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Sample records for abbott cell-dyn ruby

  1. Performance evaluation of the Abbott CELL-DYN Emerald for use as a bench-top analyzer in a research setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, T-L; Xiros, N; Guan, F; Orellana, D; Holst, J; Joshua, D E; Rasko, J E J

    2013-08-01

    The CELL-DYN Emerald is a compact bench-top hematology analyzer that can be used for a three-part white cell differential analysis. To determine its utility for analysis of human and mouse samples, we evaluated this machine against the larger CELL-DYN Sapphire and Sysmex XT2000iV hematology analyzers. 120 human (normal and abnormal) and 30 mouse (normal and abnormal) samples were analyzed on both the CELL-DYN Emerald and CELL-DYN Sapphire or Sysmex XT2000iV analyzers. For mouse samples, the CELL-DYN Emerald analyzer required manual recalibration based on the histogram populations. Analysis of the CELL-DYN Emerald showed excellent precision, within accepted ranges (white cell count CV% = 2.09%; hemoglobin CV% = 1.68%; platelets CV% = 4.13%). Linearity was excellent (R² ≥ 0.99), carryover was minimal (Emerald and Sapphire analyzers for human samples or Sysmex XT2000iV analyzer for mouse samples showed excellent correlation for all parameters. The CELL-DYN Emerald was generally comparable to the larger reference analyzer for both human and mouse samples. It would be suitable for use in satellite research laboratories or as a backup system in larger laboratories. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Malaria diagnosis with the haematology analyser Cell-Dyn 3500: What does the instrument detect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hänscheid, T.; Pinto, B. G.; Cristino, J. M.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    The Cell-Dyn 3500 instrument could become a sensitive and specific tool in the diagnosis of malaria. The instrument appears to detect malaria-pigment within monocytes and granulocytes. A case of P. vivax malaria in a patient with increased osmotically resistant erythrocytes illustrates the potential

  3. EVALUATION OF ZEBU NELLORE CATTLE BLOOD SAMPLES USING THE CELL-DYN 3500 HEMATOLOGY ANALYZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Secorun Borges

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cell-dyn 3500 is a multiparameter flow cytometer, which may analyze samples from several species performing several simultaneous analyses. It is able to perform white blood cells, red blood cells and platelet counts, besides differential leukocyte counts, packed cell volume and hemoglobin determination. Cell-Dyn 3500 performs total leukocyte count both optically and by impedance. The equipment may choose one or other method, based on the reliability of the results. Erythrocyte and platelet counts are determined by impedance. Leukocyte differentiation is based on an optical principle, using separation in multiangular polarized light. The objective of this study was to compare the results of complete blood count of Zebu Nellore heifers from Celldyn 3500, with those obtained from a semi-automated cell counter (Celm CC 510 and the manual technique. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein in 5 mL EDTA vacuum tubes from 58 Nellore heifers, at 24 months of age. Samples were processed in parallel in the three different techniques. Results were analyzed using paired t test, Pearson’s correlation and the Bland-Altmann method. There was a strong correlation for all parameters analyzed by Cell-Dyn 3500, manual method and semiautomated cell counter, except for basophils and monocytes counts. These results confirm that this analyzer is reliable for blood samples analysis of zebu cattle.

  4. Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall since September 2010 related to infant formula distributed by Abbott. This list will be updated with publicly available...

  5. FDA Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — On September 22, 2010, Abbott issued a voluntary recall of certain Similac powdered infant formula after identifying a common warehouse beetle (both larvae and...

  6. RinRuby: Accessing the R Interpreter from Pure Ruby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Crawford

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available RinRuby is a Ruby library that integrates the R interpreter in Ruby, making R's statistical routines and graphics available within Ruby. The library consists of a single Ruby script that is simple to install and does not require any special compilation or installation of R. Since the library is 100% pure Ruby, it works on a variety of operating systems, Ruby implementations, and versions of R. RinRuby's methods are simple, making for readable code. This paper describes RinRuby usage, provides comprehensive documentation, gives several examples, and discusses RinRuby's implementation. The latest version of RinRuby can be found at the project website: http://rinruby.ddahl.org/.

  7. Ruby under a microscope learning Ruby internals through experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Shaughnessy, Pat

    2013-01-01

    How Ruby Works Under the HoodRuby is a powerful programming language with a focus on simplicity, but beneath its elegant syntax it performs countless unseen tasks.Ruby Under a Microscope gives you a hands-on look at Ruby's core, using extensive diagrams and thorough explanations to show you how Ruby is implemented (no C skills required). Author Pat Shaughnessy takes a scientific approach, laying out a series of experiments with Ruby code to take you behind the scenes of how programming languages work. You'll even find information on JRuby and Rubinius (two alternative implementations of Ruby),

  8. BioRuby: bioinformatics software for the Ruby programming language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Naohisa; Prins, Pjotr; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Bonnal, Raoul; Aerts, Jan; Katayama, Toshiaki

    2010-10-15

    The BioRuby software toolkit contains a comprehensive set of free development tools and libraries for bioinformatics and molecular biology, written in the Ruby programming language. BioRuby has components for sequence analysis, pathway analysis, protein modelling and phylogenetic analysis; it supports many widely used data formats and provides easy access to databases, external programs and public web services, including BLAST, KEGG, GenBank, MEDLINE and GO. BioRuby comes with a tutorial, documentation and an interactive environment, which can be used in the shell, and in the web browser. BioRuby is free and open source software, made available under the Ruby license. BioRuby runs on all platforms that support Ruby, including Linux, Mac OS X and Windows. And, with JRuby, BioRuby runs on the Java Virtual Machine. The source code is available from http://www.bioruby.org/. katayama@bioruby.org

  9. Development of aplications in Ruby language

    OpenAIRE

    KOHOUT, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    This work is engaged in a script language Ruby and its enlargement Ruby on Rails for developing web aplications. It is attended to features of Ruby language in different examples. It illustrates bindings between Ruby and Ruby on Rails framework. It describes techniques and procedures for developing aplications in this language. Furthermore it is focused on development tools and suitable environments for a production in Ruby (Ruby on Rails). It tries to compare Ruby with the other programming ...

  10. Remembering Ruby Special monograph edition: Remembering Ruby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Johnson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Remembering Ruby’ is a tribute to Doctor Ruby Langford Ginibi, a remarkable woman and an important Australian writer. Winner of numerous awards for her contribution to literature, as well as to Australian culture, Ruby was an Aboriginal Elder of the Bundjalung nation and a tireless campaigner for the rights of her people. Ruby’s writing is passionate, sincere and heart-felt, as well as extraordinarily funny and articulate. She knew that getting people to listen to her story would be fundamental to naming the hidden history of Indigenous Australia and to changing cultural perceptions in a broader context. As an elder she took on the complex and demanding role of ‘edumacation’, as she called it, and her representations of life and culture continue to provide important reflections, from an Indigenous perspective, on the effects of ignorance, racism and colonisation in an Australian context. As Aboriginal mother, aunty, teacher and scholar her writing represents a particular Australian experience for a readership of people interested in human rights and equality the world over. This monograph, in honouring Ruby Langford Ginibi, is the written expression of an ongoing dialogue between the two authors about their experiences living in Australia and the way that Ruby has interconnected with us and influenced our experiences of growing up in an Australian cultural context. It also brings into focus the many ways that Ruby Langford Ginibi’s writing has been central to challenging and changing prevailing perspectives on the lives of Indigenous people over the last twenty-five years. An excellent communicator with a wicked sense of humour, Ruby’s tireless telling of the truth about the impacts of invasion on Indigenous people makes her an important cultural ambassador for all Australians. Ruby’s totem, the Willy Wagtail, is connected to being a messenger for her people and in writing ‘Remembering Ruby’ we aim to contribute to keeping

  11. MacRuby Ruby and Cocoa on OS X

    CERN Document Server

    Aimonetti, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Want to build native Mac OS X applications with a sleek, developer-friendly alternative to Objective-C? MacRuby is an ideal choice. This in-depth guide shows you how Apple's implementation of Ruby gives you access to all the features available to Objective-C programmers. You'll get clear, detailed explanations of MacRuby, including quick programming techniques such as prototyping. Perfect for programmers at any level, this book is packed with code samples and complete project examples. If you use Ruby, you can tap your skills to take advantage of Interface Builder, Cocoa libraries, the Objec

  12. Ruby on Rails Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstadt, Jake

    2011-01-01

    Ruby on Rails is an open source web application framework for the Ruby programming language. The first application I built was a web application to manage and authenticate other applications. One of the main requirements for this application was a single sign-on service. This allowed authentication to be built in one location and be implemented in many different applications. For example, users would be able to login using their existing credentials, and be able to access other NASA applications without authenticating again. The second application I worked on was an internal qualification plan app. Previously, the viewing of employee qualifications was managed through Excel spread sheets. I built a database driven application to streamline the process of managing qualifications. Employees would be able to login securely to view, edit and update their personal qualifications.

  13. Ruby on Rails for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Burd

    2007-01-01

    Quickly create Web sites with this poweful tool Use this free and easy programming language for e-commerce sites and blogs If you need to build Web and database applications quickly but you don''t dream in computer code, take heart! Ruby on Rails was created for you, and this book will have you up and running in no time. The Ruby scripting language and the Rails framework let you create full-featured Web applications fast. It''s even fun! Discover how toInstall and run Ruby and RailsUse the RadRails IDECreate a blog with RubyConnect your Web site to a databaseBuild a shopping cartExplore Ruby'

  14. Nystatin LF (Aronex/Abbott).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, S; Rex, J H

    2001-04-01

    November 1998, Aronex signed a licensing collaboration with Abbott Laboratories for the worldwide rights to nystatin LF [305531].

  15. Hello Ruby adventures in coding

    CERN Document Server

    Liukas, Linda

    2015-01-01

    "Code is the 21st century literacy and the need for people to speak the ABCs of Programming is imminent." --Linda Liukas Meet Ruby--a small girl with a huge imagination. In Ruby's world anything is possible if you put your mind to it. When her dad asks her to find five hidden gems Ruby is determined to solve the puzzle with the help of her new friends, including the Wise Snow Leopard, the Friendly Foxes, and the Messy Robots. As Ruby stomps around her world kids will be introduced to the basic concepts behind coding and programming through storytelling. Learn how to break big problems into small problems, repeat tasks, look for patterns, create step-by-step plans, and think outside the box. With hands-on activities included in every chapter, future coders will be thrilled to put their own imaginations to work.

  16. 77 FR 13232 - Abbott Laboratories; Filing of Food Additive Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 172 Abbott Laboratories; Filing of Food Additive... Administration (FDA) is announcing that Abbott Laboratories has filed a petition proposing that the food additive...))), notice is given that a food additive petition (FAP 2A4788) has been filed by Abbott Laboratories, 3300...

  17. Ruby fluorescence pressure scale: Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lei; Bi Yan; Xu Ji-An

    2013-01-01

    Effect of non-hydrostatic stress on X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) is studied. The pressure gradient in the sample chamber leads to the broadening of the diffraction peaks, which increase with the hkl index of the crystal. It is found that the difference between the determined d-spacing compressive ratio d/d 0 and the real d-spacing compressive ratio d r /d 0 is determined by the yield stress of the pressure transmitting media (if used) and the shear modulus of the sample. On the basis of the corrected experiment data of Mao et al. (MXB86), which was used to calibrate the most widely used ruby fluorescence scale, a new relationship of ruby fluorescence pressure scale is corrected, i.e., P = (1904/9.827)[(1 + Δλ/λ 0 ) 9.827 −1]. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  18. A breeding record of Abbott's Starling Cinnyricinclus femoralis from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ). Given the paucity of ecological knowledge of this species, I share some observations of a pair of Abbott's Starlings found tending an active nest in the southern Kikuyu. Escarpment forests in November 2015. On 2 November 2015 at 1030, ...

  19. The Ruby UCSC API: accessing the UCSC genome database using Ruby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima Hiroyuki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC genome database is among the most used sources of genomic annotation in human and other organisms. The database offers an excellent web-based graphical user interface (the UCSC genome browser and several means for programmatic queries. A simple application programming interface (API in a scripting language aimed at the biologist was however not yet available. Here, we present the Ruby UCSC API, a library to access the UCSC genome database using Ruby. Results The API is designed as a BioRuby plug-in and built on the ActiveRecord 3 framework for the object-relational mapping, making writing SQL statements unnecessary. The current version of the API supports databases of all organisms in the UCSC genome database including human, mammals, vertebrates, deuterostomes, insects, nematodes, and yeast. The API uses the bin index—if available—when querying for genomic intervals. The API also supports genomic sequence queries using locally downloaded *.2bit files that are not stored in the official MySQL database. The API is implemented in pure Ruby and is therefore available in different environments and with different Ruby interpreters (including JRuby. Conclusions Assisted by the straightforward object-oriented design of Ruby and ActiveRecord, the Ruby UCSC API will facilitate biologists to query the UCSC genome database programmatically. The API is available through the RubyGem system. Source code and documentation are available at https://github.com/misshie/bioruby-ucsc-api/ under the Ruby license. Feedback and help is provided via the website at http://rubyucscapi.userecho.com/.

  20. The Ruby UCSC API: accessing the UCSC genome database using Ruby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Hiroyuki; Aerts, Jan; Katayama, Toshiaki; Bonnal, Raoul J P; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro

    2012-09-21

    The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) genome database is among the most used sources of genomic annotation in human and other organisms. The database offers an excellent web-based graphical user interface (the UCSC genome browser) and several means for programmatic queries. A simple application programming interface (API) in a scripting language aimed at the biologist was however not yet available. Here, we present the Ruby UCSC API, a library to access the UCSC genome database using Ruby. The API is designed as a BioRuby plug-in and built on the ActiveRecord 3 framework for the object-relational mapping, making writing SQL statements unnecessary. The current version of the API supports databases of all organisms in the UCSC genome database including human, mammals, vertebrates, deuterostomes, insects, nematodes, and yeast.The API uses the bin index-if available-when querying for genomic intervals. The API also supports genomic sequence queries using locally downloaded *.2bit files that are not stored in the official MySQL database. The API is implemented in pure Ruby and is therefore available in different environments and with different Ruby interpreters (including JRuby). Assisted by the straightforward object-oriented design of Ruby and ActiveRecord, the Ruby UCSC API will facilitate biologists to query the UCSC genome database programmatically. The API is available through the RubyGem system. Source code and documentation are available at https://github.com/misshie/bioruby-ucsc-api/ under the Ruby license. Feedback and help is provided via the website at http://rubyucscapi.userecho.com/.

  1. The Ruby UCSC API: accessing the UCSC genome database using Ruby

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) genome database is among the most used sources of genomic annotation in human and other organisms. The database offers an excellent web-based graphical user interface (the UCSC genome browser) and several means for programmatic queries. A simple application programming interface (API) in a scripting language aimed at the biologist was however not yet available. Here, we present the Ruby UCSC API, a library to access the UCSC genome database using Ruby. Results The API is designed as a BioRuby plug-in and built on the ActiveRecord 3 framework for the object-relational mapping, making writing SQL statements unnecessary. The current version of the API supports databases of all organisms in the UCSC genome database including human, mammals, vertebrates, deuterostomes, insects, nematodes, and yeast. The API uses the bin index—if available—when querying for genomic intervals. The API also supports genomic sequence queries using locally downloaded *.2bit files that are not stored in the official MySQL database. The API is implemented in pure Ruby and is therefore available in different environments and with different Ruby interpreters (including JRuby). Conclusions Assisted by the straightforward object-oriented design of Ruby and ActiveRecord, the Ruby UCSC API will facilitate biologists to query the UCSC genome database programmatically. The API is available through the RubyGem system. Source code and documentation are available at https://github.com/misshie/bioruby-ucsc-api/ under the Ruby license. Feedback and help is provided via the website at http://rubyucscapi.userecho.com/. PMID:22994508

  2. Instant RubyMotion app development

    CERN Document Server

    Laborde, Gant

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This book is a practical, task-based, step-by-step tutorial that will get you started with using RubyMotion to quickly and efficiently write iOS apps.To make the most of this book, you should understand the basics of programming concepts and have a basic understanding of a language similar to Ruby. If you are an Objective-C programmer, you'll learn the advantages of RubyMotion which can access the benefits of Cocoapods, but takes everything a st

  3. 77 FR 4368 - Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division, Including On-Site Leased... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on February 24, 2011, applicable to workers of Abbott Laboratories... production of immunoassay diagnostic analyzers, associated accessories, and spare parts. The notice was...

  4. Computer Vision using Ruby and libJIT

    OpenAIRE

    Wedekind, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Ruby originated in Japan, the country which is world-leading in robotic research. It suggests itself to put the two together and to start using Ruby as a language to program robots. However at the moment the performance of available Ruby interpreters is not sufficient. It is hard to achieve performance comparable to compiled C++-code since manipulation of Ruby-integers and Ruby-arrays requires frequent bounds-checking. It can be shown that universal bounds-check elimination is actually imposs...

  5. 76 FR 4283 - Foreign-Trade Zone 153-San Diego, CA; Application for Manufacturing Authority; Abbott...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... finished cardiovascular devices that Abbott may produce under FTZ procedures in the future. New major... cardiovascular devices (duty free) for the foreign inputs noted above. FTZ designation would further allow Abbott...; Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (Cardiovascular Device Manufacturing); Riverside County, CA An...

  6. Teaching Financial Literacy with Max and Ruby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Natalya; Ferguson, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    Teaching financial literacy is important at all stages of life, but is often neglected with elementary students. In this article, the authors describe a strategy for teaching financial literacy using the books about Max and Ruby by Rosemary Wells. These books can help introduce the five key concepts of financial literacy: scarcity, exchange,…

  7. The T-Ruby design system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Robin; Rasmussen, Ole

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the T-Ruby system for designing VLSI circuits, starting from formal specifications in which they are described in terms of relational abstractions of their behaviour. The design process involves correctness-preserving transformations based on proved equivalences between...

  8. The T-Ruby Design System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Robin; Rasmussen, Ole Steen

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the T-Ruby system for designing VLSI circuits, starting from formal specifications in which they are described in terms of relational abstractions of their behaviour. The design process involves correctness-preserving transformations based on proved equivalences between...

  9. Avoidance of generic competition by Abbott Laboratories' fenofibrate franchise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Nicholas S; Ross, Joseph S; Jackevicius, Cynthia A; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2012-05-14

    The ongoing debate concerning the efficacy of fenofibrate has overshadowed an important aspect of the drug's history: Abbott Laboratories, the maker of branded fenofibrate, has produced several bioequivalent reformulations that dominate the market, although generic fenofibrate has been available for almost a decade. This continued use of branded formulations, which cost twice as much as generic versions of fenofibrate, imposes an annual cost of approximately $700 million on the US health care system. Abbott Laboratories maintained its dominance of the fenofibrate market in part through a complex switching strategy involving the sequential launch of branded reformulations that had not been shown to be superior to the first-generation product and patent litigation that delayed the approval of generic formulations. The small differences in dose of the newer branded formulations prevented their substitution with generics of older-generation products. As soon as direct generic competition seemed likely at the new dose level, where substitution would be allowed, Abbott would launch another reformulation, and the cycle would repeat. Based on the fenofibrate example, our objective is to describe how current policy can allow pharmaceutical companies to maintain market share using reformulations of branded medications, without demonstrating the superiority of next-generation products.

  10. Software Testing using Ruby on Rails framework

    OpenAIRE

    Jurglič, Matic

    2014-01-01

    In the world of modern web applications and open source technologies there is a rising in popularity of using test driven development methodologies in software development. The main advantages of writing tests are easier error discovery, more effective development process, and consequently higher product quality. This thesis describes common testing techniques and focuses on usage in Ruby on Rails framework, which has a vibrant open source community with a culture that strongly emphasizes...

  11. Makit Lld: A Price above Rubies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockerts, Kai; Jorem, Kaja; Walker Pedersen, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    "Makit Ltd: A Price Above Rubies" describes the development of a social entrepreneurial venture started by three young business school graduates. It follows the start-up process from their first idea identification, via the process of business plan writing, fund raising, to eventual start....... The case lends itself, furthermore, to the introduction of a number of other topics related to social entrepreneurship, such as, for example, how to organize a founder team, the ownership structures, and how to plan for the risk of one founder leaving the team. Moreover, the case allows discussing...

  12. 76 FR 47143 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 153; Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., (Cardiovascular Devices), Riverside County, CA Pursuant to its Authority Under the... 153, has requested manufacturing authority on behalf of Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., within... procedures at sites within FTZ 153, on behalf of Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., as described in the...

  13. 75 FR 340 - Approval for Expansion of Subzone 22F, Abbott Molecular, Inc. (Pharmaceutical and Molecular...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1654] Approval for Expansion of Subzone 22F, Abbott Molecular, Inc. (Pharmaceutical and Molecular Diagnostic Products), Chicago, IL, Area... manufacturing authority on behalf of Abbott Molecular, Inc., within FTZ 22F in Des Plaines and Elk Grove Village...

  14. Ruby in a nutshell a desktop quick reference

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Yukihiro

    2002-01-01

    Ruby is an absolutely pure object-oriented scripting language written in C and designed with Perl and Python capabilities in mind. While its roots are in Japan, Ruby is slowly but surely gaining ground in the US. The goal of Yukihiro Matsumoto, creator of Ruby and author of this book, is to incorporate the strengths of languages like Perl, Python, Lisp and Smalltalk. Ruby is a genuine attempt to combine the best of everything in the scripting world. Since 1993, Ruby mailing lists have been established, Web pages have formed, and a community has grown around it. The language itself is very good at text processing and is notable for its broad object orientation. Ruby is portable and runs under GNU/Linux (and other Unices) as well as DOS, MS Windows and Mac. With Ruby in a Nutshell, Matsumoto offers a practical reference to the features of this new language including the command-line options, syntax, built-in variables, functions, and many commonly used classes and modules. This guide covers the current stable ...

  15. From Java to Ruby things every manager should know

    CERN Document Server

    Tate, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    As a development team, you want to be productive. You want to write flexible, maintainable web applications. You want to use Ruby and Rails. But can you justify the move away from established platforms such as J2EE? Bruce Tate's From Java to Ruby has the answers, and it expresses them in a language that'll help persuade managers and executives who've seen it all. See when and where the switch makes sense, and see how to make it. If you're trying to adopt Ruby in your organization and need some help, this is the book for you. Based on a decision tree (a concept familiar to managers and executives,) Java to Ruby stays above the low-level technical debate to examine the real benefits and risks to adoption. Java to Ruby is packed with interviews of Ruby customers and developers, so you can see what types of projects are likely to succeed, and which ones are likely to fail. Ruby and Rails may be the answer, but first you need to be sure you're asking the right question. By addressing risk and fitness of purpose, J...

  16. Trace element fingerprinting of jewellery rubies by external beam PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calligaro, T. E-mail: calli@culture.nl; Poirot, J.-P.; Querre, G

    1999-04-02

    External beam PIXE analysis allows the non-destructive in situ characterisation of gemstones mounted on jewellery pieces. This technique was used for the determination of the geographical origin of 64 rubies set on a high-valued necklace. The trace element content of these gemstones was measured and compared to that of a set of rubies of known sources. Multivariate statistical processing of the results allowed us to infer the provenance of rubies: one comes from Thailand/Cambodia deposit while the remaining are attributed to Burma. This highlights the complementary capabilities of PIXE and conventional geological observations.

  17. Trace element fingerprinting of jewellery rubies by external beam PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, T.; Poirot, J.-P.; Querre, G.

    1999-01-01

    External beam PIXE analysis allows the non-destructive in situ characterisation of gemstones mounted on jewellery pieces. This technique was used for the determination of the geographical origin of 64 rubies set on a high-valued necklace. The trace element content of these gemstones was measured and compared to that of a set of rubies of known sources. Multivariate statistical processing of the results allowed us to infer the provenance of rubies: one comes from Thailand/Cambodia deposit while the remaining are attributed to Burma. This highlights the complementary capabilities of PIXE and conventional geological observations

  18. Trace element fingerprinting of jewellery rubies by external beam PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaro, T.; Poirot, J.-P.; Querré, G.

    1999-04-01

    External beam PIXE analysis allows the non-destructive in situ characterisation of gemstones mounted on jewellery pieces. This technique was used for the determination of the geographical origin of 64 rubies set on a high-valued necklace. The trace element content of these gemstones was measured and compared to that of a set of rubies of known sources. Multivariate statistical processing of the results allowed us to infer the provenance of rubies : one comes from Thailand/Cambodia deposit while the remaining are attributed to Burma. This highlights the complementary capabilities of PIXE and conventional gemological observations.

  19. Vanadium-rich ruby and sapphire within Mogok Gemfield, Myanmar: implications for gem color and genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Khin; Sutherland, Lin; Yui, Tzen-Fu; Meffre, Sebastien; Thu, Kyaw

    2015-01-01

    Rubies and sapphires are of both scientific and commercial interest. These gemstones are corundum colored by transition elements within the alumina crystal lattice: Cr3+ yields red in ruby and Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ti4+ ionic interactions color sapphires. A minor ion, V3+ induces slate to purple colors and color change in some sapphires, but its role in coloring rubies remains enigmatic. Trace element and oxygen isotope composition provide genetic signatures for natural corundum and assist geographic typing. Here, we show that V can dominate chromophore contents in Mogok ruby suites. This raises implications for their color quality, enhancement treatments, geographic origin, exploration and exploitation and their comparison with rubies elsewhere. Precise LA-ICP-MS analysis of ruby and sapphire from Mogok placer and in situ deposits reveal that V can exceed 5,000 ppm, giving V/Cr, V/Fe and V/Ti ratios up to 26, 78, and 97 respectively. Such values significantly exceed those found elsewhere suggesting a localized geological control on V-rich ruby distribution. Our results demonstrate that detailed geochemical studies of ruby suites reveal that V is a potential ruby tracer, encourage comparisons of V/Cr-variation between ruby suites and widen the scope for geographic typing and genesis of ruby. This will allow more precise comparison of Asian and other ruby fields and assist confirmation of Mogok sources for rubies in historical and contemporary gems and jewelry.

  20. Ion beam analysis of rubies and their simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juncomma, U. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50202 (Thailand); Intarasiri, S., E-mail: saweat@gmail.com [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50202 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Bootkul, D. [Department of General Science (Gems and Jewelry), Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Tippawan, U., E-mail: beary1001@gmail.com [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50202 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-07-15

    Ion beam analysis (IBA) is a set of well known powerful analytical techniques which use energetic particle beam as a probe. Among them, two techniques are suitable for gemological analysis, i.e., Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) and Ionoluminescence (IL). We combine these two techniques for the investigations of rubies and their simulants. The main objective is to find a reference fingerprint of these gemstones. The data are collected from several natural rubies, synthetic rubies, red spinels, almandine garnets and rubellite which very much resemble and are difficult to distinguish with the gemologist loupe. From our measurements, due to their different crystal structures and compositions, can be clearly distinguished by the IL and PIXE techniques. The results show that the PIXE spectra consist of a few dominant lines of the host matrix elements of each gemstone and some weaker lines due to trace elements of transition metals. PIXE can easily differentiate rubies from other stones by evaluating their chemical compositions. It is noticed that synthetic rubies generally contain fewer impurities, lower iron and higher chromium than the natural ones. Moreover, the IL spectrum of ruby is unique and different from those of others stones. The typical spectrum of ruby is centered at 694 nm, with small sidebands that can be ascribed to a Cr{sup 3+} emission spectrum which is dominated by an R-line at the extreme red end of the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although the spectrum of synthetic ruby is centered at the same wavelength, the peak is stronger due to higher concentration of Cr and lower concentration of Fe than for natural rubies. For spinel, the IL spectrum shows strong deformation where the R-line is split due to the presence of MgO. For rubellite, the peak center is shifted to 692 nm which might be caused by the replacement of Mn{sup 3+} at the Al{sup 3+} site of the host structure. It is noticed that almandine garnet is not luminescent due

  1. Marble-hosted ruby deposits of the Morogoro Region, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Walter A.; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Fritz, Harald; Sutthirat, Chakkaphan

    2017-10-01

    The ruby deposits of the Uluguru and Mahenge Mts, Morogoro Region, are related to marbles which represent the cover sequence of the Eastern Granulites in Tanzania. In both localities the cover sequences define a tectonic unit which is present as a nappe structure thrusted onto the gneissic basement in a north-western direction. Based on structural geological observations the ruby deposits are bound to mica-rich boudins in fold hinges where fluids interacted with the marble-host rock in zones of higher permeability. Petrographic observations revealed that the Uluguru Mts deposits occur within calcite-dominated marbles whereas deposits in the Mahenge Mts are found in dolomite-dominated marbles. The mineral assemblage describing the marble-hosted ruby deposit in the Uluguru Mts is characterised by corundum-dolomite-phlogopite ± spinel, calcite, pargasite, scapolite, plagioclase, margarite, chlorite, tourmaline whereas the assemblage corundum-calcite-plagioclase-phlogopite ± dolomite, pargasite, sapphirine, titanite, tourmaline is present in samples from the Mahenge Mts. Although slightly different in mineral assemblage it was possible to draw a similar ruby formation history for both localities. Two ruby forming events were distinguished by textural differences, which could also be modeled by thermodynamic T-XCO2 calculations using non-ideal mixing models of essential minerals. A first formation of ruby appears to have taken place during the prograde path (M1) either by the breakdown of diaspore which was present in the original sedimentary precursor rock or by the breakdown of margarite to corundum and plagioclase. The conditions for M1 metamorphism was estimated at ∼750 °C at 10 kbar, which represents granulite facies conditions. A change in fluid composition towards a CO2 dominated fluid triggered a second ruby generation to form. Subsequently, the examined units underwent a late greenschist facies overprint. In the framework of the East African Orogen we

  2. Ion beam analysis of rubies and their simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juncomma, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Tippawan, U.

    2014-01-01

    Ion beam analysis (IBA) is a set of well known powerful analytical techniques which use energetic particle beam as a probe. Among them, two techniques are suitable for gemological analysis, i.e., Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) and Ionoluminescence (IL). We combine these two techniques for the investigations of rubies and their simulants. The main objective is to find a reference fingerprint of these gemstones. The data are collected from several natural rubies, synthetic rubies, red spinels, almandine garnets and rubellite which very much resemble and are difficult to distinguish with the gemologist loupe. From our measurements, due to their different crystal structures and compositions, can be clearly distinguished by the IL and PIXE techniques. The results show that the PIXE spectra consist of a few dominant lines of the host matrix elements of each gemstone and some weaker lines due to trace elements of transition metals. PIXE can easily differentiate rubies from other stones by evaluating their chemical compositions. It is noticed that synthetic rubies generally contain fewer impurities, lower iron and higher chromium than the natural ones. Moreover, the IL spectrum of ruby is unique and different from those of others stones. The typical spectrum of ruby is centered at 694 nm, with small sidebands that can be ascribed to a Cr 3+ emission spectrum which is dominated by an R-line at the extreme red end of the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although the spectrum of synthetic ruby is centered at the same wavelength, the peak is stronger due to higher concentration of Cr and lower concentration of Fe than for natural rubies. For spinel, the IL spectrum shows strong deformation where the R-line is split due to the presence of MgO. For rubellite, the peak center is shifted to 692 nm which might be caused by the replacement of Mn 3+ at the Al 3+ site of the host structure. It is noticed that almandine garnet is not luminescent due to the

  3. Ion beam analysis of rubies and their simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncomma, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Tippawan, U.

    2014-07-01

    Ion beam analysis (IBA) is a set of well known powerful analytical techniques which use energetic particle beam as a probe. Among them, two techniques are suitable for gemological analysis, i.e., Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) and Ionoluminescence (IL). We combine these two techniques for the investigations of rubies and their simulants. The main objective is to find a reference fingerprint of these gemstones. The data are collected from several natural rubies, synthetic rubies, red spinels, almandine garnets and rubellite which very much resemble and are difficult to distinguish with the gemologist loupe. From our measurements, due to their different crystal structures and compositions, can be clearly distinguished by the IL and PIXE techniques. The results show that the PIXE spectra consist of a few dominant lines of the host matrix elements of each gemstone and some weaker lines due to trace elements of transition metals. PIXE can easily differentiate rubies from other stones by evaluating their chemical compositions. It is noticed that synthetic rubies generally contain fewer impurities, lower iron and higher chromium than the natural ones. Moreover, the IL spectrum of ruby is unique and different from those of others stones. The typical spectrum of ruby is centered at 694 nm, with small sidebands that can be ascribed to a Cr3+ emission spectrum which is dominated by an R-line at the extreme red end of the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although the spectrum of synthetic ruby is centered at the same wavelength, the peak is stronger due to higher concentration of Cr and lower concentration of Fe than for natural rubies. For spinel, the IL spectrum shows strong deformation where the R-line is split due to the presence of MgO. For rubellite, the peak center is shifted to 692 nm which might be caused by the replacement of Mn3+ at the Al3+ site of the host structure. It is noticed that almandine garnet is not luminescent due to the

  4. Study of the photo and cathodoluminescent properties of the rubi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez S, E.; Garcia H, M.; Ramos B, F.; Alvarez F, O.; Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.; Falcony G, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this work are presented the results of the study of the photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of the rubi analysing its use in radiation dosimetry. The rubi presented a centered emission spectra in 697 nm when this was excited with UV at a wavelength 364 nm. X-ray analysis show a rhombohedric structure. While the analysis performed by EDS was obtained the composition (O= 63.13, Al= 36.75 and Cr= 0.12) weight percent, the cathodoluminescent spectra presented three peaks at 555, 600 and 630 nm, being the peak or maximum emission the 600 nm. The results showed the rubi is a promissory material for the radiations dosimetry. (Author)

  5. Bistable polarization switching in a continuous wave ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Afzal, R. Sohrab

    1988-01-01

    Bistability in the output power, polarization state, and mode volume of an argon-ion laser pumped single mode ruby laser at 6943 A has been observed. The laser operates in a radially confined mode which exhibits hysteresis and bistability only when the pump polarization is parallel to the c-axis.

  6. A multicenter evaluation of the Abbott RealTime HCV genotype II assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ciotti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral genotype is an important determinant of the therapeutical outcome of the chronic hepatitis C and is useful in clinical practice to determine the duration of treatment1.While the viral type shows a clear association with therapeutic success, there is currently no evidence to that effect for HCV subtype, whose value is thus confined to epidemiological studies.The Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay, through the use of Minor Groove Binder probes (MGB is able to distinguish genotypes 1 to 6 (target 5’-UTR region and subtypes 1a and 1b (NS5B region. In four different Italian centers a comparison between the Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay and the Versant HCV Genotype 2.0 (LIPA has been performed.A total of 143 non selected samples with the request of HCV genotyping have been analysed. 141/143 samples (98.6% have provided reportable results with both tests (2 indeterminates with LIPA. Concordance at the type level was 96.5% (136/141. Considering the 136 concordant samples, the distribution was as follows: type 1 = 61 (44.9%, 2 = 36 (26.5%, 3 = 21 (15.4%, 4 = 17 (12.5% 5 = 1 (0.7%. Both assays assigned subtype in 56/61 (91.8% samples of genotype 1 (3 and 2 samples only provided the type for LIPA and Abbott, respectively and 50/56 (89.3% had concordant subtype. It is worth to note that 4 of the 5 samples with discordant subtype Abbott 1a/LiPA 1b came from the only center that used for LIPA the 5-UTR amplicon, loosing the benefit of the core region which has been introduced in the version 2 of the test to improve the accuracy in distinguishing between 1a and 1b.There was only one discordant sample at type level (Abbott 4, LIPA 1b which after sequencing and phylogenetic analysis was resolved as type 4. Four mixed infections were detected, 3 with the Abbott test (two 1a+4 and one 1b+3 and 1 with the LIPA test (1a+3. In all cases the comparison test showed a single genotype 1 infection. The new Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay showed a

  7. 78 FR 54487 - Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic-Hematology; Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...; Diagnostic--Hematology; Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower Service Group and ATR International... February 22, 2013, applicable to workers of Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostic--Hematology division, including... firm. The workers were engaged in activities related to the production of hematology reagents and...

  8. The Labour Process of Teaching at John Abbott College (Part One).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Walter

    This survey was conducted at John Abbott College to gauge teachers' responses to issues concerning their job satisfaction, interaction with colleagues, perceptions of student abilities, and perceptions concerning union negotiating priorities and areas of conflict within the institutional environment. Of the 75 teachers contacted, 47 returned…

  9. Origin of the different color of ruby and emerald

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lastra, J. M.; Barriuso, M. T.; Aramburu, J. A.; Moreno, M.

    2005-09-01

    The different color exhibited by ruby and emerald is a fundamental but still unsolved question. According to recent EXAFS measurements, such a difference can hardly be explained on the basis of a different average distance between Cr3+ and the six oxygen ligands. The puzzling difference in color between the two gemstones is shown in this work to arise essentially from the distinct electrostatic potential imposed by the rest of lattice ions upon the active electrons of the CrO69- unit. Main effects are shown to come from the electric field generated in the neighborhood of the Cr3+ site in ruby which is absent in the case of emerald due to symmetry.

  10. [Agrobacterium rubi strains from blueberry plants are highly diverse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamovich, Eliana; López, Ana C; Alippi, Adriana M

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of a collection of Agrobacterium rubi strains isolated from blueberries from different regions of Argentina was studied by conventional microbiological tests and molecular techniques. Results from biochemical and physiological reactions, as well as from rep-PCR and RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified 23S rDNA showed high phenotypic and genotypic intraspecific variation. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenzig, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    The following chapter describes a PCR method for the identification of the raspberry root rot pathogen Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi. Furthermore, a nested PCR suitable for the detection of the pathogen in infected raspberry roots and validated against the "Duncan bait test" (EPPO Bull 35:87-91, 2005) is explained. Protocols for different DNA extraction methods are given which can be transferred to other fungal pathogens.

  12. Methods for detection of Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi on raspberry

    OpenAIRE

    Koprivica Mirjana; Dulić-Marković Ivana; Jevtić Radivoje; Cooke Dave E.L.

    2009-01-01

    Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi (Wilcox and Duncan), a causal agent of raspberry root rot, is a serious soil-borne pathogen listed by EPPO as an A2 quarantine pest. Root samples were collected from badly diseased raspberry plants showing a variety of characteristic and often dramatic symptoms during surveys carried out in western Serbia in 2002. Identification of the causal agent was performed in collaboration work with the Scottish Crop Research Institute (S.C.R.I.), Dundee, UK. Necrotic ...

  13. Gene flow analysis demonstrates that Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi constitutes a distinct species, Phytophthora rubi comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man in 't Veld, Willem A

    2007-01-01

    Isozyme analysis and cytochrome oxidase sequences were used to examine whether differentiation of P. fragariae var. fragariae and P. fragariae var. rubi at the variety level is justified. In isozyme studies six strains of both P. fragariae varieties were analyzed with malate dehydrogenase (MDH), glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), aconitase (ACO), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD), comprising altogether seven putative loci. Five unique alleles (Mdh-1(A), Mdh-2(B), Gpi(A), Aco(B) and Idh-1(B)) were found in strains of P. fragariae var. fragariae, whereas five unique alleles (Mdh-1(B), Mdh-2(A), Gpi(B), Aco(A) and Idh-1(A)) were present in strains of P. fragariae var. rubi. It was inferred from these data that there is no gene flow between the two P. fragariae varieties. Cytochrome oxidase I (Cox I) sequences showed consistent differences at 15 positions between strains of Fragaria and Rubus respectively. Based on isozyme data, cytochrome oxidase I sequences, and previously published differences in restyriction enzyme patterns of mitochondrial DNA, sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial genes, AFLP patterns and pathogenicity, it was concluded that both specific pathogenic varieties of P. fragariae are reproductively isolated and constitute a distinct species. Consequently strains isolated from Rubus idaeus are assigned to Phytophthora rubi comb. nov.

  14. Ruby laser for treatment of tattoos: technical considerations affecting clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Robert E.

    1990-06-01

    Recent clinical research on the use of ruby lasers for the treatment of tattoos and FIlk approval of a commercial system have renewed interest in this device. In this paper the principles of Q-switched ruby laser operation are reviewed, and potential sources of error in the estimation of delivered fluence are discussed.

  15. Methods for Detection of Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi on Raspberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Koprivica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi (Wilcox & Duncan, a causal agent of raspberry root rot, is a serious soil-borne pathogen listed by EPPO as an A2 quarantine pest. Root samples were collected from badly diseased raspberry plants showing a variety of characteristic and often dramatic symptoms during surveys carried out in western Serbia in 2002. Identification of the causal agent was performed in collaboration work with the Scottish Crop Research Institute (S.C.R.I., Dundee, UK. Necrotic roots were plated on selective French bean agar (incorporating ampicilin, ryfamicin, bavistin and hymexasol. Detection of isolates was based on cultural and morphological features compared with referent cultures. DNA was extracted directly from the sampled roots using extraction buffer (200 mM Tris- HCl pH 8.5, 250 mM NaCl, 25 mM EDTA, 0.5% SDS, purified by multi spin separation columns [Thistle Scientific (Axygen] or in 24:1 mixture of chlorophorm- iso-amyl alcohol and amplified by nested PCR (ITS4 and DC6 for first round, DC1and DC5 for second round. Diluted DNA extracts were also amplified by conventional PCR with modified ”universal” Phytophthora primers (ITS 6, ITS 7 and ITS 8, Cooke et al., 2000 and digested with Msp1. Digestion patterns of the universal primers PCR product from infected roots matched those of Scottish strains. P. fragariae var. rubi occured on 8 out of 14 sites. Our results indicate that nested PCR (ITS4 and DC6 for first round, DC1 and DC5 for second round or digestion of the ”universal” Phytophthora primers PCR product for detection of P. fragariae var. rubi are more sensitive and less time-consuming and therefore recommended for use.

  16. Performance evaluation of the Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II for hepatitis C virus genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Yong-Hak; Ko, Sun-Young; Kim, Myeong Hee; Oh, Heung-Bum

    2010-04-01

    The Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus (HCV) Genotype II (Abbott Molecular Inc.) for HCV genotyping, which uses real-time PCR technology, has recently been developed. Accuracy and sensitivity of detection were assessed using the HCV RNA PHW202 performance panel (SeraCare Life Sciences). Consistency with restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP) data, cross-reactivity with other viruses, and the ability to detect minor strains in mixtures of genotypes 1 and 2 were evaluated using clinical samples. All performance panel viruses were correctly genotyped at levels of >500 IU/mL. Results were 100% concordant with RFMP genotypic data (66/66). However, 5% (3/66) of the samples examined displayed probable genotypic cross reactivity. No cross reactivity with other viruses was evident. Minor strains in the mixtures were not effectively distinguished, even at quantities higher than the detection limit. The Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay was very accurate and yielded results consistent with RFMP data. Although the assay has the advantages of automation and short turnaround time, we suggest that further improvements are necessary before it is used routinely in clinical practice. Efforts are needed to decrease cross reactivity among genotypes and to improve the ability to detect minor genotypes in mixed infections.

  17. RubyMotion iOS develoment essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Nalwaya, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    This is a step-by-step book that builds on your knowledge by adding to an example app over the course of each chapter. Each topic uses example code that can be compiled and tested to show how things work practically instead of just telling you the theory. Complicated tasks are broken down into easy to follow steps with clear explanations of what each line of code is doing.Whether you are a novice to iOS development or looking for a simpler alternative to Objective-C; with RubyMotion iOS Development Essentials, you will become a pro at writing great iOS apps

  18. O universo humanizado de Murilo Rubião

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Verônica Nogueira

    2008-01-01

    Sabe-se que o Modernismo inicia em 1922, com a Semana de Arte Moderna. A partir desse movimento, a literatura brasileira é constituída, ao longo dos anos, por uma série de correntes ecléticas: geração de 45, concretismo, poesia marginal, regionalismo, nouveau roman, entre outros. É nesta atmosfera contemporânea que surge no âmbito ficcional o escritor mineiro Murilo Rubião. Sua obra intimista parte de uma literatura fantástica humanizada para representar a angústia do homem moderno diante dos...

  19. Influence of modified atmosphere packaging on 'Star Ruby' grapefruit phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Priyanka R; Jayaprakasha, G K; Porat, Ron; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2015-01-28

    Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) can extend the shelf life of salads, vegetables, and fruits by generating a storage environment with low O2, high CO2, and high humidity. The current study investigates the effect of modified atmosphere and humidity generated by two plastic films, microperforated bags (MIPBs) and macroperforated bags (MAPBs), on the levels of phytochemicals present in 'Star Ruby' grapefruits (Citrus paradisi, Macf.) stored for 16 weeks at 10 °C. Control fruits were stored without any packaging film. Juice samples were analyzed every 4 weeks for ascorbic acid, carotenoids, limonoids, flavonoids, and furocoumarins and assessed for quality parameters. MAP significantly reduced weight loss compared to control grapefruits. Control fruits had more β-carotene, lycopene, and furocoumarin compared with the fruits in MAP. Flavonoid content was highest in fruits stored in MAPB (P 0.05). The MAP treatments did not significantly affect ascorbic acid, limonoids, or fruit quality parameters, including total soluble solids, acidity, ripening ratio, decay and disorders, fruit taste, and off-flavors after 16 weeks of storage. These results suggest that MAP can be used to maintain the quality of 'Star Ruby' grapefruit with no detrimental effect on health-promoting phytochemicals.

  20. BioC implementations in Go, Perl, Python and Ruby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanli; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Kwon, Dongseop; Marques, Hernani; Rinaldi, Fabio; Wilbur, W John; Comeau, Donald C

    2014-01-01

    As part of a communitywide effort for evaluating text mining and information extraction systems applied to the biomedical domain, BioC is focused on the goal of interoperability, currently a major barrier to wide-scale adoption of text mining tools. BioC is a simple XML format, specified by DTD, for exchanging data for biomedical natural language processing. With initial implementations in C++ and Java, BioC provides libraries of code for reading and writing BioC text documents and annotations. We extend BioC to Perl, Python, Go and Ruby. We used SWIG to extend the C++ implementation for Perl and one Python implementation. A second Python implementation and the Ruby implementation use native data structures and libraries. BioC is also implemented in the Google language Go. BioC modules are functional in all of these languages, which can facilitate text mining tasks. BioC implementations are freely available through the BioC site: http://bioc.sourceforge.net. Database URL: http://bioc.sourceforge.net/ Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Optical and structural characterization of pulsed laser deposited ruby thin films for temperature sensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Satchi [Laser and Photonics Lab, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Khare, Alika, E-mail: alika@iitg.ernet.in [Laser and Photonics Lab, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epitaxial ruby thin film is deposited on sapphire substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PL spectra for R lines show highly crystalline stress free film with FWHM of 11.4 cm{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PLD ruby thin film can be used as photonics based temperature sensor. - Abstract: The ruby thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique in an atmosphere of oxygen using ruby pellet, indigenously prepared by mixing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in appropriate proportion. The characteristics R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines at 694.2 nm and 692.7 nm in the photoluminescence spectra of target pellet as well as that of PLD thin films, confirmed the ruby phase in both. The XRD and Raman spectra confirmed deposition of c-axis oriented crystalline ruby thin film on sapphire substrate. Effect of deposition time, substrate and deposition temperature on PLD grown thin films of ruby are reported. The intensity of R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines of PLD ruby thin films increased enormously after annealing the film at 1000 Degree-Sign C for 2 h. The film deposited on sapphire substrate for 2 h was 260 nm thick and the corresponding deposition rate was 2.16 nm/min. This film was subjected to temperature dependent photoluminescence studies. The peak positions of R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines and corresponding line width of PLD ruby thin film were observed to be blue shifted with decrease in temperature. R{sub 1} line position sensitivity, d{nu}{sup Macron }/dT, cm{sup -1}/K in the range 138-368 K was very well fitted to linear fit and hence can be used as temperature sensor in this range.

  2. Clinical utility of Abbott Precision Xceed Pro® ketone meter in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hoi-Ying Elsie; Agus, Michael; Kellogg, Mark D

    2011-11-01

    Diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) often rely on the measurement of urine ketones along with blood glucose, anion gap, and pH. These values, however, do not reliably reflect the severity of ketoacidosis. The Abbott Precision Xceed Pro® meter is an FDA-approved device that quantitatively measures β-hydroxybutyrate (BOH) in whole blood. This study was undertaken to determine whether the ketone meter meets the analytical criteria to aid DKA diagnosis and management in the hospital. 54 heparinized venous whole blood BOH concentrations from 27 diabetic patients were measured by the Abbott meter, and compared with the plasma BOH concentrations measured with Stanbio reagent (reference method). Measurements were done in the hospital central laboratory. Of the 54 pairs of specimens analyzed, 17 pairs displayed a difference of >15% between the two methods. Nearly all discrepant points occurred when BOH >5 mmol/L (reference method). Linearity evaluation revealed that the meter is not linear from 0.0 to 8.0 mmol/L, contrary to the claim by the manufacturer. Further, we identified acetoacetate, a metabolite commonly present in DKA patients, as a potential interfering substance for the meter BOH measurement. BOH measurements by the Abbott meter up to 3 mmol/L correlate well with the reference method, but become discrepant above that point. While this characteristic may be useful in the diagnosis of DKA, it may not allow clinicians to serially follow the response to therapy in hospitalized DKA patients with BOH values greater than 5 mmol/L (reference method). © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Interaction of ruby laser with carbon fibrous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stašić Jelena M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibrous materials are interesting because of their good properties and numerous possible applications. The characteristics of these materials can be programmed by careful selection of the modification process parameters. The laser technique can be successfully employed for these purposes. The high temperatures arising in the material during a short laser pulse can cause a number of changes in the material. Carbon fibrous materials with different textile shapes, during different stages of processing, were exposed to laser radiation. A ruby laser (X=694.3 nm was used to modify the material. The structural changes were examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was established that the radiation of this laser induces structural changes leading to a better arrangement of the turbostratic carbon fiber structure.

  4. Ruby laser in prevention of post-traumatic retinal separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenov, S.N.

    1984-04-01

    An analysis was conducted of the therapeutic effectiveness in management of post-traumatic retinal detachment, employing a group of 28 subjects (28 eyes) with penetrating wounds of the eyeball. The patients ranged in age from 10 to 46 years, with duration of ocular damage ranging from several days to 1.5 years. Light coagulation was effected with ruby laser OK-2 (0.05-0.1 J). Following treatment, most patients were without serious complications, but in 4 cases preretinal point hemorrhages were observed. In 20 patients, visual function remained unchanged, while in 8 cases visual acuity improved by 0.02-0.4 units. Only one case of retinal detachment (due to hemophthalmus) occurred in 22 cases followed for 6 months to 3 years. On the basis of this study, it appears that laser coagulation can be an effective means of preventing post-traumatic retinal separation. 9 references.

