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Sample records for aav-tau mediates pyramidal

  1. AAV-tau mediates pyramidal neurodegeneration by cell-cycle re-entry without neurofibrillary tangle formation in wild-type mice.

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    Tomasz Jaworski

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease tauopathy is considered secondary to amyloid, and the duality obscures their relation and the definition of their respective contributions.Transgenic mouse models do not resolve this problem conclusively, i.e. the relative hierarchy of amyloid and tau pathology depends on the actual model and the genes expressed or inactivated. Here, we approached the problem in non-transgenic models by intracerebral injection of adeno-associated viral vectors to express protein tau or amyloid precursor protein in the hippocampus in vivo. AAV-APP mutant caused neuronal accumulation of amyloid peptides, and eventually amyloid plaques at 6 months post-injection, but with only marginal hippocampal cell-death. In contrast, AAV-Tau, either wild-type or mutant P301L, provoked dramatic degeneration of pyramidal neurons in CA1/2 and cortex within weeks. Tau-mediated neurodegeneration proceeded without formation of large fibrillar tau-aggregates or tangles, but with increased expression of cell-cycle markers.We present novel AAV-based models, which demonstrate that protein tau mediates pyramidal neurodegeneration in vivo. The data firmly support the unifying hypothesis that post-mitotic neurons are forced to re-enter the cell-cycle in primary and secondary tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Computational modeling reveals dendritic origins of GABA(A-mediated excitation in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Naomi Lewin

    Full Text Available GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system, but in some circumstances can lead to a paradoxical excitation that has been causally implicated in diverse pathologies from endocrine stress responses to diseases of excitability including neuropathic pain and temporal lobe epilepsy. We undertook a computational modeling approach to determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-dependent excitation in isolated post-synaptic CA1 hippocampal neurons because it may constitute a trigger for pathological synchronous epileptiform discharge. In particular, the interplay intracellular chloride accumulation via the GABA(A receptor and extracellular potassium accumulation via the K/Cl co-transporter KCC2 in promoting GABA(A-mediated excitation is complex. Experimentally it is difficult to determine the ionic mechanisms of depolarizing current since potassium transients are challenging to isolate pharmacologically and much GABA signaling occurs in small, difficult to measure, dendritic compartments. To address this problem and determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-mediated excitation, we built a detailed biophysically realistic model of the CA1 pyramidal neuron that includes processes critical for ion homeostasis. Our results suggest that in dendritic compartments, but not in the somatic compartments, chloride buildup is sufficient to cause dramatic depolarization of the GABA(A reversal potential and dominating bicarbonate currents that provide a substantial current source to drive whole-cell depolarization. The model simulations predict that extracellular K(+ transients can augment GABA(A-mediated excitation, but not cause it. Our model also suggests the potential for GABA(A-mediated excitation to promote network synchrony depending on interneuron synapse location - excitatory positive-feedback can occur when interneurons synapse onto distal dendritic compartments, while interneurons projecting to the perisomatic

  3. Cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha mediates electrophysiologic responses of hippocampal pyramidal neurons to neurotoxic NMDA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Kishimoto, Koji; Linden, David J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2007-04-03

    The arachidonic acid-generating enzyme cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) has been implicated in the progression of excitotoxic neuronal injury. However, the mechanisms of cPLA(2)alpha toxicity have yet to be determined. Here, we used a model system exposing mouse hippocampal slices to NMDA as an excitotoxic injury, in combination with simultaneous patch-clamp recording and confocal Ca(2+) imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons. NMDA treatment caused significantly greater injury in wild-type (WT) than in cPLA(2)alpha null CA1 neurons. Bath application of NMDA evoked a slow inward current in voltage-clamped neurons (composed of both NMDA receptor-mediated and other conductances) that was smaller in cPLA(2)alpha null than in WT slices. This was not due to down-regulation of NMDA receptor function because NMDA receptor-mediated currents were equivalent in each genotype following brief photolysis of caged glutamate. Current-clamp recordings were made during and following NMDA exposure by eliciting a single action potential with a brief current injection. After NMDA exposure, WT CA1 neurons developed a spike-evoked plateau potential and an increased spike-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) transient. These effects were absent in CA1 neurons from cPLA(2)alpha null mice and WT neurons treated with a cPLA(2)alpha inhibitor. The Ca-sensitive K-channel toxins, apamin and paxilline, caused spike broadening and Ca(2+) enhancement in WT and cPLA(2)alpha null slices. NMDA application in WT and arachidonate applied to cPLA(2)alpha null cells occluded the effects of apamin/paxilline. These results indicate that cPLA(2)alpha activity is required for development of aberrant electrophysiologic events triggered by NMDA receptor activation, in part through attenuation of K-channel function.

  4. Inhibitory nature of tiagabine-augmented GABAA receptor-mediated depolarizing responses in hippocampal pyramidal cells.

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    Jackson, M F; Esplin, B; Capek, R

    1999-03-01

    Tiagabine is a potent GABA uptake inhibitor with demonstrated anticonvulsant activity. GABA uptake inhibitors are believed to produce their anticonvulsant effects by prolonging the postsynaptic actions of GABA, released during episodes of neuronal hyperexcitability. However, tiagabine has recently been reported to facilitate the depolarizing actions of GABA in the CNS of adult rats following the stimulation of inhibitory pathways at a frequency (100 Hz) intended to mimic interneuronal activation during epileptiform activity. In the present study, we performed extracellular and whole cell recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices to examine the functional consequences of tiagabine-augmented GABA-mediated depolarizing responses. Orthodromic population spikes (PSs), elicited from the stratum radiatum, were inhibited following the activation of recurrent inhibitory pathways by antidromic conditioning stimulation of the alveus, which consisted of either a single stimulus or a train of stimuli delivered at high-frequency (100 Hz, 200 ms). The inhibition of orthodromic PSs produced by high-frequency conditioning stimulation (HFS), which was always of much greater strength and duration than that produced by a single conditioning stimulus, was greatly enhanced following the bath application of tiagabine (2-100 microM). Thus, in the presence of tiagabine (20 microM), orthodromic PSs, evoked 200 and 800 ms following HFS, were inhibited to 7.8 +/- 2.6% (mean +/- SE) and 34.4 +/- 18.5% of their unconditioned amplitudes compared with only 35.4 +/- 12.7% and 98.8 +/- 12.4% in control. Whole cell recordings revealed that the bath application of tiagabine (20 microM) either caused the appearance or greatly enhanced the amplitude of GABA-mediated depolarizing responses (DR). Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked from stratum radiatum at time points that coincided with the DR were inhibited to below the threshold for action-potential firing

  5. Modulation of NMDA and AMPA-mediated synaptic transmission by CB1 receptors in frontal cortical pyramidal cells.

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    Li, Qiang; Yan, Haidun; Wilson, Wilkie A; Swartzwelder, H Scott

    2010-06-25

    Although the endogenous cannabinoid system modulates a variety of physiological and pharmacological processes, the specific role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission and neural plasticity is not well understood. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques, evoked or spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs or sEPSCs) were recorded from visualized, layer II/III pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from rat brain. Bath application of the CB1 receptor agonist, WIN 55212-2 (WIN), reduced the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. When co-applied with the specific CB1 antagonists, AM251 or AM281, WIN did not suppress NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs. WIN also reduced the amplitude of evoked AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs, an effect that was also reversed by AM251. Both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs were significantly reduced by WIN. In contrast, WIN reduced the frequency, but not the amplitude of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that the suppression of glutamatergic activity by CB1 receptors in the frontal neocortex is mediated by a presynaptic mechanism. Taken together, these data indicate a critical role for endocannabinoid signaling in the regulation of excitatory synaptic transmission in frontal neocortex, and suggest a possible neuronal mechanism whereby THC regulates cortical function.

  6. Biphasic somatic A-type K channel downregulation mediates intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Sung-Cherl Jung

    Full Text Available Since its original description, the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP has been known to be accompanied by a lasting increase in the intrinsic excitability (intrinsic plasticity of hippocampal neurons. Recent evidence shows that dendritic excitability can be enhanced by an activity-dependent decrease in the activity of A-type K(+ channels. In the present manuscript, we examined the role of A-type K(+ channels in regulating intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus after synapse-specific LTP induction. In electrophysiological recordings we found that LTP induced a potentiation of excitability which was accompanied by a two-phased change in A-type K(+ channel activity recorded in nucleated patches from organotypic slices of rat hippocampus. Induction of LTP resulted in an immediate but short lasting hyperpolarization of the voltage-dependence of steady-state A-type K(+ channel inactivation along with a progressive, long-lasting decrease in peak A-current density. Blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis prevented the A-current decrease and most measures of intrinsic plasticity. These results suggest that two temporally distinct but overlapping mechanisms of A-channel downregulation together contribute to the plasticity of intrinsic excitability. Finally we show that intrinsic plasticity resulted in a global enhancement of EPSP-spike coupling.

  7. Elevated potassium elicits recurrent surges of large GABAA-receptor-mediated post-synaptic currents in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

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    Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Yu, Wilson; Sutton, Alex; Calos, Megan; Carlen, Peter Louis

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we found that rat hippocampal CA3 interneurons become hyperactive with increasing concentrations of extracellular K(+) up to 10 mM. However, it is unclear how this enhanced interneuronal activity affects pyramidal neurons. Here we voltage-clamped rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in vitro at 0 mV to isolate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) and measured these in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) and with 10 mM K(+) bath perfusion. In aCSF, small IPSCs were present with amplitudes of 0.053 ± 0.007 nA and a frequency of 0.27 ± 0.14 Hz. With 10 mM K(+) perfusion, IPSCs increased greatly in frequency and amplitude, culminating in surge events with peak amplitudes of 0.56 ± 0.08 nA, that appeared and disappeared cyclically with durations lasting 2.02 ± 0.37 min repeatedly, up to 10 times over a 30-min bath perfusion of elevated K(+). These large IPSCs were GABA(A)-receptor mediated and did not involve significant desensitization of this receptor. Perfusion of a GABA transporter inhibitor (NO-711), glutamate receptor inhibitors CNQX and APV, or a gap junctional blocker (carbenoxolone) prevented the resurgence of large IPSCs. Pressure ejected sucrose resulted in the abolishment of subsequent surges. No elevated K(+)-mediated surges were observed in CA3 interneurons from the stratum oriens layer. In conclusion, these cyclic large IPSC events observable in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 10 mM KCl may be due to transient GABA depletion from continuously active interneuronal afferents.

