces are needed to exclude B12 from the transporter pore....

  16. Describing the role of Drosophila melanogaster ABC transporters in insecticide biology using CRISPR-Cas9 knockouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Shane; Fusetto, Roberto; Batterham, Philip

    2017-12-01

    ABC transporters have a well-established role in drug resistance, effluxing xenobiotics from cells and tissues within the organism. More recently, research has been dedicated to understanding the role insect ABC transporters play in insecticide toxicity, but progress in understanding the contribution of specific transporters has been hampered by the lack of functional genetic tools. Here, we report knockouts of three Drosophila melanogaster ABC transporter genes, Mdr49, Mdr50, and Mdr65, that are homologous to the well-studied mammalian ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein). Each knockout mutant was created in the same wild type background and tested against a panel of insecticides representing different chemical classes. Mdr65 knockouts were more susceptible to all neuroactive insecticides tested, but Mdr49 and Mdr50 knockouts showed increased susceptibility or resistance depending on the insecticide used. Mdr65 was chosen for further analysis. Calculation of LC 50 values for the Mdr65 knockout allowed the substrate specificity of this transporter to be examined. No obvious distinguishing structural features were shared among MDR65 substrates. A role for Mdr65 in insecticide transport was confirmed by testing the capacity of the knockout to synergize with the ABC inhibitor verapamil and by measuring the levels of insecticide retained in the body of knockout flies. These data unambiguously establish the influence of ABC transporters on the capacity of wild type D. melanogaster to tolerate insecticide exposure and suggest that both tissue and substrate specificity underpin this capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract.

  18. Reversal of resistance by GF120918 in cell lines expressing the ABC half-transporter, MXR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bruin, M; Miyake, K; Litman, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of several newly identified members of the ABC transporter family has necessitated the development of antagonists that are able to inhibit more than one transporter. We assessed the ability of the chemosensitizer GF120918 to function as a multispecific antagonist using cytotoxicity...... assays, rhodamine and calcein efflux assays, and confocal microscopy in cell lines expressing different multidrug resistance transporters. At a concentration of 1 microM in cytotoxicity assays, GF120918 was able to sensitize both S1-B1-20, a subline expressing P-glycoprotein (Pgp), and S1-M1......-80, a subline expressing a newly identified mitoxantrone transporter, MXR. GF120918 was ineffective in sensitizing MRP-overexpressing MCF-7 VP-16 cells to etoposide as determined by cytotoxicity studies. In flow cytometry experiments, rhodamine 123 efflux in S1-B1-20 cells was decreased at GF120918...

  19. Transcriptional expression analysis of ABC efflux transporters and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in the Chinese rare minnow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lilai; Lv, Biping; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the cDNA fragments of five ABC transporter genes (ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC2, and ABCG2) in the rare minnow were cloned, and their tissue-specific expression patterns were evaluated across eight rare minnow tissues (liver, gill, intestine, kidney, spleen, brain, skin, and muscle). Furthermore, the transcriptional effects on these ABC transporter genes and five xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme genes (CYP1A, GSTm, GSTp1, GCLC, and UGT1a) were determined in the rare minnow liver after 12 days of pyrene exposure. Basal expression analysis showed that the tissues with high expression of the ABC transporters included the liver, kidney, and intestine. Moreover, the most highly expressed of the ABC genes were ABCB1 and ABCC2 in all eight of the tissues tested. The ABCB11 gene was almost exclusively expressed in the liver of the rare minnow, whereas ABCC1 and ABCG2 showed weak expression in all eight tissues compared to ABCB1 and ABCC2. Our results provide the first thorough examination of the expression patterns of toxicologically relevant ABC transporters in the rare minnow and serve as a necessary basis for further studies of these ABC transporters in fish. Furthermore, synergistic up-regulation of CYP1A, GSTp1, GCLC, UGT1a, and ABCC2 was observed in the rare minnow liver following pyrene exposure, while GSTm, ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, and ABCG2 were not significantly affected (p ABC transporters by pyrene suggests a possible involvement and cooperation of these genes in the detoxification process in rare minnows. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular characterization of ABC transporters in marine ciliate, Euplotes crassus: Identification and response to cadmium and benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hokyun; Yim, Bora; Kim, Jisoo; Kim, Haeyeon; Lee, Young-Mi

    2017-11-30

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters participate in transporting various substances, including xenobiotics, in or out of cells. However, their genetic information and function in ciliates remain still unclear. In this study, we sequenced and characterized two ABC transporter genes (EcABCB and EcABCC), and investigated the effect of cadmium (Cd) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) on their function and gene expression, using efflux assay and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), respectively, in the marine ciliate, Euplotes crassus. Sequencing analysis and efflux assay showed that EcABCB and EcABCC are typical ABC transporters, possessing conserved function. Exposure to Cd (≥5mg/L) and B[a]P (≥50.5μg/L) enhanced accumulation of a substrate. A significant increase in the expression of EcABCB and EcABC mRNA was observed at lower concentration in response to Cd and B[a]P. Our findings indicate that Cd and B[a]P could inhibit the efflux function of ABC transporters, leading to cellular toxicity in the ciliate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  2. Plant ABC proteins--a unified nomenclature and updated inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Paul J; Bird, David; Burla, Bo; Dassa, Elie; Forestier, Cyrille; Geisler, Markus; Klein, Markus; Kolukisaoglu, Uner; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico; Murphy, Angus; Rea, Philip A; Samuels, Lacey; Schulz, Burkhard; Spalding, Edgar J; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Theodoulou, Frederica L

    2008-04-01

    The ABC superfamily comprises both membrane-bound transporters and soluble proteins involved in a broad range of processes, many of which are of considerable agricultural, biotechnological and medical potential. Completion of the Arabidopsis and rice genome sequences has revealed a particularly large and diverse complement of plant ABC proteins in comparison with other organisms. Forward and reverse genetics, together with heterologous expression, have uncovered many novel roles for plant ABC proteins, but this progress has been accompanied by a confusing proliferation of names for plant ABC genes and their products. A consolidated nomenclature will provide much-needed clarity and a framework for future research.

  3. Using mass spectrometry for identification of ABC transporters from Xanthomonas citri and mutants expressed in different growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, J.N.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Xanthomonas citri is a phytopathogenic bacterium that infects citrus plants causing significant losses for the economy. In our group, we have focused on the identification and characterization of ABC transport proteins of this bacterium, in order to determinate their function for growth in vitro and in vivo, during infection. ABC transporters represent one of the largest families of proteins, which transport since small molecules as ions up to oligopeptides and sugars. In prokaryotic cells many works have reported the ABC transport function in pathogenesis, resistance, biofilm formation, infectivity and DNA repair, but until our knowledge, there is no data related to these transporters and X. citri. So, In order to determinate which transporters are expressed in X. citri, we started a proteomic analysis based on mono and bi-dimensional gels associated to mass spectrometry analyses. After growing X. citri and two different mutants deleted for ssuA and nitA genes in LB and minimum media, cellular extracts were obtained and used for preparation of mono and bi-dimensional gels. Seven bands covering the expected mass of ABC transporter components (20 kDa to 50 kDa) in SDS-PAGE were cut off the gel, treated with trypsin and submitted to the MS for protein identification. The results of 2D gels were good enough and will serve as a standard for development of similar experiments in large scale. (author)

  4. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Genes in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Li, Shangqi; Peng, Wenzhu; Feng, Shuaisheng; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Xu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family is considered to be one of the largest gene families in all forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life. Although the ABC transporter genes have been annotated in some species, detailed information about the ABC superfamily and the evolutionary characterization of ABC genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) are still unclear. In this research, we identified 61 ABC transporter genes in the common carp genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into seven subfamilies, namely 11 ABCAs, six ABCBs, 19 ABCCs, eight ABCDs, two ABCEs, four ABCFs, and 11 ABCGs. Comparative analysis of the ABC genes in seven vertebrate species including common carp, showed that at least 10 common carp genes were retained from the third round of whole genome duplication, while 12 duplicated ABC genes may have come from the fourth round of whole genome duplication. Gene losses were also observed for 14 ABC genes. Expression profiles of the 61 ABC genes in six common carp tissues (brain, heart, spleen, kidney, intestine, and gill) revealed extensive functional divergence among the ABC genes. Different copies of some genes had tissue-specific expression patterns, which may indicate some gene function specialization. This study provides essential genomic resources for future studies in common carp.

  5. Transport through track etched polymeric blend membrane

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymer blends of polycarbonate (PC) and polysulphone (PSF) having thickness, 27 m, are prepared by solution cast method. The transport properties of pores in a blend membrane are examined. The pores were produced in this membrane by a track etching technique. For this purpose, a thin polymer membrane was ...

  6. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  7. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  8. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  9. Detergent screening and purification of the human liver ABC transporters BSEP (ABCB11 and MDR3 (ABCB4 expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Ellinger

    Full Text Available The human liver ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11 and the multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4 fulfill the translocation of bile salts and phosphatidylcholine across the apical membrane of hepatocytes. In concert with ABCG5/G8, these two transporters are responsible for the formation of bile and mutations within these transporters can lead to severe hereditary diseases. In this study, we report the heterologous overexpression and purification of human BSEP and MDR3 as well as the expression of the corresponding C-terminal GFP-fusion proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that BSEP-GFP and MDR3-GFP are localized in the plasma membrane of P. pastoris. Furthermore, we demonstrate the first purification of human BSEP and MDR3 yielding ∼1 mg and ∼6 mg per 100 g of wet cell weight, respectively. By screening over 100 detergents using a dot blot technique, we found that only zwitterionic, lipid-like detergents such as Fos-cholines or Cyclofos were able to extract both transporters in sufficient amounts for subsequent functional analysis. For MDR3, fluorescence-detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC screens revealed that increasing the acyl chain length of Fos-Cholines improved monodispersity. BSEP purified in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside or Cymal-5 after solubilization with Fos-choline 16 from P. pastoris membranes showed binding to ATP-agarose. Furthermore, detergent-solubilized and purified MDR3 showed a substrate-inducible ATPase activity upon addition of phosphatidylcholine lipids. These results form the basis for further biochemical analysis of human BSEP and MDR3 to elucidate the function of these clinically relevant ABC transporters.

  10. Detergent Screening and Purification of the Human Liver ABC Transporters BSEP (ABCB11) and MDR3 (ABCB4) Expressed in the Yeast Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stindt, Jan; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    The human liver ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11) and the multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4) fulfill the translocation of bile salts and phosphatidylcholine across the apical membrane of hepatocytes. In concert with ABCG5/G8, these two transporters are responsible for the formation of bile and mutations within these transporters can lead to severe hereditary diseases. In this study, we report the heterologous overexpression and purification of human BSEP and MDR3 as well as the expression of the corresponding C-terminal GFP-fusion proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that BSEP-GFP and MDR3-GFP are localized in the plasma membrane of P. pastoris. Furthermore, we demonstrate the first purification of human BSEP and MDR3 yielding ∼1 mg and ∼6 mg per 100 g of wet cell weight, respectively. By screening over 100 detergents using a dot blot technique, we found that only zwitterionic, lipid-like detergents such as Fos-cholines or Cyclofos were able to extract both transporters in sufficient amounts for subsequent functional analysis. For MDR3, fluorescence-detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC) screens revealed that increasing the acyl chain length of Fos-Cholines improved monodispersity. BSEP purified in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside or Cymal-5 after solubilization with Fos-choline 16 from P. pastoris membranes showed binding to ATP-agarose. Furthermore, detergent-solubilized and purified MDR3 showed a substrate-inducible ATPase activity upon addition of phosphatidylcholine lipids. These results form the basis for further biochemical analysis of human BSEP and MDR3 to elucidate the function of these clinically relevant ABC transporters. PMID:23593265

  11. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium--Effects of Prochloraz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagmur Yagdiran

    Full Text Available Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11 featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV. Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11 and bovine (BME-UV mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers.

  12. Molybdate transporter ModABC is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périnet, Simone; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Ouellet, Myriam M; Charette, Steve J; Levesque, Roger C

    2016-01-12

    Mechanisms underlying the success of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are poorly defined. The modA gene was previously linked to in vivo competitiveness of P. aeruginosa by a genetic screening in the rat lung. This gene encodes a subunit of transporter ModABC, which is responsible for extracellular uptake of molybdate. This compound is essential for molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductases. Since anaerobic growth conditions are known to occur during CF chronic lung infection, inactivation of a molybdate transporter could inhibit proliferation through the inactivation of denitrification enzymes. Hence, we performed phenotypic characterization of a modA mutant strain obtained by signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM_modA) and assessed its virulence in vivo with two host models. The STM_modA mutant was in fact defective for anaerobic growth and unable to use nitrates in the growth medium for anaerobic respiration. Bacterial growth and nitrate usage were restored when the medium was supplemented with molybdate. Most significantly, the mutant strain showed reduced virulence compared to wild-type strain PAO1 according to a competitive index in the rat model of chronic lung infection and a predation assay with Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. As the latter took place in aerobic conditions, the in vivo impact of the mutation in modA appears to extend beyond its effect on anaerobic growth. These results support the modABC-encoded transporter as important for the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that enzymatic machinery implicated in anaerobic growth during chronic lung infection in CF merits further investigation as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Involvement of the carboxyl-terminal region of the yeast peroxisomal half ABC transporter Pxa2p in its interaction with Pxa1p and in transporter function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yi Chuang

    Full Text Available The peroxisome is a single membrane-bound organelle in eukaryotic cells involved in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation of fatty acids. The human genetic disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene (encoding ALDP, a peroxisomal half ATP-binding cassette [ABC] transporter. This disease is characterized by defective peroxisomal β-oxidation and a large accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in brain white matter, adrenal cortex, and testis. ALDP forms a homodimer proposed to be the functional transporter, whereas the peroxisomal transporter in yeast is a heterodimer comprising two half ABC transporters, Pxa1p and Pxa2p, both orthologs of human ALDP. While the carboxyl-terminal domain of ALDP is engaged in dimerization, it remains unknown whether the same region is involved in the interaction between Pxa1p and Pxa2p.Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we found that the carboxyl-terminal region (CT of Pxa2p, but not of Pxa1p, is required for their interaction. Further analysis indicated that the central part of the CT (designated CT2 of Pxa2p was indispensable for its interaction with the carboxyl terminally truncated Pxa1_NBD. An interaction between the CT of Pxa2p and Pxa1_NBD was not detected, but could be identified in the presence of Pxa2_NBD-CT1. A single mutation of two conserved residues (aligned with X-ALD-associated mutations at the same positions in ALDP in the CT2 of the Pxa2_NBD-CT protein impaired its interaction with Pxa1_NBD or Pxa1_NBD-CT, resulting in a mutant protein that exhibited a proteinase K digestion profile different from that of the wild-type protein. Functional analysis of these mutant proteins on oleate plates indicated that they were defective in transporter function.The CT of Pxa2p is involved in its interaction with Pxa1p and in transporter function. This concept may be applied to human ALDP studies, helping to establish the pathological mechanism for CT-related X

  14. Human and Rat ABC Transporter Efflux of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Glucuronide: Interspecies Comparison and Implications for Pharmacokinetic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant interspecies differences exist between human and rodent with respect to absorption, distribution, and excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and its primary metabolite, BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G). ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter enzymes play important roles in these physi...

  15. The substrate-binding protein in bacterial ABC transporters: dissecting roles in the evolution of substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Abbas; Horler, Richard S P; Muller, Axel; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Wilson, Keith S; Thomas, Gavin H

    2015-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, although being ubiquitous in biology, often feature a subunit that is limited primarily to bacteria and archaea. This subunit, the substrate-binding protein (SBP), is a key determinant of the substrate specificity and high affinity of ABC uptake systems in these organisms. Most prokaryotes have many SBP-dependent ABC transporters that recognize a broad range of ligands from metal ions to amino acids, sugars and peptides. Herein, we review the structure and function of a number of more unusual SBPs, including an ABC transporter involved in the transport of rare furanose forms of sugars and an SBP that has evolved to specifically recognize the bacterial cell wall-derived murein tripeptide (Mtp). Both these examples illustrate that subtle changes in binding-site architecture, including changes in side chains not directly involved in ligand co-ordination, can result in significant alteration of substrate range in novel and unpredictable ways. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  16. An ABC transporter controls export of a Drosophila germ cell attractant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Sara; Lehmann, Ruth

    2009-02-13

    Directed cell migration, which is critical for embryonic development, leukocyte trafficking, and cell metastasis, depends on chemoattraction. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase regulates the production of an attractant for Drosophila germ cells that may itself be geranylated. Chemoattractants are commonly secreted through a classical, signal peptide-dependent pathway, but a geranyl-modified attractant would require an alternative pathway. In budding yeast, pheromones produced by a-cells are farnesylated and secreted in a signal peptide-independent manner, requiring the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Ste6p. Here we show that Drosophila germ cell migration uses a similar pathway, demonstrating that invertebrate germ cells, like yeast cells, are attracted to lipid-modified peptides. Components of this unconventional export pathway are highly conserved, suggesting that this pathway may control the production of similarly modified chemoattractants in organisms ranging from yeast to humans.

  17. Genetic variation in ABC transporter A1 contributes to HDL cholesterol in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2004-01-01

    or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ABCA1 were overrepresented in individuals with the lowest 1% (n=95) or highest 1% (n=95) HDL-C levels in the general population by screening the core promoter and coding region of ABCA1. For all nonsynonymous SNPs identified, we determined the effect of genotype......Homozygosity for mutations in ABC transporter A1 (ABCA1) causes Tangier disease, a rare HDL-deficiency syndrome. Whether heterozygosity for genetic variation in ABCA1 also contributes to HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in the general population is presently unclear. We determined whether mutations...... on lipid traits in 9,259 individuals from the general population. Heterozygosity for ABCA1 mutations was identified in 10% of individuals with low HDL-C only. Three of 6 nonsynonymous SNPs (V771M, V825I, and R1587K) were associated with increases or decreases in HDL-C in women in the general population...

  18. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R.; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2016-11-08

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane reforming reactor configured using repeating assemblies of oxygen transport membrane tubes and catalytic reforming reactors.

  19. The ABC of ECF transporters : discovery and initial characterization of ECF-type ATP-binding casette (ABC) importers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Beek, Josy

    2012-01-01

    Josy ter Beek heeft een nieuwe klasse transporteiwitten in de celmembraan ontdekt en gekarakteriseerd. Aangezien deze transporter alleen door bacteriën wordt gebruikt en voor het transport van verscheidene belangrijke stoffen zorgt, kan informatie over deze nieuwe klasse transporters in de toekomst

  20. Mass transport in thin supported silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis multi-component mass transport in thin supported amorphous silica membranes is discussed. These membranes are micro-porous, with pore diameters smaller than 4Å and show high fluxes for small molecules (such as hydrogen) combined with high selectivities for these molecules with respect

  1. Cholestasis: The ABCs of Cellular Mechanisms for Impaired Bile Secretion – Transporters and Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldon A Shaffer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport of bile salts, organic anions and cations, bilirubin and other substances from the portal blood into the biliary system is accomplished through the action of an array of transporter proteins in the hepatocyte. Transporters on the basolateral membrane, which faces the space of Disse, are responsible for the uptake of bile salts and organic anions. Once translocated through the hepatocyte to the canalicular membrane, other ATP pumps provide the energy to export bile salts, phospholipids and organic ions into the bile. Canalicular transport is rate limiting. Defects in specific canalicular transporters are responsible for many of the intrahepatic cholestatic syndromes that occur in children and adults. Moreover, cholestasis provokes changes in several transport mechanisms, many of which appear to be compensatory and serve to protect the liver from the toxic effects of accumulated materials. The identification and characterization of the major transporters responsible for bile formation have yielded a more precise classification of the cholestatic syndromes of infancy and childhood, and are unlocking the molecular mechanism of acquired cholestasis in adults. This review identifies the basic physiology of bile production and the actions of the key transporters, indicates the clinical relevance and possible treatments of transport disorders, and provides an illustrative case.

  2. The ABC transporter Rv1272c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances the import of long-chain fatty acids in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Audrey; Daniel, Jaiyanth

    2018-02-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which causes tuberculosis, is capable of accumulating triacylglycerol (TAG) by utilizing fatty acids from host cells. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are involved in transport processes in all organisms. Among the classical ABC transporters in Mtb none have been implicated in fatty acid import. Since the transport of fatty acids from the host cell is important for dormancy-associated TAG synthesis in the pathogen, mycobacterial ABC transporter(s) could potentially be involved in this process. Based on sequence identities with a bacterial ABC transporter that mediates fatty acid import for TAG synthesis, we identified Rv1272c, a hitherto uncharacterized ABC-transporter in Mtb that also shows sequence identities with a plant ABC transporter involved in fatty acid transport. We expressed Rv1272c in E. coli and show that it enhances the import of radiolabeled fatty acids. We also show that Rv1272c causes a significant increase in the metabolic incorporation of radiolabeled long-chain fatty acids into cardiolipin, a tetra-acylated phospholipid, and phosphatidylglycerol in E. coli. This is the first report on the function of Rv1272c showing that it displays a long-chain fatty acid transport function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. Results A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene, proposed to play a role in the incorporation of ergosterol in the yeast plasma membrane, was found to confer resistance to growth inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 expression was seen to contribute to decreased 3 H-ethanol intracellular concentrations and decreased plasma membrane permeabilization of yeast cells challenged with inhibitory ethanol concentrations. Given the increased tolerance to ethanol of cells expressing PDR18, the final concentration of ethanol produced during high gravity alcoholic fermentation by yeast cells devoid of PDR18 was lower than the final ethanol concentration produced by the corresponding parental strain. Moreover, an engineered yeast strain in which the PDR18 promoter was replaced in the genome by the stronger PDR5 promoter, leading to increased PDR18 mRNA levels during alcoholic fermentation, was able to attain a 6 % higher ethanol concentration and a 17 % higher ethanol production yield than the parental strain. The improved fermentative performance of yeast cells over-expressing PDR18 was found to correlate with their increased ethanol tolerance and ability to restrain plasma membrane permeabilization induced throughout high gravity fermentation. Conclusions PDR18 gene over-expression increases yeast ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance leading to the production of highly inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 overexpression in industrial yeast strains appears to be a promising approach to improve alcoholic

  4. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miguel C; Godinho, Cláudia P; Cabrito, Tânia R; Mira, Nuno P; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2012-07-27

    The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene, proposed to play a role in the incorporation of ergosterol in the yeast plasma membrane, was found to confer resistance to growth inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 expression was seen to contribute to decreased ³H-ethanol intracellular concentrations and decreased plasma membrane permeabilization of yeast cells challenged with inhibitory ethanol concentrations. Given the increased tolerance to ethanol of cells expressing PDR18, the final concentration of ethanol produced during high gravity alcoholic fermentation by yeast cells devoid of PDR18 was lower than the final ethanol concentration produced by the corresponding parental strain. Moreover, an engineered yeast strain in which the PDR18 promoter was replaced in the genome by the stronger PDR5 promoter, leading to increased PDR18 mRNA levels during alcoholic fermentation, was able to attain a 6 % higher ethanol concentration and a 17 % higher ethanol production yield than the parental strain. The improved fermentative performance of yeast cells over-expressing PDR18 was found to correlate with their increased ethanol tolerance and ability to restrain plasma membrane permeabilization induced throughout high gravity fermentation. PDR18 gene over-expression increases yeast ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance leading to the production of highly inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 overexpression in industrial yeast strains appears to be a promising approach to improve alcoholic fermentation performance for sustainable bio

  5. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Miguel C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. Results A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene, proposed to play a role in the incorporation of ergosterol in the yeast plasma membrane, was found to confer resistance to growth inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 expression was seen to contribute to decreased 3 H-ethanol intracellular concentrations and decreased plasma membrane permeabilization of yeast cells challenged with inhibitory ethanol concentrations. Given the increased tolerance to ethanol of cells expressing PDR18, the final concentration of ethanol produced during high gravity alcoholic fermentation by yeast cells devoid of PDR18 was lower than the final ethanol concentration produced by the corresponding parental strain. Moreover, an engineered yeast strain in which the PDR18 promoter was replaced in the genome by the stronger PDR5 promoter, leading to increased PDR18 mRNA levels during alcoholic fermentation, was able to attain a 6 % higher ethanol concentration and a 17 % higher ethanol production yield than the parental strain. The improved fermentative performance of yeast cells over-expressing PDR18 was found to correlate with their increased ethanol tolerance and ability to restrain plasma membrane permeabilization induced throughout high gravity fermentation. Conclusions PDR18 gene over-expression increases yeast ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance leading to the production of highly inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 overexpression in industrial yeast strains appears to be a promising approach to

  6. The ABC of Biofilm Drug Tolerance: the MerR-Like Regulator BrlR Is an Activator of ABC Transport Systems, with PA1874-77 Contributing to the Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms to Tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Bandita; Sauer, Karin

    2018-02-01

    A hallmark of biofilms is their tolerance to killing by antimicrobial agents. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa , biofilm drug tolerance requires the c-di-GMP-responsive MerR transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm drug tolerance has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that BrlR activates the expression of at least 7 ABC transport systems, including the PA1874-PA1875-PA1876-PA1877 (PA1874-77) operon, with chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter region of PA1874-77. Insertional inactivation of the 7 ABC transport systems rendered P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms susceptible to tobramycin or norfloxacin. Susceptibility was linked to drug accumulation, with BrlR contributing to norfloxacin accumulation in a manner dependent on multidrug efflux pumps and the PA1874-77 ABC transport system. Inactivation of the respective ABC transport system, furthermore, eliminated the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by tobramycin but not norfloxacin, indicating that drug accumulation is not linked to biofilm drug tolerance. Our findings indicate for the first time that BrlR, a MerR-type transcriptional activator, activates genes encoding several ABC transport systems, in addition to multiple multidrug efflux pump genes. Moreover, our data confirm a BrlR target contributing to drug tolerance, likely countering the prevailing dogma that biofilm tolerance arises from a multiplicity of factors. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhiza affects nickel translocation and expression of ABC transporter and metallothionein genes in Festuca arundinacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Leila; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Mostafavi pour, Sodabeh

    2016-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are key microorganisms for enhancing phytoremediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study, the effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Funneliformis mosseae (=Glomus mosseae) on physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the nickel (Ni) tolerance of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea = Schedonorus arundinaceus) were investigated. Nickel addition had a pronounced negative effect on tall fescue growth and photosynthetic pigment contents, as well as on AMF colonization. Phosphorus content increased markedly in mycorrhizal plants (M) compared to non-inoculated (NM) ones. However, no significant difference was observed in root carbohydrate content between AMF-inoculated and non-inoculated plants. For both M and NM plants, Ni concentrations in shoots and roots increased according to the addition of the metal into soil, but inoculation with F. mosseae led to significantly lower Ni translocation from roots to the aboveground parts compared to non-inoculated plants. ABC transporter and metallothionein transcripts accumulated to considerably higher levels in tall fescue plants colonized by F. mosseae than in the corresponding non-mycorrhizal plants. These results highlight the importance of mycorrhizal colonization in alleviating Ni-induced stress by reducing Ni transport from roots to shoots of tall fescue plants.

  8. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  9. Lithium transport across biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1990-01-01

    Li+ is actively transported out of cells, and across different epithelia of both mammalian and amphibian origin. Due to the low affinity of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase for Li+, the transport is most likely energized by exchange and/or cotransport processes. The detailed mechanism by which Li+ is reabsorbed...

  10. Lithium transport across biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1990-01-01

    Li+ is actively transported out of cells, and across different epithelia of both mammalian and amphibian origin. Due to the low affinity of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase for Li+, the transport is most likely energized by exchange and/or cotransport processes. The detailed mechanism by which Li+ is reabsorb...

  11. In Vitro and Ex Vivo Model Systems to Measure ABC Transporter Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Nienke M; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E

    2016-01-01

    With the aging population the occurrence of central nervous system diseases such as cancer, mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases, is expected to increase and hence, the demand for effective drugs. However, the passage of drugs across the blood-brain barrier represents a major challenge in accomplishing efficient brain delivery of therapeutic agents. This highly efficient barrier is composed of a monolayer of capillary endothelial cells supported by pericytes and astrocytic end-feet, that together effectively shield the brain from the blood. The brain microvascular endothelial cells form a physical and metabolic barrier where paracellular and transcellular transport of molecules in and out of the brain is closely regulated, allowing nutrients to pass but preventing the entry of harmful neurotoxic substances, including drugs. For this purpose brain endothelial cells express efficient efflux pumps, such as ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which limit the delivery of drugs into the brain. To treat the above-mentioned chronic central nervous system disorders, it is crucial to design compounds that can pass the blood-brain barrier and thus the ABC transporters. In order to achieve this, representative models of the blood-brain barrier with predictive validity are necessary. This review discusses the current in vitro and ex vivo model systems that are used to measure ABC transporter activity in order to study potential in vivo efficacy of blood-brain barrier-drug passage.

  12. Chorioamnionitis Induces a Specific Signature of Placental ABC Transporters Associated with an Increase of miR-331-5p in the Human Preterm Placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Imperio, Guinever Eustaquio; Bloise, Enrrico; Javam, Mohsen; Lye, Phetcharawan; Constantinof, Andrea; Dunk, Caroline; Dos Reis, Fernando Marcos; Lye, Stephen James; Gibb, William; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M; Matthews, Stephen Giles

    2018-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate drug biodisposition and immunological responses in the placental barrier. In vitro infective challenges alter expression of specific placental ABC transporters. We hypothesized that chorioamnionitis induces a distinct pattern of ABC transporter expression. Gene expression of 50 ABC transporters was assessed using TaqMan® Human ABC Transporter Array, in preterm human placentas without (PTD; n=6) or with histological chorioamnionitis (PTDC; n=6). Validation was performed using qPCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. MicroRNAs known to regulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp) were examined by qPCR. Up-regulation of ABCB9, ABCC2 and ABCF2 mRNA was detected in chorioamnionitis (pABC transporters will likely lead to modified transport of clinically relevant compounds at the inflamed placenta. A better understanding of the potential role of these transporters in the events surrounding PTD may also enable new strategies to be developed for prevention and treatment of PTD. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Beyond Competitive Inhibition: Regulation of ABC Transporters by Kinases and Protein-Protein Interactions as Potential Mechanisms of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Rebecca R; Potukuchi, Praveen K; Schuetz, Erin G; Schuetz, John D

    2018-03-07

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane efflux transporters mediating the extrusion of an array of substrates ranging from amino acids and lipids to xenobiotics, and many therapeutic compounds, including anticancer drugs. The ABC transporters are also recognized as important contributors to pharmacokinetics, especially in drug-drug interactions and adverse drug effects. Drugs and xenobiotics, as well as pathological conditions, can influence the transcription of ABC transporters, or modify their activity or intracellular localization. Kinases can affect the aforementioned processes for ABC transporters as do protein interactions. In this review, we focus on the ABC transporters ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC4 and ABCG2 and illustrate how kinases and protein-protein interactions affect these transporters. The clinical relevance of these factors is currently unknown, however these examples suggest that our understanding of drug-drug interactions will benefit from further knowledge of how kinases and protein-protein interactions affect ABC transporters. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Molecular mechanism of α-tocopheryl-phosphate transport across the cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negis, Yesim; Meydani, Mohsen; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Azzi, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    α-Tocopheryl-phosphate (α-TP) is synthesized and hydrolyzed in animal cells and tissues where it modulates several functions. α-TP is more potent than α-T in inhibiting cell proliferation, down-regulating CD36 transcription, inhibiting atherosclerotic plaque formation. Administration of α-TP to cells or animals requires its transfer through membranes, via a transporter. We show here that α-TP is passing the plasma membrane via a system that is inhibited by glibenclamide and probenecid, inhibitors of a number of transporters. Glibenclamide and probenecid prevent dose-dependently α-TP inhibition of cell proliferation. The two inhibitors act on ATP binding cassette (ABC) and organic anion transporters (OAT). Since ABC transporters function to export solutes and α-TP is transported into cells, it may be concluded that α-TP transport may occur via an OAT family member. Due to the protection by glibenclamide and probenecid on the α-TP induced cell growth inhibition it appears that α-TP acts after its uptake inside cells

  15. Co-Induction of a Glutathione-S-transferase, a Glutathione Transporter and an ABC Transporter in Maize by Xenobiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiqian; Song, Xiaoyu; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Chengju

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione conjugation reactions are one of the principal mechanisms that plants utilize to detoxify xenobiotics. The induction by four herbicides (2,4-D, atrazine, metolachlor and primisulfuron) and a herbicide safener (dichlormid) on the expression of three genes, ZmGST27, ZmGT1 and ZmMRP1, encoding respectively a glutathione-S-transferase, a glutathione transporter and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter was studied in maize. The results demonstrate that the inducing effect on gene expression varies with both chemicals and genes. The expression of ZmGST27 and ZmMRP1 was up-regulated by all five compounds, whereas that of ZmGT1 was increased by atrazine, metolachlor, primisulfuron and dichlormid, but not by 2,4-D. For all chemicals, the inducing effect was first detected on ZmGST27. The finding that ZmGT1 is activated alongside ZmGST27 and ZmMRP1 suggests that glutathione transporters are an important component in the xenobiotic detoxification system of plants. PMID:22792398

  16. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis to predict drug-drug interactions of ABC transporter ABCG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T; Hirano, H; Saito, H; Sano, K; Ikegami, Y; Yamaotsu, N; Hirono, S

    2012-06-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis is a practical approach by which chemical structure is quantitatively correlated with biological activity or chemical reactivity. Human ABC transporter ABCG2 exhibits broad substrate specificity toward structurally diverse compounds. To gain insight into the relationship between the molecular structures of compounds and the interaction with ABCG2, we have developed an algorithm that analyzes QSAR to evaluate ABCG2-drug interactions. In addition, to support QSAR analysis, we developed a high-speed screening method for analyzing the drug-drug interactions of ABCG2. Based on both experimental results and computational QSAR analysis data, we propose a hypothetical mechanism underlying ABC-mediated drug transport and its interaction with drugs.