  5. Visuaalantropoloogia - inimlik mõõde asjade maailmas / Jay Ruby ; interv. Peeter Linnap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruby, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Ameerika visuaalkultuuri teoreetik Jay Ruby on paari viimase aastakümne jooksul keskendunud pildilise kommunikatsiooni etnograafilisele käsitlemisele Ameerika maaühiskonnas. Peeter Linnapi intervjuu Jay Rubyga Tartu Kõrgemas Kunstikoolis 23. V

  6. Rapid middle Miocene extension and unroofing of the southern Ruby Mountains, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Howard, Keith A.; Fleck, Robert J.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    Paleozoic rocks in the northern Ruby Mountains were metamorphosed during Mesozoic crustal shortening and Cenozoic magmatism, but equivalent strata in the southern Ruby Mountains were never buried deeper than stratigraphic depths prior to exhumation in the footwall of a west dipping brittle normal fault. In the southern Ruby Mountains, Miocene sedimentary rocks in the hanging wall of this fault date from 15.2 to 11.6 Ma and contain abundant detritus from the Paleozoic section. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He samples of the Eocene Harrison Pass pluton record rapid cooling that peaked ca. 17–15 Ma, while apatite fission track data from Jurassic plutons east and west of the southern Ruby Mountains indicate near-surface temperatures (period of rapid extension (ca. 17–15 to 12–10 Ma) documented widely across the northern Basin and Range Province.

  7. 75 FR 66779 - Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Elko and White Pine Counties, NV; Comprehensive Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... emanating from the base of the Ruby Mountains provide life-sustaining water to the 39,926-acre refuge. The marsh is surrounded by 22,926 acres of meadows, grasslands, alkali playa, and shrub-steppe uplands...

  8. Evaluation of procalcitonin assay on the Abbott Architect i2000 SR® analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mouatani, Ahmed; Rotaru, Irina; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Hennequin, Carole

    2018-04-05

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is a useful biomarker for the diagnosis of bacterial infection. Its measurement is used routinely as a valuable tool for antibiotic treatment decision. The aim of this study is to assess the analytical performance of the new Architect Brahms PCT® reagents on the Abbott Architect i2000-SR® immuno-analyzer. The Architect PCT® assay was evaluated according to the modified SFBC protocol, in accordance with the NF EN ISO 15189 standard. Sixty two samples from patients hospitalized in Necker Hospital (Paris) have been tested with the evaluated method, and results were compared to those of the PCT Kryptor Brahms® method. Analytical performances tested complied with those announced by the manufacturer. Linear regression showed a strong correlation between the two methods (r >0.99), despite a tendency for overestimation by the new method (y=1.10 x +0.05). Bland-Altman plots confirmed this strong correlation by showing only two points outside the acceptable limits without clinical incidence, given the high PCT concentrations (over 10 ng/mL) in those samples. In conclusion, the new PCT assay on the Abbott Architect i2000-SR® shows excellent analytical performances, even at low concentrations. A slight positive bias compared to the Brahms Kryptor® was observed, but did not lead to inappropriate clinical decisions.

  9. Simply rails 2 the ultimate beginner's guide to Ruby on rails

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Want to learn all about Ruby on Rails 2.0, the web application framework that is inspiring developers around the world? The second edition of this practical, hands on book will: show you how to install Ruby on Rails on Windows, Mac, or Linux walk you, step by step, through the development of a Web 2.0 social news application, just like digg.com show you how to test, debug, benchmark, and deploy your Rails application Unlike other Rails books, this book doesn't assume that you are an experienced web developer, or that you've used Ruby before. An entire chapter is devoted to learning Ruby in a fun way, using the interactive Ruby console, so you can follow along at home. You'll be an accomplished Ruby programmer in no time! The example application that the book builds - a user-generated news web site - is built upon with each following chapter, and concepts such as sessions, cookies and basic AJAX usage are gradually introduced. Different aspects of Rails, such as user authentication, session cookies, and automa...

  10. Multicenter evaluation of the new Abbott RealTime assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutten, M.; Peters, D.; Back, N. K. T.; Beld, M.; Beuselinck, K.; Foulongne, V.; Geretti, A.-M.; Pandiani, L.; Tiemann, C.; Niesters, H. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    The analytical performances of the new Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral load assays were compared at nine laboratories with different competitor assays. These included the Abbott LcX, Bayer Versant bDNA, Roche COBAS Amplicor, and Roche COBAS

  11. Multicenter evaluation of the new Abbott RealTime assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutten, Martin; Peters, D; Back, N K T; Beld, M; Beuselinck, K; Foulongne, V; Geretti, A-M; Pandiani, L; Tiemann, C; Niesters, H G M

    The analytical performances of the new Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral load assays were compared at nine laboratories with different competitor assays. These included the Abbott LcX, Bayer Versant bDNA, Roche COBAS Amplicor, and Roche COBAS

  12. Effect of fusion mixture treatment on the surface of low grade natural ruby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Pradhan, K.C.; Nayak, B.B.; Dash, Tapan; Sahu, R.K.; Mishra, B.K.

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The colour of low grade natural ruby is enhanced with fusion mixture treatment. Comparative optical absorption and photoluminesence properties of both untreated and treated ruby samples are studied. - Highlights: • Colour of the low grade natural ruby is improved with fusion mixture treatment. • Surface impurities are removed with fusion mixture. • Photoluminescence spectrum of ruby influenced by its Cr 3+ concentration. • X-ray diffraction study confirms the presence of corundum phases in ruby samples. • Treated ruby looks brighter than untreated ruby due to variation in Cr 3+ concentration. - Abstract: Improvement in aesthetic look of low grade natural ruby (gemstone) surface was clearly evident after fusion mixture treatment. Surface impurities of the gemstone were significantly reduced to give it a face lift. The processing consists of heat treatment (1000 °C) of the raw gemstone with fusion mixture (sodium and potassium carbonates), followed by hydrochloric acid digestion (90 °C) and ultrasonic cleaning.Both the untreated and the treated gemstone were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance),photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The paper consolidates the results of these studies and presents the effect of the typical chemical treatment (stated above) on the low grade natural ruby. While X-ray diffraction study identifies the occurrence of alumina phase in both the treated and the untreated gemstones, the UV–vis spectra exhibit strong characteristic absorption of Cr 3+ at 400 and 550 nm wavelength for the treated gemstone in contrast to weak absorption observed for the untreated gemstone at such wavelengths, thus showing the beneficial effect of fusion mixture treatment. Peaks observed for the gemstone (for both treated and untreated samples) in the excitation spectra of photoluminescence show a good correlation with observed UV–vis (diffuse reflectance) spectra

  13. Effect of fusion mixture treatment on the surface of low grade natural ruby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakthivel, R., E-mail: velsak_r@yahoo.com; Pradhan, K.C.; Nayak, B.B.; Dash, Tapan; Sahu, R.K.; Mishra, B.K.

    2017-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The colour of low grade natural ruby is enhanced with fusion mixture treatment. Comparative optical absorption and photoluminesence properties of both untreated and treated ruby samples are studied. - Highlights: • Colour of the low grade natural ruby is improved with fusion mixture treatment. • Surface impurities are removed with fusion mixture. • Photoluminescence spectrum of ruby influenced by its Cr{sup 3+} concentration. • X-ray diffraction study confirms the presence of corundum phases in ruby samples. • Treated ruby looks brighter than untreated ruby due to variation in Cr{sup 3+} concentration. - Abstract: Improvement in aesthetic look of low grade natural ruby (gemstone) surface was clearly evident after fusion mixture treatment. Surface impurities of the gemstone were significantly reduced to give it a face lift. The processing consists of heat treatment (1000 °C) of the raw gemstone with fusion mixture (sodium and potassium carbonates), followed by hydrochloric acid digestion (90 °C) and ultrasonic cleaning.Both the untreated and the treated gemstone were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance),photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The paper consolidates the results of these studies and presents the effect of the typical chemical treatment (stated above) on the low grade natural ruby. While X-ray diffraction study identifies the occurrence of alumina phase in both the treated and the untreated gemstones, the UV–vis spectra exhibit strong characteristic absorption of Cr{sup 3+}at 400 and 550 nm wavelength for the treated gemstone in contrast to weak absorption observed for the untreated gemstone at such wavelengths, thus showing the beneficial effect of fusion mixture treatment. Peaks observed for the gemstone (for both treated and untreated samples) in the excitation spectra of photoluminescence show a good correlation with observed UV–vis (diffuse reflectance

  14. Comparison of the Abbott Realtime HIV-1 and HCV viral load assays with commercial competitor assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutten, Martin

    2008-07-01

    The introduction of commercially available quantitative HIV-1 RNA detection methods at the end of the last century has had a significant impact on the management of patients requiring treatment. Similarly for hepatitis C virus (HCV), clinical decision-making with respect to initiation and prolonging therapy is largely based on data from viral load assays. The methods developed in the early 1990s and further improved since then still have significant drawbacks. For example, they are labor intensive, have a small dynamic range and are contamination sensitive. The development of real-time detection techniques for reverse transcription PCR has in part solved these problems. In the present review the advantages and disadvantages of the recently marketed Abbott Realtime HCV and HIV-1 viral load assays relative to their competitors will be discussed.

  15. Evaluating lubricating capacity of vegetal oils using Abbott-Firestone curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, C.; Cristea, G. C.; Dima, C.; Deleanu, L.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the change of functional parameters defined on the Abbott-Firestone curve in order to evaluate the surface quality of the balls from the four ball tester, after tests done with several vegetable oils. The tests were done using two grades of rapeseed oil (degummed and refined) and two grades of soybean oil (coarse and degummed) and a common transmission oil (T90). Test parameters were 200 N and 0.576 m/s (1500 rpm) for 60 minutes. For the refined rapeseed oil, the changes in shape of the Abbott-Firestone curves are more dramatic, these being characterized by high values of Spk (the average value for the wear scars on the three balls), thus being 40% of the sum Svk + Sk + Spk, percentage also obtained for the soybean oil, but the value Spk being lower. For the degummed soybean oil, the profile height of the wear scars are taller than those obtained after testing the coarse soybean oil, meaning that the degumming process has a negative influence on the worn surface quality and the lubricating capacity of this oil. Comparing the surface quality of the wear scars on fixed tested balls is a reliable method to point out the lubricant properties of the vegetable oils, especially if they are compared to a “classical” lubricant as a non-additivated transmission mineral oil T90. The best surface after testing was obtained for the soybean oil, followed by T90 oil and the degummed grades of the soybean oil and rapeseed oil (these three giving very close values for the functional parameters), but the refined rapeseed oil generated the poorest quality of the wear scars on the balls, under the same testing conditions.

  16. Bistable direction switching in an off-axis pumped continuous wave ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, R. Sohrab; Lawandy, N. M.

    1988-01-01

    A report is presented of the observation of hysteretic bistable direction switching in a single-mode CW ruby laser system. This effect is only observed when the pump beam which is focused into the ruby rod is misaligned with respect to the rod end faces. At low pump powers, the ruby lases in a mode nearly collinear with the pump axis. At a higher pump power the ruby switches to a mode that is collinear with the rod end faces and preserves the original polarization. The effect is large enough to switch the beam by an angle equal to twice the diffraction angle. The observations show that under steady-state pumping, a CW ruby laser can exhibit bistable operation in its output direction and power. A calculation using the heat equation with two concentric cylinders with one as a heat source (pump laser) and the outer wall of the other held at 77 K, gives an increase in core temperature of about 0.01 K. Therefore, the increase in temperature is not large enough to change the index of refraction to account for such large macroscopic effects.

  17. Evaluation of the Abbott realtime HCV genotype II RUO (GT II) assay with reference to 5'UTR, core and NS5B sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Melanie A; Lucic, Danijela X; Sears, Mitchell T; Cloherty, Gavin A; Hillyard, David R

    2014-05-01

    HCV genotyping is a critical tool for guiding initiation of therapy and selecting the most appropriate treatment regimen. To evaluate the concordance between the Abbott GT II assay and genotyping by sequencing subregions of the HCV 5'UTR, core and NS5B. The Abbott assay was used to genotype 127 routine patient specimens and 35 patient specimens with unusual subtypes and mixed infection. Abbott results were compared to genotyping by 5'UTR, core and NS5B sequencing. Sequences were genotyped using the NCBI non-redundant database and the online genotyping tool COMET. Among routine specimens, core/NS5B sequencing identified 93 genotype 1s, 13 genotype 2s, 15 genotype 3s, three genotype 4s, two genotype 6s and one recombinant specimen. Genotype calls by 5'UTR, core, NS5B sequencing and the Abbott assay were 97.6% concordant. Core/NS5B sequencing identified two discrepant samples as genotype 6 (subtypes 6l and 6u) while Abbott and 5'UTR sequencing identified these samples as genotype 1 with no subtype. The Abbott assay subtyped 91.4% of genotype 1 specimens. Among the 35 rare specimens, the Abbott assay inaccurately genotyped 3k, 6e, 6o, 6q and one genotype 4 variant; gave indeterminate results for 3g, 3h, 4r, 6m, 6n, and 6q specimens; and agreed with core/NS5B sequencing for mixed specimens. The Abbott assay is an automated HCV genotyping method with improved accuracy over 5'UTR sequencing. Samples identified by the Abbott assay as genotype 1 with no subtype may be rare subtypes of other genotypes and thus require confirmation by another method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mr.CAS-A minimalistic (pure) Ruby CAS for fast prototyping and code generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, Matteo

    There are Computer Algebra System (CAS) systems on the market with complete solutions for manipulation of analytical models. But exporting a model that implements specific algorithms on specific platforms, for target languages or for particular numerical library, is often a rigid procedure that requires manual post-processing. This work presents a Ruby library that exposes core CAS capabilities, i.e. simplification, substitution, evaluation, etc. The library aims at programmers that need to rapidly prototype and generate numerical code for different target languages, while keeping separated mathematical expression from the code generation rules, where best practices for numerical conditioning are implemented. The library is written in pure Ruby language and is compatible with most Ruby interpreters.

  19. Mr.CAS—A minimalistic (pure Ruby CAS for fast prototyping and code generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Ragni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are Computer Algebra System (CAS systems on the market with complete solutions for manipulation of analytical models. But exporting a model that implements specific algorithms on specific platforms, for target languages or for particular numerical library, is often a rigid procedure that requires manual post-processing. This work presents a Ruby library that exposes core CAS capabilities, i.e. simplification, substitution, evaluation, etc. The library aims at programmers that need to rapidly prototype and generate numerical code for different target languages, while keeping separated mathematical expression from the code generation rules, where best practices for numerical conditioning are implemented. The library is written in pure Ruby language and is compatible with most Ruby interpreters.

  20. A Ruby API to query the Ensembl database for genomic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, Francesco; Aerts, Jan

    2011-04-01

    The Ensembl database makes genomic features available via its Genome Browser. It is also possible to access the underlying data through a Perl API for advanced querying. We have developed a full-featured Ruby API to the Ensembl databases, providing the same functionality as the Perl interface with additional features. A single Ruby API is used to access different releases of the Ensembl databases and is also able to query multi-species databases. Most functionality of the API is provided using the ActiveRecord pattern. The library depends on introspection to make it release independent. The API is available through the Rubygem system and can be installed with the command gem install ruby-ensembl-api.

  1. Dotyophycus pacificum I. A. Abbott (Liagoraceae, Rhodophyta a new record for the Atlantic Ocean Dotyophycus pacificum Abbott (Liagoraceae, Rhodophyta nova referência para o oceano Atlântico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos de Castro Nunes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of Dotyophycus pacificum I. A. Abbott were found during a survey of Rhodophyta on the coast of Bahia state. The samples were taken from 23-36 meters depth and the specimens found were studied in detail and compared to other morphologically similar species. This is the first time that the genus Dotyophycus is cited for the Atlantic Ocean.Durante estudo sobre as rodofíceas do litoral do estado da Bahia foram encontrados exemplares de Dotyophycus pacificum Abbott em coletas realizadas a 23-36 metros de profundidade. Os espécimes foram estudados detalhadamente e comparados a espécies morfologicamente semelhantes. Esta é a primeira ocorrência de D. pacificum para o oceano Atlântico.

  2. Growth of ruby crystals by the heat exchanger method, phase 1: NSF small business innovation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1980-03-01

    Conditions for the growth of large, uniformly doped laser crystals by the heat exchanger method are explored. Determination of the melt point, selection of crucible material and establishment of furnace operating parameters are discussed. The melt point of ruby was found to be 2040 plus or minus 10 C. Molybdenum crucibles can be used to contain ruby in vacuum as well as under argon atmospheres at desired superheat temperatures over extended periods required for crystal growth. Thermodynamic analysis was conducted and vapor pressures of volatile species calculated. Experimentally, volatilization of chromium oxides was suppressed by using welded covers on crucibles and operating under an argon pressure in the furnace.

  3. WE-DE-201-10: Pitfalls When Using Ruby as An Inorganic Scintillator Detector for Ir-192 Brachytherapy Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertzscher, G; Beddar, S [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the promising potential of inorganic scintillator detectors (ISDs) and investigate various unwanted luminescence properties which may compromise their accuracy. Methods: The ISDs were comprised of a ruby crystal coupled to a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) fiber-optic cable and a charged coupled device camera. A new type of ISD was manufactured and included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The purpose of the filter was to suppress the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light induced in the PMMA (the stem signal) from striking the ruby crystal, generating unwanted ruby excitation. A variety of experiments were performed to characterize the ruby based ISDs. The relative contribution of the induced ruby signal and the stem signal were quantified while exposing the detector and a bare fiber-optic cable to a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) source, respectively. The unwanted ruby excitation was quantified while irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and a comparison to other commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). Results: When the BT source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted ruby excitation amounted to >5% of the total signal if the source-distance from the scintillator was >7 cm. However, the unwanted excitation was suppressed to <1% if the ISD incorporated an optic filter. The stem signal was suppressed with a 20 nm band-pass filter and was <3% as long as the source-distance was <7 cm. The ruby based ISDs generated signal up to 20(40) times that of BCF-12(BCF-60). Conclusion: The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby based ISDs for HDR BT. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the scintillator volume and the fiber-optic cable to prevent the stem signal to excite the ruby crystal.

  4. Hemangioma rubi no couro cabeludo Cherry hemangioma in the scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Pereira

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available O hemangioma rubi (HR é dermatose de origem vascular extremamente freqüente, acometendo mais de 75% da população acima de 70 anos de idade. Em geral compõe-se de lesões múltiplas,localizadas predominantemente no alto do tronco e braços. Clinicamente é caracterizado por lesões que variam desde máculas puntiformes até lesões papulosas com cinco milímetros de diâmetro. As mais novas são vermelhas, em tons vivos, e as mais antigas podem ser azuladas. O HR é de etiologia desconhecida. Histologicamente chama atenção uma neoformação de vasos capilares, que se tornam dilatados e com fenestrações em suas paredes. A membrana basal está muito espessada e existe abundante estroma de colágeno entre os vasos. O presente trabalho demonstra a alta incidência do HR no couro cabeludo Em amostra de 171 pacientes, sendo 85 homens e 86 mulheres, o autor observou que 123 deles (72% tinham HR no couro cabeludo, localização em que o HR nunca foi descrito na literatura.Cherry hemangioma (CH is an extremely frequent dermatosis with vascular origin involving more than 75% of the population over 70 years of age. Normally they are multiplex spots and focus predominantly on the upper trunk and arms. Clinically they are characterized by pinpoint maculae and papules with up to 5 millimeters in diameter. The most recent lesions can be a strong red color while the older ones are bluish. The etiology of CH is still unknown. From the histologic standpoint, the neoformation of the capillary tube draws attention: they are very dilated and with fenestration along the wall. The basement membranes are thickened and there is abundant collagen stroma between the veins. This work demonstrates the high frequency of CH in the scalp. In a sample of 171 patients (85 men and 86 women the author noted that 123 (72% had CH in the scalp. However, according to the literature, CH in the scalp has never been described.

  5. Premios Academia Nacional de Medicina deColombia – LABORATORIOS ABBOTT 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Jácome Roca

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    La Academia Nacional de Medicina con la colaboración de Laboratorios Abbott otorgó en noviembre de 2011 la quinta versión del Premio a las Ciencias Médicas, uno en las áreas de ciencias médicas y experimentales y otro en el área de ciencias clínicas. Presentamos aquí algunas notas sobre los trabajos ganadores y los que obtuvieron menciones honoríficas

    El Premio en el área de las Ciencias Básicas lo obtuvieron Carlos Vélez Pardo y Marlene Jiménez del Río, profesores del Grupo de Neurociencias de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Antioquia en Medellín. El trabajo ganador se tituló: “MECANISMOS MOLECULARES DE PÉRDIDA NEURONAL Y DE CITOPROTECCIÓN EN MODE-LOS IN VITRO E IN VIVO DE LA ENFERMEDAD DE ALZHEIMER Y PARKINSON” [1,2].

  6. Analytical and Clinical Performance Evaluation of the Abbott Architect PIVKA Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Dae-Hyun; Hyun, Jungwon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Min-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Seok; Park, Ji-Young; Shin, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hyoun Chan

    2018-01-01

    Protein induced by vitamin K absence (PIVKA) is measured using various assays and is used to help diagnose hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of the recently released Abbott Architect PIVKA assay. Precision, linearity, and correlation tests were performed in accordance with the Clinical Laboratory Standardization Institute guidelines. Sample type suitability was assessed using serum and plasma samples from the same patients, and the reference interval was established using sera from 204 healthy individuals. The assay had coefficients of variation of 3.2-3.5% and intra-laboratory variation of 3.6-5.5%. Linearity was confirmed across the entire measurable range. The Architect PIVKA assay was comparable to the Lumipulse PIVKA assay, and the plasma and serum samples provided similar results. The lower reference limit was 13.0 mAU/mL and the upper reference limit was 37.4 mAU/mL. The ability of the Architect PIVKA assay to detect hepatocellular carcinoma was comparable to that of the alpha-fetoprotein test and the Lumipulse PIVKA assay. The Architect PIVKA assay provides excellent analytical and clinical performance, is simple for clinical laboratories to adopt, and has improved sample type suitability that could broaden the assay's utility. © 2018 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  7. Peddling Poverty for Profit: Elements of Oppression in Ruby Payne's Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Paul C.

    2008-01-01

    Ruby Payne, CEO of aha! Process, Inc., and author of "A Framework for Understanding Poverty" (2005), has become one of the most influential figures in the U.S. public education milieu. Payne's framework, built largely upon understanding the "culture" of poverty, instructs educators on the values and mindsets poor students carry into the classroom…

  8. Treatment of an amalgam tattoo with the Q-switched ruby laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashinoff, R; Tanenbaum, D

    1994-10-01

    The amalgam tattoo is an asymptomatic, ill-defined pigmented macule or patch on the gingiva, buccal mucosa, or mucobuccal fold. It can be cosmetically disfiguring if present on the anterior gingiva. The only reported treatments have involved extensive surgery and grafting. We report use of the Q-switched ruby laser to remove a gingival amalgam tattoo.

  9. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Ruby Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Field and laboratory data are presented for 693 water samples from the Ruby Quadrangle, Alaska. The samples were collected by Los Alamos National Laboratory; laboratory analysis and data reporting were performed by the Uranium Resource Evaluation Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  10. Photodissociation of H2+ by a ruby laser with ion energy analysis of ejected H+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozenne, J.B.; Pham, D.; Tadjeddine, M.; Durup, J.

    1974-01-01

    The kinetic energy released in the photodissociation of H 2 + by a ruby laser beam has been measured. The spectrum of the dissociation kinetic energy of H + +H shows several vibrational levels, and after deconvolution due to the energetic and angular resolution of the apparatus, gives a population of those vibrational levels, close to theoretical population [fr

  11. Whole Genome Sequences of the Raspberry and Strawberry Pathogens Phytophthora rubi and P. fragariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabima, Javier F; Kronmiller, Brent A; Press, Caroline M; Tyler, Brett M; Zasada, Inga A; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2017-10-01

    Phytophthora rubi and P. fragariae are two closely related oomycete plant pathogens that exhibit strong morphological and physiological similarities but are specialized to infect different hosts of economic importance, namely, raspberry and strawberry. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of these two Phytophthora species as a first step toward understanding the genomic processes underlying plant host adaptation in these pathogens.

  12. Fluorescent cooling of objects exposed to sunlight – The ruby example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdahl, Paul; Chen, Sharon S.; Destaillats, Hugo; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Levinson, Ronnen M.; Zalich, Michael A.

    2016-06-04

    Various pigments are used to formulate desirable non-white colors that stay cooler in the sun than alternatives, which is particularly useful for hot climate areas. These cool pigments provide a high near-infrared (NIR) reflectance in the solar infrared range of 700-2500 nm, and also a color specified by a reflectance spectrum in the 400-700 nm visible range. Still cooler materials can be formulated by also utilizing the phenomenon of fluorescence (photoluminescence). Ruby, Al2O3 :Cr, is a prime example, with efficient emission in the deep red (~694 nm) and near infrared (700-800 nm). A layer of synthetic ruby crystals on a white surface having an attractive red color can remain cooler in the sun than conventional red materials. Ruby particles can also be used as a red/pink pigment. Increasing the Cr:Al ratio produces a stronger (darker) pigment but doping above ~3 wt% Cr2O3 causes concentration quenching of the fluorescence. The system quantum efficiency for lightly doped ruby-pigmented coatings over white is high, 0.83 ± 0.10.

  13. A Low-Cost Time-Resolved Spectrometer for the Study of Ruby Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBane, George C.; Cannella, Christian; Schaertel, Stephanie

    2018-01-01

    A low-cost time-resolved emission spectrometer optimized for ruby emission is presented. The use of a Class II diode laser module as the excitation source reduces costs and hazards. The design presented here can facilitate the inclusion of time-resolved emission spectroscopy with laser excitation sources in the undergraduate laboratory curriculum.…

  14. Whole genome sequences of the raspberry and strawberry pathogens Phytophthora rubi and P. fragariae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora rubi and P. fragariae are two closely related oomycete plant pathogens that exhibit strong morphological and physiological similarities, but are specialized to infect different hosts of economic importance, namely raspberry and strawberry. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of t...

  15. Populations of Phytophthora rubi Show Little Differentiation and High Rates of Migration Among States in the Western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabima, Javier F; Coffey, Michael D; Zazada, Inga A; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2018-04-11

    Population genetics is a powerful tool to understand patterns and evolutionary processes that are involved in plant-pathogen emergence and adaptation to agricultural ecosystems. We are interested in studying the population dynamics of Phytophthora rubi, the causal agent of Phytophthora root rot in raspberry. P. rubi is found in the western United States, where most of the fresh and processed raspberries are produced. We used genotyping-by-sequencing to characterize genetic diversity in populations of P. rubi sampled in the United States and other countries. Our results confirm that P. rubi is a monophyletic species with complete lineage sorting from its sister taxon P. fragariae. Overall, populations of P. rubi show low genetic diversity across the western United States. Demographic analyses suggest that populations of P. rubi from the western United States are the source of pathogen migration to Europe. We found no evidence for population differentiation at a global or regional (western United States) level. Finally, our results provide evidence of migration from California and Oregon into Washington. This report provides new insights into the evolution and structure of global and western United States populations of the raspberry pathogen P. rubi, indicating that human activity might be involved in moving the pathogen among regions and fields.

  16. Efficient Development of Web Application for Remote Participation using Ruby on Rails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, M.; Yoshida, M.; Iwata, C.; Nakanishi, H.; Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Toki (Japan); Inagaki, S. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Large experiments such as ITER need international collaboration, and remote participation plays an important role to carry out such a large scale experiment. When scientists use their personal computer to participate in experiments remotely, web based applications become useful tools. Because the applications are downloaded every time they access to the web servers, they don't have to install extra software. Also, the developers do not need to distribute the latest program files when they are modified. This feature is important for remote participation to reduce maintenance costs. Therefore, the authors have been developing web based applications for LHD experiment in NIFS. In the previous presentation [1], we showed the usefulness of Ruby on Rails to develop web based application for analysis code. Because the author thought this approach is also useful to develop applications for the remote participation, we have been developing several web based applications to participate in the LHD experiments using Ruby on Rails, such as data viewers and scheduler of experiments. The main reason to adopt Ruby on Rails for this purpose is its great efficiency for developing web applications. For example, in order to develop data viewer, the authors used an existing program run on X-Window System. Using Ruby on Rails, the authors could minimize the modifications of the examining program to add web interfaces. In this presentation, the authors will show the several web-based applications for LHD experiment using Ruby on Rails, and discuss its usefulness to develop remote participation tools. [1] M. Emoto, S. Murakami, M. Yoshida, H. Funaba and Y. Nagayama. Web interface for plasma analysis codes., Fus. Eng. Des. 83 pp.453-457(2008). (authors)

  17. Academia Nacional de Médicina-Abbott 2008. Rotavirus, efectos adversos evitables y otras investigaciones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Jácome Roca

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    La Academia Nacional de Medicina con la colaboración de Laboratorios Abbott otorgó en noviembre de
    2008 la segunda versión del Premio a las Ciencias Médicas, uno en las áreas de Ciencias Médicas y
    experimentales y otro en el área de Ciencias Clínicas.
     
    Presentamos aqui algunas notas sobre los trabajos ganadores y los que obtuvieron menciones honoríficas. 

    El Premio en el área de las Ciencias Básicas lo obtuvieron profesores de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia en Bogotá, pertenecientes al Laboratorio de Biología Molecular de Virus de la Facultad de Medicina y al Departamento de Química de la Facultad de Ciencias. Se trata de los investigadores Carlos Arturo Guerrero Fonseca, Martha Calderón, Orlando Acosta y Fanny Guzmán.

    El trabajo se titula "Interferencia de la infección por rotavirus mediante la inhibición de la actividad de
    la proteína disulfuro isomerasa (PDI de la membrana celular de las líneas MA 104 y Caen-2".

  18. Key Performance Indicators to Measure Improvement After Implementation of Total Laboratory Automation Abbott Accelerator a3600.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miler, Marijana; Nikolac Gabaj, Nora; Dukic, Lora; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2017-12-27

    The aim of the study was to estimate improvement of work efficiency in the laboratory after implementation of total laboratory automation (TLA) by Abbott Accelerator a3600 in the laboratory with measuring different key performance indicators (KPIs) before and after TLA implementation. The objective was also to recommend steps for defining KPIs in other laboratories. For evaluation of improvement 10 organizational and/or technical KPIs were defined for all phases of laboratory work and measured before (November 2013) and after (from 2015 to 2017) TLA implementation. Out of 10 defined KPIs, 9 were successfully measured and significantly improved. Waiting time for registration of samples in the LIS was significantly reduced from 16 (9-28) to 9 (6-16) minutes after TLA (P performed at core biochemistry analyzers which significantly reduced walking distance for sample management (for more than 800 m per worker) and number of tube touches (for almost 50%). Analyzers downtime and engagement time for analyzers maintenance was reduced for 50 h and 28 h per month, respectively. TLA eliminated manual dilution of samples with extreme results with sigma values increment from 3.4 to >6 after TLA. Although median turnaround time TAT for potassium and troponin was higher (for approximately 20 min), number of outliers with TAT >60 min expressed as sigma values were satisfying (>3). Implementation of the TLA improved the most of the processes in our laboratory with 9 out of 10 properly defined and measured KPIs. With proper planning and defining of KPIs, every laboratory could measure changes in daily workflow.

  19. Impact of inter-genotypic recombination and probe cross-reactivity on the performance of the Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay for hepatitis C genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Yip, Cyril C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; To, Kelvin K W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2018-01-11

    The Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay (Abbott-RT-HCV assay) is a real-time PCR based genotyping method for hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study measured the impact of inter-genotypic recombination and probe cross-reactivity on the performance of the Abbott-RT-HCV assay. 517 samples were genotyped using the Abbott-RT-HCV assay over a one-year period, 34 (6.6%) were identified as HCV genotype 1 without further subtype designation raising the possibility of inaccurate genotyping. These samples were subjected to confirmatory sequencing. 27 of these 34 (79%) samples were genotype 1b while five (15%) were genotype 6. One HCV isolate was an inter-genotypic 1a/4o recombinant. This is a novel natural HCV recombinant that has never been reported. Inter-genotypic recombination and probe cross-reactivity can affect the accuracy of the Abbott-RT-HCV assay, both of which have significant implications on antiviral regimen choice. Confirmatory sequencing of ambiguous results is crucial for accurate genotyping. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. O absurdo da existência nos contos de Murilo Rubião

    OpenAIRE

    Sardas, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Muitos contos do escritor mineiro Murilo Rubião (1916-1991) trazem ações e situações entendidas, no geral, como absurdas que, analisadas de forma mais detida, são representações do sentimento de estranhamento do homem diante do mundo e do esvaziamento de sentido da experiência moderna. São narrativas que levam a crítica especializada a associar o fantástico típico do autor à adjetivação ou categoria do absurdo. Mas, o que caracteriza e para onde aponta o universo absurdo criado por Rubião? Es...

  1. Advances in Trace Element “Fingerprinting” of Gem Corundum, Ruby and Sapphire, Mogok Area, Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lin Sutherland

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mogok gem corundum samples from twelve localities were analyzed for trace element signatures (LA-ICP-MS method and oxygen isotope values (δ18O, by laser fluorination. The study augmented earlier findings on Mogok gem suites that suggested the Mogok tract forms a high vanadium gem corundum area and also identified rare alluvial ruby and sapphire grains characterised by unusually high silicon, calcium and gallium, presence of noticeable boron, tin and niobium and very low iron, titanium and magnesium contents. Oxygen isotope values (δ18O for the ruby and high Si-Ca-Ga corundum (20‰–25‰ and for sapphire (10‰–20‰ indicate typical crustal values, with values >20‰ being typical of carbonate genesis. The high Si-Ca-Ga ruby has high chromium (up to 3.2 wt % Cr and gallium (up to 0. 08 wt % Ga compared to most Mogok ruby (<2 wt % Cr; <0.02 wt % Ga. In trace element ratio plots the Si-Ca-Ga-rich corundum falls into separate fields from the typical Mogok metamorphic fields. The high Ga/Mg ratios (46–521 lie well within the magmatic range (>6, and with other features suggest a potential skarn-like, carbonate-related genesis with a high degree of magmatic fluid input The overall trace element results widen the range of different signatures identified within Mogok gem corundum suites and indicate complex genesis. The expanded geochemical platform, related to a variety of metamorphic, metasomatic and magmatic sources, now provides a wider base for geographic typing of Mogok gem corundum suites. It allows more detailed comparisons with suites from other deposits and will assist identification of Mogok gem corundum sources used in jewelry.

  2. Stress waves generated in thin metallic films by a Q-switched ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation results on stress waves generated by Q-switched ruby laser irradiated thin metal films under confinement, studied over a wide range of film materials and film thicknesses, are reviewed. The results indicate that the dependence on these parameters is much weaker than is predicted by heat transfer estimations commonly used to describe the interaction of laser irradiation with unconfined bulk-solid surfaces.

  3. Development of real-time radiation exposure dosimetry system using synthetic ruby for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Win, Thet Pe; Muroi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kenki; Takahashi, Kaito; Usui, Akihito; Saito, Haruo; Kozakai, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IVR) tends to involve long procedures, consequently delivering high radiation doses to the patient. Radiation-induced injuries that occur because of the effect of the high radiation doses are a considerable problem for those performing IVR. For example, skin injuries can include skin erythema if the skin is exposed to radiation doses beyond the threshold level of 2 Gy. One of the reasons for this type of injury is that the local skin dose cannot be monitored in real time. Although there are systems employed to measure the exposure dose, some do not work in real time (such as thermoluminescence dosimeters and fluorescent glass dosimeters), while certain real-time measurement systems that enter the field of view (such as patient skin dosimeters and dosimeters using a nontoxic phosphor) interfere with IVR. However, synthetic ruby has been shown to emit light in response to radiation. The luminous wavelength is 693 nm. It is possible to monitor the radiation dose by detecting the emitted light. However, small synthetic rubies emit a tiny amount of light that is difficult to detect using common systems such as photodiodes. A large enough synthetic ruby to increase the quantity of emitted light would however enter the field of view and interfere with the IVR procedure. Additionally, although a photodiode system could reduce the system size, the data is susceptible to effects from the X-rays and outside temperature. Therefore, use of a sensitive photon counting system as used in nuclear medicine could potentially have a beneficial effect in detecting the weak light signal. A real-time radiation exposure dosimetry system for use in IVR should be sufficiently sensitive, not interfere with the IVR procedure, and ideally have the possibility of development into a system that can provide simultaneous multipoint measurements. This article discusses the development of a realtime radiation exposure dosimetry system for use in IVR that employs a small

  4. Under the Radar: The First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Goss, W.

    2012-05-01

    Under the Radar, the First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott W. Miller Goss, NRAO Socorro NM Ruby Payne-Scott (1912-1981) was an eminent Australian scientist who made major contributions to the WWII radar effort (CSIR) from 1941 to 1945. In late 1945, she pioneered radio astronomy efforts at Dover Heights in Sydney, Australia at a beautiful cliff top overlooking the Tasman Sea. Again at Dover Heights, Payne-Scott carried out the first interferometry in radio astronomy using an Australian Army radar antenna as a radio telescope at sun-rise, 26 January 1946. She continued these ground breaking activities until 1951. Ruby Payne-Scott played a major role in discovering and elucidating the properties of Type III bursts from the sun, the most common of the five classes of transient phenomena from the solar corona. These bursts are one of the most intensively studied forms of radio emission in all of astronomy. She is also one of the inventors of aperture synthesis in radio astronomy. I examine her career at the University of Sydney and her conflicts with the CSIR hierarchy concerning the rights of women in the work place, specifically equal wages and the lack of permanent status for married women. I also explore her membership in the Communist Party of Australia as well as her partially released Australian Scientific Intelligence Organization file. Payne-Scott’s role as a major participant in the flourishing radio astronomy research of the post war era remains a remarkable story. She had a number of strong collaborations with the pioneers of early radio astronomy in Australia: Pawsey, Mills, Christiansen, Bolton and Little. I am currently working on a popular version of the Payne-Scott story; “Making Waves, The Story of Ruby Payne-Scott: Australian Pioneer Radio Astronomer” will be published in 2013 by Springer in the Astronomers’ Universe Series.

  5. Stability-activity tradeoffs constrain the adaptive evolution of RubisCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Romain A; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Williams, Mark A; Orengo, Christine A

    2014-02-11

    A well-known case of evolutionary adaptation is that of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO), the enzyme responsible for fixation of CO2 during photosynthesis. Although the majority of plants use the ancestral C3 photosynthetic pathway, many flowering plants have evolved a derived pathway named C4 photosynthesis. The latter concentrates CO2, and C4 RubisCOs consequently have lower specificity for, and faster turnover of, CO2. The C4 forms result from convergent evolution in multiple clades, with substitutions at a small number of sites under positive selection. To understand the physical constraints on these evolutionary changes, we reconstructed in silico ancestral sequences and 3D structures of RubisCO from a large group of related C3 and C4 species. We were able to precisely track their past evolutionary trajectories, identify mutations on each branch of the phylogeny, and evaluate their stability effect. We show that RubisCO evolution has been constrained by stability-activity tradeoffs similar in character to those previously identified in laboratory-based experiments. The C4 properties require a subset of several ancestral destabilizing mutations, which from their location in the structure are inferred to mainly be involved in enhancing conformational flexibility of the open-closed transition in the catalytic cycle. These mutations are near, but not in, the active site or at intersubunit interfaces. The C3 to C4 transition is preceded by a sustained period in which stability of the enzyme is increased, creating the capacity to accept the functionally necessary destabilizing mutations, and is immediately followed by compensatory mutations that restore global stability.

  6. Electron beam physical vapor deposition of thin ruby films for remote temperature sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Greg Walker, D.; Valentine, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors (TGPs) possessing temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties have a wide range of uses in thermometry due to their remote access and large temperature sensitivity range. However, in most cases, phosphors are synthesized in powder form, which prevents their use in high resolution micro and nanoscale thermal microscopy. In the present study, we investigate the use of electron beam physical vapor deposition to fabricate thin films of chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Cr-Al 2 O 3 , ruby) thermographic phosphors. Although as-deposited films were amorphous and exhibited weak photoluminescence, the films regained the stoichiometry and α-Al 2 O 3 crystal structure of the combustion synthesized source powder after thermal annealing. As a consequence, the annealed films exhibit both strong photoluminescence and a temperature-dependent lifetime that decreases from 2.9 ms at 298 K to 2.1 ms at 370 K. Ruby films were also deposited on multiple substrates. To ensure a continuous film with smooth surface morphology and strong photoluminescence, we use a sapphire substrate, which is thermal expansion coefficient and lattice matched to the film. These thin ruby films can potentially be used as remote temperature sensors for probing the local temperatures of micro and nanoscale structures.

  7. Aplicação de ethephon e qualidade da uva 'Rubi' em Porto Feliz-SP Ethephon on 'Rubi' grapevine quality in Porto Feliz, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Rodrigues

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A produção de uvas de mesa é uma importante atividade econômica no Estado de São Paulo. A região de Porto Feliz, em clima Cwa, apresenta grande número de agricultores familiares dedicados a esta atividade. Condições climáticas e manejo da cultura durante a fase de amadurecimento determinam a qualidade dos bagos, sendo o uso de fitorreguladores uma ferramenta útil para o ajustamento de atributos da qualidade. Avaliaram-se sete concentrações de ethephon, aplicadas por imersão dos cachos no início da mudança de coloração dos bagos, sobre a qualidade de uva 'Rubi', durante os ciclos de 2007 e de 2008, em propriedade comercial localizada em Porto Feliz-SP. Os atributos de qualidade avaliados foram a coloração de bagos, teor de sólidos solúveis totais e desbagoamento pós-colheita, sendo determinado também o índice de velocidade de desbagoamento. Os dados coletados foram submetidos à análise de variância e de regressão. Em 2007, observaram-se maiores coloração e teor de sólidos solúveis totais, associados às maiores temperaturas registradas no período entre o início de maturação e a colheita. O uso de ethephon, independentemente da concentração utilizada, promoveu coloração mais avermelhada dos bagos de 'Rubi' nas duas safras. Não houve efeito do uso do ethephon sobre o teor de sólidos solúveis totais. Não foi possível inferir sobre o efeito do etephon no desbagoamento em função do elevado coeficiente de variação. Estudos básicos para avaliar o efeito de fatores climáticos, nutricionais e de manejo do vinhedo são necessários no desenvolvimento de coloração dos bagos da cultivar 'Rubi' em clima tropical.Grapevine production for fresh market is an important economic activity in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The region of Porto Feliz is located in Cwa climate and concentrates several small producers. Climatic conditions and cultural practices during fruit maturation determine berry quality, and

  8. Hook effect in Abbott i-STAT β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) point of care assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgen, Urs; Pretorius, Carel J; Gous, Rehna S; Martin, Cameron; Hale, Vincent J; Ungerer, Jacobus P J

    2014-09-01

    Point-of-care testing for β-hCG has been widely advocated to allow rapid diagnosis/exclusion of pregnancy in the emergency department. A quantitative blood β-hCG assay has the additional benefit of being able to monitor the viability of pregnancy, using serial measurements, to determine the appropriate expected increase in β-hCG levels over time (e.g. ectopic pregnancy), and aiding in determining if an intrauterine gestational sac should be visible on sonographic imaging. Evaluation of the newly released Abbott i-STAT β-hCG point-of-care assay with the Beckman Coulter β-hCG laboratory assay in use. Whole blood, plasma and serum samples with a wide range of β-hCG concentrations were analysed by both methods. The Abbott I-STAT β-hCG compares favourably, can be performed on heparinised whole blood, plasma and serum, and shows acceptable accuracy and precision. However a hook effect at elevated β-hCG was shown in gestational trophoblastic disease as well as normal pregnancies. The i-STAT β-hCG performs acceptably in its intended use in the early detection of pregnancy, but results should always be interpreted within the clinical context, as a hook effect may occur. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pigmented guinea pig skin irradiated with Q-switched ruby laser pulses. Morphologic and histologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, J.S.; Margolis, R.J.; Polla, L.L.; Watanabe, S.; Hruza, G.J.; Parrish, J.A.; Anderson, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Q-switched ruby laser pulses cause selective damage to cutaneous pigmented cells. Repair of this selective damage has not been well described. Therefore, using epilated pigmented and albino guinea pig skin, we studied the acute injury and tissue repair caused by 40-ns, Q-switched ruby laser pulses. Gross observation and light and electron microscopy were performed. No specific changes were evident in the albino guinea pigs. In pigmented animals, with radiant exposures of 0.4 J/cm2 or greater, white spots confined to the 2.5-mm exposure sites developed immediately and faded over 20 minutes. Delayed depigmentation occurred at seven to ten days, followed by full repigmentation by four to eight weeks. Regrowing hairs in sites irradiated at and above 0.4 J/cm2 remained white for at least four months. Histologically, vacuolation of pigment-laden cells was seen immediately in the epidermis and the follicular epithelium at exposures of 0.3 J/cm2 and greater. Melanosomal disruption was seen immediately by electron microscopy at and above 0.3 J/cm2. Over the next seven days, epidermal necrosis was followed by regeneration of a depigmented epidermis. By four months, melanosomes and melanin pigmentation had returned; however, hair follicles remained depigmented and devoid of melanocytes. This study demonstrates that selective melanosomal disruption caused by Q-switched ruby laser pulses leads to transient cutaneous depigmentation and persistent follicular depigmentation. Potential exists for selective treatment of pigmented epidermal and dermal lesions with this modality.

  10. Effect of fusion mixture treatment on the surface of low grade natural ruby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, R.; Pradhan, K. C.; Nayak, B. B.; Dash, Tapan; Sahu, R. K.; Mishra, B. K.

    2017-05-01

    Improvement in aesthetic look of low grade natural ruby (gemstone) surface was clearly evident after fusion mixture treatment. Surface impurities of the gemstone were significantly reduced to give it a face lift. The processing consists of heat treatment (1000 °C) of the raw gemstone with fusion mixture (sodium and potassium carbonates), followed by hydrochloric acid digestion (90 °C) and ultrasonic cleaning.Both the untreated and the treated gemstone were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance),photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The paper consolidates the results of these studies and presents the effect of the typical chemical treatment (stated above) on the low grade natural ruby. While X-ray diffraction study identifies the occurrence of alumina phase in both the treated and the untreated gemstones, the UV-vis spectra exhibit strong characteristic absorption of Cr3+at 400 and 550 nm wavelength for the treated gemstone in contrast to weak absorption observed for the untreated gemstone at such wavelengths, thus showing the beneficial effect of fusion mixture treatment. Peaks observed for the gemstone (for both treated and untreated samples) in the excitation spectra of photoluminescence show a good correlation with observed UV-vis (diffuse reflectance) spectra. Photoluminescence emission spectra of the untreated gemstone show characteristic emission at 695 nm for Cr3+ ion (as in alumina matrix), but its emission intensity significantly reduces after fusion mixture treatment. It is found that the surface of the fusion mixture treated ruby gemstone looks much brighter than the corresponding untreated surface.

  11. HCV-RNA quantification in liver bioptic samples and extrahepatic compartments, using the abbott RealTime HCV assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, FrancescoPaolo; Cento, Valeria; Sorbo, Maria Chiara; Manuelli, Matteo Ciancio; Lenci, Ilaria; Sforza, Daniele; Di Carlo, Domenico; Milana, Martina; Manzia, Tommaso Maria; Angelico, Mario; Tisone, Giuseppe; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the performance of a rapid method to quantify HCV-RNA in the hepatic and extrahepatic compartments, by using for the first time the Abbott RealTime HCV-assay. Non-tumoral (NT), tumoral (TT) liver samples, lymph nodes and ascitic fluid from patients undergoing orthotopic-liver-transplantation (N=18) or liver resection (N=4) were used for the HCV-RNA quantification; 5/22 patients were tested after or during direct acting antivirals (DAA) treatment. Total RNA and DNA quantification from tissue-biopsies allowed normalization of HCV-RNA concentrations in IU/μg of total RNA and IU/10 6 liver-cells, respectively. HCV-RNA was successfully quantified with high reliability in liver biopsies, lymph nodes and ascitic fluid samples. Among the 17 untreated patients, a positive and significant HCV-RNA correlation between serum and NT liver-samples was observed (Pearson: rho=0.544, p=0.024). Three DAA-treated patients were HCV-RNA "undetectable" in serum, but still "detectable" in all tested liver-tissues. Differently, only one DAA-treated patient, tested after sustained-virological-response, showed HCV-RNA "undetectability" in liver-tissue. HCV-RNA was successfully quantified with high reliability in liver bioptic samples and extrahepatic compartments, even when HCV-RNA was "undetectable" in serum. Abbott RealTime HCV-assay is a good diagnostic tool for HCV quantification in intra- and extra-hepatic compartments, whenever a bioptic sample is available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Hepatitis C virus genotyping: comparison of the Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay and NS5B sequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghefi, P; Marchadier, E; Dussaix, E; Roque-Afonso, A-M

    2010-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotyping is needed for treatment decision and monitoring. The results of a genotyping assay based on real-time PCR and TaqMan chemistry were compared with the results of NS5B region sequencing. One hundred and two sera (genotypes 1-6) were tested. Amplification and detection of viral RNA were performed with the Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay targeting 5'non-coded region (5'NC) for the identification of genotypes 1 to 6 and NS5B, for 1a and 1b subtypes detection. Sequencing of 5'NC fragment was used to resolve discrepant results. No indeterminate results were obtained. Concordance with NS5B sequencing was 93% (95 on 102), 96% at the genotype level (98 on 102) and 93% for genotype 1 subtyping (40 on 43). Discordant genotyping results were a 2f subtype identified as 5, a 6a typed as 1, a 3a identified as a 1-3 co-infection and a 4r identified as a 1-4 co-infection. Discordant subtyping results were 2 1b subtypes only typed as 1 and a 1e identified as 1a. Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II assay is a rapid, automated and simple to interpret method for HCV genotyping. It allows the detection of possible mixed infections which might have a negative impact on therapeutic response. However, the discrepant results found in this small series underline the need for assay optimization. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystalline Chromium Doped Aluminum Oxide (RUBY) Use as a Luminescent Screen for Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K. A.; Gassner, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    In the search for a better luminescent screen material, the authors tested pieces of mono-crystalline chromium doped aluminum oxide (more commonly known as a ruby) using a 24 GeV proton beam. Due to the large variations in beam intensity and species which are run at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), they hope to find a material which can sufficiently luminesce, is compatible in vacuum, and maintain its performance level over extended use. Results from frame grabbed video camera images using a variety of neutral density filters are presented

  14. Mutation of Rubie, a novel long non-coding RNA located upstream of Bmp4, causes vestibular malformation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A Roberts

    Full Text Available The vestibular apparatus of the vertebrate inner ear uses three fluid-filled semicircular canals to sense angular acceleration of the head. Malformation of these canals disrupts the sense of balance and frequently causes circling behavior in mice. The Epistatic circler (Ecl is a complex mutant derived from wildtype SWR/J and C57L/J mice. Ecl circling has been shown to result from the epistatic interaction of an SWR-derived locus on chromosome 14 and a C57L-derived locus on chromosome 4, but the causative genes have not been previously identified.We developed a mouse chromosome substitution strain (CSS-14 that carries an SWR/J chromosome 14 on a C57BL/10J genetic background and, like Ecl, exhibits circling behavior due to lateral semicircular canal malformation. We utilized CSS-14 to identify the chromosome 14 Ecl gene by positional cloning. Our candidate interval is located upstream of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4 and contains an inner ear-specific, long non-coding RNA that we have designated Rubie (RNA upstream of Bmp4 expressed in inner ear. Rubie is spliced and polyadenylated, and is expressed in developing semicircular canals. However, we discovered that the SWR/J allele of Rubie is disrupted by an intronic endogenous retrovirus that causes aberrant splicing and premature polyadenylation of the transcript. Rubie lies in the conserved gene desert upstream of Bmp4, within a region previously shown to be important for inner ear expression of Bmp4. We found that the expression patterns of Bmp4 and Rubie are nearly identical in developing inner ears.Based on these results and previous studies showing that Bmp4 is essential for proper vestibular development, we propose that Rubie is the gene mutated in Ecl mice, that it is involved in regulating inner ear expression of Bmp4, and that aberrant Bmp4 expression contributes to the Ecl phenotype.