  8. GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors-mediate synaptic currents in hippocampal interneurons and pyramidal cells in juvenile mice

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    Jakob evon Engelhardt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The differential regulation of the two major N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR subunits GluN2A and GluN2B during development in forebrain pyramidal cells has been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, much less is known about the role of GluN2D, which is expressed at low levels and is downregulated following the second postnatal week. However, it appears that few cells, presumably interneurons, continue to express GluN2D also in juvenile mice. To investigate which hippocampal cell types express this subunit, we generated transgenic mice with EGFP-tagged GluN2D receptors. The expression of the transgene was confined to hippocampal interneurons, most of which were parvalbumin- and/or somatostatin-positive. Electrophysiological and morphological analyses showed that GluN2D was present mainly in fast spiking basket and axo-axonic cells. Based on pharmacological evidence and electrophysiological analysis of GluN2D knockout mice, we conclude that GluN2D-containing NMDARs mediate synaptic currents in hippocampal interneurons of young and juvenile mice and in CA1 pyramidal neurons of newborn mice.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated retrograde signaling required for the induction of long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses of visual cortical pyramidal neurons.

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    Inagaki, Tsuyoshi; Begum, Tahamina; Reza, Faruque; Horibe, Shoko; Inaba, Mie; Yoshimura, Yumiko; Komatsu, Yukio

    2008-06-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) induces long-term potentiation (LTP) at inhibitory synapses of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in developing rat visual cortex. This LTP requires postsynaptic Ca2+ rise for induction, while the maintenance mechanism is present at the presynaptic site, suggesting presynaptic LTP expression and the necessity of retrograde signaling. We investigated whether the supposed signal is mediated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is expressed in pyramidal neurons but not inhibitory interneurons. LTP did not occur when HFS was applied in the presence of the Trk receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a in the perfusion medium. HFS produced LTP when bath application of K252a was started after HFS or when K252a was loaded into postsynaptic cells. LTP did not occur in the presence of TrkB-IgG scavenging BDNF or function-blocking anti-BDNF antibody in the medium. In cells loaded with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA, the addition of BDNF to the medium enabled HFS to induce LTP without affecting baseline synaptic transmission. These results suggest that BDNF released from postsynaptic cells activates presynaptic TrkB, leading to LTP. Because BDNF, expressed activity dependently, regulates the maturation of cortical inhibition, inhibitory LTP may contribute to this developmental process, and hence experience-dependent functional maturation of visual cortex.

  10. Proteolytic degradation of glutamate decarboxylase mediates disinhibition of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells in cathepsin D-deficient mice.

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    Shimizu, Tokiko; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Yamasaki, Ryo; Yamada, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Ukai, Kiyoharu; Koike, Masato; Mine, Kazunori; von Figura, Kurt; Peters, Christoph; Saftig, Paul; Fukuda, Takaichi; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Although of clinical importance, little is known about the mechanism of seizure in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). In the present study, we have attempted to elucidate the mechanism underlying the seizure of cathepsin D-deficient (CD-/-) mice that show a novel type of lysosomal storage disease with a phenotype resembling late infantile NCL. In hippocampal slices prepared from CD-/- mice at post-natal day (P)24, spontaneous burst discharges were recorded from CA3 pyramidal cells. At P24, the mean amplitude of IPSPs after stimulation of the mossy fibres was significantly smaller than that of wild-type mice, which was substantiated by the decreased level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contents in the hippocampus measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). At this stage, activated microglia were found to accumulate in the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal CA3 subfield of CD-/- mice. However, there was no significant change in the numerical density of GABAergic interneurons in the CA3 subfield of CD-/- mice at P24, estimated by counting the number of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive somata. In the hippocampus and the cortex of CD-/- mice at P24, some GABAergic interneurons displayed extremely high somatic granular immunoreactivites for GAD67, suggesting the lysosomal accumulation of GAD67. GAD67 levels in axon terminals abutting on to perisomatic regions of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells was not significantly changed in CD-/- mice even at P24, whereas the total protein levels of GAD67 in both the hippocampus and the cortex of CD-/- mice after P24 were significantly decreased as a result of degradation. Furthermore, the recombinant human GAD65/67 was rapidly digested by the lysosomal fraction prepared from the whole brain of wild-type and CD-/- mice. These observations strongly suggest that the reduction of GABA contents, presumably because of lysosomal degradation of GAD67 and lysosomal accumulation of its degraded forms

  11. GABAA receptor-mediated feedforward and feedback inhibition differentially modulate the gain and the neural code transformation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

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    Jang, Hyun Jae; Park, Kyerl; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Han, Kyu Hun; Kwag, Jeehyun

    2015-12-01

    Diverse variety of hippocampal interneurons exists in the CA1 area, which provides either feedforward (FF) or feedback (FB) inhibition to CA1 pyramidal cell (PC). However, how the two different inhibitory network architectures modulate the computational mode of CA1 PC is unknown. By investigating the CA3 PC rate-driven input-output function of CA1 PC using in vitro electrophysiology, in vitro-simulation of inhibitory network, and in silico computational modeling, we demonstrated for the first time that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibition differentially modulate the gain, the spike precision, the neural code transformation and the information capacity of CA1 PC. Recruitment of FF inhibition buffered the CA1 PC spikes to theta-frequency regardless of the input frequency, abolishing the gain and making CA1 PC insensitive to its inputs. Instead, temporal variability of the CA1 PC spikes was increased, promoting the rate-to-temporal code transformation to enhance the information capacity of CA1 PC. In contrast, the recruitment of FB inhibition sub-linearly transformed the input rate to spike output rate with high gain and low spike temporal variability, promoting the rate-to-rate code transformation. These results suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibitory circuits could serve as network mechanisms for differentially modulating the gain of CA1 PC, allowing CA1 PC to switch between different computational modes using rate and temporal codes ad hoc. Such switch will allow CA1 PC to efficiently respond to spatio-temporally dynamic inputs and expand its computational capacity during different behavioral and neuromodulatory states in vivo.

  12. Roles of HIF-1α, VEGF, and NF-κB in Ischemic Preconditioning-Mediated Neuroprotection of Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons Against a Subsequent Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

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    Lee, Jae-Chul; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Choi, Soo Young; Bai, Hui Chen; Shin, Bich-Na; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kim, Dae Won; Kang, Il Jun; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Bae, Eun Joo

    2016-10-26

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) provides neuroprotection against subsequent severe ischemic insults by specific mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that IPC attenuates post-ischemic neuronal death in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) throughout hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and its associated factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Lethal ischemia (LI) without IPC increased expressions of HIF-1α, VEGF, and p-IκB-α (/and translocation of NF-κB p65 into nucleus) in CA1 pyramidal neurons at 12 h and/or 1-day post-LI; thereafter, their expressions were decreased in the CA1 pyramidal neurons with time and newly expressed in non-pyramidal cells (pericytes), and the CA1 pyramidal neurons were dead at 5-day post-LI, and, at this point in time, their immunoreactivities were newly expressed in pericytes. In animals with IPC subjected to LI (IPC/LI)-group), CA1 pyramidal neurons were well protected, and expressions of HIF-1α, VEGF, and p-IκB-α (/and translocation of NF-κB p65 into nucleus) were significantly increased compared to the sham-group and maintained after LI. Whereas, treatment with 2ME2 (a HIF-1α inhibitor) into the IPC/LI-group did not preserve the IPC-mediated increases of HIF-1α, VEGF, and p-IκB-α (/and translocation of NF-κB p65 into nucleus) expressions and did not show IPC-mediated neuroprotection. In brief, IPC protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from LI by upregulation of HIF-1α, VEGF, and p-IκB-α expressions. This study suggests that IPC increases HIF-1α expression in CA1 pyramidal neurons, which enhances VEGF expression and NF-κB activation and that IPC may be a strategy for a therapeutic intervention of cerebral ischemic injury.

  13. Pyramid Comet Sampler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the sampling requirements, we propose an Inverted Pyramid sampling system. Each face of the pyramid includes a cutting blade which is independently actuated...

  14. Pyramid beam splitter

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    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  15. Thermoluminescence of pyramid stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Eid, A.M. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo (Egypt))

    1982-01-01

    It is the aim of the present study to investigate some thermoluminescence properties of pyramid stones. Using a few grammes of pyramid stones from Pyramids I and II, the TL glow peaks were observed at 250 and 310/sup 0/C, respectively. The TL glow peaks of samples annealed at 600/sup 0/C, then exposed to /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays were observed at 120, 190 and 310/sup 0/C, respectively. The accumulated dose of natural samples is estimated to be around 310 Gray (31 krad). By assuming an annual dose is 1 mGy, the estimated age of pyramid stones is 0.31 M year.

  16. Rebuilding the Food Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willet, Walter C.; Stampfer, Meir J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the old food guide pyramid released in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Contradicts the message that fat is bad, which was presented to the public by nutritionists, and the effects of plant oils on cholesterol. Introduces a new food pyramid. (YDS)

  17. The Healthy Eating Pyramid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jimmy; Lin

    2007-01-01

    Experts from the Harvard School of Public Health created the Healthy Eating Pyramid.The pyramid is about the links between diet and health and offers useable information to help people make better choices about what to eat. Remember:its base is daily exercise and weight control.

  18. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Exendin-4 and Diazepam Differentially Regulate GABAA Receptor-Mediated Tonic Currents in Rat Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons.

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    Sergiy V Korol

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 is a metabolic hormone that is secreted in a glucose-dependent manner and enhances insulin secretion. GLP-1 receptors are also found in the brain where their signalling affects neuronal activity. We have previously shown that the GLP-1 receptor agonists, GLP-1 and exendin-4 enhanced GABA-activated synaptic and tonic currents in rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons. The hippocampus is the centre for memory and learning and is important for cognition. Here we examined if exendin-4 similarly enhanced the GABA-activated currents in the presence of the benzodiazepine diazepam. In whole-cell recordings in rat brain slices, diazepam (1 μM, an allosteric positive modulator of GABAA receptors, alone enhanced the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (sIPSC amplitude and frequency by a factor of 1.3 and 1.6, respectively, and doubled the tonic GABAA current normally recorded in the CA3 pyramidal cells. Importantly, in the presence of exendin-4 (10 nM plus diazepam (1 μM, only the tonic but not the sIPSC currents transiently increased as compared to currents recorded in the presence of diazepam alone. The results suggest that exendin-4 potentiates a subpopulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in the CA3 pyramidal neurons.