  17. The ABC transporter BcatrB from Botrytis cinerea exports camalexin and is a virulence factor on Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanato, Francesca L.; Abou-Mansour, Eliane; Buchala, Antony; Kretschmer, Matthias; Mosbach, Andreas; Hahn, Matthias; Bochet, Christian G.; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Schoonbeek, Henk-jan

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is known to produce the phytoalexin camalexin in response to abiotic and biotic stress. Here we studied the mechanisms of tolerance to camalexin in the fungus Botrytis cinerea, a necrotrophic pathogen of A. thaliana. Exposure of B. cinerea to camalexin induces expression of BcatrB, an ABC transporter that functions in the efflux of fungitoxic compounds. B. cinerea inoculated on wild-type A. thaliana plants yields smaller lesions than on camalexin-deficient A. thaliana mut...

  18. Reduction of U(VI) by the deep subsurface bacterium, Thermus scotoductus SA-01, and the involvement of the ABC transporter protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Errol Duncan; Piater, Lizelle Ann; van Heerden, Esta

    2012-02-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of uranium on the growth of the bacterium Thermus scotoductus strain SA-01 as well as the whole cell U(VI) reduction capabilities of the organism. Also, site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the identity of a protein capable of a possible alternative mechanism of U(VI) reduction. SA-01 can grow aerobically in up to 1.25 mM uranium and has the capability to reduce low levels of U(VI) in under 20 h. TEM analysis performed on cells exposed to uranium showed extracellular and membrane-bound accumulation of uranium. The reductase-like protein was surprisingly identified as a peptide ABC transporter, peptide-binding protein. This study showcases the concept of protein promiscuity, where this protein with a distinct function in situ can also have the unintended function of a reactant for the reduction of U(VI). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multidrug ABC transporter Cdr1 of Candida albicans harbors specific and overlapping binding sites for human steroid hormones transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Pratima; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Chaptal, Vincent; Falson, Pierre; Prasad, Rajendra

    2017-10-01

    The present study examines the kinetics of steroids efflux mediated by the Candida drug resistance protein 1 (Cdr1p) and evaluates their interaction with the protein. We exploited our in-house mutant library for targeting the 252 residues forming the twelve transmembrane helices (TMHs) of Cdr1p. The screening revealed 65 and 58 residues critical for β-estradiol and corticosterone transport, respectively. Notably, up to 83% critical residues for corticosterone face the lipid interface compared to 54% for β-estradiol. Molecular docking identified a possible peripheral corticosterone-binding site made of 8/14 critical/non-critical residues between TMHs 3, 4 and 6. β-estradiol transport was severely hampered by alanine replacements of Cdr1p core residues involving TMHs 2, 5 and 8, in a binding site made of 10/14 critical residues mainly shared with rhodamine 6G with which it competes. By contrast, TMH11 was poorly impacted, although being part of the core domain. Finally, we observed the presence of several contiguous stretches of 3-5 critical residues in TMHs 2, 5 and 10 that points to a rotation motion of these helices during the substrate transport cycle. The selective structural arrangement of the steroid-binding pockets in the core region and at the lipid-TMD interface, which was never reported before, together with the possible rotation of some TMHs may be the structural basis of the drug-transport mechanism achieved by these type II ABC transporters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A mutation within the extended X loop abolished substrate-induced ATPase activity of the human liver ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter MDR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Marianne; Stindt, Jan; Dröge, Carola; Linnemann, Doris; Kubitz, Ralf; Schmitt, Lutz

    2015-02-20

    The human multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4) belongs to the ubiquitous family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and is located in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. There it flops the phospholipids of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) family from the inner to the outer leaflet. Here, we report the characterization of wild type MDR3 and the Q1174E mutant, which was identified previously in a patient with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC-3). We expressed different variants of MDR3 in the yeast Pichia pastoris, purified the proteins via tandem affinity chromatography, and determined MDR3-specific ATPase activity in the presence or absence of phospholipids. The ATPase activity of wild type MDR3 was stimulated 2-fold by liver PC or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. Furthermore, the cross-linking of MDR3 with a thiol-reactive fluorophore blocked ATP hydrolysis and exhibited no PC stimulation. Similarly, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin lipids did not induce an increase of wild type MDR3 ATPase activity. The phosphate analogues beryllium fluoride and aluminum fluoride led to complete inhibition of ATPase activity, whereas orthovanadate inhibited exclusively the PC-stimulated ATPase activity of MDR3. The Q1174E mutation is located in the nucleotide-binding domain in direct proximity of the leucine of the ABC signature motif and extended the X loop, which is found in ABC exporters. Our data on the Q1174E mutant demonstrated basal ATPase activity, but PC lipids were incapable of stimulating ATPase activity highlighting the role of the extended X loop in the cross-talk of the nucleotide-binding domain and the transmembrane domain. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Survey of ABC transporter and metallothionein genes expressions in tall fescue inoculated with Funneliformis intraradices under Nickel toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massomeh Rafiei-Demneh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, there are complex network of transport, chelation, and sequestration processes that functions in maintaining concentrations of essential metal ions in different cellular compartments, thus minimizing the damage caused by entry of non-essential metal ions into the cytosol. In the presence of toxic ones, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are able to alleviate metal toxicity in the plant. In this study the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Funneliformis intraradices on growth, Nickel tolerance, and ABC transporter and metallothionein expression in leaves and roots of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea plants cultivated in Ni polluted soil were evaluated. The fungi infected (M+ and uninfected (M- fescue plants were cultivated in soil under different Ni concentrations (0, 30, 90 and 180 ppm for 3 months. Results demonstrated the positive effect of fungi colonization on the increase in growth and reduction in Ni uptake (90 and 180 ppm and Ni translocation from roots to shoot of tall fescue under Ni stress. The results also demonstrated that the level of ABC transporterand metallothionein transcripts accumulation in roots was considerably higher for both M- and M+ plants compared to the control. Also, M+ plants showed less ABC and MET expression compared to the M- plants. These results demonstrated the importance of mycorrhizal colonization of F. intraradices in reduction of Ni transport from root to shoot of tall fescue which alleviates Ni-induced stress.

  2. A burst of ABC genes in the genome of the polyphagous spider mite Tetranychus urticae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) gene superfamily is widespread across all living species. The majority of ABC genes encode ABC transporters, which are membrane-spanning proteins capable of transferring substrates across biological membranes by hydrolyzing ATP. Although ABC transporters have often been associated with resistance to drugs and toxic compounds, within the Arthropoda ABC gene families have only been characterized in detail in several insects and a crustacean. In this study, we report a genome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC gene superfamily in the spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, a chelicerate ~ 450 million years diverged from other Arthropod lineages. T. urticae is a major agricultural pest, and is among of the most polyphagous arthropod herbivores known. The species resists a staggering array of toxic plant secondary metabolites, and has developed resistance to all major classes of pesticides in use for its control. Results We identified 103 ABC genes in the T. urticae genome, the highest number discovered in a metazoan species to date. Within the T. urticae ABC gene set, all members of the eight currently described subfamilies (A to H) were detected. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the high number of ABC genes in T. urticae is due primarily to lineage-specific expansions of ABC genes within the ABCC, ABCG and ABCH subfamilies. In particular, the ABCC subfamily harbors the highest number of T. urticae ABC genes (39). In a comparative genomic analysis, we found clear orthologous relationships between a subset of T. urticae ABC proteins and ABC proteins in both vertebrates and invertebrates known to be involved in fundamental cellular processes. These included members of the ABCB-half transporters, and the ABCD, ABCE and ABCF families. Furthermore, one-to-one orthologues could be distinguished between T. urticae proteins and human ABCC10, ABCG5 and ABCG8, the Drosophila melanogaster sulfonylurea receptor and ecdysone

  3. Biomolecular Transport through Hemofiltration Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subhra; Fissell, William H.; Roy, Shuvo

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for filtration of large solutes through a pore in the presence of transmembrane pressures, applied/induced electric fields, and dissimilar interactions at the pore entrance and exit is developed to characterize and predict the experimental performance of a hemofiltration membrane with nanometer scale pores designed for a proposed implantable Renal Assist Device (RAD). The model reveals that the sieving characteristics of the membrane can be improved by applying an external electric field, and ensuring a smaller ratio of the pore-feed and pore-permeate equilibrium partitioning coefficients when diffusion is present. The model is then customized to study the sieving characteristics for both charged and uncharged solutes in the slit-shaped nanopores of the hemofiltration device for the RAD. The effect of streaming potential or induced fields are found to be negligible under representative operating conditions. Experimental data on the sieving coefficient of bovine serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase and thyroglobulin are reported and compared with the theoretical predictions. Both steric and electrostatic partitioning are considered and the comparison suggests that in general electrostatic effects are present in the filtration of proteins though some data, particularly those recorded in a strongly hypertonic solution (10×PBS), show better agreement with the steric partitioning theory. PMID:19184436

  4. Transport processes of the legume symbiosome membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C Clarke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosome membrane (SM is a physical barrier between the host plant and nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis, and represents a regulated interface for the movement of solutes between the symbionts that is under plant control. The primary nutrient exchange across the SM is the transport of a carbon energy source from plant to bacteroid in exchange for fixed nitrogen. At a biochemical level two channels have been implicated in movement of fixed nitrogen across the SM and a uniporter that transports monovalent dicarboxylate ions has been characterized that would transport fixed carbon. The aquaporin NOD26 may provide a channel for ammonia, but the genes encoding the other transporters have not been identified. Transport of several other solutes, including calcium and potassium, have been demonstrated in isolated symbiosomes, and genes encoding transport systems for the movement of iron, nitrate, sulfate and zinc in nodules have been identified. However, definitively matching transport activities with these genes has proved difficult and many further transport processes are expected on the SM to facilitate the movement of nutrients between the symbionts. Recently, work detailing the SM proteome in soybean has been completed, contributing significantly to the database of known SM proteins. This represents a valuable resource for the identification of transporter protein candidates, some of which may correspond to transport processes previously described, or to novel transport systems in the symbiosis. Putative transporters identified from the proteome include homologues of transporters of sulfate, calcium, peptides and various metal ions. Here we review current knowledge of transport processes of the SM and discuss the requirements for additional transport routes of other nutrients exchanged in the symbiosis, with a focus on transport systems identified through the soybean SM proteome.

  5. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membrane for Coal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Joseph [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Porter, Jason [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Patki, Neil [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Kelley, Madison [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Stanislowski, Josh [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Tolbert, Scott [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Way, J. Douglas [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Makuch, David [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

    2015-12-23

    A pilot-scale hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) separator was built that incorporated 98 membranes that were each 24 inches long. This separator used an advanced design to minimize the impact of concentration polarization and separated over 1000 scfh of hydrogen from a hydrogen-nitrogen feed of 5000 scfh that contained 30% hydrogen. This mixture was chosen because it was representative of the hydrogen concentration expected in coal gasification. When tested with an operating gasifier, the hydrogen concentration was lower and contaminants in the syngas adversely impacted membrane performance. All 98 membranes survived the test, but flux was lower than expected. Improved ceramic substrates were produced that have small surface pores to enable membrane production and large pores in the bulk of the substrate to allow high flux. Pd-Au was chosen as the membrane alloy because of its resistance to sulfur contamination and good flux. Processes were developed to produce a large quantity of long membranes for use in the demonstration test.

  6. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2011-01-01

    membrane include ABC transporters, vacuolar (V-type) H+ pumps, and P-type pumps. These pumps all utilize ATP as a fuel for energizing pumping. This review focuses on the physiological roles of plasma membrane P-type pumps, as they represent the major ATP hydrolytic activity in this membrane....

  7. Whole-Transcriptome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Family Genes in the Latex-Producing Laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 ‘full-size’, 21 ‘half-size’ and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  8. Evolutionary relationships of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) uptake porters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei Hao; Västermark, Åke; Shlykov, Maksim A; Reddy, Vamsee; Sun, Eric I; Saier, Milton H

    2013-05-06

    The ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) functional superfamily includes integral transmembrane exporters that have evolved three times independently, forming three families termed ABC1, ABC2 and ABC3, upon which monophyletic ATPases have been superimposed for energy-coupling purposes [e.g., J Membr Biol 231(1):1-10, 2009]. The goal of the work reported in this communication was to understand how the integral membrane constituents of ABC uptake transporters with different numbers of predicted or established transmembrane segments (TMSs) evolved. In a few cases, high resolution 3-dimensional structures were available, and in these cases, their structures plus primary sequence analyses allowed us to predict evolutionary pathways of origin. All of the 35 currently recognized families of ABC uptake proteins except for one (family 21) were shown to be homologous using quantitative statistical methods. These methods involved using established programs that compare native protein sequences with each other, after having compared each sequence with thousands of its own shuffled sequences, to gain evidence for homology. Topological analyses suggested that these porters contain numbers of TMSs ranging from four or five to twenty. Intragenic duplication events occurred multiple times during the evolution of these porters. They originated from a simple primordial protein containing 3 TMSs which duplicated to 6 TMSs, and then produced porters of the various topologies via insertions, deletions and further duplications. Except for family 21 which proved to be related to ABC1 exporters, they are all related to members of the previously identified ABC2 exporter family. Duplications that occurred in addition to the primordial 3 → 6 duplication included 5 → 10, 6 → 12 and 10 → 20 TMSs. In one case, protein topologies were uncertain as different programs gave discrepant predictions. It could not be concluded with certainty whether a 4 TMS ancestral protein or a 5 TMS ancestral protein

  9. Iowa ABC connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    For several years the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT), Iowa State University, the Federal Highway Administration, : and several Iowa counties have been working to develop accelerated bridge construction (ABC) concepts, details, and processes....

  10. Effects of deletion of the Streptococcus pneumoniae lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase gene lgt on ABC transporter function and on growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneeta Chimalapati

    Full Text Available Lipoproteins are an important class of surface associated proteins that have diverse roles and frequently are involved in the virulence of bacterial pathogens. As prolipoproteins are attached to the cell membrane by a single enzyme, prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt, deletion of the corresponding gene potentially allows the characterisation of the overall importance of lipoproteins for specific bacterial functions. We have used a Δlgt mutant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to investigate the effects of loss of lipoprotein attachment on cation acquisition, growth in media containing specific carbon sources, and virulence in different infection models. Immunoblots of triton X-114 extracts, flow cytometry and immuno-fluorescence microscopy confirmed the Δlgt mutant had markedly reduced lipoprotein expression on the cell surface. The Δlgt mutant had reduced growth in cation depleted medium, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, reduced zinc uptake, and reduced intracellular levels of several cations. Doubling time of the Δlgt mutant was also increased slightly when grown in medium with glucose, raffinose and maltotriose as sole carbon sources. These multiple defects in cation and sugar ABC transporter function for the Δlgt mutant were associated with only slightly delayed growth in complete medium. However the Δlgt mutant had significantly reduced growth in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and a marked impairment in virulence in mouse models of nasopharyngeal colonisation, sepsis and pneumonia. These data suggest that for S. pneumoniae loss of surface localisation of lipoproteins has widespread effects on ABC transporter functions that collectively prevent the Δlgt mutant from establishing invasive infection.

  11. The Arabidopsis Peroxisomal ABC Transporter, Comatose, Complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pxa1 pxa2Δ Mutant for Metabolism of Long-chain Fatty Acids and Exhibits Fatty Acyl-CoA-stimulated ATPase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, Yvonne; De Marcos Lousa, Carine; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Johnson, Barbara; Baldwin, Stephen A.; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Baker, Alison

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ABC transporter Comatose (CTS; AtABCD1) is required for uptake into the peroxisome of a wide range of substrates for β-oxidation, but it is uncertain whether CTS itself is the transporter or if the transported substrates are free acids or CoA esters. To establish a system for its biochemical analysis, CTS was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The plant protein was correctly targeted to yeast peroxisomes, was assembled into the membrane with its nucleotide binding domains in the cytosol, and exhibited basal ATPase activity that was sensitive to aluminum fluoride and abrogated by mutation of a conserved Walker A motif lysine residue. The yeast pxa1 pxa2Δ mutant lacks the homologous peroxisomal ABC transporter and is unable to grow on oleic acid. Consistent with its exhibiting a function in yeast akin to that in the plant, CTS rescued the oleate growth phenotype of the pxa1 pxa2Δ mutant, and restored β-oxidation of fatty acids with a range of chain lengths and varying degrees of desaturation. When expressed in yeast peroxisomal membranes, the basal ATPase activity of CTS could be stimulated by fatty acyl-CoAs but not by fatty acids. The implications of these findings for the function and substrate specificity of CTS are discussed. PMID:20659892

  12. The Arabidopsis peroxisomal ABC transporter, comatose, complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pxa1 pxa2Delta mutant for metabolism of long-chain fatty acids and exhibits fatty acyl-CoA-stimulated ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, Yvonne; De Marcos Lousa, Carine; van Roermund, Carlo W; Wanders, Ronald J A; Johnson, Barbara; Baldwin, Stephen A; Theodoulou, Frederica L; Baker, Alison

    2010-09-24

    The Arabidopsis ABC transporter Comatose (CTS; AtABCD1) is required for uptake into the peroxisome of a wide range of substrates for β-oxidation, but it is uncertain whether CTS itself is the transporter or if the transported substrates are free acids or CoA esters. To establish a system for its biochemical analysis, CTS was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The plant protein was correctly targeted to yeast peroxisomes, was assembled into the membrane with its nucleotide binding domains in the cytosol, and exhibited basal ATPase activity that was sensitive to aluminum fluoride and abrogated by mutation of a conserved Walker A motif lysine residue. The yeast pxa1 pxa2Δ mutant lacks the homologous peroxisomal ABC transporter and is unable to grow on oleic acid. Consistent with its exhibiting a function in yeast akin to that in the plant, CTS rescued the oleate growth phenotype of the pxa1 pxa2Δ mutant, and restored β-oxidation of fatty acids with a range of chain lengths and varying degrees of desaturation. When expressed in yeast peroxisomal membranes, the basal ATPase activity of CTS could be stimulated by fatty acyl-CoAs but not by fatty acids. The implications of these findings for the function and substrate specificity of CTS are discussed.

  13. The cystic-fibrosis-associated ΔF508 mutation confers post-transcriptional destabilization on the C. elegans ABC transporter PGP-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping He

    2012-11-01

    Membrane proteins make up ∼30% of the proteome. During the early stages of maturation, this class of proteins can experience localized misfolding in distinct cellular compartments, such as the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum (ER lumen and ER membrane. ER quality control (ERQC mechanisms monitor folding and determine whether a membrane protein is appropriately folded or is misfolded and warrants degradation. ERQC plays crucial roles in human diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, in which deletion of a single amino acid (F508 results in the misfolding and degradation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR Cl– channel. We introduced the ΔF508 mutation into Caenorhabditis elegans PGP-3, a 12-transmembrane ABC transporter with 15% identity to CFTR. When expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, PGP-3wt was stable and efficiently trafficked to the apical plasma membrane through a COPII-dependent mechanism. However, PGP-3ΔF508 was post-transcriptionally destabilized, resulting in reduced total and apical membrane protein levels. Genetic or physiological activation of the osmotic stress response pathway, which causes accumulation of the chemical chaperone glycerol, stabilized PGP-3ΔF508. Efficient degradation of PGP-3ΔF508 required the function of several C. elegans ER-associated degradation (ERAD homologs, suggesting that destabilization occurs through an ERAD-type mechanism. Our studies show that the ΔF508 mutation causes post-transcriptional destabilization and degradation of PGP-3 in C. elegans epithelial cells. This model, combined with the power of C. elegans genetics, provides a new opportunity to genetically dissect metazoan ERQC.

  14. Maltose and maltodextrin utilization by Listeria monocytogenes depend on an inducible ABC transporter which is repressed by glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Gopal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the environment as well as in the vertebrate intestine, Listeriae have access to complex carbohydrates like maltodextrins. Bacterial exploitation of such compounds requires specific uptake and utilization systems.We could show that Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species contain genes/gene products with high homology to the maltodextrin ABC transporter and utilization system of B. subtilis. Mutant construction and growth tests revealed that the L. monocytogenes gene cluster was required for the efficient utilization of maltodextrins as well as maltose. The gene for the ATP binding protein of the transporter was located distant from the cluster. Transcription analyses demonstrated that the system was induced by maltose/maltodextrins and repressed by glucose. Its induction was dependent on a LacI type transcriptional regulator. Repression by glucose was independent of the catabolite control protein CcpA, but was relieved in a mutant defective for Hpr kinase/phosphorylase.The data obtained show that in L. monocytogenes the uptake of maltodextrin and, in contrast to B. subtilis, also maltose is exclusively mediated by an ABC transporter. Furthermore, the results suggest that glucose repression of the uptake system possibly is by inducer exclusion, a mechanism not described so far in this organism.

  15. Validation of inhibitors of an ABC transporter required to transport lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, David J.; Okuda, Suguru; Denny, William A.; Kahne, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria creates a permeability barrier that prevents the entry of most currently available antibiotics. The seven lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) proteins involved in transporting and assembling this glycolipid are essential for growth and division in Escherichia coli; therefore, inhibiting their functions leads to cell death. LptB, the ATPase that provides energy for LPS transport and assembly, forms a complex with three other inner membrane (IM) components, LptC, F, and G. We demonstrate that inhibitors of pure LptB can also inhibit the full IM complex, LptBFGC, purified in detergent. We also compare inhibition of LptB and the LptBFGC complex with the antibiotic activity of these compounds. Our long-term goal is to develop tools to study inhibitors of LPS biogenesis that could serve as potentiators by disrupting the OM permeability barrier, facilitating entry of clinically used antibiotics not normally used to treat Gram-negative infections, or that can serve as antibiotics themselves. PMID:23665139

  16. ABC protein transport of MRI contrast agents in canalicular rat liver plasma vesicles and yeast vacuoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascolo, Lorella; Petrovic, Sinisa; Cupelli, Felicia; Bruschi, Carlo V.; Anelli, Pier Lucio; Lorusso, Vito; Visigalli, Massimo; Uggeri, Fulvio; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of excretion into bile of hepatospecific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast media employed labeled Gd-reagents EOB.DTPA, BOPTA, B 20790 (iopanoate-linked), and B 21690 (glycocholate-linked) for measurement in rat liver canalicular plasma membrane vesicles and yeast vacuoles. The presence of ATP gave threefold greater transport of B 20790 and B 21690 than of EOB.DTPA and BOPTA. In yeast vacuoles the ATP stimulatory effect was eightfold with B 20790 and fivefold greater for B 21690, whereas in YCF1- or YLLO115w-deleted yeast cells the transport was significantly reduced and absent from double mutants, YCF1 and YLLO15w. The transport was similar in wild-type and deletant cells for B 21690; taurocholate gave 85% inhibition. These data suggest that bilary secretion of structurally related MRI agents depend on molecular structure. The findings are suggestive as of possible value for clinical diagnosis of inherited hyperbilirubinemias and other liver disorders

  17. Structure and function of the universal stress protein TeaD and its role in regulating the ectoine transporter TeaABC of Halomonas elongata DSM 2581(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Kuhlmann, Sonja I; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Grammann, Katrin; Ziegler, Christine M

    2010-03-16

    The halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata takes up the compatible solute ectoine via the osmoregulated TRAP transporter TeaABC. A fourth orf (teaD) is located adjacent to the teaABC locus that encodes a putative universal stress protein (USP). By RT-PCR experiments we proved a cotranscription of teaD along with teaABC. Deletion of teaD resulted in an enhanced uptake for ectoine by the transporter TeaABC and hence a negative activity regulation of TeaABC by TeaD. A transcriptional regulation via DNA binding could be excluded. ATP binding to native TeaD was shown by HPLC, and the crystal structure of TeaD was solved in complex with ATP to a resolution of 1.9 A by molecular replacement. TeaD forms a dimer-dimer complex with one ATP molecule bound to each monomer, which has a Rossmann-like alpha/beta overall fold. Our results reveal an ATP-dependent oligomerization of TeaD, which might have a functional role in the regulatory mechanism of TeaD. USP-encoding orfs, which are located adjacent to genes encoding for TeaABC homologues, could be identified in several other organisms, and their physiological role in balancing the internal cellular ectoine pool is discussed.

  18. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Randy D.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoactive drugs, these transport systems have important roles in transmitter release, but we are only beginning to understand their contribution to synaptic transmission, plasticity, behavior, and disease. Recent work has started to provide a structural basis for their activity, to characterize their trafficking and potential for regulation. The results indicate that far from the passive target of psychoactive drugs, neurotransmitter transporters undergo regulation that contributes to synaptic plasticity. PMID:22199021

  19. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    Multicellular, as well as unicellular, organisms have evolved mechanisms to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental cues and to a changing environment. The working hypothesis is that the balance of fluxes mediated by diverse transporters at the plasma membrane and in subcellular organelles determines ionic cellular distribution, which is critical for maintenance of membrane potential, pH control, osmolality, transport of nutrients, and protein activity. An emerging theme in plant cell biology is that cells respond and adapt to diverse cues through changes of the dynamic endomembrane system. Yet we know very little about the transporters that might influence the operation of the secretory system in plants. Here we focus on transporters that influence alkali cation and pH homeostasis, mainly in the endomembrane/ secretory system. The endomembrane system of eukaryote cells serves several major functions: i) sort cargo (e.g. enzymes, transporters or receptors) to specific destinations, ii) modulate the protein and lipid composition of membrane domains through remodeling, and iii) determine and alter the properties of the cell wall through synthesis and remodeling. We had uncovered a novel family of predicted cation/H+ exchangers (CHX) and K+ efflux antiporters (KEA) that are prevalent in higher plants, but rare in metazoans. We combined phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses with molecular genetic, cell biological and biochemical studies, and have published the first reports on functions of plant CHXs and KEAs. CHX studied to date act at the endomembrane system where their actions are distinct from the better-studied NHX (Na/K-H+ exchangers). Arabidopsis thaliana CHX20 in guard cells modulate stomatal opening, and thus is significant for vegetative survival. Other CHXs ensure reproductive success on dry land, as they participate in organizing pollen walls, targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule or promoting

  20. The ABC transporter BcatrB from Botrytis cinerea exports camalexin and is a virulence factor on Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanato, Francesca L; Abou-Mansour, Eliane; Buchala, Antony; Kretschmer, Matthias; Mosbach, Andreas; Hahn, Matthias; Bochet, Christian G; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Schoonbeek, Henk-jan

    2009-05-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is known to produce the phytoalexin camalexin in response to abiotic and biotic stress. Here we studied the mechanisms of tolerance to camalexin in the fungus Botrytis cinerea, a necrotrophic pathogen of A. thaliana. Exposure of B. cinerea to camalexin induces expression of BcatrB, an ABC transporter that functions in the efflux of fungitoxic compounds. B. cinerea inoculated on wild-type A. thaliana plants yields smaller lesions than on camalexin-deficient A. thaliana mutants. A B. cinerea strain lacking functional BcatrB is more sensitive to camalexin in vitro and less virulent on wild-type plants, but is still fully virulent on camalexin-deficient mutants. Pre-treatment of A. thaliana with UV-C leads to increased camalexin accumulation and substantial resistance to B. cinerea. UV-C-induced resistance was not seen in the camalexin-deficient mutants cyp79B2/B3, cyp71A13, pad3 or pad2, and was strongly reduced in ups1. Here we demonstrate that an ABC transporter is a virulence factor that increases tolerance of the pathogen towards a phytoalexin, and the complete restoration of virulence on host plants lacking this phytoalexin.

  1. TetAB46, a predicted heterodimeric ABC transporter conferring tetracycline resistance in Streptococcus australis isolated from the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Philip J; Ciric, Lena; Lerner, Avigdor; Seville, Lorna A; Roberts, Adam P; Mullany, Peter; Allan, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    To identify the genes responsible for tetracycline resistance in a strain of Streptococcus australis isolated from pooled saliva from healthy volunteers in France. S. australis is a viridans Streptococcus, originally isolated from the oral cavity of children in Australia, and subsequently reported in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and as a cause of invasive disease in an elderly patient. Agar containing 2 mg/L tetracycline was used for the isolation of tetracycline-resistant organisms. A genomic library in Escherichia coli was used to isolate the tetracycline resistance determinant. In-frame deletions and chromosomal repair were used to confirm function. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by agar dilution and disc diffusion assay. The tetracycline resistance determinant from S. australis FRStet12 was isolated from a genomic library in E. coli and DNA sequencing showed two open reading frames predicted to encode proteins with similarity to multidrug resistance-type ABC transporters. Both genes were required for tetracycline resistance (to both the naturally occurring and semi-synthetic tetracyclines) and they were designated tetAB(46). This is the first report of a predicted ABC transporter conferring tetracycline resistance in a member of the oral microbiota.