  15. O Fantástico e a Alegoria em 'A cidade' de Murilo Rubião

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Larissa Müller de

    2012-01-01

    Metadados do Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso: O Fantástico e a Alegoria em 'A cidade' de Murilo Rubião, pela discente: Larissa Müller de Faria, sob Orientação de Marilene Weinhardt do curso de Especialização em Literatura Latino-Americana (2011-2012) da Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana (UNILA), no Repositório Institucional da UNILA (RI-UNILA) O Fantástico e a Alegoria em 'A cidade' de Murilo Rubião

  16. The Cascading Impacts of Technology Selection: Incorporating Ruby on Rails into ECHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilone, D.; Cechini, M.

    2010-12-01

    NASA’s Earth Observing System (EOS) ClearingHOuse (ECHO) is a SOA based Earth Science Data search and order system implemented in Java with one significant exception: the web client used by 98% of our users is written in Perl. After several decades of maintenance the Perl based application had reached the end of its serviceable life and ECHO was tasked with implementing a replacement. Despite a broad investment in Java, the ECHO team conducted a survey of modern development technologies including Flex, Python/Django, JSF2/Spring and Ruby on Rails. The team ultimately chose Ruby on Rails (RoR) with Cucumber for testing due to its perceived applicability to web application development and corresponding development efficiency gains. Both positive and negative impacts on the entire ECHO team, including our stakeholders, were immediate and sometimes subtle. The technology selection caused shifts in our architecture and design, development and deployment procedures, requirement definition approach, testing approach, and, somewhat surprisingly, our project team structure and software process. This presentation discusses our experiences, including technical, process, and psychological, using RoR on a production system. During this session we will discuss: - Real impacts of introducing a dynamic language to a Java team - Real and perceived efficiency advantages - Impediments to adoption and effectiveness - Impacts of transition from Test Driven Development to Behavior Driven Development - Leveraging Cucumber to provide fully executable requirement documents - Impacts on team structure and roles

  17. Q-switched ruby laser irradiation of normal human skin. Histologic and ultrastructural findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruza, G J; Dover, J S; Flotte, T J; Goetschkes, M; Watanabe, S; Anderson, R R

    1991-12-01

    The Q-switched ruby laser is used for treatment of tatoos. The effects of Q-switched ruby laser pulses on sun-exposed and sun-protected human skin, as well as senile lentigines, were investigated with clinical observation, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. A pinpricklike sensation occurred at radiant exposures as low as 0.2 J/cm2. Immediate erythema, delayed edema, and immediate whitening occurred with increasing radiant exposure. The threshold for immediate whitening varied inversely with skin pigmentation, ranging from a mean of 1.4 J/cm2 in lentigines to 3.1 J/cm2 in sun-protected skin. Transmission electron microscopy showed immediate alteration of mature melanosomes and nuclei within keratinocytes and melanocytes, but stage I and II melanosomes were unaffected. Histologically, immediate injury was confined to the epidermis. There was minimal inflammatory response 1 day after exposure. After 1 week, subthreshold exposures induced hyperpigmentation, with epidermal hyperplasia and increased melanin staining noted histologically. At higher radiant exposures, hypopigmentation occurred with desquamation of a pigmented scale/crust. All sites returned to normal skin color and texture without scarring within 3 to 6 months. These observations suggest that the human skin response to selective photothermolysis of pigmented cells is similar to that reported in animal models, including low radiant exposure stimulation of melanogenesis and high radiant exposure lethal injury to pigmented epidermal cells.

  18. Melanosomes are a primary target of Q-switched ruby laser irradiation in guinea pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polla, L.L.; Margolis, R.J.; Dover, J.S.; Whitaker, D.; Murphy, G.F.; Jacques, S.L.; Anderson, R.R.

    1987-09-01

    The specific targeting of melanosomes may allow for laser therapy of pigmented cutaneous lesions. The mechanism of selective destruction of pigmented cells by various lasers, however, has not been fully clarified. Black, brown, and albino guinea pigs were exposed to optical pulses at various radiant exposure doses from a Q-switched, 40 nsec, 694 nm ruby laser. Biopsies were analyzed by light and electron microscopy (EM). Albino animals failed to develop clinical or microscopic evidence of cutaneous injury after irradiation. In both black and brown animals, the clinical threshold for gross change was 0.4 J/cm2, which produced an ash-white spot. By light microscopy, alterations appeared at 0.3 J/cm2 and included separation at the dermoepidermal junction, and the formation of vacuolated epidermal cells with a peripheral cytoplasmic condensation of pigment. By EM, enlarged melanosomes with a central lucent zone were observed within affected epidermal cells at 0.3 J/cm2. At 0.8 and 1.2 J/cm2, individual melanosomes were more intensely damaged and disruption of melanosomes deep in the hair papillae was observed. Dermal-epidermal blisters were formed precisely at the lamina lucida, leaving basal cell membranes and hemidesmosomes intact. Possible mechanisms for melanosomal injury are discussed. These observations show that the effects of the Q-switched ruby laser are melanin-specific and melanin-dependent, and may be useful in the selective destruction of pigmented as well as superficial cutaneous lesions.

  19. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Nayak, B.B.; Mishra, B.K. [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Cr and N ion implantation on natural rubies of low aesthetic quality. • Cr-ion implantation improves colour tone from red to deep red (pigeon eye red). • N-ion implantation at fluence of 3 × 10{sup 17} causes blue coloration on surface. • Certain extent of amorphization is observed in the case of N-ion implantation. - Abstract: Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV–Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 10{sup 17} N-ions/cm{sup 2} fluence, formation of colour centres (F{sup +}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 2}{sup +} and F{sub 2}{sup 2+}) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  20. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ≥1 mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5 mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9 mg pigment/cm2 skin.

  1. Infinite projected entangled-pair state algorithm for ruby and triangle-honeycomb lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Saeed S.; Orús, Román; Kargarian, Mehdi; Langari, Abdollah

    2018-03-01

    The infinite projected entangled-pair state (iPEPS) algorithm is one of the most efficient techniques for studying the ground-state properties of two-dimensional quantum lattice Hamiltonians in the thermodynamic limit. Here, we show how the algorithm can be adapted to explore nearest-neighbor local Hamiltonians on the ruby and triangle-honeycomb lattices, using the corner transfer matrix (CTM) renormalization group for 2D tensor network contraction. Additionally, we show how the CTM method can be used to calculate the ground-state fidelity per lattice site and the boundary density operator and entanglement entropy (EE) on an infinite cylinder. As a benchmark, we apply the iPEPS method to the ruby model with anisotropic interactions and explore the ground-state properties of the system. We further extract the phase diagram of the model in different regimes of the couplings by measuring two-point correlators, ground-state fidelity, and EE on an infinite cylinder. Our phase diagram is in agreement with previous studies of the model by exact diagonalization.

  2. Influence of chromium concentration on the optical-electronic properties of ruby microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossolino, L C; Zanatta, A R

    2010-01-01

    Films of amorphous aluminium nitride (AlN) were prepared by conventional radio frequency sputtering of an Al + Cr target in a plasma of pure nitrogen. The Cr-to-Al relative area determines the Cr content, which remained in the ∼0-3.5 at% concentration range in this study. Film deposition was followed by thermal annealing of the samples up to 1050 0 C in an atmosphere of oxygen and by spectroscopic characterization through energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, photoluminescence and optical transmission measurements. According to the experimental results, the optical-electronic properties of the Cr-containing AlN films are highly influenced by both the Cr concentration and the temperature of the thermal treatments. In fact, thermal annealing at 1050 0 C induces the development of structures that, because of their typical size and distinctive spectral characteristics, were designated by ruby microstructures (RbMSs). These RbMSs are surrounded by a N-rich environment in which Cr 3+ ions exhibit luminescent features not present in other Cr 3+ -containing systems such as ruby, emerald or alexandrite. The light emissions shown by the RbMSs and surroundings were investigated according to the Cr concentration and temperature of measurement, allowing the identification of several Cr 3+ -related luminescent lines. The main characteristics of these luminescent lines and corresponding excitation-recombination processes are presented and discussed in view of a detailed spectroscopic analysis.

  3. Murilo Rubião e a geração Suplemento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera lúcia Andrade

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Em 1966, atendendo à solicitação do então governador de Minas Gerais,Israel Pinheiro, quanto à inclusão de uma página de Literaturano jornal oficial Minas Gerais, Murilo Rubião sugere a criação deum suplemento que, apesar do nome literário, incluiria matérias demúsica, artes plásticas e cinema. Estava assim criado o Suplemento Literáriodo Minas Gerais, q ue serviria de instrumento de expressão pa ratoda uma geração de novos escritores e artistas mineiros que passa rama ser conh ecidos como a "Geração Suplemento". O presente texto trataexatamente dessa geração, procurando mostrar como ela se constitu iu,os seus principais componentes c o tipo de produção que realizou, bemcomo intenta caracterizar a importância que o escritor Murilo Rubiãoteve para os jovens dessa época.

  4. Making waves the story of Ruby Payne-Scott : Australian pioneer radio astronomer

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, M

    2013-01-01

    This book is an abbreviated, partly re-written version of "Under the Radar - The First Woman in Radio Astronomy: Ruby Payne-Scott." It addresses a general readership interested in historical and sociological aspects of astronomy and presents the biography of Ruby Payne-Scott (1912 – 1981). As the first female radio astronomer (and one of the first people in the world to consider radio astronomy), she made classic contributions to solar radio physics. She also played a major role in the design of the Australian government's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research radars, which were in turn of vital importance in the Southwest Pacific Theatre in World War II. These radars were used by military personnel from Australia, the United States and New Zealand. From a sociological perspective, her career offers many examples of the perils of being a female academic in the first half of the 20th century. Written in an engaging style and complemented by many historical photographs, this book offers fascinating...

  5. Opening the Museum: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, by Rubie Watson, Occasional Papers, Volume I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Givens

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Rubie Watson, the Williarn and Muriel Howells Director of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, has put together an excellent little volume covering the history of the opening of the Peabody Museum ofArchaeology and Ethnology.

  6. Calcium rubies: a family of red-emitting functionalizable indicators suitable for two-photon Ca2+ imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, Mayeul; Loukou, Christina; Yakovlev, Aleksey V; Wilms, Christian D; Li, Dongdong; Evrard, Alexis; Zamaleeva, Alsu; Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François; Ropert, Nicole; Eilers, Jens; Oheim, Martin; Feltz, Anne; Mallet, Jean-Maurice

    2012-09-12

    We designed Calcium Rubies, a family of functionalizable BAPTA-based red-fluorescent calcium (Ca(2+)) indicators as new tools for biological Ca(2+) imaging. The specificity of this Ca(2+)-indicator family is its side arm, attached on the ethylene glycol bridge that allows coupling the indicator to various groups while leaving open the possibility of aromatic substitutions on the BAPTA core for tuning the Ca(2+)-binding affinity. Using this possibility we now synthesize and characterize three different CaRubies with affinities between 3 and 22 μM. Their long excitation and emission wavelengths (peaks at 586/604 nm) allow their use in otherwise challenging multicolor experiments, e.g., when combining Ca(2+) uncaging or optogenetic stimulation with Ca(2+) imaging in cells expressing fluorescent proteins. We illustrate this capacity by the detection of Ca(2+) transients evoked by blue light in cultured astrocytes expressing CatCh, a light-sensitive Ca(2+)-translocating channelrhodopsin linked to yellow fluorescent protein. Using time-correlated single-photon counting, we measured fluorescence lifetimes for all CaRubies and demonstrate a 10-fold increase in the average lifetime upon Ca(2+) chelation. Since only the fluorescence quantum yield but not the absorbance of the CaRubies is Ca(2+)-dependent, calibrated two-photon fluorescence excitation measurements of absolute Ca(2+) concentrations are feasible.

  7. Andreas Ruby

    OpenAIRE

    De Ferrari,Felipe; Courreges,Kim

    2010-01-01

    Durante 2009 y después de tres años de operación, 0300TV tomó la forma de una editorial independiente dedicada a la arquitectura, que opera con registros audiovisuales, publicaciones, textos críticos, investigaciones, exposiciones y conferencias. Siendo actualmente dirigida por Felipe De Ferrari y Diego Grass, su compromiso con la disciplina los ha llevado a asumir encargos de distinto alcance y escala. Han realizado más de sesenta entrevistas inéditas, concentrándose en arquitectos que parti...

  8. Effect of lubricants and a vaginal spermicide gel on the detection of prostate specific antigen, a biomarker of semen exposure, using a quantitative (Abbott ARCHITECT) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Margaret C; Melendez, Johan H; Kourtis, Athena P; Chaney, Dorothy M; Brown, Teresa M; Black, Carolyn M; Mauck, Christine K; Schwartz, Jill L; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Jamieson, Denise J; Macaluso, Maurizio; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the effects of commonly used lubricants on detection of biomarkers of semen exposure. We investigated the in vitro effect of Gynol®, K-Y Jelly®, Replens®, Astroglide®, Carbopol, and Silicorel on quantitative detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). A predetermined concentration of each of the gels was added to serially diluted semen samples. Additionally, serial dilutions of each of the gels were added to three different semen dilutions (high, medium, or low). The resulting samples were tested for PSA on the Abbott ARCHITECT System. When using the Abbott ARCHITECT system, the only products that inhibited PSA detection were Gynol® and Replens®. The inhibition caused by Gynol® was dose-dependent, but that of Replens was dose-independent. K-Y Jelly®-spiked samples had higher PSA values than controls. Caution is warranted when using the Abbott quantitative assay for PSA detection as a biomarker of semen exposure in settings where Gynol®, Replens® or K-Y Jelly® might also have been used. Neither Astroglide® nor Silicorel inhibited PSA detection. Additional studies evaluating other vaginal products, including microbicides, and their effects on other assays, are needed. In vivo studies will be especially important to optimize PSA detection from clinical samples. Researchers should consider the potential for specific lubricants or any vaginal products to affect the particular assay used for semen biomarker detection. The Abbott ARCHITECT's total PSA assay should not be used with the product Replens. Caution is warranted when using the assay in settings where Gynol or K-Y jelly may have been used. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Enraizamento de estacas caulinares de kiwi (Actinidia chinensis Planch cv Abbott tratadas com auxinas e boro Rooting of kiwi stem cuttings (Actinidia chinensis Planch. cv Abbott treated with auxins and boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Ono

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como finalidade, estudar o efeito de várias auxinas sintéticas em formulações comerciais e do boro, sobre o enraizamento de estacas caulinares de kiwi (Actinidia chinensis Planch, cv Abbott.. As estacas utilizadas continham dois nós e duas folhas cortadas ao meio, com aproximadamente 10 cm de comprimento, onde o corte basal em bisel foi realizado logo abaixo de um nó e o apical acima do outro nó. O efeito das auxinas, sobre o enraizamento de estacas caulinares de kiwi foi verificado mediante os seguintes tratamentos, aplicados sobre as bases das estacas: T1 H(20; T2 (NAA 300 ppm; T3 (IBA 300 ppm; T4 (NAA 300 ppm + B; T5 (IBA 300 ppm + B; T6 (NAA 0,5%-pó e T7 (IBA 0,5%-pó. Após o tratamento das estacas, estas foram plantadas em bandejas de enraizamento, contendo vermiculita pura e colocadas em câmara de nebulização, onde permaneceram por 120 dias, até a sua coleta. Para a avaliação do efeito de auxinas e do ácido bórico, sobre o enraizamento de estacas caulinares de kiwi, foram realizadas as seguintes observações: 1. porcentagem de estacas enraizadas; 2. análise de açúcares redutores e açúcares totais (em g/100 g de matéria seca; 3. análise de triptofano (em µg/100 mg de matéria seca. Os resultados obtidos no processo de enraizamento de estacas caulinares de kiwi (Actinidia chinensis Planch. variedade Abbott, levou a concluir que o inverno e outono foram as melhores épocas de coleta dos ramos de auxinas para a confecção das estacas. O processo de enraizamento foi ainda incrementado com a aplicação exógena na base das estacas, sendo que o alto teor de açúcares redutores e totais beneficiou a maior porcentagem de enraizamento.This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of some synthetical auxins and boron trade formulations in the rooting of stem cuttings of some kiwi (Actinidia chinensis Planch varieties. The experiment was carried out in a misty nebulization chamber in the Botany

  10. Measuring Gambling Reinforcers, Over Consumption and Fallacies: The Psychometric Properties and Predictive Validity of the Jonsson-Abbott Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Jonsson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, gambling and problem gambling research relies on cross-sectional and retrospective designs. This has compromised identification of temporal relationships and causal inference. To overcome these problems a new questionnaire, the Jonsson-Abbott Scale (JAS, was developed and used in a large, prospective, general population study, The Swedish Longitudinal Gambling Study (Swelogs. The JAS has 11 items and seeks to identify early indicators, examine relationships between indicators and assess their capacity to predict future problem progression. The aims of the study were to examine psychometric properties of the JAS (internal consistency and dimensionality and predictive validity with respect to increased gambling risk and problem gambling onset. The results are based on repeated interviews with 3818 participants. The response rate from the initial baseline wave was 74%. The original sample consisted of a random, stratified selection from the Swedish population register aged between 16 and 84. The results indicate an acceptable fit of a three-factor solution in a confirmatory factor analysis with ‘Over consumption,’ ‘Gambling fallacies,’ and ‘Reinforcers’ as factors. Reinforcers, Over consumption and Gambling fallacies were significant predictors of gambling risk potential and Gambling fallacies and Over consumption were significant predictors of problem gambling onset (incident cases at 12 month follow up. When controlled for risk potential measured at baseline, the predictor Over consumption was not significant for gambling risk potential at follow up. For incident cases, Gambling fallacies and Over consumption remained significant when controlled for risk potential. Implications of the results for the development of problem gambling, early detection, prevention, and future research are discussed.

  11. Measuring Gambling Reinforcers, Over Consumption and Fallacies: The Psychometric Properties and Predictive Validity of the Jonsson-Abbott Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Jakob; Abbott, Max W; Sjöberg, Anders; Carlbring, Per

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, gambling and problem gambling research relies on cross-sectional and retrospective designs. This has compromised identification of temporal relationships and causal inference. To overcome these problems a new questionnaire, the Jonsson-Abbott Scale (JAS), was developed and used in a large, prospective, general population study, The Swedish Longitudinal Gambling Study (Swelogs). The JAS has 11 items and seeks to identify early indicators, examine relationships between indicators and assess their capacity to predict future problem progression. The aims of the study were to examine psychometric properties of the JAS (internal consistency and dimensionality) and predictive validity with respect to increased gambling risk and problem gambling onset. The results are based on repeated interviews with 3818 participants. The response rate from the initial baseline wave was 74%. The original sample consisted of a random, stratified selection from the Swedish population register aged between 16 and 84. The results indicate an acceptable fit of a three-factor solution in a confirmatory factor analysis with 'Over consumption,' 'Gambling fallacies,' and 'Reinforcers' as factors. Reinforcers, Over consumption and Gambling fallacies were significant predictors of gambling risk potential and Gambling fallacies and Over consumption were significant predictors of problem gambling onset (incident cases) at 12 month follow up. When controlled for risk potential measured at baseline, the predictor Over consumption was not significant for gambling risk potential at follow up. For incident cases, Gambling fallacies and Over consumption remained significant when controlled for risk potential. Implications of the results for the development of problem gambling, early detection, prevention, and future research are discussed.

  12. A next generation enzymatic magnesium assay on the Abbott ARCHITECT chemistry system meets performance goals based on biological variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, D; Martens, P; Mah, W; Yip, P M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of the Abbott ARCHITECT enzymatic assay for magnesium (3P68) in serum/plasma and urine against analytical goals based on biological variation. Analytical performance was evaluated according to CLSI protocols. Precision was examined using commercial chemistry controls. Accuracy was assessed against NIST SRM 956c, electrolytes in human serum. Correlation with the arsenazo Mg assay (7D70) was completed using patient samples (plasma, N = 101; urine, N = 90). Common interferences were examined in pooled patient specimens with high and low magnesium concentrations. The enzymatic Mg assay displayed imprecision of 1.7% at 0.72 mmol/L and 1.4% at 1.80 mmol/L (20 days, one calibration, one reagent lot). The linear range was verified between 0.18-7.0 mmol/L (plasma) and 0.01-10.69 mmol/L (urine). Results of the enzymatic assay (x) correlated well with the predicate assay (y) with the relationships y = 0.891x + 0.035, R = 0.967 (plasma) and y = 1.181x + 0.086, R = 0.997 (urine). Mean bias of the NIST SRM 956 c samples was -1.4%. This method showed minimal interference by hemoglobin (3g/L as hemolysate), lipemia (20 g/L Intralipid), unconjugated bilirubin (531 μmol/L), and ascorbate (680 μmol/L). The ARCHITECT Magnesium assay 3P68 achieved the desirable analytical quality specification of 4.8% for total allowable error. In comparison to the 7D70 assay, notable improvements are seen in precision, 30-day calibration stability, and minimal interference by hemolyzed and lipemic samples. © 2013.

  13. Abbott RealTime PCR assay is useful for evaluating virological response to antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezaki, Hiroaki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ihara, Takeshi; Hayashi, Takeo; Ogawa, Eiichi; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Taniai, Hiroaki; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Murata, Masayuki; Hayashi, Jun

    2011-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the utility of the Abbott RealTime PCR assay (ART) for the monitoring of chronic hepatitis C patients. The serum samples of 183 patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b who had completed a 48-week period of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) alpha-2b plus ribavirin treatment were prospectively analyzed. Serum HCV RNA levels were measured both by ART and by the Roche COBAS Amplicor Monitor test, version2.0 (CAM) at baseline and at weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 of treatment, and at 24 weeks after the end of treatment (EOT). A significant positive correlation of pretreatment HCV RNA levels was found between ART and CAM (r = 0.595, P HCV RNA level from the pretreatment level determined by ART in SVR patients was significantly higher than that in non-SVR patients at all time points tested. The logarithmic decline determined by CAM in SVR patients was significantly higher than that in non-SVR patients only at week 4, but there was no significant difference at other weeks. Of 124 patients who were HCV RNA-negative at EOT by ART, 58 (46.8%) had a relapse of viremia at 24 weeks after EOT, whereas 77 of 143 patients (53.8%) who were HCV RNA-negative at EOT by CAM had a relapse. The relapse rate was lower when determined by ART than by CAM, but not significantly so. ART is more useful than CAM for evaluating the virological response to antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C.

  14. Laboratory model for the study and treatment of traumatic tattoos with the Q-switched ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Richard T.; Lach, Elliot

    1994-09-01

    The outcome of laser tattoo removal is dependent on the type of laser and characteristics of the tattoo. A rabbit model was developed to study the Q-switched ruby laser in the treatment of traumatic tattooing. On the backs of white New Zealand rabbits, three 3 cm patches were dermabraded and dressed with carbon black and antibiotic ointment. After a healing period of eight weeks, pre-treatment biopsies were obtained, and the rabbits were treated with the Q- switched ruby laser at various fluence settings with a pulse width of 34 nsec. At set intervals, further biopsies were obtained and studied with light and electron microscopic analysis, and photodocumentation was performed. Grossly, clearance of the tattooed areas was noted in the laser treated specimens. More effective clearance was observed with higher fluence treatment. No infections occurred, and hair regrowth was noted in all cases, though the rate seemed to be altered by laser treatment.

  15. A ruby-colored Pseudobaeospora species is described as new from material collected on the island of Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardin, Dennis E; Hemmes, Don E; Perry, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Pseudobaeospora wipapatiae is described as new based on material collected in alien wet habitats on the island of Hawaii. Unique features of this beautiful species include deep ruby-colored basidiomes with two-spored basidia, amyloid cheilocystidia and a hymeniderm pileipellis with abundant pileocystidia that is initially deep ruby in KOH then changes to lilac gray. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear large ribosomal subunit sequence data suggest a close relationship between Pseudobaeospora and Tricholoma. BLAST comparisons of internal transcribed spacer and 5.8S nuclear ribosomal subunit regions sequence data reveal greatest similarity with existing sequences of Pseudobaeospora species. A comprehensive description, color photograph, illustrations of salient micromorphological features and comparisons with phenetically similar taxa are provided. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  16. Effects of Process Parameters on Ultrasonic Micro-Hole Drilling in Glass and Ruby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorderet, Alain; Deghilage, Emmanuel; Agbeviade, Kossi

    2011-05-01

    Brittle materials such as ceramics, glasses and oxide single crystals find increasing applications in advanced micro-engineering products. Machining small features in such materials represents a manufacturing challenge. Ultrasonic drilling constitutes a promising technique for realizing simple micro-holes of high diameter-to-depth ratio. The process involves impacting abrasive particles in suspension in a liquid slurry between tool and work piece. Among the process performance criteria, the drilling time (productivity) is one of the most important quantities to evaluate the suitability of the process for industrial applications. This paper summarizes recent results pertaining to the ultrasonic micro-drilling process obtained with a semi-industrial 3-axis machine. The workpiece is vibrated at 40 kHz frequency with an amplitude of several micrometers. A voice-coil actuator and a control loop based on the drilling force impose the tool feed. In addition, the tool is rotated at a prescribed speed to improve the drilling speed as well as the hole geometry. Typically, a WC wire serves as tool to bore 200 μm diameter micro-holes of 300 to 1,000 μm depth in glass and ruby. The abrasive slurry contains B4C particles of 1 μm to 5 μm diameter in various concentrations. This paper discusses, on the basis of the experimental results, the influence of several parameters on the drilling time. First, the results show that the control strategy based on the drilling force allows to reach higher feed rates (avoiding tool breakage). Typically, a 8 um/s feed rate is achieved with glass and 0.9 μm/s with ruby. Tool rotation, even for values as low as 50 rpm, increases productivity and improves holes geometry. Drilling with 1 μm and 5 μm B4C particles yields similar productivity results. Our future research will focus on using the presented results to develop a model that can serve to optimize the process for different applications.

  17. Determinazione quantitativa di HCV-RNA: valutazione comparativa dei saggi Abbott Real-Time e Versant bDNA v.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Manzin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA measurement before, during and after antiviral therapy has become an essential tool in the management of interferon-based treatment of HCV-related infections. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR has been largely used to obtain quantitative data, but laborious, time-consuming post-PCR handling steps are required to gain valuable results. Real time (RT PCR now provides advantages over end-point (EP PCR due to its improved rapidity, sensitivity, reproducibility and the reduced risk of carry-over contamination, and has now proven itself to be valuable for the more precise monitoring of viral load kinetics and assessing antiviral response.The Abbott Real-Time HCV-RNA is a recently introduced assay for the automated processing of clinical samples and HCV-RNA quantitation: its basic technology relies on use of fluorescent linear probes (dynamic range using 0.5 ml as input target= 12-108 IU/mL and a hybridization/detection step at low temperature (35°C, which allows target mismatches to be tolerated. To determine the clinical application of the Abbott Real-Time assay and defining its correlation with the Bayer Versant bDNA v.3 assay, 68 consecutive samples from unselected HCV-infected patients were retrospectively analysed with RT and the results obtained using the two tests compared.A good correlation was found between RT-PCR and bDNA: 97% of samples tested had a result within a 0.5 log HCV IU/mL difference (bias=0.15 log, whereas 6 samples negative with bDNA gave positive results with Abbott RT (range, 1.89-3.07 log IU/mL and “in-house” qualitative RT-PCR assays.

  18. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan; Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Nayak, B. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2016-04-01

    Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV-Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 1017 N-ions/cm2 fluence, formation of colour centres (F+, F2, F2+ and F22+) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  19. Rubi Fructus (Rubus coreanus Inhibits Differentiation to Adipocytes in 3T3-L1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rubi Fructus (RF is known to exert several pharmacological effects including antitumor, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, its antiobesity effect has not been reported yet. This study was focused on the antidifferentiation effect of RF extract on 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. When 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were differentiating into adipocytes, 10–100 μg/mL of RF was added. Next, the lipid contents were quantified by Oil Red O staining. RF significantly reduced lipid accumulation and downregulated the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ, CCAAT0-enhancer-binding proteins α (C/EBPα, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2 (aP2, resistin, and adiponectin in ways that were concentration dependent. Moreover, RF markedly upregulated liver kinase B1 and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Interestingly, pretreatment with AMPKα siRNA and RF downregulated the expression of PPARγ and C/EBPα protein as well as the adipocyte differentiation. Our study shows that RF is capable of inhibiting the differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes through the modulation of PPARγ, C/EBPα, and AMPK, suggesting that it has a potential for therapeutic application in the treatment or prevention of obesity.

  20. Light and electron microscopic analysis of tattoos treated by Q-switched ruby laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.R.; Anderson, R.R.; Gange, R.W.; Michaud, N.A.; Flotte, T.J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1991-07-01

    Short-pulse laser exposures can be used to alter pigmented structures in tissue by selective photothermolysis. Potential mechanisms of human tattoo pigment lightening with Q-switched ruby laser were explored by light and electron microscopy. Significant variation existed between and within tattoos. Electron microscopy of untreated tattoos revealed membrane-bound pigment granules, predominantly within fibroblasts and macrophages, and occasionally in mast cells. These granules contained pigment particles ranging from 2-in diameter. Immediately after exposure, dose-related injury was observed in cells containing pigment. Some pigment particles were smaller and lamellated. At fluences greater than or equal to 3 J/cm2, dermal vacuoles and homogenization of collagen bundles immediately adjacent to extracellular pigment were occasionally observed. A brisk neutrophilic infiltrate was apparent by 24 h. Eleven days later, the pigment was again intracellular. Half of the biopsies at 150 d revealed a mild persistent lymphocytic infiltrate. There was no fibrosis except for one case of clinical scarring. These findings confirm that short-pulse radiation can be used to selectively disrupt cells containing tattoo pigments. The physial alteration of pigment granules, redistribution, and elimination appear to account for clinical lightening of the tattoos.

  1. Pulse stretching in a Q-switched ruby laser for bubble chamber holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harigel, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    During the first test of a modified in-line holography scheme in BEBC, heavy laser induced boiling was observed when using Q-switched pulses (>= 20 ns, <= 3J). This boiling spoiled the conventional pictures taken some 10 ms later. There was no boiling present when the laser was fired in the non-Q-switched mode (proportional 1 ms) at the same energy, however this latter mode is unsuitable for holography, mainly due to the bubble movement and size variation during illumination. Our approach has therefore been to aim for an intermediate duration. Consequently, a pulse stretching technique for a Q-switched ruby laser oscillator was developed, which gives a fairly flat pulse of proportional 2 μs duration with proportional 4 m coherence length. The cavity was followed by four amplifiers and they produce light energies up to 10 J for the holographic recording of particle tracks in a large volume (several cubic meters). The entire equipment was then tested during a technical run with the 15-foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab, and results obtained with various laser pulse durations are discussed. (orig./HSI)

  2. The analysis of damage threshold in the ruby laser interaction with copper and aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katavić Boris T.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive methods are dominant in diagnosing the status and protection of all kinds of contemporary industrial object, as well as object of industrial heritage. Laser methods open wide possibilities of research in the field of diagnosis and metal processing. This paper presents the results of laser radiation interaction (wavelength λ = 694.3 nm, Ruby laser, Q-switch mode with metal samples covered with a deposit. The goal of the examination was to determine the maximum energy density, that can be used in diagnostics purpouses (interferometric methods, 3D scanning, i.e. and as a tool for safe removal of deposits, without interacting with the basic material. Microscopic examination performed with SEM coupled with EDX allowed the determination of the safe laser light energy density levels, which caused the removal of the deposite from the surface of the sample, without degradation of the surface. The energy density up to 20 103 J/m2 is maximum allowed for the diagnosis or deposit removal.

  3. Surface and bulk 3D analysis of natural and processed ruby using electron probe micro analyzer and X-ray micro CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Singh, Saroj K.; Mishra, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Firm linking between two advance techniques: Micro-CT and EPMA for mineral analysis. • Attempt to identify and differentiate the treated gem stone from natural counterpart. • 3D structural and surface elemental analysis of the natural gem stone. - Abstract: The change in surface compositional and bulk structural characteristics of the natural ruby stone, before and after heat treatment with lead oxide has been analyzed using two advance characterization techniques like: X-ray micro CT scan (μ-CT) and electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA). The analytical correlation between these two techniques in identification as well as in depth study of the ores and minerals before and after processing has been presented. Also, we describe the aesthetic enhancement of a low quality defective ruby stone by lead oxide filling and the sequential analysis of this ruby stone before and after treatment using these two advanced techniques to identify and to confirm the change in its aesthetic value. The cracks healing and pores filling by the metal oxide on the surface of the ruby have been analyzed using μ-CT and EPMA. Moreover, in this work we describe the advance characterization of the repaired gem stones especially ruby stones. This work will light up the path for in-depth understanding of diffusion mechanism and abstract information of impurity particles inside the minerals. Based on these observations, EPMA and micro CT are shown to be powerful tools for the identification as well as research in gem stones.

  4. The Roche Immunoturbidimetric Albumin Method on Cobas c 501 Gives Higher Values Than the Abbott and Roche BCP Methods When Analyzing Patient Plasma Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna; Flodin, Mats; Havelka, Aleksandra Mandic; Xu, Xiao Yan; Larsson, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Serum/plasma albumin is an important and widely used laboratory marker and it is important that we measure albumin correctly without bias. We had indications that the immunoturbidimetric method on Cobas c 501 and the bromocresol purple (BCP) method on Architect 16000 differed, so we decided to study these methods more closely. A total of 1,951 patient requests with albumin measured with both the Architect BCP and Cobas immunoturbidimetric methods were extracted from the laboratory system. A comparison with fresh plasma samples was also performed that included immunoturbidimetric and BCP methods on Cobas c 501 and analysis of the international protein calibrator ERM-DA470k/IFCC. The median difference between the Abbott BCP and Roche immunoturbidimetric methods was 3.3 g/l and the Roche method overestimated ERM-DA470k/IFCC by 2.2 g/l. The Roche immunoturbidimetric method gave higher values than the Roche BCP method: y = 1.111x - 0.739, R² = 0.971. The Roche immunoturbidimetric albumin method gives clearly higher values than the Abbott and Roche BCP methods when analyzing fresh patient samples. The differences between the two methods were similar at normal and low albumin levels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Automated detection of malaria pigment: feasibility for malaria diagnosing in an area with seasonal malaria in northern Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Langen, Adrianus J.; van Dillen, Jeroen; de Witte, Piet; Mucheto, Samson; Nagelkerke, Nico; Kager, Piet

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility of automated malaria detection with the Cell-Dyn 3700 (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA, USA) haematology analyser for diagnosing malaria in northern Namibia. METHODS: From April to June 2003, all patients with a positive blood smear result and a subset of

  6. Weight of Production of Emeralds, Rubies, Sapphires, and Tanzanite from 1995 Through 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas R.; Menzie, W. David; Olson, Donald W.

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) historically has not attempted to report comprehensive world production of gemstones on a country basis. This was because estimation of gemstone production is inherently difficult due to the fragmentary nature of the industry, the lack of governmental oversight or reporting in many countries where colored gemstones are mined, and the wide variation in quality between individual gemstones. Unlike diamonds, which, with the exception of the alluvial stones of West Africa, are mainly produced by large international mining companies and evaluated, cut, and marketed through a highly developed pricing structure and complex commercial arrangements, colored gemstones are mainly mined by individuals or small companies and have less developed evaluation and marketing arrangements. The trading centers for colored gems are smaller and less well known than the diamond centers. Colored gemstones, like alluvial diamonds, have the potential to be used to fund civil conflicts and other illegal activities, and because trade in colored gemstones is less organized than that of diamonds, they offer less opportunity for effective regulation of their trade. And, like diamond, until the recent advent of the Kimberley Process no generally accepted estimates of colored gemstone production globally or by producing country have existed. The present paper is a first attempt to develop production statistics for the three precious gems -emeralds, rubies, and sapphires - and tanzanite tanzanite, a semi-precious gem. The data consist of the weight of production of each of the gemstones from 1995 through 2005. Preliminary data on the weights of gemstone production were presented as a poster session at the Gemological Institute of America's Gemological Research Conference in San Diego, CA, in 2006, and as a published abstract (Yager, 2006) in an attempt to gather response to the estimates. The USGS continues to welcome information and suggestions that would improve the

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Ruby NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Ruby NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  8. Rubi Fructus (Rubus coreanus) activates the expression of thermogenic genes in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, M Y; Kim, H L; Park, J; Jung, Y; Youn, D H; Lee, J H; Jin, J S; So, H S; Park, R; Kim, S H; Kim, S J; Hong, S H; Um, J Y

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the anti-obesity effect of Rubi Fructus (RF) extract using brown adipose tissue (BAT) and primary brown preadipocytes in vivo and in vitro. Male C57BL/6 J mice (n=5 per group) were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks with or without RF. Brown preadipocytes from the interscapular BAT of mice (age, post-natal days 1-3) were cultured with differentiation media (DM) including isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, T3, indomethacin and insulin with or without RF. In HFD-induced obese C57BL/6 J mice, long-term RF treatment significantly reduced weight gain as well as the weights of the white adipose tissue, liver and spleen. Serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were also reduced in the HFD group which received RF treatment. Furthermore, RF induced thermogenic-, adipogenic- and mitochondria-related gene expressions in BAT. In primary brown adipocytes, RF effectively stimulated the expressions of thermogenic- and mitochondria-related genes. In addition, to examine whether LIPIN1, a regulator of adipocyte differentiation, is regulated by RF, Lipin1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and RF were pretreated in primary brown adipocytes. Pretreatment with Lipin1 siRNA and RF downregulated the DM-induced expression levels of thermogenic- and mitochondria-related genes. Moreover, RF markedly upregulated AMP-activated protein kinase. Our study shows that RF is capable of stimulating the differentiation of brown adipocytes through the modulation of thermogenic genes. This study demonstrates that RF prevents the development of obesity in mice fed with a HFD and that it is also capable of stimulating the differentiation of brown adipocytes through the modulation of thermogenic genes, which suggests that RF has potential as a therapeutic application for the treatment or prevention of obesity.

  9. Efficient development of web applications for remote participation using Ruby on Rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emoto, M.; Yoshida, M.; Iwata, C.; Inagaki, S.; Nagayama, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale experiments such as ITER require international collaboration, and remote participation plays an important role in carrying out such experiments. Web-based applications are useful tools for scientists participating in experiments remotely using personal computers. Since the participants typically download web-based applications to their computer each time they access the web servers, they do not need to install extra software in order to use these applications. In addition, the application developers do not need to distribute the latest program files each time they are modified, thus reducing maintenance costs for remote participation systems. For these reasons, we have been developing web-based applications for the LHD experiments at NIFS. In a previous study, we showed the benefits of using Ruby on Rails (RoR) to develop web-based applications for analysis code. We thought this approach would also be useful for developing applications for remote participation. Therefore, we have developed several web-based applications using RoR for participating in the LHD experiments. These applications include a data viewer and a scheduler of experiments. The main reason to adopt RoR for this purpose is its efficiency for developing web-based applications. For example, to develop a data viewer, we used an existing program running on an X-Windows System. Using RoR, we could minimize the modifications of the existing programs to add web interfaces. In this paper, we will report a web-based application developed using RoR for the LHD experiment. We will also discuss the benefits of using RoR in developing remote participation tools.

  10. Glucose transporter expression in an avian nectarivore: the ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Welch

    Full Text Available Glucose transporter (GLUT proteins play a key role in the transport of monosaccharides across cellular membranes, and thus, blood sugar regulation and tissue metabolism. Patterns of GLUT expression, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4, have been well characterized in mammals. However, relatively little is known about patterns of GLUT expression in birds with existing data limited to the granivorous or herbivorous chicken, duck and sparrow. The smallest avian taxa, hummingbirds, exhibit some of the highest fasted and fed blood glucose levels and display an unusual ability to switch rapidly and completely between endogenous fat and exogenous sugar to fuel energetically expensive hovering flight. Despite this, nothing is known about the GLUT transporters that enable observed rapid rates of carbohydrate flux. We examined GLUT (GLUT1, 2, 3, & 4 expression in pectoralis, leg muscle, heart, liver, kidney, intestine and brain from both zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata and ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris. mRNA expression of all four transporters was probed using reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR. In addition, GLUT1 and 4 protein expression were assayed by western blot and immunostaining. Patterns of RNA and protein expression of GLUT1-3 in both species agree closely with published reports from other birds and mammals. As in other birds, and unlike in mammals, we did not detect GLUT4. A lack of GLUT4 correlates with hyperglycemia and an uncoupling of exercise intensity and relative oxidation of carbohydrates in hummingbirds. The function of GLUTs present in hummingbird muscle tissue (e.g. GLUT1 and 3 remain undescribed. Thus, further work is necessary to determine if high capillary density, and thus surface area across which cellular-mediated transport of sugars into active tissues (e.g. muscle occurs, rather than taxon-specific differences in GLUT density or kinetics, can account for observed rapid rates of sugar flux into these

  11. Resource defense and monopolization in a marked population of ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseu, François; Charette, Yanick; Bélisle, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Resource defense behavior is often explained by the spatial and temporal distribution of resources. However, factors such as competition, habitat complexity, and individual space use may also affect the capacity of individuals to defend and monopolize resources. Yet, studies frequently focus on one or two factors, overlooking the complexity found in natural settings. Here, we addressed defense and monopolization of nectar feeders in a population of free-ranging ruby-throated hummingbirds marked with passive integrated transponder (PIT tags). Our study system consisted of a 44 ha systematic grid of 45 feeders equipped with PIT tag detectors recording every visit made at feeders. We modeled the number of visits by competitors (NVC) at feeders in response to space use by a focal individual potentially defending a feeder, number of competitors, nectar sucrose concentration, and habitat visibility. Individuals who were more concentrated at certain feeders on a given day and who were more stable in their use of the grid throughout the season gained higher exclusivity in the use of those feeders on that day, especially for males competing against males. The level of spatial concentration at feeders and its negative effect on NVC was, however, highly variable among individuals, suggesting a continuum in resource defense strategies. Although the apparent capacity to defend feeders was not affected by competition or nectar sucrose concentration, the level of monopolization decreased with increasing number of competitors and higher nectar quality. Defense was enhanced by visibility near feeders, but only in forested habitats. The reverse effect of visibility in open habitats was more difficult to interpret as it was probably confounded by perch availability, from which a bird can defend its feeder. Our study is among the first to quantify the joint use of food resource by overlapping individuals unconstrained in their use of space. Our results show the importance of

  12. Efficient development of web applications for remote participation using Ruby on Rails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, M., E-mail: emo@nifs.ac.j [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yoshida, M.; Iwata, C. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Inagaki, S. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Large-scale experiments such as ITER require international collaboration, and remote participation plays an important role in carrying out such experiments. Web-based applications are useful tools for scientists participating in experiments remotely using personal computers. Since the participants typically download web-based applications to their computer each time they access the web servers, they do not need to install extra software in order to use these applications. In addition, the application developers do not need to distribute the latest program files each time they are modified, thus reducing maintenance costs for remote participation systems. For these reasons, we have been developing web-based applications for the LHD experiments at NIFS. In a previous study, we showed the benefits of using Ruby on Rails (RoR) to develop web-based applications for analysis code. We thought this approach would also be useful for developing applications for remote participation. Therefore, we have developed several web-based applications using RoR for participating in the LHD experiments. These applications include a data viewer and a scheduler of experiments. The main reason to adopt RoR for this purpose is its efficiency for developing web-based applications. For example, to develop a data viewer, we used an existing program running on an X-Windows System. Using RoR, we could minimize the modifications of the existing programs to add web interfaces. In this paper, we will report a web-based application developed using RoR for the LHD experiment. We will also discuss the benefits of using RoR in developing remote participation tools.

  13. PREMIO NACIONAL A LA INVESTIGACIÓN EN CIENCIAS MÉDICAS. Academia Nacional de Medicina, Laboratorios Abbott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Malagón Londoño

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Presidente

    Una vez más cumplimos uno de los objetivos primordiales de la Academia, cual es: estimular la investigación entre los profesionales de la salud residentes en Colombia y premiar la excelencia de quienes se hayan destacado con trabajos originales e inéditos en los campos de las ciencias clínicas y de las áreas básicas. A la convocatoria abierta para el concurso fue sorprendente y grato para esta Academia recibir una respuesta positiva de más de 100 profesionales estudiosos y consagrados a la investigación quienes por la importancia de los temas y el manejo metodológico, serio y responsable científicamente, llevaron al jurado calificador a una difícil selección de los mejores, para lo cual la preselección inicial de los 50, propició la más cuidadosa y ardua labor, habida cuenta de la sobresaliente calidad de los trabajos presentados.

    Esto condujo a una primera conclusión: la del progreso en las características de excelencia de los investigadores colombianos y luego a la de la seriedad con que respondieron a la convocatoria. Por lo mismo la labor del Coordinador del concurso y de todo el equipo de reconocidos profesionales que integraron el grupo calificador resultó ardua y en extremo difícil; solo el altruismo, la consagración y la experiencia del Académico Hernando Groot Liévano y la seriedad, el conocimiento y dedicación del grupo de expertos que lo secundó para la evaluación cualitativa, permitió que los trabajos presentados fueran analizados exhaustivamente, para culminar el proceso de selección y cumplir el cronograma dispendioso para llegar a esta fecha solemne de entrega de los premios.

    Debo reconocer con gratitud a nombre de la Academia no solo la ejemplar dedicación del coordinador y los examinadores, sino la colaboración de los Laboratorios Abbott; estos demostraron laudable compromiso con las disciplinas del conocimiento, lo cual explica el apoyo solidario

  14. Temporal migration patterns between natal locations of ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) and their Gulf Coast stopover site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenzal, Theodore J; Contina, Andrea J; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Moore, Frank R

    2018-01-01

    Autumn latitudinal migrations generally exhibit one of two different temporal migration patterns: type 1 where southern populations migrate south before northern populations, or type 2 where northern populations overtake southern populations en route . The ruby-throated hummingbird ( Archilochus colubris ) is a species with an expansive breeding range, which allows opportunities to examine variation in the timing of migration. Our objective was to determine a relationship between natal origin of ruby-throated hummingbirds and arrival at a Gulf coast stopover site; and if so, what factors, such as differences in body size across the range as well as the cost of migration, might drive such a pattern. To carry out our objectives, we captured hummingbirds at a coastal stopover site during autumn migration, at which time we collected feathers from juveniles for analysis of hydrogen stable isotopes. Using the hydrogen stable isotope gradient of precipitation across North America and published hydrogen isotope values of feathers from populations of breeding ruby-throated hummingbirds, we assigned migrants to probable natal latitudes. Our results confirm that individuals from across the range (30-50° N) stopover along the Gulf of Mexico and there is a positive relationship between arrival day and latitude, suggesting a type 1 migration pattern. We also found no relationship between fuel load (proxy for migration cost) or fat-free body mass (proxy for body size) and natal latitude. Our results, coupled with previous work on the spatial migration patterns of hummingbirds, show a type 1 chain migration pattern. While the mechanisms we tested do not seem to influence the evolution of migratory patterns, other factors such as resource availability may play a prominent role in the evolution of this migration system.

  15. The Influence of Different Interstock Lengths of Minneola Tanjelo on Photosynthetic Parameters and Fruit Yield of Star Ruby Grapefruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Yılmaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Minneola Tangelo hybrid, a cross of grapefruit and mandarin (Duncan grapefruit x Dancy mandarin, used as interstock to Star Ruby grapefruit with different lengths. Effects of different interstock lengths on fruit yield and quality, plant development and photosynthetic parameters were investigated. According to the results, different interstock lengths significantly affected fruit yield and size. The highest fruit yield was determined in T-M20-S whereas the lowest was on T-M5-S. The highest fruit size were determined in Star Ruby fruits on T-M5-S and T-M40-S whereas the lowest on T-M20-S and T-S (control. T-M40-S and T-M20-S treatments markedly reduced stem diameter and tree canopy in comparison to other treatments and control. Usage of different interstock lengths did not significantly affected some of fruit quality traits, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, leaf transpiration rate, leaf water usage efficiency and leaf chlorophyll concentration. In regards to seasonal changes, net photosynthetic rate were higher in spring and summer seasons then winter and fall seasons.