  19. Phasic and tonic type A γ-Aminobutryic acid receptor mediated effect of Withania somnifera on mice hippocampal CA1 pyramidal Neurons

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    Janardhan Prasad Bhattarai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Nepali and Indian system of traditional medicine, Withania somnifera (WS is considered as a rejuvenative medicine to maintain physical and mental health and has also been shown to improve memory consolidation. Objective: In this study, a methanolic extract of WS (mWS was applied on mice hippocampal CA1 neurons to identify the receptors activated by the WS. Materials and Methods: The whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed on CA1 pyramidal neurons from immature mice (7-20 postnatal days. The cells were voltage clamped at -60 mV. Extract of WS root were applied to identify the effect of mWS. Results: The application of mWS (400 ng/μl induced remarkable inward currents (-158.1 ± 28.08 pA, n = 26 on the CA1 pyramidal neurons. These inward currents were not only reproducible but also concentration dependent. mWS-induced inward currents remained persistent in the presence of amino acid receptor blocking cocktail (AARBC containing blockers for the ionotropic glutamate receptors, glycine receptors and voltage-gated Na + channel (Control: -200.3 ± 55.42 pA, AARBC: -151.5 ± 40.58 pA, P > 0.05 suggesting that most of the responses by mWS are postsynaptic events. Interestingly, these inward currents were almost completely blocked by broad GABA A receptor antagonist, bicuculline- 20 μM (BIC (BIC: -1.46 ± 1.4 pA, P < 0.001, but only partially by synaptic GABA A receptor blocker gabazine (1 μM (GBZ: -18.26 ± 4.70 pA, P < 0.01. Conclusion: These results suggest that WS acts on synaptic/extrasynaptic GABA A receptors and may play an important role in the process of memory and neuroprotection via activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABA A receptors.

  20. Climbing the Needs Pyramids

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    J. C. Lomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Maslow’s theory of human adult motivation is often represented by a pyramid image showing two proposals: First, the five needs stages in emergent order of hierarchical ascension and second, a percentage of the adult population suggested to occupy each needs tier. Specifically, Maslow proposed that adults would be motivated to satisfy their unfilled needs until they reached the hierarchy’s apex and achieved self-transcendence. Yet how adults can purposefully ascend Maslow’s pyramid through satisfying unfilled needs remains elusive. This brief article challenges this on the theory’s 70th anniversary by presenting a new image of the needs hierarchy, based on ecological design principles to support adults’ purposeful endeavors to climb the needs pyramid.

  1. PYRAMID ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey was conducted in the Pyramid Roadless Area, California. The area contains mineral showings, but no mineral-resource potential was identified during our studies. Three granodiorite samples on the west side of the roadless area contained weakly anomalous concentrations of uranium. Two samples of roof-pendant rocks, one metasedimentary rock and one metavolcanic rock, contain low concentrations of copper, and of copper and molybdenum, respectively. Although none was identified, the geologic terrane is permissive for mineral occurrences and large-scale, detailed geologic mapping of the areas of metasedimentary and metavolcanic roof pendants in the Pyramid Roadless Area could define a mineral-resource potential for tungsten and precious metals.

  2. Building the next pyramid

    CERN Document Server

    West, Joseph; Waters, Kevin; Ward, Stephen; Ward, Tia

    2015-01-01

    The results of experimental tests of a novel method for moving large (pyramid construction size) stone blocks by rolling them are presented. The method is implemented by tying 12 identical rods of appropriately chosen radius to the faces of the block forming a rough dodecagon prism. Experiments using a 1,000 kg block show that it can be moved across level open ground with a dynamic coefficient of friction of less than 0.06. This value is a factor of five lower than that obtained for dragging the block, and the best values reported for dragging by others, at 0.3. the results are more dramatic than those obtained on smaller scale experiments on a 29.6 kg block, also reported here. For full scale pyramid blocks, the wooden "rods" woudl need to be posts of order 30 cm in diameter, similar in size to those used as masts on ships in the Nile.

  3. Climbing the Needs Pyramids

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. Lomas

    2013-01-01

    Abraham Maslow’s theory of human adult motivation is often represented by a pyramid image showing two proposals: First, the five needs stages in emergent order of hierarchical ascension and second, a percentage of the adult population suggested to occupy each needs tier. Specifically, Maslow proposed that adults would be motivated to satisfy their unfilled needs until they reached the hierarchy’s apex and achieved self...

  4. Imaging the Cheops Pyramid

    CERN Document Server

    Bui, H D

    2012-01-01

    In this book Egyptian Archeology  and Mathematics meet. The author is an expert in theories and applications in Solid Mechanics and Inverse Problems, a former professor at Ecole Polytechnique and now works with Electricité de France on maintenance operations on nuclear power plants. In the Autumn of 1986, after the end of the operation on the King’s chamber conducted under the Technological and Scientific Sponsorship of EDF, to locate a cavity, he was called to solve a mathematical inverse problem, to find the unknown tomb of the King and the density structure of the whole pyramid based on measurements of microgravity made inside and outside of the pyramid. This book recounts the various search operations on the pyramid of Cheops made at the request of the Egyptian and French authorities in 1986-1987. After the premature end of the Cheops operation in the Autumn of 1986, following the fiasco of unsuccessful drillings in the area suspected by both architects G. Dormion and J.P. Goidin and microgravity aus...

  5. Event Detection by Velocity Pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose velocity pyramid for multimediaevent detection. Recently, spatial pyramid matching is proposed to in-troduce coarse geometric information into Bag of Features framework,and is eective for static image recognition and detection. In video, notonly spatial information but also temporal information, which repre-sents its dynamic nature, is important. In order to fully utilize it, wepropose velocity pyramid where video frames are divided into motionalsub-regions. Our meth...

  6. PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

    2009-06-06

    The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

  7. The pyramidal capacitated vehicle routing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the pyramidal capacitated vehicle routing problem (PCVRP) as a restricted version of the capacitated vehicle routing problem (CVRP). In the PCVRP each route is required to be pyramidal in a sense generalized from the pyramidal traveling salesman problem (PTSP). A pyramidal...

  8. Overcomplete steerable pyramid filters and rotation invariance

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    A given (overcomplete) discrete oriented pyramid may be converted into a steerable pyramid by interpolation. We present a technique for deriving the optimal interpolation functions (otherwise called 'steering coefficients'). The proposed scheme is demonstrated on a computationally efficient oriented pyramid, which is a variation on the Burt and Adelson (1983) pyramid. We apply the generated steerable pyramid to orientation-invariant texture analysis in order to demonstrate its excellent rotat...

  9. Pyramidal cell-interneuron interactions underlie hippocampal ripple oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Eichler, Ronny; Senzai, Yuta; Royer, Sebastien; Buzsáki, György

    2014-07-16

    High-frequency ripple oscillations, observed most prominently in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal layer, are associated with memory consolidation. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying the generation, frequency control, and spatial coherence of the rhythm are poorly understood. Using multisite optogenetic manipulations in freely behaving rodents, we found that depolarization of a small group of nearby pyramidal cells was sufficient to induce high-frequency oscillations, whereas closed-loop silencing of pyramidal cells or activation of parvalbumin- (PV) or somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons aborted spontaneously occurring ripples. Focal pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors abolished ripples. Localized PV interneuron activation paced ensemble spiking, and simultaneous induction of high-frequency oscillations at multiple locations resulted in a temporally coherent pattern mediated by phase-locked interneuron spiking. These results constrain competing models of ripple generation and indicate that temporally precise local interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons support ripple generation in the intact hippocampus.

  10. Pyramid Lake Task Force : Final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Pyramid Lake Task Force was created to address Pyramid Lake’s recession and recommend possible solutions that would consider both the needs for preserving the...

  11. One Kind of Network Complexity Pyramid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Pyramid architecture can be widely found in nature and most social fields. For example, Zoltvai and Barabasi firstly proposed the life’s complexity pyramid in biology science, and it was found that the

  12. A Rebuttal of NTL Institute's Learning Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letrud, Kare

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the learning pyramid corroborated by National Training Laboratories Institute. It present and compliment historical and methodological critique against the learning pyramid, and call upon NTL Institute ought to retract their model.

  13. Urban Public Health: Is There a Pyramid?

    OpenAIRE

    Meirong Su; Bin Chen; Zhifeng Yang; Yanpeng Cai; Jiao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Early ecologists identified a pyramidal trophic structure in terms of number, biomass and energy transfer. In 1943, the psychologist Maslow put forward a pyramid model to describe layers of human needs. It is indicated that the pyramid principle is universally applicable in natural, humanistic and social disciplines. Here, we report that a pyramid structure also exists in urban public health (UPH). Based on 18 indicators, the UPH states of four cities (Beijing, Tokyo, New York, and London) ar...

  14. A magic pyramid of supergravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasiou, A.; Borsten, L.; Duff, M.J.; Hughes, L.J.; Nagy, S. [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London,London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-29

    By formulating N=1,2,4,8, D=3, Yang-Mills with a single Lagrangian and single set of transformation rules, but with fields valued respectively in ℝ,ℂ,ℍ,O, it was recently shown that tensoring left and right multiplets yields a Freudenthal-Rosenfeld-Tits magic square of D=3 supergravities. This was subsequently tied in with the more familiar ℝ,ℂ,ℍ,O description of spacetime to give a unified division-algebraic description of extended super Yang-Mills in D=3,4,6,10. Here, these constructions are brought together resulting in a magic pyramid of supergravities. The base of the pyramid in D=3 is the known 4×4 magic square, while the higher levels are comprised of a 3×3 square in D=4, a 2×2 square in D=6 and Type II supergravity at the apex in D=10. The corresponding U-duality groups are given by a new algebraic structure, the magic pyramid formula, which may be regarded as being defined over three division algebras, one for spacetime and each of the left/right Yang-Mills multiplets. We also construct a conformal magic pyramid by tensoring conformal supermultiplets in D=3,4,6. The missing entry in D=10 is suggestive of an exotic theory with G/H duality structure F{sub 4(4)}/Sp(3)×Sp(1)

  15. A magic pyramid of supergravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, A.; Borsten, L.; Duff, M. J.; Hughes, L. J.; Nagy, S.