  2. Investigating the dynamic nature of the ABC transporters: ABCB1 and MsbA as examples for the potential synergies of MD theory and EPR applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockner, Thomas; Mullen, Anna; MacMillan, Fraser

    2015-10-01

    ABC transporters are primary active transporters found in all kingdoms of life. Human multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1, or P-glycoprotein, has an extremely broad substrate spectrum and confers resistance against chemotherapy drug treatment in cancer cells. The bacterial ABC transporter MsbA is a lipid A flippase and a homolog to the human ABCB1 transporter, with which it partially shares its substrate spectrum. Crystal structures of MsbA and ABCB1 have been solved in multiple conformations, providing a glimpse into the possible conformational changes the transporter could be going through during the transport cycle. Crystal structures are inherently static, while a dynamic picture of the transporter in motion is needed for a complete understanding of transporter function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can provide structural information on ABC transporters, but the strength of these two methods lies in the potential to characterise the dynamic regime of these transporters. Information from the two methods is quite complementary. MD simulations provide an all atom dynamic picture of the time evolution of the molecular system, though with a narrow time window. EPR spectroscopy can probe structural, environmental and dynamic properties of the transporter in several time regimes, but only through the attachment sites of an exogenous spin label. In this review the synergistic effects that can be achieved by combining the two methods are highlighted, and a brief methodological background is also presented. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  4. The Arabidopsis thaliana ABC protein superfamily, a complete inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fernández, R; Davies, T G; Coleman, J O; Rea, P A

    2001-08-10

    We describe the first complete inventory of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins from a multicellular organism, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. By the application of several search criteria, Arabidopsis was found to contain a total of 129 open reading frames (ORFs) capable of encoding ABC proteins, of which 103 possessed contiguous transmembrane spans and were identified as putative intrinsic membrane proteins. Fifty-two of the putative intrinsic membrane proteins contained at least two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding folds (NBFs) and could be classified as belonging to one of five subfamilies of full-molecule transporters. The other 51 putative membrane proteins, all of which were half-molecule transporters, fell into five subfamilies. Of the remaining ORFs identified, all of which encoded proteins lacking TMDs, 11 could be classified into three subfamilies. There were no obvious homologs in other organisms for 15 of the ORFs which encoded a heterogeneous group of non-intrinsic ABC proteins (NAPs). Unrooted phylogenetic analyses substantiated the subfamily designations. Notable features of the Arabidopsis ABC superfamily was the presence of a large yeast-like PDR subfamily, and the absence of genes encoding bona fide cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), sulfonylurea receptor (SUR), and heavy metal tolerance factor 1 (HMT1) homologs. Arabidopsis was unusual in its large allocation of ORFs (a minimum of 0.5%) to members of the ABC protein superfamily.

  5. Lateral gene transfer of an ABC transporter complex between major constituents of the human gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meehan Conor J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several links have been established between the human gut microbiome and conditions such as obesity and inflammatory bowel syndrome. This highlights the importance of understanding what properties of the gut microbiome can affect the health of the human host. Studies have been undertaken to determine the species composition of this microbiome and infer functional profiles associated with such host properties. However, lateral gene transfer (LGT between community members may result in misleading taxonomic attributions for the recipient organisms, thus making species-function links difficult to establish. Results We identified a peptides/nickel transport complex whose components differed in abundance based upon levels of host obesity, and assigned the encoded proteins to members of the microbial community. Each protein was assigned to several distinct taxonomic groups, with moderate levels of agreement observed among different proteins in the complex. Phylogenetic trees of these proteins produced clusters that differed greatly from taxonomic attributions and indicated that habitat-directed LGT of this complex is likely to have occurred, though not always between the same partners. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that certain membrane transport systems may be an important factor within an obese-associated gut microbiome and that such complexes may be acquired several times by different strains of the same species. Additionally, an example of individual proteins from different organisms being transferred into one operon was observed, potentially demonstrating a functional complex despite the donors of the subunits being taxonomically disparate. Our results also highlight the potential impact of habitat-directed LGT on the resident microbiota.

  6. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is only...... expressed in M cells and the gene product is responsible for the secretion of the mating pheromone. M-factor, a nonapeptide that is S-farnesylated and carboxy-methylated on its C-terminal cysteine residue. The predicted Mam1 protein is highly homologous to mammalian multiple drug-resistance proteins...

  7. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease is Necessary For Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Under Aerobic, Anaerobic, Planktonic or Biofilm Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron eMcDaniel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2-, pH 6.5 at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2-. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2-, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2- plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 25 mM (aerobic, 15 mM (anaerobic A-NO2- and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic, respectively. Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2- in biofilms. A-NO2- sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2- as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains.

  8. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T; Ko, Seung-Hyun B; Mortensen, Joel E; Lam, Joseph S; Muruve, Daniel A; Hassett, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite ([Formula: see text], pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to [Formula: see text]. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to [Formula: see text], but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with [Formula: see text] plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM [Formula: see text], and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to [Formula: see text] in biofilms. [Formula: see text] sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, [Formula: see text] as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains.

  9. The role of peroxisomal ABC transporters in the mouse adrenal gland: the loss of Abcd2 (ALDR), Not Abcd1 (ALD), causes oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jyh-Feng; Barron-Casella, Emily; Deering, Rebecca; Heinzer, Ann K; Moser, Ann B; deMesy Bentley, Karen L; Wand, Gary S; C McGuinness, Martina; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A; Pujol, Aurora; Smith, Kirby D; Powers, James M

    2007-03-01

    X-linked adreno-leukodystrophy is a progressive, systemic peroxisomal disorder that primarily affects the adrenal cortex, as well as myelin and axons of the central nervous system. Marked phenotypic heterogeneity does not correlate with disease-causing mutations in ABCD1, which encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein that is a member of the ABC transmembrane transporter proteins. The precise physiological functions of ABCD1 and ABCD2, a closely related peroxisomal membrane half-transporter, are unknown. The abcd1 knockout mouse does not develop the inflammatory demyelination so typical and devastating in adreno-leukodystrophy, but it does display the same lamellae and lipid profiles in adrenocortical cells under the electron microscope as the human patients. The adrenocortical cells in the mouse also exhibit immunohistochemical evidence of oxidative stress at 12 weeks but no evidence of oxidative damage. To better understand the pathogenesis of this complex disease, we evaluate the adrenal lesion of the abcd1 knockout mouse as a function of normal aging, dietary or therapeutic manipulations, and abcd genotype. The loss of abcd2 causes oxidative stress in the adrenal at 12 weeks, as judged by increased immunoreactivity for the mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase, in both the inner cortex and medulla. The loss of abcd2 (n=20), but not abcd1 (n=27), results in the spontaneous and premature deposition of ceroid, a known end-product of oxidative damage, predominantly in adrenal medullary cells. These data indicate that the loss of abcd2 results in greater oxidative stress in murine adrenal cells than the loss of abcd1, providing a clue to its cellular function. We also find that the adrenocortical lesion of the abcd1 knockout mouse does not produce functional impairment at ten to nineteen months or overt hypocortisolism at any age, nor does it progress histologically; these and other data align this mouse model closer to human female heterozygotes than to male

  10. Secondary metabolites inhibiting ABC transporters and reversing resistance of cancer cells and fungi to cytotoxic and antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eWink

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungal, bacterial and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: 1. Activation of ABC transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, 2. Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidise lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulphate or amino acids, and 3. Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarises the evidence that secondary metabolites of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids ( monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins, steroids (including cardiac glycosides and tetraterpenes but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse MDR, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these secondary metabolites are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion.

  11. Rhizobium leguminosarum has a second general amino acid permease with unusually broad substrate specificity and high similarity to branched-chain amino acid transporters (Bra/LIV) of the ABC family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosie, A H F; Allaway, D; Galloway, C S; Dunsby, H A; Poole, P S

    2002-08-01

    Amino acid uptake by Rhizobium leguminosarum is dominated by two ABC transporters, the general amino acid permease (Aap) and the branched-chain amino acid permease (Bra(Rl)). Characterization of the solute specificity of Bra(Rl) shows it to be the second general amino acid permease of R. leguminosarum. Although Bra(Rl) has high sequence identity to members of the family of hydrophobic amino acid transporters (HAAT), it transports a broad range of solutes, including acidic and basic polar amino acids (L-glutamate, L-arginine, and L-histidine), in addition to neutral amino acids (L-alanine and L-leucine). While amino and carboxyl groups are required for transport, solutes do not have to be alpha-amino acids. Consistent with this, Bra(Rl) is the first ABC transporter to be shown to transport gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). All previously identified bacterial GABA transporters are secondary carriers of the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily. Also, transport by Bra(Rl) does not appear to be stereospecific as D amino acids cause significant inhibition of uptake of L-glutamate and L-leucine. Unlike all other solutes tested, L-alanine uptake is not dependent on solute binding protein BraC(Rl). Therefore, a second, unidentified solute binding protein may interact with the BraDEFG(Rl) membrane complex during L-alanine uptake. Overall, the data indicate that Bra(Rl) is a general amino acid permease of the HAAT family. Furthermore, Bra(Rl) has the broadest solute specificity of any characterized bacterial amino acid transporter.

  12. Iowa ABC connections : [tech transfer summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) and other organizations have : been developing accelerated bridge construction (ABC) concepts, details, and : processes, and Iowa has come to be viewed as a national leader in the area of : ABC. However, th...

  13. Conserved ABC Transport System Regulated by the General Stress Response Pathways of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Willett, Jonathan W.; Czyż, Daniel M.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean; Stock, Ann M.

    2016-12-19

    of the YehZ ligand-binding pocket is incompatible with high-affinity binding to glycine betaine. This is consistent with weak measured binding of YehZ to glycine betaine and related compatible solutes. We conclude that YehZYXW is a conserved, stress-regulated transport system that is phylogenetically and functionally distinct from quaternary ammonium-compatible solute importers.

    IMPORTANCEBrucella abortusσE1regulates transcription in response to stressors encountered in its mammalian host and is necessary for maintenance of chronic infection in a mouse model. The functions of the majority of genes regulated by σE1remain undefined. We present a functional/structural analysis of a conserved putative membrane transport system (YehZYXW) whose expression is strongly activated by σE1. Though annotated as a quaternary ammonium osmolyte uptake system, experimental physiological studies and measured ligand-binding properties of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP), YehZ, are inconsistent with this function. A crystal structure ofB. abortusYehZ provides molecular insight into differences between bona fide quaternary ammonium osmolyte importers and YehZ-related proteins, which form a distinct phylogenetic and functional group of PBPs.

  14. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2017-10-03

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane system for utilizing heat generated in reactively-driven oxygen transport membrane tubes to generate steam, heat process fluid and/or provide energy to carry out endothermic chemical reactions. The system provides for improved thermal coupling of oxygen transport membrane tubes to steam generation tubes or process heater tubes or reactor tubes for efficient and effective radiant heat transfer.

  15. The expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and a putative ABC transporter permease is inversely correlated during biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes 4b G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the molecular basis of biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the deletion mutant of lm.G_1771 gene, which encodes for a putative ABC_transporter permease, is highly expressed in biofilm. In this study, the sod gene deletion mutant delta ...

  16. Pharmacological activation of LXR in utero directly influences ABC transporter expression and function in mice but does not affect adult cholesterol metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, E. M. E.; Huijkman, N. C. A.; Baller, J. F. W.; Kuipers, F.; Plosch, T.

    2008-01-01

    van Straten EM, Huijkman NC, Baller JF, Kuipers F, Plosch T. Pharmacological activation of LXR in utero directly influences ABC transporter expression and function in mice but does not affect adult cholesterol metabolism. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 295: E1341-E1348, 2008. First published October

  17. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Dominik [Research Group Molecular Neuro-Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard [Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Naujokat, Cord, E-mail: cord.naujokat@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  18. Conservation of targeting but divergence in function and quality control of peroxisomal ABC transporters: an analysis using cross-kingdom expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xuebin; de Marcos Lousa, Carine; Schutte-Lensink, Nellie; Ofman, Rob; Wanders, Ronald J.; Baldwin, Stephen A.; Baker, Alison; Kemp, Stephan; Theodoulou, Frederica L.

    2011-01-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) subfamily D transporters are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms and are known to play essential roles in mammals and plants; however, their number, organization and physiological contexts differ. Via cross-kingdom expression experiments, we have explored the conservation of

  19. Antagonistic changes in sensitivity to antifungal drugs by mutations of an important ABC transporter gene in a fungal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Guan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal pathogens can be lethal, especially among immunocompromised populations, such as patients with AIDS and recipients of tissue transplantation or chemotherapy. Prolonged usage of antifungal reagents can lead to drug resistance and treatment failure. Understanding mechanisms that underlie drug resistance by pathogenic microorganisms is thus vital for dealing with this emerging issue. In this study, we show that dramatic sequence changes in PDR5, an ABC (ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter protein gene in an opportunistic fungal pathogen, caused the organism to become hypersensitive to azole, a widely used antifungal drug. Surprisingly, the same mutations conferred growth advantages to the organism on polyenes, which are also commonly used antimycotics. Our results indicate that Pdr5p might be important for ergosterol homeostasis. The observed remarkable sequence divergence in the PDR5 gene in yeast strain YJM789 may represent an interesting case of adaptive loss of gene function with significant clinical implications.

  20. ABC transporter PEN3/PDR8/ABCG36 interacts with calmodulin that, like PEN3, is required for Arabidopsis nonhost resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campe, Ruth; Langenbach, Caspar; Leissing, Franz; Popescu, George V; Popescu, Sorina C; Goellner, Katharina; Beckers, Gerold J M; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is the most prevalent form of plant immunity. In Arabidopsis, NHR requires membrane-localized ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter PENETRATION (PEN) 3. Upon perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PEN3 becomes phosphorylated, suggestive of PEN3 regulation by post-translational modification. Here, we investigated the PEN3 protein interaction network. We probed the Arabidopsis protein microarray AtPMA-5000 with the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of PEN3. Several of the proteins identified to interact with PEN3 in vitro represent cellular Ca(2+) sensors, including calmodulin (CaM) 3, CaM7 and several CaM-like proteins, pointing to the importance of Ca(2+) sensing to PEN3-mediated NHR. We demonstrated co-localization of PEN3 and CaM7, and we confirmed PEN3-CaM interaction in vitro and in vivo by PEN3 pull-down with CaM Sepharose, CaM overlay assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We also show that just like in pen3, NHR to the nonadapted fungal pathogens Phakopsora pachyrhizi and Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei is compromised in the Arabidopsis cam7 and pen3 cam7 mutants. Our study discloses CaM7 as a PEN3-interacting protein crucial to Arabidopsis NHR and emphasizes the importance of Ca(2+) sensing to plant immunity. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Membrane porters of ATP-binding cassette transport systems are polyphyletic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Dukarevich, Maxim; Sun, Eric I; Yen, Ming Ren; Saier, Milton H

    2009-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily consists of both importers and exporters. These transporters have, by tradition, been classified according to the ATP hydrolyzing constituents, which are monophyletic. The evolutionary origins of the transmembrane porter proteins/domains are not known. Using five distinct computer programs, we here provide convincing statistical data suggesting that the transmembrane domains of ABC exporters are polyphyletic, having arisen at least three times independently. ABC1 porters arose by intragenic triplication of a primordial two-transmembrane segment (TMS)-encoding genetic element, yielding six TMS proteins. ABC2 porters arose by intragenic duplication of a dissimilar primordial three-TMS-encoding genetic element, yielding a distinctive protein family, nonhomologous to the ABC1 proteins. ABC3 porters arose by duplication of a primordial four-TMS-encoding genetic element, yielding either eight- or 10-TMS proteins. We assign each of 48 of the 50 currently recognized families of ABC exporters to one of the three evolutionarily distinct ABC types. Currently available high-resolution structural data for ABC porters are fully consistent with our findings. These results provide guides for future structural and mechanistic studies of these important transport systems.

  2. Optimization of Western blotting analysis for the isolation and detection of membrane xenobiotic transporter ABCG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczygieł, Małgorzata; Markiewicz, Marcin; Szafraniec, Milena; Zuziak, Roxana; Urbańska, Krystyna; Fiedor, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    All organisms are exposed to numerous stress factors, which include harmful xenobiotics. The diversity of these compounds is enormous, thus in the course of evolution diverse biological defense mechanisms at various levels of organization have developed. One of them engages an evolutionarily conserved family of transporters from the ABC superfamily, found in most species - from bacteria to humans. An important example of such a transporter is the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), a typical integral membrane protein. It plays a key role in the absorption, distribution and elimination of a wide variety of xenobiotics, including drugs used in chemotherapy, and is involved in multidrug resistance. It also protects against phototoxic chlorophyll derivatives of dietary origin. BCRP is a hemitransporter which consists of one transmembrane domain, made of six alpha-helices forming a characteristic pore structure, and one ATP-binding domain, which provides the energy from ATP hydrolysis, required for active transport of the substrates. The isolation of BCRP is still not an easy task, because its insolubility in water and the presence of membrane rafts pose serious methodological and technical challenges during the purification. The aim of this study was to optimize the methods for detection and isolation of BCRP-enriched fractions obtained from animal tissue samples. In this report we describe an optimization of isolation of a BCRP-enriched membrane fraction, which is suitable for further protein quantitative and qualitative analysis using the molecular biology tools.

  3. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is only...... expressed in M cells and the gene product is responsible for the secretion of the mating pheromone. M-factor, a nonapeptide that is S-farnesylated and carboxy-methylated on its C-terminal cysteine residue. The predicted Mam1 protein is highly homologous to mammalian multiple drug-resistance proteins...... and to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE6 gene product, which mediates export of a-factor mating pheromone. We show that STE6 can also mediate secretion of M-factor in S. pombe....

  4. Collective motor dynamics in membrane transport in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaklee, Paige Marie

    2009-01-01

    Key cellular processes such as cell division, internal cellular organization, membrane compartmentalization and intracellular transport rely on motor proteins. Motor proteins, ATP-based mechanoenzymes, actively transport cargo throughout the cell by walking on cytoskeletal filaments. Motors have

  5. Professionsbachelorens ABC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Christian Bundgaard

    2008-01-01

    På baggrund af Lars-Henrik Schmidts "Sociale ABC" og Bloom og Dreyfus' taksonomier gives der et teoretiske bud på professionsbachelorbegrebet......På baggrund af Lars-Henrik Schmidts "Sociale ABC" og Bloom og Dreyfus' taksonomier gives der et teoretiske bud på professionsbachelorbegrebet...

  6. The multidrug ABC transporter BmrC/BmrD of Bacillus subtilis is regulated via a ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Reilman, E.; Mars, R. A. T.; van Dijl, J. M.; Denham, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Expression of particular drug transporters in response to antibiotic pressure is a critical element in the development of bacterial multidrug resistance, and represents a serious concern for human health. To obtain a better understanding of underlying regulatory mechanisms, we have dissected the transcriptional activation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter BmrC/BmrD of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. By using promoter-GFP fusions and live cell array technology,...

  7. Carrier mediated transport through supported liquid membranes; determination of transport parameters from a single transport experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrisstoffels, L.A.J.; Struijk, Wilhelmina; de Jong, Feike; Reinhoudt, David

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a time-dependent transport model for carrier assisted cation transport through supported liquid membranes. The model describes the flux of salt as a function of time and two parameters viz. the diffusion coefficient of the cation complex (D), and the extraction constant (Kex).

  8. Mixed Gas Transport Study Through Polymeric Membranes: a Novel Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Dhingra, Sukhtej Singh

    1997-01-01

    The gas transport and separation properties of polymers have been successfully exploited in commercial ventures. Industrial applications employing membrane processes range from production of pure gases to barrier coatings for protection against environmental elements. Membrane separations are simple, energy efficient processes, which can be economically competitive with traditional separation technologies. Membrane separation and permeation characteristics for a...

  9. 9-Deazapurines as Broad-Spectrum Inhibitors of the ABC Transport Proteins P-Glycoprotein, Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1, and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Katja; Schmitt, Sven Marcel; Wiese, Michael

    2017-11-09

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) are the three major ABC transport proteins conferring resistance to many structurally diverse anticancer agents, leading to the phenomenon called multidrug resistance (MDR). Much effort has been put into the development of clinically useful compounds to reverse MDR. Broad-spectrum inhibitors of ABC transport proteins can be of great use in cancers that simultaneously coexpress two or three transporters. In this work, we continued our effort to generate new, potent, nontoxic, and multiply effective inhibitors of the three major ABC transporters. The best compound was active in a very low micromolar concentration range against all three transporters and restored sensitivity toward daunorubicin (P-gp and MRP1) and SN-38 (BCRP) in A2780/ADR (P-gp), H69AR (MRP1), and MDCK II BCRP (BCRP) cells. Additionally, the compound is a noncompetitive inhibitor of daunorubicin (MRP1), calcein AM (P-gp), and pheophorbide A (BCRP) transport.

  10. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Opstal, van E.J.; Alink, G.M.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles

  11. YehZYXW of Escherichia coli Is a Low-Affinity, Non-Osmoregulatory Betaine-Specific ABC Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Shenhui; Cressatti, Marisa; Mendoza, Kris E; Coumoundouros, Chelsea N; Plater, Samantha M; Culham, Doreen E; Kimber, Matthew S; Wood, Janet M

    2015-09-22

    Transporter-mediated osmolyte accumulation stimulates the growth of Escherichia coli in high-osmolality environments. YehZYXW was predicted to be an osmoregulatory transporter because (1) osmotic and stationary phase induction of yehZYXW is mediated by RpoS, (2) the Yeh proteins are homologous to the components of known osmoregulatory ABC transporters (e.g., ProU of E. coli), and (3) YehZ models based on the structures of periplasmic betaine-binding proteins suggested that YehZ retains key betaine-binding residues. The betaines choline-O-sulfate, glycine betaine, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate bound YehZ and ProX with millimolar and micromolar affinities, respectively, as determined by equilibrium dialysis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The crystal structure of the YehZ apoprotein, determined at 1.5 Å resolution (PDB ID: 4WEP ), confirmed its similarity to other betaine-binding proteins. Small and nonpolar residues in the hinge region of YehZ (e.g., Gly223) pack more closely than the corresponding residues in ProX, stabilizing the apoprotein. Betaines bound YehZ-Gly223Ser an order of magnitude more tightly than YehZ, suggesting that weak substrate binding in YehZ is at least partially due to apo state stabilization. Neither ProX nor YehZ bound proline. Assays based on osmoprotection or proline auxotrophy failed to detect YehZYXW-mediated uptake of proline, betaines, or other osmolytes. However, transport assays revealed low-affinity glycine betaine uptake, mediated by YehZYXW, that was inhibited at high salinity. Thus, YehZYXW is a betaine transporter that shares substrate specificity, but not an osmoregulatory function, with homologues like E. coli ProU. Other work suggests that yehZYXW may be an antivirulence locus whose expression promotes persistent, asymptomatic bacterial infection.

  12. RCN1/OsABCG5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is required for hypodermal suberization of roots in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Katsuhiro; Ando, Miho; Nishiuchi, Shunsaku; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Kohtaro; Nakamura, Motoaki; Matsuo, Yuichi; Yasuno, Naoko; Yamanouchi, Utako; Fujimoto, Masaru; Takanashi, Hideki; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus B; Shitan, Nobukazu; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Takamure, Itsuro; Yano, Masahiro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Schreiber, Lukas; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2014-10-01

    Suberin is a complex polymer composed of aliphatic and phenolic compounds. It is a constituent of apoplastic plant interfaces. In many plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa), the hypodermis in the outer part of roots forms a suberized cell wall (the Casparian strip and/or suberin lamellae), which inhibits the flow of water and ions and protects against pathogens. To date, there is no genetic evidence that suberin forms an apoplastic transport barrier in the hypodermis. We discovered that a rice reduced culm number1 (rcn1) mutant could not develop roots longer than 100 mm in waterlogged soil. The mutated gene encoded an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter named RCN1/OsABCG5. RCN1/OsABCG5 gene expression in the wild type was increased in most hypodermal and some endodermal roots cells under stagnant deoxygenated conditions. A GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 fusion protein localized at the plasma membrane of the wild type. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, well suberized hypodermis developed in wild types but not in rcn1 mutants. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, apoplastic tracers (periodic acid and berberine) were blocked at the hypodermis in the wild type but not in rcn1, indicating that the apoplastic barrier in the mutant was impaired. The amount of the major aliphatic suberin monomers originating from C(28) and C(30) fatty acids or ω-OH fatty acids was much lower in rcn1 than in the wild type. These findings suggest that RCN1/OsABCG5 has a role in the suberization of the hypodermis of rice roots, which contributes to formation of the apoplastic barrier. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Brzozowska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabidiol (CBD is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−, Bcrp knockout (Abcg2−∕−, combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−Abcg2−∕− and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders.

  14. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-)), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2 (-∕-)), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-) Abcg2 (-∕-)) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders.

  15. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Holt, Jason [Berkeley, CA; Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Park, Hyung Gyu [Oakland, CA

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  16. Recent achievements in facilitated transport membranes for separation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Ferraz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane separation processes have been extensively used for some important industrial separations, substituting traditional methods. However, some applications require the development of new membranes. In this work, we discuss recent progress achieved in this field, focusing on gas and liquid separation using facilitated transport membranes. The advantages of using a carrier species either in a liquid membrane or fixed in a polymer matrix to enhance both the flux and the selectivity of the transport are summarized. The most probable transport mechanisms in these membranes are presented and the improvements needed to spread this technology are also discussed. As examples, we discuss our very successful experiences in air fractioning, olefin/paraffin separation and sugar recovery using liquid and fixed carrier membranes.

  17. Transport of Carbon Dioxide through a Biomimetic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios Matsaridis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic membranes (BMM based on polymer filters impregnated with lipids or their analogues are widely applied in numerous areas of physics, biology, and medicine. In this paper we report the design and testing of an electrochemical system, which allows the investigation of CO2 transport through natural membranes such as alveoli barrier membrane system and also can be applied for solid-state measurements. The experimental setup comprises a specially designed two-compartment cell with BMM connected with an electrochemical workstation placed in a Faraday cage, two PH meters, and a nondispersive infrared gas analyzer. We prove, experimentally, that the CO2 transport through the natural membranes under different conditions depends on pH and displays a similar behavior as natural membranes. The influence of different drugs on the CO2 transport process through such membranes is discussed.

  18. Ion Transport through Diffusion Layer Controlled by Charge Mosaic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yamauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic transport behaviors in near interface of the membranes were studied using commercial anion and cation exchange membrane and charge mosaic membrane. Current-voltage curve gave the limiting current density that indicates the ceiling of conventional flux. From chronopotentiometry above the limiting current density, the transition time was estimated. The thickness of boundary layer was derived with conjunction with the conventional limiting current density and the transition time from steady state flux. On the other hand, the charge mosaic membrane was introduced in order to examine the ion transport on the membrane surface in detail. The concentration profile was discussed by the kinetic transport number with regard to the water dissociation (splitting on the membrane surface.

  19. Ion specificity and ionic strength dependence of the osmoregulatory ABC transporter OpuA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, N. A. B. Nik; Biemans-Oldehinkel, Esther; Patzlaff, Jason S.; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Poolman, Bert

    2006-01-01

    The ATPase subunit of the osmoregulatory ATP- binding cassette transporterOpuAfrom Lactococcus lactis has a C- terminal extension, the tandem cystathionine beta- synthase ( CBS) domain, which constitutes the sensor that allows the transporter to sense and respond to osmotic stress ( Biemans-

  20. Drug trafficking in mice: In vivo functions of OATP uptake and ABC efflux transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iusuf, D.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing attention for drug uptake transporters of the Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide (human OATP, mouse Oatp, gene names SLCO, Slco) superfamily. Especially the OATP1A and OATP1B subfamilies turn out to have important physiological and pharmacological

  1. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Tek Tay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the

  2. Detoxification of multiple heavy metals by a half-molecule ABC transporter, HMT-1, and coelomocytes of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc S Schwartz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing methods for protecting organisms in metal-polluted environments is contingent upon our understanding of cellular detoxification mechanisms. In this regard, half-molecule ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters of the HMT-1 subfamily are required for cadmium (Cd detoxification. HMTs have conserved structural architecture that distinguishes them from other ABC transporters and allows the identification of homologs in genomes of different species including humans. We recently discovered that HMT-1 from the simple, unicellular organism, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, SpHMT1, acts independently of phytochelatin synthase (PCS and detoxifies Cd, but not other heavy metals. Whether HMTs from multicellular organisms confer tolerance only to Cd or also to other heavy metals is not known.Using molecular genetics approaches and functional in vivo assays we showed that HMT-1 from a multicellular organism, Caenorhabditis elegans, functions distinctly from its S. pombe counterpart in that in addition to Cd it confers tolerance to arsenic (As and copper (Cu while acting independently of pcs-1. Further investigation of hmt-1 and pcs-1 revealed that these genes are expressed in different cell types, supporting the notion that hmt-1 and pcs-1 operate in distinct detoxification pathways. Interestingly, pcs-1 and hmt-1 are co-expressed in highly endocytic C. elegans cells with unknown function, the coelomocytes. By analyzing heavy metal and oxidative stress sensitivities of the coelomocyte-deficient C. elegans strain we discovered that coelomocytes are essential mainly for detoxification of heavy metals, but not of oxidative stress, a by-product of heavy metal toxicity.We established that HMT-1 from the multicellular organism confers tolerance to multiple heavy metals and is expressed in liver-like cells, the coelomocytes, as well as head neurons and intestinal cells, which are cell types that are affected by heavy metal poisoning in humans. We also showed

  3. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Mooij (Miriam); A.T. Nies (Anne T.); C.A.J. Knibbe (Catherijne); E. Schaeffeler (Elke); D. Tibboel (Dick); M. Schwab (Matthias); S.N. de Wildt (Saskia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMembrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown

  4. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, M.G.; Nies, A.T.; Knibbe, C.A.; Schaeffeler, E.; Tibboel, D.; Schwab, M.; Wildt, S.N. de

    2016-01-01

    Membrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown in drug-drug

  5. An ABC-Type Cobalt Transport System Is Essential for Growth of Sinorhizobium melilotiat Trace Metal Concentrations ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Poduska, Branislava; Morton, Richard A.; Finan, Turlough M.

    2011-01-01

    We report expression and mutant phenotypes for a gene cluster in Sinorhizobium meliloti, designated cbtJKL, that has been shown to encode an ABC-type cobalt transport system. Transcription of cbtJKLinitiated 384 nucleotides upstream from the cbtJtranslation start codon, and the resulting 5′ region contained a putative B12riboswitch. Expression of the cbtJKLgenes appeared to be controlled by (cobalt-loaded) cobalamin interacting at the B12riboswitch, since (i) a putative B12riboswitch was located within this large upstream region, (ii) cbtJtranscription was repressed upon addition of cobalt or vitamin B12, and (iii) deletions in the B12riboswitch resulted in constitutive cbtJKLtranscription. Insertion mutants in cbtJKLfailed to grow in LB medium, and growth was restored through the addition of cobalt but not other metals. This growth phenotype appeared to be due to the chelation of cobalt present in LB, and cbtJKLmutants also failed to grow in minimal medium containing the chelating agent EDTA unless the medium was supplemented with additional or excess cobalt. In uptake experiments, 57Co2+accumulation was high in wild-type cells expressing the cbtJKLgenes, whereas wild-type cells in which cbtJKLexpression was repressed showed reduced accumulation. In cbtJKLmutant cells, 57Co2+accumulation was reduced relative to that of the wild type, and presumably, this residual cobalt transport occurred via an alternate ion uptake system(s) that is not specific to cobalt. In symbiosis, the alternate system(s) appeared to mediate cobalt transport into bacteroid cells, as low cbtJKLexpression was detected in bacteroids and cbtJKLmutants formed N2-fixing nodules on alfalfa. PMID:21725018

  6. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W. (CIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  7. Effect of nephrotoxicants on renal membrane transport: In vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, R.A.; Berndt, W.O.