  16. Manipulation of Zeeman coherence in solids at room temperature: Ramsey interference in the coherent-population-trapping spectrum of ruby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesov, Roman; Scully, Marlan O.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) in a three-level atomic medium pumped by two subsequent short optical pulses is considered under the condition of negligible population decay from the excited optical state. It is shown that the amount of atomic population transferred to the excited state by the combined action of the pulses strongly depends on the phase of the ground-state coherence excited by the first pulse at the arrival time of the second pulse. Oscillatory behavior of optical excitation efficiency on the time delay between the pulses is predicted. It is also shown that saturating optical pulses can produce population inversion in a resonantly pumped quasi-two-level system. A class of solid materials in which the predicted phenomena can be observed at room temperature is found. It includes some rare-earth and transition-metal doped dielectric crystals where Orbach relaxation between ground-state Zeeman states is suppressed: ruby, alexandrite, and several others. On the basis of the theoretical predictions, experimental observation of Ramsey fringes in CPT spectrum of ruby is reported

  17. O tema do amor em “Bruma (A Estrela Vermelha”, de Murilo Rubião

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilma Socorro Gonçalves Vieira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta uma análise da manifestação do amor no conto “Bruma (a estrela vermelha”, de Murilo Rubião, como sugestão de um processo individual marcado pelo anseio inconsciente de alcançar a plenitude humana. O entendimento é de que o tema do amor se apresenta associado ao do ciúme e que as inquietações vividas e narradas pelo protagonista sugerem um paradoxal sentimento que se oculta, ao mesmo tempo em que se revela, no discurso e nas imagens presentes na narrativa. A base da análise consiste na hermenêutica simbólica, conforme as pesquisas de Gilbert Durand acerca das estruturas antropológicas do imaginário, juntamente com estudos na perspectiva da semiótica das paixões, desenvolvidos por Greimas e Fontanille, além dos trabalhos de Jorge Schwartz – voltado à investigação dos traços distintivos da poética muriliana –, de Suzana Cánovas – a respeito do universo fantástico de Rubião – e de Salma Silva – sobre as formas sob as quais o tema do amor pode se apresentar no texto literário.

  18. 'Redemption between politics and ontology: Agamben on the coming politics' [Review] Abbott, M (2014) The figure of this world: Agamben and the question of political ontology; Whyte, J (2014) Catastrophe and redemption: the political thought of Giorgio Agamben

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Review of: \\ud \\ud Abbott, M. (2014) The figure of this world: Agamben and the question of political ontology. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 9780748684090\\ud \\ud Whyte, J. (2014) Catastrophe and redemption: the political thought of Giorgio Agamben. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 9781438448527

  19. Accuracy and precision of four value-added blood glucose meters: the Abbott Optium, the DDI Prodigy, the HDI True Track, and the HypoGuard Assure Pro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Catherine A; Kane, Michael P; Bakst, Gary; Busch, Robert S; Abelseth, Jill M; Hamilton, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    This study compared the accuracy and precision of four value-added glucose meters. Finger stick glucose measurements in diabetes patients were performed using the Abbott Diabetes Care (Alameda, CA) Optium, Diagnostic Devices, Inc. (Miami, FL) DDI Prodigy, Home Diagnostics, Inc. (Fort Lauderdale, FL) HDI True Track Smart System, and Arkray, USA (Minneapolis, MN) HypoGuard Assure Pro. Finger glucose measurements were compared with laboratory reference results. Accuracy was assessed by a Clarke error grid analysis (EGA), a Parkes EGA, and within 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of the laboratory value criteria (chi2 analysis). Meter precision was determined by calculating absolute mean differences in glucose values between duplicate samples (Kruskal-Wallis test). Finger sticks were obtained from 125 diabetes patients, of which 90.4% were Caucasian, 51.2% were female, 83.2% had type 2 diabetes, and average age of 59 years (SD 14 years). Mean venipuncture blood glucose was 151 mg/dL (SD +/-65 mg/dL; range, 58-474 mg/dL). Clinical accuracy by Clarke EGA was demonstrated in 94% of Optium, 82% of Prodigy, 61% of True Track, and 77% of the Assure Pro samples (P meters. Within 5% accuracy was achieved in 34%, 24%, 29%, and 13%, respectively (P meter systems. The HDI True Track was significantly less precise than the other meter systems. The Abbott Optium was significantly more accurate than the other meter systems, whereas the HDI True Track was significantly less accurate and less precise compared to the other meter systems.

  20. Comparative study of the serum measurement of PTH on Roche Cobas e411® versus the Abbott Architect ci8200®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalah, Mohammed; Bouayadi, Ouardia; Rahmani, Nawal; Lyagoubi, Amina; Lamrabat, Somiya; Choukri, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Parathormone (PTH) is the main hormone of phosphocalcic homeostasis. It is synthesized and secreted by the parathyroid glands. PTH has become a routine test in the medical biology laboratory. However, its measurement presents analytical difficulties with the various marketed kits. The aim of this work is to present the results of a comparative study between the PTH measurment on Abbott architect ci8200 and on Roche's Cobas e411 automaton. It is a prospective study carried out for 252 hospitalized patients in the various departments of the University Hospital Center Mohammed VI of Oujda. The "intact" PTH tests were performed on two automata: Abbott Architect ci8200 and Roche Cobas e411. The first uses chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The second uses electrochemiluminiscence sandwich enzyme immunoassay. The agreement of the results between the different techniques was evaluated using the Bland-Altman difference diagram and the Passing-Bablok and Deming regression line (MedCalc software version 14.8.1.0 ® ). By analyzing the diagram of Bland-Altman, we note that the average bias between both methods is of the order of 193.9 pg/mL. As for the equation of the right of Passing-Bablok, it is: Y(Architect) = 3.11 X (Cobas) - 12.26. In conclusion, our study shows a great discrepancy between the results of the PTH assay on the Architect ci8200 versus the Cobas e411, hence the biologist's indisputable role in the control and evaluation of the kits marketed through the various validation tests.

  1. Comparison of cardiac TnI outliers using a contemporary and a high-sensitivity assay on the Abbott Architect platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J B; Southby, S J; Stuart, L A; Mackay, R; Florkowski, C M; George, P M

    2014-07-01

    Assays for cardiac troponin (cTn) have undergone improvements in sensitivity and precision in recent years. Increased rates of outliers, however, have been reported on various cTn platforms, typically giving irreproducible, falsely higher results. We aimed to evaluate the outlier rate occurring in patients with elevated cTnI using a contemporary and high-sensitivity assay. All patients with elevated cTnI (up to 300 ng/L) performed over a 21-month period were assayed in duplicate. A contemporary assay (Abbott STAT Troponin-I) was used for the first part of the study and subsequently a high-sensitivity assay (Abbott STAT High-Sensitive Troponin-I) was used. Outliers exceeded a calculated critical difference (CD) (CD = z × √2 × SDAnalytical) where z = 3.5 (for probability of 0.0005) and critical outliers also were on a different side of the decision level. The respective outlier and critical outlier rates were 0.22% and 0.10% for the contemporary assay (n = 4009) and 0.18% and 0.13% for the high-sensitivity assay (n = 3878). There was no significant reduction in outlier rate between the two assays (χ(2) = 0.034, P = 0.854). Fifty-six percent of outliers occurred in samples where cTn was an 'add-on' test (and was stored and refrigerated prior to assay). Despite recent improvements in cTn methods, outliers (including critical outliers) still occur at a low rate in both a contemporary and high-sensitivity cTnI assay. Laboratory and clinical staff should be aware of this potential analytical error, particularly in samples with suboptimal sample handling such as add-on tests. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. The need for a sequencing-based assay to supplement the Abbott m2000 RealTime HCV Genotype II assay: a 1 year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedet, Marlin; Adachi, Dena; Wong, Anita; Wong, Sallene; Pabbaraju, Kanti; Tellier, Raymond; Tang, Julian W

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) genotyping is important for treatment planning. The Abbott m2000 RealTime HCV Genotype II assay is a PCR-based assay targeting specific regions of the 5'NCR gene for genotypes 1-6, and the NS5b gene for subgenotypes 1a/1b. However, not all genotypes can be resolved, with results being reported as: 'indeterminate', 'mixed', 'genotype X reactivity with Y', or just the major genotype 1 alone. To assess the supplementary testing required for these unresolved HCV genotypes, these samples were tested further using an in-house core/E1 sequencing assay. The resulting genotypes/subgenotypes were assigned using phylogenetic analysis with reference HCV genotype sequences. Additional testing was conducted using the INNO-LiPA HCV II assay for truly mixed genotypes. Out of 1052 samples tested, 89 (8.5%) underwent further sequencing to determine the HCV genotype: 16 that were 'indeterminate' on the m2000, were mostly genotype 2s and 3s by sequencing; 12 that were 'mixed', were mostly one of the genotypes reported in the mixture; 7 that were 'X reactivity with Y', were usually genotype X; 54 that gave just a major genotype 1 result were mostly 1a, with some 6 and 1b, and a few 1c. For three truly mixed genotypes, additional testing using the VERSANT(®) HCV Genotype Assay (LiPA) 2.0, showed two mixed 1 and 3, and one indistinguishable 6c-6l genotypes. The Abbott m2000 RealTime HCV Genotype II assay can resolve most (∼90%) HCV genotypes. However in 9-10% of cases, to fully resolve the genotype, additional testing is required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fractional CO2 laser is as effective as Q-switched ruby laser for the initial treatment of a traumatic tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Anna-Theresa; Grunewald, Sonja; Wagner, Justinus A; Simon, Jan C; Paasch, Uwe

    2014-12-01

    Q-switched laser treatments are considered the standard method for removing both regular and traumatic tattoos. Recently, the removal of tattoo ink using ablative fractional lasers has been reported. Ablative fractional CO2 laser and q-switched ruby laser treatments were used in a split-face mode to compare the safety and efficacy of the two types of laser in removing a traumatic tattoo caused by the explosion of a firework. A male patient suffering from a traumatic tattoo due to explosive deposits in his entire face was subjected to therapy. A series of eleven treatments were performed. The right side of the face was always treated using an ablative fractional CO2 laser, whereas the left side was treated only using a q-switched ruby laser. After a series of eleven treatments, the patient demonstrated a significant lightening on both sides of his traumatic tattoo, with no clinical difference. After the first six treatments, the patient displayed greater lightening on the right side of his face, whereas after another five treatments, the left side of the patient's face appeared lighter. No side effects were reported. In the initial stage of removing the traumatic tattoo, the ablative fractional laser treatment appeared to be as effective as the standard ruby laser therapy. However, from the 6th treatment onward, the ruby laser therapy was more effective. Although ablative fractional CO2 lasers have the potential to remove traumatic tattoos, they remain a second-line treatment option.

  4. What's a Nice Hummingbird Like You Doing at an AGU Meeting Like This? (or, Operation RubyThroat Meets The GLOBE Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, B.

    2003-12-01

    "Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" is an international cross-disciplinary initiative that uses Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) as a hook to excite K-12 students (and adults) about science learning. In 2002, Operation RubyThroat affiliated with The GLOBE Program as the first GLOBE protocol that involves animal behavior. Through Operation RubyThroat, students make observations about hummingbird phenology, behavior, and ecology and correlate their data against traditional GLOBE observations of atmosphere, climate, land cover, soils, hydrology, and phenology. Although Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (RTHUs) breed throughout the eastern half of the United States and southern Canada and may be the most common and most widely distributed of all 338 hummingbird species, little is known about how abiotic environmental factors affect their migration, nesting activities, and everyday behavior. Operation RubyThroat participants in the U.S. and Canada log early arrival dates of RTHUs during spring migration, note their presence throughout the breeding season, and report the last date RTHUs are seen in autumn. Conversely, participants in Mexico and all seven Central American countries (the region in which RTHUs spend their non-breeding months) watch for early arrivals in fall and late departures in spring. Participants also attempt to estimate numbers of RTHUs in local populations by counting the number of visits hummingbirds make to feeders and/or flowers in a 45-minute time block. Optional activities include observations of RTHU nesting behaviors and determining RTHU preferences for various species of native and exotic nectar sources. Participating schools are encouraged to establish Schoolyard Hummingbird Habitats in which to make their observations, but data may be collected in backyards or at local parks, nature centers, botanical gardens, and other sites where RTHUs occur. Adults not affiliated with K-12 schools are invited to become certified in

  5. Nicotine promotes rooting in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shrish C

    2015-11-01

    Nicotine promotes rooting in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby). Nicotine at 10(-9) to 10(-3) M concentrations was added to the MS basal medium. The optimum response (three-fold increase in rooting) was obtained at 10(-7) M nicotine-enriched MS medium. At the same level i.e. 10(-7) M Nicotine induced dramatic increase (11-fold) in the number of secondary roots per root. We have shown earlier that exogenous acetylcholine induces a similar response in tomato leaves. Since nicotine is an agonist of one of the two acetylcholine receptors in animals, its ability to simulate ACh action in a plant system suggests the presence of the same molecular mechanism operative in both, animal and plant cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Large Pilot Scale Testing of Linde/BASF Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology at the Abbott Coal-Fired Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Kevin C. [University of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2017-08-18

    The work summarized in this report is the first step towards a project that will re-train and create jobs for personnel in the coal industry and continue regional economic development to benefit regions impacted by previous downturns. The larger project is aimed at capturing ~300 tons/day (272 metric tonnes/day) CO2 at a 90% capture rate from existing coal- fired boilers at the Abbott Power Plant on the campus of University of Illinois (UI). It will employ the Linde-BASF novel amine-based advanced CO2 capture technology, which has already shown the potential to be cost-effective, energy efficient and compact at the 0.5-1.5 MWe pilot scales. The overall objective of the project is to design and install a scaled-up system of nominal 15 MWe size, integrate it with the Abbott Power Plant flue gas, steam and other utility systems, and demonstrate the viability of continuous operation under realistic conditions with high efficiency and capacity. The project will also begin to build a workforce that understands how to operate and maintain the capture plants by including students from regional community colleges and universities in the operation and evaluation of the capture system. This project will also lay the groundwork for follow-on projects that pilot utilization of the captured CO2 from coal-fired power plants. The net impact will be to demonstrate a replicable means to (1) use a standardized procedure to evaluate power plants for their ability to be retrofitted with a pilot capture unit; (2) design and construct reliable capture systems based on the Linde-BASF technology; (3) operate and maintain these systems; (4) implement training programs with local community colleges and universities to establish a workforce to operate and maintain the systems; and (5) prepare to evaluate at the large pilot scale level various methods to utilize the resulting captured CO2. Towards the larger project goal, the UI-led team, together

  7. Effect of lubricants and a vaginal spermicide gel on the detection of prostate specific antigen, a biomarker of semen exposure, using a quantitative (Abbott ARCHITECT) assay☆, ☆☆, ★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Margaret C.; Melendez, Johan H.; Kourtis, Athena P.; Chaney, Dorothy M.; Brown, Teresa M.; Black, Carolyn M.; Mauck, Christine K.; Schwartz, Jill L.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Macaluso, Maurizio; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the effects of commonly used lubricants on detection of biomarkers of semen exposure. We investigated the in vitro effect of Gynol®, K-Y Jelly®, Replens®, Astroglide®, Carbopol, and Silicorel on quantitative detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Study Design A predetermined concentration of each of the gels was added to serially diluted semen samples. Additionally, serial dilutions of each of the gels were added to three different semen dilutions (high, medium, or low). The resulting samples were tested for PSA on the Abbott ARCHITECT System. Results When using the Abbott ARCHITECT system, the only products that inhibited PSA detection were Gynol® and Replens®. The inhibition caused by Gynol® was dose-dependent, but that of Replens was dose-independent. K-Y Jelly®-spiked samples had higher PSA values than controls. Conclusions Caution is warranted when using the Abbott quantitative assay for PSA detection as a biomarker of semen exposure in settings where Gynol®, Replens® or K-Y Jelly® might also have been used. Neither Astroglide® nor Silicorel inhibited PSA detection. Additional studies evaluating other vaginal products, including microbicides, and their effects on other assays, are needed. In vivo studies will be especially important to optimize PSA detection from clinical samples. Implications Researchers should consider the potential for specific lubricants or any vaginal products to affect the particular assay used for semen biomarker detection. The Abbott ARCHITECT’s total PSA assay should not be used with the product Replens. Caution is warranted when using the assay in settings where Gynol or K-Y jelly may have been used. PMID:24314911

  8. Comparison of Abbott Architect®, Siemens Immulite®, and Diasorin Liaison®for determination of Epstein-Barr virus serological diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Catherine; Segard, Christine; Bouvier, Maryline; Stefanski, Martine; Pannier, Christine; Zawadzki, Patricia; Roussel, Catherine; Hecquet, Denise; Duverlie, Gilles; Brochot, Etienne; Castelain, Sandrine

    2018-02-01

    This study compared the performance of 3 automated immunoassays, Architect ® (Abbott), Immulite ® (Siemens) and Liaison ® (Diasorin), for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology. Ninety-one serum samples collected in Amiens University Hospital were analyzed for the presence of Viral Capsid Antigen (VCA) IgG and IgM and Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) IgG. The agreement between the 3 assays was calculated for each marker individually and for determination of the EBV profile, based on interpretation of the combination of these 3 EBV markers. Although similar results were obtained with Architect ® and Liaison ® , several discordant results were observed with Immulite ® , particularly for EBNA IgG. A large number of EBNA IgG-positive results were observed, which interfered with interpretation of the EBV profile. In contrast, Immulite ® performed similarly to the 2 other assays for detection of VCA IgM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Age- and Gender-Specific Reference Intervals for Fasting Blood Glucose and Lipid Levels in School Children Measured With Abbott Architect c8000 Chemistry Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Waleed; Albanyan, Esam; Altwaijri, Yasmin; Tamim, Hani; Alhussein, Fahad

    2012-04-01

    Reference intervals for pubertal characteristics are influenced by genetic, geographic, dietary and socioeconomic factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish age-specific reference intervals of glucose and lipid levels among local school children. This was cross-sectional study, conducted among Saudi school children. Fasting blood samples were collected from 2149 children, 1138 (53%) boys and 1011 (47%) girls, aged 6 to 18 years old. Samples were analyzed on the Architect c8000 Chemistry System (Abbott Diagnostics, USA) for glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL. Reference intervals were established by nonparametric methods between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. Significant differences were observed between boys and girls for cholesterol and triglycerides levels in all age groups (P levels were found to be significant (P levels except at age 12 to 13 years. Saudi children have comparable serum cholesterol levels than their Western counterparts. This may reflect changing dietary habits and increasing affluence in Saudi Arabia. Increased lipid screening is anticipated, and these reference intervals will aid in the early assessment of cardiovascular and diabetes risk in Saudi pediatric populations.

  10. Molecular detection and confirmation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in urogenital and extragenital specimens using the Abbott CT/NG RealTime assay and an in-house assay targeting the porA pseudogene.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, A

    2011-04-01

    Culture for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) is being replaced by molecular assays, but difficulties are observed with false positive and negatives results, especially for extragenital samples. This study evaluates the Abbott CT\\/NG Real-Time assay and a real-time porA pseudogene assay. Samples (n = 600) from a mixed prevalence Irish population include 164 male urines with corresponding urethral swabs, 58 endocervical swabs, 173 male pharyngeal swabs, 205 male rectal swabs, 36 NG clinical isolates and 26 commensal Neisseria species isolates. There was a 100% concordance between the Abbott CT\\/NG Real-Time and the porA assay. The positivity rate was 1.2%, 1.7%, 8.1% and 5.8% for FVU\\/urethral swabs, endocervical, pharyngeal and rectal swabs, respectively. These results were compared to culture and discrepancies were found with nine pharyngeal and three rectal swabs. Seven of the 12 discrepant positive samples were sequenced and were confirmed "true positives". The sensitivity and specificity of the molecular assays was 100%. The sensitivity of the culture-based testing was 100% for urogenital samples but 36% and 75% for pharyngeal and rectal swabs, respectively. The combined Abbott CT\\/NG and porA assays provide a valuable alternative to culture and also generate a significant increase in the diagnosis of pharyngeal and rectal NG infection.

  11. Improving clinical laboratory efficiency: a time-motion evaluation of the Abbott m2000 RealTime and Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan PCR systems for the simultaneous quantitation of HIV-1 RNA and HCV RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Alessandra; Coen, Sabrina; Belladonna, Stefano; Pulvirenti, F Renato; Clemens, John M; Capobianchi, M Rosaria

    2011-08-01

    Diagnostic laboratories need automation that facilitates efficient processing and workflow management to meet today's challenges for expanding services and reducing cost, yet maintaining the highest levels of quality. Processing efficiency of two commercially available automated systems for quantifying HIV-1 and HCV RNA, Abbott m2000 system and Roche COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan 96 (docked) systems (CAP/CTM), was evaluated in a mid/high throughput workflow laboratory using a representative daily workload of 24 HCV and 72 HIV samples. Three test scenarios were evaluated: A) one run with four batches on the CAP/CTM system, B) two runs on the Abbott m2000 and C) one run using the Abbott m2000 maxCycle feature (maxCycle) for co-processing these assays. Cycle times for processing, throughput and hands-on time were evaluated. Overall processing cycle time was 10.3, 9.1 and 7.6 h for Scenarios A), B) and C), respectively. Total hands-on time for each scenario was, in order, 100.0 (A), 90.3 (B) and 61.4 min (C). The interface of an automated analyzer to the laboratory workflow, notably system set up for samples and reagents and clean up functions, are as important as the automation capability of the analyzer for the overall impact to processing efficiency and operator hands-on time.

  12. Evidence of colour-modification induced charge and structural disorder in natural corundum: Spectroscopic studies of beryllium treated sapphires and rubies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, M D; Mane, Sandesh N; Gaonkar, Mahesh P; Panjikar, J; Ramachandran, K T [Gemmological Institute of India, 304 Sukhsagar Building, N.S.Patkar Marg, Opera House, Mumbai 400 007 (India); Bagla, H, E-mail: mdsastry@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, KC College, Church gate, Mumbai 400 020 (India)

    2009-07-15

    Corundum {alpha} - Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals is an important gemstone known by different names depending on the colour it exhibits which in turn depends on the impurities that are present. The colour depends on the valence state of the impurity element present in corundum (Cr{sup 3+} in ruby, Fe{sup 3+} in yellow sapphire and Fe-Ti complex in blue sapphire). There have been a number of reports of diffusion controlled high temperature chemical reactions to influence the colouration in these materials. Present paper deals with the Raman and FT-IR results on Be treated rubies/sapphires and gives evidence of the disorder brought about by such treatments. This can be effectively used for diagnostic purposes for detecting the treated stones.

  13. Evidence of colour-modification induced charge and structural disorder in natural corundum: Spectroscopic studies of beryllium treated sapphires and rubies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, M. D.; Mane, Sandesh N.; Gaonkar, Mahesh P.; Bagla, H.; Panjikar, J.; Ramachandran, K. T.

    2009-07-01

    Corundum α - Al2O3 single crystals is an important gemstone known by different names depending on the colour it exhibits which in turn depends on the impurities that are present. The colour depends on the valence state of the impurity element present in corundum (Cr3+ in ruby, Fe3+ in yellow sapphire and Fe-Ti complex in blue sapphire). There have been a number of reports of diffusion controlled high temperature chemical reactions to influence the colouration in these materials. Present paper deals with the Raman and FT-IR results on Be treated rubies/sapphires and gives evidence of the disorder brought about by such treatments. This can be effectively used for diagnostic purposes for detecting the treated stones.

  14. Evidence of colour-modification induced charge and structural disorder in natural corundum: Spectroscopic studies of beryllium treated sapphires and rubies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, M D; Mane, Sandesh N; Gaonkar, Mahesh P; Panjikar, J; Ramachandran, K T; Bagla, H

    2009-01-01

    Corundum α - Al 2 O 3 single crystals is an important gemstone known by different names depending on the colour it exhibits which in turn depends on the impurities that are present. The colour depends on the valence state of the impurity element present in corundum (Cr 3+ in ruby, Fe 3+ in yellow sapphire and Fe-Ti complex in blue sapphire). There have been a number of reports of diffusion controlled high temperature chemical reactions to influence the colouration in these materials. Present paper deals with the Raman and FT-IR results on Be treated rubies/sapphires and gives evidence of the disorder brought about by such treatments. This can be effectively used for diagnostic purposes for detecting the treated stones.

  15. A web based Radiation Oncology Dose Manager with a rich User Interface developed using AJAX, ruby, dynamic XHTML and the new Yahoo/EXT User Interface Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Faisal; Hong, Robert

    2007-10-11

    With the evolution of AJAX, ruby on rails, advanced dynamic XHTML technologies and the advent of powerful user interface libraries for javascript (EXT, Yahoo User Interface Library), developers now have the ability to provide truly rich interfaces within web browsers, with reasonable effort and without third-party plugins. We designed and developed an example of such a solution. The User Interface allows radiation oncology practices to intuitively manage different dose fractionation schemes by helping estimate total dose to irradiated organs.

  16. Scientific communications: Re-Os sulfide (bornite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite) systematics of the carbonate-hosted copper deposits at ruby creek, southern brooks range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, D.; Kelley, K.D.; Hitzman, M.W.; Zieg, J.

    2009-01-01

    New Re-Os data for chalcopyrite, bornite, and pyrite from the carbonate-hosted Cu deposit at Ruby Creek (Bornite), Alaska, show extremely high Re abundances (hundreds of ppb, low ppm) and contain essentially no common Os. The Re-Os data provide the first absolute ages of ore formation for the carbonate-hosted Ruby Creek Cu-(Co) deposit and demonstrate that the Re-Os systematics of pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite are unaffected by greenschist metamorphism. The Re-Os data show that the main phase of Cu mineralization pre dominantly occurred at 384 ?? 4.2 Ma, with an earlier phase possibly at ???400 Ma. The Re-Os data are consistent with the observed paragenetic sequence and coincide with zircon U-Pb ages from igneous rocks within the Ambler metallogenic belt, some of which are spatially and genetically associated with regional volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. The latter may suggest a temporal link between regional magmatism and hydrothermal mineralization in the Ambler district. The utility of bornite and chalcopyrite, in addition to pyrite, contributes to a new understanding of Re-Os geochronology and permits a refinement of the genetic model for the Ruby Creek deposit. ?? 2009 Society of Economices Geologists, Inc.

  17. Holocene Paleoenvironment of the North-central Great Basin: Preliminary Results from Favre Lake, Northern Ruby Mountains, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starratt, S.; Wahl, D.; Wan, E.; Anderson, L.; Wanket, J.; Olson, H.; Lloyd-Davies, T.; Kusler, J.

    2009-12-01

    Little is known about Holocene climate variability in north-central Nevada. This study aims to assess changes in watershed vegetation, fire history, lake levels and limnological conditions in order to understand secular to millennial-scale changes in regional climate. Favre Lake (2,899 m a.s.l.; 12 m deep; 7.7 hectares) is a flow-through lake in the northern Ruby Mountains. The primary sources of influent, both of which appear to be intermittent, are Castle Lake (2,989 m a.s.l.) and Liberty Lake (3,077 m a.s.l.). The bedrock of the three lake basins is early Paleozoic marble and Mesozoic granite and metamorphic rocks. Bathymetric maps and temperature, pH, salinity, and conductivity profiles have been generated for Favre Lake. Surface samples and a series of cores were also collected using a modified Livingstone piston corer. The presence of the Mazama ash in the basal sediment (~4 m below the sediment/water interface) indicates the record extends to ~7,700 cal yr B.P. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) and loss-on-ignition data indicate that the sediments in the lowest part of the core contain primary and reworked Mazama ash. About 2,000 years ago CaCO3 increased from 2 to 3% of the inorganic sediment. The upper 25 cm of the core are marked by an increase in MS which may indicate increased erosion due to grazing. Between about 7,700 and 6,000 cal yr B.P. the diatom flora is dominated by a diverse assemblage of benthic species. The remainder of the core is dominated by Fragilaria, suggesting that lake level rose and flooded the shelf that surrounds the depocenter of the lake. This is supported by changes in the abundance of the aquatic fern Isoetes. Pinus and Artemisia dominate the pollen record, followed by subordinate levels of Poaceae, Asteraceae, Amaranthaceae, and Sarcobatus. The late early Holocene (7,700-6,000 cal yr B.P.) is dominated by Pinus which is present in reduced amounts during the middle Holocene (6,000-3,000 cal yr B.P.) and then returns to dominance in

  18. Identification of early HIV infections using the fourth generation Abbott ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CIA) in San Diego County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manlutac, Anna Liza M; Giesick, Jill S; McVay, Patricia A

    2013-12-01

    HIV screening assays have gone through several generations of development in an effort to narrow the "window period" of detection. Utilizing a fourth generation HIV screening assay has the potential to detect earlier HIV infection, thus reducing HIV-1 transmission. To identify acute infections to decrease HIV transmission in San Diego County. Serum specimens were collected from clients seen by multiple submitters in San Diego County. All acceptable specimens were screened using the 4th Gen Combo Assay. Initially reactive specimens were repeated in duplicate and if repeatedly reactive, were confirmed by HIV-1 Immunofluorescent Antibody Assay (IFA). IFA negative/inconclusive specimens were sent for HIV-1 NAT and HIV-2 antibody testing to referral laboratories. BioRad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test was also performed on a subset of specimens. Of 14,559 specimens received in 20 months, 14,517 specimens were tested. Of the 14,517 specimens that were tested, a total of 279 (1.9%) specimens were CIA repeatedly reactive and 240 of the 279 confirmed by HIV-1 IFA. Thirty-nine gave IFA negative/inconclusive result and 30 were further tested for HIV-1 NAT and 36 for HIV-2 antibody. Thirteen specimens were considered false positives by CIA and 17 specimens were classified as acute infections. Eleven of 39 IFA negative/inconclusive specimens were further tested by Multispot. Five of the 11 were positive by Multispot. The fourth generation Abbott ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo Assay identified 17 patients who may have been missed by the prior HIV-1 screening assay used at San Diego County Public Health Laboratory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Outliers affecting cardiac troponin I measurement: comparison of a new high sensitivity assay with a contemporary assay on the Abbott ARCHITECT analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Nicola; Blennerhassett, John; Lambert, Ramon; Sheehan, Paul; Vasikaran, Samuel D

    2014-07-01

    False-positive cardiac troponin (Tn) results caused by outliers have been reported on various analytical platforms. We have compared the precision profile and outlier rate of the Abbott Diagnostics contemporary troponin I (TnI) assay with their high sensitivity (hs) TnI assay. Three studies were conducted over a 10-month period using routine patients' samples. TnI was measured in duplicate using the contemporary TnI assay in Study 1 and Study 2 (n = 7011 and 7089) and the hs-TnI assay in Study 3 (n = 1522). Critical outliers were defined as duplicate results whose absolute difference exceeded a critical difference (CD = z x √2 x SDAnalytical) at a probability level of 0.0005, with one of the results on the opposite side of the decision limit to its partner. The TnI concentration at 10% imprecision (coefficient of variation) for the contemporary TnI assay was 0.034 µg/L (Study 1) and 0.042 µg/L (Study 2), and 0.006 µg/L (6 ng/L) for the hs-TnI assay. The critical outlier rates for the contemporary TnI assay were 0.51% (Study 1) and 0.37% (Study 2) using a cut-off of 0.04 µg/L, and 0% for the hs-TnI assay using gender-specific cut-offs. The significant number of critical outliers detected using the contemporary TnI assay may pose a risk for misclassification of patients. By contrast, no critical outliers were detected using the hs-TnI assay. However, the total outlier rates for both assays were significantly higher than the expected variability of either assay. The cause of these outliers remains unclear. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Evaluation of the Abbott RealTime HCV genotype II plus RUO (PLUS) assay with reference to core and NS5B sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Melanie A; Lucic, Danijela; Ebbert, Mark T W; Cloherty, Gavin A; Toolsie, Dan; Hillyard, David R

    2017-05-01

    HCV genotyping remains a critical tool for guiding initiation of therapy and selecting the most appropriate treatment regimen. Current commercial genotyping assays may have difficulty identifying 1a, 1b and genotype 6. To evaluate the concordance for identifying 1a, 1b, and genotype 6 between two methods: the PLUS assay and core/NS5B sequencing. This study included 236 plasma and serum samples previously genotyped by core/NS5B sequencing. Of these, 25 samples were also previously tested by the Abbott RealTime HCV GT II Research Use Only (RUO) assay and yielded ambiguous results. The remaining 211 samples were routine genotype 1 (n=169) and genotype 6 (n=42). Genotypes obtained from sequence data were determined using a laboratory-developed HCV sequence analysis tool and the NCBI non-redundant database. Agreement between the PLUS assay and core/NS5B sequencing for genotype 1 samples was 95.8% (162/169), with 96% (127/132) and 95% (35/37) agreement for 1a and 1b samples respectively. PLUS results agreed with core/NS5B sequencing for 83% (35/42) of unselected genotype 6 samples, with the remaining seven "not detected" by the PLUS assay. Among the 25 samples with ambiguous GT II results, 15 were concordant by PLUS and core/NS5B sequencing, nine were not detected by PLUS, and one sample had an internal control failure. The PLUS assay is an automated method that identifies 1a, 1b and genotype 6 with good agreement with gold-standard core/NS5B sequencing and can aid in the resolution of certain genotype samples with ambiguous GT II results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ettevaatust, disain! / Ilka Ruby, Andreas Ruby

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruby, Ilka

    2010-01-01

    Berliinis elavad arhitektuuri- ja kunstikriitikud disaini fetišeerimisest kaasaegses arhitektuuri avangardis. "Hea" disaini kasutamisest kurja jõu väljendusena filmikunstis. Kasutuspõhisest lähenemisest arhitektuurile

  2. Drying rates of Rubi grapes submitted to chemical pretreatments for raisin production Taxas de secagem de uva Rubi submetida a pré-tratamentos químicos para a produção de passas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Regina Nicoletti Telis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the most appropriated chemical treatment to be used to dry grapes cv. Rubi for raisin production. Drying curves for convective drying with air at 50ºC, in a tray drier, were obtained for grapes submitted to chemical pretreatments with different concentrations of potassium carbonate and olive oil, and different dipping times, according to factorial designs. Convective drying curves were also obtained for grapes pretreated in aqueous suspensions of soybean lecithin, at varied lecithin concentrations and dipping times. Page model was adjusted to the experimental drying curves, and the calculated drying times showed that the best pretreatment consisted in dipping grapes for 2 minutes in a 5% olive oil and 6% K2CO3 emulsion, at 50ºC, which resulted in a drying time close to that of the pretreatment with 2.5% of olive oil, but with a lower consumption of this substance. In addition, the immersion of grapes in an aqueous suspension of 2% soy lecithin, at 50ºC, for 5 minutes, resulted in a total drying time slightly higher than the most effective pretreatment.O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar o pré-tratamento químico mais apropriado para a secagem de uvas cv. Rubi para a produção de passas. Foram obtidas curvas de secagem convectiva com ar a 50ºC, em um secador de bandejas, para uvas submetidas a pré-tratamentos químicos com diferentes concentrações de carbonato de potássio e azeite de oliva, e diferentes tempos de imersão, de acordo com planejamentos fatoriais. Também foram obtidas curvas de secagem convectiva, para uvas pré-tratadas em suspensões aquosas de lecitina de soja, em várias concentrações de lecitina e diferentes tempos de imersão. O modelo de Page foi ajustado às curvas de secagem experimental, e os tempos de secagem calculados mostraram que o melhor pré-tratamento consistiu na imersão das uvas por 2 minutos, em uma emulsão de 5% de azeite de oliva e 6% de K2CO3, a

  3. Analysis of magnetotelluric profile data from the Ruby Mountains metamorphic core complex and southern Carlin Trend region, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamaker, Philip E.; Doerner, William M.; Stodt, John A.; Sodergen, Timothy L.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    We have collected about 150 magnetotelluric (MT) soundings in northeastern Nevada in the region of the Ruby Mountains metamorphic core complex uplift and southern Carlin mineral trend, in an effort to illuminate controls on core complex evolution and deposition of world-class gold deposits. The region has experienced a broad range of tectonic events including several periods of compressional and extensional deformation, which have contributed to the total expression of electrical resistivity. Most of the soundings are in three east-west profiles across increasing degrees of core uplift to the north (Bald Mountain, Harrison Pass and Secret Pass latitudes). Two shorter lines cross a prominent east-west structure to the north of the northern profile. MT impedance tensor and vertical magnetic field rotations imply a N-NNE average regional geoelectric strike, similar to surface geologic trends. Model resistivity cross sections were derived using a 2-D inversion algorithm, which damps departures of model parameters from an a priori structure, emphasizing the transverse magnetic (TM) mode and vertical magnetic field data. Geological interpretation of the resistivity combines previous seismic, potential field and isotope models, structural and petrological models for regional compression and extension, and detailed structural/stratigraphic interpretations incorporating drilling for petroleum and mineral exploration. To first order, the resistivity structure is one of a moderately conductive, Phanerozoic sedimentary section fundamentally disrupted by intrusion and uplift of resistive crystalline rocks. Late Devonian and early Mississippian shales of the Pilot and Chainman Formations together form an important conductive marker sequence in the stratigraphy and show pronounced increases in conductance (conductivity-thickness product) from east to west. These increases in conductance are attributed to graphitization caused by Elko-Sevier era compressional shear deformation and

  4. Direct Observation of Cr3+ 3d States in Ruby: Toward Experimental Mechanistic Evidence of Metal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunault, Myrtille O J Y; Harada, Yoshihisa; Miyawaki, Jun; Wang, Jian; Meijerink, Andries; de Groot, Frank M F; van Schooneveld, Matti M

    2018-04-26

    The role of transition metals in chemical reactions is often derived from probing the metal 3d states. However, the relation between metal site geometry and 3d electronic states, arising from multielectronic effects, makes the spectral data interpretation and modeling of these optical excited states a challenge. Here we show, using the well-known case of red ruby, that unique insights into the density of transition metal 3d excited states can be gained with 2p3d resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). We compare the experimental determination of the 3d excited states of Cr 3+ impurities in Al 2 O 3 with 190 meV resolution 2p3d RIXS to optical absorption spectroscopy and to simulations. Using the crystal field multiplet theory, we calculate jointly for the first time the Cr 3+ multielectronic states, RIXS, and optical spectra based on a unique set of parameters. We demonstrate that (i) anisotropic 3d multielectronic interactions causes different scaling of Slater integrals, and (ii) a previously not observed doublet excited state exists around 3.35 eV. These results allow to discuss the influence of interferences in the RIXS intermediate state, of core-hole lifetime broadenings, and of selection rules on the RIXS intensities. Finally, our results demonstrate that using an intermediate excitation energy between L 3 and L 2 edges allows measurement of the density of 3d excited states as a fingerprint of the metal local structure. This opens up a new direction to pump-before-destroy investigations of transition metal complex structures and reaction mechanisms.

  5. A composição das personagens femininas nos contos de Murilo Rubião como forma de autoquestionamento literário

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Gabriel Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Este artigo tem por objetivo analisar a composição das personagens femininas feita pelo contista mineiro Murilo Rubião (1916-1991), partindo da hipótese de que o trabalho do contista, ao compor essas figuras femininas, é uma forma de autoquestionamento do próprio fazer literário e da própria literatura e com técnica literária capaz de demonstrar a modernização tardia do processo social brasileiro.

  6. Preliminary analysis of the role of lake basin morphology on the modern diatom flora in the Ruby Mountains and East Humboldt Range, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starratt, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    As paleolimnologists, we often look at the world through a 5-cm-diameter hole in the bottom of a lake, and although a number of studies have shown that a single core in the deepest part of a lake does not necessarily reflect the entire diatom flora, time and money often limit our ability to collect more than one core from a given site. This preliminary study is part of a multidisciplinary research project to understand Holocene climate variability in alpine regions of the Great Basin, and ultimately, to compare these high elevation records to the better studied pluvial records from adjacent valleys, in this case, the Ruby Valley.

  7. 16 CFR 23.23 - Misuse of the words “ruby,” “sapphire,” “emerald,” “topaz,” “stone,” “birthstone,” “gemstone,” etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.23 Misuse of the words “ruby,” “sapphire,” “emerald,” “topaz,” “stone...,” “emerald,” “topaz,” or the name of any other precious or semi-precious stone to describe any product that... “ruby,” “sapphire,” “emerald,” “topaz,” or the name of any other precious or semi-precious stone, or the...

  8. Výroba nástroje pro zalisování tvarové podložky do příruby

    OpenAIRE

    Kolář, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Bakalářská práce řeší návrh nástroje pro zalisování tvarové podložky do příruby vysokotlakého čerpadla. Teoretická část závěrečného projektu shrnuje poznatky z teorie a technologie tváření kovů a slitin za studena. V praktické části závěrečné práce jsou zpracovány tři varianty upevnění tvarové podložky do příruby vysokotlakého čerpadla. Na základě provedených zkoušek byla pro opravy přírub čerpadel vybrána varianta řešení II, která se jeví jako nejvýhodnější. Příruba vysokotlakého čerpadla je...

  9. A representação do mito de Sísifo no conto, "Petúnia" de Murilo Rubião

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguinaldo Adolfo do Carmo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse artigo é mostrar como o mito de Sísifo é representado no conto “Petúnia” de Murilo Rubião. A obra de Rubião vem sendo definida como pertencente ao fantástico, ao realismo mágico, ao absurdo e ao surreal, marcada também por forte presença da mitologia. O conto escolhido para análise pertence à obra O convidado, publicada pela primeira vez em 1974. O trabalho consiste em analisar o conto tendo como base a crítica de Jorge Schwartz e Davi Arrigucci Jr., entre outros críticos da narrativa contemporânea. Ademais, utilizaremos, também como base, os estudos que envolvem a figura do mito, bem como sua relação no campo literário. O mito é frequentemente usado na literatura e em outras manifestações artísticas em consequência de seu valor simbólico. Dessa forma, tentaremos mostrar os possíveis aspectos do mito que incidem na literatura rubiana.

  10. A nationwide multicentre study in Turkey for establishing reference intervals of haematological parameters with novel use of a panel of whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarda, Yesim; Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Bakan, Ebubekir; Polat, Harun; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Baygutalp, Nurcan K.; Taneli, Fatma; Guvenc, Yesim; Ormen, Murat; Erbayraktar, Zubeyde; Aksoy, Nurten; Sezen, Hatice; Demir, Meltem; Eskandari, Gulcin; Polat, Gurbuz; Mete, Nuriye; Yuksel, Hatice; Vatansev, Husamettin; Gun, Fatma; Akin, Okhan; Ceylan, Ozlem; Noyan, Tevfik; Gozlukaya, Ozgul; Aliyazicioglu, Yuksel; Kahraman, Sevim; Dirican, Melahat; Tuncer, Gul Ozlem; Kimura, Shogo; Eker, Pinar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A nationwide multicentre study was conducted to establish well-defined reference intervals (RIs) of haematological parameters for the Turkish population in consideration of sources of variation in reference values (RVs). Materials and methods K2-EDTA whole blood samples (total of 3363) were collected from 12 laboratories. Sera were also collected for measurements of iron, UIBC, TIBC, and ferritin for use in the latent abnormal values exclusion (LAVE) method. The blood samples were analysed within 2 hours in each laboratory using Cell Dyn and Ruby (Abbott), LH780 (Beckman Coulter), or XT-2000i (Sysmex). A panel of freshly prepared blood from 40 healthy volunteers was measured in common to assess any analyser-dependent bias in the measurements. The SD ratio (SDR) based on ANOVA was used to judge the need for partitioning RVs. RIs were computed by the parametric method with/without applying the LAVE method. Results Analyser-dependent bias was found for basophils (Bas), MCHC, RDW and MPV from the panel test results and thus those RIs were derived for each manufacturer. RIs were determined from all volunteers’ results for WBC, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, MCV, MCH and platelets. Gender-specific RIs were required for RBC, haemoglobin, haematocrit, iron, UIBC and ferritin. Region-specific RIs were required for RBC, haemoglobin, haematocrit, UIBC, and TIBC. Conclusions With the novel use of a freshly prepared blood panel, manufacturer-specific RIs’ were derived for Bas, Bas%, MCHC, RDW and MPV. Regional differences in RIs were observed among the 7 regions of Turkey, which may be attributed to nutritional or environmental factors, including altitude. PMID:28694726

  11. Late summer disease symptoms in western Washington red raspberry fields associated with co-occurrence of Phytophthora rubi, Verticillium dahliae, and Pratylenchus penetrans, but not Raspberry bushy dwarf virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    60% of the $109 million processed by the U.S. red raspberry industry is in northern Washington. In 2012, late summer disease symptoms were observed in many raspberry fields. These symptoms were initially attributed to Verticillium dahliae, but other soilborne pathogens (Phytophthora rubi, Pratylench...

  12. The Effect of Local Lacustrine Conditions on the Expression of Regional Holocene Climate in the Ruby Mountains, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starratt, S.; Kusler, J. E.; Addison, J. A.; Wahl, D.

    2013-12-01

    Climate of the north-central Great Basin currently exhibits a bimodal precipitation pattern, dominated by winter (NDJF) precipitation from the eastern Pacific Ocean, augmented by late spring (MJ) convectional precipitation. Reconstruction of past moisture variability has proven difficult due to limited paleoclimate records in this region and the effect of lake-specific and local watershed characteristics. In order to better understand the Holocene climate record a series of cores were collected in Favre Lake (2902 masl, 8 ha, 12 m deep) using a modified Livingstone piston corer. The presence of the Mazama ash in the basal sediment (~4 m below the sediment/water interface) indicates the record extends to ~7700 cal yr B.P. The pollen record is dominated by Pinus and Artemisia, followed by subordinate levels of Poaceae, Asteraceae, Amaranthaceae, and Sarcobatus. Small fragilarioid diatoms (Pseudostaurosira, Staurosira, and Staurosirella) comprise as much as 80% of the assemblage. The remainder of the assemblage is dominated by benthic taxa. Planktonic species account for about 10% of the assemblage. Biogenic silica values vary between 20 and 30 wt %. These proxies suggest that the lake was small between 7,700 and 5,500 cal yr BP; for most of the remainder of the record, the lake covered a shallow (~1 m deep) shelf, resulting in the dominance of small fragilarioid diatoms. Planktonic species increase in abundance in the last 200 years, indicating the establishment of modern conditions. In order to evaluate the role of local conditions on the climate record, surface sediments were collected from tarns in the northern Ruby Mountains (Lamoille Lake, 2976 masl, 6 ha; Upper Dollar Lake, 2942 masl, ~1 ha, 2 m deep; Lower Dollar Lake, 2937 masl, ~1 ha, 2 m deep; Liberty Lake, 3064 masl, 9 ha, 33 m deep; Castle Lake, 2980 masl, 6 ha, 4.6 m deep; Favre Lake), and East Humboldt Range (Angel Lake, 2553 masl, 5 ha, 9 m deep). Slope aspects above the lakes are north (Lamoille

  13. Acetylcholine suppresses shoot formation and callusing in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shirish C

    2016-06-02

    We present experimental evidence to show that acetylcholine (ACh) causes decrease in shoot formation in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var Pusa Ruby) when cultured on shoot regeneration medium. The optimum response was obtained at 10(-4) M ACh-enriched medium. ACh also causes decrease in percentage of cultures forming callus and reduces the callus mass. Inhibitors of enzymatic hydrolysis of ACh, neostigmine and physostigmine, also suppresses callogenesis and caulogenesis. On the other hand, the breakdown products of Ach, choline and acetate, do not alter the morphogenic response induced on the shoot regeneration medium. Neostigmine showed optimal reduction in shoot formation at 10(-5) M. The explants cultured on neostigmine augmented medium showed decline in the activity of ACh hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase. ACh and neostigmine added together showed marked reduction in callus mass. These results strongly support the role of ACh as a natural regulator of morphogenesis in tomato plants.

  14. XPS and ToF-SIMS analysis of natural rubies and sapphires heat-treated in a reducing (5 mol% H2/Ar) atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achiwawanich, S.; James, B.D.; Liesegang, J.

    2008-01-01

    Surface effects on Mong Hsu rubies and Kanchanaburi sapphires after heat treatment in a controlled reducing atmosphere (5 mol% H 2 /Ar) have been investigated using advanced surface science techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Visual appearance of the gemstones is clearly affected by the heat treatment in a reducing atmosphere. Kanchanaburi sapphires, in particular, exhibit Fe-containing precipitates after the heat treatment which have not been observed in previous studies under an inert atmosphere. Significant correlation between changes in visual appearance of the gemstones and variations in surface concentration of trace elements, especially Ti and Fe are observed. The XPS and ToF-SIMS results suggest that; (1) a reducing atmosphere affects the oxidation state of Fe; (2) dissociation of Fe-Ti interaction may occur during heat treatment.

  15. XPS and ToF-SIMS analysis of natural rubies and sapphires heat-treated in a reducing (5 mol% H 2/Ar) atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achiwawanich, S.; James, B. D.; Liesegang, J.

    2008-12-01

    Surface effects on Mong Hsu rubies and Kanchanaburi sapphires after heat treatment in a controlled reducing atmosphere (5 mol% H 2/Ar) have been investigated using advanced surface science techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Visual appearance of the gemstones is clearly affected by the heat treatment in a reducing atmosphere. Kanchanaburi sapphires, in particular, exhibit Fe-containing precipitates after the heat treatment which have not been observed in previous studies under an inert atmosphere. Significant correlation between changes in visual appearance of the gemstones and variations in surface concentration of trace elements, especially Ti and Fe are observed. The XPS and ToF-SIMS results suggest that; (1) a reducing atmosphere affects the oxidation state of Fe; (2) dissociation of Fe-Ti interaction may occur during heat treatment.

  16. XPS and ToF-SIMS analysis of natural rubies and sapphires heat-treated in a reducing (5 mol% H{sub 2}/Ar) atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achiwawanich, S. [Department of Physics, La Trobe University, VIC 3086 (Australia); Centre for Materials and Surface Science, La Trobe University, VIC 3086 (Australia); James, B.D. [Centre for Materials and Surface Science, La Trobe University, VIC 3086 (Australia); Department of Chemistry, La Trobe University, VIC 3086 (Australia); Liesegang, J. [Department of Physics, La Trobe University, VIC 3086 (Australia); Centre for Materials and Surface Science, La Trobe University, VIC 3086 (Australia)], E-mail: J.Liesegang@latrobe.edu.au

    2008-12-30

    Surface effects on Mong Hsu rubies and Kanchanaburi sapphires after heat treatment in a controlled reducing atmosphere (5 mol% H{sub 2}/Ar) have been investigated using advanced surface science techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Visual appearance of the gemstones is clearly affected by the heat treatment in a reducing atmosphere. Kanchanaburi sapphires, in particular, exhibit Fe-containing precipitates after the heat treatment which have not been observed in previous studies under an inert atmosphere. Significant correlation between changes in visual appearance of the gemstones and variations in surface concentration of trace elements, especially Ti and Fe are observed. The XPS and ToF-SIMS results suggest that; (1) a reducing atmosphere affects the oxidation state of Fe; (2) dissociation of Fe-Ti interaction may occur during heat treatment.