    2014-04-01

    By formulating = 1, 2, 4, 8, D = 3, Yang-Mills with a single Lagrangian and single set of transformation rules, but with fields valued respectively in , it was recently shown that tensoring left and right multiplets yields a Freudenthal-Rosenfeld-Tits magic square of D = 3 supergravities. This was subsequently tied in with the more familiar description of spacetime to give a unified division-algebraic description of extended super Yang-Mills in D = 3, 4, 6, 10. Here, these constructions are brought together resulting in a magic pyramid of supergravities. The base of the pyramid in D = 3 is the known 4 × 4 magic square, while the higher levels are comprised of a 3 × 3 square in D = 4, a 2 × 2 square in D = 6 and Type II supergravity at the apex in D = 10. The corresponding U-duality groups are given by a new algebraic structure, the magic pyramid formula, which may be regarded as being defined over three division algebras, one for spacetime and each of the left/right Yang-Mills multiplets. We also construct a conformal magic pyramid by tensoring conformal supermultiplets in D = 3, 4, 6. The missing entry in D = 10 is suggestive of anexotic theory with G/ H duality structure F 4(4)/Sp(3) × Sp(1).

  16. The Chinese Pyramids and the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese Pyramids are huge ancient burial mounds. In the satellite images we can see some complexes where the main buildings are the pyramidal mounds of an emperor and his empress. Here we discuss a possible sunrise/sunset orientation of these two pyramids on the solstices and equinoxes.

  17. Three Types of Network Complexity Pyramid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG; Jin-qing; LI; Yong; LIU; Qiang

    2012-01-01

    <正>Exploring the complexity and diversity of complex networks have been very challenging issues in network science and engineering. Among them exploring the network complexity pyramids (NCP) are one of important expressions in network complexity. So far as we have proposed the three types of the network complexity pyramid (NCP). The first type of NCP is the network model complexity pyramid with

  18. A magic pyramid of supergravities

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, A; Duff, M J; Hughes, L J; Nagy, S

    2013-01-01

    By formulating N = 1, 2, 4, 8, D = 3, Yang-Mills with a single Lagrangian and single set of transformation rules, but with fields valued respectively in R,C,H,O, it was recently shown that tensoring left and right multiplets yields a Freudenthal-Rosenfeld-Tits magic square of D = 3 supergravities. This was subsequently tied in with the more familiar R,C,H,O description of spacetime to give a unified division-algebraic description of extended super Yang-Mills in D = 3, 4, 6, 10. Here, these constructions are brought together resulting in a magic pyramid of supergravities. The base of the pyramid in D = 3 is the known 4x4 magic square, while the higher levels are comprised of a 3x3 square in D = 4, a 2x2 square in D = 6 and Type II supergravity at the apex in D = 10. The corresponding U-duality groups are given by a new algebraic structure, the magic pyramid formula, which may be regarded as being defined over three division algebras, one for spacetime and each of the left/right Yang-Mills multiplets. We also c...

  19. The pyramids of Greece: Ancient meridian observatories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodossiou, Efstratios; Manimanis, Vassilios N.; Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Katsiotis, Marco

    Pyramids, "Dragon Houses" ("Drakospita") and megalithic structures in general create always a special interest. We postulate that, as happens with the Drakospita of Euboea, the pyramid-like structures of Argolis (Eastern Peloponnese) were constructed by the Dryops. It is known that, in addition to Euboea and some Cyclades islands, this prehellenic people had also settled in Argolis, where they founded the city of Asine. We also propose that the pyramids of Argolis and in particular the pyramid of Hellinikon village were very likely, besides being a burial monument or guard house, might be served also for astronomical observations.

  20. Urban public health: is there a pyramid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Meirong; Chen, Bin; Yang, Zhifeng; Cai, Yanpeng; Wang, Jiao

    2013-01-28

    Early ecologists identified a pyramidal trophic structure in terms of number, biomass and energy transfer. In 1943, the psychologist Maslow put forward a pyramid model to describe layers of human needs. It is indicated that the pyramid principle is universally applicable in natural, humanistic and social disciplines. Here, we report that a pyramid structure also exists in urban public health (UPH). Based on 18 indicators, the UPH states of four cities (Beijing, Tokyo, New York, and London) are compared from the point of view of five aspects, namely physical health, living conditions, social security, environmental quality, and education and culture. A pyramid structure was found in each city when focusing on 2000-2009 data. The pyramid of Beijing is relatively similar to that of Tokyo, and the pyramids of New York and London are similar to each other. A general development trend in UPH is proposed and represented by different pyramid modes. As a basic conjecture, the UPH pyramid model can be verified and developed with data of more cities over a longer period, and be used to promote healthy urban development.

  1. Urban Public Health: Is There a Pyramid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirong Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early ecologists identified a pyramidal trophic structure in terms of number, biomass and energy transfer. In 1943, the psychologist Maslow put forward a pyramid model to describe layers of human needs. It is indicated that the pyramid principle is universally applicable in natural, humanistic and social disciplines. Here, we report that a pyramid structure also exists in urban public health (UPH. Based on 18 indicators, the UPH states of four cities (Beijing, Tokyo, New York, and London are compared from the point of view of five aspects, namely physical health, living conditions, social security, environmental quality, and education and culture. A pyramid structure was found in each city when focusing on 2000–2009 data. The pyramid of Beijing is relatively similar to that of Tokyo, and the pyramids of New York and London are similar to each other. A general development trend in UPH is proposed and represented by different pyramid modes. As a basic conjecture, the UPH pyramid model can be verified and developed with data of more cities over a longer period, and be used to promote healthy urban development.

  2. Active browsing using similarity pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jau-Yuen; Bouman, Charles A.; Dalton, John C.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to managing large image databases, which we call active browsing. Active browsing integrates relevance feedback into the browsing environment, so that users can modify the database's organization to suit the desired task. Our method is based on a similarity pyramid data structure, which hierarchically organizes the database, so that it can be efficiently browsed. At coarse levels, the similarity pyramid allows users to view the database as large clusters of similar images. Alternatively, users can 'zoom into' finer levels to view individual images. We discuss relevance feedback for the browsing process, and argue that it is fundamentally different from relevance feedback for more traditional search-by-query tasks. We propose two fundamental operations for active browsing: pruning and reorganization. Both of these operations depend on a user-defined relevance set, which represents the image or set of images desired by the user. We present statistical methods for accurately pruning the database, and we propose a new 'worm hole' distance metric for reorganizing the database, so that members of the relevance set are grouped together.

  3. The Pyramidal Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens

    This paper introduces the Pyramidal Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (PCVRP) as a restricted version of the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (CVRP). In the PCVRP each route is required to be pyramidal in a sense generalized from the Pyramidal Traveling Salesman Problem (PTSP). A pyramidal...... found in many optimal solutions to CVRP instances. An optimal solution to the PCVRP may therefore be useful in itself as a heuristic solution to the CVRP. Further, an attempt can be made to find an even better CVRP solution by solving a TSP, possibly leading to a non-pyramidal route, for each...... of the routes in the PCVRP solution. This paper develops an exact branch-and-cut-and-price (BCP) algorithm for the PCVRP. At the pricing stage, elementary routes can be computed in pseudo-polynomial time in the PCVRP, unlike in the CVRP. We have therefore implemented pricing algorithms that generate only...

  4. BDNF has opposite effects on the quantal amplitude of pyramidal neuron and interneuron excitatory synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, L C; Nelson, S B; Turrigiano, G G

    1998-09-01

    Recently, we have identified a novel form of synaptic plasticity that acts to stabilize neocortical firing rates by scaling the quantal amplitude of AMPA-mediated synaptic inputs up or down as a function of neuronal activity. Here, we show that the effects of activity blockade on quantal amplitude are mediated through the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Exogenous BDNF prevented, and a TrkB-IgG fusion protein reproduced, the effects of activity blockade on pyramidal quantal amplitude. BDNF had opposite effects on pyramidal neuron and interneuron quantal amplitudes and modified the ratio of pyramidal neuron to interneuron firing rates. These data demonstrate a novel role for BDNF in the homeostatic regulation of excitatory synaptic strengths and in the maintenance of the balance of cortical excitation and inhibition.

  5. Maskless inverted pyramid texturization of silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Lixia; Liu, Yaoping; Mei, Zengxia; Chen, Wei; Li, Junqiang; Liang, Huili; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Xiaolong, Du

    2015-06-02

    We discovered a technical solution of such outstanding importance that it can trigger new approaches in silicon wet etching processing and, in particular, photovoltaic cell manufacturing. The so called inverted pyramid arrays, outperforming conventional pyramid textures and black silicon because of their superior light-trapping and structure characteristics, can currently only be achieved using more complex techniques involving lithography, laser processing, etc. Importantly, our data demonstrate a feasibility of inverted pyramidal texturization of silicon by maskless Cu-nanoparticles assisted etching in Cu(NO3)2 / HF / H2O2 / H2O solutions and as such may have significant impacts on communities of fellow researchers and industrialists.

  6. Simulation of gene pyramiding in Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Gene pyramiding has been successfully practiced in plant breeding for developing new breeds or lines in which favorable genes from several different lines were integrated.But it has not been used in animal breeding,and some theoretical investigation and simulation analysis with respect to its strategies,feasibility and efficiency are needed before it can be implemented in animals.In this study,we used four different pure fines of Drosophila melanogaster,each of which is homozygous at a specific mutant gene with a visible effect on phenotype,to simulate the gene pyramiding process and analyze the duration and population size required in different pyramiding strategies.We finally got the ideal individuals,which are homozygous at the four target genes simultaneously.This study demonstrates that gene pyramiding is feasible in animal breeding and the interaction between genes may affect the final results.

  7. Waring’s Problem for Pyramidal Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓越凡; 杨振宁

    1994-01-01

    It has been proved that every positive integer is expressible as a sum of no more than eight pyramidal numbers P(m)=(m-1)m(m+1)/6.This paper reports on a computer calculation of the partition of integers from n=1 to 109 into pyramidal numbers.We find that no integer≤10°needs more than five pyramidal numbers for its partition,and only 241 of them do need five.We define J(n) as the least number of pyramidal numbers to partition n,and Nk(n) as the number of positive integers l less than or equal to n for which J(l)=k.Based on our numerical results we make conjectures about the asymptotic form of Nk(n) for n→∞

  8. FABRIC DEFECT DETECTION USING STEERABLE PYRAMID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mythili

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel idea is proposed for fabric defect detection. De- fects are detected in the fabric using steerable pyramid along with a defect detection algorithm. Various steerable pyramid of four size 256*256, 128*128, 64*64, 32*32 and with four orientation bands 00,450, 900, 1350 are used. Utilizing a Steerable pyramid proved ade- quate in the representation of fabric images in multi-scale and multi- orientations; thus allowing defect detection algorithms to run more effectively. Defect detection algorithm identifies and locates the im- perfection in the defective sample using the statistics mean and stan- dard deviation. This statistics represents the relative amount of inten- sity in the texture and is sufficient to measure defects in the current model .The obtained result are compared with the existing methods wavelet based system and with Gaussian and Laplacian pyramid.