    1990-01-01

    It is possible to study the effects of nephrotoxicants on membrane function free of other cellular influences. By the use of Percoll gradient centrifugation, highly purified preparations of right-side-out basolateral (BL) and brush border (BB) membrane vesicles can be obtained from rat (male, Sprague-Dawley) renal cortex. Membrane function can be monitored by evaluation of sodium driven transport: 14 C-p-aminohippurate (PAH) for BL and 14 C-glucose for BB. Transport was measured by the rapid filtration technique. Each vesicle preparation was preincubated with the nephrotoxicant for five minutes before initiation of transport. Control vesicles showed a prominant overshoot 1 to 2 minutes after start of transport. Mercuric ion (Hg) had no effect on transport by BB at concentrations as high as 10μM. Transport by BL was reduced significantly at Hg concentrations as low as 100 nM. Chromate (Cr) also reduced BL transport at 100 nM and had no effect on BB transport. Citrinin significantly reduced both BB and BL transport, but the sensitivity of the membrane preparations differed. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that some nephrotoxicants may act on either side of the renal tubular cell membrane

  8. Development, Maintenance, and Reversal of Multiple Drug Resistance: At the Crossroads of TFPI1, ABC Transporters, and HIF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terra Arnason

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Early detection and improved therapies for many cancers are enhancing survival rates. Although many cytotoxic therapies are approved for aggressive or metastatic cancer; response rates are low and acquisition of de novo resistance is virtually universal. For decades; chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer have included anthracyclines such as Doxorubicin (DOX; and its use in aggressive tumors appears to remain a viable option; but drug resistance arises against DOX; as for all other classes of compounds. Our recent work suggests the anticoagulant protein Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor 1α (TFPI1α plays a role in driving the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR; but not maintenance; of the MDR state. Other factors; such as the ABC transporter drug efflux pumps MDR-1/P-gp (ABCB1 and BCRP (ABCG2; are required for MDR maintenance; as well as development. The patient population struggling with therapeutic resistance specifically requires novel treatment options to resensitize these tumor cells to therapy. In this review we discuss the development, maintenance, and reversal of MDR as three distinct phases of cancer biology. Possible means to exploit these stages to reverse MDR will be explored. Early molecular detection of MDRcancers before clinical failure has the potential to offer new approaches to fighting MDRcancer.

  9. Membrane Transporters as Mediators of Cisplatin Effects and Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Ciarimboli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transporters are important mediators of specific cellular uptake and thus, not only for effects, but also for side effects, metabolism, and excretion of many drugs such as cisplatin. Cisplatin is a potent cytostatic drug, whose use is limited by its severe acute and chronic nephro-, oto-, and peripheral neurotoxicity. For this reason, other platinum derivatives, such as carboplatin and oxaliplatin, with less toxicity but still with antitumoral action have been developed. Several transporters, which are expressed on the cell membranes, have been associated with cisplatin transport across the plasma membrane and across the cell: the copper transporter 1 (Ctr1, the copper transporter 2 (Ctr2, the P-type copper-transporting ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B, the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2, and the multidrug extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1. Some of these transporters are also able to accept other platinum derivatives as substrate. Since membrane transporters display a specific tissue distribution, they can be important molecules that mediate the entry of platinum derivatives in target and also nontarget cells possibly mediating specific effects and side effects of the chemotherapeutic drug. This paper summarizes the literature on toxicities of cisplatin compared to that of carboplatin and oxaliplatin and the interaction of these platinum derivatives with membrane transporters.

  10. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz...... and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured inmammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene...... and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied...

  11. Thermodynamics of the ATPase cycle of GlcV, the nucleotide-binding domain of the glucose ABC transporter of Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pretz, Monika G.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea; Tampe, Robert; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; van der Does, Chris

    2006-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters drive the transport of substrates across the membrane by the hydrolysis of ATP. They typically have a conserved domain structure with two membrane-spanning domains that form the transport channel and two cytosolic nucleotide-binding domains ( NBDs) that energize the

  12. Transport through zeolite filled polymeric membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, J.P.; Boom, J.P.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; Zwijnenberg, Harmen Jan; Bargeman, D.; de Boer, R.; Smolders, C.A.; Bargeman, D.; Strathmann, H.; Smolders, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the effect of zeolite particles incorporated in rubbery polymers on the pervaporation properties of membranes made from these polymers is discussed. Pervaporation of methanol/toluene mixtures was carried out with membranes prepared from the toluene selective polymer EPDM and the

  13. The Role of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Lipid Rafts in the Localization and Function of the ABCC1 Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willem Kok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are known to be important factors in multidrug resistance of tumor cells. Lipid rafts have been implicated in their localization in the plasma membrane, where they function as drug efflux pumps. This specific localization in rafts may support the activity of ABC/Abc transporters. This raises questions regarding the nature and composition of the lipid rafts that harbor ABC/Abc transporters and the dependence of ABC/Abc transporters—concerning their localization and activity—on lipid raft constituents. Here we review our work of the past 10 years aimed at evaluating whether ABC/Abc transporters are dependent on a particular membrane environment for their function. What is the nature of this membrane environment and which of the lipid raft constituents are important for this dependency? It turns out that cortical actin is of major importance for stabilizing the localization and function of the ABC/Abc transporter, provided it is localized in an actin-dependent subtype of lipid rafts, as is the case for human ABCC1/multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1 and rodent Abcc1/Mrp1 but not human ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (PGP. On the other hand, sphingolipids do not appear to be modulators of ABCC1/MRP1 (or Abcc1/Mrp1, even though they are coregulated during drug resistance development.

  14. Reversal of resistance by GF120918 in cell lines expressing the ABC half-transporter, MXR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bruin, M; Miyake, K; Litman, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    -80, a subline expressing a newly identified mitoxantrone transporter, MXR. GF120918 was ineffective in sensitizing MRP-overexpressing MCF-7 VP-16 cells to etoposide as determined by cytotoxicity studies. In flow cytometry experiments, rhodamine 123 efflux in S1-B1-20 cells was decreased at GF120918...

  15. Metallodynameric membranes--toward the constitutional transport of gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Gihane; Macron, Thomas; Gilles, Arnaud; Mouline, Zineb; Barboiu, Mihail

    2012-07-11

    The adequate selection of macromonomers, dialdehyde core connectors and of coordinating metal ions makes possible the generation of metallodynameric materials, allowing the fine modulation of the gas transport through rubbery membranes.

  16. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied

  17. Directed Evolution of Membrane Transport Using Synthetic Selections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Anne Pihl; Genee, Hans J.; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding and engineering solute transporters is important for metabolic engineering and the development of therapeutics. However, limited available experimental data on membrane transporters makes sequence-function relationships complex to predict. Here we apply ligand-responsive biosensor s...... as a substrate. Our results provide insight into the molecular determinants of substrate recognition of the PnuC transporter family and demonstrate how synthetic biology can be deployed to engineer the substrate spectrum of small molecule transporters....

  18. A lower isoelectric point increases signal sequence-mediated secretion of recombinant proteins through a bacterial ABC transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Hyunjong; Park, Jiyeon; Kim, Sun Chang; Ahn, Jung Hoon

    2017-12-01

    Efficient protein production for industrial and academic purposes often involves engineering microorganisms to produce and secrete target proteins into the culture. Pseudomonas fluorescens has a TliDEF ATP-binding cassette transporter, a type I secretion system, which recognizes C-terminal LARD3 signal sequence of thermostable lipase TliA. Many proteins are secreted by TliDEF in vivo when recombined with LARD3, but there are still others that cannot be secreted by TliDEF even when LARD3 is attached. However, the factors that determine whether or not a recombinant protein can be secreted through TliDEF are still unknown. Here, we recombined LARD3 with several proteins and examined their secretion through TliDEF. We found that the proteins secreted via LARD3 are highly negatively charged with highly-acidic isoelectric points (pI) lower than 5.5. Attaching oligo-aspartate to lower the pI of negatively-charged recombinant proteins improved their secretion, and attaching oligo-arginine to negatively-charged proteins blocked their secretion by LARD3. In addition, negatively supercharged green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed improved secretion, whereas positively supercharged GFP did not secrete. These results disclosed that proteins' acidic pI and net negative charge are major factors that determine their secretion through TliDEF. Homology modeling for TliDEF revealed that TliD dimer forms evolutionarily-conserved positively-charged clusters in its pore and substrate entrance site, which also partially explains the pI dependence of the TliDEF-dependent secretions. In conclusion, lowering the isoelectric point improved LARD3-mediated protein secretion, both widening the range of protein targets for efficient production via secretion and signifying an important aspect of ABC transporter-mediated secretions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  20. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  1. Polar transport in plants mediated by membrane transporters: focus on mechanisms of polar auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramoto, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Directional cell-to-cell transport of functional molecules, called polar transport, enables plants to sense and respond to developmental and environmental signals. Transporters that localize to plasma membranes (PMs) in a polar manner are key components of these systems. PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers, which are the most studied polar-localized PM proteins, are implicated in the polar transport of auxin that in turn regulates plant development and tropic growth. In this review, the regulatory mechanisms underlying polar localization of PINs, control of auxin efflux activity, and PIN abundance at PMs are considered. Up to date information on polar-localized nutrient transporters that regulate directional nutrient movement from soil into the root vasculature is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Downregulation of eIF4G by microRNA-503 enhances drug sensitivity of MCF-7/ADR cells through suppressing the expression of ABC transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xia; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zang, Jinglei; Zhang, Si; Huang, Nan; Guan, Xinxin; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhihui; Li, Xi; Lei, Xiaoyong

    2017-06-01

    Overexpression of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transport protein is emerging as a critical contributor to anticancer drug resistance. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4F complex, the key modulator of mRNA translation, is regulated by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in anticancer drug-resistant tumors. The present study demonstrated the roles of ABC translation protein alterations in the acquisition of the Adriamycin (ADM)-resistant phenotype of MCF-7 human breast cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were applied to examine the differences in mRNA and protein levels, respectively. It was found that the expression of the ABC sub-family B member 1, ABC sub-family C member 1 and ABC sub-family G member 2 transport proteins were upregulated in MCF-7/ADR cells. An MTT assay was used to detect the cell viability, from the results MCF-7/ADR cells were less sensitive to ADM, tamoxifen (TAM) and taxol (TAX) treatment compared with MCF-7 cells. We predicted that the 3'-untranslated region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-γ 1 (eIF4G) contains a potential miRNA binding site for microRNA (miR)-503 through using computational programs. These binding sites were confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. eIF4G mRNA degradation was accelerated in cells transfected with miR-503 mimics. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that eIF4G and ABC translation proteins were significantly downregulated in MCF-7/ADR cells after transfection with miR-503. It was found that miR-503 mimics could sensitize the cells to treatment with ADM, TAM and TAX. These findings demonstrated for the first time that eIF4G acted as a key factor in MCF-7/ADR cells, and may be an efficient agent for preventing and reversing multi-drug resistance in breast cancer.

  3. ABC Transporters and Their Role in the Neoadjuvant Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vrana

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of esophageal cancer (EC is poor, despite considerable effort of both experimental scientists and clinicians. The tri-modality treatment consisting of neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery has remained the gold standard over decades, unfortunately, without significant progress in recent years. Suitable prognostic factors indicating which patients will benefit from this tri-modality treatment are missing. Some patients rapidly progress on the neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, which is thus useless and sometimes even harmful. At the same time, other patients achieve complete remission on neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and subsequent surgery may increase their risk of morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of patients ranges from excellent to extremely poor. Considering these differences, the role of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, among other factors, in the EC response to chemotherapy may be more important compared, for example, with pancreatic cancer where all patients progress on chemotherapy regardless of the treatment or disease stage. This review surveys published literature describing the potential role of ATP-binding cassette transporters, the genetic polymorphisms, epigenetic regulations, and phenotypic changes in the prognosis and therapy of EC. The review provides knowledge base for further research of potential predictive biomarkers that will allow the stratification of patients into defined groups for optimal therapeutic outcome.

  4. Inactivation of the peroxisomal ABCD2 transporter in the mouse leads to late-onset ataxia involving mitochondria, Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrer, Isidre; Kapfhammer, Josef P.; Hindelang, Colette; Kemp, Stephan; Troffer-Charlier, Nathalie; Broccoli, Vania; Callyzot, Noëlle; Mooyer, Petra; Selhorst, Jacqueline; Vreken, Peter; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Mandel, Jean Louis; Pujol, Aurora

    2005-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters facilitate unidirectional translocation of chemically diverse substances, ranging from peptides to lipids, across cell or organelle membranes. In peroxisomes, a subfamily of four ABC transporters (ABCD1 to ABCD4) has been related to fatty acid transport,

  5. Drosophila ABC transporter mutants white, brown and scarlet have altered contents and distribution of biogenic amines in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycz, J; Borycz, J A; Kubów, A; Lloyd, V; Meinertzhagen, I A

    2008-11-01

    Monoamines such as dopamine, histamine and serotonin (5-HT) are widely distributed throughout the brain of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, where many of their actions have been investigated. For example, histamine is released from photoreceptor synapses in the lamina neuropile of the visual system. Mutations of the genes white, an important eye pigmentation marker in fly genetics that encodes an ABC transporter, and its binding partner brown, cause neural phenotypes not readily reconciled solely with actions in eye pigmentation. We find that flies mutant for these genes, and another binding partner, scarlet, have about half the wild-type amount of histamine in the head, as well as reduced 5-HT and dopamine. These differences parallel reductions in immunoreactivity to the corresponding biogenic amines. They also correlate with the amine content of fractions after differential centrifugation of head homogenates. Thus, most of the amine is found in the vesicle-rich fraction of wild-type head homogenates, whereas it is found in the supernatant fractions from white, brown and scarlet flies. White co-expresses in lamina epithelial glia with Ebony, which conjugates histamine to beta-alanine. Histamine is then released when the conjugate is hydrolyzed in photoreceptors, by Tan. Mutant white ameliorates the effects of tan on head histamine whereas it exacerbates the effects of ebony. Our results are consistent with the proposal that histamine uptake by the epithelial glia may be white dependent. Behavioral abnormalities in white, brown and scarlet mutants could arise because aminergic neurons in the Drosophila brain have reduced amine for release.

  6. Mutational analysis of the binding affinity and transport activity for N-acetylglucosamine of the novel ABC transporter Ngc in the chitin-degrader Streptomyces olivaceoviridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, A; Schrempf, H

    2004-06-01

    The highly differentiated bacterium Streptomyces olivaceoviridis efficiently hydrolyses chitin, a highly abundant natural polysaccharide, to low molecular weight products including N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and N,N' -diacetylchitobiose (chitobiose). NAG is taken up by a PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system) which includes the PtsC2 protein, and via the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter Ngc, which itself includes the substrate-binding protein NgcE. This is at present the only ABC transporter which is known to mediate specific uptake of NAG (K(m) 0.48 microM, V(max) 1.3 nmol/min/mg dry weight) and is competitively inhibited by chitobiose (K(i) 0.68 microM). The latter finding suggests that the Ngc system transports both NAG and chitobiose efficiently. To identify amino acid residues required for the function of NgcE, either the wild-type or one of several mutant forms of the ngcE gene was introduced into the strain S. olivaceoviridis DeltaNgcE/DeltaPtsC1/DeltaPtsC2, which lacks both functional transport systems for NAG, and chromosomal recombinants were selected. Based on the in vivo transport parameters of the recombinants, and the in vitro binding characteristics of the corresponding purified proteins, the following conclusions can be drawn. (1) Replacement of the C-terminally located residue Y396 by A (Y396A) has little effect on ligand-binding or transport parameters. The W395A mutation also induced little change in the substrate affinity in vitro, but it led in vivo to a marked increase (11 fold) in K(m), and enhanced V(max) (by 1.5 fold). (2) The amino acids Y201 and W280 both contribute (51% and 38%) to the ligand-binding capacity of NgcE. They are both very important for the in vivo function of the complete transport apparatus; strains expressing either Y201A or W280A show drastically (100 or 150 times) enhanced K(m) values. (3) The concomitant presence of either Y200 and W280 or Y201 and W280 is essential for the function of Ngc

  7. Structure and Water Transport in Nafion Nanocomposite Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric; Page, Kirt

    2014-03-01

    Perfluorinated ionomers, specifically Nafion, are the most widely used ion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications, where an understanding of the relationship between membrane structure and transport of water/ions is critical to battery performance. In this study, the structure of Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes, synthesized using sol-gel chemistry, as well as cast directly from Nafion/SiO2 nanoparticle dispersions, was measured using both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS). Through contrast match studies of the SiO2 nanoparticles, direct information on the change in the structure of the Nafion membranes and the ion-transport channels within was obtained, where differences in membrane structure was observed between the solution-cast membranes and the membranes synthesized using sol-gel chemistry. Additionally, water sorption and diffusion in these Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes were measured using in situ time-resolved Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS).

  8. Combined phylogeny and neighborhood analysis of the evolution of the ABC transporters conferring multiple drug resistance in hemiascomycete yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffeau André

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pleiotropic Drug Resistant transporters (PDR are members of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC subfamily which export antifungals and other xenobiotics in fungi and plants. This subfamily of transmembrane transporters has nine known members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have analyzed the complex evolution of the pleiotropic drug resistance proteins (Pdrp subfamily where gene duplications and deletions occur independently in individual genomes. This study was carried out on 62 Pdrp from nine hemiascomycetous species, seven of which span 6 of the 14 clades of the Saccharomyces complex while the two others species, Debaryomyces hansenii and Yarrowia lipolytica, are further apart from an evolutive point of view. Results Combined phylogenetic and neighborhood analyses enabled us to identify five Pdrp clusters in the Saccharomyces complex. Three of them comprise orthologs of the Pdrp sensu stricto, Pdr5p, Pdr10p, Pdr12p, Pdr15p, Snq2p and YNR070wp. The evolutive pathway of the orthologs of Snq2 and YNR070w is particularly complex due to a tandem gene array in Eremothecium gossypii, Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces (Lachancea kluyveri. This pathway and different cases of duplications and deletions were clarified by using a neighborhood analysis based on synteny. For the two distant species, Yarrowia lipolytica and Debaryomyces hansenii, no neighborhood evidence is available for these clusters and many homologs of Pdr5 and Pdr15 are phylogenetically assigned to species-based clusters. Two other clusters comprise the orthologs of the sensu lato Pdrp, Aus1p/Pdr11p and YOL075cp respectively. The evolutionary pathway of these clusters is simpler. Nevertheless, orthologs of these genes are missing in some species. Conclusion Numerous duplications were traced among the Hemiascomycetous Pdrp studied. The role of the Whole Genome Duplication (WGD is sorted out and our analyses confirm the common ancestrality of Pdr5p and Pdr15p. A tandem

  9. Combined phylogeny and neighborhood analysis of the evolution of the ABC transporters conferring multiple drug resistance in hemiascomycete yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seret, Marie-Line; Diffels, Julie F; Goffeau, André; Baret, Philippe V

    2009-10-01

    Pleiotropic Drug Resistant transporters (PDR) are members of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) subfamily which export antifungals and other xenobiotics in fungi and plants. This subfamily of transmembrane transporters has nine known members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have analyzed the complex evolution of the pleiotropic drug resistance proteins (Pdrp) subfamily where gene duplications and deletions occur independently in individual genomes. This study was carried out on 62 Pdrp from nine hemiascomycetous species, seven of which span 6 of the 14 clades of the Saccharomyces complex while the two others species, Debaryomyces hansenii and Yarrowia lipolytica, are further apart from an evolutive point of view. Combined phylogenetic and neighborhood analyses enabled us to identify five Pdrp clusters in the Saccharomyces complex. Three of them comprise orthologs of the Pdrp sensu stricto, Pdr5p, Pdr10p, Pdr12p, Pdr15p, Snq2p and YNR070wp. The evolutive pathway of the orthologs of Snq2 and YNR070w is particularly complex due to a tandem gene array in Eremothecium gossypii, Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces (Lachancea) kluyveri. This pathway and different cases of duplications and deletions were clarified by using a neighborhood analysis based on synteny. For the two distant species, Yarrowia lipolytica and Debaryomyces hansenii, no neighborhood evidence is available for these clusters and many homologs of Pdr5 and Pdr15 are phylogenetically assigned to species-based clusters. Two other clusters comprise the orthologs of the sensu lato Pdrp, Aus1p/Pdr11p and YOL075cp respectively. The evolutionary pathway of these clusters is simpler. Nevertheless, orthologs of these genes are missing in some species. Numerous duplications were traced among the Hemiascomycetous Pdrp studied. The role of the Whole Genome Duplication (WGD) is sorted out and our analyses confirm the common ancestrality of Pdr5p and Pdr15p. A tandem gene array is observed in Eremothecium gossypii. One

  10. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis ABC transporter MRP7 modifies cadmium root-to-shoot transport and accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojas, Sylwia [Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa str. 1, 02-096 Warszawa (Poland); Hennig, Jacek [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Pawinskiego str. 5A, 02-106 Warszawa (Poland); Plaza, Sonia; Geisler, Markus [Institute of Plant Biology, University of Zuerich, CH-8008 Zuerich (Switzerland); Siemianowski, Oskar; Sklodowska, Aleksandra [Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa str. 1, 02-096 Warszawa (Poland); Ruszczynska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura str.1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Antosiewicz, Danuta M., E-mail: dma@biol.uw.edu.p [Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa str. 1, 02-096 Warszawa (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    Arabidopsis MRPs/ABCCs have been shown to remove various organic and inorganic substrates from the cytosol to other subcellular compartments. Here we first demonstrate that heterologous expression of AtMRP7 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi) modifies cadmium accumulation, distribution and tolerance. Arabidopsis MRP7 was localized both in the tonoplast and in the plasma membrane when expressed in tobacco. Its overexpression increased tobacco Cd-tolerance and resulted in enhanced cadmium concentration in leaf vacuoles, indicating more efficient detoxification by means of vacuolar storage. Heterologous AtMRP7 expression also led to more efficient retention of Cd in roots, suggesting a contribution to the control of cadmium root-to-shoot translocation. The results underscore the use of AtMRP7 in plant genetic engineering to modify the heavy-metal accumulation pattern for a broad range of applications. - AtMRP7 expression in tobacco enhances Cd-tolerance and increases Cd storage in vacuoles

  11. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis ABC transporter MRP7 modifies cadmium root-to-shoot transport and accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojas, Sylwia; Hennig, Jacek; Plaza, Sonia; Geisler, Markus; Siemianowski, Oskar; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Ruszczynska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa; Antosiewicz, Danuta M.

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis MRPs/ABCCs have been shown to remove various organic and inorganic substrates from the cytosol to other subcellular compartments. Here we first demonstrate that heterologous expression of AtMRP7 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi) modifies cadmium accumulation, distribution and tolerance. Arabidopsis MRP7 was localized both in the tonoplast and in the plasma membrane when expressed in tobacco. Its overexpression increased tobacco Cd-tolerance and resulted in enhanced cadmium concentration in leaf vacuoles, indicating more efficient detoxification by means of vacuolar storage. Heterologous AtMRP7 expression also led to more efficient retention of Cd in roots, suggesting a contribution to the control of cadmium root-to-shoot translocation. The results underscore the use of AtMRP7 in plant genetic engineering to modify the heavy-metal accumulation pattern for a broad range of applications. - AtMRP7 expression in tobacco enhances Cd-tolerance and increases Cd storage in vacuoles

  12. Gene expression of membrane transporters: Importance for prognosis and progression of ovarian carcinoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elsnerová, K.; Mohelniková; Duchonová, B.; Čeřovská, E.; Ehrlichová, M.; Gut, I.; Rob, L.; Skapa, P.; Hruda, M.; Bartáková, A.; Bouda, J.; Vodička, Pavel; Souček, P.; Václavíková, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2016), s. 2159-2170 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14056; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14050 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : epithelial ovarian cancer * ABC transporters * SLC transporters * gene expression * prognosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.662, year: 2016

  13. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  14. Ion transport across the biological membrane by computational protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Gevorg

    The cellular membrane is impermeable to most of the chemicals the cell needs to take in or discard to survive. Therefore, transporters-a class of transmembrane proteins tasked with shuttling cargo chemicals in and out of the cell-are essential to all cellular life. From existing crystal structures, we know transporters to be complex machines, exquisitely tuned for specificity and controllability. But how could membrane-bound life have evolved if it needed such complex machines to exist first? To shed light onto this question, we considered the task of designing a transporter de novo. As our guiding principle, we took the ``alternating-access model''-a conceptual mechanism stating that transporters work by rocking between two conformations, each exposing the cargo-binding site to either the intra- or the extra-cellular environment. A computational design framework was developed to encode an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that rocked between two alternative states to orchestrate the movement of Zn(II) ions across the membrane. The ensemble nature of both states was accounted for using a free energy-based approach, and sequences were chosen based on predicted formation of the targeted topology in the membrane and bi-stability. A single sequence was prepared experimentally and shown to function as a Zn(II) transporter in lipid vesicles. Further, transport was specific to Zn(II) ions and several control peptides supported the underlying design principles. This included a mutant designed to retain all properties but with reduced rocking, which showed greatly depressed transport ability. These results suggest that early transporters could have evolved in the context of simple topologies, to be later tuned by evolution for improved properties and controllability. Our study also serves as an important advance in computational protein design, showing the feasibility of designing functional membrane proteins and of tuning conformational landscapes for desired function

  15. Controlled Transport of Functionalized Nanochannel though Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Via the Dissipative Particle Dynamics approach, we study the directed transport of a transmembrane nanochannel to a desired location within a lipid bilayer. Each nanochannel encompasses an ABA architecture, with a hydrophobic shaft (B) with two hydrophilic ends (A). One of the ends of the nanochannel is functionalized with hydrophilic functional groups, or hairs. The hydrophilic hairs serve a dual role: (a) control transport across the membrane barrier, and (b) enable the channel relocation to a specific membrane site. Our system comprises a lipid membrane with an embedded transmembrane nanochannel with the hairs extending into solution. First, we hold a suitably functionalized pipette above the membrane while the nanochannel freely diffuses within the membrane. For an optimal range of parameters, we demonstrate that the hairs find the pipette and spontaneously anchor onto it. We then show that by moving the pipette for a range of velocities, we can effectively transport the channel to any location within the membrane. This prototype assembly can provide guidelines for designing a number of systems for biomimetic applications.

  16. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  17. Method of making a hydrogen transport membrane, and article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph M.; Corpus, Joseph M.; Lim, Hankwon

    2015-07-21

    The present invention relates to a method of manufacturing a hydrogen transport membrane and the composite article itself. More specifically, the invention relates to producing a membrane substrate, wherein the ceramic substrate is coated with a metal oxide slurry, thereby eliminating the need for an activation step prior to plating the ceramic membrane through an electroless plating process. The invention also relates to modifying the pore size and porosity of the substrate by oxidation or reduction of the particles deposited by the metal oxide slurry.

  18. Mechanical reliability of geometrically imperfect tubular oxygen transport membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Søgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    operation. This paper investigates numerically the failure risk of tubular oxygen transport membranes under industrial operating conditions using finite element modeling and Weibull strength analysis. The effects of component manufacturing defects on fracture probability are elucidated by explicit modeling...... of imperfections in the tubular membrane geometry. A supported membrane made of dense and porous Zr-doped-BSCF is studied as an illustrative example. It is shown that stresses induced by oxygen stoichiometry gradients relax over time due to creep and external pressure is the dominating source of stress in the long...... quality (in terms of specification of tolerable deviation from perfect tubular shape) that allows fail-safe operation are deduced....

  19. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  20. Dicarbanonaborates in yeast respiration and membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyk, A; Lapathitis, G

    1997-04-01

    Two derivatives of carborates, sodium 5,6-dichloro-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-Cl) and sodium 5-mercapto-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-SH) were found to inhibit endogenous as well as glucose-induced respiration of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both substances slightly increased endogenous acid production, were neutral toward H(+)-ATPase-associated acidification but pronouncedly inhibited the K(+)-stimulated acidification. The same effects were observed also with an ATPase-deficient mutant of the yeast. The ATP-hydrolyzing activity of yeast plasma membranes in vitro was severely reduced. The membrane potential was substantially increased toward more negative values. The H(+)-symporting uptake of glutamic acid was considerably decreased, that of adenine was diminished much less. The effects of the dicarbanonaborates are obviously pleiotropic but their inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and of uptake of H(+)-symported substances, on the one hand, and absolute lack of effect on ATPase-catalyzed acidification, on the other, pose an unresolved problem.

  1. In Vitro Assessment of the Effect of Antiepileptic Drugs on Expression and Function of ABC Transporters and Their Interactions with ABCC2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpreet Kaur Grewal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters have a significant role in drug disposition and response and various studies have implicated their involvement in epilepsy pharmacoresistance. Since genetic studies till now are inconclusive, we thought of investigating the role of xenobiotics as transcriptional modulators of ABC transporters. Here, we investigated the effect of six antiepileptic drugs (AEDs viz. phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, lamotrigine, topiramate and levetiracetam, on the expression and function of ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCC2 and ABCG2 in Caco2 and HepG2 cell lines through real time PCR, western blot and functional activity assays. Further, the interaction of AEDs with maximally induced ABCC2 was studied. Carbamazepine caused a significant induction in expression of ABCB1 and ABCC2 in HepG2 and Caco2 cells, both at the transcript and protein level, together with increased functional activity. Valproate caused a significant increase in the expression and functional activity of ABCB1 in HepG2 only. No significant effect of phenytoin, lamotrigine, topiramate and levetiracetam on the transporters under study was observed in either of the cell lines. We demonstrated the interaction of carbamazepine and valproate with ABCC2 with ATPase and 5,6-carboxyfluorescein inhibition assays. Thus, altered functionality of ABCB1 and ABCC2 can affect the disposition and bioavailability of administered drugs, interfering with AED therapy.

  2. An inventory of the human ABC proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, I; Sarkadi, B; Váradi, A

    1999-12-06

    Currently 30 human ABC proteins are represented by full sequences in various databases, and this paper provides a brief overview of these proteins. ABC proteins are composed of transmembrane domains (TMDs), and nucleotide binding domains (NBDs, or ATP-binding cassettes, ABSs). The arrangement of these domains, together with available membrane topology models of the family members, are presented. Based on their sequence similarity scores, the members of the human ABC protein family can be grouped into eight subfamilies. At present the MDR/TAP, the ALD, the MRP/CFTR, the ABC1, the White, the RNAseL inhibitor, the ANSA, and the GCN20 subfamilies are identified. Mutations of many human ABC proteins are known to be causative in inherited diseases, and a short description of the molecular pathology of these ABC gene-related genetic diseases is also provided.

  3. Hypoxanthine transport through human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capuozzo, E.; Crifo, C.; Gigante, M.C.; Salerno, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report the kinetics of 14-C hypoxanthine uptake by intact human erythrocytes suspended in a phosphate-free medium, i.e. in conditions which make negligible 14-C hypoxanthine phosphoribosylation. Human erythrocytes were prepared from blood freshly drawn in heparin and washed three times with isotonic glucose-NaCl solution. In the absence of inorganic phosphate in the suspending medium, hypoxanthine receptor appears to be saturated by relatively low purine base concentration. When the cells are suspended in a medium containing inorganic phosphate, and thus, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate becomes available for nucleotide synthesis, hypoxanthine in phosphoribosylted to IMP. It can be suggested that under these conditions the receptor gets rid of hypoxanthine, crosses the cell membrane, and takes up new exogenous purine base

  4. Barriers to Superfast Water Transport in Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Ritos, Konstantinos; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes hold the promise of extraordinary fast water transport for applications such as energy efficient filtration and molecular level drug delivery. However, experiments and computations have reported flow rate enhancements over continuum hydrodynamics that contradict each...... over the continuum predictions. These rates are far below those reported experimentally. The results suggest that the reported superfast water transport rates cannot be attributed to interactions of water with pristine CNTs alone....