  17. EFEITO DO ETHEPHON EM VIDEIRA 'RUBI' (Vitis vinifera L., CULTIVADA NA REGIÃO NOROESTE DO ESTADO DE SÃO PAULO EFFECT OF INCREASING ETHEPHON IN VINE 'RUBI' (Vitis vinifera L., CULTIVATED IN THE NORTHWEST REGION OF SÃO PAULO STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIO AUGUSTO FRACARO

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido em vinhedo comercial da cv. Rubi, localizado na região Noroeste do Estado de São Paulo. Teve, como objetivo, verificar o efeito do ethephon, aplicado antes da poda de produção, na porcentagem de desfolhamento, tempo de realização da poda, brotação dos ramos, produção da videira, tentando reduzir os custos, melhorando a produtividade e a qualidade. Concluiu-se que a aplicação de 7500ppm de ethephon, 20 dias antes da poda, foi o tratamento que proporcionou maior porcentagem de desfolhamento, menor tempo de realização da poda, maior porcentagem de gemas brotadas e maior produção.The experiment was carried in commercial vineyard of cultivar Ruby, located in the region northwest of São Paulo State. Had as objective, evaluating the effect of ethephon, applied before the pruning the production, in the percentage of defoliation, time of accomplishment of the pruning, shooting of the branches, production of the grapevine, tempt to reduce costs improving the productivity and the quality. It was concluded that the 7500 ppm the ethephon application, 20 days before the pruning, it was the treatment provide larger percentage of it defoliates, smaller time of accomplishment of the pruning, larger percentage of sprouted bud and larger production.

  18. The ruby-crowned tanager Tachyphonus coronatus Vieillot, 1822 (Passeriformes: Thraupidae) as a new host for Isospora ramphoceli Berto, Flausino, Luz, Ferreira, Lopes, 2010 in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Mariana Borges; de Pinho, Irlane Faria; da Silva, Lidiane Maria; Lopes, Bruno doBomfim; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Ildemar; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes; Berto, Bruno Pereira

    2017-06-01

    Despite 12 coccidian species had been recorded from passerines of the Thraupidae family, none of them has been reported in the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia, in Southeastern Brazil. This locality is a protected area with a high degree of vulnerability, and is considered a "conservation island" of biodiversity. The aim of the current work was describe Isospora ramphoceli Berto, Flausino, Luz, Ferreira, Lopes, 2010 from ruby-crowned tanagers Tachyphonus coronatus Vieillot, 1822 in the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia. The oocysts of I. ramphoceli are subspheroidal, 23.1 × 22.1 μm, with smooth, bilayered wall. Micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal or ovoidal, 16.2 × 10.8 μm. Stieda body is knob-like and substieda body is large and homogeneous. Sporocyst residuum is composed of many scattered granules. Sporozoites are vermiform with a posterior refractile body and a nucleus. In addition to new locality, this is the first description of I. ramphoceli from T. coronatus.

  19. Evaluation of the effect of Q-switched ruby and Q-switched Nd-YAG laser irradiation on melanosomes in dermal melanocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, H

    1997-12-01

    Q-switched ruby laser (QSRL) and Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (QSNYL) treatment of dermal melanocytosis, especially nevus of Ota, has produced favorable results that are mediated by selective photothermolysis. However, the precise effects of irradiation on melanosomes and cells containing melanosomes remain unclear, and an optimal method of irradiation has not been found. In this study synthetic melanin powder and pigmented dermal tissue obtained from five blue nevus lesions, also classified as dermal melanocytosis, were used as targets to identify the specific effects of these forms of irradiation in vitro. Morphological changes were assessed by microscopy after irradiation with QSRL and QSNYL at a fluence of 5 J/cm2, the fluence ordinarily utilized in clinical applications. Light microscopy revealed that most of the synthetic melanin powder retained in 1% agar was no longer visible after QSRL irradiation. In contrast, melanin powder particles were partly crushed by QSNYL irradiation. Electron microscopic examination of melanosomes in the blue nevus tissue after irradiation showed expansion and various other forms of disruption. Statistical analysis by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the length of the major axis of the melanosomes indicated that QSRL irradiation caused significantly greater melanosome expansion than QSNYL irradiation. These findings indicate that QSRL irradiation had a greater photothermal effect on dermal melanosomes than QSNYL irradiation. This suggests that QSRL is more efficacious in the treatment of dermal melanocytosis than QSNYL.

  20. CLSI-based transference of the CALIPER database of pediatric reference intervals from Abbott to Beckman, Ortho, Roche and Siemens Clinical Chemistry Assays: direct validation using reference samples from the CALIPER cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Mathew P; Cohen, Ashley H; Colantonio, David A; Chan, Man Khun; Marvasti, Tina Binesh; Randell, Edward; Delvin, Edgard; Cousineau, Jocelyne; Grey, Vijaylaxmi; Greenway, Donald; Meng, Qing H; Jung, Benjamin; Bhuiyan, Jalaluddin; Seccombe, David; Adeli, Khosrow

    2013-09-01

    The CALIPER program recently established a comprehensive database of age- and sex-stratified pediatric reference intervals for 40 biochemical markers. However, this database was only directly applicable for Abbott ARCHITECT assays. We therefore sought to expand the scope of this database to biochemical assays from other major manufacturers, allowing for a much wider application of the CALIPER database. Based on CLSI C28-A3 and EP9-A2 guidelines, CALIPER reference intervals were transferred (using specific statistical criteria) to assays performed on four other commonly used clinical chemistry platforms including Beckman Coulter DxC800, Ortho Vitros 5600, Roche Cobas 6000, and Siemens Vista 1500. The resulting reference intervals were subjected to a thorough validation using 100 reference specimens (healthy community children and adolescents) from the CALIPER bio-bank, and all testing centers participated in an external quality assessment (EQA) evaluation. In general, the transferred pediatric reference intervals were similar to those established in our previous study. However, assay-specific differences in reference limits were observed for many analytes, and in some instances were considerable. The results of the EQA evaluation generally mimicked the similarities and differences in reference limits among the five manufacturers' assays. In addition, the majority of transferred reference intervals were validated through the analysis of CALIPER reference samples. This study greatly extends the utility of the CALIPER reference interval database which is now directly applicable for assays performed on five major analytical platforms in clinical use, and should permit the worldwide application of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance characteristics of the COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan v2.0 and the Abbott RealTime hepatitis C assays - implications for response-guided therapy in genotype 1 infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ninon; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth; Greil, Richard; Strasser, Michael; Oberkofler, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of the protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir a novel therapy approach for HCV genotype 1 infected subjects has become standard of care. Quantification of HCV viral load (VL) represents an important predictor of treatment response. Two different real-time PCR platforms, the COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan v2.0 (CAP-CTM v2.0) and the Abbott RealTime (ART) HCV assay are most widely used. We performed a comparative evaluation of both systems focusing on genotype 1 HCV quantification using clinical specimens, the fourth WHO International Standard for HCV and the Paul Ehrlich National Standard, respectively. The HCV VL assays showed an excellent overall agreement in the clinical specimens studied (R(2)=0.912). Discrepant results were obtained at the low VL end. Four samples tested negative with CAP-CTM v2.0 but were detectable with ART and two samples were undetectable with ART but tested positive with CAP-CTM v2.0. The coefficient of variation in replicate measurements of both reference materials was higher for CAP-CTM v2.0 as compared with ART at the clinical decision point for boceprevir (≥100 IU/ml), but was similar for the two assays at the clinical decision point for telaprevir (≥1,000 IU/ml). The tendency for underestimation of the diluted standards was higher for ART than for CAP-CTM v2.0. Although both assays allowed accurate determination of VL levels in clinical samples, careful interpretation of results at the low VL end is essential. Furthermore, discontinuation of therapy based on single HCV RNA measurement should be carefully reconciled, unless the issue of assay variability has been addressed adequately.

  2. Comparison of the Roche COBAS Amplicor Monitor, Roche COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS Taqman and Abbott RealTime Test assays for quantification of hepatitis C virus and HIV RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Dietmar; Gerritzen, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of two newly developed automated real-time PCR assays, the COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) and the Abbott RealTime tests, in the quantification of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA. The widely used semi-automated COBAS Amplicor Monitor (CAM) assay served as the reference test. Several specimens were analyzed, including 102 plasma samples from HCV patients and 109 from HIV patients and 10 samples from negative donors, as well as Quality Control in Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) and National Institute for Biological Standards and Controls (NIBSC) proficiency program panels. Good correlation was observed among the three assays, with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.8 (CAM-CAP/CTM), 0.89 (CAM-RealTime) and 0.91 (CAP/CTM-RealTime) for HCV and 0.83 (CAM-RealTime), 0.85 (CAM-CAP/CTM) and 0.89 (CAP/CTM-RealTime) for HIV. The overall concordance for negative/positive results was 100% for HCV and 98% for HIV. All assays were equally able to quantify HCV genotypes 1, 3, 5 and HIV group M (subtypes A-H) and N from QCMD and NIBSC panels. In terms of workflow, the RealTime assay requires more hands-on-time than the CAP/CTM assay. The results indicate that real-time PCR assays can improve the efficiency of end-point PCR tests by better covering viral dynamic ranges and providing higher throughput and automation.

  3. Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV assays for prediction of sustained virological response to pegylated interferon and ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hasegawa, Izumi; Ohno, Tomoyoshi; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Kurbanov, Fuat; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Nojiri, Shunsuke; Joh, Takashi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-02-01

    Two commercial real-time PCR assays are currently available for sensitive hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA quantification: the Abbott RealTime HCV assay (ART) and Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV assay (CAP/CTM). We assessed whether the two real-time PCR assays were more effective than Roche Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, v.2.0 (CAM) for prediction of the sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) in chronic hepatitis C. Sixty patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1b (37 males and 23 females, 53 +/- 12 years of age) were treated with PEG-IFNalpha2b plus RBV for 48 weeks. Stored specimens at nine time points for each patient (at baseline, on treatment, and 24 weeks after treatment) were tested by the two real-time PCR assays and CAM. Twenty-six (43.3%) patients reached SVR. The positive predictive values (PPVs) for SVR of undetectable HCV RNA at week 12 by CAM, ART, and CAP/CTM were 74.3%, 88.0%, and 95.2%, respectively. An undetectable HCV RNA level by CAM, ART, and CAP/CTM correctly predicted SVR at week 4 in 100%, 100%, and 100% of patients, at weeks 5 to 8 in 91.7%, 100%, and 100% of patients, at weeks 9 to 12 in 55.6%, 75%, and 87.5% of patients, and at weeks 13 to 24 in 0%, 26.7%, and 40% of patients, respectively. Of 16 patients who relapsed after treatment, HCV RNA was detectable in 2 patients at the end of treatment by CAP/CTM but undetectable by ART and CAM. HCV RNA tests using ART and CAP/CTM are considered to be more effective at predicting SVR than CAM, and the PPV for SVR was slightly higher in CAP/CTM than in ART.

  4. Performance comparison of the versant HCV genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA) and the abbott realtime HCV genotype II assay for detecting hepatitis C virus genotype 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruifeng; Cong, Xu; Du, Shaocai; Fei, Ran; Rao, Huiying; Wei, Lai

    2014-10-01

    The Versant HCV genotype 2.0 assay (line probe assay [LiPA] 2.0), based on reverse hybridization, and the Abbott Realtime HCV genotype II assay (Realtime II), based on genotype-specific real-time PCR, have been widely used to analyze hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes. However, their performances for detecting HCV genotype 6 infections have not been well studied. Here, we analyzed genotype 6 in 63 samples from the China HCV Genotyping Study that were originally identified as genotype 6 using the LiPA 2.0. The genotyping results were confirmed by nonstructural 5B (NS5B) or core sequence phylogenetic analysis. A total of 57 samples were confirmed to be genotype 6 (51 genotype 6a, 5 genotype 6n, and 1 genotype 6e). Four samples identified as a mixture of genotypes 6 and 4 by the LiPA 2.0 were confirmed to be genotype 3b. The remaining two samples classified as genotype 6 by the LiPA 2.0 were confirmed to be genotype 1b, which were intergenotypic recombinants and excluded from further comparison. In 57 genotype 6 samples detected using the Realtime II version 2.00 assay, 47 genotype 6a samples were identified as genotype 6, one 6e sample was misclassified as genotype 1, and four 6a and five 6n samples yielded indeterminate results. Nine nucleotide profiles in the 5' untranslated region affected the performances of both assays. Therefore, our analysis shows that both assays have limitations in identifying HCV genotype 6. The LiPA 2.0 cannot distinguish some 3b samples from genotype 6 samples. The Realtime II assay fails to identify some 6a and all non-6a subtypes, and it misclassifies genotype 6e as genotype 1. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, and Queer Visibility Through Selfies: Comparing Platform Mediators Across Ruby Rose’s Instagram and Vine Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Duguay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the relationship between social media platforms and the production and dissemination of selfies in light of its implications for the visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer (LGBTQ people. Applying an Actor Network Theory lens, two popular visual media apps, Instagram and Vine, are examined through a comparative walkthrough method. This reveals platform elements, or mediators, that can influence the conversational capacity of selfies in terms of the following: range, the variety of discourses addressed within a selfie; reach, circulation within and across publics; and salience, the strength and clarity of discourses communicated through a selfie. These mediators are illustrated through LGBTQ celebrity Ruby Rose’s Instagram selfies and Vine videos. Instagram’s use expectations encourage selfies focused on mainstream discourses of normative beauty and conspicuous consumption with an emphasis on appearance, extending through features constraining selfies’ reach and salience. In contrast, Vine’s broader use expectations enable a variety of discourses to be communicated across publics with an emphasis on creative, first-person sharing. These findings are reflected in Rose’s Instagram selfies, which mute alternative discourses of gender and sexuality through desexualized and aesthetically appealing self-representations, while Vines display her personal side, enabling both LGBTQ and heterosexual, cisgender people to identify with her without minimizing non-normative aspects of her gender and sexuality. These findings demonstrate the relevance of platforms in shaping selfies’ conversational capacity, as mediators can influence whether selfies feature in conversations reinforcing dominant discourses or in counterpublic conversations, contributing to everyday activism that challenges normative gender and sexual discourses.

  6. Crescimento inicial do cafeeiro Rubi em resposta a doses de nitrogênio, fósforo e potássio e a regimes hídricos Initial growth of Rubi coffee plant in response to nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and water regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Barbosa Nazareno

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o crescimento da parte aérea do cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. cultivar Rubi MG 1192 submetido a três doses de N, P e K e dois regimes hídricos durante o primeiro ano após o transplante, em 20 de novembro de 2000. O crescimento da planta foi avaliado aos 134, 196, 236, 284, 334 e 383 dias após o transplante (dat. Houve resposta ao N e ao K no crescimento em número de ramos plagiotrópicos por planta, ao passo que no número de nós com gemas por planta, observou-se resposta apenas ao nitrogênio. Não houve resposta ao N, P e K no aumento da massa seca da parte aérea e no índice de área foliar. Além de mostrar efeito significativo no crescimento do cafeeiro, a irrigação antecipou o rápido crescimento para julho (236 dat proporcionando plantas mais vigorosas. Nas plantas não-irrigadas, o rápido crescimento ocorreu em meados de outubro (334 dat. Entretanto, a irrigação não impediu a queda na taxa de crescimento durante o inverno. O desenvolvimento das gemas em frutos ou ramos secundários nas plantas não-irrigadas alterou a distribuição de matéria seca e reduziu o crescimento do caule, ramos e folhas.The objective of this work was to evaluate shoot growth of coffee trees (Coffea arabica L. cultivar Rubi MG 1192 under three N, P and K doses and two water regimes during the first year after transplanting, starting on the 20th November 2000. The growth was evaluated at 134, 196, 236, 284, 334 and 383 days after transplanting (DAT. Nitrogen and K affected the number of plagiotropic branches per plant. Nevertheless, only N affected the number of nodes with axillary buds. There was no growth response to N, P, and K in terms of the total shoot dry mass and leaf area index during the experimental period. Irrigated treatments presented the best plant growth results, provided more vigorous plants and anticipated the fast growth phase to July (236 DAT, but could not avoid growth rate decrease during

  7. Moessbauerspectroscopy on Gold Ruby Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslbeck, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the chemical states of gold and the physical mechanisms of the growing process of the particles under the influence of additional ingredients like tin, lead, antimony and selenium before, during and after the colouring process are investigated by using the Moessbauer spectroscopy on 197 Au, 119 Sn and 121 Sb, optical spectroscopy and X-ray-diffraction. Gold in an unnealed, colourless state of the glasses consists of monovalent forming linear bonds to two neighbouring oxygen atoms. The Lamb-Moessbauer factor of these gold oxide bondings is observed as 0.095 at 4.2 K. The gold in it's oxide state transforms to gold particles with a diameter of 3 nm to 60 nm. The size of the gold particles is quite definable within the optical spectra and certain sizes are also discernable within the Moessbauer spectra. One component of the Moessbauer spectra is assigned to the surface layer of the gold particles. By comparing this surface component with the amount of the bulk metallic core, one can calculate the size of the gold particles. In the Moessbauer spectra of the colourless glass one also can find parts of bulk metallic gold. Investigations with X-ray diffraction show that these are gold particles with a diameter of 100 nm to 300 nm and therefore have no additional colouring effect within the visible spectrum. The Moessbauer spectra on gold of the remelt glasses are similar to those which have been measured on the initial colourless glasses

  8. Despliegue de una aplicación Ruby on Rails utilizando las tecnologías de virtualización Docker y Coreos en la nube pública de Amazon Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Santana Martel, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    [ES]Este Trabajo de Fin de Máster trata la utilización de distintas tecnologías de virtualización, contenedores y orquestación sobre una aplicación web para generar una infraestructura como código reproducible, tanto en local como en la nube. Así, se toma una aplicación Ruby on Rails y se redefine a una arquitectura de microservicios encapsulados en contenedores Docker. Además, se prepara para la integración y despliegue continuos con el uso de Travis CI, Docker Hub y GitHub. Ésta será ejecut...

  9. O guarda-roupa do fantasma ou a astúcia da representação em fuga. Para uma leitura de "Epidólia" de Murilo Rubião

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos, Hermenegildo

    2015-01-01

    Em "Epidólia" de Murilo Rubião discute-se a possibilidade de a literatura representar o mundo. Aquilo que não se deixa representar é o fantasma. Mas o fantasma se mostra ao se esconder. Assim, a forma-fantasma é paradoxalmente a única representação possível do irrepresentável. Também a mercadoria, o valor de troca, é fantasmagórica. A ilusão da representação faz parte do tecido social. A literatura, por ser ficção, pode nos dar a ver o que a ideologia esconde.

  10. Treatment of pigmentary disorders in patients with skin of color with a novel 755 nm picosecond, Q-switched ruby, and Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond lasers: A retrospective photographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Melissa Kanchanapoomi; Ng, Elise; Bae, Yoon-Soo Cindy; Brauer, Jeremy A; Geronemus, Roy G

    2016-02-01

    Laser procedures in skin of color (SOC) patients are challenging due to the increased risk of dyspigmentation and scarring. A novel 755 nm alexandrite picosecond laser has demonstrated effectiveness for tattoo removal and treatment of acne scars. No studies to date have evaluated its applications in pigmentary disorders. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the safety profile and efficacy of the picosecond alexandrite laser compared to the current standard treatment, Q-switched ruby and neodynium (Nd):YAG nanosecond lasers, for pigmentary disorders in SOC patients. A retrospective photographic and chart evaluation of seventy 755 nm alexandrite picosecond, ninety-two Q-switched frequency doubled 532 nm and 1,064 nm Nd:YAG nanosecond, and forty-seven Q-switched 694 nm ruby nanosecond laser treatments, in forty-two subjects of Fitzpatrick skin types III-VI was conducted in a single laser specialty center. The picosecond laser was a research prototype device. Treatment efficacy was assessed by two blinded physician evaluators, using a visual analog scale for percentage of pigmentary clearance in standard photographs. Subject assessment of efficacy, satisfaction, and adverse events was performed using a questionnaire survey. The most common pigmentary disorder treated was Nevus of Ota (38.1%), followed by solar lentigines (23.8%). Other pigmentary disorders included post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, congenital nevus, café au lait macule, dermal melanocytosis, Nevus of Ito, and Becker's nevus. Clinical efficacy of the Q-switched nanosecond lasers and picosecond laser treatments were comparable for lesions treated on the face with a mean visual analog score of 2.57 and 2.44, respectively, corresponding to approximately 50% pigmentary clearance. Subject questionnaires were completed in 58.8% of the picosecond subjects and 52.0% of the Q-switched subjects. Eighty four percent of subjects receiving Q-switched nanosecond laser treatments and 50% of the

  11. Screening Phytophthora rubi for fungicide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary results from the survey for fungicide resistance in Phytophthora were reported at the 2016 Washington Small Fruit Conference. Phytophthora was isolated from diseased plants in 28 red raspberry fields and tested against mefenoxam, the active ingredient of Ridomil. Most isolates were ident...

  12. Los seis proyectos de james Abbott Mcneill Whistler

    OpenAIRE

    Radyk, Lucrecia

    2017-01-01

    Una serie de bocetos al óleo de James McNeill Whistler presenta un caso particular en la obra de este pintor, reconocido como uno de los iniciadores de la estética del ?arte por el arte? en Inglaterra. Se propone un recorrido por textos contemporáneos de las obras, en los que se alude a los Seis proyectos, a fin de ubicarlos en el contexto de la obra de Whistler y en relación con sus postulados estéticos. Nos interesa demostrar en especial el carácter central de estas pinturas en la obra ...

  13. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (MCHr) in the detection of iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrechaga Igartua, Eloísa; Hoffmann, Johannes J M L; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Silvia; Escanero, Jesús F

    2017-09-01

    Blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration within the reference interval does not exclude iron deficiency (ID): individuals with normal stores lose iron during a long period before their Hb falls below of the level that is defined as anemia. The process entails a decrease of storage iron, shown by serum ferritin below reference range, followed by iron depletion, eventually leading to iron restricted erythropoiesis; consequence of an imbalance between erythropoietic iron requirements and too low supply is a reduction of Hb synthesis in reticulocytes. We study the potential utility of mean reticulocyte hemoglobin content (MCHr), reported by CELL-DYN Sapphire (Abbott Diagnostics) analyzer, in the detection of ID in non-anemic adults. 207 patients with Hb within the reference range were enrolled. ID was defined as Hb>120g/L (women), >130g/L (men) and serum ferritin iron deficient adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Coffee (Coffea arabica cv. Rubi) seed germination: mechanisms and regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, da E.A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Coffee seeds display slow and variable germination which severely hampers the production of seedlings for planting in the following growth season. Little work has been done with the aim to understand the behavior of

  15. Head first rails a learner's companion to ruby on rails

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, David

    2009-01-01

    Ready to transport your web applications into the Web 2.0 era? Head First Rails takes your programming -- and productivity -- to the max. You'll learn everything from the fundamentals of Rails scaffolding to building customized interactive web apps using Rails' rich set of tools and the MVC framework. By the time you're finished, you'll have learned more than just another web framework. You'll master database interactions, integration with Ajax and XML, rich content, and even dynamic graphing of your data -- all in a fraction of the time it takes to build the same apps with Java, PHP, ASP.NE

  16. Practical Ruby projects ideas for the eclectic programmer

    CERN Document Server

    Cyll, Topher

    2008-01-01

    Cyll brings several imaginative projects to this book, ranging from making generative music, animations, and turn-based games to implementing simulations, algorithms, and even an implementation of Lisp. Each chapter looks at solving tricky development problems, enforces best practices, and encourages creative thinking.

  17. Nägemine piltide kaudu : Fotograafia antropoloogiast / Jay Ruby

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruby, Jay, 1935-

    2010-01-01

    Fotograafia ja sotsiaalteaduste suhtest visuaalse etnograafia seisukohalt. Uurimisprojektist, mille sihiks on mõista kõikide fotograafia liikide kultuurilist rolli ja funktsioone inimeste elus antropoloogilisest vaatenurgast, olles huvitatud kultuurilisest ja kommunikatiivsest, mitte hinnangulisest algest

  18. Multiple interruption of optically generated acoustic phonons in ruby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkhuis, J.I.

    1979-01-01

    This thesis clarifies the rate-determining processes which tend to equilibrate the bottlenecked 29 cm -1 phonons with the temperature bath in stationary experiments. In addition, the direct relaxation between the Zeeman components of E is measured, revealing at high pumping, both continuous and time-resolved, a strong phonon bottleneck. (Auth.)

  19. Desarrollo SaaS con Ruby on Rails

    OpenAIRE

    Peralta Calvo, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Con el objetivo de liberar a los dispositivos finales de lógica de cómputo, muchas veces esta se traslada al servidor y estos terminales simplemente se tienen que ocupar de consultar información. Las aplicaciones web se alojan en la nube y hacen el desarrollo y el mantenimiento más sencillos. En este Trabajo de Fin de Grado se ha implementado una aplicación web accesible por navegador y desarrollada con metodologías ágiles. Mediante una serie de herramientas y ténicas de desarrollo se ha c...

  20. Optic flow stabilizes flight in ruby-throated hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Ivo G; Biewener, Andrew A

    2016-08-15

    Flying birds rely on visual cues for retinal image stabilization by negating rotation-induced optic flow, the motion of the visual panorama across the retina, through corrective eye and head movements. In combination with vestibular and proprioceptive feedback, birds may also use visual cues to stabilize their body during flight. Here, we test whether artificially induced wide-field motion generated through projected visual patterns elicits maneuvers in body orientation and flight position, in addition to stabilizing vision. To test this hypothesis, we present hummingbirds flying freely within a 1.2 m cylindrical visual arena with a virtual surround rotated at different speeds about its vertical axis. The birds responded robustly to these visual perturbations by rotating their heads and bodies with the moving visual surround, and by adjusting their flight trajectories, following the surround. Thus, similar to insects, hummingbirds appear to use optic flow cues to control flight maneuvers as well as to stabilize their visual inputs. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Wing-pitching mechanism of hovering Ruby-throated hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2015-01-19

    In hovering flight, hummingbirds reverse the angle of attack of their wings through pitch reversal in order to generate aerodynamic lift during both downstroke and upstroke. In addition, the wings may pitch during translation to further enhance lift production. It is not yet clear whether these pitching motions are caused by the wing inertia or actuated through the musculoskeletal system. Here we perform a computational analysis of the pitching dynamics by incorporating the realistic wing kinematics to determine the inertial effects. The aerodynamic effect is also included using the pressure data from a previous three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation of a hovering hummingbird. The results show that like many insects, pitch reversal of the hummingbird is, to a large degree, caused by the wing inertia. However, actuation power input at the root is needed in the beginning of pronation to initiate a fast pitch reversal and also in mid-downstroke to enable a nose-up pitching motion for lift enhancement. The muscles on the wing may not necessarily be activated for pitching of the distal section. Finally, power analysis of the flapping motion shows that there is no requirement for substantial elastic energy storage or energy absorption at the shoulder joint.

  2. Wing-pitching mechanism of hovering Ruby-throated hummingbirds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2015-01-01

    In hovering flight, hummingbirds reverse the angle of attack of their wings through pitch reversal in order to generate aerodynamic lift during both downstroke and upstroke. In addition, the wings may pitch during translation to further enhance lift production. It is not yet clear whether these pitching motions are caused by the wing inertia or actuated through the musculoskeletal system. Here we perform a computational analysis of the pitching dynamics by incorporating the realistic wing kinematics to determine the inertial effects. The aerodynamic effect is also included using the pressure data from a previous three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation of a hovering hummingbird. The results show that like many insects, pitch reversal of the hummingbird is, to a large degree, caused by the wing inertia. However, actuation power input at the root is needed in the beginning of pronation to initiate a fast pitch reversal and also in mid-downstroke to enable a nose-up pitching motion for lift enhancement. The muscles on the wing may not necessarily be activated for pitching of the distal section. Finally, power analysis of the flapping motion shows that there is no requirement for substantial elastic energy storage or energy absorption at the shoulder joint. (paper)

  3. Well-Being in Central Asia and the Caucasus | Abbott | Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with four countries that, like Rwanda, suffered economic and social collapse in the early 1990s. It develops a sociologically informed understanding of what influences the well-being of people living in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan (Central Asian Republics) and Armenia and Georgia ( the Caucasus), four of ...

  4. Well-Being in Central Asia and the Caucasus | Abbott | Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwanda Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web ...

  5. 77 FR 75610 - Foreign-Trade Zone 22-Chicago, IL, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Abbott...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... trials; radioactive elements and isotopes and compounds other than those of subheadings 2844.10, 2844.20... elements; isotopes or compounds; radioactive residues; elements, isotopes and compounds with cobalt-60 radioactivity only; and other elements, isotopes and compounds: Americium-241, californium-252, curium-244...

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gravitational waves search from known PSR with LIGO (Abbott+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnho Ltz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. 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M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kramer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; MacLeod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGra, Th C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R. J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero E. A.; QuitzoW-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Buchner, S.; Cognard, I.; Corongiu, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L.; Hobbs, G. B.; Kerr, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Possenti, A.; Ridolfi, A.; Shannon, R. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.; (The Ligo Scientific Collaboration)

    2017-11-01

    We have obtained timings for 200 known pulsars. Timing was performed using the 42ft telescope and Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank (UK), the 26m telescope at Hartebeesthoek (South Africa), the Parkes radio telescope (Australia), the Nancay Decimetric Radio Telescope (France), the Arecibo Observatory (Puerto Rico) and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Of these, 122 have been targeted in previous campaigns (Aasi+ 2014, J/ApJ/785/119), while 78 are new to this search. (1 data file).

  7. European multicenter analytical evaluation of the Abbott ARCHITECT STAT high sensitive troponin I immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintus, Magdalena; Kozinski, Marek; Boudry, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    high sensitive cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) assay and its 99th percentile upper reference limit (URL). METHODS: Laboratories from nine European countries evaluated the ARCHITECT STAT high sensitive troponin I (hs-TnI) immunoassay on the ARCHITECT i2000SR/i1000SR immunoanalyzers. Imprecision, limit...

  8. Prevalence, Severity, and Determinant Factors of Anemia among Pregnant Women in South Sudanese Refugees, Pugnido, Western Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Aklilu; Yemane, Tilahun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anemia is one of the major health problems among refugee pregnant women in the world. Anemia among pregnant women is multifactorial and results in detrimental consequences on the mothers and infants. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and determinants of anemia among pregnant women in South Sudanese refugees, Pugnido western, Ethiopia. Methods. A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Pugnido Administration Refugee and Returnee Affairs Health Center from April 15 to June 30, 2015. Demographic and related data were collected using questionnaire based interview. Complete blood count was done using CELL-DYN 1800 (Abbott USA). Blood smear and fecal specimen were examined for hemoparasite and intestinal parasite, respectively. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were done using SPSS-Version 20.0. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia was 36.1%, from whom 2.3% had severe anemia. Being in third trimester, eating meat at most once a week, drinking tea immediately after meal at least once a day, having mid-upper arm circumference below 21 centimeters, and intestinal parasitic infection were identified as independent factors of anemia. Conclusion. More than one-third of pregnant women had anemia in this study. Intervention based strategies on identified determinant factors will be very important to combat anemia among the group. PMID:28058116

  9. Evaluation of immunoturbidimetric rheumatoid factor method from Diagam on Abbott c8000 analyzer: comparison with immunonephelemetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Anne Marie; Hurstel, Rémy; Bargnoux, Anne Sophie; Badiou, Stéphanie; Cristol, Jean Paul

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) consists of autoantibodies and because of its heterogeneity its determination is not easy. Currently, nephelometry and Elisa method are considered as reference methods. Due to consolidation, many laboratories have fully automated turbidimetric apparatus, and specific nephelemetric systems are not always available. In addition, nephelemetry is more accurate, but time consuming, expensive, and requires a specific device, resulting in a lower efficiency. Turbidimetry could be an attractive alternative. The turbidimetric RF test from Diagam meets the requirements of accuracy and precision for optimal clinical use, with an acceptable measuring range, and could be an alternative in the determination of RF, without the associated cost of a dedicated instrument, making consolidation and saving blood possible.

  10. Evaluation and comparison of Abbott Jaffe and enzymatic creatinine methods: Could the old method meet the new requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küme, Tuncay; Sağlam, Barıs; Ergon, Cem; Sisman, Ali Rıza

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the analytical performance characteristics of the two creatinine methods based on the Jaffe and enzymatic methods. Two original creatinine methods, Jaffe and enzymatic, were evaluated on Architect c16000 automated analyzer via limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ), linearity, intra-assay and inter-assay precision, and comparability in serum and urine samples. The method comparison and bias estimation using patient samples according to CLSI guideline were performed on 230 serum and 141 urine samples by analyzing on the same auto-analyzer. The LODs were determined as 0.1 mg/dL for both serum methods and as 0.25 and 0.07 mg/dL for the Jaffe and the enzymatic urine method respectively. The LOQs were similar with 0.05 mg/dL value for both serum methods, and enzymatic urine method had a lower LOQ than Jaffe urine method, values at 0.5 and 2 mg/dL respectively. Both methods were linear up to 65 mg/dL for serum and 260 mg/dL for urine. The intra-assay and inter-assay precision data were under desirable levels in both methods. The higher correlations were determined between two methods in serum and urine (r=.9994, r=.9998 respectively). On the other hand, Jaffe method gave the higher creatinine results than enzymatic method, especially at the low concentrations in both serum and urine. Both Jaffe and enzymatic methods were found to meet the analytical performance requirements in routine use. However, enzymatic method was found to have better performance in low creatinine levels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Screening for hypoglycemia at the bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU with the Abbott PCx glucose meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila Afisi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Point of care (POC glucose meters are routinely used as a screening tool for hypoglycemia in a neonatal setting. Glucose meters however, lack the same accuracy as laboratory instruments for glucose measurement. In this study we investigated potential reasons for this inaccuracy and established a cut off value for confirmatory testing. Methods In this prospective study, all patients in the neonatal intensive care unit who had a plasma glucose test ordered were eligible to participate. Demographic information, sample collection information (nine variables and a recent hematocrit value were recorded for each sample. Glucose measurements were taken at the bedside on the glucose meter (RN PCx as well as in the laboratory on both the glucose meter (LAB PCx and the laboratory analyzer (PG. Data were analyzed by simple and mixed-effects regression analysis and by analysis of a receiver operator characteristics (ROC curve. Results There were 475 samples analyzed from 132 patients. RN PCx values were higher than PG values (mean = 4.9%, while LAB PCx results were lower (mean = -5.2% than PG values. Only 31% of the difference between RN PCx – PG and 46% of the difference for LAB PCx – PG could be accounted for by the variables tested. The largest proportion of variance between PCx and PG measurements was explained by hematocrit (about 30% with a greater effect seen at glucose concentrations ≤4.0 mmol/L (≤72 mg/dL(48% and 40% for RN PCx and LAB PCx, respectively. The ROC analysis showed that for detection of all cases of hypoglycemia (PG Conclusion The large difference between glucose results obtained by PCx glucose meter compared to the laboratory analyzer can be explained in part by hematocrit and low glucose concentration. These results emphasize that the glucose meter is useful only as a screening device for neonatal hypoglycemia and that a screening cut off value must be established.

  12. Does recreational scuba diving have clinically significant effect on routine haematological parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Antonija; Nikolac, Nora; Braticevic, Marina Njire; Milcic, Ana; Sobocanec, Sandra; Balog, Tihomir; Dabelic, Sanja; Dumic, Jerka

    2017-06-15

    Scuba diving represents a combination of exercise and changes in environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate changes in haematological parameters after recreational scuba diving in order to identify clinically significant changes. The study included males, 17 recreational divers, median age (range) 41 (30-52) years. Blood samples were taken before diving, immediately after diving to 30 meters for 30 minutes, 3 hours and 6 hours after diving. Complete blood counts were analyzed on the Cell Dyn Ruby haematology analyzer. Statistical significance between successive measurements was tested using Friedman test. The difference between the two measurements was judged against desirable bias (DSB) derived from biological variation and calculated reference change values (RCV). The difference higher than RCV was considered clinically significant. A statistically significant increase and difference judging against DSB was observed: for neutrophils immediately, 3 and 6 hours after diving (18%, 34% and 36%, respectively), for white blood cells (WBCs) 3 and 6 hours after diving (20% and 25%, respectively), for lymphocytes (20%) and monocytes (23%) 6 hours after diving. A statistically significant decrease and difference judging against DSB was found: immediately after diving for monocytes (- 15%), 3 and 6 hours after diving for red blood cells (RBCs) (- 2.6% and -2.9%, respectively), haemoglobin (- 2.1% and - 2.8%, respectively) and haematocrit (- 2.4% and - 3.2%, respectively). A clinically significant change was not found for any of the test parameters when compared to RCV. Observed statistically significant changes after recreational scuba diving; WBCs, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes increase and RBCs, haemoglobin, haematocrit decrease, probably will not affect clinical decision.

  13. Multigene characterization of a new 'Candidatus Phytoplasma rubi'-related strain associated with blackberry witches' broom

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fránová, Jana; de Sousa, E.; Koloniuk, Igor; Mimoso, C.; Matos, J.; Cardoso, F.; Contaldo, N.; Paltrinieri, S.; Bertaccini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2016), s. 1438-1446 ISSN 1466-5026 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : 16SRibosomal-RNA * flavescence doree * gene-sequences Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.134, year: 2016

  14. RubiShort: Reducing scan time in 82Rb heart scans to minimize movements artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jeppe; Vraa, Kaspar J.; Harms, Hans

    Aim: Relative and absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) can derived from a single 82Rb PET/CT scan using list mode data to extract both static and dynamic PET series. However, patient movement and changes in breathing pattern, especially during pharmacological stress, reduce the quality of the scans...

  15. Structure, metamorphism, and geochronology of the Cosmos Hills and Ruby Ridge, Brooks Range schist belt, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Peter B.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    The boundary of the internal zones of the Brooks Range orogenic belt (the schist belt) is a fault contact that dips toward the hinterland (the Yukon-Koyukuk province). This fault, here referred to as the Cosmos Hills fault zone, juxtaposes oceanic rocks and unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks structurally above blueschist-to-greenschist facies metamorphic rocks of the schist belt. Near the fault contact, schist belt rocks are increasingly affected by a prominent, subhorizontal transposition foliation that is locally mylonitic in the fault zone. Structural and petrologic observations combined with 40Ar/39Ar incremental-release geochronology give evidence for a polyphase metamorphic and deformational history beginning in the Middle Jurassic and continuing until the Late Cretaceous. Our 40Ar/39Ar cooling age for Jurassic metamorphism is consistent with stratigraphic and other evidence for the onset of Brooks Range orogenesis. Jurassic metamorphism is nearly everywhere overprinted by a regional greenschist-facies event dated at 130–125 Ma. Near the contact with the Cosmos Hills fault zone, the schist belt is increasingly affected by a younger greenschist metamorphism that is texturally related to a prominent foliation that folds and transposes an older fabric. The 40Ar/39Ar results on phengite and fuchsite that define this younger fabric give recrystallization ages ranging from 103 to less than 90 Ma. We conclude that metamorphism that formed the transposition fabric peaked around 100 Ma and may have continued until well after 90 Ma. This age for greenschist metamorphism is broadly synchronous with the depositional age of locally derived, shallow-marine clastic sedimentary strata in the hanging wall of the fault zone and thus substantiates the interpretation that the fault zone accommodated extension in the Late Cretaceous. This extension unroofed and exhumed the schist belt during relative subsidence of the Yukon-Koyukuk province.

  16. Pildi vaatenurgast : Fotograafilise tähenduse tõlgenduslikud strateegiad / Jay Ruby

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruby, Jay, 1935-

    2010-01-01

    Fotograafia rollist antropoloogias ja selle sihist, fotode tõlgendamisest ja kontekstist, pildiliste sõnumite osast kultuuris. Foto kui kunst, kui esteetiline objekt versus foto kui reaalsuse "vahendamata" salvestus - need levinud seisukohad häirivad fotode teadusliku interpretatsiooni väljakujunemist ja fotode antropoloogilise tõlgendamise süsteemi väljatöötamist. Eesmärgiks peaks olema pakkuda antropoloogidele kommunikatsiooni pildilist vahendit

  17. Glucanolytic Actinomycetes Antagonistic to Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi, the Causal Agent of Raspberry Root Rot

    OpenAIRE

    Valois, D.; Fayad, K.; Barasubiye, T.; Garon, M.; Dery, C.; Brzezinski, R.; Beaulieu, C.

    1996-01-01

    A collection of about 200 actinomycete strains was screened for the ability to grow on fragmented Phytophthora mycelium and to produce metabolites that inhibit Phytophthora growth. Thirteen strains were selected, and all produced (beta)-1,3-, (beta)-1,4-, and (beta)-1,6-glucanases. These enzymes could hydrolyze glucans from Phytophthora cell walls and cause lysis of Phytophthora cells. These enzymes also degraded other glucan substrates, such as cellulose, laminarin, pustulan, and yeast cell ...

  18. Glucanolytic Actinomycetes Antagonistic to Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi, the Causal Agent of Raspberry Root Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valois, D; Fayad, K; Barasubiye, T; Garon, M; Dery, C; Brzezinski, R; Beaulieu, C

    1996-05-01

    A collection of about 200 actinomycete strains was screened for the ability to grow on fragmented Phytophthora mycelium and to produce metabolites that inhibit Phytophthora growth. Thirteen strains were selected, and all produced (beta)-1,3-, (beta)-1,4-, and (beta)-1,6-glucanases. These enzymes could hydrolyze glucans from Phytophthora cell walls and cause lysis of Phytophthora cells. These enzymes also degraded other glucan substrates, such as cellulose, laminarin, pustulan, and yeast cell walls. Eleven strains significantly reduced the root rot index when inoculated on raspberry plantlets.

  19. Value based management and productivity : the mining situation / Tania Ruby Pienaar.

    OpenAIRE

    Pienaar, Tania Ruby

    2009-01-01

    The cost of mining companies listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) have not been immune to inflationary pressures. Increasing cost pressures, lower grades, and reduced electricity supply imply that management will have to apply rigorous cost saving measures to mitigate the effect on profits. One such measure is value based management (VBM). VBM is a powerful management framework with the aim to focus all managerial processes on shareholder wealth creation. It therefore encourages al...

  20. Analytical and clinical comparison of Elecsys syphilis (Roche®) - Architect syphilis TP and reformulated Architect syphilis TP (Abbott®) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keukeleire, Steven; Desmet, Stefanie; Lagrou, Katrien; Oosterlynck, Julie; Verhulst, Manon; Van Besien, Jessica; Saegeman, Veroniek; Reynders, Marijke

    2017-03-01

    The performance of Elecsys Syphilis was compared to Architect Syphilis TP and Reformulated Architect Syphilis TP. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 98.4% and 99.5%, 97.7% and 97.1%, and 99.2% and 99.7% respectively. The assays are comparable and considered adequate for syphilis screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Media Images Abbott and Costello Meet the End of the World: Who Is the Enemy in "The Da Vinci Code" and "An Inconvenient Truth?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Popular culture requires readily identifiable villains. Subcultural groups often serve this role, creating controversies. Controversies based on religion are especially bitter. As a rule, religion in the movies is inoffensively sentimental, but "The Da Vinci Code" is both popular and provocative, treading on the dangerous ground of Jesus's…

  2. Impact of mine and natural sources of mercury on water, sediment, and biota in Harley Gulch adjacent to the Abbott-Turkey Run mine, Lake County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Stable-isotope data indicate that there are three sources of water that effect the composition and Hg concentration of waters in Harley Gulch: (1) meteoric water that dominates water chemistry during the wet season; (2) thermal water effluent from the Turkey Run mine that effects the chemistry at sample site HG1; and (3) cold connate groundwater that dominates water chemistry during the dry season as it upwells and reaches the surface. The results from sampling executed for this study suggest four distinct areas in Harley Gulch: (1) the contaminated West Fork of Harley Gulch, consisting of the stream immediately downstream from the mine area and the wetlands upstream from Harley Gulch canyon (sample sites HG1-HG2, (2) the East Fork of Harley Gulch, where no mining has occurred (sample site HG3), (3) sample sites HG4-HG7, where a seasonal influx of saline groundwater alters stream chemistry, and (4) sample sites HG7-HG10, downstream in Harley Gulch towards the confluence with Cache Creek.

  3. 75 FR 3221 - Ruby Pipeline, L.L.C.; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... EIS have been mailed to Federal, State, and local government agencies; elected officials; Native... Interpretive Rule published at 66 FR 1864 ) and found at http://www.fs.fed.us/appeals/appeals_related.php#app...

  4. Comparative Test of the Effectiveness of Large Bombs against Reinforced Concrete Structures (Anglo-American Bomb Tests-Project RUBY).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-10-31

    be expected to perforate up to 15’-l0" of reinforced concreto at this striking velocity. (3) The rocket assisted 4500-lb. Disney bomb, with a striking...to 30 doegre until it is brought to reot in the esneret or ele perforates the slabe (4) The reliability of the arm~t d firing systen of the Disne...Field, Florida. 1. GEMAL: a. Descriotion.-This test is a joint British-American project tc letni el concrete penetrating performance of large bombs

  5. 78 FR 25301 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Ruby...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ...-effects analysis under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark... construction and operation of interstate natural gas pipelines. The FERC issues Certificates of Public... 1938 (NGA), as amended, and authorizes construction and siting of facilities for the import or export...

  6. Tartaric stabilization of a Reserve Ruby Port Wine by cold and electrodialysis processes: Effect on chemical and sensory characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge, Nuno; Vilela, Alice; Braga, António; M. Nunes, Fernando; Cosme, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Cold stabilization is the most common wine operation for wine tartaric stabilization. This operation consists in cooling the wine at temperatures near the wine freezing point [1, 2], to induce potassium bitartrate crystals precipitation. However, this is a slow and costly operation. Electrodialysis is a process that allows the separation of anions and cations according to their electrical charge through a selective permeability membrane, by the passage of an electric field [3-6]. Electrodialy...

  7. 19 CFR 12.151 - Prohibitions and conditions on importations of jadeite, rubies, and articles of jewelry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Merchandise Subject to Economic Sanctions § 12.151 Prohibitions and... country other than Burma and possesses the documents described in paragraph (e) of this section. (d...

  8. Mise en abyme čtení v románech " Madam Bovaryová" a " Na ruby"

    OpenAIRE

    Sekerková, Danka

    2011-01-01

    Title of the thesis: Mise en abyme of the reading in novels "Madame Bovary" and "A Rebours". Keywords: literature, mímésis, anti-mímésis, reception of a literary work, reading, mise en abyme of reading (Metareading), reader, Metareader, fictional reality (fiction), objective reality (reality) and intertextuality. Abstract: The main subject of this diploma thesis is the reading of novels and its pernicious effect on a reader. This aspect is studied in the novels which involve the process of re...

  9. Erythrocyte Aggregation and Blood Viscosity is Similar in Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease Patients with and without Leg Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Andre S A; Duncan, Walworth W; Pepple, D J

    2018-03-01

    Background  There is no consensus regarding the role of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in the pathogenesis of leg ulcers (LUs) in sickle cell disease (SCD). Objectives  We sought to evaluate whether the cross-sectional determination of RBC aggregation and hematological indices were associated with the presence of LU in homozygous SCD. Methods  Twenty-seven patients with LU and 23 with no history of ulceration were recruited into the study. A laser-assisted rotational red cell analyzer (LoRRca) was used in the determination of the aggregation index (AI), aggregation half-time ( t 1/2 ), and the RBC aggregate strength (AMP). Hematological indices were determined using a CELL-DYN Ruby analyzer. Whole blood viscosity (WBV) and plasma viscosity (PV) were measured using a Vilastic bioprofiler. The data were presented as means ± standard deviation or median, interquartile range. Two-sample t -test was used to test for associations between the AIs, WBV, and PV in patients with and without LU. Statistical significance was taken as p  < 0.05. All analyses were conducted using Stata/SE v . 12.1 (StataCorp, College Station, TX). Results  The AI was comparable in the group with and without ulcers (68.6, 16.7 versus 67.7, 16.9; p  = 0.74); t 1/2 (1.7, 1.3 versus 1.8, 1.3; p  = 0.71); AMP (18.8, 14.5 versus 19.1, 13.3; p  = 0.84), WBV (3.8, 1.2 versus 3.8, 0.7; p  = 0.77); and the PV (1.3, 0.08 versus 1.4, 0.1; p  = 0.31) and were also not statistically different between the groups of participants. Conclusion  RBC aggregation and aggregate strength are not associated with leg ulceration in SCD.

  10. Automated detection of haemozoin-containing monocytes for the diagnosis of malaria in microscopically negative cases during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänscheid, Thomas; Längin, Matthias; Codices, Vera; Luty, Adrian J F; Adegnika, Ayola A; Kremsner, Peter G; Grobusch, Martin P

    2009-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sequesters in the placenta. Cell-Dyn automated flow cytometric haematology analysers have the capacity to detect haemozoin-containing circulating leukocytes during routine FBC analysis. In Lambaréné, Gabon, 685 FBCs of pregnant women were analysed, yielding 86.8% sensitivity and 78.5% specificity compared to microscopy. In a subset of 37 Cell-Dyn positive but microscopy negative samples, PCR detected five positive cases. This methodology may serve as an adjunct rapid diagnostic tool for malaria during pregnancy, even in microscopically negative cases.