  9. Evaluation of the Green Egyptian Pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Ammar

    2012-12-01

    The research concluded to the need of developing the Egyptian pyramid system through studying more global systems, in addition to the need to benefit from the Egyptian experience stock of solutions and environmental treatments in ancient architecture.

  10. An Improved Pyramid for Spatially Scalable Video Coding

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses an improved pyramid for spatially scalable video coding. We introduce additional update steps in the analysis and the synthesis of the Laplacian pyramid. Our pyramid is able to control efficiently the quantization noise energy in the reconstruction. Hence, it provides improved coding performance when compared to the standard Laplacian pyramid. Moreover, our pyramid does not require biorthogonal filters as they should be used for the frame reconstruction of the Laplacian p...

  11. Novel nootropic dipeptide Noopept increases inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratenko, Rodion V; Derevyagin, Vladimir I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2010-05-31

    Effects of newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptide Noopept on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependant spontaneous IPSCs whereas spike-independent mIPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that Noopept mediates its effect due to the activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion.

  12. The Babinski sign and the pyramidal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gijn, J

    1978-10-01

    The presence or absence of a Babinski sign can be puzzling, but in the light of existing pathological studies it is more fruitful to consider which pyramidal tract fibres release it than whether they release it. This was investigated clinically, by looking for correlations with other reflex changes and with motor deficits in the leg. A survey of 50 patients with a unilateral Babinski sign and six patients who lacked it in spite of other pyramidal tract signs was supplemented with follow-up of the patients who had acute lesions. Appearance of the Bibinski sign proved to depend on the interaction of two factors: (1) activity (not necessarily hyperactivity) in the segmental pathways of the flexion synergy; (2) a motor deficit of the foot, in some cases consisting only in an impairment of rapid foot movements, and probably representing a disturbance of direct pyramidal tract projections to distal motoneurones.

  13. A 3D pyramid spline element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Chen; Chong-Jun Li; Wan-Ji Chen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,a 13-node pyramid spline element is derived by using the tetrahedron volume coordinates and the B-net method,which achieves the second order completeness in Cartesian coordinates.Some appropriate examples were employed to evaluate the performance of the proposed element.The numerical results show that the spline element has much better performance compared with the isoparametric serendipity element Q20 and its degenerate pyramid element P13 especially when mesh is distorted,and it is comparable to the Lagrange element Q27.It has been demonstrated that the spline finite element method is an efficient tool for developing high accuracy elements.

  14. Tiling a Pyramidal Polycube with Dominoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Bodini

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The notion of pyramidal polycubes, namely the piling-up of bricks of a non-increasing size, generalizes in ℝ n the concept of trapezoidal polyominoes. In the present paper, we prove that n-dimensional dominoes can tile a pyramidal polycube if and only if the latter is balanced, that is, if the number of white cubes is equal to the number of black ones for a chessboard-like coloration, generalizing the result of [BC92] when n=2

  15. Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure Pyramids and the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the orientation of the Egyptian pyramids at Giza with respect to sunrises and sunsets, using SunCalc.net software. We can see that Khufu and Khafre pyramids had been positioned in a manner that, from each pyramid, it was always possible to observe the points of the horizon where the sun was rising and setting on each day of the year. A discussion for the Menkaure pyramid is also proposed.

  16. Modified Mean-Pyramid Coding Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kar-Ming; Romer, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Modified mean-pyramid coding scheme requires transmission of slightly fewer data. Data-expansion factor reduced from 1/3 to 1/12. Schemes for progressive transmission of image data transmitted in sequence of frames in such way coarse version of image reconstructed after receipt of first frame and increasingly refined version of image reconstructed after receipt of each subsequent frame.

  17. Pyramid Servings Database (PSDB) for NHANES III

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute developed a database to examine dietary data from the National Center for Health Statistics' Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in terms of servings from each of United States Department of Agriculture's The Food Guide Pyramid's major and minor food groups.

  18. Digital pyramid wavefront sensor with tunable modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akondi, Vyas; Castillo, Sara; Vohnsen, Brian

    2013-07-29

    The pyramid wavefront sensor is known for its high sensitivity and dynamic range that can be tuned by mechanically altering its modulation amplitude. Here, a novel modulating digital scheme employing a reflecting phase only spatial light modulator is demonstrated. The use of the modulator allows an easy reconfigurable pyramid with digital control of the apex angle and modulation geometry without the need of any mechanically moving parts. Aberrations introduced by a 140-actuator deformable mirror were simultaneously sensed with the help of a commercial Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. The wavefronts reconstructed using the digital pyramid wavefront sensor matched very closely with those sensed by the Hartmann-Shack. It is noted that a tunable modulation is necessary to operate the wavefront sensor in the linear regime and to accurately sense aberrations. Through simulations, it is shown that the wavefront sensor can be extended to astronomical applications as well. This novel digital pyramid wavefront sensor has the potential to become an attractive option in both open and closed loop adaptive optics systems.

  19. Toddler Teachers' Use of "Teaching Pyramid" Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Diane; Demchak, MaryAnn

    2011-01-01

    Effective strategies to promote social-emotional development and prevent occurrence of challenging behaviors in young children is critical. The "Teaching Pyramid", a framework for supporting social-emotional development and preventing and addressing challenging behaviors, was developed for preschool children. This mixed methods study…

  20. Comparing Volumes of Prisms and Pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Natalya

    2012-01-01

    Students' experience in using formulas for volumes is often limited to substituting numbers into given formulas. An activity presented in this article may help students make connections between the formulas for volumes of prisms and volumes of pyramids. In addition, some interesting facts from number theory arise, demonstrating strong connections…

  1. Toddler Teachers' Use of "Teaching Pyramid" Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Diane; Demchak, MaryAnn

    2011-01-01

    Effective strategies to promote social-emotional development and prevent occurrence of challenging behaviors in young children is critical. The "Teaching Pyramid", a framework for supporting social-emotional development and preventing and addressing challenging behaviors, was developed for preschool children. This mixed methods study investigated…

  2. The Dairy Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the dairy group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases…

  3. Ancient Pyramids Help Students Learn Math Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Courtney D.; Stump, Amanda M.; Lazaros, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an activity that allows students to use mathematics and critical-thinking skills to emulate processes used by the ancient Egyptians to prepare the site for the Pyramids of Giza. To accomplish this, they use three different methods. First, they create a square using only simple technological tools that were available to the…

  4. Jonestown in the Shadow of Maslow's Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Edgar M.; Wigglesworth, David C.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the light of the Jonestown tragedy. Maintains that members of the People's Temple felt frustrated in attaining the lower levels in the world of reality, and so moved outside the pyramid in search of the top, self-actualization. In the process, their primary needs were met. Journal availability: see SO 507…

  5. Idea Bank: Assessing Your Curriculum with the Creative Rights Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a creative rights pyramid that was developed as part of the author's efforts to: (1) teach about copyright and intellectual property; and (2) increase students' awareness of their own intellectual property in and outside the music classroom. The pyramid is based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food pyramid to suggest…

  6. LANDSAT-BASED WATER QUALITY MONITORING OF PYRAMID LAKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT) in cooperation with federal, state and local entities has been able to increase stream flow, establish water quality standards and improve fish habitat in the Truckee River, a primary source of water for pyramid Lake. In the past, pyramid Lake wat...

  7. On the astronomical orientation of the IV dynasty Egyptian pyramids and the dating of the second Giza pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Magli, Giulio

    2003-01-01

    The data on the astronomical orientation of the IV dynasty Egyptian pyramids are re-analyzed and it is shown that such data suggest an inverse chronology between the `first` and the `second` Giza pyramid.

  8. Intrinsic oscillations of neocortex generated by layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L R; Amitai, Y; Connors, B W

    1991-01-25

    Rhythmic activity in the neocortex varies with different behavioral and pathological states and in some cases may encode sensory information. However, the neural mechanisms of these oscillations are largely unknown. Many pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the neocortex showed prolonged, 5- to 12-hertz rhythmic firing patterns at threshold. Rhythmic firing was due to intrinsic membrane properties, sodium conductances were essential for rhythmicity, and calcium-dependent conductances strongly modified rhythmicity. Isolated slices of neocortex generated epochs of 4- to 10-hertz synchronized activity when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated channels were facilitated. Layer 5 was both necessary and sufficient to produce these synchronized oscillations. Thus, synaptic networks of intrinsically rhythmic neurons in layer 5 may generate or promote certain synchronized oscillations of the neocortex.

  9. Intrinsic Oscillations of Neocortex Generated by Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laurie R.; Amitai, Yael; Connors, Barry W.

    1991-01-01

    Rhythmic activity in the neocortex varies with different behavioral and pathological states and in some cases may encode sensory information. However, the neural mechanisms of these oscillations are largely unknown. Many pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the neocortex showed prolonged, 5- to 12-hertz rhythmic firing patterns at threshold. Rhythmic firing was due to intrinsic membrane properties, sodium conductances were essential for rhythmicity, and calcium-dependent conductances strongly modified rhythmicity. Isolated slices of neocortex generated epochs of 4- to 10-hertz synchronized activity when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated channels were facilitated. Layer 5 was both necessary and sufficient to produce these synchronized oscillations. Thus, synaptic networks of intrinsically rhythmic neurons in layer 5 may generate or promote certain synchronized oscillations of the neocortex.

  10. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024 ×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  11. Postsynaptic blockade of inhibitory postsynaptic currents by plasmin in CA1 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, A; Tanaka, T; Saito, H; Matsuki, N

    1997-06-27

    We have shown previously that plasmin facilitated the generation of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 and dentate region of rat hippocampus. In the present study, we investigated the effects of plasmin on postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. Plasmin (100 nM) had no effect on NMDA nor on non-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. However, plasmin significantly decreased GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents. This effect of plasmin disappeared when intracellular Ca2+ was strongly chelated with BAPTA. Furthermore, plasmin attenuated the GABA-induced currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the STP-enhancing effect of plasmin is due to a blockade of postsynaptic GABA(A) responses and that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ by plasmin may be involved in its mechanism.

  12. Compression asphyxia from a human pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Ambade, Vipul Namdeorao; Biyabani, Naushad

    2015-12-01

    In compression asphyxia, respiration is stopped by external forces on the body. It is usually due to an external force compressing the trunk such as a heavy weight on the chest or abdomen and is associated with internal injuries. In present case, the victim was trapped and crushed under the falling persons from a human pyramid formation for a "Dahi Handi" festival. There was neither any severe blunt force injury nor any significant pathological natural disease contributing to the cause of death. The victim was unable to remove himself from the situation because his cognitive responses and coordination were impaired due to alcohol intake. The victim died from asphyxia due to compression of his chest and abdomen. Compression asphyxia resulting from the collapse of a human pyramid and the dynamics of its impact force in these circumstances is very rare and is not reported previously to the best of our knowledge.