  5. An overview of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, B

    1995-12-01

    All eukaryotic cells contain a wide variety of proteins embedded in the plasma and internal membranes, which ensure transmembrane solute transport. It is now established that a large proportion of these transport proteins can be grouped into families apparently conserved throughout organisms. This article presents the data of an in silicio analysis aimed at establishing a preliminary classification of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis was conducted at a time when about 65% of all yeast genes were available in public databases. In addition to approximately 60 transport proteins whose function was at least partially known, approximately 100 deduced protein sequences of unknown function display significant sequence similarity to membrane transport proteins characterized in yeast and/or other organisms. While some protein families have been well characterized by classical genetic experimental approaches, others have largely if not totally escaped characterization. The proteins revealed by this in silicio analysis also include a putative K+ channel, proteins similar to aquaporins of plant and animal origin, proteins similar to Na+-solute symporters, a protein very similar to electroneural cation-chloride cotransporters, and a putative Na+-H+ antiporter. A new research area is anticipated: the functional analysis of many transport proteins whose existence was revealed by genome sequencing.

  6. Membrane transport of anandamide through resealed human red blood cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, I.N.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    The use of resealed red blood cell membranes (ghosts) allows the study of the transport of a compound in a nonmetabolizing system with a biological membrane. Transmembrane movements of anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine, arachidonoylethanolamide) have been studied by exchange efflux experiments...... at 0°C and pH 7.3 with albumin-free and albumin-filled human red blood cell ghosts. The efflux kinetics is biexponential and is analyzed in terms of compartment models. The distribution of anandamide on the membrane inner to outer leaflet pools is determined to be 0.275 ± 0.023, and the rate constant...... of unidirectional flux from inside to outside is 0.361 ± 0.023 s. The rate constant of unidirectional flux from the membrane to BSA in the medium ([BSA]) increases with the square root of [BSA] in accordance with the theory of an unstirred layer around ghosts. Anandamide passed through the red blood cell membrane...

  7. Membrane transporter engineering in industrial biotechnology and whole cell biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Douglas B; Swainston, Neil; Pir, Pınar; Oliver, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Because they mainly do not involve chemical changes, membrane transporters have been a Cinderella subject in the biotechnology of small molecule production, but this is a serious oversight. Influx transporters contribute significantly to the flux towards product, and efflux transporters ensure the accumulation of product in the much greater extracellular space of fermentors. Programmes for improving biotechnological processes might therefore give greater consideration to transporters than may have been commonplace. Strategies for identifying important transporters include expression profiling, genome-wide knockout studies, stress-based selection, and the use of inhibitors. In addition, modern methods of directed evolution and synthetic biology, especially those effecting changes in energy coupling, offer huge opportunities for increasing the flux towards extracellular product formation by transporter engineering. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25% by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental well-being. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be utilized to enhance yields of staple crops, incre...

  9. Water vapor and Gas Transport through Polymeric Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor transport through polymeric materials plays an important role in a large number of applications such as: food packaging, breathable clothing, roofing membranes, diapers, and the removal of water vapor from gas streams (e.g. dehydration of natural gas or the drying of compressed air).

  10. On the mechanism of gas transport in rigid polymer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensema, E.R.; Hensema, E.R.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Smolders, C.A.; Smolders, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional polymers are compared as gas separation membrane materials with tailormade polymers. The increased permeability of the latter are due to their higher free volume available for gas transport. The increased free volume is associated with the rigidity polymer backbone. Free volume is

  11. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Minford, Eric [Laurys Station, PA; Waldron, William Emil [Whitehall, PA

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  12. Civilsamfundets ABC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anker Brink; Meyer, Gitte

    Filantropiske fonde og foreninger får stadig større indflydelse på udviklingen af det danske samfund – fra kunst, kultur, byggeri og byudvikling til forskning og udvikling af den danske velfærdsstat. Gennem 32 essays giver Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer en oplysende – og polemisk – analyse af de...... for almenvelllet? CIVILSAMFUNDETS ABC er skrevet på baggrund af et udredningsprojekt om civilsamfundets rolle i det danske samfund. Såvel udredningsprojektet som ABC’en er finansieret af Realdania...

  13. Role of Passive Diffusion, Transporters, and Membrane Trafficking-Mediated Processes in Cellular Drug Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocucci, E; Kim, J Y; Bai, Y; Pabla, N

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular drug accumulation is thought to be dictated by two major processes, passive diffusion through the lipid membrane or membrane transporters. The relative role played by these distinct processes remains actively debated. Moreover, the role of membrane-trafficking in drug transport remains underappreciated and unexplored. Here we discuss the distinct processes involved in cellular drug distribution and propose that better experimental models are required to elucidate the differential contributions of various processes in intracellular drug accumulation. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of reduced glutathione transport: role of the MRP/CFTR/ABCC and OATP/SLC21A families of membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballatori, Nazzareno; Hammond, Christine L.; Cunningham, Jennifer B.; Krance, Suzanne M.; Marchan, Rosemarie

    2005-01-01

    The initial step in reduced glutathione (GSH) turnover in all mammalian cells is its transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space; however, the mechanisms of GSH transport are not clearly defined. GSH export is required for the delivery of its constituent amino acids to other tissues, detoxification of drugs, metals, and other reactive compounds of both endogenous and exogenous origin, protection against oxidant stress, and secretion of hepatic bile. Recent studies indicate that some members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP/CFTR or ABCC) family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, as well as some members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP or SLC21A) family of transporters contribute to this process. In particular, five of the 12 members of the MRP/CFTR family appear to mediate GSH export from cells namely, MRP1, MRP2, MRP4, MRP5, and CFTR. Additionally, two members of the OATP family, rat Oatp1 and Oatp2, have been identified as GSH transporters. For the Oatp1 transporter, efflux of GSH may provide the driving force for the uptake of extracellular substrates. In humans, OATP-B and OATP8 do not appear to transport GSH; however, other members of this family have yet to be characterized in regards to GSH transport. In yeast, the ABC proteins Ycf1p and Bpt1p transport GSH from the cytosol into the vacuole, whereas Hgt1p mediates GSH uptake across the plasma membrane. Because transport is a key step in GSH homeostasis and is intimately linked to its biological functions, GSH export proteins are likely to modulate essential cellular functions

  15. LrABCF1, a GCN-type ATP-binding cassette transporter from lilium regale, is involved in defense responses against viral and fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are essential for membrane translocation in diverse biological processes, such as plant development and defense response. Here, a general control non-derepressible (GCN)-type ABC transporter gene, designated LrABCF1, was identified from Cucumber mosaic virus (...

  16. The Putative Response Regulator BaeR Stimulates Multidrug Resistance of Escherichia coli via a Novel Multidrug Exporter System, MdtABC

    OpenAIRE

    Nagakubo, Satoshi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Hirata, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2002-01-01

    Overproduction of the response regulator BaeR confers resistance to novobiocin and bile salts in a ΔacrAB mutant by stimulating drug exporter gene expression. The mdtABC (multidrug transporter ABC, formerly known as yegMNO) genes, which encode a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) drug efflux system, are responsible for resistance. The MdtABC system comprises the transmembrane MdtB/MdtC heteromultimer and MdtA membrane fusion protein. MdtAC also confers bile salt, but not novobiocin, re...

  17. Membranes on nanopores for multiplexed single-transporter analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Michael; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The study of membrane proteins as prime drug targets has led to intensified efforts to characterize their structure and function. With regards to the structural analysis of membrane proteins, there have been considerable technological innovations in cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography, but advancements in the elucidation of membrane protein function, especially on a single-molecule level, have been struggling to bridge from basic science to high-throughput applications. There is a need for advanced biosensor platforms allowing membrane protein-mediated transport and potential suppressor libraries to be characterized. Membrane proteins facilitating the translocation of non-electrogenic substrates particularly suffer from a lack of such techniques to date. Here, we summarize recent developments in the field of membrane protein analysis, with a special focus on micro- and nanostructured platforms for purpose of high-throughput screening using fluorescent read-out systems. Additionally, their use as novel biosensor platforms to elucidate non-electrogenic substrate translocation is described. This overview contains 82 references. (author)

  18. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins in aquatic invertebrates: Evolutionary significance and application in marine ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Hui-Su; Kang, Hye-Min; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2017-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily is known to play a fundamental role in biological processes and is highly conserved across animal taxa. The ABC proteins function as active transporters for multiple substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. As this superfamily is derived from a common ancestor, ABC genes have evolved via lineage-specific duplications through the process of adaptation. In this review, we summarized information about the ABC gene families in aquatic invertebrates, considering their evolution and putative functions in defense mechanisms. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted to examine the evolutionary significance of ABC gene families in aquatic invertebrates. Particularly, a massive expansion of multixenobiotic resistance (MXR)-mediated efflux transporters was identified in the absence of the ABCG2 (BCRP) gene in Ecdysozoa and Platyzoa, suggesting that a loss of Abcg2 gene occurred sporadically in these species during divergence of Protostome to Lophotrochozoa. Furthermore, in aquatic invertebrates, the ecotoxicological significance of MXR is discussed while considering the role of MXR-mediated efflux transporters in response to various environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling CO2-facilitated transport across a diethanolamine liquid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihong Bao; Michael C. Trachtenberg [Carbozyme Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We compared experimental and model data for the facilitated transport of CO2 from a CO2-air mixture across an aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) via a hollow fiber, contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) permeator. A two-step carbamate formation model was devised to analyze the data instead of the one-step mechanism used by previous investigators. The effects of DEA concentration, liquid membrane thickness and feed CO2 concentration were also studied. With a 20% (wt) DEA liquid membrane and feed of 15% CO2 in CO2-air mixture at atmosphere pressure, the permeance reached 1.51E-8 mol/m{sup 2} s Pa with a CO2/N2 selectivity of 115. Model predictions compared well with the experimental results at CO2 concentrations of industrial importance. Short-term stability of the HFCLM permeator performance was examined. The system was stable during 5-days of testing.

  20. Plant Phosphoproteomics: Analysis of Plasma Membrane Transporters by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Juanying; Rudashevskaya, Elena; Young, Clifford

      Phosphorylation is a key regulatory factor in all aspects of eukaryotic biology including the regulation of plant membrane-bound transport proteins. To date, mass spectrometry (MS) has been introduced as powerful technology for study of post translational modifications (PTMs), including protein...... phosphorylation. Due to the low abundance of phosphoprotein, the specific enrichment prior to MS analysis is necessary. Plant proton pump (H+-ATPase) is an enzyme controls the major transport processes in the plant, such as root nutrient uptake. Moreover, this pump has been proposed to be involved in other...... important physiological functions, such as stomata aperture, cell elongation, or cellular pH regulation. It is known that the activity of plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase is regulated by phosphorylation. Therefore, we first investigated the phosphorylation profile of plant H+-ATPase by enriching...

  1. Quantitative visualization of passive transport across bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, John M. A.; Edwards, Martin A.; Rudd, Nicola C.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict and interpret membrane permeation coefficients is of critical importance, particularly because passive transport is crucial for the effective delivery of many pharmaceutical agents to intracellular targets. We present a method for the quantitative measurement of the permeation coefficients of protonophores by using laser confocal scanning microscopy coupled to microelectrochemistry, which is amenable to precise modeling with the finite element method. The technique delivers well defined and high mass transport rates and allows rapid visualization of the entire pH distribution on both the cis and trans side of model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). A homologous series of carboxylic acids was investigated as probe molecules for BLMs composed of soybean phosphatidylcholine. Significantly, the permeation coefficient decreased with acyl tail length contrary to previous work and to Overton's rule. The reasons for this difference are considered, and we suggest that the applicability of Overton's rule requires re-evaluation. PMID:18787114

  2. Development of thin film oxygen transport membranes on metallic supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Ye

    2012-04-25

    interlayer, though it comprised some cracks. The second interlayer had a crack-free and porous structure. The top membrane layer was deposited by physical vapor deposition (magnetron sputtering) with a thickness of 3.8 {mu}m improving the gastightness considerably but showing still reasonable air-leakage. Summarizing, the successful development of a metal-perovskite-composite could be shown, which acts as a basis for a further development of a gas-tight metal supported oxygen transport asymmetric membrane structure. (orig.)

  3. Membrane transporters and drought resistance – a complex issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Maria Jarzyniak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted.

  4. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Julian I; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-05-02

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land.

  5. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V.; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-01-01

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land. PMID:23636397

  6. Mechanisms and regulation of water transport across the peritoneal membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Morelle, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis represents the major home-based dialysis modality for patients with end-stage renal disease. The capacity of the peritoneal membrane to transport water in response to an osmotic gradient contributes to the efficiency of the technique. Previous studies have demonstrated that aquaporin water channels are expressed in the endothelium lining peritoneal microvessels and mediate ultrafiltration during peritoneal dialysis. The investigations presented in this work provide novel i...

  7. Role of membranes and membrane reactors in the hydrogen supply of fuel cells for transports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julbe, A.; Guizard, Ch. [Institut Europeen des Membranes, UMII, Lab. des Materiaux et des Procedes Membranaires, CNRS UMR 5635, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2000-07-01

    Production, storage and supply of high-purity hydrogen as a clean and efficient fuel is central to fuel cells technology, in particular in vehicle traction. Actually, technologies for handling liquefied or gaseous hydrogen in transports are not available so that a number of alternative fuels are considered with the aim of in-situ generation of hydrogen through catalytic processes. The integrated concept of membrane reactors (MRs) can greatly benefit to these technologies. Particular emphasis is put on inorganic membranes and their role in MRs performance for H{sub 2} production.

  8. Simulation of water transport through a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrink, S.J.; Berendsen, H.J.C. (Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands))

    1994-04-14

    To obtain insight in the process of water permeation through a lipid membrane we performed molecular dynamics simulations on a phospholipid (DPPC)/water system with atomic detail. Since the actual process of permeation is too slow to be studied directly, we deduced the permeation rate indirectly via computation of the free energy and diffusion rate profiles of a water molecule across the bilayer. We concluded that the permeation of water through a lipid membrane cannot be described adequately by a simple homogeneous solubility-diffusion model. Both the excess free energy and the diffusion rate strongly depend on the position in the membrane, as a result from the inhomogeneous nature of the membrane. The calculated excess free energy profile has a shallow slope and a maximum height of 26 kJ/mol. The diffusion rate is highest in the middle of the membrane where the lipid density is low. In the interfacial region almost all water molecules are bound by the lipid headgroups, and the diffusion turns out to be 1 order of magnitude smaller. The total transport process is essentially determined by the free energy barrier. 78 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  10. Calcium and proton transport in membrane vesicles from barley roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuPont, F.M.; Windle, J.J.; Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Ca 2+ uptake by membrane fractions from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv CM72) roots was characterized. Uptake of 45 Ca 2+ was measured in membrane vesicles obtained from continuous and discontinuous sucrose gradients. A single, large peak of Ca 2+ uptake coincided with the peak of proton transport by the tonoplast H + -ATPase. Depending on the concentration of Ca 2+ in the assay, Ca 2+ uptake was inhibited 50 to 75% by those combinations of ionophores and solutes that eliminated the pH gradient and membrane potential. However, 25 to 50% of the Ca 2+ uptake in the tonoplast-enriched fraction was not sensitive to ionophores but was inhibited by vanadate. The results suggest that 45 Ca uptake was driven by the low affinity, high capacity tonoplast Ca 2+ /nH + antiporter and also by a high affinity, lower capacity Ca 2+ -ATPase. The Ca 2+ -ATPase may be associated with tonoplast, Golgi or contaminating vesicles of unknown origin. No Ca 2+ transport was specifically associated with the distinct peak of endoplasmic reticulum that was identified by NADH cytochrome c reductase, choline phosphotransferase, and dolichol-P-mannosyl synthase activities. A small shoulder of Ca 2+ uptake in the plasma membrane region of the gradient was inhibited by vanadate and erythrosin B and may represent the activity of a separate plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase. Vesicle volumes were estimated using electron spin resonance techniques, and intravesicular Ca 2+ concentrations were estimated to be as high as 5 millimolar. ATP-driven uptake of Ca 2+ created 800- to 2,000-fold concentration gradients within minutes. Problems in interpreting the effects of Ca 2+ on ATP-generated pH gradients are discussed and the suggestion is made that Ca 2+ dissipates pH gradients by a different mechanism than is responsible for Ca 2+ uptake into tonoplast vesicles

  11. Numerical simulation of ion transport membrane reactors: Oxygen permeation and transport and fuel conversion

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2012-07-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) based reactors have been suggested as a novel technology for several applications including fuel reforming and oxy-fuel combustion, which integrates air separation and fuel conversion while reducing complexity and the associated energy penalty. To utilize this technology more effectively, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of the fundamental processes of oxygen transport and fuel conversion in the immediate vicinity of the membrane. In this paper, a numerical model that spatially resolves the gas flow, transport and reactions is presented. The model incorporates detailed gas phase chemistry and transport. The model is used to express the oxygen permeation flux in terms of the oxygen concentrations at the membrane surface given data on the bulk concentration, which is necessary for cases when mass transfer limitations on the permeate side are important and for reactive flow modeling. The simulation results show the dependence of oxygen transport and fuel conversion on the geometry and flow parameters including the membrane temperature, feed and sweep gas flow, oxygen concentration in the feed and fuel concentration in the sweep gas. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Identification of the minimal region in lipase ABC transporter recognition domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens for secretion and fluorescence of green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Yeonwoo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TliA is a thermostable lipase secreted by the type 1 secretion system (T1SS of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The secretion is promoted by its secretion/chaperone domain located near the C-terminus, which is composed mainly of four Repeat-in-Toxin (RTX repeats. In order to identify the minimal region of TliA responsible for its secretion, five different copies of the secretion/chaperone domain, each involving truncated N-terminal residues and a common C-terminus, were acquired and named as lipase ABC transporter recognition domains (LARDs. Each LARD was fused to epidermal growth factor (EGF or green fluorescent protein (GFP, and the secretion of EGF-LARD or GFP-LARD fusion proteins was assessed in Escherichia coli with ABC transporter. Results Among the fusion proteins, GFP or EGF with 105-residue LARD3 was most efficiently secreted. In addition, GFP-LARD3 emitted wild type GFP fluorescence. Structurally, LARD3 had the 4 RTX repeats exposed at the N-terminus, while other LARDs had additional residues prior to them or missed some of the RTX repeats. LARD3 was both necessary and sufficient for efficient secretion and maintenance of GFP fluorescence in E. coli, which was also confirmed in P. fluorescens and P. fluorescens ▵tliA, a knock-out mutant of tliA. Conclusion LARD3 was a potent secretion signal in T1SS for its fusion flanking RTX motif, which enhanced secretion and preserved the fluorescence of GFP. LARD3-mediated secretion in E. coli or P. fluorescens will enable the development of enhanced protein manufacturing factory and recombinant microbe secreting protein of interest in situ.

  13. TransportTP: A two-phase classification approach for membrane transporter prediction and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udvardi Michael K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane transporters play crucial roles in living cells. Experimental characterization of transporters is costly and time-consuming. Current computational methods for transporter characterization still require extensive curation efforts, especially for eukaryotic organisms. We developed a novel genome-scale transporter prediction and characterization system called TransportTP that combined homology-based and machine learning methods in a two-phase classification approach. First, traditional homology methods were employed to predict novel transporters based on sequence similarity to known classified proteins in the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB. Second, machine learning methods were used to integrate a variety of features to refine the initial predictions. A set of rules based on transporter features was developed by machine learning using well-curated proteomes as guides. Results In a cross-validation using the yeast proteome for training and the proteomes of ten other organisms for testing, TransportTP achieved an equivalent recall and precision of 81.8%, based on TransportDB, a manually annotated transporter database. In an independent test using the Arabidopsis proteome for training and four recently sequenced plant proteomes for testing, it achieved a recall of 74.6% and a precision of 73.4%, according to our manual curation. Conclusions TransportTP is the most effective tool for eukaryotic transporter characterization up to date.

  14. The role of transporters on drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Ngatidjan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pharmacodynamical studies showed that most drugs elicit their effects by acting on 3 kinds of protein molecules known as receptors, enzymes or transporters. Although their detail properties had not been explained for decades the roles of transporters in drug kinetics and dynamics has been well understood, even have been applied in the therapy. Transporters are classified into 2 major classes, the solute carriers (SLC and ATP-binding cassette (ABC families. SLC transporters do not possess ATP binding site property as those of ABC transporters. SLC transporters consist of 3 SLC subfamilies i.e. organic cation transporters (OCTs, organic anion transporters (OATs and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs. In contrast, ABC transporters require ATP hydrolysis to transport substrate across cell membrane. Human ABC-transporters consist of ABCA1- 13, ABCB1-11, ABCC1-12, ABCD1-4, ABCE1, ABCF1-3 and ABCG1-8 subfamily. Although the originally funtion of transporter is to transport specific physiological substrate such as nutrient, hormone, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other physiological subtances across cell membrane the specificity is not restricted to each substrate. Drugs and other xenobiotics which have structural similarity to the physiological substrates are recognized and transported by the related transporters. The competition of them on transporters therefore may lead to the occurence of drug-drug interactions (DDI or drugphysiological substrate interaction in the drug-kinetics phase. Many transporters located in the liver, intestinal and renal epithelial cell membranes involve in the transport of endogenous substance or xenobiotics including drugs play important roles as protective barrier. Since transporters also serve as the targets of drug action it is understood that transporters play important role in the pathogenesis of diseases as well as in the drug therapy of diseases.

  15. Transport of Proteins Dissolved in Organic Solvents Across Biomimetic Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Lev E.; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    1995-02-01

    Using lipid-impregnated porous cellulose membranes as biomimetic barriers, we tested the hypothesis that to afford effective transmembrane transfer of proteins and nucleic acids, the vehicle solvent should be able to dissolve both the biopolymers and the lipids. While the majority of solvents dissolve one or the other, ethanol and methanol were found to dissolve both, especially if the protein had been lyophilized from an aqueous solution of a pH remote from the protein's isoelectric point. A number of proteins, as well as RNA and DNA, dissolved in these alcohols readily crossed the lipidized membranes, whereas the same biopolymers placed in nondissolving solvents (e.g., hexane and ethyl acetate) or in those unable to dissolve lipids (e.g., water and dimethyl sulfoxide) exhibited little transmembrane transport. The solubility of biopolymers in ethanol and methanol was further enhanced by complexation with detergents and poly(ethylene glycol); significant protein and nucleic acid transport through the lipidized membranes was observed from these solvents but not from water.

  16. Human ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABC1): Genomic organization and identification of the genetic defect in the original Tangier disease kindred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remaley, Alan T.; Rust, Stephan; Rosier, Marie; Knapper, Cathy; Naudin, Laurent; Broccardo, Cyril; Peterson, Katherine M.; Koch, Christine; Arnould, Isabelle; Prades, Catherine; Duverger, Nicholas; Funke, Harald; Assman, Gerd; Dinger, Maria; Dean, Michael; Chimini, Giovanna; Santamarina-Fojo, Silvia; Fredrickson, Donald S.; Denefle, Patrice; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1999-01-01

    Tangier disease is characterized by low serum high density lipoproteins and a biochemical defect in the cellular efflux of lipids to high density lipoproteins. ABC1, a member of the ATP-binding cassette family, recently has been identified as the defective gene in Tangier disease. We report here the organization of the human ABC1 gene and the identification of a mutation in the ABC1 gene from the original Tangier disease kindred. The organization of the human ABC1 gene is similar to that of the mouse ABC1 gene and other related ABC genes. The ABC1 gene contains 49 exons that range in size from 33 to 249 bp and is over 70 kb in length. Sequence analysis of the ABC1 gene revealed that the proband for Tangier disease was homozygous for a deletion of nucleotides 3283 and 3284 (TC) in exon 22. The deletion results in a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon starting at nucleotide 3375. The product is predicted to encode a nonfunctional protein of 1,084 aa, which is approximately half the size of the full-length ABC1 protein. The loss of a Mnl1 restriction site, which results from the deletion, was used to establish the genotype of the rest of the kindred. In summary, we report on the genomic organization of the human ABC1 gene and identify a frameshift mutation in the ABC1 gene of the index case of Tangier disease. These results will be useful in the future characterization of the structure and function of the ABC1 gene and the analysis of additional ABC1 mutations in patients with Tangier disease. PMID:10535983

  17. Effects of in vitro exposure to ivermectin and levamisole on the expression patterns of ABC transporters in Haemonchus contortus larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Raza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the interaction of ATP binding cassette (ABC transport proteins with ivermectin (IVM and levamisole (LEV in larvae of susceptible and resistant isolates of Haemonchus contortus in vitro by measuring transcription patterns following exposure to these anthelmintics. Furthermore, we studied the consequences of drug exposure by measuring the sensitivity of L3 to subsequent exposure to higher drug concentrations using larval migration assays. The most highly transcribed transporter genes in both susceptible and resistant L3 were pgp-9.3, abcf-1, mrp-5, abcf-2, pgp-3, and pgp-10. The resistant isolate showed significantly higher transcription of pgp-1, pgp-9.1 and pgp-9.2 compared to the susceptible isolate. Five P-gp genes and the haf-6 gene showed significantly higher transcription (up to 12.6-fold after 3 h exposure to IVM in the resistant isolate. Similarly, five P-gp genes, haf-6 and abcf-1 were transcribed at significantly higher levels (up to 10.3-fold following 3 h exposure to LEV in this isolate. On the other hand, there were no significant changes in transcriptional patterns of all transporter genes in the susceptible isolate following 3 and 6 h exposure to IVM or LEV. In contrast to these isolate-specific transcription changes, both isolates showed an increase in R-123 efflux following exposure to the drugs, suggesting that the drugs stimulated activity of existing transporter proteins in both isolates. Exposure of resistant larvae to IVM or LEV resulted, in some instances, in an increase in the proportion of the population able to migrate at the highest IVM concentrations in subsequent migration assays. The significant increase in transcription of some ABC transporter genes following 3 h exposure to both IVM and LEV in the resistant isolate only, suggests that an ability to rapidly upregulate protective pathways in response to drugs may be a component of the resistance displayed by this isolate.

  18. ABC Technology Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) facility will be designed to accomplish the following mission: 'Provide a weapon's grade plutonium disposition capability in a safe, economical, and environmentally sound manner on a prudent schedule for [50] tons of weapon's grade plutonium to be disposed on in [20] years.' This mission is supported by four major objectives: provide a reliable plutonium disposition capability within the next [15] years; provide a level of safety and of safety assurance that meets or exceeds that afforded to the public by modern commercial nuclear power plants; meet or exceed all applicable federal, state, and local regulations or standards for environmental compliance; manage the program in a cost effective manner. The ABC Technology Development Program defines the technology development activities that are required to accomplish this mission. The technology development tasks are related to the following topics: blanket system; vessel systems; reactivity control systems; heat transport system components; energy conversion systems; shutdown heat transport systems components; auxiliary systems; technology demonstrations - large scale experiments

  19. Artificial membranes with selective nanochannels for protein transport

    KAUST Repository

    Sutisna, B.

    2016-09-05

    A poly(styrene-b-tert-butoxystyrene-b-styrene) copolymer was synthesized by anionic polymerization and hydrolyzed to poly(styrene-b-4-hydroxystyrene-b-styrene). Lamellar morphology was confirmed in the bulk after annealing. Membranes were fabricated by self-assembly of the hydrolyzed copolymer in solution, followed by water induced phase separation. A high density of pores of 4 to 5 nm diameter led to a water permeance of 40 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 and molecular weight cut-off around 8 kg mol−1. The morphology was controlled by tuning the polymer concentration, evaporation time, and the addition of imidazole and pyridine to stabilize the terpolymer micelles in the casting solution via hydrogen bond complexes. Transmission electron microscopy of the membrane cross-sections confirmed the formation of channels with hydroxyl groups beneficial for hydrogen-bond forming sites. The morphology evolution was investigated by time-resolved grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering experiments. The membrane channels reject polyethylene glycol with a molecular size of 10 kg mol−1, but are permeable to proteins, such as lysozyme (14.3 kg mol−1) and cytochrome c (12.4 kg mol−1), due to the right balance of hydrogen bond interactions along the channels, electrostatic attraction, as well as the right pore sizes. Our results demonstrate that artificial channels can be designed for protein transport via block copolymer self-assembly using classical methods of membrane preparation.

  20. Oxygen transport membranes for biomass gasification and cement industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Shiyang

    Oxygen transport membranes (OTMs) are of particular interest for their potential applications in high purity oxygen separation, biomass gasification and carbon capture and storage in cement production. Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95-δ (GCO) is one of the interesting materials of OTMs because of its high ionic...... be an interstitial defect in GCO. Also dual phase membranes were studied. A 1-mm thick dual phase composite oxygen membrane (50vol.% Al0.02Ga0.02Zn0.96O1.02-50 vol.% Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95-δ) with catalyst on both sides was observed to sustain an oxygen flux of 0.3 Nml cm-2 min-1 under air/N2 at 900 °C. The material....... In this study various routes for enhancing the electronic conductivity were investigated; either via elemental substitution or via mixing doped-ceria with another material when forming the membrane layers. The increase of electronic conductivity by substitution co-doped Gd and Pr in ceria was investigated...

  1. Membrane Assembly and Ion Transport Ability of a Fluorinated Nanopore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Godbout

    Full Text Available A novel 21-residue peptide incorporating six fluorinated amino acids was prepared. It was designed to fold into an amphiphilic alpha helical structure of nanoscale length with one hydrophobic face and one fluorinated face. The formation of a fluorous interface serves as the main vector for the formation of a superstructure in a bilayer membrane. Fluorescence assays showed this ion channel's ability to facilitate the translocation of alkali metal ions through a phospholipid membrane, with selectivity for sodium ions. Computational studies showed that a tetramer structure is the most probable and stable supramolecular assembly for the active ion channel structure. The results illustrate the possibility of exploiting multiple Fδ-:M+ interactions for ion transport and using fluorous interfaces to create functional nanostructures.