  11. Automated detection of haemozoin-containing monocytes for the diagnosis of malaria in microscopically negative cases during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hänscheid, Thomas; Längin, Matthias; Codices, Vera; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sequesters in the placenta. Cell-Dyn automated flow cytometric haematology analysers have the capacity to detect haemozoin-containing circulating leukocytes during routine FBC analysis. In Lambaréné, Gabon, 685 FBCs of pregnant women were analysed, yielding 86.8% sensitivity

  12. Short report: evaluation of a simple and inexpensive photometric device for the measurement of hemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Esser, Gilbert; Trinkle, Cordula; Issifou, Saadou; Grobusch, Martin P.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the accuracy of a simple and inexpensive photometric device (DHT) for the estimation of the blood concentration of hemoglobin by comparison with an automated, high-resolution, flow cytometry-based hematology analyzer (CellDyn 3000) and a centrifugal quantitative buffy coat

  13. Sensitivity of hemozoin detection by automated flow cytometry in non- and semi-immune malaria patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobusch, Martin P.; Hänscheid, Thomas; Krämer, Benedikt; Neukammer, Jörg; May, Jürgen; Seybold, Joachim; Kun, Jürgen F. J.; Suttorp, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cell-Dyn automated blood cell analyzers use laser flow cytometry technology, allowing detection of malaria pigment (hemozoin) in monocytes. We evaluated the value of such an instrument to diagnose malaria in febrile travelers returning to Berlin, Germany, the relation between the

  14. Capillary versus Venous Hemoglobin Determination in the Assessment of Healthy Blood Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Abhilasha J.; Wesley, Robert; Leitman, Susan F.; Bryant, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives To determine the accuracy of fingerstick hemoglobin assessment in blood donors, the performance of a portable hemoglobinometer (HemoCue Hb 201+) was prospectively compared with that of an automated hematology analyzer (Cell-Dyn 4000). Hemoglobin values obtained by the latter were used as the “true” result. Material and Methods Capillary fingerstick samples were assayed by HemoCue in 150 donors. Fingerstick samples from two sites, one on each hand, were obtained from a subset of 50 subjects. Concurrent venous samples were tested using both HemoCue and Cell-Dyn devices. Results Capillary hemoglobin values (HemoCue) were significantly greater than venous hemoglobin values (HemoCue), which in turn were significantly greater than venous hemoglobin values by Cell-Dyn (mean ± SD: 14.05 ± 1.51, 13.89 ± 1.31, 13.62 ± 1.23, respectively; phemoglobin screening criteria (≥12.5 g/dL) by capillary HemoCue, but were deferred by Cell-Dyn values (false-pass). Five donors (3%) were deferred by capillary sampling, but passed by Cell-Dyn (false-fail). Substantial variability in repeated fingerstick HemoCue results was seen (mean hemoglobin 13.72 vs. 13.70 g/dL, absolute mean difference between paired samples 0.76 g/dL). Hand dominance was not a factor. Conclusions Capillary samples assessed via a portable device yielded higher hemoglobin values than venous samples assessed on an automated analyzer. False-pass and false-fail rates were low and acceptable in the donor screening setting, with “true” values not differing by a clinically significant degree from threshold values used to assess acceptability for blood donation. PMID:23294266

  15. Efficacy of 694-nm fractional Q-switched ruby laser (QSRL) combined with sonophoresis on levorotatory vitamin C for treatment of melasma in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H L; Hu, B; Zhang, C

    2016-07-01

    Melasma is a common acquired and distressing pigmentary disorder presenting to dermatology clinics. It is notably difficult to cure and has a tendency to relapse. The efficacy of classical Q-switched laser in treatment of melasma remains controversial. This study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of 694-nm fractional QSRL combined with sonophoresis on levorotatory vitamin C for the treatment of melasma patients. Twenty-six patients with melasma were enrolled. Each patient received four to six fractional QSRL treatments at pulse energies of 2.5 to 4 J/cm(2) combined with sonophoresis on levorotatory vitamin C at 2-week intervals. The severity and the area of melasma were assessed by two investigators using the melasma area and severity index (MASI). Side effects were documented. Mean MASI score decreased from 15.51 ± 3.00 before treatment to 10.02 ± 4.39 3 months after the final treatment (P sonophoresis on levorotatory vitamin C is safe and effective for the treatment of melasma in Chinese patients.

  16. Map showing areas with potential for talc deposits in the Gravelly, Greenhorn, and Ruby ranges and the Henrys Lake Mountains of southwestern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Berg, Richard B.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.

    1998-01-01

    For the last several years, Montana has been the leading talc producing state in the United States (U.S. Geological Survey, 1996). For example, in 1992 Montana supplied about 40 percent of the U.S. mine production of talc (Virta, 1992). All of this production has come from the large deposits of high purity talc in the southwestern part of the state. All Montana talc is currently (1997) extracted from four mines, each within the study area of this map—the open pit operations of the Treasure State, Regal, and Yellowstone mines and the underground operation of the Beaverhead mine (see map numbers 1-4 on list and map to the left). The related mineral chlorite is mined at the Antler mine, located nearby, but outside of the study area in the Highland Mountains. Montana talc has at least two market advantages: (1) some deposits are very large and near surface, allowing economic mining by open pit methods; and (2) the deposits are of high purity and lack tremolite or other amphibole mineral contaminants (such as absestos) that occur in some other talc-rich deposits. Talc from southwest Montana is used in ceramics, paint, paper, plastics, cosmetics, rubber, roofing, flooring, caulking, and agricultural applications. The talc is also used in the processes of recycling paper and plastics. Talc was first discovered in the early 1900's at the present site of the Yellowstone mine (Perry, 1948, p. 9). Modest production began in 1942 from shallow pits and adits, supplying steatite (massive, compact, high-purity) talc that was used to make ceramic insulators. The southwest Montana talc industry grew to become a significant part of the region's economy; this history is described by Perry (1948), Olson (1976), and Berg (1997). Exploration and development are likely to continue for the foreseeable future for several reasons: (1) mines are active in the area at present and an infrastructure for talc processing exists; (2) large changes in domestic and export talc markets are not expected in the next few years based on recent market trends (Virta, 1997); (3) the talc of this region is especially pure and asbestos-free; and (4) except for potential ground stabilization problems and land disturbance associated with largescale open pit mining, no significant environmental impacts are associated with talc mining

  17. Genesis of a UK Faculty of Clinical Informatics at a time of anticipation for some, and ruby, golden and diamond celebrations for others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This Editorial marks the launch of the UK Faculty of Clinical Informatics (FCI at the time when non-clinically qualified informaticians are anticipating the lauch of  the Federation of Informatics Professionals in Health and Care (Fed-IP.

  18. Electrical Resistance Tomography to Monitor Mitigation of Metal-Toxic Acid-Leachates Ruby Gulch Waste Rock Repository Gilt Edge Mine Superfund Site, South Dakota USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R.; Heath, G.; Richardson, A.; Paul, D.; Wangerud, K.

    2003-12-01

    At a cyanide heap-leach open-pit mine, 15-million cubic yards of acid-generating sulfides were dumped at the head of a steep-walled mountain valley, with 30 inches/year precipitation generating 60- gallons/minute ARD leachate. Remediation has reshaped the dump to a 70-acre, 3.5:1-sloped geometry, installed drainage benches and runoff diversions, and capped the repository and lined diversions with a polyethylene geomembrane and cover system. Monitoring was needed to evaluate (a) long-term geomembrane integrity, (b) diversion liner integrity and long-term effectiveness, (c) ARD geochemistry, kinetics and pore-gas dynamics within the repository mass, and (d) groundwater interactions. Observation wells were paired with a 600-electrode resistivity survey system. Using near-surface and down-hole electrodes and automated data collection and post-processing, periodic two- and three-dimensional resistivity images are developed to reflect current and changed-conditions in moisture, temperature, geochemical components, and flow-direction analysis. Examination of total resistivity values and time variances between images allows direct observation of liner and cap integrity with precise identification and location of leaks; likewise, if runoff migrates from degraded diversion ditches into the repository zone, there is an accompanying and noticeable change in resistivity values. Used in combination with monitoring wells containing borehole resistivity electrodes (calibrated with direct sampling of dump water/moisture, temperature and pore-gas composition), the resistivity arrays allow at-depth imaging of geochemical conditions within the repository mass. The information provides early indications of progress or deficiencies in de-watering and ARD- mitigation that is the remedy intent. If emerging technologies present opportunities for secondary treatment, deep resistivity images may assist in developing application methods and evaluating the effectiveness of any reagents introduced into the repository mass to further effect changes in oxidation/reduction reactions.

  19. Experimental study of Rayleigh scattering with a ruby laser beam: relative variation of scattered light with the number of scattering center and the gases nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Charles

    1973-06-01

    The experimental variation of the scattered light with the number of scattering centers and with the refraction index of gases is in agreement with the theoretical Rayleigh scattering. A direct calibration System gives the absolute value of the Rayleigh ratio. The experimental value appears to be half of the theoretical one. (author) [fr

  20. Re-visiting the Aphidius urticae s. str. group: re-description of Aphidius rubi Starý and A. silvaticus Starý (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jamhour, A.; Mitrović, M.; Petrović, A.; Starý, Petr; Tomanović, Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4178, č. 2 (2016), s. 278-288 ISSN 1175-5326 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : aphid parasitoids * cytochrome oxidasae subunit I * cryptic speciation Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.972, year: 2016

  1. 'Red Ruby': an interactive web-based intervention for lifestyle modification on metabolic syndrome: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiry, Leila; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Najafi, Mahdi; Mohammad, Kazem; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Montazeri, Ali

    2014-07-24

    Although effectiveness of web-based interventions on lifestyle changes are recognized, the potential of such programs on metabolic syndrome has not been explored. We describe the protocol of a randomized controlled trial that aims to determine the feasibility, acceptability, usability, and effectiveness of interactive technology on lifestyle intervention in a population with metabolic syndrome. This is a two-arm randomized controlled trial. The study includes 160 participants (n = 80 per arm) who will be recruited via online registration on the study website. The inclusion criteria are that they should have metabolic syndrome and have access to the Internet. All participants will receive information on dietary intake and physical activity through the study website. The intervention group will receive additional resources via the study website including interactive Healthy Heart Profile and calorie restricted diet tailored to the participants. The primary outcomes are feasibility, acceptability, usability, and the change in metabolic syndrome components. The secondary outcomes are comparing quality of life, physical activity and food intake among the study arms. The participants will be followed up to 6 months with data collection scheduled at baseline, 3 and 6 months. There is a need for developing and evaluating web-based interventions that target people with high risk for cardiovascular diseases. This study will therefore make an important contribution to this novel field of research and practice. IRCT201111198132N1.

  2. A European multicientre study on the comparison of HBV viral loads between VERIS HBV assay and Roche COBAS® TAQMAN® HBV test, Abbott RealTime HBV assay, Siemens VERSANT HBV assay, and Qiagen artus HBV RG kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Izopet, Jacques; Lombardi, Alessandra; Marcos, MaAngeles; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Hepatitis B viral load testing is essential to treatment and monitoring decisions in patients with chronic Hepatitis B. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HBV Assay (Veris) for use on the fully automated DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. 1 OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical performance of the Veris HBV Assay at multiple EU laboratories STUDY DESIGN: Method comparison was performed with a total of 344 plasma specimens from HBV infected patients tested with Veris and COBAS ® TaqMan ® HBV Test (Cobas), 207 specimens tested with Veris and RealTime HBV Assay (RealTime), 86 specimens tested with Veris and VERSANT ® HBV Assay (Versant), and 74 specimens tested with Veris and artus ® HBV RG PCR kit (artus). Bland-Altman analysis showed average bias of -0.46 log 10 IU/mL between Veris and Cobas, -0.46 log 10 IU/mL between Veris and RealTime, -0.36 log 10 IU/mL between Veris and Versant, and -0.12 log 10 IU/mL between Veris and artus. Bias was consistent across the assay range. Patient monitoring results using Veris demonstrated similar viral load trends over time to Cobas, RealTime, and artus. The VERIS HBV Assay demonstrated comparable clinical performance, with varying degrees of negative bias, compared to other currently marketed assays for HBV DNA monitoring. This negative bias should be taken into consideration if switching monitoring methods to Veris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A European multicientre study on the comparison of HIV-1 viral loads between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and Roche COBAS® TAQMAN® HIV-1 test, Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Hofmann, Jörg; Izopet, Jacques; Kühn, Sebastian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Mancon, Alessandro; Marcos, Mª Angeles; Mileto, Davide; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Viral load monitoring is essential for patients under treatment for HIV. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the novel, automated DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. ¥ OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the clinical performance of the new quantitative VERIS HIV-1 Assay at multiple EU laboratories. Method comparison with the VERIS HIV-1 Assay was performed with 415 specimens at 5 sites tested with COBAS ® AmpliPrep/COBAS ® TaqMan ® HIV-1 Test, v2.0, 169 specimens at 3 sites tested with RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and 202 specimens from 2 sites tested with VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Patient monitoring sample results from 4 sites were also compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed the average bias between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay to be 0.28, 0.39, and 0.61 log 10 cp/mL, respectively. Bias at low end levels below 1000cp/mL showed predicted bias to be DxN VERIS System demonstrated comparable clinical performance to COBAS ® HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Software product quality measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Godliauskas, Eimantas

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses Ruby product quality measures, suggesting three new measures for Ruby product quality measurement tool Rubocop to measure Ruby product quality characteristics defined in ISO 2502n standard series. This paper consists of four main chapters. The first chapter gives a brief view of software product quality and software product quality measurement. The second chapter analyses object oriented quality measures. The third chapter gives a brief view of the most popular Ruby qualit...

  5. 75 FR 13676 - Prohibitions and Conditions for Importation of Burmese and Non-Burmese Covered Articles of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Importation of Burmese and Non- Burmese Covered Articles of Jadeite, Rubies, and Articles of Jewelry... importation of Burmese and non-Burmese covered articles of jadeite, rubies, and articles of jewelry containing... importation of jadeite and rubies mined or extracted from Burma, and articles of jewelry containing jadeite or...

  6. Comparative study of the electronic structure of natural and synthetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Kenya, etc. Synthetic ruby due to the low cost mass pro- duction is also available. Therefore, there is a commer- cial demand to distinguish a precious natural ruby from the artificial (synthetic) ruby. Some of the known methods for identification of gemstones utilize the knowledge of refractive index (RI), specific gravity (SG), ...

  7. Explorations in computing an introduction to computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Conery, John S

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Computation The Limits of Computation Algorithms A Laboratory for Computational ExperimentsThe Ruby WorkbenchIntroducing Ruby and the RubyLabs environment for computational experimentsInteractive Ruby Numbers Variables Methods RubyLabs The Sieve of EratosthenesAn algorithm for finding prime numbersThe Sieve Algorithm The mod Operator Containers Iterators Boolean Values and the delete if Method Exploring the Algorithm The sieve Method A Better Sieve Experiments with the Sieve A Journey of a Thousand MilesIteration as a strategy for solving computational problemsSearching and Sortin

  8. An interactive web-based intervention on nutritional status, physical activity and health-related quality of life in patient with metabolic syndrome: a randomized-controlled trial (The Red Ruby Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiry, L; Montazeri, A; Najafi, M; Yaseri, M; Farhangi, M A

    2017-01-09

    Physical inactivity and unhealthy nutritional behaviors are recognized as the key factors in the cause and management of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The effectiveness of interactive web-based interventions on dietary intakes, physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among people with MetS is currently unknown. The two-arm randomized-controlled trial was conducted for patients with MetS from June through December 2012 in Tehran, Iran. Participants (n=160) were recruited through online registration on the study website. After free clinical assessments of eligible participants for MetS, they were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups (n=80). All participants received general information about cardiovascular diseases and MetS risk factors via the website. The intervention group logged in to interactive part including My Healthy Heart Profile, received tailored calorie-restricted diet and used all parts of the interactive prevention program. Anthropometric measures, glycemic status, lipid profile, physical activity and food intake were evaluated at the beginning and after 6-month follow-up. HRQOL was assessed at beginning, 3- and 6-month follow-up. There were no significant differences between the intervention and control groups on age, gender, education and MetS factors. In comparison with control group, the intervention group showed significant changes in moderate physical activity 260.3±473.6 vs 101.6±213.1 MET-min/week, walking 505.2±505.3 vs 321±884 MET-min per week, cholesterol intake -88.4±158.7 vs -8.3±6 mg per day, total calories -430.2±957.5 vs -392.9±34.7 kcal per day and sodium 1336.9±2467 vs 1342±3200.4 mmol per day. With regard to HRQOL, the intervention group showed greater improvement in general health and vitality (P<0.05 for all). These results indicate the positive impact of a lifestyle intervention by a web-based program on physical activity, dietary intake and several dimension of QoL. The use of web-based approaches is a great interest to manage patients at high cardiovascular risk, especially where the prevalence of obesity, MetS and diabetes is increasing.

  9. Combining 1,4-dimethoxybenzene, the major flower volatile of wild strawberry Fragaria vesca, with the aggregation pheromone of the strawberry blossom weevil Anthonomus rubi improves attraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibe, Atle; Borg-Karlson, Anna Karin; Cross, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    by over two fold compared to the pheromone alone. There was no significant difference between the response of overwintered or summer emerged adults. Field trials in 2007-2008 in central and southern Norway, Denmark and southern England used green funnel traps with white cross vanes for the evaluations...

  10. Estabilização de vinho do Porto Reserva Ruby: alternativas às gelatinas de origem animal e à estabilização tartárica pelo frio

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge, Nuno Filipe Alves

    2014-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado em Enologia As características sensoriais e a estabilidade do Vinho do Porto são fatores importantes para a sua aceitação no mercado, face às exigências dos consumidores. Um vinho em garrafa deve apresentar uma cor perfeita, limpidez cristalina, equilíbrio sensorial e ausência de depósito. Um excesso de taninos torna os vinhos muito agressivos sensorialmente, sendo estes geralmente removidos por colas proteicas de origem animal, como por exemplo as gelatinas ou as a...

  11. Design and deployment of semiochemical traps for capturing Anthonomus rubi Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Lygus rugulipennis Poppius (Hetereoptera: Miridae) in soft fruit crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fountain, Michelle T.; Baroffio, Catherine; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2017-01-01

    optimized and tested a single trap for both species. A series of field experiments in crops and semi-natural habitats in five European countries tested capture of the target pests and the ability to avoid captures of beneficial arthropods. A Unitrap containing a trapping agent of water and detergent...... if deployed at ground level and although a cross vane was not important for catches of ETB it was needed for significant captures of SBW. The potential for mass trapping SBW and ETB simultaneously in soft fruit crops is discussed including potential improvements to make this more effective and economic...

  12. RUBY-1: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the safety and tolerability of the novel oral factor Xa inhibitor darexaban (YM150) following acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steg, Ph Gabriel; Mehta, Shamir R; Jukema, J Wouter

    2011-01-01

    To establish the safety, tolerability and most promising regimen of darexaban (YM150), a novel, oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, for prevention of ischaemic events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS)....

  13. Pinnavormimise kunst / Inga Raukas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raukas, Inga, 1967-

    2006-01-01

    2006. a. Barcelonas Land & Scape'i seerias ilmunud Ilka & Andreas Ruby raamatust maastikulisest arhitektuurist "Groundscapes. The rediscovery of the ground in contemporary arhitecture" (Editorial Gustavo Gili)

  14. Laboratory selection for spirodiclofen resistance and cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-04-25

    Apr 25, 2011 ... Tetranychidae), is an important pest of citrus trees(Zhang et al., 1994). ... by Sumitomo Chemical (Japan), hexythiazox (Nissorun®, 5% EC) by Nippon Soda .... Data analysis. Abbott's formula was used to calculate percentage mortality after correction for control mortality (Abbott, 1925). All control mortalities.

  15. Virologic responses and tolerance of peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    third‑generation HCV enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay (Axsym HCV, version 3.0, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott. Park, IL, USA). The serum RNA level of HCV was measured through a quantitative real‑time polymerase chain reaction assay (Applied Biosystems 7500 real‑time PCR system; Applied. Biosystems, Atlanta ...

  16. Saccharum officinarum L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    Rands et Abbott,. 1964) et à la mosaïque (Abbott, 1961), deux maladies dues à un virus, ainsi qu'à la gommose. (Hughes, 1964) provoquée par une bactérie. En réponse à cette contrainte, des hybrides interspécifiques entre S.

  17. JOPAT [14th Edition - Jan to Dec 2009

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secretary

    population across the development sectors in Nigeria. HIV voluntary counselling and ... Serial algorithm was performed using Determine HIV1&2 (Abbott Japan Co.,. TM. LTD. Minato-ku,Tokyo, Japan.) ... HIV1&2 (Abbott Japan Co.,), Stat pak HIV 1 & 2 (Chembio diagnostic system, Inc) and Genie II. HIV-1/HIV-2 (Bio-Rad, ...

  18. Improved Analysis of GW150914 Using a Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, J.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoebeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J. V.; Vano-Vinuales, A.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Bruegmann, B.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, I.W.T.; Clark, M.; de Haas, R.; Hemberger, D.; Hinder, I.; Kidder, L. E.; Kinsey, M.; Laguna, P.; Ossokine, S.; Pan, Y.; Roever, C.; Scheel, M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016).]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).

  19. Unraveling Dimensions : Commodity futures curves and equity liquidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Karstanje (Dennis)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ An inspiring and intriguing book on dimensions is “Flatland - A Romancy of Many Dimensions” by Edwin A. Abbott. In this satirical novel, Abbott describes different dimensional worlds from the point of view of A. Square, who is living in the

  20. Anatomical challenges for transcatheter mitral valve intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H V; Søndergaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Following the success of transcatheter aortic and pulmonary valve implantation, there is a large interest in transcatheter mitral valve interventions to treat severe mitral regurgitation (MR). With the exception for the MitraClipTM (Abbott, Abbott Park, IL, USA) edge-to-edge leaflet plication...

  1. Socio-demographic risk factors for HIV infection in women living in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research team was kept blinded to the outcome of the individual HIV tests that were performed on an Abbott AxSYM . System, using the Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV-1/HIV-. 2): (Recombinant Antigens and Synthetic Peptides) reagent pack. (Abbott, Germany, catalogue no 3D41-20). The HIV 1/2 gO reagent.

  2. Evaluation of rapid enzyme immunobinding assays for the detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three rapid enzyme immunobinding assays, Abbott's TestPack HIV-1/HIV-2, Clonatec's Rapid HIV-1/HIV-2 AB and the DuPont HIVCHEK 1+2, were evaluated using a panel of 20 selected sera with Western blot-proven reactivity to at least one envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1. The Abbott assay had the highest sensitivity and ...

  3. Comparative study of the electronic structure of natural and synthetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... have studied the Cr–K-edge XANES and EXAFS in natural Indian rubies from two sources and a synthetic ruby at ESRF. Weight % of various constituents in them is determined using EDAX measurements. Taking the results from the three techniques together we are able to demonstrate their feasibility in quantitative study ...

  4. Transformational VLSI Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ole Steen

    This thesis introduces a formal approach to deriving VLSI circuits by the use of correctness-preserving transformations. Both the specification and the implementation are descibed by the relation based language Ruby. In order to prove the transformation rules a proof tool called RubyZF has been...

  5. MEASUREMENT OF MINORITY-ARRIER LIFETIME IN SILICON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1982-09-01

    -switched, pulsed ruby laser oscillator with two ruby laser amplifiers. ... and. ∆σ α exp[ ][ τ t. -. ] (1). Where ∆p and ∆n are respectively, the concentrations of excess holes and excess electrons and τ is a characteristic time ...

  6. Comparative study of the electronic structure of natural and synthetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    , Roma, Italy. MS received 2 May 2002. Abstract. We have studied the Cr–K-edge XANES and EXAFS in natural Indian rubies from two sources and a synthetic ruby at ESRF. Weight % of various constituents in them is determined using EDAX ...

  7. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Lam, Amy J; Kim, Bongjae B; Jacobs, Conor L; Howe, Elizabeth S; Davidson, Michael W; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-02-16

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude.

  8. Prison talk

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Alison

    2005-01-01

    A few French scientists are bringing astronomy to captive audiences, such as the terminally ill and the incarcerated. Alison Abbott joined a group of convicted murderers to learn about gravity (1 page)

  9. PPARα-independent transcriptional targets of perfluoroalkyl acids revealed by transcript profiling

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microarray datasets used in the analysis. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Rosen, M., K. Das, J. Rooney, B. Abbott, C. Lau, and C. Corton....

  10. On Teaching "Flatland."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Joan

    1984-01-01

    Using Edwin Abbott's book, "Flatland," is suggested for mathematics and English classes to help students lose their fear of mathematics. Background information and comments on the book are given. (MNS)

  11. Comparative evaluation of two different remineralizing agents on the microhardness of bleached enamel surface: Results of an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunpriya Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Both GC Tooth Mousse (Recaldent and Toothmin Tooth cream (Abbott Healthcare Pvt.Ltd increase the microhardness of bleached enamel. Toothmin tooth cream is a better agent for increasing microhardness, although difference is not significant.

  12. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-01-01

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  13. Cloudy cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott RL, Zegabs M, Elander TR. Acanthamoeba keratits. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology 2013 edition . Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 4, chap 18A. Batta ...

  14. Frederic Andrews Gibbs and the Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2017-01-01

    Frederic Gibbs, the peerless expert on electroencephalogrphy was summoned to provide opinion on the EEG tracing of Jack Ruby, who murdered Lee Harvey Oswald, the assassin of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the American President, in 1963. Gibbs pleaded that the tracing suggested features indicative of psychomotor epilepsy and Ruby killed Oswald in a state of fugue. His view was not agreed upon but Gibbs stood his ground unflinchingly. Subsequent appeals to the higher court spared Ruby from imminent execution and finally he died a natural death from metastatic complications of carcinoma of the lung in 1967.

  15. Combined radioimmunoassay of HBs-antigen and anti-HBs using the Biotest combRIA-Au kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kselikova, M.; Novak, J.; Urbankova, J.

    1979-01-01

    Hepatitis B antigen and antibody were determined simultaneously by radioimmunoassay using the Biotest combRIA-Au kit. The results in determining antigens and antibodies in sera with a known content of these substances by this kit nearly equal those of isolated determinations of antigen by the Abbott AUSRIA II-125 kit, and of antibody by the Abbott AUSAB kit, resp., except for a negligible number of sera with a very low content of either antigen or antibody. (author)

  16. Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Closure (Withdrawal of Units) of Norton Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    Creeper Certhia americana House Wren Troglodytes aedon Cactus Wren Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus Ruby-crowned Kinglet Regulus calendula Western...harbor, etc.) Rosmarinus officinalis prostratus (Dwarf Rosemary) Baccharis pilularis (Coyote Brush) Shrubs Dodonaea viscosa "Purpureat"(Hopseed Bush

  17. A Rails / Django Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ruby on Rails (“Rails” is the dominant web programming framework for Ruby and, even outside the Ruby community, is considered the epitome of the latest generation of high-productivity, open source web development tools. Django is one of many competing web development frameworks for Python. It is notable, first, for being highly regarded amongst Python programmers, and second, for being one of the few of the new generation of framework that does not ape Ruby on Rails. Both Rails and Django claim greatly enhanced productivity, compared with more traditional web development frameworks. In this paper, we compare the two frameworks from the point of view of a developer attempting to choose one of the two frameworks for a new project.

  18. Ionic liquid-mediated three-component synthesis of fluorinated spiro ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mediated three-component synthesis of fluorinated spiro-thiazine derivatives and their antimycobacterial and DNA cleavage activities. Anshu Dandia Ruby Singh Deepti Saini. Volume 125 Issue 5 September 2013 pp 1045-1053 ...

  19. Swept Line Electron Beam Annealing of Ion Implanted Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    a pre- liminary study using silicon solar cells. This work was undertaken in cooperation with Dr. J. Eguren of the Instituto De Energia Solar , Madrid...device fabrication has been attempted. To date, resistors, capacitors, diodes, bipolar transistors, MOSFEs, and solar cells have been fabricated with...34 " 48 *Si Solar Cells Ruby PL P+ Ion-Implanted 49 Ruby PL Pulsed Diffused 50 :C

  20. Rake task management essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Koleshko, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    A step-by-step and interactive approach explaining the Rake essentials along with code examples and advanced features. If you are a developer who is acquainted with the Ruby language and want to speed up writing the code concerned with files, then this book is for you. To start reading this book, basic Ruby knowledge is required; however, a huge amount of experience with the language is not necessary.

  1. The Resource, Spring 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    High- Energy Compounds • HPCMP Users Advocacy Group • Cpusets on the Origin 3800 • User Disk Striping on the T3E • HPCMP Users Group Conference 2002...Spring 2002 Cpusets on the Origin 3800 By Dr. Jeff Hensley The Origin 3800 (O3K) series machine (Ruby) at the ERDC MSRC recently underwent a...configuration change designed to enhance the overall efficiency of the system. In February 2002, Ruby was configured to use cpusets , a method of logically

  2. Instant Nokogiri

    CERN Document Server

    Powers, Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A concise, illustrated guide to extracting information available on the Internet using Nokogiri.""Instant Nokogiri"" is the perfect choice for the aspiring Ruby developer looking to incorporate screen scraping and parsing technology in their applications. Beginner level Ruby, basic HTML, and CSS experience is suggested.

  3. Php, Ruby, Python - на чем остановить свой выбор студенту при изучении веб-разработки?

    OpenAIRE

    Potapova, N. V.; Bolshakova, A. A.; Потапова, Н. В.; Большакова, А. А.

    2017-01-01

    Consider and choose a programming language designed for speed and ease of use for beginners programmer Рассмотрим и выберем язык программирования, предназначенный для быстроты и удобства использования начинающим программистом

  4. Geneva University: Exploring Flatland with cold atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Lundi 12 mars 2012 17h00 - Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg « Exploring Flatland with cold atoms » Prof. Jean Dalibard Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, CNRS, Physics Department of Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris In his world-famous novel "Flatland" published in 1884, the English writer Edwin Abbott imagined a social life in a two-dimensional world. With a very original use of geometrical notions, E. Abbott produced a unique satire of his own society. Long after Abbott's visionary allegory, Microscopic Physics has provided a practical path for the exploration of low-dimensional worlds. With the realization of quantum wells for example, it has been possible to produce two-dimensional gases of electrons. The prope...

  5. Drug-eluting or bare-metal stents for large coronary vessel stenting? The BASKET-PROVE (PROspective Validation Examination) trial: Study protocol and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, M.; Bertel, O.; Bonetti, P.O.

    2008-01-01

    Background Based on a subgroup analysis of 18-month BAsel Stent Kosten Effektivitats Trial (BASKET) outcome data, we hypothesized that very late (>12 months) stent thrombosis occurs predominantly after drug-eluting stent implantation in large native coronary vessel stenting. Methods To prove...... or refute this hypothesis, we set up an 11-center 4-country prospective trial of 2260 consecutive patients treated with >= 3.0-mm stents only, randomized to receive Cypher (Johnson & Johnson, Miami Lakes, FL), Vision (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Laboratories, IL), or Xience stents (Abbott Vascular). Only...... to cobalt-chromium bare-metal stents in this relevant, low-risk group of everyday patients. In addition, a comparison with similar BASKET patients will allow to estimate the impact of 12-versus 6-month dual antiplatelet therapy on these outcomes Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  6. Flatland an edition with notes and commentary

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Edwin A; Banchoff, Thomas F

    2010-01-01

    Flatland, Edwin Abbott Abbott's story of a two-dimensional universe, as told by one of its inhabitants who is introduced to the mysteries of three-dimensional space, has enjoyed an enduring popularity from the time of its publication in 1884. This fully annotated edition enables the modern-day reader to understand and appreciate the many "dimensions" of this classic satire. Mathematical notes and illustrations enhance the usefulness of Flatland as an elementary introduction to higher-dimensional geometry. Historical notes show connections to late-Victorian England and to classical Greece. Citations from Abbott's other writings as well as the works of Plato and Aristotle serve to interpret the text. Commentary on language and literary style includes numerous definitions of obscure words. An appendix gives a comprehensive account of the life and work of Flatland's remarkable author.

  7. The impact of change in albumin assay on reference intervals, prevalence of 'hypoalbuminaemia' and albumin prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley-Grant, Deon; Herbert, Mike; Cornes, Michael P; Barlow, Ian M; Ford, Clare; Gama, Rousseau

    2016-01-01

    We studied the impact on reference intervals, classification of patients with hypoalbuminaemia and albumin infusion prescriptions on changing from a bromocresol green (BCG) to a bromocresol purple (BCP) serum albumin assay. Passing-Bablok regression analysis and Bland-Altman plot were used to compare Abbott BCP and Roche BCG methods. Linear regression analysis was used to compare in-house and an external laboratory Abbott BCP serum albumin results. Reference intervals for Abbott BCP serum albumin were derived in two different laboratories using pathology data from adult patients in primary care. Prescriptions for 20% albumin infusions were compared one year before and one year after changing the albumin method. Abbott BCP assay had a negative bias of approximately 6 g/L compared with Roche BCG method.There was good agreement (y = 1.04 x - 1.03; R(2 )= 0.9933) between in-house and external laboratory Abbott BCP results. Reference intervals for the serum albumin Abbott BCP assay were 31-45 g/L, different to those recommended by Pathology Harmony and the manufacturers (35-50 g/L). Following the change in method there was a large increase in the number of patients classified as hypoalbuminaemic using Pathology Harmony references intervals (32%) but not when retrospectively compared to locally derived reference intervals (16%) compared with the previous year (12%). The method change was associated with a 44.6% increase in albumin prescriptions. This equated to an annual increase in expenditure of £35,234. We suggest that serum albumin reference intervals be method specific to prevent misclassification of albumin status in patients. Change in albumin methodology may have significant impact on hospital resources. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Health care costs matter: a review of nutrition economics – is there a role for nutritional support to reduce the cost of medical health care?

    OpenAIRE

    Naberhuis,Jane K; Hunt,Vivienne; Bell,Jvawnna; Partridge,Jamie; Goates,Scott; Nuijten,Mark

    2017-01-01

    Jane K Naberhuis,1 Vivienne N Hunt,2 Jvawnna D Bell,3 Jamie S Partridge,3 Scott Goates,3 Mark JC Nuijten4 1Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA; 2Abbott Nutrition, Research and Development, Singapore; 3Abbott Nutrition, Research and Development, Columbus, OH, USA; 4A2M (Ars Accessus Medica), Amsterdam, The Netherlands Background and aims: As policy-makers assess the value of money spent on health care, researc...

  9. Health care costs matter: a review of nutrition economics – is there a role for nutritional support to reduce the cost of medical health care?

    OpenAIRE

    Naberhuis JK; Hunt VN; Bell JD; Partridge JS; Goates S; Nuijten MJC

    2017-01-01

    Jane K Naberhuis,1 Vivienne N Hunt,2 Jvawnna D Bell,3 Jamie S Partridge,3 Scott Goates,3 Mark JC Nuijten4 1Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA; 2Abbott Nutrition, Research and Development, Singapore; 3Abbott Nutrition, Research and Development, Columbus, OH, USA; 4A2M (Ars Accessus Medica), Amsterdam, The Netherlands Background and aims: As policy-makers assess the value of money spent on health care, research in the fie...

  10. Principais substâncias responsáveis pelo aroma de mangas comerciais brasileiras identificadas por cromatografia gasosa de alta resolução/olfatometria/espectrometria de massas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Diógenes C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Six Brazilian commercial mangoes were analysed by HRGC-O-AEDA-MS, viz., Carlota, Haden, Espada, Coração de boi, Rubi and Tommy Atkins. All them showed ethyl butanoate as the main aroma character impact compound by AEDA evaluation. The ethyl esters of 2 and 3-methylbutanoic acids are also important, the main contribution in Carlota variety being 2(S enantiomer. In Rubi variety, both 2(R enantiomer and 3-methyl isomer contributes to the caprylic fruity note observed. In four varieties, viz., Haden, Espada, Rubi and Tommy Atkins, d-3-carene showed to be the second impact aroma compound presented. In Tommy Atkins variety, a-pinene also has a significant contribution, mainly due to its (1R,5R(+-enantiomer.

  11. Automated haematology analysis to diagnose malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobusch Martin P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For more than a decade, flow cytometry-based automated haematology analysers have been studied for malaria diagnosis. Although current haematology analysers are not specifically designed to detect malaria-related abnormalities, most studies have found sensitivities that comply with WHO malaria-diagnostic guidelines, i.e. ≥ 95% in samples with > 100 parasites/μl. Establishing a correct and early malaria diagnosis is a prerequisite for an adequate treatment and to minimizing adverse outcomes. Expert light microscopy remains the 'gold standard' for malaria diagnosis in most clinical settings. However, it requires an explicit request from clinicians and has variable accuracy. Malaria diagnosis with flow cytometry-based haematology analysers could become an important adjuvant diagnostic tool in the routine laboratory work-up of febrile patients in or returning from malaria-endemic regions. Haematology analysers so far studied for malaria diagnosis are the Cell-Dyn®, Coulter® GEN·S and LH 750, and the Sysmex XE-2100® analysers. For Cell-Dyn analysers, abnormal depolarization events mainly in the lobularity/granularity and other scatter-plots, and various reticulocyte abnormalities have shown overall sensitivities and specificities of 49% to 97% and 61% to 100%, respectively. For the Coulter analysers, a 'malaria factor' using the monocyte and lymphocyte size standard deviations obtained by impedance detection has shown overall sensitivities and specificities of 82% to 98% and 72% to 94%, respectively. For the XE-2100, abnormal patterns in the DIFF, WBC/BASO, and RET-EXT scatter-plots, and pseudoeosinophilia and other abnormal haematological variables have been described, and multivariate diagnostic models have been designed with overall sensitivities and specificities of 86% to 97% and 81% to 98%, respectively. The accuracy for malaria diagnosis may vary according to species, parasite load, immunity and clinical context where the

  12. Adoption in rock and white-tailed ptarmigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M.M.L.; Fedy, B.C.; Wilson, S.; Martin, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Reports of adoption in birds are widespread, but few studies report rates of adoption or possible mechanisms for this phenomenon, particularly in the Order Galliformes. We report incidents of adoption in Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) and White-tailed Ptarmigan (L. leucura) from two sites in western Canada. Adoption rates for White-tailed Ptarmigan on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and the Ruby Ranges, Yukon Territory were 13% (n = 16 broods) and 4% (n = 27), respectively, while rates for Rock Ptarmigan were 14% (n = 29) in the Ruby Ranges. Low brood densities may result in lower rates of adoption for ptarmigan. ?? 2009 The Wilson Ornithological Society.

  13. Fusion of protoplasts with irradiated micro protoplasts as a tool for radiation hybrid panel in citrus;Fusao de protoplastos com microprotoplastos irradiados como ferramenta para painel hibrido de radiacao em citros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Claudine Maria de, E-mail: debona@iapar.b [Instituto Agronomico do Parana (IAPAR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Administrativo do Governo do Estado; Stelly, David, E-mail: stelly@tamu.ed [Texas A and M University (Tamu), College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences; Miller Junior, J. Creighton, E-mail: jcmillerjr@tamu.ed [Texas A and M University (Tamu), College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Sciences; Louzada, Eliezer Silva, E-mail: elouzada@ag.tamu.ed [Texas A and M University, (Tamuk), Weslaco, TX (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The objective of this work was to combine asymmetric somatic hybridization (donor-recipient fusion or gamma fusion) to microprotoplast-mediated chromosome transfer, as a tool to be used for chromosome mapping in Citrus. Swinglea glutinosa micro protoplasts were irradiated either with 50, 70, 100 or 200 gamma rays and fused to cv. Ruby Red grapefruit or Murcott tangor protoplasts. Cell colonies were successfully formed and AFLP analyses confirmed presence of S. glutinosa in both 'Murcott' tangor and 'Ruby Red' grapefruit genomes. (author)

  14. Rails on Windows

    CERN Document Server

    Hibbs, Curt

    2007-01-01

    It's no secret that the entire Ruby onRails core team uses OS X as their preferreddevelopment environment. Becauseof this, it is very easy to findauthoritative information on the webabout using Rails on OS X. But the truthis that Windows developers using Railsprobably outnumber those using otherplatforms. A Windows development environmentcan be just as productive asany other platform. This is a guide to developing with Rubyon Rails under Windows. It won't teachyou how to write Ruby on Rails web applications,but it will show you what toolsto use and how to set them up to createa complete Rail

  15. Sistema de gestión de eventos

    OpenAIRE

    Flores Gallardo, Fabricio Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Se desarrolló un sistema web que permita crear y gestionar eventos, invitar a amigos, asignarles tareas o cosas por hacer dentro del evento. Además, el inicio de sesión se hace utilizando el API de Facebook. Adicionalmente, el evento puede incluir canciones, las mismas que obtenemos a través de Spotify. Para el desarrollo del proyecto, se utilizaron tecnologías de libre distribución, como Ruby, Ruby on Rails en el lado del servidor, y JavaScript y AngularJS en el lado del cliente. ...

  16. Comparison of Benchtop Fourier-Transform (FT) and Portable Grating Scanning Spectrometers for Determination of Total Soluble Solid Contents in Single Grape Berry (Vitis vinifera L.) and Calibration Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Hui; Sun, Ke; Sun, Ye; Wei, Kangli; Tu, Kang; Pan, Leiqing

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was applied for the determination of total soluble solid contents (SSC) of single Ruby Seedless grape berries using both benchtop Fourier transform (VECTOR 22/N) and portable grating scanning (SupNIR-1500) spectrometers in this study. The results showed that the best SSC prediction was obtained by VECTOR 22/N in the range of 12,000 to 4000 cm−1 (833–2500 nm) for Ruby Seedless with determination coefficient of prediction (Rp 2) of 0.918, root mean squares error...

  17. O DIÁLOGO EPISTOLAR ENTRE MÁRIO DE ANDRADE E MURILO RUBIÃO

    OpenAIRE

    Canovas, Suzana Yolanda Lenhardt Machado

    2008-01-01

    Este trabalho analisa a correspondência trocada entre Mário de Andrade e Murilo Rubião, publicada sob o título de Mário e o pirotécnico aprendiz: cartas de Mário de Andrade e Murilo Rubião, obra organizada por Marcos Antonio de Moraes. Há, sobretudo, a preocupação de ver os dois autores como figuras humanas e escritores de vanguarda, que romperam com a tradição literária nas respectivas épocas em que viveram.

  18. Efeito da idade e do repouso pós-colheita de frutos de pepino na semente armazenada

    OpenAIRE

    Barbedo,Claudio José; Barbedo,Adeliana Saes Coelho; Nakagawa,João; Sato,Osvaldo

    1999-01-01

    Para avaliar os efeitos da idade e do repouso pós-colheita de frutos de pepino (Cucumis sativus L.) de duas cultivares, Pérola (espinhos escuros) e Rubi (espinhos claros), sobre as alterações na qualidade fisiológica das sementes durante o armazenamento, conduziu-se um experimento em Botucatu, SP e Bandeirantes, PR, durante quatro anos. Os frutos foram colhidos desde os 15 ('Rubi') ou 20 ('Pérola') dias até 45 dias após a antese, permanecendo em repouso pós-colheita por 0, 5, 10 e 15 dias, an...

  19. Effect of fruit age and post-harvest period of cucumber on stored seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Barbedo, Claudio José; Barbedo, Adeliana Saes Coelho; Nakagawa, João [UNESP; Sato, Osvaldo

    1999-01-01

    Para avaliar os efeitos da idade e do repouso pós-colheita de frutos de pepino (Cucumis sativus L.) de duas cultivares, Pérola (espinhos escuros) e Rubi (espinhos claros), sobre as alterações na qualidade fisiológica das sementes durante o armazenamento, conduziu-se um experimento em Botucatu, SP e Bandeirantes, PR, durante quatro anos. Os frutos foram colhidos desde os 15 ('Rubi') ou 20 ('Pérola') dias até 45 dias após a antese, permanecendo em repouso pós-colheita por 0, 5, 10 e 15 dias, an...

  20. COMPARISON OF CALCULATED AND DIRECT LOW DENSITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-03-03

    Mar 3, 2004 ... the borderline high LDL-C group of the National Cholesterol Education Program. (NCEP) classification (LDL-C 3.36 - 4.14mmol/L). Conclusion: There is lack of agreement between the FF and the Abbott direct LDL-. C assay. If the two methods are used interchangeably, there may be confusion in the.

  1. The clinical spectrum and cost implications of hospitalised HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with the treatment protocols and management of the patients. Laboratory investigations. Sera were screened for HIV1/HIV2 antibodies using the rapid test. Determine (Abbott). All positive tests, as well as all sera of children under the age of 15 months, were sent to Groote Schuur Hospital for ELISA. Due to financial ...

  2. Just a suburban boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Barrett

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A review of Craig McGregor's Australian Son: Inside Mark Latham (Pluto Press, North Melbourne, 2004, Margaret Simons's Quarterly Essay: Latham’s World: The New Politics of the Outsiders (Black Inc., Melbourne, 2004 and Michael Duffy's Latham and Abbott (Random House Australia, Milson’s Point, 2004.

  3. SUPPLEMENT: "LOCALIZATION AND BROADBAND FOLLOW-UP OF THE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT GW150914" (2016, ApJL, 826, L13)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.A.; DeRosa, R. T.; Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Franco, S; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tpai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tyr, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H. -F.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Allison, J.; Bannister, K.; Bell, E.M.; Chatterjee, S.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, Ian; Hotan, A.; Indermuehle, B.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Murphy, Michael T.; Popping, A.; Reynolds, J.; Sault, R. J.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M. T.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Cunniffe, R.; Jelinek, M.; Tello, J. C.; Oates, S. R.; Hu, Y. M.; Kubanek, P.; Guziy, S.; Castellon, A.; Garcia-Cerezo, A.; Munoz, V. F.; Perez del Pulgar, C.; Castillo-Carrion, S.; Castro Ceron, J. M.; Hudec, R.; Caballero-Garcia, M. D.; Pata, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J. A.; Konig, S.; Rendon, F.; Mateo Sanguino, T. de J.; Munoz-Fernandez, R.; Yock, P. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W. H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I. H.; Bai, J.C.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W. H.; Claret, A.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Pandey, S. B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Berger, Charles E H; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W. -F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C. L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, A.G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, J.D.M.; Johnson, M.D.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Kind, M. C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. G. F.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; San Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A. C.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, C.R.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Connaughton, V.; Burns, J.E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Zhang, B.; Hui, C. M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M. M.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, W.O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H. -F.; Blackburn, L.; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M.; Albert, M.A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Dominguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; DuBois, RN; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Lopez-Longo, F.J.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; op Reimer, W.S.; Salvetti, D.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Sgro, C.; Di Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D.J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.D.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zimmer, S.; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, K.S.; Courvoisier, T. J. -L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J. P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Singer, L. P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A. L.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Thivichon-Prince, Béatrice; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, M.D.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; Abe, F.; Doi, Masao; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K. S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, J.D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; Bersier, D. F.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C. G.; Piascik, A. S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I. A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, Y.A.; Buckley, C.D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, M.K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Williams, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Wright, D.E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Olivares E, F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Chen, T. -W.; Valle, M. D.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, R.M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cwiek, A.; Cwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; Evans, P.A.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F. E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, L. M.; Siegel, M.J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; Beroiz, M.; Penuela, T.; Macri, L. M.; Oelkers, R. J.; Lambas, D. G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J.L.; Depoy, D. L.; Padilla, N.D.; Pereyra, N. A.; Benacquista, M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, G.C.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze-Topphoff, U.; Postigo, A. de U.; Thoene, C. C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.

    This Supplement provides supporting material for Abbott et al. (2016a). We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient

  4. Mobile Phone Use for Agribusiness by Farmers in Southwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E M IGBOKWE

    function of market economies especially outside Nigeria (Aker, 2008; Jensen, 2009;. Muto and Yamano, 2009). Also, some scholars have devoted attentions to the impact of mobile phones use by farmers on agricultural development (Martin and. Abbott, 2011; Alhassan and Kwakwa, 2012; Mehta, 2013). Recently in Nigeria ...

  5. The effect of intercropping Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) Hochst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-06

    Mar 6, 2009 ... Understanding the ecological and economic interaction between the various ... agro forestry systems but the interactions involved are ... among the plants. This network made by AM intercon- nections may bring benefits to the plant such as extension of root longevity (Tommerup and Abbott, 1981) and also ...

  6. anion dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUMAN Das

    Raven E 2007 Extraction of glycerol from biodiesel into a eutectic based ionic liquid Green Chem. 9 868. 9. Abbott A P, Bell T J, Handa S and Stoddart B 2006. Cationic functionalisation of cellulose using a choline based ionic liquid analogue Green Chem. 8 784. 10. ZhaoHandBakerGA2013Ionicliquidsanddeepeutec-.

  7. Microalbuminuria Represents a Feature of Advanced Renal Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... beta thalassemia J Nephrol 1997; 10(3):163-167. 3. Abbott,KC, Hypolite, IO and Agodoa, LY. Sickle cell nephropathy at end-stage renal disease in the United States: patient characteristics and sur- vival Clin Nephrol 2002; 58(1): 9-15. 4. Polkinghome ,KR Detection and measure- ment of urinary protein ...

  8. Oxidative stress pattern in hepatitis C patients co-infected with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cwe

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... protein in serum was determined according to Gornall (1949). HCV diagnosis was carried out using ELISA (3rd generation) [Abbott laboratories, Chicago, IL USA] (Vrielink et al., 1997). Serum TNF- alpha levels were measured using ELISA Kit [ASSAYPRO, Assay. Max Human Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha] ...

  9. Navigating between the Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  10. Fulfilling the potential of cancer prevention and early detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curry, Susan J; Byers, Tim; Hewitt, Maria Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    ... competences and with regard for appropriate balance. Support for this project was provided by the National Cancer Institute; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; the American Cancer Society; Abbott Laboratories; the American Society of Clinical Oncology; Amgen, Inc.; Aventis; and the United Health Care Foundation. The views pre...

  11. CLSI-based transference and verification of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals for 29 Ortho VITROS 5600 chemistry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Victoria; Truong, Dorothy; Woroch, Amy; Chan, Man Khun; Tahmasebi, Houman; Adeli, Khosrow

    2018-03-01

    Evidence-based reference intervals (RIs) are essential to accurately interpret pediatric laboratory test results. To fill gaps in pediatric RIs, the Canadian Laboratory Initiative on Pediatric Reference Intervals (CALIPER) project developed an age- and sex-specific pediatric RI database based on healthy pediatric subjects. Originally established for Abbott ARCHITECT assays, CALIPER RIs were transferred to assays on Beckman, Roche, Siemens, and Ortho analytical platforms. This study provides transferred reference intervals for 29 biochemical assays for the Ortho VITROS 5600 Chemistry System (Ortho). Based on Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines, a method comparison analysis was performed by measuring approximately 200 patient serum samples using Abbott and Ortho assays. The equation of the line of best fit was calculated and the appropriateness of the linear model was assessed. This equation was used to transfer RIs from Abbott to Ortho assays. Transferred RIs were verified using 84 healthy pediatric serum samples from the CALIPER cohort. RIs for most chemistry analytes successfully transferred from Abbott to Ortho assays. Calcium and CO 2 did not meet statistical criteria for transference (r 2 CALIPER pediatric RI database to laboratories using Ortho VITROS 5600 biochemical assays. Clinical laboratories should verify CALIPER reference intervals for their specific analytical platform and local population as recommended by CLSI. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pierce - University of Georgia | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Investigator: J. Michael Pierce, PhDInstitution: University of Georgia, Athens, GA Our project, Discovery and Development of Cancer Glycomarkers, is a joint collaboration between our laboratories at the CCRC, which include Karen Abbott, Lance Wells, Kevin Dobbin, and Mike Tiemeyer, those at TGen, in Phoenix, AZ, Daniel Von Hoff, Haiyong Han, and Mike Demeure, and

  13. 1996 Toxic Hazards Research Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    samples were collected from an indwelling venous catheter using a heparinized syringe. Plasma was immediately separated by centrifugation and frozen at... Moth Management Program (L.C. Abbott). Session III concerned biologically based modeling applications in risk assessment of toxic substances and

  14. A Study to Determine the Evolution of Advances in Medical Technology Expected in the Next 25 Years and Possible Impacts on Coast Guard Operations and Support Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    a physician. An example of the kind of cybernetic system referred to above can be of value. Certain types of ventricular arrhythmia are dangerous in...also be used to measure bilirubin levels in newborns .18 Abbott Laboratories is introducing a new automated microbiology system that is designed to

  15. ONRASIA Scientific Information Bulletin. Volume 17, Number 2, Apr-Jun 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Eutrophicated Bay Asian ILanguages 2. Psychological and Physiological Measurements of Fluctuating Offensive Odors Technologies for Global Environment 1...the United Kingdom, Dr. Gavino C. Trono (Philippines) from nets or planted in the bottom Sweden, Italy, Morocco , and France. substantiated Abbott’s

  16. Ethical Behavior & Decision-Making among Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    One-hundred and eleven graduate students enrolled in a clinical psychology training program (PsyD) participated in a research study that examined the ethical decision-making processes and factors that have been proposed to influence behavior (Smith, McGuire, Abbott, & Blau, 1991). Using a two-part questionnaire, data regarding the ethical…

  17. Rwanda Journal - Vol 19 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Well-Being in Central Asia and the Caucasus · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. P Abbott, C Wallace, R Sapsford, 34-55. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/rj.v2i1.12F · Job Satisfaction at SAPREF (South African Petroleum Refinery) · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ...