  13. How they (should have) built the pyramids

    CERN Document Server

    West, J; Waters, K

    2014-01-01

    A novel method is proposed for moving large, pyramid construction size, stone blocks. The method is inspired by a well known introductory physics homework problem, and is implemented by tying 12 identical rods of appropriately chosen radius to the faces of the block. The rods form the corners and new faces that transform the square prism into a dodecagon which can then be moved more easily by rolling than by dragging. Experimental results are presented and compared to independent work by another group which utilized wooden attachments providing a cylindrical shape. It is found that a small scale stone block converted to dodecagons can be moved across level open ground with a dynamic coefficient of friction of the order 0.2. For full scale pyramid blocks, the wooden rods would need to be posts of order 30 cm in diameter, similar in size to those used as masts on ships in the Nile.

  14. Centre of pressure correlates with pyramid performance in acrobatic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floría, Pablo; Gómez-Landero, Luis Arturo; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Acrobatic gymnasts need excellent balance control to execute pyramids where one gymnast is supported by another. The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe balance performance by assessing the centre of pressure displacement in a group of acrobatic gymnasts executing pyramids; (2) to determine the relationship between the parameters describing the centre of pressure oscillations and pyramid score; and (3) to examine the role of each foot in providing a solid base of support to maintain the balance of the pyramid. Sixteen acrobatic gymnasts grouped in pairs performed a Half pyramid and a Straddle pyramid held for 7 s on two force platforms. Path length, variance, range trajectory, and surface area of the centre of pressure of each foot were examined to analyse the balance of the pyramid. The path length was correlated with the pyramid score (Straddle: p = 0.692 [large]; Half: p = 0.407 [moderate]). There were differences in the functions of each leg to maintain balance, with the non-preferred leg supporting a higher weight of the pyramid while the preferred leg performed control movements to maintain balance. The results suggested that quantitative analysis of balance can provide important information on pyramid performance.

  15. Optimizing pyramided transgenic Bt crops for sustainable pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Yves; Crickmore, Neil; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2015-02-01

    Transgenic crop pyramids producing two or more Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins that kill the same insect pest have been widely used to delay evolution of pest resistance. To assess the potential of pyramids to achieve this goal, we analyze data from 38 studies that report effects of ten Bt toxins used in transgenic crops against 15 insect pests. We find that compared with optimal low levels of insect survival, survival on currently used pyramids is often higher for both susceptible insects and insects resistant to one of the toxins in the pyramid. Furthermore, we find that cross-resistance and antagonism between toxins used in pyramids are common, and that these problems are associated with the similarity of the amino acid sequences of domains II and III of the toxins, respectively. This analysis should assist in future pyramid design and the development of sustainable resistance management strategies.

  16. Double Pyramidal Central Configurations with a Concave Quadrilateral Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXuefei

    2002-01-01

    As for a doudle pyramidal central configuration in 6-body problems,the case when its bese is a concave polygon is studied.By advancing several assumptions according to the definition of double pyramidal central configuration and deducing two theorems and two corollaries on this subject,the essential and sufficient conditions to form a double pyramidal central configuration with a concave quadriateral base are demonstrated.

  17. Content-adaptive pyramid representation for 3D object classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Boulgouris, Nikolaos; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel representation for the classification of 3D images. Unlike most current approaches, our representation is not based on a fixed pyramid but adapts to image content and uses image regions instead of rectangular pyramid scales. Image characteristics, such as depth ...... and color, are used for defining regions within images. Multiple region scales are formed in order to construct the proposed pyramid image representation. The proposed method achieves excellent results in comparison to conventional representations....

  18. Revisiting static modulation in pyramid wavefront sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Vassallo, D.; Bergomi, M.; Biondi, F.; Farinato, J.; Greggio, D.; Magrin, D.; Viotto, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Pyramid Sensor (PS) is based on the Focault knife-edge test, yielding then, in geometrical approximation, only the sign of the wavefront slope. To provide linear measurements of the wavefront slopes the PS relies on a technique known as modulation, which also plays a central role to improve the linear range of the pyramid WFS, very small in the nonmodulated case. In the main PS using modulation so far, this task is achieved by moving optical components in the WFS, increasing the complexity of the system. An attractive idea to simplify the optical and mechanical design of a pyramid WFS is to work without any dynamic modulation. This concept was only merely described and functionally tested in the framework of MAD, and subsequently, with a holographic diffuser. The latter produce a sort of random distribution of the light coming out from the pupil plane, leading to sort of inefficient modulation, as most of the rays are focused in the central region of the light diffused by such device. The bi-dimensional original grating is, in contrast, producing a well defined deterministic distribution of the light onto a specifically shaped pattern. A crude option has been already discussed as a possibility, and it is here generalized to holographic plates leading to various distribution of lights, including a circle whose diameter would match the required modulation pattern, or more cost effective approaches like the one of a square pattern. These holographic diffusers would exhibit also zero-th and high order patterns and the actual size of the equivalent modulation would be linearly wavelength dependent, leading to colour effects that requires a careful handling in order to properly choose the right amount of equivalent modulation.

  19. Base-of-the-pyramid global strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boşcor, D.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global strategies for MNCs should focus on customers in emerging and developing markets instead of customers in developed economies. The “base-of-the-pyramid segment” comprises 4 billion people in the world. In order to be successful, companies will be required to form unconventional partnerships- with entities ranging from local governments to non-profit organizations - to gain the community’s trust and understand the environmental, infrastructure and political issues that may affect business. Being able to provide affordable, high-quality products and services in this market segment often means new approaches to marketing- new packaging and pricing structures, and using unfamiliar distribution structures.

  20. Plasmonic Tipless Pyramid Arrays for Cell Poration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courvoisier, Sébastien; Saklayen, Nabiha; Huber, Marinus; Chen, Jun; Diebold, Eric D; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Mazur, Eric

    2015-07-08

    Improving the efficiency, cell survival, and throughput of methods to modify and control the genetic expression of cells is of great benefit to biology and medicine. We investigate, both computationally and experimentally, a nanostructured substrate made of tipless pyramids for plasmonic-induced transfection. By optimizing the geometrical parameters for an excitation wavelength of 800 nm, we demonstrate a 100-fold intensity enhancement of the electric near field at the cell-substrate contact area, while the low absorption typical for gold is maintained. We demonstrate that such a substrate can induce transient poration of cells by a purely optically induced process.

  1. Extracting the abstraction pyramid from complex networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yuh-Jyh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, the organization of system modules is typically limited to either a multilevel hierarchy that describes the "vertical" relationships between modules at different levels (e.g., module A at level two is included in module B at level one, or a single-level graph that represents the "horizontal" relationships among modules (e.g., genetic interactions between module A and module B. Both types of organizations fail to provide a broader and deeper view of the complex systems that arise from an integration of vertical and horizontal relationships. Results We propose a complex network analysis tool, Pyramabs, which was developed to integrate vertical and horizontal relationships and extract information at various granularities to create a pyramid from a complex system of interacting objects. The pyramid depicts the nested structure implied in a complex system, and shows the vertical relationships between abstract networks at different levels. In addition, at each level the abstract network of modules, which are connected by weighted links, represents the modules' horizontal relationships. We first tested Pyramabs on hierarchical random networks to verify its ability to find the module organization pre-embedded in the networks. We later tested it on a protein-protein interaction (PPI network and a metabolic network. According to Gene Ontology (GO and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, the vertical relationships identified from the PPI and metabolic pathways correctly characterized the inclusion (i.e., part-of relationship, and the horizontal relationships provided a good indication of the functional closeness between modules. Our experiments with Pyramabs demonstrated its ability to perform knowledge mining in complex systems. Conclusions Networks are a flexible and convenient method of representing interactions in a complex system, and an increasing amount of information in real-world situations is

  2. Cosmological SUSY Breaking and the Pyramid Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, T

    2014-01-01

    I review the ideas of holographic space-time (HST), Cosmological SUSY breaking (CSB), and the Pyramid Schemes, which are the only known models of Tera-scale physics consistent with CSB, current particle data, and gauge coupling unification. There is considerable uncertainty in the estimate of the masses of supersymmetric partners of the standard model particles, but the model predicts that the gluino is probably out of reach of the LHC, squarks may be in reach, and the NLSP is a right handed slepton, which should be discovered soon.

  3. The Alphabet Pyramid of Team Development and Situation Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Roy

    2001-01-01

    This pyramid model of team development has four sides--awareness, behavior, communication, and direction--on a foundation of evaluation. The four equal sides of a pyramid represent the equal importance of the different roles, including leader, within a team. All team members are involved in evaluation and deciding what is important, which empowers…

  4. Commentary on "Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosile, Grace Ann

    2008-01-01

    This commentary asks some critical questions concerning the article "Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid" included in this special issue. Are "bottom of the pyramid" (BOP) multidisciplinary action project (MAP) students prepared to critically assess the impact of their interventions beyond a narrow definition of profit in complex and…

  5. A multi octaves directive dielectric lens: The Pyramid Antenna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marliani, L.; Bruni, S.; Neto, A.

    2005-01-01

    Leaky wave antennas have been investigated for a long time and are typically an inexpensive solution for beam scanning antennas. We have designed a novel antenna topology, named the pyramid antenna, based on the broadband leaky concept. The pyramid antenna, currently covered by a patent application,

  6. Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Doing business at the base of the pyramid is a topic of increasing interest to business practitioners and academics. Base of the pyramid business offers the promise of great economic gains for companies and the possibility of a powerful new approach to alleviate poverty. At the same time, it may threaten local culture and independence while…

  7. 38 CFR 4.14 - Avoidance of pyramiding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Avoidance of pyramiding. 4.14 Section 4.14 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.14 Avoidance of pyramiding. The evaluation of...

  8. Tribonacci-like sequences and generalized Pascal's pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    A well-known result of Feinberg and Shannon states that the tribonacci sequence can be detected by the so-called Pascal's pyramid. Here we will show that any tribonacci-like sequence can be obtained by the diagonals of the Feinberg's triangle associated to a suitable generalized Pascal's pyramid. The results also extend similar properties of Fibonacci-like sequences.