  2. Quantized Water Transport: Ideal Desalination through Graphyne-4 Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, E. G.; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Graphyne sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations on pore-size effects suggest that γ-graphyne-4, with 4 acetylene bonds between two adjacent phenyl rings, has the best performance with 100% salt rejection and an unprecedented water permeability, to our knowledge, of ~13 L/cm2/day/MPa, 3 orders of magnitude higher than prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis, and ~10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene. Strikingly, water permeability across graphyne exhibits unexpected nonlinear dependence on the pore size. This counter-intuitive behavior is attributed to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale, which has wide implications in controlling nanoscale water transport and designing highly effective membranes. PMID:24196437

  3. Glia plasma membrane transporters: Key players in glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Méndez, Marco; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the central nervous system, elicits its functions through the activation of specific membrane receptors that are expressed in neurons and glial cells. The re-cycling of this amino acid is carried out mostly through a continuous interplay between neurons and glia cells, given the fact that the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft depends mainly on glial glutamate transporters. Therefore, a functional and physical interaction between membrane transporters links glutamate uptake, transformation to glutamine and its release to the extra-synaptic space and its uptake to the pre-synaptic terminal. This sequence of events, best known as the glutamate/glutamine shuttle is central to glutamatergic transmission. In this sense, the uptake process triggers a complex series of biochemical cascades that modify the physiology of glial cells in the immediate, short and long term so as to be capable to take up, transform and release these amino acids in a regulated amount and in an appropriate time frame to sustain glutamatergic neurotransmission. Among the signaling cascades activated in glial cells by glutamate transporters, a sustained Na(+) and Ca(2+) influx, protein posttranslational modifications and gene expression regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels are present. Therefore, it is clear that the pivotal role of glial cells in the context of excitatory transmission has been constantly underestimated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glycine transporter dimers: evidence for occurrence in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette; Dutertre, Sébastien; Hastrup, Hanne; Jha, Alok; Gether, Ulrik; Sitte, Harald H; Betz, Heinrich; Eulenburg, Volker

    2008-04-18

    Different Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma membrane based on hydrodynamic and native gel electrophoretic studies. Here, we used cysteine substitution and oxidative cross-linking to show that of GlyT1 and GlyT2 also form dimeric complexes within the plasma membrane. GlyT oligomerization at the cell surface was confirmed for both GlyT1 and GlyT2 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy. Endoglycosidase treatment and surface biotinylation further revealed that complex-glycosylated GlyTs form dimers located at the cell surface. Furthermore, substitution of tryptophan 469 of GlyT2 by an arginine generated a transporter deficient in dimerization that was retained intracellulary. Based on these results and GlyT structures modeled by using the crystal structure of the bacterial homolog LeuT(Aa), as a template, residues located within the extracellular loop 3 and at the beginning of transmembrane domain 6 are proposed to contribute to the dimerization interface of GlyTs.

  5. RNA-seq analysis of the effect of kanamycin and the ABC transporter AtWBC19 on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings reveals changes in metal content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayalew Mentewab

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to antibiotics produced by soil microorganisms, but little is known about their responses at the transcriptional level. Likewise, few endogenous mechanisms of antibiotic resistance have been reported. The Arabidopsis thaliana ATP Binding Cassette (ABC transporter AtWBC19 (ABCG19 is known to confer kanamycin resistance, but the exact mechanism of resistance is not well understood. Here we examined the transcriptomes of control seedlings and wbc19 mutant seedlings using RNA-seq analysis. Exposure to kanamycin indicated changes in the organization of the photosynthetic apparatus, metabolic fluxes and metal uptake. Elemental analysis showed a 60% and 80% reduction of iron uptake in control and wbc19 mutant seedlings respectively, upon exposure to kanamycin. The drop in iron content was accompanied by the upregulation of the gene encoding for FERRIC REDUCTION OXIDASE 6 (FRO6 in mutant seedlings but not by the differential expression of other transport genes known to be induced by iron deficiency. In addition, wbc19 mutants displayed a distinct expression profile in the absence of kanamycin. Most notably the expression of several zinc ion binding proteins, including ZINC TRANSPORTER 1 PRECURSOR (ZIP1 was increased, suggesting abnormal zinc uptake. Elemental analysis confirmed a 50% decrease of zinc content in wbc19 mutants. Thus, the antibiotic resistance gene WBC19 appears to also have a role in zinc uptake.

  6. Regulation of transport processes across the tonoplast membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eTrentmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, the vacuole builds up the cellular turgor and represents an important component in cellular responses to diverse stress stimuli. Rapid volume changes of cells, particularly of motor cells, like guard cells, are caused by variation of osmolytes and consequently of the water contents in the vacuole. Moreover, directed solute uptake into or release out of the large central vacuole allows adaptation of cytosolic metabolite levels according to the current physiological requirements and specific cellular demands. Therefore, solute passage across the vacuolar membrane, the tonoplast, has to be tightly regulated. Important principles in vacuolar transport regulation are changes of tonoplast transport protein abundances by differential expression of genes or changes of their activities, e.g. due to post-translational modification or by interacting proteins. Because vacuolar transport is in most cases driven by an electro-chemical gradient altered activities of tonoplast proton pumps significantly influence vacuolar transport capacities. Intense studies on individual tonoplast proteins but also unbiased system biological approaches have provided important insights into the regulation of vacuolar transport. This short review refers to selected examples of tonoplast proteins and their regulation, with special focus on protein phosphorylation.

  7. Slow DNA transport through nanopores in hafnium oxide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Joseph; Henley, Robert; Bell, David C; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Wanunu, Meni

    2013-11-26

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2-7 nm thick) freestanding hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with 50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore.

  8. Calcium transport across the membrane of Paramecium caudatum (protozoa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinac, B.

    1980-06-01

    Calcium transport across the membrane of Paramecium caudatum was studied by measuring calcium uptake and release by means of flow-through-technique, which was developed especially for this purpose. The method allows continuous flow of the cells suspension with radioactive and inactive solution, respectively, combined with simultaneous electrical stimulation of the cells by means of extracellular electrodes. The results obtained were compared to and interpreted according to behavioral patterns of Paramecium, which were registered by the time exposure dark-field macrophotographic technique under the same experimental conditions. (orig.) [de

  9. A kinetic study of mercury(II transport through a membrane assisted by new transport reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görgülü Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new organodithiophosphorus derivative, namely O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate, was synthesized and then the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. Results The compound 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The transport of mercury(II ion by a zwitterionic dithiophosphonate 1 in the liquid membrane was studied and the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. The compound 1 is expected to serve as a model liquid membrane transport with mercury(II ions. Conclusion A kinetic study of mercury(II transport through a membrane assisted by O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate was performed. It can be concluded that the compound 1 can be provided a general and straightforward route to remove toxic metals ions such as mercury(II ion from water or other solution.

  10. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects.

  11. 75 FR 49549 - ABC & D Recycling, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35397] ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA ABC & D Recycling, Inc. (ABC & D...\\ The line is currently operated by the Massachusetts Central Railroad Corporation.\\2\\ \\1\\ ABC & D...

  12. Transport Parameters in a Porous Cellulose Acetate Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPolo, R.; Sha'afi, R. I.; Solomon, A. K.

    1970-01-01

    The transport parameters of a cellulose acetate membrane prepared from a mixture of cellulose acetate, formamide, and acetone, 25:25:50 by weight, were studied. The membrane consists of a thin, porous layer, the skin, in series with a thick, highly porous layer, the coarse support. In the skin the diffusional permeability coefficient, ω, of a number of small amides and alcohols depends critically upon the partition coefficient, Ks, the size of the molecule, and the apparent hydrogen-bonding ability, Ns, of the solute. These observations are in general agreement with our earlier conclusions on the properties of nonporous membranes. On the other hand, the corrected reflection coefficient, σ', is not a very sensitive function of either Ns or Ks taken separately. The correlation between σ' and molecular diameter is reasonably good; however, it is much improved when both Ns and Ks are taken into consideration. Isotope interaction was also studied in the present preparation and was found to provide only a small (5–8%) contribution to the diffusional permeability coefficient of ethylene glycol. The contribution of solute-water friction was found to be less than 24% of the total solute friction. PMID:5410490

  13. Whole-genome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter family genes in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 "full-size," 41 "half-size," and 15 "soluble" putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera.

  14. Whole-genome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter family genes in Vitis vinifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birsen Çakır

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 "full-size," 41 "half-size," and 15 "soluble" putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera.

  15. Towards Co-evolution of Membrane Transport and Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Protocellular boundaries were inextricably connected to the metabolism they encapsulated: to be inheritable, early metabolism must have led to an increased rate of growth and division of vesicles and, similarly, transport through vesicle boundaries must have supported the evolution of metabolism. Even though explaining how this coupling emerged and evolved in the absence of the complex machinery of modern cells is one of the key issues in studies on the origin of life, little is known about the biochemical and biophysical processes that might have been involved. This gap in our knowledge is a major impediment in efforts to construct scenarios for the origin of life and laboratory models of protocells. A combination of experimental and computational studies carried out by us and our collaborators is aimed at helping to close this gap. Properties of membranes might have contributed to the selection of RNA as an early biopolymer. A kinetic mechanism was proposed (Sacerdote & Szostak, 2005) in which ribose was supplied more quickly than other aldopentoses to primordial cells for preferential incorporation of ribonucleotides into nucleic acids. This proposal is based on a finding that ribose permeates membranes an order of magnitude faster than its diastereomers, arabinose and xylose. Our computer simulations, which yield permeation rates in excellent agreement with experiment, and kinetic modeling explain this phenomenon in terms of inter- and intramolecular interactions involving exocyclic hydroxyl groups attached to carbon atoms of the pyranose ring (Wei and Pohorille, 2009). They also constrain scenarios for the formation of the earliest nucleic acids (Wei and Pohorille, 2013). In one scenario, sugars permeate protocellular walls and subsequently are used to synthesize nucleic acids inside protocells. As long as this process proceeds at the rate faster than 6x10(exp -3)/s, ribose derivatives will be available for synthesis easier than their diastereomers. If

  16. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli ABC transport receptor phosphate-binding protein at the Protein Crystallography Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, K H; Bacik, J; Quiocho, F A; Fisher, S Z

    2014-06-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential molecule for all known life. Organisms have developed many mechanisms to ensure an adequate supply, even in low-phosphate conditions. In prokaryotes phosphate transport is instigated by the phosphate-binding protein (PBP), the initial receptor for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) phosphate transporter. In the crystal structure of the PBP-phosphate complex, the phosphate is completely desolvated and sequestered in a deep cleft and is bound by 13 hydrogen bonds: 12 to protein NH and OH donor groups and one to a carboxylate acceptor group. The carboxylate plays a key recognition role by accepting a phosphate hydrogen. PBP phosphate affinity is relatively consistent across a broad pH range, indicating the capacity to bind monobasic (H2PO4-) and dibasic (HPO4(2-)) phosphate; however, the mechanism by which it might accommodate the second hydrogen of monobasic phosphate is unclear. To answer this question, neutron diffraction studies were initiated. Large single crystals with a volume of 8 mm3 were grown and subjected to hydrogen/deuterium exchange. A 2.5 Å resolution data set was collected on the Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Initial refinement of the neutron data shows significant nuclear density, and refinement is ongoing. This is the first report of a neutron study from this superfamily.

  17. Membrane-traversing mechanism of thyroid hormone transport by monocarboxylate transporter 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protze, Jonas; Braun, Doreen; Hinz, Katrin Manuela; Bayer-Kusch, Dorothea; Schweizer, Ulrich; Krause, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) mediates thyroid hormone (TH) transport across the plasma membrane in many cell types. In order to better understand its mechanism, we have generated three new MCT8 homology models based on sugar transporters XylE in the intracellular opened (PDB ID: 4aj4) and the extracellular partly occluded (PDB ID: 4gby) conformations as well as FucP (PDB ID: 3o7q) and GLUT3 (PDB ID: 4zwc) in the fully extracellular opened conformation. T 3 -docking studies from both sides revealed interactions with His192, His415, Arg445 and Asp498 as previously identified. Selected mutations revealed further transport-sensitive positions mainly at the discontinuous transmembrane helices TMH7 and 10. Lys418 is potentially involved in neutralising the charge of the TH substrate because it can be replaced by charged, but not by uncharged, amino acids. The side chain of Thr503 was hypothesised to stabilise a helix break at TMH10 that undergoes a prominent local shift during the transport cycle. A T503V mutation accordingly affected transport. The aromatic Tyr419, the polar Ser313 and Ser314 as well as the charged Glu422 and Glu423 lining the transport channel have been studied. Based on related sugar transporters, we suggest an alternating access mechanism for MCT8 involving a series of amino acid positions previously and newly identified as critical for transport.

  18. Preparation of Citric Acid Crosslinked Chitosan/Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Blend Membranes for Creatinine Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Ariadi Lusiana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of membrane using crosslinking reaction between chitosan and citric acid showed that functional group modification increased the number of active carrier groups which lead to better transport capacity of the membrane. In addition, the substitution of the carboxyl group increased creatinine permeation of chitosan membrane. The transport capacity of citric acid crosslinked chitosan membrane for creatinine was found to be 6.3 mg/L. The presence of cyanocobalamin slightly hindered the transport of creatinine although compounds did not able to pass through citric acid crosslinked chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol blend membrane, as compounds no found in the acceptor phase.

  19. Dual phase oxygen transport membrane for efficient oxyfuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasamy, Madhumidha

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen transport membranes (OTMs) are attracting great interest for the separation of oxygen from air in an energy efficient way. A variety of solid oxide ceramic materials that possess mixed ionic and electronic conductivity (MIEC) are being investigated for efficient oxygen separation (Betz '10, Skinner '03). Unfortunately these materials do not exhibit high degradation stability under harsh ambient conditions such as flue gas containing CO 2 , SO x , H 2 O and dust, pressure gradients and high temperatures that are typical in fossil fuel power plants. For this reason, dual phase composite membranes are developed to combine the best characteristics of different compounds to achieve high oxygen permeability and sufficient chemical and mechanical stability at elevated temperatures. In this thesis, the dual phase membrane Ce 0.8 Gd 0.2 O 2-δ - FeCo 2 O 4 (CGO-FCO) was developed after systematic investigation of various combinations of ionic and electronic conductors. The phase distribution of the composite was investigated in detail using electron microscopes and this analysis revealed the phase interaction leading to grain boundary rock salt phase and formation of perovskite secondary phase. A systematic study explored the onset of phase interactions to form perovskite phase and the role of this unintended phase as pure electronic conductor was identified. Additionally optimization of conventional sintering process to eliminate spinel phase decomposition into rock salt was identified. An elaborate study on the absolute minimum electronic conductor requirement for efficient percolation network was carried out and its influence on oxygen flux value was measured. Oxygen permeation measurements in the temperature range of 600 C - 1000 C under partial pressure gradient provided by air and argon as feed and sweep gases are used to identify limiting transport processes. The dual phase membranes are much more prone to surface exchange limitations because of the

  20. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  1. System and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.

    2017-02-21

    A system and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  2. Modeling bidirectional transport of quantum dot nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2011-08-01

    This paper develops a model of transport of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes (MNTs). It is assumed that QDs are transported inside intracellular organelles (called here nanoparticle-loaded vesicles, NLVs) that are propelled by either kinesin or dynein molecular motors while moving on microtubules (MTs). A vesicle may have both types of motors attached to it, but the motors are assumed to work in a cooperative fashion, meaning that at a given time the vesicle is moved by either kinesin or dynein motors. The motors are assumed not to work against each other, when one type of motors is pulling the vesicle, the other type is inactive. From time to time the motors may switch their roles: passive motors can become active motors and vice versa, resulting in the change of the vesicle's direction of motion. It is further assumed that QDs can escape NLVs and become free QDs, which are then transported by diffusion. Free QDs can be internalized by NLVs. The effects of two possible types of MT orientation in MNTs are investigated: when all MTs have a uniform polarity orientation, with their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells connected by an MNT, and when MTs have a mixed polarity orientation, with half of MTs having their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells and the other half having their plus-ends directed toward the other cell. Computational results are presented for three cases. The first case is when organelles are as likely to be transported by kinesin motors as by dynein motors. The second case is when organelles are more likely to be transported by kinesin motors than by dynein motors, and the third case is when NLVs do not associate with dynein motors at all. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A continuum and atomistic simulation study of ion transport in multilayered graphene membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, GengPing

    2017-01-01

    Graphene membrane as a staggered multilayer structure was demonstrated to be a promising filter membrane for the gas and liquid separation. The superior property of graphene membrane is owing to the exotic behaviour of fluid confined in the graphene nanochannel (< 10 nm), namely the booming nanofluidics field. Unlike the 1-D nanochannel in lab-on-a-chip devices, the graphene membrane has a unique cascading nano-slit system. Understanding of ion transport in graphene membranes i...

  4. In vitro characterization of ABC transporters involved in the absorption and distribution of liensinine and its analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lushan; Shen, Qi; Zhou, Quan; Jiang, Huidi; Bi, Huichang; Huang, Min; Zhou, Hui; Zeng, Su

    2013-11-25

    Lotus plumule, the dried young cotyledon and radicle of the Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. (Fam. Nymphaeaceae) ripe seed, is a famous Traditional Chinese Medicine to remove heat from the heart, anchor the mind, improve seminal emission, and arrest bleeding for centuries in China. Liensinine and its analogs neferine and isoliensinine are the major active components in lotus plumule. Aim of the study is to investigate the association of liensinine, neferine, and isoliensinine with efflux transporters. Caco-2, MDCK, MDCK-MDR1, and MDCK-MRP2 were used as cell models for the transcellular transport and accumulation studies. The results obtained in Caco-2 cells suggested that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) might be involved in transcellular transport. Cellular accumulation and transport experiments were further performed in MDCK-MDR1 cells. GF120918 and cyclosporine A were found to completely inhibit the efflux, and the net efflux ratios of these alkaloids exhibited saturation over the concentration range. No significant differences in liensinine accumulation and transport were observed between MDCK and MDCK-MRP2 cells. These results demonstrated that liensinine, neferine, and isoliensinine are substrates of P-gp, whereas MRP2 is not involved in the transport process, suggesting that P-gp might be responsible for the absorption and distribution of the 3 alkaloids. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A fluid membrane enhances the velocity of cargo transport by small teams of kinesin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaochu; Tseng, Kuo-Fu; King, Stephen J.; Qiu, Weihong; Xu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Kinesin-1 (hereafter referred to as kinesin) is a major microtubule-based motor protein for plus-end-directed intracellular transport in live cells. While the single-molecule functions of kinesin are well characterized, the physiologically relevant transport of membranous cargos by small teams of kinesins remains poorly understood. A key experimental challenge remains in the quantitative control of the number of motors driving transport. Here we utilized "motile fraction" to overcome this challenge and experimentally accessed transport by a single kinesin through the physiologically relevant transport by a small team of kinesins. We used a fluid lipid bilayer to model the cellular membrane in vitro and employed optical trapping to quantify the transport of membrane-enclosed cargos versus traditional membrane-free cargos under identical conditions. We found that coupling motors via a fluid membrane significantly enhances the velocity of cargo transport by small teams of kinesins. Importantly, enclosing a cargo in a fluid lipid membrane did not impact single-kinesin transport, indicating that membrane-dependent velocity enhancement for team-based transport arises from altered interactions between kinesins. Our study demonstrates that membrane-based coupling between motors is a key determinant of kinesin-based transport. Enhanced velocity may be critical for fast delivery of cargos in live cells.

  6. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swathirajan, S. [General Motors R& D Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  7. ABC Kinga kauplused = ABC King shoe stores

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    Tallinnas Kristiine keskuses, Tartu Kaubamajas ja Pärnus Port Artur 2 asuvate ABC Kinga kaupluste sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekid Andres Labi ja Janno Roos (Ruumilabor OÜ), loetletud nende ühiselt tehtud töid

  8. Characterization of a lactose-responsive promoter of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene from Lactobacillus acidophilus 05-172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhu; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2017-09-01

    A novel lactose-responsive promoter of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene Lba1680 of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain 05-172 isolated from a traditionally fermented dairy product koumiss was characterized. In L. acidophilus 05-172, expression of Lba1680 was induced by lactose, with lactose-induced transcription of Lba1680 being 6.1-fold higher than that induced by glucose. This is in contrast to L. acidophilus NCFM, a strain isolated from human feces, in which expression of Lba1680 and Lba1679 is induced by glucose. Both gene expression and enzyme activity assays in L. paracasei transformed with a vector containing the inducible Lba1680 promoter (PLba1680) of strain 05-172 and a heme-dependent catalase gene as reporter confirmed that PLba1680 is specifically induced by lactose. Its regulatory expression could not be repressed by glucose, and was independent of cAMP receptor protein. This lactose-responsive promoter might be used in the expression of functional genes in L. paracasei incorporated into a lactose-rich environment, such as dairy products. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The ABC model of recombination reinterpreted: Impact on understanding carrier transport and efficiency droop in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, M. A.; Allsopp, D. W. E.; Kappers, M. J.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    The efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) remains a topic of great contemporary interest due to their potential to reduce the amount of energy consumed in lighting. The current consensus is that electrons and holes distribute themselves through the emissive region by a drift-diffusion process which results in a highly non-uniform distribution of the light emission and can reduce efficiency. In this paper, the measured variations in the external quantum efficiency of a range of InGaN/GaN LEDs with different numbers of quantum wells (QWs) are shown to compare closely with the predictions of a revised ABC model, in which it is assumed that the electrically injected electrons and holes are uniformly distributed through the multi-quantum well (MQW) region, or nearly so, and hence carrier recombination occurs equally in all the quantum wells. The implications of the reported results are that drift-diffusion plays a far lesser role in cross-well carrier transport than previously thought; that the dominant cause of efficiency droop is intrinsic to the quantum wells and that reductions in the density of non-radiative recombination centers in the MQW would enable the use of more QWs and thereby reduce Auger losses by spreading carriers more evenly across a wider emissive region.

  10. The function of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 is not susceptible to actin disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meszaros, Peter; Hummel, Ina; Klappe, Karin; Draghiciu, Oana; Hoekstra, Dick; Kok, Jan W.

    Previously we have shown that the activity of the multidrug transporter ABCC1 (multidrug resistance protein 1), and its localization in lipid rafts, depends on cortical actin (Hummel I, Klappe K, Ercan C, Kok JW. Mol. Pharm. 2011 79, 229-40). Here we show that the efflux activity of the ATP-binding

  11. Relative rates of amino acid import via the ABC transporter GlnPQ determine the growth performance of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulyani, Faizah; Schuurman-Wolters, Geesina; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    The GlnPQ transporter from Lactococcus lactis has the remarkable feature of having two substrate-binding domains (SBD) fused to the N-terminus of the transmembrane domain (TMD), and thus four SBDs are present in the homodimeric complex. Although X-ray structures and ligand binding data are available

  12. Giant photoeffect in proton transport through graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Hidalgo, Marcelo; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sheng; Kravets, Vasyl G.; Rodriguez, Francisco J.; Berdyugin, Alexey; Grigorenko, Alexander; Geim, Andre K.

    2018-04-01

    Graphene has recently been shown to be permeable to thermal protons1, the nuclei of hydrogen atoms, which sparked interest in its use as a proton-conducting membrane in relevant technologies1-4. However, the influence of light on proton permeation remains unknown. Here we report that proton transport through Pt-nanoparticle-decorated graphene can be enhanced strongly by illuminating it with visible light. Using electrical measurements and mass spectrometry, we find a photoresponsivity of ˜104 A W-1, which translates into a gain of ˜104 protons per photon with response times in the microsecond range. These characteristics are competitive with those of state-of-the-art photodetectors that are based on electron transport using silicon and novel two-dimensional materials5-7. The photo-proton effect could be important for graphene's envisaged use in fuel cells and hydrogen isotope separation. Our observations may also be of interest for other applications such as light-induced water splitting, photocatalysis and novel photodetectors.

  13. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  14. Improved Fuel Transport Selectivity in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Kyle Tyler

    2014-01-01

    In polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, fuel crossover through the membrane is a significant problem that contributes to reduction in cell efficiency and accelerated membrane degradation. The need for high water content in the membrane to produce acceptable conductivities leads to excessive fuel crossover while also limiting cell operating temperature to

  15. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen I. Zgurskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of cells. Some transporters together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs and outer membrane channels assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protect bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes.

  16. Highly Parallel Transport Recordings on a Membrane-on-Nanopore Chip at Single Molecule Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, Michael; Kleefen, Alexander; Mukherjee, Nobina; Seelheim, Patrick; Windschiegl, Barbara; Brueggen, Marc Vor Der; Kocer, Armagan; Tampe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins are prime drug targets as they control the transit of information, ions, and solutes across membranes. Here, we present a membrane-on-nanopore platform to analyze nonelectrogenic channels and transporters that are typically not accessible by electrophysiological methods in a

  17. Enhancing the ABC Cross

    OpenAIRE

    Euske, K.J.; Vercio, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the ABC Cross was to portray both a cost and process view of an organization as simply as possible. Unfortunately, the model’s simplified form does not capture the real value of activity-based costing (ABC) for cost accounting that emerged in the mid-1980s. Here we present several ABC models that can help functional and process managers make better decisions.

  18. Multidrug resistance mediated by ABC transporters in osteosarcoma cell lines: mRNA analysis and functional radiotracer studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Celia Maria Freitas [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biophysics/Biomathematics, IBILI, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: cgomes@ibili.uc.pt; van Paassen, Heidi [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Romeo, Salvatore [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Welling, Mick M. [Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Feitsma, R.I.J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Abrunhosa, Antero J. [Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biophysics/Biomathematics, IBILI, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Botelho, M. Filomena [Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biophysics/Biomathematics, IBILI, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W. [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Pauwels, Ernest [Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Cleton-Jansen, Anne Marie [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-10-15

    Drug resistance remains a significant impediment to successful chemotherapy and constitutes a major prognostic factor in osteosarcoma (OS) patients. This study was designed to identify the role and prognostic significance of multidrug-resistance (MDR)-related transporters, such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP1) and breast-cancer-related protein (BCRP), in OS using cationic lipophilic radiotracers. We evaluated the chemosensitivity of four OS cell lines (Saos-2, 143B, MNNG/HOS and U-2OS) to doxorubicin (DOX), cisplatin (CIS) and methotrexate. The expression of MDR-related transporters was analyzed at mRNA level by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and at functional level by {sup 99m}Tc sestamibi and {sup 99m}Tc tetrofosmin. The effectiveness of MDR modulators [cyclosporin A (CsA) and imatinib] on transporter inhibition and on the reversal of resistance was also assessed. MNNG/HOS and U-2OS cells expressing high levels of MDR1 were highly resistant to DOX and showed reduced accumulation and higher efflux for radiotracers. Although MRP1 was uniformly expressed in all cells, only U-2OS was resistant to CIS. CsA restored sensitivity to DOX and CIS, and enhanced the accumulation and efflux half-life of radiotracers in MDR1-expressing cell lines. The chemosensitivity of OS cells to DOX was strongly dependent on mRNA MDR1 expression and could be circumvented by adding CsA. The kinetic parameters of radiotracers correlated with MDR1 expression levels, hence predicting DOX resistance. We concluded that sensitivity to chemotherapy is strongly dependent on the expression of MDR1 transporter and that radiotracer studies could prove clinically useful in predicting chemotherapy response and in evaluating the efficacy of MDR-reversing agents.

  19. Radiative ballistic phonon transport in silicon-nitride membranes at low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevers, H.F.C.; Ridder, M.L.; Germeau, A.; Bruijn, M.P.; de Korte, P.A.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the phonon transport in free-standing 1 µm thick silicon-nitride membranes at temperatures around 100 mK. By varying the geometry of the membranes and the dimensions of the heater element, we are able to distinguish between radiative and diffuse phonon transport. The data indicate that

  20. An ABC transporter B family protein, ABCB19, is required for cytoplasmic streaming and gravitropism of the inflorescence stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Keishi; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Koumoto, Yasuko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    A significant feature of plant cells is the extensive motility of organelles and the cytosol, which was originally defined as cytoplasmic streaming. We suggested previously that a three-way interaction between plant-specific motor proteins myosin XIs, actin filaments, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was responsible for cytoplasmic streaming. (1) Currently, however, there are no reports of molecular components for cytoplasmic streaming other than the actin-myosin-cytoskeleton and ER-related proteins. In the present study, we found that elongated cells of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit vigorous cytoplasmic streaming. Statistical analysis showed that the maximal velocity of plastid movements is 7.26 µm/s, which is much faster than the previously reported velocities of organelles. Surprisingly, the maximal velocity of streaming in the inflorescence stem cells was significantly reduced to 1.11 µm/s in an Arabidopsis mutant, abcb19-101, which lacks ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUBFAMILY B19 (ABCB19) that mediates the polar transport of the phytohormone auxin together with PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Polar auxin transport establishes the auxin concentration gradient essential for plant development and tropisms. Deficiency of ABCB19 activity eventually caused enhanced gravitropic responses of the inflorescence stems and abnormally flexed inflorescence stems. These results suggest that ABCB19-mediated auxin transport plays a role not only in tropism regulation, but also in cytoplasmic streaming.

  1. An ABC transporter B family protein, ABCB19, is required for cytoplasmic streaming and gravitropism of the inflorescence stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Keishi; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Koumoto, Yasuko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A significant feature of plant cells is the extensive motility of organelles and the cytosol, which was originally defined as cytoplasmic streaming. We suggested previously that a three-way interaction between plant-specific motor proteins myosin XIs, actin filaments, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was responsible for cytoplasmic streaming.1 Currently, however, there are no reports of molecular components for cytoplasmic streaming other than the actin-myosin-cytoskeleton and ER-related proteins. In the present study, we found that elongated cells of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit vigorous cytoplasmic streaming. Statistical analysis showed that the maximal velocity of plastid movements is 7.26 µm/s, which is much faster than the previously reported velocities of organelles. Surprisingly, the maximal velocity of streaming in the inflorescence stem cells was significantly reduced to 1.11 µm/s in an Arabidopsis mutant, abcb19-101, which lacks ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUBFAMILY B19 (ABCB19) that mediates the polar transport of the phytohormone auxin together with PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Polar auxin transport establishes the auxin concentration gradient essential for plant development and tropisms. Deficiency of ABCB19 activity eventually caused enhanced gravitropic responses of the inflorescence stems and abnormally flexed inflorescence stems. These results suggest that ABCB19-mediated auxin transport plays a role not only in tropism regulation, but also in cytoplasmic streaming. PMID:26337543

  2. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter VcaM from Vibrio cholerae is Dependent on the Outer Membrane Factor Family for Its Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jung Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae ATP-binding cassette transporter VcaM (V. cholerae ABC multidrug resistance pump has previously been shown to confer resistance to a variety of medically important drugs. In this study, we set to analyse its properties both in vitro in detergent-solubilised state and in vivo to differentiate its dependency on auxiliary proteins for its function. We report the first detailed kinetic parameters of purified VcaM and the rate of phosphate (Pi production. To determine the possible functional dependencies of VcaM on the tripartite efflux pumps we then utilized different E. coli strains lacking the principal secondary transporter AcrB (Acriflavine resistance protein, as well as cells lacking the outer membrane factor (OMF TolC (Tolerance to colicins. Consistent with the ATPase function of VcaM we found it to be susceptible to sodium orthovanadate (NaOV, however, we also found a clear dependency of VcaM function on TolC. Inhibitors targeting secondary active transporters had no effects on either VcaM-conferred resistance or Hoechst 33342 accumulation, suggesting that VcaM might be capable of engaging with the TolC-channel without periplasmic mediation by additional transporters. Our findings are indicative of VcaM being capable of a one-step substrate translocation from cytosol to extracellular space utilising the TolC-channel, making it the only multidrug ABC-transporter outside of the MacB-family with demonstrable TolC-dependency.

  3. PPAR Medicines and Human Disease: The ABCs of It All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Apostoli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that pump a variety of hydrophobic compounds across cellular and subcellular barriers and are implicated in human diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis. Inhibition of ABC transporter activity showed promise in early preclinical studies; however, the outcomes in clinical trials with these agents have not been as encouraging. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate genes involved in fat and glucose metabolism, and inflammation. Activation of PPAR signaling is also reported to regulate ABC gene expression. This suggests the potential of PPAR medicines as a novel means of controlling ABC transporter activity at the transcriptional level. This paper summarizes the advances made in understanding how PPAR medicines affect ABC transporters, and the potential implications for impacting on human diseases, in particular with respect to cancer and atherosclerosis.

  4. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

    2006-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

  5. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaojing [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Xu, Yonghong [Institute of Ophthalmological Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 430060 Wuhan (China); Meng, Xiangning [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Watari, Fumio [Department of Biomedical, Dental Materials and Engineering, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Liu, Hudan, E-mail: hudanliu@hust.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Chen, Xiao, E-mail: mornsmile@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China)

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  6. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-10-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels.