  18. TENSÕES DO ESPAÇO LITERÁRIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Brandão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Analisando imagens e cenas extraídas da obra de cinco escritores – Georges Perec, Edwin Abbott, Franz Kafka, Joan Brossa e Lewis Carroll –, o ensaio propõe reflexões sobre a diversidade e a complexidade da categoria espaço nas literaturas moderna e contemporânea.

  19. The xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related retrovirus debate continues at first international workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Stoye (Jonathan); R.H. Silverman (Robert); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); S.F.J. Le Grice

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe 1stInternational Workshop on Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Retrovirus (XMRV), co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, The Department of Health and Human Services and Abbott Diagnostics, was convened on September 7/8, 2010 on the NIH campus, Bethesda, MD.

  20. Polio Comes Home: Pleasure and Paralysis in Candy Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawash, Samira

    2010-01-01

    The Candy Land board game has been in production since 1949 and remains one of the best-known and biggest-selling children's board games of all time. Beginning with the fiftieth-anniversary edition in 1998, Hasbro Inc. has promoted the story of how a retired schoolteacher named Eleanor Abbott came to invent Candy Land while recuperating in a polio…

  1. The use of two biological formulations of Bacillus Thuringiensis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two biological formulations of the microbial agents Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus sphaericus, known by their trade names Vectobac 12 AS and VectoLex CG (Corn Cob) granules, respectively, were obtained from Valent Biosciences Company (formerly Abbott Laboratories) of North Chicago, USA, and applied to control ...

  2. Short communication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-10-25

    Oct 25, 2011 ... After opt-out counseling, serial HIV-1/2 algorithm antibody tests were done using. Determine HIV-1/2 assay(Abbott Diagnostics, Hoofddorp, the Netherland) and SD bioline HIV 1/3 ... Ethics and administrative aspects. All interventions within this project were implemented under the supervision of the District ...

  3. 2018-03-06T09:38:01Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/61850 2018-03-06T09:38:01Z rj:ART Well-Being in Central Asia and the Caucasus Abbott, P Wallace, C Sapsford, R Social Quality Model; Satisfaction with Life; Central Asia; Caucasus; Empowerment This paper deals with four countries ...

  4. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and consequences for PTH reference values.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, M.M.; de Jongh, R.T.; Lips, P.T.A.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Milaneschi, Y.; Smit, J.H.; van Schoor, N.M.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Heijboer, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Reference values of PTH depend on vitamin D status of the reference population. This is often not described in package inserts. The aim of the present study was therefore to calculate assay specific PTH reference levels in EDTA plasma for the Architect (Abbott) in relation to 25-hydroxyvitamin D

  5. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and consequences for PTH reference values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, M. M. L.; de Jongh, R. T.; Lips, P. T. A. M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Milaneschi, Y.; Smit, J. H.; van Schoor, N. M.; Blankenstein, M. A.; Heijboer, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Reference values of PTH depend on vitamin D status of the reference population. This is often not described in package inserts. The aim of the present study was therefore to calculate assay specific PTH reference levels in EDTA plasma for the Architect (Abbott) in relation to 25-hydroxyvitamin D

  6. Improved Analysis of GW150914 Using a Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, C.; Casentini, J.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gaebel, S.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J. V.; Vano-Vinuales, A.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Brügmann, B.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, T.; Clark, M.; Haas, R.; Hemberger, D.; Hinder, I.; Kidder, L. E.; Kinsey, M.; Laguna, P.; Ossokine, S.; Pan, Y.; Röver, C.; Scheel, M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016).]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom) and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB) model calibrated to numerical-relativity simulations, which forces spin alignment (nonprecessing EOBNR). Here, we present new results that include a 15-dimensional precessing-spin waveform model (precessing EOBNR) developed within the EOB formalism. We find good agreement with the parameters estimated previously [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).], and we quote updated component masses of 35-3+5 M⊙ and 3 0-4+3 M⊙ (where errors correspond to 90% symmetric credible intervals). We also present slightly tighter constraints on the dimensionless spin magnitudes of the two black holes, with a primary spin estimate <0.65 and a secondary spin estimate <0.75 at 90% probability. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] estimated the systematic parameter-extraction errors due to waveform-model uncertainty by combining the posterior probability densities of precessing IMRPhenom and nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we find that the two precessing-spin models are in closer agreement, suggesting that these systematic errors are smaller than previously quoted.

  7. Evaluation ofrapid enzyme immunobinding assays for the detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abbott. Clonatec. DuPont. No. tests/kit. 40. 30. 200r100. Neg. control. Yes. Yes. Yes. Weak pos. control. No. Yes. Yes. Pos. control. Yes. Yes. Yes. Internal quality control indicator. Yes'. Yes'. No. HIV-1/HIV-2 detection. Yes. Yest. Yes. Reconstitution of reagents required. No. Yes. Yes. Stability of. Equal to. 1 moo for. 6 moo for ...

  8. Personnel breathing zone sevoflurane concentration adherence to occupational exposure limits in conjunction with filling of vaporisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijbel, H; Bjurstöm, R; Jakobsson, J G

    2010-10-01

    Work place pollution during filling of anaesthetic vaporisers has been a matter of concern. We studied personnel breathing zone ambient air sevoflurane concentrations during filling of sevoflurane with three different filling systems: Quik-Fil™ for Abbott and Dräger Fill™ resp. Easy-Fil™ adapters for Baxter sevoflurane bottles, referred to as 'Abbott and Baxter filling systems'. Sequential filling of three vaporisers was performed for a 15-min period, once with each of Abbott and Baxter filling systems, by four nurses. Ambient-air sevoflurane p.p.m. concentration in the breathing zone was continuously measured using a Miran 1a device during filling, and the mean 15 min sevoflurane concentration was calculated. All eight measured (4 × 2 sequences) 15-min mean breathing zone sevoflurane concentrations covering filling of three vaporisers were well below the recommended short-term value (STV) provided by the Swedish Work Environment Authority (STV 20 p.p.m.). The breathing zone sevoflurane concentration during filling of sevoflurane with Baxter or Abbott filling systems, in an ordinary operating theatre, was found to be reassuringly below the Swedish recommended STV (20 p.p.m. average for a 15-min period).

  9. Noise Assisted Directed Motion at the Molecular Level - 1 -R-ES ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [6] F J iilicher, A Ajdari and J Prost, Modeling molecular motors, Rev. Mod. Phys., Vol. 69, p. 1269,1997. [7] P Reimann, Brownian motors: noisy transport far from equilibrium,. Physics Reports, Vol. 361, p. 57,2002. [8] AM Jayannavar, cond-mat. 0107079. [9] ForParrondo's games, see G P Harmer and D Abbott, Nature, Vol.

  10. Manifest Destiny's Child: Mary Hazelton Blanchard Wade and the Literature of American Empire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Tanfer Emin

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses how, following in the footsteps of United States imperial children's writers Jacob Abbott and Edward Stratemeyer, Mary Hazelton Blanchard Wade (1860-1936), the original author of the "Our Little Cousins" series (1901-1905), contributed to the American culture of empire. Wade was one of the most prolific and popular…

  11. Translational medicine and drug discovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Littman, Bruce H; Krishna, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    ..., and examples of their application to real-life drug discovery and development. The latest thinking is presented by researchers from many of the world's leading pharmaceutical companies, including Pfizer, Merck, Eli Lilly, Abbott, and Novartis, as well as from academic institutions and public- private partnerships that support translational research...

  12. Corrigendum to 'Ventricular tachyarrhythmia during pregnancy in women with heart disease: Data from the ROPAC, a registry from the European Society of Cardiology' [Int. J. Cardiol. 220 131-136

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Ertekin (Ebru); I.M. van Hagen (Iris); A.M. Salam (Amar M.); T.P.E. Ruys (Titia); M.R. Johnson (Mark); J. Popelová (Jana); W.A. Parsonage (William A.); Z. Ashour (Zeinab); Shotan, A. (Avraham); Oliver, J.M. (José M.); G.R. Veldtman (Gruschen R.); R. Hall (Ruth); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe authors regret that some dates of sponsor's involvement in the program were incorrectly reported in the initial published paper, therefore please consider the below corrected information: Since the start of EORP, the following companies have supported the programme: Abbott Vascular

  13. Optics in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Adolf W.; Pe'er, Avi; Wang, Dayong; Piestun, Rafael; Friesem, Asher A.

    2003-11-01

    "Flatland" is the title of a science fiction story, written in 1880 by E.A. Abbott. The creatures of Flatland, living in their two-dimensional universe, are inspected and manipulated by 3D-people like we are. Here we show how the optics part of this science fiction story can be implemented -- for fun and profit.

  14. The Effect of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Crevicular Fluid Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    periodontal disease, and local factors such as xerostomia , fixed partial dentures, orthodontic appliances, restorations with defective margins, or any...aid in managing the periodontal patient. Oral Sci Rev 8:49-61, 1976. 94. Abbott, B.H., and Caffesse, R.G.: Crevicular fluid: Origin, composition

  15. Supplement: “Localization And Broadband Follow-Up of the Gravitational-Wave Transient GW150914” (2016, Apjl, 826, L13)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    This Supplement provides supporting material for Abbott et al. (2016a). We briefly summarize pastelectromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-upprogram. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient...

  16. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR REGULATION IN THE RAT EMBRYO: A POTENTIAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat embryo: a potential site for developmental toxicity?Ghosh B, Wood CR, Held GA, Abbott BD, Lau C.National Research Council, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

  17. Adding Dimension to Flatland: A Novel Approach to Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbenshade, Donald H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Discussed is the use of the book Flatland, written by Edwin Abbott, as a novel assigned for reading in secondary school geometry. The assignment is largely designed to reverse the low student interest in geometry. It is noted that overall the book was well received by students. (MP)

  18. Adding Depth to Geometry through "Flatland"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gail Marie

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author features "Flatland," by Edwin Abbott, a fantastic story about a square who lives in a two-dimensional world and who receives a visitor from the third dimension. Written in 1884 by a teacher-theologian who dabbled in mathematics, the novel is full of rich themes, including social class structure, the treatment of people…

  19. Using "Flatland 2: Sphereland" to Help Teach Motion and Multiple Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Seth; Johnson, Dano; Vondracek, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The 1884 book "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions," written by Edwin Abbott, has captured the interest of numerous generations, and has also been used in schools to help students learn and think about the concept of dimension in a creative, fun way. In 2007, a film was released called "Flatland: The Movie," and over one…

  20. An ultrastructural study of spermatogenesis and the mature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1992-10-22

    Oct 22, 1992 ... The ele<:tron micrographs of Cloney & Abbott (1980), Cotelli el al. (1980) and Fukumoto (1981; 1983; 1986), however. clearly show membrane-enclosed vesicles at the anterior tip of the spcrm. Some workers who have observed anteriorly located vesicles. do not consider these to represent an acrosome ...

  1. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    following scientists in reviewing manuscripts during 2011. Abbott Dallas, Columbia University, Palisades, United States. Achuta Rao Krishna, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi. Ahlfeld David P, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, United States. Ahmad Talat, Kashmir University, Srinagar. Alex Sobhana, Indian Institute ...

  2. Assessing Success in School Finance Litigation: The Case of New Jersey. Education, Equity, and the Law. No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Margaret E.; Weiss, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Education finance policy in New Jersey has been shaped by over 30 years of school finance litigation. Through its decisions in "Robinson v. Cahill" (1973-1976) and "Abbott v. Burke" (1985-2005), the justices of New Jersey's supreme court have defined the state's constitutional guarantee of a "thorough and efficient"…

  3. Mechanisms of Very Late Bioresorbable Scaffold Thrombosis: The INVEST Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamaji, Kyohei; Ueki, Yasushi; Souteyrand, Geraud; Daemen, Joost; Wiebe, Jens; Nef, Holger; Adriaenssens, Tom; Loh, Joshua P.; Lattuca, Benoit; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J.; Gomez-Lara, Josep; Timmers, Leo; Motreff, Pascal; Hoppmann, Petra; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Byrne, Robert A.; Meincke, Felix; Boeder, Niklas; Honton, Benjamin; O'Sullivan, Crochan J.; Ielasi, Alfonso; Delarche, Nicolas; Christ, Günter; Lee, Joe K. T.; Lee, Michael; Amabile, Nicolas; Karagiannis, Alexios; Windecker, Stephan; Räber, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    Very late scaffold thrombosis (VLScT) occurs more frequently after bioresorbable scaffold (Absorb BVS 1.1, Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California) implantation than with metallic everolimus-eluting stents. The purpose of this study was to elucidate mechanisms underlying VLScT as assessed by

  4. Mechanisms of Very Late Bioresorbable Scaffold Thrombosis : The INVEST Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamaji, Kyohei; Ueki, Yasushi; Souteyrand, Geraud; Daemen, Joost; Wiebe, Jens; Nef, Holger; Adriaenssens, Tom; Loh, Joshua P; Lattuca, Benoit; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J.; Gomez-Lara, Josep; Timmers, Leo; Motreff, Pascal; Hoppmann, Petra; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Byrne, Robert A.; Meincke, Felix; Boeder, Niklas; Honton, Benjamin; O'Sullivan, Crochan J; Ielasi, Alfonso; Delarche, Nicolas; Christ, Günter; Lee, Joe K T; Lee, Michael; Amabile, Nicolas; Karagiannis, Alexios; Windecker, Stephan; Räber, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Very late scaffold thrombosis (VLScT) occurs more frequently after bioresorbable scaffold (Absorb BVS 1.1, Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California) implantation than with metallic everolimus-eluting stents. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to elucidate mechanisms underlying

  5. Nucleic Acid Amplification of the opa Gene for Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: experience from a diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, M J; Young, Sheryl; Creighton, Julie; Anderson, Trevor; Werno, Anja

    2011-03-01

    We report results of Neisseria gonorrhoeae nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) with the Abbott m2000 PCR at a tertiary laboratory 6 months after its introduction. Of 5,475 specimens tested, 45 samples (0.82%) tested positive for N. gonorrhoeae. Eight were not cultured, but seven tested positive with a porA pseudogene NAAT.

  6. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Male-limited evolution suggests no extant intralocus sexual conflict over the sexually dimorphic cuticular hydrocarbons of Drosophila melanogaster · Stéphanie Bedhomme Adam K. Chippindale N. G. Prasad Matthieu Delcourt Jessica K. Abbott Martin A. Mallet Howard D. Rundle · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  7. Vitamin D status, receptor gene BsmI (A/G) polymorphism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rasha Rizk Elzehery

    d Abbott Nutrition Reserch and Development, Columbus, OH, USA. a r t i c l e i n f o. Article history: Received 19 October 2016. Accepted 20 November 2016. Available online 5 December 2016. Keywords: 25 Hydroxy vitamin D. Vitamin D receptor (VDR). Breast cancer risk. Polymorphisms. Genotype. a b s t r a c t.

  8. 78 FR 10564 - Proposed Modification of Class B Airspace; Minneapolis, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... International Airport (MSP), MN, within Class B airspace. The FAA is proposing this action to ensure containment...://www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colby Abbott, Airspace Policy and ATC... subarea by 0.8 NM laterally, but still provide containment of large turbine-powered aircraft within Class...

  9. 78 FR 63861 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Minneapolis, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    .... The FAA is taking this action to ensure containment of aircraft being vectored to and conducting dual... conforming amendments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colby Abbott, Airspace Policy and ATC Procedures... lateral and vertical limits of the Class B airspace to ensure the containment of large turbine-powered...

  10. The metabolic profiles of HIV-infected and non-infected women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parameter. Methods and equipment. HIV tests. Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV 1/HIV-2: Recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides) reagent pack (Abbott, Germany, catalogue no. 3D41-20). Total lymphocyte counts Via a full blood count on ethyldimethylacetic acid. (EDTA) blood using a Coulter Microdiff 18 Cell.

  11. Male-limited evolution suggests no extant intralocus sexual conflict ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-12-02

    Dec 2, 2011 ... estimates of sexually antagonistic selection will be important to fully resolve these alternatives. [Bedhomme S., Chippindale A. K., Prasad N. G., Delcourt M., Abbott J. K., Mallet M. A. and Rundle H. D. 2011 Male-limited evolution suggests no extant intralocus sexual conflict over the sexually dimorphic ...

  12. EAMJ September 432-448.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-09-09

    Sep 9, 2008 ... Malnutrition alone causes false negative results and HIV-infected subjects have significantly depressed delayed type hypersensitivity responses .... Determine HIV1/2 (Abbott Labs, Germany). If indeterminate or positive, confirmatory testing was done with Capillus HIV-1/HIV-2 (Trinity Biotech,. Ireland).

  13. Serial 5-Year Evaluation of Side Branches Jailed by Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds Using 3-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography: Insights From the ABSORB Cohort B Trial (A Clinical Evaluation of the Bioabsorbable Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System in the Treatment of Patients With De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onuma, Y.; Grundeken, M.J.; Nakatani, S.; Asano, T.; Sotomi, Y.; Foin, N.; Ng, J.; Okamura, T.; Wykrzykowska, J.J.; Winter, R.J. de; Geuns, R.J.M. van; Koolen, J.; Christiansen, E.; Whitbourn, R.; McClean, D.; Smits, P; Windecker, S.; Ormiston, J.A.; Serruys, P.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The long-term fate of Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA) struts jailing side branch ostia has not been clarified. We therefore evaluate serially (post-procedure and at 6 months, 1, 2, 3, and 5 years) the appearance and fate of jailed Absorb

  14. Serial 5-Year Evaluation of Side Branches Jailed by Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds Using 3-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography Insights From the ABSORB Cohort B Trial (A Clinical Evaluation of the Bioabsorbable Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System in the Treatment of Patients With De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onuma, Yoshinobu; Grundeken, Maik J.; Nakatani, Shimpei; Asano, Taku; Sotomi, Yohei; Foin, Nicolas; Ng, Jaryl; Okamura, Takayuki; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J.; de Winter, Robbert J.; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Koolen, Jacques; Christiansen, Evald; Whitbourn, Robert; McClean, Dougal; Smits, Pieter; Windecker, Stephan; Ormiston, John A.; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2017-01-01

    Background-The long-term fate of Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA) struts jailing side branch ostia has not been clarified. We therefore evaluate serially (post-procedure and at 6 months, 1, 2, 3, and 5 years) the appearance and fate of jailed Absorb

  15. Mida mõtlevad tippjuhid? / interv. John A. Byrne

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    USA majandusliku olukorra ja tulevikuprognooside üle arutlevad FedExi juht Fred Smith, Chrysleri tegevjuht Robert Nardell, endine General Electric'u aseesimees Dennis Dammerman, Caritas Christi Health Care tegevjuht Ralph de la Torre, Abbott Labs tegevjuht Miles White, FPL Group tegevjuht Lewis Hay, BorgWarneri tegevjuht Timothy Manganello ning Schering-Plough tegevjuht Fred Hassan

  16. Therapeutic hypothermia reduces intestinal ischemia/reperfusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... diamine oxidase (DAO) and apoptosis rate of intestinal epithelial cells were tested by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. ... The interruption and restoration of blood flow, induced by. *Corresponding author. ... intubated with a 14-gauge cannula (Abbocath-T, Abbott Hospital. Products Division; North ...

  17. EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD. B D Abbott, A R Buckalew, and K E Leffler. RTD, NHEERL, ORD,US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is teratogenic in C57BL/6J mice, producing cleft palate (CP) after exposure...

  18. Parameters, US Army War College Quarterly. Volume 19, Number 3, September 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    for funds to maintain their combat capability. This period is often depicted as a time of selfish, childish parochialism orchestrated by a group of...on a more vital role in counter- ing this cancerous attack against our national security. Colonel Mike Abbott Annual subscriptions to Parameters are

  19. RETINOIC ACID INDUCTION OF CLEFT PALATE IN EGF AND TGF-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE: STAGE SPECIFIC INFLUENCES OF GROWTH FACTOR EXPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABBOTT, B. D., LEFFLER, K.E. AND BUCKALEW, A.R, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Retinoic acid induction of cleft palate (CP) in EGF and TGF knockout mice: Stage specific influences of growth factor expression.<...

  20. New Automated Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Core Antigen Assay as an Alternative to Real-Time PCR for HCV RNA Quantification▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yongjung; Lee, Jong-Han; Kim, Beom Seok; Kim, Do Young; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2010-01-01

    An automated hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen (Ag) assay was evaluated with clinical samples. Determination of HCV Ag and RNA levels in 282 subjects using Abbott HCV Ag and Roche Cobas TaqMan assays revealed that these two tests were highly correlated (r = 0.9464). Thus, the HCV Ag assay could be an alternative test to quantitative reverse transcription-PCR.

  1. 78 FR 17866 - New Animal Drug Approvals; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor's Drug Labeler Code; Gonadorelin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... Rd., Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL 60064, has informed FDA of.... Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. 0 5. In Sec. 522...) Limitations. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. (2...

  2. 21 CFR 522.2120 - Spectinomycin dihydrochloride injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with E. coli. (ii) Baby chicks at the rate of 2.5 to 5 milligrams per chick as an aid in the control of... dihydrochloride pentahydrate used in manufacturing the drug is the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces flavopersicus (var. Abbott) or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other means. Each...

  3. Echogenicity as a surrogate for bioresorbable everolimus-eluting scaffold degradation: analysis at 1-, 3-, 6-, 12- 18, 24-, 30-, 36- and 42-month follow-up in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A.M. Campos (Carlos); Y. Ishibashi (Yuki); J. Eggermont (Jeroen); T. Nakatani (Tomoya); Y.-K. Cho (Yun-Kyeong); J. Dijkstra (Jouke); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); A. Sheehy (Alexander); J. Lane (Jennifer); M. Kamberi (Marika); R. Rapoza (Richard); L. Perkins (Laura); H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); Y. Onuma (Yoshinobu); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the study is to validate intravascular quantitative echogenicity as a surrogate for molecular weight assessment of poly-l-lactide-acid (PLLA) bioresorbable scaffold (Absorb BVS, Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California). We analyzed at 9 time points (from 1- to 42-month

  4. CLSI-based transference of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals to Beckman Coulter AU biochemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou El Hassan, Mohamed; Stoianov, Alexandra; Araújo, Petra A T; Sadeghieh, Tara; Chan, Man Khun; Chen, Yunqi; Randell, Edward; Nieuwesteeg, Michelle; Adeli, Khosrow

    2015-11-01

    The CALIPER program has established a comprehensive database of pediatric reference intervals using largely the Abbott ARCHITECT biochemical assays. To expand clinical application of CALIPER reference standards, the present study is aimed at transferring CALIPER reference intervals from the Abbott ARCHITECT to Beckman Coulter AU assays. Transference of CALIPER reference intervals was performed based on the CLSI guidelines C28-A3 and EP9-A2. The new reference intervals were directly verified using up to 100 reference samples from the healthy CALIPER cohort. We found a strong correlation between Abbott ARCHITECT and Beckman Coulter AU biochemical assays, allowing the transference of the vast majority (94%; 30 out of 32 assays) of CALIPER reference intervals previously established using Abbott assays. Transferred reference intervals were, in general, similar to previously published CALIPER reference intervals, with some exceptions. Most of the transferred reference intervals were sex-specific and were verified using healthy reference samples from the CALIPER biobank based on CLSI criteria. It is important to note that the comparisons performed between the Abbott and Beckman Coulter assays make no assumptions as to assay accuracy or which system is more correct/accurate. The majority of CALIPER reference intervals were transferrable to Beckman Coulter AU assays, allowing the establishment of a new database of pediatric reference intervals. This further expands the utility of the CALIPER database to clinical laboratories using the AU assays; however, each laboratory should validate these intervals for their analytical platform and local population as recommended by the CLSI. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparable performance of TMA and Real-Time PCR in detecting minimal residual hepatitis C viraemia at the end of antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoletto, Gladis; Campagnolo, Davide; Mirandola, Silvia; Comastri, Giuseppe; Severini, Letizia; Pulvirenti, Franco Renato; Alberti, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C may cause transient on-treatment response followed by post-treatment relapse. We have compared the prognostic value for post-treatment relapse of minimal hepatitis C residual viraemia detected at end-of-therapy by transcription mediated assay (TMA) and by Abbott RealTime PCR HCV assay. Minimal residual viraemia was investigated in 202 HCV patients who had completed a full course of Pegylated Interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin and were HCV-RNA negative by conventional PCR in two separate serum samples obtained during the last week of therapy and the results were then correlated with post-treatment outcome. Minimal residual viraemia was detected in 22/202 (11%, 95% CI: 7-16%) and in 28/202 (13.8%, 95% CI 10-19%) patients by TMA and by Abbott RealTime HCV assay, respectively, with 92% concordant results. Post-treatment relapse was seen in 81.8% (95% CI: 60-93%) of TMA positive and in 82.1% (95% CI: 64-92%) of Abbott RealTime HCV assay positive cases compared to 16.6% (95% CI: 12-23%) of TMA negative and 17.2% (95% CI: 12-23%) of Abbott RealTime HCV assay negative patients. These results indicate that TMA and the Abbott RealTime HCV assay have comparable sensitivity and specificity in identifying minimal residual viraemia at the end of antiviral therapy, with excellent predictive value for post-treatment relapse. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality requirements for veterinary hematology analyzers in small animals-a survey about veterinary experts' requirements and objective evaluation of analyzer performance based on a meta-analysis of method validation studies: bench top hematology analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Andrea M; Moritz, Andreas; Freeman, Kathleen P; Bauer, Natali

    2016-09-01

    Scarce information exists about quality requirements and objective evaluation of performance of large veterinary bench top hematology analyzers. The study was aimed at comparing the observed total error (TEobs ) derived from meta-analysis of published method validation data to the total allowable error (TEa ) for veterinary hematology variables in small animals based on experts' opinions. Ideally, TEobs should be hematology analyzers (ADVIA 2120; Sysmex XT2000iV, and CellDyn 3500) was calculated based on method validation studies published between 2005 and 2013 (n = 4). The percent TEobs = 2 * CV (%) + bias (%). The CV was derived from published studies except for the ADVIA 2120 (internal data), and bias was estimated from the regression equation. A total of 41 veterinary experts (19 diplomates, 8 residents, 10 postgraduate students, 4 anonymous specialists) responded. The proposed range of TEa was wide, but generally ≤ 20%. The TEobs was < TEa for all variables and analyzers except for canine and feline HGB (high bias, low CV) and platelet counts (high bias, high CV). Overall, veterinary bench top analyzers fulfilled experts' requirements except for HGB due to method-related bias, and platelet counts due to known preanalytic/analytic issues. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  7. Bootstrap for rails

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Syed Fazle

    2015-01-01

    If you are a web developer who has a basic understanding of Ruby on Rails, this is the book for you. You should definitely have previous knowledge about HTML and how it works. However, CSS and JavaScript knowledge is optional for this book.

  8. Comment on "Stimulated emission from trap electronic states in oxide of nanocrystal Si" /Appl. Phys. lett. 92, 221910 (2008)/

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valenta, J.; Pelant, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 6 (2008), 066101/1-066101/1 ISSN 0003-6951 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : silicon nanostructures * porous silicon * stimulated emission * ruby rod Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Phys ics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.726, year: 2008

  9. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. Rakesh Kumar. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 57 Issue 1 July 2001 pp 215-218 Others. The automatic liquid nitrogen filling system for GDA detectors · Rakesh Kumar A J Malyadri S Muralithar Ruby Shanti S K Saini Kusum Rani B P Ajith Kumar ...

  10. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. B P Ajith Kumar. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 57 Issue 1 July 2001 pp 215-218 Others. The automatic liquid nitrogen filling system for GDA detectors · Rakesh Kumar A J Malyadri S Muralithar Ruby Shanti S K Saini Kusum Rani B P Ajith Kumar ...

  11. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vivo effects of Cannabis sativa L. extract on blood coagulation, fat and glucose metabolism in normal and streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. Ruby-Ann Levendal, CL Frost. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajtcam.v3i4.31172 ...

  12. High-speed interferometry of expanding and collapsing laser produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Boiko, V.A.; Gribkov, V.A.; Zakharov, S.M.; Krokhin, O.N.; Nikulin, V.Ya.; Sklizkov, G.V.

    An installation with a good time and space resolution for the interferometric investigation of dense non-stationary plasma is described. The installation consists of a Mach-Zender interferometer, an electro-optical image converter camera and a ruby laser with an impulse of variable duration of 1nsec to 150nsec

  13. Environmental Statement on the Tactical Fighter Weapons Center (TFWC) Range Complex, Nellis Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-10

    Regulus calendula cineaceus Ruby-crowned Kinglet 197. Anthus spinoietta rubescens Water Pipit 198. Bombycilla cedrorum Cedar Waxwing 199. Phainopela nitens...velifer White River Speckled Dace 13. Moapa coriacea* ** Moapa Dace 14. Cyprinus carpio Asian Carp 15. Lepidomeda mollispinus pratensis Big Spring

  14. Synthesis and characterization of metal oxide nanorod brushes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    ducing chromium ions during the synthesis of alumina rods. Keywords. Metal oxide nanorods; nanorod brushes; alumina nanorods; MoO3 nanorods; ZnO nanorods; ruby nanorods. 1. Introduction. Synthesis of one-dimensional metal oxide nanostructures is getting enormous attention in recent years due to their potential ...

  15. High Pressure Research on Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    etc.) is called the Hugoniot. From the Hugoniot curves, a 300 K P – V isotherm can be derived by taking into account the internal shock energies. Shock wave experiments are very important for obtaining EOS data to design nuclear weapons. The same EOSs and computer. Figure 14. The Ruby fluo- rescence spectra at 1 at-.

  16. 16 CFR 1500.91 - Determinations regarding lead content for certain materials or products under section 101 of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... product or material: (1) Precious gemstones: diamond, ruby, sapphire, emerald. (2) Semiprecious gemstones... 1303, and inks used in after-treatment applications, including screen prints, transfers, decals, or other prints). (7) Textiles (excluding after-treatment applications, including screen prints, transfers...

  17. Mise au point d'un test in vitro de comportement au sel de quatre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    agrumes. 8155. Ruby), and 'Shamouti' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) were maintained on MT media containing different NaCl doses, i.e.: 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 mM. The results showed that the different salt levels used had a ...

  18. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tree is a host of lac insects which secrete a resinous substance that yields shellac or lac. A ruby-coloured gum known as Bengal Kino is collected from the incisions made in the bark. The wood, resistant to water, is used in water-well work. The seeds are used as anthelmintic and as an antidote for snake-bite.

  19. Non-resonant two and three-photon ionization of the singlet and triplet metastable helium atoms of an atomic jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Bernard.

    1978-01-01

    The three-photon ionization cross-section of the helium metastables He(2 1 S) and He(2 3 S) is determined by means of the linearly polarized radiation of a pulsed ruby laser with an emission wavelength equal to 6946.4 A at 19 0 C. Two-photon ionization, obtained by doubling the laser beam frequency, is also studied [fr

  20. Health-Terrain: Visualizing Large Scale Health Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal pattern of Flu. 2. System Integration and User Interface The system is implemented using Javascript in an HTML5 canvas. The architecture... HTML5 canvas. The architecture pattern is based on the Ruby on Rails (RoR) framework for delivering web applications with AJAX services and a

  1. A Matter of Friendship: Educational Interventions into Culture and Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuffelton, Amy B.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary educational reformers have claimed that research on social class differences in child raising justifies programs that aim to lift children out of poverty by means of cultural interventions. Focusing on the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP), Ruby Payne's "aha! Process," and the Harlem Children's Zone as examples,…

  2. Photoresonance anode plasma production by KrF lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knyazev, B.A.; Melnikov, P.I.; Doroshkin, A.A.; Matveenko, A.N.; Bluhm, H.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of an intense KrF laser pulse with vapor clouds of different elemental composition has been studied experimentally. The clouds were produced by evaporation of solid targets with a ruby laser. Ionization of the expanding clouds by a KrF laser was observed for clouds containing tantalum atoms. (author). 5 figs., 7 refs

  3. 簡易顕微分光装置の開発と学校教育への応用

    OpenAIRE

    秋重, 幸邦; 湯浅, 聖子

    2008-01-01

    We made a simple microspectrophotometer using an old microscope, an optical fiber, a spectrophotometer with CCD and a personal computer. Furthermore, we successfully made a fluorescence spectrophotometer using a solidstate laser and a sharp cut filter for detecting emission from small Ruby chips, around 0.1 mm. We propose some experimental techniques concerning the optical spectroscopy for school education.

  4. Monitoring endurance athletes : A multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, Tina Ardi

    2016-01-01

    Endurance athletes seek for the optimal balance in training stress and recovery so they can perform at their best and avoid injuries. The PhD thesis of Ruby Otter at the School of Sport Studies (Hanze University of Applied Sciences) and the Center of Human Movement Sciences (UMCG, University of

  5. Learning Mongoid

    CERN Document Server

    Rege, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial with focused examples that will help you build scalable, high performance Rails web applications with Mongoid.If you are an application developer who wants to learn how to use Mongoid in a Rails application, this book will be great for you. You are expected to be familiar with MongoDB and Ruby.

  6. Fusion of protoplasts with irradiated microprotoplasts as a tool for radiation hybrid panel in citrus Fusão de protoplastos com microprotoplastos irradiados como ferramenta para painel híbrido de radiação em citros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Maria de Bona

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to combine asymmetric somatic hybridization (donor-recipient fusion or gamma fusion to microprotoplast-mediated chromosome transfer, as a tool to be used for chromosome mapping in Citrus. Swinglea glutinosa microprotoplasts were irradiated either with 50, 70, 100 or 200 gamma rays and fused to cv. Ruby Red grapefruit or Murcott tangor protoplasts. Cell colonies were successfully formed and AFLP analyses confirmed presence of S. glutinosa in both 'Murcott' tangor and 'Ruby Red' grapefruit genomes.O objetivo deste trabalho foi combinar hibridação somática assimétrica (fusão doador-recipiente ou fusão gama e transferência cromossômica mediada por microprotoplastos como uma ferramenta para o mapeamento cromossômico em Citrus. Microprotoplastos de Swinglea glutinosa foram irradiados com doses de 50, 70, 100 ou 200 raios gama e fusionados com protoplastos de pomelo cv. Ruby Red ou de tangor Murcott. Houve sucesso na formação de colônias de células, e a análise AFLP confirmou a presença de S. glutinosa nos genomas do tangor 'Murcott' e do pomelo 'Ruby Red'.

  7. Loop quasi-invariant chunk detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyen, Jean-Yves; Rubiano, Thomas; Seiller, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    the computational complexity of the overall program can be decreased. In this paper, we introduce the theory around this concept and present a prototype analysis pass implemented on LLVM. We already implemented a proof of concept on a toy C parser (https://github.com/ThomasRuby/LQICM_On_C_Toy_Parser) analysing...

  8. Total phenol content of guava fruit and development of an in vitro regeneration protocol amenable to genetic improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total soluble phenolics in two white (‘Allahabad Safeda’ and ‘Lucknow-49’), two pink (‘Beaumont’ and ‘Gushiken Sweet’), and three red fleshed (‘Ka Hua Kola’, ‘Ruby Supreme’ and ‘Red Fleshed’) guava (Psidium guajava. L.) fruits were assessed using the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. ‘Allahabad Safeda’ and...

  9. Seasonal variation in chemical composition, aroma volatiles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate compositional changes and antioxidant capacities of pomegranate fruit ('Bhagwa' and 'Ruby') at five distinct stages of maturity over two growing seasons. Total soluble solids (TSS), pH, titratable acidity (TA), phenolic concentrations, antioxidant capacity and aroma volatile ...

  10. Developing Cooperative Learning in Initial Teacher Education: Indicators for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliffe, Wendy; Snaith, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of supporting pre-service teachers to use cooperative learning in one initial teacher education institution in England. In a context where the government requires all teacher education to be "school-led" and where school partners do not commonly use cooperative learning (Baines, Rubie-Davies, and Blatchford…

  11. Effect of windbreaks on wind speed and canker incidence on grapefruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    For fresh grapefruit, the goal is to maximize pack-out by minimizing canker lesions on fruit. The objective of these trials was to determine the relationship between wind speed and incidence and severity of citrus canker on 5 to 7 yr-old Ruby Red grapefruit trees located in two trial blocks (~4.5 ha...

  12. The Returns on Investment Grade Diamonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: This paper examines the risk-return characteristics of investment grade gems (white diamonds, colored diamonds and other types of gems including sapphires, rubies, and emeralds). The transactions are coming from gem auctions and span the period 1999-2012. Over our time frame, the annual

  13. Investing in Diamonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the risk-return characteristics of investment grade gems (white diamonds, colored diamonds and other types of gems including sapphires, rubies, and emeralds). The transactions are coming from gem auctions and span the period 1999-2012. Over our time frame, the annual nominal USD

  14. Laser Plasmas: Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Emission plasma plume generated by pulsed laser ablation of a lithium solid target by a ruby laser (694 nm, 20 ns, 3 J) was subjected to optical emission spectroscopy: time and space resolved optical emission was characterised as a function of distance from the target surface. Propagation of the plume was studied through ...

  15. Differential effects of ocean acidification on carbon acquisition in two bloom-forming dinoflagellate species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberlein, T.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Rost, B.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellates represent a cosmopolitan group of phytoplankton with the ability to form harmful algal blooms. Featuring a Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) with very low CO2-affinities, photosynthesis of this group may be particularly prone to carbon limitation and thus

  16. 75 FR 6025 - Environmental Impact Statements and Regulations; Availability of EPA Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... (ERP), under section 309 of the Clean Air Act and Section 102(2)(c) of the National Environmental.... 20090210, ERP No. D-FRC-A03087-00, Ruby Pipeline Project, Proposed Natural Gas Pipeline Facilities, Right... hydrostatic pipeline testing. Rating EC2. EIS No. 20090267, ERP No. D-AFS-J65546-MT, Bitterroot National...

  17. Hair removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair...

  18. Logbook, Ethiopia in a Timeline: The School, The Book, The Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angélil, M., Siress, C and Barthes, CM (Editors) 2013, Berlin: Ruby Press ISBN: 978-3-944074-04-7 152 Pages. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  19. Evaluation of new cultivars of mango ( Mangifera indica L.) in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data for girth and tree size are presented for 14 new mango cultivars planted at Ejura in the forest savanna u-ansitional zone of Ghana. Girth increases in all cultivars were approximately linear from 1969 tg 1971. Trunk increase was fastest in Sunset followed by Palmer and Jacquelin in that order. Ruby exhibited the slowest ...

  20. Stimulated emission of phonons in an acoustic cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilstra, Lieuwe Gijsbert

    2001-01-01

    This thesis will present experiments on stimulated emission of phonons in dilute ruby following complete population inversion of the Zeeman-split E(2E) Kramers doublet by selective pulsed optical pumping into its upper component. The resulting phonon avalanches are detected by use of the R1

  1. The Unique Story of a High-Tech Polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 6. The Unique Story of a High-Tech Polymer. Panchanan Pramanik Ruby Chakraborty. General Article Volume 9 Issue 6 June 2004 pp 39-50. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Sharing Programming Resources Between Bio* Projects Through Remote Procedure Call and Native Call Stack Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.C.P.; Goto, N.; Yates, A.; Gautier, L.; Willis, S.; Fields, C.; Katayama, T.

    2012-01-01

    Open-source software (OSS) encourages computer programmers to reuse software components written by others. In evolutionary bioinformatics, OSS comes in a broad range of programming languages, including C/C++, Perl, Python, Ruby, Java, and R. To avoid writing the same functionality multiple times for

  3. Thermal processes in gallium arsenide during nanosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivlev, G.D.; Malevich, V.L.

    1990-01-01

    Phase changes in the surface layers of semiconductors during irradiation by nanosecond laser pulses have been the subject of large numbers of papers. The authors have performed numerical modeling and an experimental study of phase changes in the surface layers of single crystal gallium arsenide heated by single pulses of ruby laser light

  4. Lõunamaa meremehed plaanivad Muuga sadamas streikima hakata / Küllike Rooväli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rooväli, Küllike, 1969-

    1999-01-01

    Muuga sadamas seisva Malaisia lipu all sõitva laeva Lantic Ruby meeskond ei nõustu Eestist palgata lahkuma, kavatsedes kohe pärast laeva täislaadimist alustada Eesti meremeeste ametiühingute toel streiki ning lasta alus arestida. Rahvusvaheline transporditöötajate organisatsioon ITF

  5. Mise au point d'un test in vitro de comportement au sel de quatre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    30 avr. 2015 ... Introduction: Soil and water salinity is an important abiotic stress that can affect both production and quality of citrus fruits. ... genotypes, Cleopatra mandarin and Star Ruby grapefruit showed the best performance under salt stress conditions. ..... stress oxydatif (Turkan et Demiral, 2009) pouvant conduire à la.

  6. GridSpace Engine of the ViroLab Virtual Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciepiela, E.; Kocot, J.; Gubala, T.; Malawski, M.; Kasztelnik, M.; Bubak, M.; Bubak, M.; Turała, M.; Wiatr, K.

    2008-01-01

    GridSpace Engine is the central operational unit of the ViroLab Virtual Laboratory. This specific runtime environment enables access to computational and data resources by coordinating execution of experiments written in the Ruby programming language extended with virtual laboratory capabilities.

  7. Proteome Analysis for Understanding Abiotic Stress (Salinity and Drought Tolerance in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad A. El Rabey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to study the proteome of date palm under salinity and drought stress conditions to possibly identify proteins involved in stress tolerance. For this purpose, three-month-old seedlings of date palm cultivar “Sagie” were subjected to drought (27.5 g/L polyethylene glycol 6000 and salinity stress conditions (16 g/L NaCl for one month. DIGE analysis of protein extracts identified 47 differentially expressed proteins in leaves of salt- and drought-treated palm seedlings. Mass spectrometric analysis identified 12 proteins; three out of them were significantly changed under both salt and drought stress, while the other nine were significantly changed only in salt-stressed plants. The levels of ATP synthase alpha and beta subunits, an unknown protein and some of RubisCO fragments were significantly changed under both salt and drought stress conditions. Changes in abundance of superoxide dismutase, chlorophyll A-B binding protein, light-harvesting complex1 protein Lhca1, RubisCO activase, phosphoglycerate kinase, chloroplast light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein, phosphoribulokinase, transketolase, RubisCO, and some of RubisCO fragments were significant only for salt stress.

  8. TELEOSTEI; MUGILIDAE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the alimentary canal, and ventral to the large swim-bladder. Each testis is suspended by the mesorchium, which is continuous with the visceral peritoneum of the swim-bladder and which runs along the entire length of the testes, as in Eucalia inconstans (Ruby & McMillan. 1970). The left testis is always the longer of the two ...

  9. V V Raman is Emeritus Professor of Physics and Humanities at the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    edu http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varadaraja_V. _Raman petty piece of charcoal; rubies, sapphires and emeralds would all be dark as the depths of hell. The effect of light on the world around us is of incredible variety. The magnificent aurora and.

  10. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sprint ability among Malaysian netball players · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Soh Kim Geok, Ruby Husain, 214-219. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajpherd.v12i2.24722 ...

  11. :Ffowering 'Trees-

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tree is a host of lac insects which secrete a resinous substance that yields shellac or lac. A ruby-coloured gum known as Bengal Kino is collected from the incisions made in the bark. The wood, resistant to water, is used in water-well work. The seeds are used as anthelmintic and as an antidote for snake-bite.

  12. Plaadid / Paavo Käämbre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Käämbre, Paavo, 1984-

    2005-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Cassidy "I'm a Hustla", Tony Iommi and Glenn Hughes "Fused", Peer Günt "No Piercing, No Tattoo", Julio Iglesias "L'Homme Que Je Suis", Raveonettes "Pretty In Black", Roisin Murphy "Ruby Blue", James Blunt "Back To Bedlam"

  13. Pharmaceutical and pharmacological approaches for bioavailability ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urien S, Doz F, Giraud C, Rey E, Gentet JC, Chastagner P,. Vassal G, Corradini N, Auvrignon A, Leblond P, Rubie H and Treluyer JM 2011 Developmental pharmacokinetics of etoposide in 67 children: lack of dexamethasone effect. Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol. 67 597-603. 2010. A lyophilized etoposide submicron ...

  14. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on canopy structure of Ulva communities from southern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischof, K; Peralta, G; Krabs, G; van de Poll, WH; Perez-Llorens, JL; Breeman, AM

    2002-01-01

    Within the sheltered creeks of Cadiz bay, Ulva thalli form extended mat-like canopies. The effect of solar ultraviolet radiation on photosynthetic activity, the composition of photosynthetic and xanthophyll cycle pigments, and the amount of RubisCO, chaperonin 60 (CPN 60), and the induction of DNA

  15. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on canopy structure of Ulva communities from southern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischof, K.; Peralta, G.; Kräbs, G.; van de Poll, W.H.; Lucas Pérez-Lloréns, J.; Breeman, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Within the sheltered creeks of Cádiz bay, Ulva thalli form extended mat-like canopies. The effect of solar ultraviolet radiation on photosynthetic activity, the composition of photosynthetic and xanthophyll cycle pigments, and the amount of RubisCO, chaperonin 60 (CPN 60), and the induction of DNA

  16. The optimisation of the Multi-Atmospheric Ar:Xe Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielkens, S.W.A.

    1998-01-01

    In 1960 the first successful demonstration of laser operation was achieved by Maiman in ruby [1], which is an example of a solid-state laser. Since then numerous other types of lasers have been constructed, like gas lasers, semiconductor lasers, dye lasers, chemical lasers and free-electron lasers

  17. Getting started with Julia

    CERN Document Server

    Balbaert, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    This book is for you if you are a data scientist or working on any technical or scientific computation projects. The book assumes you have a basic working knowledge of high-level dynamic languages such as MATLAB, R, Python, or Ruby.

  18. Comparative study of the electronic structure of natural and synthetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparative study of the electronic structure of natural and synthetic rubies using XAFS and EDAX analyses ... Electronics and Engineering Research Institute, Pilani 333 031, India; Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma, “La Sapienza”, 00185 P,le A.Moro, Roma, Italy; Gem Testing Laboratory, Jaipur 302 003, India ...

  19. Hard assets : The return of rare diamonds and gems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, Luc; Spaenjers, Christophe; Grynberg, Roman; Mbayi, Letsema

    This note examines the investment performance of diamonds and other gems (sapphires, rubies, and emeralds) over the period 1999–2010, using a novel data set of auction transactions. Over our time frame, the annualized real USD returns for white and colored diamonds equaled 6.4% and 2.9%,

  20. 水晶を染めた模造宝石

    OpenAIRE

    滝, 貞男; 山下, 久雄; 尾崎, 行雄

    1983-01-01

    Physical properties of gemstones called ""quartz emerald"", ""quartz ruby"" and ""quartz sapphire"" were examined. The properties were identical with those of quartz and it was concluded that they were dyed ""crackled"" quartz crystals. Measurements of transmission curves of gemstones and absorption spectra of dyes extracted from them were carried out. As the result, they showed remarkable differences in comparison with natural stones.

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 1083 ... Vol 15, No 2 (2009), Comparison of physical profile of Malaysian basketball and netball players by playing position, Abstract. KG Soh, KL Soh, H Ruby, OFM Sofian, ... Vol 12, No 3 (2006):, Constructing safety through “contrast” during training in scuba diving, Abstract. Lourens H Human, Marike du ...

  2. The Thomson scattering system at DANTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadeberg, M.

    1983-08-01

    The construction and operation of the 90 deg Thomson Scattering diagnostic at DANTE is described. The system is based on a double-pulse ruby laser and a three channel spectrometer. Two single point measurements can be made during each plasma discharge. (Auth.)

  3. Experiment of laser thomson scattering at HL-1 tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Henian; Chen Jiafu; Yan Derong; Liu Aiping; Shi Peilan; Wang Wei; Liu Xiaomei

    1989-05-01

    The structure and performance of the Ruby Laser Thomson Scattering apparatus for HL-1 tokamak device is described. The method of acquisition and calibration of multichannel scattered signals are presented. Examples of measured electron temperature T. with experimental error are given

  4. Mastering Ext JS

    CERN Document Server

    Groner, Loiane

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who is familiar with Ext JS and want to augment your skills to create even better web applications, this is the book for you. Basic knowledge of JavaScript/HTML/CSS and any server-side language (PHP, Java, C#, Ruby, or Python) is required.

  5. The Contributions of James Moir to Physical Chemistry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    This article examines his research in physical chemistry, covering the spectral analysis of the ruby and emerald gemstones, a detailed analysis of part of the Fraunhofer lines of the solar spectrum, and an examination of the spectra of cobalt compounds, the permanganate ion, and uranium compounds. Finally, as part of his ...