  9. Tunneling and propping : A justification for pyramidal ownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riyanto, Y.E.; Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This paper links existence of the pyramidal ownership structure to tunneling and propping. Tunneling refers to a transfer of resources from a lower-level firm to a higher-level firm in the pyramidal chain, whereas propping concerns a transfer in the opposite direction intended to bail out the receiv

  10. Location-dependent excitatory synaptic interactions in pyramidal neuron dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardia F Behabadi

    Full Text Available Neocortical pyramidal neurons (PNs receive thousands of excitatory synaptic contacts on their basal dendrites. Some act as classical driver inputs while others are thought to modulate PN responses based on sensory or behavioral context, but the biophysical mechanisms that mediate classical-contextual interactions in these dendrites remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. Distal excitation lowers the local spike threshold for more proximal inputs, while having little effect on peak responses at the soma. In contrast, proximal excitation lowers the threshold, but also substantially increases the gain of distally-driven responses. Our findings support the view that PN basal dendrites possess significant analog computing capabilities, and suggest that the diverse forms of nonlinear response modulation seen in the neocortex, including uni-modal, cross-modal, and attentional effects, could depend in part on pathway-specific biases in the spatial distribution of excitatory synaptic contacts onto PN basal dendritic arbors.

  11. Action potential modulation in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons facilitates OLM interneuron activation in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits of rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyun Kim

    Full Text Available Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play a key role in feedback inhibition and in the control of network activity. However, how these cells are efficiently activated in the network remains unclear. To address this question, I performed recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons, the presynaptic fibers that provide feedback innervation of these interneurons. Two forms of axonal action potential (AP modulation were identified. First, repetitive stimulation resulted in activity-dependent AP broadening. Broadening showed fast onset, with marked changes in AP shape following a single AP. Second, tonic depolarization in CA1 pyramidal neuron somata induced AP broadening in the axon, and depolarization-induced broadening summated with activity-dependent broadening. Outside-out patch recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons revealed a high density of α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX-sensitive, inactivating K+ channels, suggesting that K+ channel inactivation mechanistically contributes to AP broadening. To examine the functional consequences of axonal AP modulation for synaptic transmission, I performed paired recordings between synaptically connected CA1 pyramidal neurons and O-LM interneurons. CA1 pyramidal neuron-O-LM interneuron excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs showed facilitation during both repetitive stimulation and tonic depolarization of the presynaptic neuron. Both effects were mimicked and occluded by α-DTX, suggesting that they were mediated by K+ channel inactivation. Therefore, axonal AP modulation can greatly facilitate the activation of O-LM interneurons. In conclusion, modulation of AP shape in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons substantially enhances the efficacy of principal neuron-interneuron synapses, promoting the activation of O-LM interneurons in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits.

  12. Action potential modulation in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons facilitates OLM interneuron activation in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits of rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyun

    2014-01-01

    Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play a key role in feedback inhibition and in the control of network activity. However, how these cells are efficiently activated in the network remains unclear. To address this question, I performed recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons, the presynaptic fibers that provide feedback innervation of these interneurons. Two forms of axonal action potential (AP) modulation were identified. First, repetitive stimulation resulted in activity-dependent AP broadening. Broadening showed fast onset, with marked changes in AP shape following a single AP. Second, tonic depolarization in CA1 pyramidal neuron somata induced AP broadening in the axon, and depolarization-induced broadening summated with activity-dependent broadening. Outside-out patch recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons revealed a high density of α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX)-sensitive, inactivating K+ channels, suggesting that K+ channel inactivation mechanistically contributes to AP broadening. To examine the functional consequences of axonal AP modulation for synaptic transmission, I performed paired recordings between synaptically connected CA1 pyramidal neurons and O-LM interneurons. CA1 pyramidal neuron-O-LM interneuron excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) showed facilitation during both repetitive stimulation and tonic depolarization of the presynaptic neuron. Both effects were mimicked and occluded by α-DTX, suggesting that they were mediated by K+ channel inactivation. Therefore, axonal AP modulation can greatly facilitate the activation of O-LM interneurons. In conclusion, modulation of AP shape in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons substantially enhances the efficacy of principal neuron-interneuron synapses, promoting the activation of O-LM interneurons in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits.

  13. The NGS Pyramid wavefront sensor for ERIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, A.; Antichi, J.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.; Carbonaro, L.; Agapito, G.; Biliotti, V.; Briguglio, R.; Di Rico, G.; Dolci, M.; Ferruzzi, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Marchetti, E.; Fedrigo, E.; Le Louarn, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Amico, P.; Hubin, N.

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is the new Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for VLT in construction at ESO with the collaboration of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, ETH-Institute for Astronomy and INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. The ERIS AO system relies on a 40×40 sub-aperture Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) for two operating modes: a pure Natural Guide Star high-order sensing for high Strehl and contrast correction and a low-order visible sensing in support of the Laser Guide Star AO mode. In this paper we present in detail the preliminary design of the ERIS PWFS that is developed under the responsibility of INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in collaboration with ESO.

  14. Fabrication and measurement of a flexoelectric micro-pyramid composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A fabrication method by combining precision mechanical dicing and wet etching was developed to prepare micro-pyramid structures based on (Ba0.67Sr0.33TiO3 ceramics. The effective piezoelectric properties of flexoelectric pyramid structures in ten micrometers scale were investigated and measured through converse flexoelectric effect. The scaling effect of the flexoelectric response was demonstrated as the structure size shrinks down. The results do suggest the great potential of flexoelectric micro pyramids as an alternative to lead-free piezoelectric material.

  15. Ischemic stroke of the pyramidal decussation causing quadriplegia and anarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Emilia G; Kamel, Hooman; Johnson, Eric C B; Shalev, Sarah M; Josephson, S Andrew

    2012-10-01

    A 52-year-old man with a history of hypertension and previously irradiated head and neck cancer presented with quadriplegia and anarthria sparing the face and sensory functions. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute infarction of the pyramidal decussation. We describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of infarction at the pyramidal decussation and review the arterial supply to this region in the lower brainstem. Although rare, infarction of the pyramidal decussation should be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients present with atraumatic pure motor quadriplegia.

  16. Papillary Carcinoma Arising from the Pyramidal Lobe of the Thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Sarah; Kim, Eun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Kwak, Jin Young [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The authors present a rare case of papillary carcinoma arising from the pyramidal lobe of the thyroid in a 54-year-old woman, who presented with a right submental palpable mass. An ultrasound evaluation depicted a 3 cm mixed echoic mass from the thyroid cartilage level without a focal lesion in the thyroid gland. Surgical specimens obtained during bilateral thyroidectomy confirmed papillary carcinoma of the pyramidal lobe. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report to describe papillary carcinoma arising from the pyramidal lobe of the thyroid gland

  17. NONLINEAR BENDING THEORY OF DIAGONAL SQUARE PYRAMID RETICULATED SHALLOW SHELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖潭; 刘人怀

    2001-01-01

    Double-deck reticulated shells are a main form of large space structures. One of the shells is the diagonal square pyramid reticulated shallow shell, whose its upper and lower faces bear most of the load but its core is comparatively flexible. According to its geometrical and mechanical characteristics, the diagonal square pyramid reticulated shallow shell is treated as a shallow sandwich shell on the basis of three basic assumptions. Its constitutive relations are analyzed from the point of view of energy and internal force equivalence. Basic equations of the geometrically nonlinear bending theory of the diagonal square pyramid reticulated shallow shell are established by means of the virtual work principle .

  18. Inclinations of Egyptian pyramids and finding of the divine essence

    OpenAIRE

    GRIGORIEV STANISLAV ARKADIEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is discovery of astronomical reasons in orientation of slopes of Egyptian pyramids used as tombs for pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. The article contains results of statistical analysis of change in inclination of slopes of the pyramids (3rd 2nd millennia BC) depending on time of their building. The first year of the corresponding pharaoh’s reign has been accepted, as usually it is considered that building of pyramids ones started during either the first or second year of ...

  19. Activation of functional α7-containing nAChRs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by physiological levels of choline in the presence of PNU-120596.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bopanna I Kalappa

    entire pyramidal neuron and occasionally trigger action potentials. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The majority of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons express functional α7-containing nAChRs. In the absence of PNU-120596, a positive allosteric modulator of α7 nAChRs, a lack of responsiveness of some hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons to focal application of 0.5-1 mM choline does not imply a lack of expression of functional α7-containing nAChRs in these neurons. Rather, it may indicate a lack of detection of α7-containing nAChR-mediated currents by patch-clamp electrophysiology. 2 PNU-120596 can serve as a powerful tool for detection and enhancement of responsiveness of low densities of functional α7-containing nAChRs such as those present in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. 3 In the presence of PNU-120596, physiological concentrations of choline activate functional CA1 pyramidal α7-containing nAChRs and produce step-like currents that cause repetitive step-like depolarizations, occasionally triggering bursts of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that in the presence of PNU-120596 and possibly other positive allosteric modulators, endogenous choline may persistently activate CA1 pyramidal α7-containing nAChRs, enhance the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons and thus act as a potent therapeutic agent with potential neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing properties.

  20. A Remark on the Mallat Pyramidal Algorithm of Wavelet Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    The exact relationships between the lenthgs of scale sequences and wavelet sequences in the Mallat pyramidal algorithm for computing wavelet trans-form coefficients are obtained,and the maximum possible scale of arbitrary discrete signal is derived.

  1. PYRAMIDAL-HOLLOW-BEAM DIPOLE TRAP FOR ALKALI ATOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN JIAN-PING; GAO WEI-JIAN; WANG YU-ZHU; ZHU YI-FU; WANG YI-QIU

    2000-01-01

    We propose a dark gravito-optical dipole trap, for alkali atoms, consisting of a blue-detuned, pyramidal-hollow laser beam propagating upward and the gravity field. When cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap are loaded into the pyramidal-hollow beam and bounce inside the pyramidal-hollow beam, they experience efficient Sisyphus cooling and geometric cooling induced by the pyramidal-hollow beam and the weak repumping beam propagating downward. Our study shows that an ultracold and dense atomic sample with an equilibrium 3D momentum of ~ 3hk and an atomic density above the point of Bose-Einstein condensation may be obtained in this pure optical trap.

  2. Residential solar-heating system uses pyramidal optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes reflective panels which optimize annual solar energy collection in attic installation. Subunits include collection, storage, distribution, and 4-mode control systems. Pyramid optical system heats single-family and multi-family dwellings.

  3. The Fishery of Truckee River and Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides an overview of the Washoe Project Act. Trout populations in Pyramid Lake began to decline in the 1930s due to poor water quality and poor...