  7. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-01-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels

  8. Oxygen Transport Membranes: A Material Science and Process Engineering Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes several fundamental aspects on the membrane-integrated oxy-fuel combustion process and can be divided in two parts: 1) The development and characterization of membrane materials; 2) The design, simulation and evaluation of a coal-fired power plant, coupled with a membrane

  9. ABC transporters and the proteasome complex are implicated in susceptibility to Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis across multiple drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Nicoletti

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN represent rare but serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs. Both are characterized by distinctive blistering lesions and significant mortality rates. While there is evidence for strong drug-specific genetic predisposition related to HLA alleles, recent genome wide association studies (GWAS on European and Asian populations have failed to identify genetic susceptibility alleles that are common across multiple drugs. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the low to moderate effect size of individual genetic risk factors. To test this hypothesis we developed Pointer, a new algorithm that assesses the aggregate effect of multiple low risk variants on a pathway using a gene set enrichment approach. A key advantage of our method is the capability to associate SNPs with genes by exploiting physical proximity as well as by using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs that capture information about both cis- and trans-acting regulatory effects. We control for known bias-inducing aspects of enrichment based analyses, such as: 1 gene length, 2 gene set size, 3 presence of biologically related genes within the same linkage disequilibrium (LD region, and, 4 genes shared among multiple gene sets. We applied this approach to publicly available SJS/TEN genome-wide genotype data and identified the ABC transporter and Proteasome pathways as potentially implicated in the genetic susceptibility of non-drug-specific SJS/TEN. We demonstrated that the innovative SNP-to-gene mapping phase of the method was essential in detecting the significant enrichment for those pathways. Analysis of an independent gene expression dataset provides supportive functional evidence for the involvement of Proteasome pathways in SJS/TEN cutaneous lesions. These results suggest that Pointer provides a useful framework for the integrative analysis of pharmacogenetic GWAS data, by increasing the power to detect

  10. The ABC and AUSSAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarritty, Ian

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's (ABC) utilization of the AUSSAT telecommunications satellite to extend its television and radio transmission range to reach remote Australian audiences; the satellite's program gathering and interchange capabilities; and ABC's generation of other benefits to offset cost of satellite services.…

  11. Evaluation of transport properties of nanofiltration membranes exposed to radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Elizabeth E.M.; Barbosa, Celina C.R.; Bastos, Edna T.R., E-mail: eemo@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeira, RJ (Brazil); Afonso, Julio C., E-mail: Julio@iq.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2011-07-01

    The application of membrane separation processes (PSM) for treatment of radioactive waste requires the selection of a suitable membrane for the treatment of waste, as the membrane will be directly exposed to the radioactive liquid waste, and also exposed to ionizing radiation. The nanofiltration membrane is most suitable for treatment of radioactive waste, since it has high rejection of multivalent ions. Usually the membranes are made of polymers and depending on the composition of the waste, type and dose of radiation absorbed may be changes in the structure of the membrane, resulting in loss of its transport properties. We tested two commercial nanofiltration membranes: NF and SW Dow/Filmtec. The waste liquid used was obtained in the process of conversion of uranium hexafluoride gas to solid uranium dioxide, known as 'carbonated water'. The membranes were characterized as their transport properties (hydraulic permeability, permeate flux and salt rejection) before and after their immersion in the waste for 24 hours. The surface of the membranes was also evaluated by SEM and FTIR. It was observed that in both the porosity of the membrane selective layer was altered, but not the membrane surface charge, which is responsible for the selectivity of the membrane. The NF membranes and SW showed uranium ion rejection of 64% and 55% respectively. (author)

  12. Separation of some metal ions using coupled transport supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid membrane extraction processes has become very popular due to their superiority in many ways over other separation techniques. In coupled transport membranes the metal ions can be transported across the membrane against their concentration gradient under the influence of chemical potential difference. Liquid membranes consisting of a carrier-cum-diluent, supported in microporous polymeric hydrophobic films have been studied for transport of metal ions like U(VI), Cr(VI), Be(II), V(V), Ti(IV), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hf(IV), W(VI), and Co(II). The present paper presents basic data with respect to flux and permeabilities of these metal ions across membranes based on experimental results and theoretical equations, using different carriers and diluents and provides a brief reference to possibility of such membranes for large scale applications. (author)

  13. Multiphase transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Eric D.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) enable efficient conversion of fuels to electricity. They have enormous potential due to the high energy density of the fuels they utilize (hydrogen or alcohols). Power density is a major limitation to wide-scale introduction of PEMFCs. Power density in hydrogen fuel cells is limited by accumulation of water in what is termed fuel cell `flooding.' Flooding may occur in either the gas diffusion layer (GDL) or within the flow channels of the bipolar plate. These components comprise the electrodes of the fuel cell and balance transport of reactants/products with electrical conductivity. This thesis explores the role of electrode materials in the fuel cell and examines the fundamental connection between material properties and multiphase transport processes. Water is generated at the cathode catalyst layer. As liquid water accumulates it will utilize the largest pores in the GDL to go from the catalyst layer to the flow channels. Water collects to large pores via lateral transport at the interface between the GDL and catalyst layer. We have shown that water may be collected in these large pores from several centimeters away, suggesting that we could engineer the GDL to control flooding with careful placement and distribution of large flow-directing pores. Once liquid water is in the flow channels it forms slugs that block gas flow. The slugs are pushed along the channel by a pressure gradient that is dependent on the material wettability. The permeable nature of the GDL also plays a major role in slug growth and allowing bypass of gas between adjacent channels. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have analogous multiphase flow issues where carbon dioxide bubbles accumulate, `blinding' regions of the fuel cell. This problem is fundamentally similar to water management in hydrogen fuel cells but with a gas/liquid phase inversion. Gas bubbles move laterally through the porous GDL and emerge to form large bubbles within the

  14. Impaired phloem loading in zmsweet13a,b,c sucrose transporter triple knock-out mutants in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrutczyk, Margaret; Hartwig, Thomas; Horschman, Marc; Char, Si Nian; Yang, Jinliang; Yang, Bing; Frommer, Wolf B; Sosso, Davide

    2018-04-01

    Crop yield depends on efficient allocation of sucrose from leaves to seeds. In Arabidopsis, phloem loading is mediated by a combination of SWEET sucrose effluxers and subsequent uptake by SUT1/SUC2 sucrose/H + symporters. ZmSUT1 is essential for carbon allocation in maize, but the relative contribution to apoplasmic phloem loading and retrieval of sucrose leaking from the translocation path is not known. Here we analysed the contribution of SWEETs to phloem loading in maize. We identified three leaf-expressed SWEET sucrose transporters as key components of apoplasmic phloem loading in Zea mays L. ZmSWEET13 paralogues (a, b, c) are among the most highly expressed genes in the leaf vasculature. Genome-edited triple knock-out mutants were severely stunted. Photosynthesis of mutants was impaired and leaves accumulated high levels of soluble sugars and starch. RNA-seq revealed profound transcriptional deregulation of genes associated with photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyses may indicate that variability in ZmSWEET13s correlates with agronomical traits, especifically flowering time and leaf angle. This work provides support for cooperation of three ZmSWEET13s with ZmSUT1 in phloem loading in Z. mays. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  16. Transport phenomena in gas-selective silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio

    Upcoming technology platforms for green fuel production require the development of advanced molecular separation processes for recovering dry liquid biofuels [1,2], biomethane [2] and hydrogen [3]. Replacement of extractive distillation, cryodistillation and adsorption processes by membrane units...... may lead to vast energy savings [2,3]. In this context, ultramicroporous silica membranes, that is, silica membranes with pores smaller than 1 nm [4], appear to be able to play a determinant role. Indeed, in reason of their extremely small pore size, these membranes can be used as sieves to recover...... fluxes than zeolite membranes. Ultramicroporous silica membranes typical typically an asymmetric structure, consisting of few millimeters thick macroporous tubes or disks, which confer mechanical strength to the membrane, and one or more mesoporous intermediate layers with subsequently smaller pore sizes...

  17. Dual fluorescent labelling of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum for the analysis of the ABC type transporter pfmdr2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosental Benyamin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of the Plasmodium falciparum heavy metal transporter gene pfmdr2 employed radioactive labelled heavy metal. As the use of radioactive isotopes shrank considerably during the last few years, resulting in the cessation of the production of some isotopes, amongst them Cadmium109 which was used for that purpose, a different approach had to be developed. Herein, a dual fluorescent labelling of heavy metals accumulation in the P. falciparum parasite is proposed as an alternative to the use of radioactive labelled heavy metals. Methods Plasmodium falciparum Cd resistant and sensitive strains at the trophozoite stage were used in this study. The cells were cultured at different CdCl2 concentrations and for different time periods followed by staining of the infected red blood cells with Fluo-3/AM for Cd detection and Hoechst 33342 for parasite DNA labelling. The fluorescent analysis was done by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Results The results show that the sensitive strain has a higher Fluo-3/AM fluorescence in a Cd concentration and time dependent manner, whereas in the resistant strain Fluo-3/AM fluorescence levels were negligible and increased only at high concentrations of Cd and at long incubation periods, but to a much lesser extent than the sensitive strain. No Cd uptake is observed in uninfected red blood cells populations originating from cultures infected with either sensitive or resistant strain. In addition, confocal microscopy overlay of Fluo-3/AM and Hoechst staining shows that the Cd metal accumulates in the parasite itself. Conclusions The dual fluorescent labelling is a valid method for detecting heavy metal accumulation in P. falciparum. Furthermore, in contrast to the use of radioactive labelled heavy metal, the fluorescent labelling enables us to differentiate between the different populations existing in a P. falciparum infected red blood cells cultures and thus actually study a phenomenon at

  18. Role of STARD4 in sterol transport between the endocytic recycling compartment and the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaea, David B; Mao, Shu; Lund, Frederik W; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2017-04-15

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of membranes in mammalian cells. The plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) are both highly enriched in cholesterol. The abundance and distribution of cholesterol among organelles are tightly controlled by a combination of mechanisms involving vesicular and nonvesicular sterol transport processes. Using the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol, we examined sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and a novel sterol efflux assay. We found that sterol transport between these organelles in a U2OS cell line has a t 1/2 =12-15 min. Approximately 70% of sterol transport is ATP independent and therefore is nonvesicular. Increasing cellular cholesterol levels dramatically increases bidirectional transport rate constants, but decreases in cholesterol levels have only a modest effect. A soluble sterol transport protein, STARD4, accounts for ∼25% of total sterol transport and ∼33% of nonvesicular sterol transport between the plasma membrane and ERC. This study shows that nonvesicular sterol transport mechanisms and STARD4 in particular account for a large fraction of sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC. © 2017 Iaea et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Effect of adenine nucleotides and gamma radiation on the transport of TEMPOL across the erythrocyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, Z.; Gwozdzinski, K.; Helszer, Z. (Lodz Univ. (Poland). Dept. of Biophysics)

    1983-09-01

    External adenine compounds bring about changes in the transport of hydrophilic molecules across control and irradiated bovine erythrocyte membranes. Changes in the transport induced by incubation of erythrocytes with nucleotides depend on the type of nucleotide and its concentration. The range of nucleotide concentrations over which the stimulatory effect on the transport occurs is established.

  20. Solvent-extraction and Langmuir-adsorption-based transport in chemically functionalized nanopore membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Damian J; Baker, Lane A; Martin, Charles R

    2005-11-10

    We have investigated the transport properties of nanopore alumina membranes that were rendered hydrophobic by functionalization with octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS). The pores in these ODS-modified membranes are so hydrophobic that they are not wetted by water. Nevertheless, nonionic molecules can be transported from an aqueous feed solution on one side of the membrane, through the dry nanopores, and into an aqueous receiver solution on the other side. The transport mechanism involves Langmuir-type adsorption of the permeating molecule onto the ODS layers lining the pore walls, followed by solid-state diffusion along these ODS layers; we have measured the diffusion coefficients associated with this transport process. We have also investigated the transport properties of membranes prepared by filling the ODS-modified pores with the water-immiscible (hydrophobic) liquid mineral oil. In this case the transport mechanism involves solvent extraction of the permeating molecule into the mineral oil subphase confined with the pores, followed by solution-based diffusion through this liquid subphase. Because of this different transport mechanism, the supported-liquid membranes show substantially better transport selectivity than the ODS-modified membranes that contain no liquid subphase.

  1. Polyamines as mediators of insulin's action on pyruvate dehydrogenase, 45Ca2+ fluxes, and membrane transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, A.D.; Koenig, H.; Lu, C.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin (IN) induces a rapid stimulation of Ca 2+ fluxes and membrane transport in mouse kidney cortex which involves rapid polyamine synthesis. 1.3 nM (IN) induced an early ( 45 Ca 2+ influx and efflux peaked at 1-2 min and returned to basal levels by 5-10 min. The ODC inhibitor α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO, 5 mM) abolished IN stimulation of PDH, 45 Ca 2+ fluxes and membrane transport, and putrescine (.5 mM) nullified DFMO inhibition. IN (50 mUnits/kg) in rats induced an early ( 2+ fluxes, and membrane transport

  2. Transport phenomena in gas-selective silica membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Boffa, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Upcoming technology platforms for green fuel production require the development of advanced molecular separation processes for recovering dry liquid biofuels [1,2], biomethane [2] and hydrogen [3]. Replacement of extractive distillation, cryodistillation and adsorption processes by membrane units may lead to vast energy savings [2,3]. In this context, ultramicroporous silica membranes, that is, silica membranes with pores smaller than 1 nm [4], appear to be able to play a determinant role. In...

  3. GLTP Mediated Non-Vesicular GM1 Transport between Native Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjumjunov-Crncevic, Esmina; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside) transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes. PMID:23555818

  4. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lauria

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP, we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes.

  5. Electrical Resistance and Transport Numbers of Ion-Exchange Membranes Used in Electrodialytic Soil Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    1999-01-01

    Electrodialytic soil remediation is a recently developed method to decontaminate heavy metal polluted soil using ion-exchange membranes. In this method one side of the ion-exchange membrane is in direct contact with the polluted soil. It is of great importance to know if this contact with the soil...... different electrodialytic soil remediation experiments. The experiments showed that after the use in electrodialytic soil remediation, the ion-exchange membranes had transport numbers in the same magnitude as new membranes. The electrical resistance for six membranes did not differ from that of new...

  6. On the resistances of membrane, diffusion boundary layer and double layer in ion exchange membrane transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlugolecki, P.E.; Ogonowski, Piotr; Metz, S.J.; Saakes, Michel; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Membrane resistances are often measured under direct current conditions using a standard 0.5 M NaCl characterization solution, although several electro-membrane processes (e.g. reverse electrodialysis, electrodialysis, fuel cells, microbial fuel cells and membrane capacitive deionization) operate in

  7. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of transport and separation properties of carbon nanotube electrospun membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Gil

    2016-12-27

    Developing a high flux and selective membrane is required to make membrane distillation (MD) a more attractive desalination process. Amongst other characteristics membrane hydrophobicity is significantly important to get high vapor transport and low wettability. In this study, a laboratory fabricated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite electrospun (E-CNT) membrane was tested and has showed a higher permeate flux compared to poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PH) electrospun membrane (E-PH membrane) in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Only 1% and 2% of CNTs incorporation resulted in an enhanced permeate flux with lower sensitivity to feed salinity while treating a 35 and 70 g/L NaCl solutions. Experimental results and the mechanisms of E-CNT membrane were validated by a proposed new step-modeling approach. The increased vapor transport in E-CNT membranes could not be elucidated by an enhancement of mass transfer only at a given physico-chemical properties. However, the theoretical modeling approach considering the heat and mass transfers simultaneously enabled to explain successfully the enhanced flux in the DCMD process using E-CNT membranes. This indicates that both mass and heat transfers improved by CNTs are attributed to the enhanced vapor transport in the E-CNT membrane.

  8. Rapportering med ABC modellen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lars Ole

    2006-01-01

    I denne artikel diskuteres Activity Based Costing (ABC) som rapporterings-teknik for kunde profitabilitet. Der argumenteres for, at indtægtserhvervel-sen inkl. dens direkte omkostningsforbrug bør adskilles fra omkostnings-beskrivelsen til produktfremstilling. Dvs. der gennemføres en aktivitetsba......-seret rapportering for indtægter og en ABC model for omkostningsforbrug til produktfremstilling. Modellen er tilført logiske beslutningsobjekter (klas-sifikationer), som er opbygget niveaubaseret. Samtidigt føres belæg for, at ABC modellen bør baseres på logiske fordelinger til kalkulationsobjektet i stedet...

  9. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been i...

  10. Metallodynameric membranes--are metallic ions facilitating the transport of CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Gihane; Macron, Thomas; Gilles, Arnaud; Charmette, Christophe; Sanchez, Jose; Barboiu, Mihail

    2012-12-07

    The concomitant operation of dynamic covalent frameworks and metallodynamers results in the formation of selective Zn(2+)-based dynameric membranes for restrictive facilitated and selective transport of CO(2).

  11. Oxygen transport membrane based advanced power cycle with low pressure synthesis gas slip stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2016-09-27

    A method and system for generating electrical power in which a high pressure synthesis gas stream generated in a gasifier is partially oxidized in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor, expanded and thereafter, is combusted in an oxygen transport membrane based boiler. A low pressure synthesis gas slip stream is split off downstream of the expanders and used as the source of fuel in the oxygen transport membrane based partial oxidation reactors to allow the oxygen transport membrane to operate at low fuel pressures with high fuel utilization. The combustion within the boiler generates heat to raise steam to in turn generate electricity by a generator coupled to a steam turbine. The resultant flue gas can be purified to produce a carbon dioxide product.

  12. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  13. A putative amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, NMB1612, from Neisseria meningitidis, induces murine bactericidal antibodies against meningococci expressing heterologous NMB1612 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Humbert, María Victoria; Laver, Jay R; Phillips, Renee; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-08-26

    The nmb1612 (NEIS1533) gene encoding the ~27-kDa putative amino acid ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, periplasmic substrate-binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) strain MC58 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant (r)NMB1612 was used for animal immunization studies. Immunization of mice with rNMB1612 adsorbed to Al(OH)3 and in liposomes with and without MPLA, induced antiserum with bactericidal activity in an assay using baby rabbit complement, against the homologous strain MC58 (encoding protein representative of Allele 62) and killed heterologous strains encoding proteins of three other alleles (representative of Alleles 1, 64 and 68), with similar SBA titres. However, strain MC58 was not killed (titre bactericidal assay (hSBA) using anti-rNMB1612 sera, although another strain (MC168) expressing the same protein was killed (median titres of 16-64 in the hSBA). Analysis of the NMB1612 amino acid sequences from 4351 meningococcal strains in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database and a collection of 13 isolates from colonized individuals and from patients, showed that antibodies raised against rNMB1612 could potentially kill at least 72% of the MenB strains in the complete sequence database. For MenB disease occurring specifically in the UK from 2013 to 2015, >91% of the isolates causing disease in this recent period expressed NMB1612 protein encoded by Allele 1 and could be potentially killed by sera raised to the recombinant antigen in the current study. The NMB1612 protein was surface-accessible and expressed by different meningococcal strains. In summary, the properties of (i) NMB1612 protein conservation and expression, (ii) limited amino acid sequence variation between proteins encoded by different alleles, and (iii) the ability of a recombinant protein to induce cross-strain bactericidal antibodies, would all suggest a promising antigen for consideration for inclusion in new meningococcal vaccines

  14. Identification of ABC transporter genes conferring combined pleuromutilin-lincosamide-streptogramin A resistance in bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-06-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of combined pleuromutilin-lincosamide-streptogramin A resistance in 26 unrelated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from dairy cows suffering from mastitis. The 26 pleuromutilin-resistant staphylococcal isolates were screened for the presence of the genes vga(A), vga(B), vga(C), vga(E), vga(E) variant, sal(A), vmlR, cfr, lsa(A), lsa(B), lsa(C), and lsa(E) by PCR. None of the 26 isolates carried the genes vga(B), vga(C), vga(E), vga(E) variant, vmlR, cfr, lsa(A), lsa(B), or lsa(C). Two Staphylococcus haemolyticus and single Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus lentus, and Staphylococcus hominis were vga(A)-positive. Twelve S. aureus, two Staphylococcus warneri, as well as single S. lentus and S. xylosus carried the lsa(E) gene. Moreover, single S. aureus, S. haemolyticus, S. xylosus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were positive for both genes, vga(A) and lsa(E). The sal(A) gene was found in a single Staphylococcus sciuri. All ABC transporter genes were located in the chromosomal DNA, except for a plasmid-borne vga(A) gene in the S. epidermidis isolate. The genetic environment of the lsa(E)-positive isolates was analyzed using previously described PCR assays. Except for the S. warneri and S. xylosus, all lsa(E)-positive isolates harbored a part of the previously described enterococcal multiresistance gene cluster. This is the first report of the novel lsa(E) gene in the aforementioned bovine CoNS species. This is also the first identification of the sal(A) gene in a S. sciuri from a case of bovine mastitis. Moreover, the sal(A) gene was shown to also confer pleuromutilin resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transport of europium(III) through supported liquid membrane containing diisodecylphosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shigeto

    1987-01-01

    The transport of europium has been investigated through a supported liquid membrane containing diisodecylphosphoric acid (DIDPA). By the addition of 1-octanol to the membrane phase, europium was quantitatively transported from the feed solution of 0.1 M HNO 3 into the product solution of 5 M HNO 3 . The apparent rate constant (k obs ) increased with increasing carrier concentration and became nearly constant above 0.05 M DIDPA. (author)

  16. Uptake of L-cystine via an ABC transporter contributes defense of oxidative stress in the L-cystine export-dependent manner in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Ohtsu

    Full Text Available Intracellular thiols like L-cystine and L-cystine play a critical role in the regulation of cellular processes. Here we show that Escherichia coli has two L-cystine transporters, the symporter YdjN and the ATP-binding cassette importer FliY-YecSC. These proteins import L-cystine, an oxidized product of L-cystine from the periplasm to the cytoplasm. The symporter YdjN, which is expected to be a new member of the L-cystine regulon, is a low affinity L-cystine transporter (Km = 1.1 μM that is mainly involved in L-cystine uptake from outside as a nutrient. E. coli has only two L-cystine importers because ΔydjNΔyecS mutant cells are not capable of growing in the minimal medium containing L-cystine as a sole sulfur source. Another protein YecSC is the FliY-dependent L-cystine transporter that functions cooperatively with the L-cystine transporter YdeD, which exports L-cystine as reducing equivalents from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, to prevent E. coli cells from oxidative stress. The exported L-cystine can reduce the periplasmic hydrogen peroxide to water, and then generated L-cystine is imported back into the cytoplasm via the ATP-binding cassette transporter YecSC with a high affinity to L-cystine (Km = 110 nM in a manner dependent on FliY, the periplasmic L-cystine-binding protein. The double disruption of ydeD and fliY increased cellular levels of lipid peroxides. From these findings, we propose that the hydrogen peroxide-inducible L-cystine/L-cystine shuttle system plays a role of detoxification of hydrogen peroxide before lipid peroxidation occurs, and then might specific prevent damage to membrane lipids.

  17. Surface and charge transport characterization of polyaniline-cellulose acetate composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiser, Asif A; Hyland, Margaret M; Patterson, Darrell A

    2011-02-24

    This study elucidates the charge transport processes of polyaniline (PANI) composite membranes and correlates them to the PANI deposition site and the extent of PANI surface layering on the base microporous membranes. PANI was deposited either as a surface layer or inside the pores of cellulose acetate microporous membranes using various in situ chemical polymerization techniques. The extent of PANI layering at the surface of the base membrane and its oxidation and doping states were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). PANI deposition on the membranes showed a strong dependence on the polymerization technique and polymerization time within a single technique. In XPS, the deconvolution of C 1s and N 1s core-level spectra of the composite membranes was used to quantify the extent of PANI layering at the surface along with its oxidation and doping states. PANI incompletely covered the surface of the base microporous membranes for all the employed techniques. However, the extent of the layering increased with the polymerization time in a particular technique. The charge transport through the bulk membrane and charge transfer at the membrane/electrode interface were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The data were analyzed using the equivalent circuit modeling technique. The modeling parameters revealed that PANI deposition at the surface enhanced the interfacial charge transfer but the process depended on the extent of the surface coverage of the membrane. In addition, the charge transport in the bulk membrane depended on the PANI intercalation level, which varied depending on the polymerization technique employed. In addition, the EIS of electrolyte-soaked membranes was also conducted to evaluate the effects of PANI deposition site on charge transport in the presence of an electrolyte. PANI layering at the pore walls of the base membrane from diaphragmatic polymerization

  18. Podocyte expression of membrane transporters involved in puromycin aminonucleoside-mediated injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Zennaro

    Full Text Available Several complex mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of the intricate ramified morphology of glomerular podocytes and to interactions with neighboring cells and the underlying basement membrane. Recently, components of small molecule transporter families have been found in the podocyte membrane, but expression and function of membrane transporters in podocytes is largely unexplored. To investigate this complex field of investigation, we used two molecules which are known substrates of membrane transporters, namely Penicillin G and Puromycin Aminonucleoside (PA. We observed that Penicillin G pre-administration prevented both in vitro and in vivo podocyte damage caused by PA, suggesting the engagement of the same membrane transporters by the two molecules. Indeed, we found that podocytes express a series of transporters which are known to be used by Penicillin G, such as members of the Organic Anion Transporter Polypeptides (OATP/Oatp family of influx transporters, and P-glycoprotein, a member of the MultiDrug Resistance (MDR efflux transporter family. Expression of OATP/Oatp transporters was modified by PA treatment. Similarly, in vitro PA treatment increased mRNA and protein expression of P-glycoprotein, as well as its activity, confirming the engagement of the molecule upon PA administration. In summary, we have characterized some of the small molecule transporters present at the podocyte membrane, focusing on those used by PA to enter and exit the cell. Further investigation will be needed to understand precisely the role of these transporter families in maintaining podocyte homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury.

  19. Composite membranes prepared from cation exchange membranes and polyaniline and their transport properties in electrodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sata, Tshikatsu; Ishii, Yuuko; Kawamura, Kohei; Matsusaki, Koji [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube City, Yamaguchi (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    1999-02-01

    A cation exchange membrane was modified with polyaniline by polymerizing aniline with ammonium peroxodisulfate on the membrane surfaces, producing a membrane with polyaniline layers on both surfaces or a membrane with a single polyaniline layer on the surface. The modified membranes, composite membranes, showed sodium ion permselectivity in electrodialysis compared with divalent cations at an optimum polymerization time. The electronic conductivity of dry membranes showed a maximum (ca. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm) at the same polymerization time as the time to attain a maximum value of the sodium ion permselectivity. Because emeraldine-based polyaniline is conductive and has a cationic charge, the sodium ion permselectivity is based on the difference in the electrostatic repulsion forces of the cationic charge on the membrane surface of a desalting side to divalent cations and sodium ions. In fact, the selective permeation of sodium ions appeared only when the layer faced the desalting side of the membrane, and was affected by dissociation of polyaniline. Further oxidized polyaniline, pernigraniline-based polyaniline, did not affect the permselectivity between cations, and the diffusion coefficient of neutral molecules, urea, increased with increasing polymerization time. Sodium ion permselectivity was maintained with repeated electrodialysis.

  20. Molecular mobility and transport in polymer membranes and polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagidullin, Alexandr; Meier-Haack, Jochen; Scheler, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers prepared by the layer-by-layer technique provide an efficient way to generate planar structures of tailored surface charge and hydrophobicity, which are used as membranes for pervaporation. The use of polyelectrolyte multilayers to form the membrane permits tailoring the surface charge of the membrane and, thus, selectivity; at the same time, it reduces fouling of the membrane by adsorption of organic matter. Pulsed field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to investigate the diffusion of probe molecules into polymer systems. Evaluation of the apparent diffusion coefficient in porous poly(amide) results in a pore size of 4 microm, as found in electron micrographs. For the pore size obtained for polyelectrolyte multilayers, no equivalent pores could be found in microscopy. Propagators for the diffusion of propanol and propanol-water mixture into multilayers reveal that there might be selective interaction of probe molecules with the polyelectrolyte system.

  1. Water transport through graphene oxide membranes: the roles of driving forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J Y; Wang, B; Li, K

    2018-02-21

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have shown excellent selectivities in nanofiltration and pervaporation. However, the water transport mechanisms in the unique membrane laminar structure are still not well understood, especially in pervaporation which involves selective permeation and evaporation. Herein, water transport in GO membranes was tested under two different modes: pressure-driven permeation and pervaporation. The pure water flux was found to be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in pervaporation due to the large capillary pressure induced by evaporation. The water flux in pervaporation was suggested to be limited by evaporation at room temperature but surface diffusion at high temperature.

  2. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  3. Spectrins: a structural platform for stabilization and activation of membrane channels, receptors and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnicka, Beata; Czogalla, Aleksander; Hryniewicz-Jankowska, Anita; Bogusławska, Dżamila M; Grochowalska, Renata; Heger, Elżbieta; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on structure and functions of spectrin as a major component of the membrane skeleton. Recent advances on spectrin function as an interface for signal transduction mediation and a number of data concerning interaction of spectrin with membrane channels, adhesion molecules, receptors and transporters draw a picture of multifaceted protein. Here, we attempted to show the current depiction of multitask role of spectrin in cell physiology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish K Mishra

    Full Text Available Membrane transport proteins (transporters move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task.Support vector machine (SVM-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM, were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset.Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions

  5. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nitish K; Chang, Junil; Zhao, Patrick X

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task. Support vector machine (SVM)-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM), were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset. Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM) and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions for the

  6. ABC proteins protect the human body and maintain optimal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2011-01-01

    Human MDR1, a multi-drug transporter gene, was isolated as the first of the eukaryote ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) proteins from a multidrug-resistant carcinoma cell line in 1986. To date, over 25 years, many ABC proteins have been found to play important physiological roles by transporting hydrophobic compounds. Defects in their functions cause various diseases, indicating that endogenous hydrophobic compounds, as well as water-soluble compounds, are properly transported by transmembrane proteins. MDR1 transports a large number of structurally unrelated drugs and is involved in their pharmacokinetics, and thus is a key factor in drug interaction. ABCA1, an ABC protein, eliminates excess cholesterol in peripheral cells by generating HDL. Because ABCA1 is a key molecule in cholesterol homeostasis, its function and expression are highly regulated. Eukaryote ABC proteins function on the body surface facing the outside and in organ pathways to adapt to the extracellular environment and protect the body to maintain optimal health.