  6. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 6. The Unique Story of a High-Tech Polymer. Panchanan Pramanik Ruby Chakraborty. General Article Volume 9 Issue 6 June 2004 pp 39-50. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Cuby: An Integrative Framework for Computational Chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 13 (2016), s. 1230-1237 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-01214P Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : software framework * workflow automation * QM/MM * datasets * Ruby Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.229, year: 2016

  8. 76 FR 21741 - Emergency Access Advisory Committee; Announcement of Establishment, and of Members and Co...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... Telephone, Inc.-- Rebecca Ladew TeleCommunications Systems, Inc.--Don Mitchell Telecommunications Industry...) represent Federal agencies; and three (3) represent industry organizations. The EAAC's membership is..., alternate Laura Ruby National Association of the Deaf, Telecommunications for the Deaf, Inc. and NorCal...

  9. AIR POLLUTION AND HUMMINGBIRDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multidisciplinary team of EPA-RTP ORD pulmonary toxicologists, engineers, ecologists, and statisticians have designed a study of how ground-level ozone and other air pollutants may influence feeding activity of the ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). Be...

  10. Rust essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Balbaert, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for software developers interested in systems level and application programming, and are looking for a quick entry into using Rust and understanding the core features of the framework. It is assumed that you have a basic understanding of Java, C#, Ruby, Python or JavaScript.

  11. Hard Assets : The Returns on Rare Diamonds and Gems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the investment performance of diamonds and other gems (sapphires, rubies, and emeralds) over the period 1999-2010, using a novel data set of auction transactions. Between 1999 and 2010, the annualized real USD returns for white and colored diamonds equaled 6.4% and 2.9%,

  12. Expanding the scope of a single pathogen survey to solve the mystery of the ailing red raspberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington state produces almost 60% of the processed raspberries ($79 M value) in the U.S. Production is severely limited by Raspberry Bushy Dwarf Virus (RBDV) and the soilborne pathogens Phytophthora rubi and Pratylenchus penetrans. However, in 2012, growers began noticing plants with unusual symp...

  13. USSR Report Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-24

    mould, yellow rust, powdery mildew, double blossom (Cercosporella rubi) and some other diseases. On the whole, as maintained by T.T. Kuznetsov with co...digestion), newsprint, cardboard, fodder yeast, cardboard boxes, cul- tural, personal and household goods: furniture, wallpaper , matches, skis

  14. A peek into the history of sapphire crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel C.

    2003-09-01

    After the chemical compositions of sapphire and ruby were unraveled in the middle of the 19th century, chemists set out to grow artificial crystals of these valuable gemstones. In 1885 a dealer in Geneva began to sell ruby that is now believed to have been created by flame fusion. Gemnologists rapidly concluded that the stones were artificial, but the Geneva ruby stimulated A. V. L. Verneuil in Paris to develop a flame fusion process to produce higher quality ruby and sapphire. By 1900 there was brisk demand for ruby manufactured by Verneuil's method, even though Verneuil did not publicly announce his work until 1902 and did not publish details until 1904. The Verneuil process was used with little alteration for the next 50 years. From 1932-1953, S. K. Popov in the Soviet Union established a capability for manufacturing high quality sapphire by the Verneuil process. In the U.S., under government contract, Linde Air Products Co. implemented the Verneuil process for ruby and sapphire when European sources were cut off during World War II. These materials were essential to the war effort for jewel bearings in precision instruments. In the 1960s and 1970s, the Czochralski process was implemented by Linde and its successor, Union Carbide, to make higher crystal quality material for ruby lasers. Stimulated by a government contract for structural fibers in 1966, H. LaBelle invented edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG). The Saphikon company, which is currently owned by Saint-Gobain, evolved from this effort. Independently and simultaneously, Stepanov developed edge-defined film-fed growth in the Soviet Union. In 1967 F. Schmid and D. Viechnicki at the Army Materials Research Lab grew sapphire by the heat exchanger method (HEM). Schmid went on to establish Crystal Systems, Inc. around this technology. Rotem Industries, founded in Israel in 1969, perfected the growth of sapphire hemispheres and near-net-shape domes by gradient solidification. In the U.S., growth of near

  15. Late-Pleistocene avifaunas from Cape Wanbrow, Otago, South Island, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthy, T.H.; Grant-Mackie, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Fossil avifaunas from the Hillgrove Formation at Boatmans Harbour, Ruby Gully, and Old Rifle Butts, all on Cape Wanbrow, Oamaru, north-east Otago, are listed. The marine beach sands and gravels at Old Rifle Butts that form the lowest part of the Hillgrove Formation and overlie the palaeo-wave platform were deposited during the last interglacial ∼ 130-110 kyr BP (Oxygen Isotope Stage 5). There are a few small avifaunas (totalling 11 spp.) from these beach sediments (J41/f8710, f8214, f8227). The colluvial, valley-fill deposits in Ruby Gully and at its mouth are the youngest in the sequence. Radiocarbon dating indicates their emplacement between 27 and 34 kyr BP, or the later part of Oxygen Isotope Stage 3. If these ages are representative of the true age of the samples and not the limitations of radiocarbon technology, they indicate that these deposits in Ruby Gully are much younger than the beach deposits. Radiocarbon ages on a pitfall fauna from a small cave 3-4 m above the base of the Hillgrove Formation indicate that the cave fauna has a similar age as that in Ruby Gully. The dune and interdune waterlaid deposits at Old Rifle Butts (>2 m above the wave platform) may date from an unknown time between 100 and 35 kyr BP or be coeval with those in Ruby Gully. Fifty-three species of bird (32 land and freshwater taxa) are represented in the combined avifaunas making this the richest Pleistocene avifauna known from New Zealand. All bird taxa are known from Late Holocene avifaunas in the eastern South Island. Key taxa (Pachyornis elephantopus, Emeus crassus, Euryapteryx geranoides, Coturnix, Chenonetta, Cnemiornis, Harpagornis, Fulica, Porphyrio, Gallinula) indicate that the habitat was mainly grassland and shrubland. Tuatara, indeterminate skinks, and seals are also present. (author). 57 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Verification of the harmonization of human epididymis protein 4 assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Simona; Borille, Simona; Carnevale, Assunta; Frusciante, Erika; Bassani, Niccolò; Panteghini, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    Serum human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) has gained relevance as an ovarian cancer (OC) biomarker and new automated methods have replaced the first released manual EIA by tracing results to it. We verified agreement and bias of automated methods vs. EIA as well as possible effects on patients' management. One hundred and fifteen serum samples were measured by Abbott Architect i2000, Fujirebio Lumipulse G1200, Roche Modular E170, and Fujirebio EIA. Passing-Bablok regression was used to compare automated assays to EIA and agreement between methods was estimated by Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). The bias vs. EIA was estimated and compared to specifications derived from HE4 biological variation. Median (25th-75th percentiles) HE4 concentrations (pmol/L) were 84.5 (60.1-148.8) for EIA, 82.7 (50.3-153.9) for Abbott, 89.1 (55.2-154.9) for Roche, and 112.2 (67.8-194.2) for Fujirebio. Estimated regressions and agreements (95% confidence interval) were: Abbott=1.01(0.98-1.03) EIA-4.8(-7.5/-2.6), CCC=0.99(0.99-1.00); Roche=0.91(0.89-0.93) EIA+5.7(4.2/8.0), CCC=0.98(0.98-0.99); Fujirebio=1.20(1.17-1.24) EIA+ 2.4(-0.6/4.9), CCC=0.97(0.96-0.98). The average bias vs. EIA resulted within the desirable goal for Abbott [-3.3% (-6.1/-0.5)] and Roche [-0.2% (-3.0/2.5)]. However, while for Abbott the bias was constant and acceptable along the measurement concentration range, Roche bias increased up to -28% for HE4 values >250 pmol/L. Lumipulse showed a markedly positive bias [25.3% (21.8/28.8)]. Abbott and Roche assays exhibited a good comparability in the range of HE4 values around the previously recommended 140 pmol/L cut-off. For patient monitoring, however, the assay used for determining serial HE4 must not be changed as results from different systems in lower and higher concentration ranges can markedly differ.

  17. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) excretion increases in normal pregnancy but not in preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Lars; Andersen, Anita Sylvest; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) serum values have been shown to increase in preeclampsia. The goal of the present study was to evaluate changes in urinary NGAL concentrations during uncomplicated pregnancy and in cases of preeclampsia and hypertension. METHODS: Fifty......-one pregnant women who developed preeclampsia and 28 diagnosed with essential or gestational hypertension were investigated for urinary NGAL concentrations during pregnancy. As controls, 100 healthy pregnant women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies were randomly selected. Urinary NGAL as well as urinary...... creatinine and albumin were measured by a standardized clinical chemistry platform (ARCHITECT®; Abbott Diagnostics, Abbott Park, IL, USA). RESULTS: Urinary NGAL concentrations increased during pregnancy in healthy pregnant women, whereas this increase was not detected in preeclampsia. In order to correct...

  18. Effectiveness of some microorganisms in the limitation of grapevine cuttings infection by Phomopsis viticola Sacc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Król

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of using antagonistic fungi and bacteria in the limitation of grapevine stems infection by Phomopsis viticola Sacc. were studied. Trichodema koningii Oud., T.viride Persoon ex S.F.,T.harzianum Rifai, Gliocladium catenulatum Gilman and Abbott, G.fimbriatum Gilman and Abbott, Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas fluorescens and five unidentified isolates of bacteria i.e.: 22a, 35, 40, 45, 66 were estimated. It was appeared what Trichoderma spp. were the most effective in protection of grapevine stems against the infection by P.viticola. After these antagonistic fungi were used on protected grapevine canes not numerous necrosis were observed and few cultures of pathogen were reisolated from them. Moreover, Trichoderma spp. survived on the grapevine stems during the period of experiment. The abilities of other microorganisms tested to protect grapevine cuttings against P.viticola infection and to exist on the stems were less than Trichoderma spp.

  19. Proactive life extension of pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Lloyd

    1998-03-01

    For a company to maintain its competitive edge in today's global market every opportunity to gain an advantage must be exploited. Many companies are strategically focusing on improved utilization of existing equipment as well as regulatory compliance. Abbott Laboratories is no exception. Pharmaceutical companies such as Abbott Laboratories realize that reliability and availability of their production equipment is critical to be successful and competitive. Abbott Laboratories, like many of our competitors, is working to improve safety, minimize downtime and maximize the productivity and efficiency of key production equipment such as the pressure vessels utilized in our processes. The correct strategy in obtaining these objectives is to perform meaningful inspection with prioritization based on hazard analysis and risk. The inspection data gathered in Abbott Laboratories pressure vessel program allows informed decisions leading to improved process control. The results of the program are reduced risks to the corporation and employees when operating pressure retaining equipment. Accurate and meaningful inspection methods become the cornerstone of a program allowing proper preventative maintenance actions to occur. Successful preventative/predictive maintenance programs must utilize meaningful nondestructive evaluation techniques and inspection methods. Nondestructive examination methods require accurate useful tools that allow rapid inspection for the entire pressure vessel. Results from the examination must allow the owner to prove compliance of all applicable regulatory laws and codes. At Abbott Laboratories the use of advanced NDE techniques, primarily B-scan ultrasonics, has provided us with the proper tools allowing us to obtain our objectives. Abbott Laboratories uses B-scan ultrasonics utilizing a pulse echo pitch catch technique to provide essential data on our pressure vessels. Equipment downtime is reduced because the nondestructive examination usually takes

  20. StarClose Vascular Closure Device: Prospective Study on 222 Deployments in an Interventional Radiology Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Atique; Carter, Ranjana M. S.; Phillips-Hughes, Jane; Boardman, Philip; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    The StarClose device (Abbott Vascular Devices; Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA) utilizes an externally placed Nitinol clip to achieve arterial closure following femoral artery puncture. The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy and complications of the StarClose device in patients undergoing interventional radiological procedures. Preprocedural clotting status, pulse and blood pressure, severity of vessel calcification, sheath size, and time to deployment were recorded. Postdeployment complications immediately postprocedure, at 1 h, at 2 h, and at 1 week were recorded. A duplex scan was performed in the first 10 patients to assess any immediate vascular complications. Deployments were successful in 96% achieving immediate hemostasis. Mean deployment time was 48 s. There were no major complications. The StarClose device was found to have a high technical and clinical efficacy

  1. Enrichment of Cs+, Ca2+ and Tl+ ions with microbiological collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisel, S.; Dulman, V.; Cecal, Al.

    1976-01-01

    Spicaria Violace Abbott fungus was used as a microbiological collector for 137 Cs + , 45 Ca 2+ and 204 Tl + isotopes. The samples have been developed at a temperature of 24 degC. The standard solutions of isotopes under study contained: 734μg/ml 137 Cs, 5195 μg/ml 45 Ca 2+ , 24 933 μg/ml 204 Tl + . After the development of the fungus culture, the samples were filtered through a soft paper of wide pores. The filtrate of the culture medium was measured obtained after the adequate development of the fungus. The optimal conditions for the enrichment of these isotopes with respect to pH, time and concentration have been studied. Thus by repeated concentrations the whole quantity of isotopes, 134 Cs + , 45 Ca 2+ , 204 Tl + , can be practically accumulated by means of Spicaria Violace Abbott fungus. (T.G.)

  2. Clinical performance of the VERIS HCV assay for hepatitis C virus RNA quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Laure; Prégermain, Corinne; Hottelet, Corinne; Decombe, Gwenaëlle; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2017-08-01

    Diagnosis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and treatment monitoring rely on detection/quantification of HCV RNA and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are expected to equivalently quantify the different HCV genotypes. The clinical performance of the VERIS HCV assay for HCV RNA quantification was compared to that of the Abbott RealTime HCV assay. Qualitative concordance and quantitative comparison were evaluated on a first panel of 286 clinical samples containing HCV genotypes 1-6. Forty additional genotype 4 samples were tested to explore genotype 4 HCV RNA underquantification. Qualitative discrepancies were observed for low viral loads (HCV RNA quantification by the VERIS HCV assay and the Abbott RealTime HCV assay was well correlated for all HCV genotypes, except genotype 4 where 5' UTR RNA folding may impact quantification. Nevertheless, this underestimation of HCV RNA levels had no impact on clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Académico Doctor Valentín Malagón Castro (1926 – 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gómez-González

    2008-03-01

    Recibió la medalla de Benefactor del Hospital Lorencita Villegas de Santos y en 1993 ganó el Premio Specia. Fue autor de un texto de Ortopedia y de numerosos artículos científicos entre ellos: Escoliosis, espina bífida, Síndrome doloroso de la cadera del niño, Bogotá, Abbott 1961.

  4. Evaluation du test rapide oral aware™ omt HIV 1/2 pour le ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chaque participant a fourni un échantillon de fluide oral pour la réalisation du test Aware™ OMT HIV-1/2 et du sang testé suivant l'algorithme séquentiel de tests ELISAs Murex® HIV-1.2.0 (Laboratoires Abbott, Japon) et Test ELISA peptidique maison du CeDReS. Résultats : la sensibilité, la spécificité, la Valeur Prédictive ...

  5. Development of a highly specific and sensitive rubella immunoglobulin M antibody capture enzyme immunoassay that uses enzyme-labeled antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Seppänen, H

    1990-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to rubella virus based on enzyme labeling of viral antigen was developed. The sensitivity of the EIA for the detection of recent rubella virus infection was evaluated by using 115 rubella-IgM-antibody-positive serum specimens, which were confirmed as positive by Rubazyme M (Abbott Diagnostics). In addition, 12 individuals, 2 of whom were exposed to rubella through vaccination and 10 of whom were exposed through natural in...

  6. Järeleaitamisfilmid sovetist tulnule / Kristiina Davidjants

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Davidjants, Kristiina, 1974-

    2006-01-01

    13. - 17. XI Sõpruse kinos linastunud dokumentalistide programmist, mis pühendatud globaliseerumisele. Lühidalt filmidest : "Korporatsioon" (rezh. J. Abbott, M. Achbar), "Lillede saar" (rezh. J. Furtado), "Üleilmastumine, kas vägivald või dialoog" (rezh. P. Barrat), "Ühe ettekuulutatud katastroofi kroonika" (rezh. P. Brooks), "Korralik tehas" (rezh. T. Balmes), "Darvini õudusunenägu" (rezh. H. Sauper)

  7. Improved Analysis of GW150914 Using a Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016.]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB model calibrated to numerical-relativity simulations, which forces spin alignment (nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we present new results that include a 15-dimensional precessing-spin waveform model (precessing EOBNR developed within the EOB formalism. We find good agreement with the parameters estimated previously [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.], and we quote updated component masses of 35_{-3}^{+5} M_{⊙} and 30_{-4}^{+3} M_{⊙} (where errors correspond to 90% symmetric credible intervals. We also present slightly tighter constraints on the dimensionless spin magnitudes of the two black holes, with a primary spin estimate <0.65 and a secondary spin estimate <0.75 at 90% probability. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.] estimated the systematic parameter-extraction errors due to waveform-model uncertainty by combining the posterior probability densities of precessing IMRPhenom and nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we find that the two precessing-spin models are in closer agreement, suggesting that these systematic errors are smaller than previously quoted.

  8. Study on the scalar leptoquark production in e-e accelerators; Estudo da producao de leptoquarks escalares em aceleradores e-e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magro, Mauricio Bernardino

    1993-12-31

    We present a phenomenological study of scalar leptoquarks, which are new particles predicted by composite models, using, in particular, the Abbott-Farhi model. We have calculated the production of leptoquarks in e{gamma} collisions within ee colliders, utilizing the laser back-scattering process to create the incident beam of photons. We are able to conclude e{gamma} collisions provide a good way to find scalar leptoquarks. (author) 29 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Study on the scalar leptoquark production in e-e accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magro, Mauricio Bernardino

    1993-01-01

    We present a phenomenological study of scalar leptoquarks, which are new particles predicted by composite models, using, in particular, the Abbott-Farhi model. We have calculated the production of leptoquarks in eγ collisions within ee colliders, utilizing the laser back-scattering process to create the incident beam of photons. We are able to conclude eγ collisions provide a good way to find scalar leptoquarks. (author)

  10. EAMJ Dec. Pathological.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Klatsky, A.L., Amstrong, M.A. and Friedman, G.D.. Alcohol use and subsequent cerebrovascular disease. Stroke. 1989: 20:741-946. 9. Donahue, R.P., Abbott. R.D., Reed. D.M., et al. Alcohol and hemorrhagic stroke. J. Amer. Med. Assoc. 1986;. 255: 2311-2314. 10. Albers, G., Sherman, G.D., Paulseth, J.E., ...

  11. Battling for the Soul of Education: Moving beyond School Reform to Educational Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, John

    2015-01-01

    John Abbott is seeking a revolution in education that will put learning back into the hands of the learner. He writes of the learner needing to be free-ranging and weaned from instruction. He is the director of a new wave of thinkers who are members of The 21st Century Learning Initiative, which places emphasis on the skills of critical thinking,…

  12. Ohio Army National Guard Mental Health Initiative: Risk and Resilience Factors for Combat-Related Posttraumatic Psychopathology and Post Combat Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cephalon, Dainippon Sumitomo, EPI-Q, Inc., Forest, France Foundation, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen, John- son and Johnson, Lundbeck...supported by Abbott, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, France Foundation, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen, Johnson and Johnson, Sanofi Aven- tis, Schering-Plough...archpsyc.60.3.289. Brief, D. J., Bollinger , A. R., Vielhauer, M. J., Berger-Greenstein, J. A., Morgan, E. E., Brady, S. M., ...Keane, T. M. (2004

  13. Nanoelectronics, Nanophotonics, and Nanomagnetics: Report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Workshop February 11-13, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    semiconductor nanorods or quantum wires. There are multiple directions worth pursuing to build on rapid progress in nanoantenna design, due in part to the...N. L. Abbott, R. J. Hamers, Covalently modified silicon and diamond surfaces: Resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption and optimization for...current paradigm. Single molecules (not aggregates of molecules) are possibly the only nanocomponents that can perform any reasonably useful function on

  14. Comparison of the Reference Intervals Used for the Evaluation of Maternal Thyroid Function During Pregnancy Using Sequential and Nonsequential Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jian-Xia; Yang, Shuai; Qian, Wei; Shi, Feng-Tao; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maternal thyroid dysfunction is common during pregnancy, and physiological changes during pregnancy can lead to the overdiagnosis of hyperthyroidism and misdiagnosis of hypothyroidism with nongestation-specific reference intervals. Our aim was to compare sequential with nonsequential methods for the evaluation of thyroid function in pregnant women. Methods: We tested pregnant women who underwent their trimester prenatal screening at our hospital from February 2011 to September 2012 for serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) using the Abbott and Roche kits. There were 447 and 200 patients enrolled in the nonsequential and sequential groups, respectively. The central 95% range between the 2.5th and the 97.5th percentiles was used as the reference interval for the thyroid function parameter. Results: The nonsequential group exhibited a significantly larger degree of dispersion in the TSH reference interval during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters as measured using both the Abbott and Roche kits (all P reference intervals were significantly larger in the nonsequential group than in the sequential group during the 3rd trimester as measured with both the Abbott (4.95 vs. 3.77 mU/L, P reference interval as measured with the Abbott kit during all trimesters (12.64 vs. 5.82 pmol/L; 7.96 vs. 4.77 pmol/L; 8.10 vs. 4.77 pmol/L, respectively, all P reference interval was only observed during the 2nd trimester with the Roche kit (7.76 vs. 5.52 pmol/L, P = 0.002). Conclusions: It was more reasonable to establish reference intervals for the evaluation of maternal thyroid function using the sequential method during each trimester of pregnancy. Moreover, the exclusion of pregnancy-related complications should be considered in the inclusion criteria for thyroid function tests. PMID:26996472

  15. Mechanisms and Chemoprevention of Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    gonadotropin (Sigma, St. Louis, MO) and human chorionic gonadotropin (Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Los Angeles, CA), once every 2 weeks, starting at 2 months after...Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, IL) and human chorionic gonadotropin (in bacteriostatic water) were administered i.p. and i.m., respectively, each at a...effects on the underlying stroma. As demonstrated earlier, treatment of rats with pregnant mare’s serum gonadotropin and/or human chorionic

  16. Use of the smartphone application "Pregnant with Diabetes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Sidse Kjærhus; Nichum, Vibeke Ladefoged; Barfred, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this article was to evaluate the awareness and use of the smartphone application (app) "Pregnant with Diabetes" locally, nationally and internationally. METHODS: In 2013, a patient initiated collaboration with the staff at Centre for Pregnant Women with Diabetes, Rigs-hos...... by Novo Nordisk, Bayer A/S, Diabetes Care, Abbott, MSD Denmark, A.D.I.P.S and Rigshospitalet. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  17. Comprehensive Base Realignment/Closure and Fort Belvoir Development: Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    F-1 to F-4) Four areas designated as refuge: W-1 to W-3 comprise the Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge and W-4 is the Jackson Miles Abbott Memorial Refuge...highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum), fox grape (Vitis labnIsca), poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), greenbriar (Smilax rotundijoha), Japanese...poplar, American beech, northern red oak, white oak, highbush and lowbush U blueberry , greenbriar, and poison ivy. The buildings proposed Lor renovation

  18. F-22A Beddown Environmental Assessment Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    District Field Office, Clinton Hanson, 6881 Abbott Loop Rd., Anchorage, AK 99507 Chalkyitsik Village, Paul Edwin , First Chief, P.O. Box 57...Tyonek, AK 99682-0009 3. Chalkyitsik Village ATTN: Paul Edwin P.O. Box 57 Chalkyil,ik, AK 99788-0057 4. Chickaloon Village Traditional Council...aircraft showed that there is little probability of structural damage from such operations ( Sutherland 1989). One finding in that study is that sound

  19. Real-time PCR assays for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA quantitation are adequate for clinical management of patients with chronic HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, Philippe; Bourlière, Marc; Pénaranda, Guillaume; Khiri, Hacène; Ouzan, Denis

    2006-07-01

    Because of the use of viral kinetics during polyethylene glycol (PEG)-interferon-ribavirin therapy and the development of specific new anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) drugs, assessment of the efficacy of anti-HCV drugs needs to be based not on end-point PCR assays but on real-time PCR. The aim of this study was to determine if the two available commercial real-time PCR assays, the Abbott RealTime HCV assay and the Roche Cobas TaqMan HCV assay, can become the standard for HCV RNA quantification. We investigated the prognostic relevance of HCV RNA viral loads at baseline, week 4, and week 12 to a rapid and early virological response to antiviral therapy by using the two assays. Of 59 naïve patients chronically infected by HCV (41 infected with genotype 1) who were treated with ribavirin plus PEG-interferon alfa-2b for 48 weeks, 24 patients (41%) showed a sustained virological response (SVR). With the two assays, viral loads were highly correlated, irrespective of genotype (R2=0.94 for all cases). No difference in diagnostic value was found between the Abbott and Roche assays at week 4, with respective negative predictive values (NPVs) of 84% and 78% and positive predictive values (PPVs) of 62% and 56% (not significant), and at week 12, the respective NPVs were 91% and 90% and PPVs were 44% and 46% (not significant). At week 12, 83% (20/24) and 96% (23/24) of patients with SVR tested negative for HCV RNA by the Abbott and Roche assays, respectively (the difference is not significant). In conclusion, the high sensitivities and large dynamic ranges of the Abbott and Roche assays show that a single real-time quantitative PCR assay is fully adequate for clinical and therapeutic management of HCV.

  20. Prevention of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    excised from mice killed by cervical disloca- tion , rinsed in ice-cold phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), xed in 4% para formaldehyde, and embedded...non-neoplastic diseases, such as the chronic inflammatory disease psoriasis , depend on chronic neovascularization to provide a conduit for the...Anti αvβ3 antibody • Phase I: Melanoma, solid tumours, colorectal cancer • Phase II: Melanoma, prostate cancer, psoriasis , arthritis ABT-510 (Abbott

  1. Early Jet Engines and the Transition from Centrifugal to Axial Compressors: A Case Study in Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    all historians agree that technological change isd an evolutionary process. Joseph Schumpeter , for example, saw technological change as revolutionary...NOTES ’ Joseph A. Schumpeter , Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy, 3rd ed. (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1950), p. 83, n. 2. 2 Edward W. Constant...Maxwell Reprint Co., 1970. ., Schumpeter , Joseph A. Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy. 3rd ed. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1950. ;,.’, Usher, Abbott

  2. The Evolution of Malaysias Immigration Policy Since 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    and maritime borders. 6 Alice M. Nah, “ Globalisation , Sovereignty, and Immigration Control: The Hierarchy of Rights for Migrant Workers in Malaysia...contraction. Thereby, 148 Jason P. Abbott and Oliver S Franks, “Malaysia at Fifty: Conflicting Definitions of Citizenship,” Asian Affairs 38, no. 3...religion.159 A pluralistic society evolved and the terms Malay and Chinese gained legal definitions , which yielded “different codes of conduct, laws, and

  3. Simultaneous confidence bands for log-logistic regression with applications in risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Lucy X

    2017-05-01

    In risk assessment, it is often desired to make inferences on the low dose levels at which a specific benchmark risk is attained. Applications of simultaneous hyperbolic confidence bands for low-dose risk estimation with quantal data under different dose-response models (multistage, Abbott-adjusted Weibull, and Abbott-adjusted log-logistic models) have appeared in the literature. The use of simultaneous three-segment bands under the multistage model has also been proposed recently. In this article, we present explicit formulas for constructing asymptotic one-sided simultaneous hyperbolic and three-segment bands for the simple log-logistic regression model. We use the simultaneous construction to estimate upper hyperbolic and three-segment confidence bands on extra risk and to obtain lower limits on the benchmark dose by inverting the upper bands on risk under the Abbott-adjusted log-logistic model. Monte Carlo simulations evaluate the characteristics of the simultaneous limits. An example is given to illustrate the use of the proposed methods and to compare the two types of simultaneous limits at very low dose levels. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The role of leukocyte counts in patients with unstable angina pectoris or myocardial infarction; prognostic significance and correlation with plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naveed; Adil, Malik Muhammad; Ahmed, Waqas; Habib-ur-Rehman; Shahs, Mumtaz Ali

    2011-01-01

    To study the role of leukocyte count in patients with unstable angina pectoris or myocardial infarction (Acute Coronary Syndrome) its prognostic significance and correlation with plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. A total of 143 Patients with unstable angina pectoris, non-ST segment elevation MI and ST segment elevation MI were considered for entry into the study. Plasma BNP levels were measured using a commercial BNP kit (AxSym System BNP Reagent Pack, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USA). Leukocyte count was measured on CELL DYNE counter of Abbott Laboratories. Mean age of the patients were 58.67 +/- 12.48 years. Mean leukocyte count was 9772 +/- 3006 /cumm. In all 43 (30%) patients had high leukocyte count, and 82 (57%) patients had elevated BNP level. Out of 61 patients with normal BNP level, 49 (80%) had normal leukocyte count and 12 (20%) had elevated leukocyte count. Out of 82 patients with elevated BNP level, 51 (62%) had normal leukocyte count and 31 (38%) had elevated leukocyte count (P = 0.01). No statistically significant association was found between Leukocyte count and ACS. Although there is a trend of increased Leukocyte count noted in patients with increase BNP level. This finding necessitates further studies to elucidate its accurate significance.

  5. Does tenofovir gel or do other microbicide products affect detection of biomarkers of semen exposure in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Margaret C; Kourtis, Athena P; Melendez, Johan H; Black, Carolyn M; Mauck, Christine K; Penman-Aguilar, Ana; Chaney, Dorothy M; Gallo, Maria F; Jamieson, Denise J; Macaluso, Maurizio; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2014-08-01

    There is currently no information on whether products evaluated in HIV microbicide trials affect the detection of the semen biomarkers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or Y chromosome DNA. We tested (in vitro) dilutions of tenofovir (TFV), UC781 and the hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) placebo gels using the Abacus ABAcard and the quantitative (Abbott Architect total PSA) assays for PSA and Y chromosome DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction. TFV gel and the HEC placebo adversely affected PSA detection using the ABAcard but not the Abbott Architect total PSA assay. UC781 adversely affected both the ABAcard and Abbott Architect total PSA assays. While there were some quantitative changes in the magnitude of the signal, none of the products affected positivity of the Y chromosome assay. The presence of TFV or HEC gels did not affect quantitative PSA or Y chromosome detection in vitro. Confirmation of these findings is recommended using specimens obtained following use of these gels in vivo. Researchers should consider the potential for specific microbicides or any products to affect the particular assay used for semen biomarker detection. The ABAcard assay for PSA detection should not be used with TFV UC781, or HEC. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. How Abbott’s Fenofibrate Franchise Avoided Generic Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Nicholas S.; Ross, Joseph S.; Jackevicius, Cynthia A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing debate concerning the efficacy of fenofibrate has overshadowed an important aspect of the drug’s history: Abbott, the maker of branded fenofibrate, has produced several bioequivalent reformulations, which dominate the market even though generic fenofibrate has been available for almost a decade. This continued use of branded formulations, which cost twice as much as generic versions of fenofibrate, imposes an annual cost of approximately $700 million on our healthcare system. Abbott maintained its dominance of the fenofibrate market, in part, through a complex switching strategy involving the sequential launch of branded reformulations that had not been shown to be superior to the first generation product and patent litigation that delayed the approval of generic formulations. The small differences in dose of the newer branded formulations prevented substitution with generics of older generation products. As soon as direct generic competition seemed likely at the new dose level where substitution would be allowed, Abbott would launch another reformulation and the cycle would repeat. Our objective, using the fenofibrate example, is to describe how current policy can allow pharmaceutical companies to maintain market share using reformulations of branded medications without demonstrating the superiority of next generation products. PMID:22493409

  7. Avaliação dos critérios de liberação direta dos resultados de hemogramas através de contadores eletrônicos Evaluation of the direct liberation criteria of hemogram results from electronic counters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Failace

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Os aparelhos de automação em hematologia oferecem alta sensibilidade e precisão na realização do hemograma na rotina do laboratório de hematologia. Para avaliar os critérios de liberação dos hemogramas por interfaceamento direto entre os contadores eletrônicos e o setor de emissão dos laudos, foram examinadas 247 lâminas de hemogramas. Entre essas, 149 lâminas foram consideradas concordantes com os critérios de liberação por interfaceamento direto enquanto 98 foram consideradas não concordantes pelos contadores automatizados Sysmex SE 9500 e Cell Dyn 4000. Dentre os hemogramas concordantes, a microscopia sem acesso aos dados numéricos mostrou alteração em apenas uma lâmina, a qual era clinicamente irrelevante. Por outro lado, entre os 98 hemogramas não concordantes, 32 apresentavam alterações. Os dados encontrados comprovam a satisfatória sensibilidade dos sistemas de automação analisados. As lâminas dos hemogramas não concordantes foram reexaminadas, com o objetivo de avaliar os resultados eletrônicos. Esse fato permitiu a análise das causas das reprovações com sugestões para eventuais simplificações do sistema. O presente trabalho mostrou que os resultados emitidos pelos contadores automáticos analisados apresentam uma alta correlação com a avaliação microscópica. Conclui-se, portanto, que os resultados dos hemogramas liberados pelos aparelhos analisados são satisfatórios e estes aparelhos são confiáveis para a rotina no laboratório de hematologia.Automated equipment used in the hematological laboratory for routine hemograms offers high sensitivity and great accuracy. In order to evaluate the liberation criteria of hemograms by direct interfacing between the electronic counters and the emission of results, 247 hemogram slides were examined. Of these using the Sysmex SE 9500 and Cell Dyn 4000 automated counters, 149 slides were considered concordant with liberation criteria by direct interfacing

  8. Sharing programming resources between Bio* projects through remote procedure call and native call stack strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prins, Pjotr; Goto, Naohisa; Yates, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    for different languages, it is possible to share components by bridging computer languages and Bio* projects, such as BioPerl, Biopython, BioRuby, BioJava, and R/Bioconductor. In this chapter, we compare the two principal approaches for sharing software between different programming languages: either by remote......Open-source software (OSS) encourages computer programmers to reuse software components written by others. In evolutionary bioinformatics, OSS comes in a broad range of programming languages, including C/C++, Perl, Python, Ruby, Java, and R. To avoid writing the same functionality multiple times...... procedure call (RPC) or by sharing a local call stack. RPC provides a language-independent protocol over a network interface; examples are RSOAP and Rserve. The local call stack provides a between-language mapping not over the network interface, but directly in computer memory; examples are R bindings, RPy...

  9. Calogênese, embriogênese somática e isolamento de protoplastos em variedades de laranja doce

    OpenAIRE

    Benedito Vagner Augusto; Mourão Filho Francisco de Assis Alves; Mendes Beatriz Madalena Januzzi

    2000-01-01

    Com o objetivo de produzir calos embriogênicos de citros, óvulos abortados de frutos maduros de 6 variedades de laranja doce (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck), ‘Bahia Cabula’, ‘Baianinha’, ‘Hamlin’, ‘Orvalho de Mel’, ‘Rubi’ e ‘Valência’ foram introduzidos em meio de cultivo MT modificado com adição de extrato de malte, com e sem adição de 5 mg L-1 benziladenina (BA). Os calos obtidos das variedades ‘Bahia Cabula’, ‘Orvalho de Mel’, ‘Rubi’ e ‘Valência’ foram cultivados em meio basal MT, contendo os ...

  10. Observation of the thermal conductivity of warm dense tungsten plasma generated by a pulsed-power discharge using laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Watabe, Arata; Sugimoto, Yuki; Kusano, Shingo; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.

    2017-07-01

    To observe the transport properties of a sample of warm dense matter, we used laser-induced fluorescence to measure the thermal conductivity of tungsten plasma confined within a rigid, ruby capillary tube. We determined the density and temperature of the plasma generated by an isochoric heating device using a pulsed-power discharge. The density was determined by the initial diameter of the tungsten wire used, and the temperature was obtained by spectroscopic measurements. The temperature of the ruby capillary was obtained from its fluorescence intensity, which depends on the temperature of the outer wall. We found the thermal conductivity to be approximately 30 W/K m, thus demonstrating that the thermal conductivity of warm dense matter states can be directly evaluated using the proposed method.

  11. Semiconductor processing with excimer lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.T.; Narayan, J.; Christie, W.H.; van der Leeden, G.A.; Rothe, D.E.; Cheng, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    The advantages of pulsed excimer lasers for semiconductor processing are reviewed. Extensive comparisons of the quality of annealing of ion-implanted Si obtained with XeCl and ruby lasers have been made. The results indicate that irrespective of the large differences in the optical properties of Si at uv and visible wavelengths, the efficiency of usage of the incident energy for annealing is comparable for the two lasers. However, because of the excellent optical beam quality, the XeCl laser can provide superior control of the surface melting and the resulting junction depth. Furthermore, the concentrations of electrically active point defects in the XeCl laser annealed region are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than that obtained from ruby or Nd:YAG lasers. All these results seem to suggest that XeCl lasers should be suitable for fabricating not only solar cells but also the more advanced device structures required for VLSI or VHSIC applications

  12. Optical characterization of synthetic faceted gem materials grown from hydrothermal solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Taijin; Shigley, James E.

    1998-10-01

    Various non-destructive optical characterization techniques have been used to characterize and identify synthetic gem materials grown from hydrothermal solutions, to include ruby, sapphire, emerald, amethyst and ametrine (amethyst-citrine), from their natural counterparts. The ability to observe internal features, such as inclusions, dislocations, twins, color bands, and growth zoning in gem materials is strongly dependent on the observation techniques and conditions, since faceted gemstones have many polished surfaces which can reflect and scatter light in various directions which can make observation difficult. However, diagnostic gemological properties of these faceted synthetic gem materials can be obtained by choosing effective optical characterization methods, and by modifying optical instruments. Examples of some of the distinctive features of synthetic amethyst, ametrine, pink quartz, ruby and emerald are presented to illustrate means of optical characterization of gemstones. The ability to observe defects by light scattering techniques is discussed.

  13. Constructing Workflows from Script Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołaj Baranowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For programming and executing complex applications on grid infrastructures, scientific workflows have been proposed as convenient high-level alternative to solutions based on general-purpose programming languages, APIs and scripts. GridSpace is a collaborative programming and execution environment, which is based on a scripting approach and it extends Ruby language with a high-level API for invoking operations on remote resources. In this paper we describe a tool which enables to convert the GridSpace application source code into a workflow representation which, in turn, may be used for scheduling, provenance, or visualization. We describe how we addressed the issues of analyzing Ruby source code, resolving variable and method dependencies, as well as building workflow representation. The solutions to these problems have been developed and they were evaluated by testing them on complex grid application workflows such as CyberShake, Epigenomics and Montage. Evaluation is enriched by representing typical workflow control flow patterns.

  14. Application of a newly developed high-sensitivity HBsAg chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B patients with HBsAg seroclearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Noboru; Matsuura, Kentaro; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Murakami, Shuko; Iio, Etsuko; Ogawa, Shintaro; Nojiri, Shunsuke; Joh, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2013-11-01

    We modified and automated a highly sensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) for surface antigen (HBsAg) detection using a combination of monoclonal antibodies, each for a specific epitope of HBsAg, and by improving an earlier conjugation technique. Of 471 hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers seen in our hospital between 2009 and 2012, 26 were HBsAg seronegative as determined by the Abbott Architect assay. The Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay was used to recheck those 26 patients who demonstrated seroclearance by the Abbott Architect assay. The performance of the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay was compared with that of a quantitative HBsAg detection system (Abbott Architect) and the Roche Cobas TaqMan HBV DNA assay (CTM) (lower limit of detection, 2.1 log copies/ml) using blood serum samples from patients who were determined to be HBsAg seronegative by the Abbott Architect assay. Ten patients had spontaneous HBsAg loss. Of 8 patients treated with nucleotide analogues (NAs), two were HBsAg seronegative after stopping lamivudine therapy and 6 were HBsAg seronegative during entecavir therapy. Eight acute hepatitis B (AH) patients became HBsAg seronegative. Of the 26 patients, 16 were HBsAg positive by the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay but negative by the Abbott Architect assay. The differences between the two assays in terms of detectable HBsAg persisted over the long term in the spontaneous loss group (median, 10 months), the NA-treated group (2.5 months), and the AH group (0.5 months). In 9 patients, the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay detected HBsAg when HBV DNA was negative by the CTM assay. HBsAg was also detected by the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay in 4 patients with an anti-HBs concentration of >10 mIU/ml, 3 of whom had no HBsAg escape mutations. The automatic, highly sensitive HBsAg CLEIA Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ is a convenient and precise assay for HBV monitoring.

  15. Systematic review of the performance of HIV viral load technologies on plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollis, Kimberly A; Smit, Pieter W; Fiscus, Susan; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Essajee, Shaffiq; Barnett, David; Cheng, Ben; Crowe, Suzanne M; Denny, Thomas; Landay, Alan; Stevens, Wendy; Habiyambere, Vincent; Perrins, Jos; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2014-01-01

    Viral load (VL) monitoring is the standard of care in developing country settings for detecting HIV treatment failure. Since 2010 the World Health Organization has recommended a phase-in approach to VL monitoring in resource-limited settings. We conducted a systematic review of the accuracy and precision of HIV VL technologies for treatment monitoring. A search of Medline and Embase was conducted for studies evaluating the accuracy or reproducibility of commercially available HIV VL assays. 37 studies were included for review including evaluations of the Amplicor Monitor HIV-1 v1.5 (n = 25), Cobas TaqMan v2.0 (n = 11), Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (n = 23), Versant HIV-1 RNA bDNA 3.0 (n = 15), Versant HIV-1 RNA kPCR 1.0 (n = 2), ExaVir Load v3 (n = 2), and NucliSens EasyQ v2.0 (n = 1). All currently available HIV VL assays are of sufficient sensitivity to detect plasma virus levels at a lower detection limit of 1,000 copies/mL. Bias data comparing the Abbott RealTime HIV-1, TaqMan v2.0 to the Amplicor Monitor v1.5 showed a tendency of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 to under-estimate results while the TaqMan v2.0 overestimated VL counts. Compared to the Amplicor Monitor v1.5, 2-26% and 9-70% of results from the Versant bDNA 3.0 and Abbott RealTime HIV-1 differed by greater than 0.5log10. The average intra and inter-assay variation of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 were 2.95% (range 2.0-5.1%) and 5.44% (range 1.17-30.00%) across the range of VL counts (2log10-7log10). This review found that all currently available HIV VL assays are of sufficient sensitivity to detect plasma VL of 1,000 copies/mL as a threshold to initiate investigations of treatment adherence or possible treatment failure. Sources of variability between VL assays include differences in technology platform, plasma input volume, and ability to detect HIV-1 subtypes. Monitoring of individual patients should be performed on the same technology platform to ensure appropriate interpretation of

  16. Comprehensive haematological indices reference intervals for a healthy Omani population: First comprehensive study in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and Middle Eastern countries based on age, gender and ABO blood group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mawali, Adhra; Pinto, Avinash Daniel; Al-Busaidi, Raiya; Al-Lawati, Rabab H; Morsi, Magdi

    2018-01-01

    Reference intervals for venous blood parameters differs with age, gender, geographic region, and ethnic groups. Hence local laboratory reference intervals are important to improve the diagnostic accuracy of health assessments and diseases. However, there have been no comprehensive published reference intervals established in Oman, the Gulf Cooperation Council or Middle Eastern countries. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish reference intervals for full blood count in healthy Omani adults. Venous blood specimens were collected from 2202 healthy individuals aged 18 to 69 years from January 2012 to April 2017, and analysed by Sysmex XS-1000i and Cell-Dyn Sapphire automated haematology analysers. Results were statistically analysed and compared by gender, age, and ABO blood group. The lower and upper reference limits of the haematology reference intervals were established at the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles respectively. Reference intervals were calculated for 17 haematology parameters which included red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet parameters. Red blood cell (RBC), haemoglobin (HGB), haematocrit (HCT), platelet and platelet haematocrit counts of the healthy donors were significantly different between males and females at all ages (p blood count parameters showed no significant differences between genders, age groups, instruments, or blood groups. Our study showed a lower haemoglobin limit for the normal reference interval in males and females than the currently used in Oman. Data from this study established specific reference intervals which could be considered for general use in Oman. The differences in haematology reference intervals highlights the necessity to establish reference intervals for venous blood parameters among the healthy population in each country or at least in each region.

  17. Prevalence and molecular characterization of abnormal hemoglobin in eastern Guangdong of southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M; Wang, Q; Zheng, L; Huang, Y; Lin, F; Lin, C P; Yang, L Y

    2012-02-01

    Abnormal hemoglobins (Hbs) are the most commonly inherited disorders in humans. Their frequency and types change considerably with geographic location and ethnic group. To investigate the molecular epidemiological characterization of abnormal Hbs in eastern Guangdong of southern China, a total of 11,450 'healthy' subjects were subjected to hemoglobin electrophoresis screening. Samples of EDTA-K(2) blood with abnormal Hbs were analyzed by CELL-DYN1700 blood analyzer; thalassemia genotypes and Hb E variant were identified by gap-PCR and/or reverse dot blot (RDB). The genotypes of Hb variants were detected by PCR and sequencing. The incidence of abnormal Hbs was 0.358%(41/11,450) in Chaozhou, including 12.2% (5/41) Hb J, 4.9% (2/41) Hb K, 9.7% (4/41) Hb Q, 31.7% (13/41) Hb G/D and 41.5% (17/41) Hb E. Eight types of Hb variants were found, including 3 cases of Hb J-Bangkok, 2 cases of Hb J-Wenchang-Wuming, 2 cases of Hb New York, 4 cases of Hb Q-Thailand, 5 cases of Hb G-Waimanalo, 4 cases of Hb Ottawa, 4 cases of Hb G-Chinese and 17 cases of Hb E. In comparison with other areas of Guangdong, Chaozhou had a different pattern of abnormal Hbs with a high prevalence of Hb G/D. This study describes the prevalence and molecular characterization of abnormal Hbs in eastern Guangdong. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Hematology of healthy Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J.W.; Harr, K.E.; Murphy, D.; Walsh, M.T.; Nolan, E.C.; Bonde, R.K.; Pate, M.G.; Deutsch, C.J.; Edwards, H.H.; Clapp, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hematologic analysis is an important tool in evaluating the general health status of free-ranging manatees and in the diagnosis and monitoring of rehabilitating animals. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate diagnostically important hematologic analytes in healthy manatees (Trichechus manatus) and to assess variations with respect to location (free ranging vs captive), age class (small calves, large calves, subadults, and adults), and gender. Methods: Blood was collected from 55 free-ranging and 63 captive healthy manatees. Most analytes were measured using a CELL-DYN 3500R; automated reticulocytes were measured with an ADVIA 120. Standard manual methods were used for differential leukocyte counts, reticulocyte and Heinz body counts, and plasma protein and fibrinogen concentrations. Results: Rouleaux, slight polychromasia, stomatocytosis, and low numbers of schistocytes and nucleated RBCs (NRBCs) were seen often in stained blood films. Manual reticulocyte counts were higher than automated reticulocyte counts. Heinz bodies were present in erythrocytes of most manatees. Compared with free-ranging manatees, captive animals had slightly lower MCV, MCH, and eosinophil counts and slightly higher heterophil and NRBC counts, and fibrinogen concentration. Total leukocyte, heterophil, and monocyte counts tended to be lower in adults than in younger animals. Small calves tended to have higher reticulocyte counts and NRBC counts than older animals. Conclusions: Hematologic findings were generally similar between captive and free-ranging manatees. Higher manual reticulocyte counts suggest the ADVIA detects only reticulocytes containing large amounts of RNA. Higher reticulocyte and NRBC counts in young calves probably reflect an increased rate of erythropoiesis compared with older animals. ?? 2009 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  19. Intestinal parasitosis in relation to CD4+T cells levels and anemia among HAART initiated and HAART naive pediatric HIV patients in a Model ART center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengist, Hylemariam Mihiretie; Taye, Bineyam; Tsegaye, Aster

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal parasites (IPs) are major concerns in most developing countries where HIV/AIDS cases are concentrated and almost 80% of AIDS patients die of AIDS-related infections. In the absence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV/AIDS patients in developing countries unfortunately continue to suffer from the consequences of opportunistic and other intestinal parasites. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4+ T cells levels and anemia among HAART initiated and HAART naïve pediatric HIV patients in a Model ART center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A prospective comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among HAART initiated and HAART naive pediatric HIV/AIDS patients attending a model ART center at Zewditu Memorial Hospital between August 05, 2013 and November 25, 2013. A total of 180 (79 HAART initiated and 101 HAART naïve) children were included by using consecutive sampling. Stool specimen was collected and processed using direct wet mount, formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic and associated risk factors. CD4+ T cells and complete blood counts were performed using BD FACScalibur and Cell-Dyn 1800, respectively. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 16 software. Logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between explanatory factors and outcome variables. P values intestinal parasites significantly differed by HAART status and cryptosporidium species were found only in HAART naïve patients with low CD4+ T cell counts. Anemia was also more prevalent and significantly associated with IPs in non-HAART patients. This study identified some environmental and associated risk factors for intestinal parasitic infections. Therefore, Public health measures should continue to emphasize the importance of environmental and personal hygiene to protect HIV/AIDS patients from

  20. Comprehensive haematological indices reference intervals for a healthy Omani population: First comprehensive study in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and Middle Eastern countries based on age, gender and ABO blood group comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Avinash Daniel; Al-Busaidi, Raiya; Al-Lawati, Rabab H.; Morsi, Magdi

    2018-01-01

    Background Reference intervals for venous blood parameters differs with age, gender, geographic region, and ethnic groups. Hence local laboratory reference intervals are important to improve the diagnostic accuracy of health assessments and diseases. However, there have been no comprehensive published reference intervals established in Oman, the Gulf Cooperation Council or Middle Eastern countries. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish reference intervals for full blood count in healthy Omani adults. Methods Venous blood specimens were collected from 2202 healthy individuals aged 18 to 69 years from January 2012 to April 2017, and analysed by Sysmex XS-1000i and Cell-Dyn Sapphire automated haematology analysers. Results were statistically analysed and compared by gender, age, and ABO blood group. The lower and upper reference limits of the haematology reference intervals were established at the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles respectively. Results Reference intervals were calculated for 17 haematology parameters which included red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet parameters. Red blood cell (RBC), haemoglobin (HGB), haematocrit (HCT), platelet and platelet haematocrit counts of the healthy donors were significantly different between males and females at all ages (p values of RBC, HGB and HCT than females. Other complete blood count parameters showed no significant differences between genders, age groups, instruments, or blood groups. Our study showed a lower haemoglobin limit for the normal reference interval in males and females than the currently used in Oman. Conclusions Data from this study established specific reference intervals which could be considered for general use in Oman. The differences in haematology reference intervals highlights the necessity to establish reference intervals for venous blood parameters among the healthy population in each country or at least in each region. PMID:29621271