  7. Uranyl ion transport across tri-n-butyl phosphate/n-dodecane liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, J.P.; Misra, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Carrier-facilitated transport of uranium (VI) against its concentration gradient from aqueous nitrate acidic solutions across organic bulk liquid membranes (BLM) and supported liquid membranes (SLM) containing TBP as the mobile carrier and n-dodecane as the membrane solvent was investigated. Extremely dilute uranyl nitrate solutions in about 2.5 M nitric acid generally constituted as the source phase. Uranyl transport appreciably increased with both stirring of the receiving phase and the carrier concentration in the organic membrane, while enhanced acidity of the strip side adversely affected the partioning of the cation into this phase. Among the several reagents tested, diluted ammonium carbonate (∼1M) solutions served efficiently as the stripant. Besides Accurel polypropylene (PP) film as the solid support for SLM, some silicon flat-sheet membranes with different inorganic fillers like silica, calcium silicate, calcium carbonate, chromium oxide, zinc oxide etc. and teflon membranes transported about 70% of uranium in nearly 7-8 hr employing 1 M ammonium carbonate as the strippant. Specifically, 30% TBP supported on Accurel flat-sheet supports transfered better than 70% of uranium from moderate acid feeds (2.5M) under similar conditions. Membranes supporting Aliquat-336, TLA, TOPO etc. yielded somewhat poor uranium recoveries. The feed : strip volume ratio showed an inverse relationship to the fraction of cation transported. (author). 9 refs., 2 tab s

  8. A Glimpse of Membrane Transport through Structures-Advances in the Structural Biology of the GLUT Glucose Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Nieng

    2017-08-18

    The cellular uptake of glucose is an essential physiological process, and movement of glucose across biological membranes requires specialized transporters. The major facilitator superfamily glucose transporters GLUTs, encoded by the SLC2A genes, have been a paradigm for functional, mechanistic, and structural understanding of solute transport in the past century. This review starts with a glimpse into the structural biology of membrane proteins and particularly membrane transport proteins, enumerating the landmark structures in the past 25years. The recent breakthrough in the structural elucidation of GLUTs is then elaborated following a brief overview of the research history of these archetypal transporters, their functional specificity, and physiological and pathophysiological significances. Structures of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT5 in distinct transport and/or ligand-binding states reveal detailed mechanisms of the alternating access transport cycle and substrate recognition, and thus illuminate a path by which structure-based drug design may be applied to help discover novel therapeutics against several debilitating human diseases associated with GLUT malfunction and/or misregulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Membrane Anchoring and Ion-Entry Dynamics in P-type ATPase Copper Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Christina; Sitsel, Oleg; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Cu(+)-specific P-type ATPase membrane protein transporters regulate cellular copper levels. The lack of crystal structures in Cu(+)-binding states has limited our understanding of how ion entry and binding are achieved. Here, we characterize the molecular basis of Cu(+) entry using molecular...... and provide a molecular understanding of ion entry in Cu(+)-transporting P-type ATPases....

  10. Proteoliposomes as Tool for Assaying Membrane Transporter Functions and Interactions with Xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Tonazzi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteoliposomes represent a suitable and up to date tool for studying membrane transporters which physiologically mediate absorption, excretion, trafficking and reabsorption of nutrients and metabolites. Using recently developed reconstitution strategies, transporters can be inserted in artificial bilayers with the same orientation as in the cell membranes and in the absence of other interfering molecular systems. These methodologies are very suitable for studying kinetic parameters and molecular mechanisms. After the first applications on mitochondrial transporters, in the last decade, proteoliposomes obtained with optimized methodologies have been used for studying plasma membrane transporters and defining their functional and kinetic properties and structure/function relationships. A lot of information has been obtained which has clarified and completed the knowledge on several transporters among which the OCTN sub-family members, transporters for neutral amino acid, B0AT1 and ASCT2, and others. Transporters can mediate absorption of substrate-like derivatives or drugs, improving their bioavailability or can interact with these compounds or other xenobiotics, leading to side/toxic effects. Therefore, proteoliposomes have recently been used for studying the interaction of some plasma membrane and mitochondrial transporters with toxic compounds, such as mercurials, H2O2 and some drugs. Several mechanisms have been defined and in some cases the amino acid residues responsible for the interaction have been identified. The data obtained indicate proteoliposomes as a novel and potentially important tool in drug discovery.

  11. Report membrane transport of lactic acid in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid, but little is known about the mechanisms or proteins for transporting this carboxylic acid. Since transport of the lactate anion across the plasma membrane is critical to prevent acidification of the cytoplasm, we ev...

  12. Surface modification of PTMSP membranes by plasma treatment: Asymmetry of transport in organic solvent nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, A V; Tsarkov, S E; Gilman, A B; Khotimsky, V S; Roldughin, V I; Volkov, V V

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the effect of asymmetry of the membrane transport was studied for organic solvents and solutes upon their nanofiltration through the plasma-modified membranes based on poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP). Plasma treatment is shown to provide a marked hydrophilization of the hydrophobic PTMSP surface (the contact angle of water decreases from 88 down to 20°) and leads to the development of a negative charge of -5.2 nC/cm(2). The XPS measurements prove the formation of the oxygen-containing groups (Si-O and C-O) due to the surface modification. The AFM images show that the small-scale surface roughness of the plasma-treated PTMSP sample is reduced but the large-scale surface heterogeneities become more pronounced. The modified membranes retain their hydrophilic surface properties even after the nanofiltration tests and 30-day storage under ambient conditions. The results of the filtration tests show that when the membrane is oriented so that its modified layer contacts the feed solution, the membrane permeability for linear alcohols (methanol-propanol) and acetone decreases nearly two times. When the modified membrane surface faces the permeate, the membrane is seen to regain its transport characteristics: the flux becomes equal to that of the unmodified PTMSP. The well-pronounced effect of the transport asymmetry is observed for the solution of the neutral dye Solvent Blue 35 in methanol, ethanol, and acetone. For example, the initial membrane shows the negative retention for the Solvent Blue 35 dye (-16%) upon its filtration from the ethanol solution whereas, for the modified PTMSP membrane, the retention increases up to 17%. Various effects contributing to the asymmetry of the membrane transport characteristics are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The putative response regulator BaeR stimulates multidrug resistance of Escherichia coli via a novel multidrug exporter system, MdtABC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakubo, Satoshi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Hirata, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2002-08-01

    Overproduction of the response regulator BaeR confers resistance to novobiocin and bile salts in a DeltaacrAB mutant by stimulating drug exporter gene expression. The mdtABC (multidrug transporter ABC, formerly known as yegMNO) genes, which encode a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) drug efflux system, are responsible for resistance. The MdtABC system comprises the transmembrane MdtB/MdtC heteromultimer and MdtA membrane fusion protein. MdtAC also confers bile salt, but not novobiocin, resistance. This indicates that the evolution from an MdtC homomultimer to an MdtBC heteromultimer contributed to extend the drug resistance spectrum. A BLAST search suggested that such a heteromultimer-type RND exporter constitutes a unique family among gram-negative organisms.

  14. Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications—A Systematic Non-Equilibrium Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie L. Rangel-Cárdenas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that the properties of proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications cannot be described unambiguously unless interface effects are taken into account. In order to prove this, we first develop a thermodynamically consistent description of the transport properties in the membranes, both for a homogeneous membrane and for a homogeneous membrane with two surface layers in contact with the electrodes or holder material. For each subsystem, homogeneous membrane, and the two surface layers, we limit ourselves to four parameters as the system as a whole is considered to be isothermal. We subsequently analyze the experimental results on some standard membranes that have appeared in the literature and analyze these using the two different descriptions. This analysis yields relatively well-defined values for the homogeneous membrane parameters and estimates for those of the surface layers and hence supports our hypothesis. As demonstrated, the method used here allows for a critical evaluation of the literature values. Moreover, it allows optimization of stacked transport systems such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cell units where interfacial layers, such as that between the catalyst and membrane, are taken into account systematically.

  15. Engineered Transport in Microporous Materials and Membranes for Clean Energy Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changyi; Meckler, Stephen M; Smith, Zachary P; Bachman, Jonathan E; Maserati, Lorenzo; Long, Jeffrey R; Helms, Brett A

    2018-02-01

    Many forward-looking clean-energy technologies hinge on the development of scalable and efficient membrane-based separations. Ongoing investment in the basic research of microporous materials is beginning to pay dividends in membrane technology maturation. Specifically, improvements in membrane selectivity, permeability, and durability are being leveraged for more efficient carbon capture, desalination, and energy storage, and the market adoption of membranes in those areas appears to be on the horizon. Herein, an overview of the microporous materials chemistry driving advanced membrane development, the clean-energy separations employing them, and the theoretical underpinnings tying membrane performance to membrane structure across multiple length scales is provided. The interplay of pore architecture and chemistry for a given set of analytes emerges as a critical design consideration dictating mass transport outcomes. Opportunities and outstanding challenges in the field are also discussed, including high-flux 2D molecular-sieving membranes, phase-change adsorbents as performance-enhancing components in composite membranes, and the need for quantitative metrologies for understanding mass transport in heterophasic materials and in micropores with unusual chemical interactions with analytes of interest. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Metabolism of ATP-binding cassette drug transporter inhibitors: complicating factor for multidrug resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnubben, N.H.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Zanden, J.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins play a central role in the defence of organisms against toxic compounds, including anticancer drugs. However, for compounds that are designed to display a toxic effect, this defence system diminishes

  17. Analysis of Porphyra membrane transporters demonstrates gene transfer among photosynthetic eukaryotes and numerous sodium-coupled transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Zäuner, Simone; Wheeler, Glen; Grossman, Arthur R; Prochnik, Simon E; Blouin, Nicolas A; Zhuang, Yunyun; Benning, Christoph; Berg, Gry Mine; Yarish, Charles; Eriksen, Renée L; Klein, Anita S; Lin, Senjie; Levine, Ira; Brawley, Susan H; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-04-01

    Membrane transporters play a central role in many cellular processes that rely on the movement of ions and organic molecules between the environment and the cell, and between cellular compartments. Transporters have been well characterized in plants and green algae, but little is known about transporters or their evolutionary histories in the red algae. Here we examined 482 expressed sequence tag contigs that encode putative membrane transporters in the economically important red seaweed Porphyra (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta). These contigs are part of a comprehensive transcriptome dataset from Porphyra umbilicalis and Porphyra purpurea. Using phylogenomics, we identified 30 trees that support the expected monophyly of red and green algae/plants (i.e. the Plantae hypothesis) and 19 expressed sequence tag contigs that show evidence of endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer involving stramenopiles. The majority (77%) of analyzed contigs encode transporters with unresolved phylogenies, demonstrating the difficulty in resolving the evolutionary history of genes. We observed molecular features of many sodium-coupled transport systems in marine algae, and the potential for coregulation of Porphyra transporter genes that are associated with fatty acid biosynthesis and intracellular lipid trafficking. Although both the tissue-specific and subcellular locations of the encoded proteins require further investigation, our study provides red algal gene candidates associated with transport functions and novel insights into the biology and evolution of these transporters.

  18. On water transport in polymer electrolyte membranes during the passage of current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach to model the water transport in the membranes of PEM fuel cells during operation. Starting from a frequently utilized equation the various transport mechanisms are analyzed in detail. It is shown that the commonly used approach to simply balance the electro......-osmotic drag (EOD) with counter diffusion and/or hydraulic permeation is flawed, and that any net transport of water through the membrane is caused by diffusion. Depending on the effective drag the cathode side of the membrane may experience a lower hydration than the anode side. The effect of a water......-uptake layer on the net water transport will also be pictured. Finally, the effect of EOD is visualized using “Newton’s cradle”....

  19. Description of the Gas Transport through Dynamic Liquid Membrane.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uchytil, Petr; Setničková, Kateřina; Tseng, H.-H.; Šíma, Vladimír; Petričkovič, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 184, AUG 31 (2017), s. 152-157 ISSN 1383-5866 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) MOST-16-04 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : gas separation * liquid membrane * solurion-diffusion model Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  20. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Applied for Transport Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of a PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is investigated. PEMFC may be the most promising technology for fuel cell automotive systems, which is operating at quite low temperatures, (between 60 to 80℃). In this study the fuel cell motive power part of a lift truck has...

  1. Ion transport through biological membranes an integrated theoretical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Michael C

    1975-01-01

    This book illustrates some of the ways physics and mathematics have been, and are being, used to elucidate the underlying mechan­ isms of passive ion movement through biological membranes in general, and the membranes of excltable cells in particular. I have made no effort to be comprehensive in my introduction of biological material and the reader interested in a brief account of single cell electro­ physlology from a physically-oriented biologists viewpoint will find the chapters by Woodbury (1965) an excellent introduction. Part I is introductory in nature, exploring the basic electrical properties of inexcitable and excitable cell plasma membranes. Cable theory is utilized to illustrate the function of the non-decrementing action potential as a signaling mechanism for the long range trans­ mission of information in the nervous system, and to gain some in­ sight into the gross behaviour of neurons. The detailed analysis of Hodgkin and Huxley on the squid giant axon membrane ionic conductance properties...

  2. Transport properties of fullerene-polyphenylene oxide homogeneous membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polotskaya, G.; Biryulin, Yu.; Pientka, Zbyněk; Brožová, Libuše; Bleha, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2004), s. 371-376 ISSN 1536-383X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Keywords : fullerene * polyphenylene oxide * homogeneous membranes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.117, year: 2004

  3. Transport dynamics in membranes of photosynthetic purple bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caycedo, Felipe; Rodriguez, Ferney; Quiroga, Luis; Fassioli, Francesca; Johnson, Neil

    2007-03-01

    Photo-Syntethic Unit (PSU) of purple bacteria is conformed by three basic constituents: Light Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) antenna complexes, where chromophores are distributed in a ring in close contact with caroteniods with a function of collecting light; LH1s, ring shaped structures of chromophores which harvest and funnel excitations to the Reaction Centre (RC), where phtosynthesis takes place. Studies concerning a single PSU have been capable of reproducing experimental transfer times, but incapable of explaining the fact that architecture LH2-LH1-RC of phototosynthetic membranes changes as light intensity conditions vary. The organization of antenna complexes in the membranes that support PSU seems to have its own functionality. A hopping model where excitations are transferred within a membrane is used, and populations of RC, LH1 and LH2 are investigated. Different statistics concerning arrival times of excitations that excite a single PSU are considered and compared with the global model where coordinates of a great portion of a membrane are included. The model permits in a classical basis to understand which parameters make photosynthesis in purple bateria efficient and reliable.

  4. A plasma membrane association module in yeast amino acid transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in

  5. Simulation of Water Transport through a Lipid Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Berendsen, Herman J.C.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain insight in the process of water permeation through a lipid membrane, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on a phospholipid (DPPC)/water system with atomic detail. Since the actual process of permeation is too slow to be studied directly, we deduced the permeation rate indirectly

  6. Probing water structure and transport in proton exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, X.

    2018-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have attracted tremendous attention as alternative energy sources because of their high energy density and practically zero greenhouse gas emission - water is their only direct by-product. Critical to the function of PEMFCs is fast proton and water

  7. Translocation across biological membranes: activity, structure and regulation of transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Alle cellen zijn omsloten door biologische membranen met selectief doorlatende membrane, die het mogelijk maken om omstandigheden "binnen" en "buiten" de cel te handhaven. De gereguleerde beweging van moleculen door deze membranen is nodig voor talrijke essentiële processen, waaronder het verkrijgen

  8. Amplified CPEs enhancement of chorioamnion membrane mass transport by encapsulation in nano-sized PLGA particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagury, Aharon; Amar-Lewis, Eliz; Appel, Reut; Hallak, Mordechai; Kost, Joseph

    2017-08-01

    Chemical penetration enhancers (CPEs) have long been used for mass transport enhancement across membranes. Many CPEs are used in a solution or gel and could be a solvent. The use of CPEs is mainly limited due to their toxicity/irritation levels. This study presents the evaluation of encapsulated CPEs in nano-sized polymeric particles on the chorioamnion (CA) membrane mass transport. CPEs' mass encapsulated in nanoparticles was decreased by 10,000-fold. Interestingly, this approach resulted in a 6-fold increase in mass transport across the CA. This approach may also be used with other CPEs' base applications necessitating lower CPE concentration. Applying Ultrasound (US) has shown to increase the release rate of and also the mass transport across the CA membrane. It is proposed that encapsulated CPEs penetrate into the CA membrane thus prolonging their exposure, possibly extending their penetration into the CA membrane, while insonation also deepens their penetration into the CA membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fabrication and Molecular Transport Studies of Highly c-Oriented AFI Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2017-01-10

    The AFI membrane with one-dimensional straight channels is an ideal platform for various applications. In this work, we report the fabrication of a highly c-oriented, compact and stable AFI membrane by epitaxial growth from an almost close-packed and c-oriented monolayer of plate-like seeds that is manually assembled on a porous alumina support. The straight channels in the membrane are not only aligned vertically along the membrane depth, but are also continuous without disruption. The transport resistance is thus minimized and as a result, the membrane shows almost two orders of magnitude greater permeance in pervaporation of hydrocarbons compared to reported values in the literature. The selectivity of p-xylene to 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB) is approximately 850. In addition, through gas permeation studies on a number of gas and liquid molecules, different transport mechanisms including activated Knudsen diffusion, surface diffusion and molecular sieving were discovered for different diffusion species. The ratio of kinetic diameter to channel diameter, dm/dc, and the ratio of the Lennard-Jones length constant to channel diameter, σm/dc, are found very useful in explaining the different transport behaviors. These results should be useful not only for potential industrial applications of the AFI membranes but also for the fundamental understanding of transport in nanoporous structures.

  10. Electrochemical characterization and transport phenomena of polystyrene based barium–magnesium phosphate composite membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mujahid Ali Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The polystyrene based barium–magnesium (BMP composite membrane was prepared by sol–gel method. The physico-chemical characterization of the BMP composite membrane was established by XRD, FTIR and simultaneous SEM studies. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with uniform arrangement of particles indicating no sign of visible cracks. Membrane potential is a measurable and important parameter to characterize the charge property of the membrane. Membrane potentials have been measured across the polystyrene based barium–magnesium (BMP composite membrane separating various 1:1 electrolytes at different concentrations and followed the order KCl < NaCl < LiCl. The membrane was found to be cation-selective. Membrane potentials have been used to calculate transport number, mobility ratio, distribution coefficient, charge effectiveness, and also the fixed charge density which is a central parameter governing the membrane phenomena by utilizing Teorell, Meyer, and Sievers method. The order of surface charge density for uni-univalent electrolytes solution was found to be LiCl < NaCl < KCl.

  11. Molecular phylogenetic study and expression analysis of ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family in Oryza sativa in response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jayita; Sengupta, Atreyee; Gupta, Kamala; Gupta, Bhaskar

    2015-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter is a large gene superfamily that utilizes the energy released from ATP hydrolysis for transporting myriad of substrates across the biological membranes. Although many investigations have been done on the structural and functional analysis of the ABC transporters in Oryza sativa, much less is known about molecular phylogenetic and global expression pattern of the complete ABC family in rice. In this study, we have carried out a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis constructing neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees based on various statistical methods of different ABC protein subfamily of five plant lineages including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Selaginella moellendorffii (lycophyte), Arabidopsis thaliana (dicot) and O. sativa (monocot) to explore the origin and evolutionary patterns of these ABC genes. We have identified several conserved motifs in nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of ABC proteins among all plant lineages during evolution. Amongst the different ABC protein subfamilies, 'ABCE' has not yet been identified in lower plant genomes (algae, moss and lycophytes). The result indicated that gene duplication and diversification process acted upon these genes as a major operative force creating new groups and subgroups and functional divergence during evolution. We have demonstrated that rice ABCI subfamily consists of only half size transporters that represented highly dynamic members showing maximum sequence variations among the other rice ABC subfamilies. The evolutionary and the expression analysis contribute to a deep insight into the evolution and diversity of rice ABC proteins and their roles in response to salt stress that facilitate our further understanding on rice ABC transporters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  13. Transport of Water in Semicrystalline Block Copolymer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Daniel; Oparaji, Onyekachi

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS- b-PEO) is a semicrystalline block copolymer (BCP) with interesting properties. It is mechanically tough, amphiphilic, and has a polar phase. The mechanical toughness is due to the crystallinity of PEO and the high glass transition temperature of PS, as well as the morphological structure of the BCP. The polymer has high CO2, water, and salt solubility that derive from the polar PEO component. Potential applications include CO2 separation, water purification, and lithium air batteries. In all of the aforementioned applications, water transport is an important parameter. The presence of water can also affect thermal and mechanical properties. Water transport and thermal and mechanical properties of a lamellar PS- b-PEO copolymer have been measured as a function of water activity. Water transport can be affected by the heterogeneous nature of a semicrystalline BCP. Therefore, Fourier transform infrared - attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy has been employed, because water transport and polymer swelling can be measured simultaneously. The effect of BCP structure on transport has been investigated by comparing water transport in PS- b-PEO to a PEO homopolymer. The crystalline content of the PEO and the presence of glassy PS lamellae will be used to explain the transport results.

  14. Glycine transporter dimers: evidence for occurrence in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette

    2008-01-01

    by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy. Endoglycosidase treatment and surface biotinylation further revealed that complex-glycosylated GlyTs form dimers located at the cell surface. Furthermore, substitution of tryptophan 469 of GlyT2 by an arginine generated a transporter deficient in dimerization......Different Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma...

  15. Electrogenic Na+-independent Pi transport in canine renal basolateral membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, S.J.; Hammerman, M.R.

    1986-03-01

    To define the mechanism by which Pi exists from the renal proximal tubular cell across the basolateral membrane, we measured 32Pi uptake in basolateral membrane vesicles from dog kidney in the absence of Na+. Preloading of basolateral vesicles with 2 mM Pi transstimulated 32Pi uptake, which is consistent with counterflow. We used measurements of transstimulation to quantitate the transport component of 32Pi uptake. Transstimulation of 32Pi uptake was inhibited less than 30% by concentrations of probenecid as high as 50 mM. In contrast, transstimulation of 35SO4(2-) uptake by intravesicular SO4(2-) was inhibited 92% by 5 mM probenecid. Preloading basolateral vesicles with SO4(2-) did not result in transstimulation of 32Pi uptake. Accumulation of 32Pi in basolateral vesicles above steady state was driven by a membrane potential (intravesicular positive), consistent with Na+-independent Pi transport being accompanied by the net transfer of negative charge across the membrane. We conclude that carrier-mediated, electrogenic Na+-independent 32Pi transport can be demonstrated in basolateral vesicles from dog kidney. This process appears to be mediated, at least in part, via a mechanism different from that by which SO4(2-) is transported. Electrogenic Na+-independent Pi transport may reflect one means by which Pi reabsorbed across the luminal membrane exists from the proximal tubular cell down an electrochemical gradient.

  16. AtCHX13 is a plasma membrane K(+) transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium (K+) homeostasis is essential for diverse cellular processes, although how various cation transporters collaborate to maintain a suitable K(+) required for growth and development is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis ("Arabidopsis thaliana") genome contains numerous cation:proton antiporte...

  17. AtCHX13 is a plasma membrane K+ transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium (K+) homeostasis is essential for diverse cellular processes, although how various cation transporters collaborate to maintain a suitable K+ required for growth and development is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome contains numerous cation:proton antiporters (...

  18. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  19. Role of adaptor proteins in motor regulation and membrane transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Schlager (Max)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Active transport along the cytoskeleton is a process essential for proper cellular function. Although much is known about the motor proteins that generate the necessary force and the cytoskeleton that provides the cellular infrastructure, many questions still

  20. Experimental extrusion of tubular multilayer materials for Oxygen Transport Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothanda Ramachandran, Dhavanesan

    membrane based on gadolinia doped ceria oxide, (Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95−δ), (CGO) was developed on a tubular, porous support structure based on cost-efficient magnesium oxide (MgO). The porous support structure was prepared by thermoplastic extrusion using MgO powder, thermoplastic binders and graphite pore former....... The results revealed sufficiently high bending strength values of 60 MPa for the MgO support at an operation temperature of 850 °C, whereas the strength at room temperature was 77 MPa. The oxygen permeation flux on an asymmetric tubular CGO membrane, consisting of an MgO support (porous), catalytic layer...

  1. Plasma membrane-localized transporter for aluminum in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Jixing; Yamaji, Naoki; Kasai, Tomonari; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust, but its trivalent ionic form is highly toxic to all organisms at low concentrations. How Al enters cells has not been elucidated in any organisms. Herein, we report a transporter, Nrat1 (Nramp aluminum transporter 1), specific for trivalent Al ion in rice. Nrat1 belongs to the Nramp (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein) family, but shares a low similarity with other Nramp members. When expressed in yeast, Nrat1 transp...

  2. Description of the Gas Transport through Dynamic Liquid Membrane.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uchytil, Petr; Setničková, Kateřina; Tseng, H.-H.; Šíma, Vladimír; Petričkovič, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 184, AUG 31 (2017), s. 152-157 ISSN 1383-5866 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) MOST-16-04 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : gas separation * liquid membrane * solurion-diffusion model Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  3. Membrane Drug Transporters and Chemoresistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagmann, Wolfgang; Faissner, Ralf; Schnolzer, Martina; Lohr, Matthias; Jesnowski, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks among the tumors most resistant to chemotherapy. Such chemoresistance of tumors can be mediated by various cellular mechanisms including dysregulated apoptosis or ineffective drug concentration at the intracellular target sites. In this review, we highlight recent advances in experimental chemotherapy underlining the role of cellular transporters in drug resistance. Such contribution to the chemoresistant phenotype of tumor cells or tissues can be conferred both by uptake and export transporters, as demonstrated by in vivo and in vitro data. Our studies used human pancreatic carcinoma cells, cells stably transfected with human transporter cDNAs, or cells in which a specific transporter was knocked down by RNA interference. We have previously shown that 5-fluorouracil treatment affects the expression profile of relevant cellular transporters including multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and that MRP5 (ABCC5) influences chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Similarly, cell treatment with the nucleoside drug gemcitabine or a combination of chemotherapeutic drugs can variably influence the expression pattern and relative amount of uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells or select for pre-existing subpopulations. In addition, cytotoxicity studies with MRP5-overexpressing or MRP5-silenced cells demonstrate a contribution of MRP5 also to gemcitabine resistance. These data may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine and/or 5-fluorouracil

  4. The Lack of the Essential LptC Protein in the Trans-Envelope Lipopolysaccharide Transport Machine Is Circumvented by Suppressor Mutations in LptF, an Inner Membrane Component of the Escherichia coli Transporter

    KAUST Repository

    Benedet, Mattia

    2016-08-16

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) transport (Lpt) system is responsible for transferring LPS from the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane (IM) to the outer leaflet of the outer membrane (OM), where it plays a crucial role in OM selective permeability. In E. coli seven essential proteins are assembled in an Lpt trans-envelope complex, which is conserved in gamma-Proteobacteria. LptBFG constitute the IMABC transporter, LptDE form the OM translocon for final LPS delivery, whereas LptC, an IM-anchored protein with a periplasmic domain, interacts with the IM ABC transporter, the periplasmic protein LptA, and LPS. Although essential, LptC can tolerate several mutations and its role in LPS transport is unclear. To get insights into the functional role of LptC in the Lpt machine we searched for viable mutants lacking LptC by applying a strong double selection for lptC deletion mutants. Genome sequencing of viable Delta lptC mutants revealed single amino acid substitutions at a unique position in the predicted large periplasmic domain of the IM component LptF (LptF(SupC)). In complementation tests, lptF(SupC) mutants suppress lethality of both Delta lptC and lptC conditional expressionmutants. Our data show that mutations in a specific residue of the predicted LptF periplasmic domain can compensate the lack of the essential protein LptC, implicate such LptF domain in the formation of the periplasmic bridge between the IM and OM complexes, and suggest that LptC may have evolved to improve the performance of an ancestral six-component Lpt machine.

  5. Structure of the MacAB-TolC ABC-type tripartite multidrug efflux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabrés, Salomé; Neuberger, Arthur; Blaza, James N.; Bai, Xiao-chen; Okada, Ui; Murakami, Satoshi; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Zachariae, Ulrich; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Luisi, Ben F.

    2017-01-01

    The MacA-MacB-TolC assembly of Escherichia coli is a transmembrane machine that spans the cell envelope and actively extrudes substrates, including macrolide antibiotics and polypeptide virulence factors. These transport processes are energized by the ATPase MacB, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. We present an electron cryo-microscopy structure of the ABC-type tripartite assembly at near-atomic resolution. A hexamer of the periplasmic protein MacA bridges between a TolC trimer in the outer membrane and a MacB dimer in the inner membrane, generating a quaternary structure with a central channel for substrate translocation. A gating ring found in MacA is proposed to act as a one-way valve in substrate transport. The MacB structure features an atypical transmembrane domain (TMD) with a closely packed dimer interface and a periplasmic opening that is the likely portal for substrate entry from the periplasm, with subsequent displacement through an allosteric transport mechanism. PMID:28504659

  6. Multi-component transport in polymers: hydrocarbon / hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membrane; Transport multi-composants dans les polymeres: separation hydrocarbures / hydrogene par membrane a selectivite inverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauviel, G.

    2003-12-15

    Hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membranes is investigated. The first goal is to develop materials showing an increased selectivity. Silicone membranes loaded with inorganic fillers have been prepared, but the expected enhancement is not observed. The second goal is to model the multi- component transport through rubbers. Indeed the permeability model is not able to predict correctly permeation when a vapour is present. Thus many phenomena have to be considered: diffusional inter-dependency, sorption synergy, membrane swelling and drag effect. The dependence of diffusivities with the local composition is modelled according to free-volume theory. The model resolution allows to predict the permeation flow-rates of mixed species from their pure sorption and diffusion data. For the systems under consideration, the diffusional inter-dependency is shown to be preponderant. Besides, sorption synergy importance is pointed out, whereas it is most often neglected. (author)

  7. INHIBITION OF MYCOLIC ACID TRANSPORT ACROSS THE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS PLASMA MEMBRANE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorzewicz, Anna E.; Pham, Ha; Gundi, Vijay A. K. B.; Scherman, Michael S.; North, Elton J.; Hess, Tamara; Jones, Victoria; Gruppo, Veronica; Born, Sarah E. M.; Korduláková, Jana; Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Morisseau, Christophe; Lenaerts, Anne J.; Lee, Richard E.; McNeil, Michael R.; Jackson, Mary

    2011-01-01

    New chemotherapeutics active against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) are urgently needed. We report on the identification of an adamantyl urea compound displaying potent bactericidal activity against M. tb and a unique mode of action, namely the abolition of the translocation of mycolic acids from the cytoplasm where they are synthesized to the periplasmic side of the plasma membrane where they are transferred onto cell wall arabinogalactan or used in the formation of virulence-associated outer membrane trehalose-containing glycolipids. Whole genome sequencing of spontaneous resistant mutants of M. tb selected in vitro followed by genetic validation experiments revealed that our prototype inhibitor targets the inner membrane transporter, MmpL3. Conditional gene expression of mmpL3 in mycobacteria and analysis of inhibitor-treated cells validate MmpL3 as essential for mycobacterial growth and support the involvement of this transporter in the translocation of trehalose monomycolate across the plasma membrane. PMID:22344175

  8. Fundamental transport mechanisms, fabrication and potential applications of nanoporous atomically thin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael S. H.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Jang, Doojoon; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-06-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional materials offer a new approach to controlling mass transport at the nanoscale. These materials can sustain nanoscale pores in their rigid lattices and due to their minimum possible material thickness, high mechanical strength and chemical robustness, they could be used to address persistent challenges in membrane separations. Here we discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the emerging field of nanoporous atomically thin membranes, focusing on the fundamental mechanisms of gas- and liquid-phase transport, membrane fabrication techniques and advances towards practical application. We highlight potential functional characteristics of the membranes and discuss applications where they are expected to offer advantages. Finally, we outline the major scientific questions and technological challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap from theoretical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to real-world applications.

  9. Design and optimization of porous ceramic supports for asymmetric ceria-based oxygen transport membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Pećanac, G.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure, mechanical properties and gas permeability of porous supports of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95−δ (CGO) were investigated as a function of sintering temperature and volume fraction of pore former for use in planar asymmetric oxygen transport membranes (OTMs). With increasing the pore former ...... activity of the CGO membrane was reduced by Fe2O3 addition (replacing Co3O4 as sintering additive)....

  10. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.