  4. Improving Drought Tolerance of Rice by Designed QTL Pyramiding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.K. Li; Y. Sun; L.H. Zhu; D. Dwivedi; Y.M. Gao; T.Q. Zheng; R. Lafitte; J.L. Xu; D. Mackill; B.Y. Fu; J.Domingo

    2007-01-01

    @@ Drought is the most important factor limiting rice yields in the rainfed areas of Asia. To overcome the problem, we developed a new strategy 'designed QTL pyramiding' to more efficiently develop drought tolerant (DT)rice cultivars.

  5. ASTRONOMICAL ALGORITHMS OF EGYPTIAN PYRAMIDS SLOPES AND THEIR MODULES DIVIDER

    OpenAIRE

    Aboulfotouh, Hossam M. K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to show the astronomical design principles that are encoded in the geometrical forms of the largest five pyramids of the fourth Egyptian dynasty, in Giza and Dahshur plateaus, based on using the pyramids’ design-modules that are mentioned in the so-called Rhind Mathematical Papyrus. It shows the astronomical algorithms for quantifying the slopes of pyramids, with reference to specific range of earth’s axial tilt, within spherical co-ordinates system. Besid...

  6. [TURNING THE PYRAMID IN PRENATAL CARE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohel-Shani, Iris; Daniel-Spiegel, Etty

    2015-10-01

    Most complications of pregnancy manifest towards the latter part of pregnancy. Nevertheless, present day diagnostic techniques, such as sonography, Doppler, biochemical screening tests, and the newly developed ability to study free fetal DNA in maternal blood, enables early identification of high risk groups for maternal and fetal morbidity, as well as fetal genetic and anatomical pathology. Dr. Nicolaides has coined this changing trend with the term "Turning the Pyramid". Early screening enables earlier and more directed follow-up with the application of relevant diagnostic tests. Obvious advantages include the potential to reduce maternal-fetal morbidity before it becomes apparent clinically. Additionally, the earlier diagnosis of fetal pathology, allows more time for parents and medical staff to assess the situation, and reach a decision regarding the continuation of the pregnancy. A possible drawback of such an approach, of early identification of high risk groups, is the uncertainty it arouses, sometimes for a long duration, with the accompanying apprehension and stress parents have to endure. A multidisciplinary team, consisting of specialists in fetal-maternal medicine, genetics, ultrasound, and perinatology, will be needed in order to best deal with the often complex information, which is becoming increasingly available at a very early stage of pregnancy.

  7. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  8. Influence of alignment of the pyramid on its beneficial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2007-05-01

    The present study was aimed to find out whether a change in the alignment of the pyramid from the north-south axis causes any variation in the effects produced by it on plasma cortisol levels and markers of oxidative stress in erythrocytes of adult-female Wistar rats. Plasma cortisol and erythrocyte TBARS levels were significantly lower whereas erythrocyte GSH was significantly higher in rats kept in pyramid that was aligned on the four cardinal points--north, east, south and west, as compared to normal control rats. Although there was a significant difference in the plasma cortisol level between normal control group and the group of rats kept in randomly aligned pyramid, there was no significant difference between these two groups for the other parameters. Erythrocyte TBARS levels in the group of rats kept in the randomly aligned pyramid was significantly higher than that in the group kept in the magnetically aligned pyramid. The results suggest that the north-south alignment of the pyramid is crucial for its expected effects.

  9. Macro-pyramid in GaN Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jing; YANG Zhi-Jian; XU Shi-Fa; ZHU Xing; ZHANG Guo-Yi

    2001-01-01

    A thin film of GaN with the thickness of 1.0μm was grown on α-Al2Oa substrate by metal organic chemical vapour disposition and then a thick GaN film with thickness of 12μm was grown in the halide vapour phase epitaxy system. Some macro-pyramids appeared on the surface of the sample. The macro-pyramids made the surfaceof the GaN film rough, which was harmful to the devices made by GaN materials. These defects changed the distribution of carrier concentration and affected the optical properties of GaN. The step height of the pyramids was about 30-40 nm measured by atomic force microscopy. A simple model was proposed to explain the macro- pyramid phenomenon compared with the growth spiral The growth of the macro-pyramid was relative to the physical conditions in the reaction zone. Both increasing growth temperature and low pressure may reduce the pyramid size.

  10. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells selectively innervate aspiny interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittner, Lucia; Henze, Darrell A; Záborszky, László; Buzsáki, György

    2006-09-01

    The specific connectivity among principal cells and interneurons determines the flow of activity in neuronal networks. To elucidate the connections between hippocampal principal cells and various classes of interneurons, CA3 pyramidal cells were intracellularly labelled with biocytin in anaesthetized rats and the three-dimensional distribution of their axon collaterals was reconstructed. The sections were double-stained for substance P receptor (SPR)- or metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGluR-1alpha)-immunoreactivity to investigate interneuron targets of the CA3 pyramidal cells. SPR-containing interneurons represent a large portion of the GABAergic population, including spiny and aspiny classes. Axon terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells contacted SPR-positive interneuron dendrites in the hilus and in all hippocampal strata in both CA3 and CA1 regions (7.16% of all boutons). The majority of axons formed single contacts (87.5%), but multiple contacts (up to six) on single target neurons were also found. CA3 pyramidal cell axon collaterals innervated several types of morphologically different aspiny SPR-positive interneurons. In contrast, spiny SPR-interneurons or mGluR-1alpha-positive interneurons in the hilus, CA3 and CA1 regions were rarely contacted by the filled pyramidal cells. These findings indicate a strong target selection of CA3 pyramidal cells favouring the activation of aspiny classes of interneurons.

  11. Ammonia inhibits long-term potentiation via neurosteroid synthesis in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Y; Svrakic, N; O'Dell, K; Zorumski, C F

    2013-03-13

    Neurosteroids are a class of endogenous steroids synthesized in the brain that are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders and memory impairment. Ammonia impairs long-term potentiation (LTP), a synaptic model of learning, in the hippocampus, a brain region involved in memory acquisition. Although mechanisms underlying ammonia-mediated LTP inhibition are not fully understood, we previously found that the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is important. Based on this, we hypothesize that metabolic stressors, including hyperammonemia, promote untimely NMDAR activation and result in neural adaptations that include the synthesis of allopregnanolone (alloP) and other GABA-potentiating neurosteroids that dampen neuronal activity and impair LTP and memory formation. Using an antibody against 5α-reduced neurosteroids, we found that 100 μM ammonia acutely enhanced neurosteroid immunostaining in pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. The enhanced staining was blocked by finasteride, a selective inhibitor of 5α-reductase, a key enzyme required for alloP synthesis. Finasteride also overcame LTP inhibition by 100 μM ammonia, as did picrotoxin, an inhibitor of GABA-A receptors. These results indicate that GABA-enhancing neurosteroids, synthesized locally within pyramidal neurons, contribute significantly to ammonia-mediated synaptic dysfunction. These results suggest that the manipulation of neurosteroid synthesis could provide a strategy to improve cognitive function in individuals with hyperammonemia.

  12. Characteristics of the aberrant pyramidal tract in comparison with the pyramidal tract in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Yong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aberrant pyramidal tract (APT refers to the collateral pathway of the pyramidal tract (PT through the medial lemniscus in the midbrain and pons. Using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT, we investigated the characteristics of the APT in comparison with the PT in the normal human brain. Results In thirty-four (18.3%, right hemisphere: 20, left hemisphere: 14 of the 186 hemispheres, the APTs separated from the PT at the upper midbrain level, descended through the medial lemniscus from the midbrain to the pons, and then rejoined with the PT at the upper medulla. Nine (26.5% of the 34 APTs were found to originate from the primary somatosensory cortex without a primary motor cortex origin. Values of fractional anisotropy (FA and tract volume of the APT were lower than those of the PT (P P >0.05. Conclusion We found that the APT has different characteristics, including less directionality, fewer neural fibers, and less origin from the primary motor cortex than the PT.

  13. Housing under the pyramid reduces susceptibility of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons to prenatal stress in the developing rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Krishna Dilip; George, Mitchel Constance; Ramasamy, Perumal; Mustapha, Zainal Arifin

    2013-12-01

    Mother-offspring interaction begins before birth. The foetus is particularly vulnerable to environmental insults and stress. The body responds by releasing excess of the stress hormone cortisol, which acts on glucocorticoid receptors. Hippocampus in the brain is rich in glucocorticoid receptors and therefore susceptible to stress. The stress effects are reduced when the animals are placed under a model wooden pyramid. The present study was to first explore the effects of prenatal restraint-stress on the plasma corticosterone levels and the dendritic arborisation of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of the offspring. Further, to test whether the pyramid environment would alter these effects, as housing under a pyramid is known to reduce the stress effects, pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were restrained for 9 h per day from gestation day 7 until parturition in a wire-mesh restrainer. Plasma corticosterone levels were found to be significantly increased. In addition, there was a significant reduction in the apical and the basal total dendritic branching points and intersections of the CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. The results thus suggest that, housing in the pyramid dramatically reduces prenatal stress effects in rats.

  14. Polychromatic white LED using GaN nano pyramid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taek; Kim, Jusung; Yang, Moonseung; Park, Yongsoo; Chung, U.-In; Ko, Yongho; Cho, Yonghoon

    2013-03-01

    We have developed monolithic white light emitting diodes (LEDs) with a hybrid structure of planar c-planes and nano size hexagonal pyramids. The white spectrum is composed of blue and yellow emissions from the InGaN multi quantum wells (MQWs) on the planar c-planes and on the nano pyramids, respectively. The yellow emission is originated from quantum wells, wires, and dots that are formed at the sides, edges, and tops of the nano-pyramids, respectively. As a result, the emission peaks are different and the entire yellow spectrum is broad enough to make a white in combination with a blue emission. The longer wavelength from the InGaN on nano-pyramids than the wavelength from the InGaN on c-planes is explained by excess In supply from the dielectric selective growth mask. The color temperature is tuned from 3600K to 6400K by controlling the relative area ratio of c-plane and nano-pyramids.

  15. Pyramidal ice crystal scattering phase functions and concentric halos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Liu

    Full Text Available Phase functions have been calculated using the Monte Carlo/geometric ray tracing method for single hexagonal pyramidal ice crystals (such as solid and hollow bullets randomly oriented in space and horizontal plane, in order to study the concentric halo formations. Results from three dimensional model calculations show that 9° halo can be as bright as the common 22° halo for pyramidal angle of 28°, and the 18°, 20°, 24° and 35° halos cannot be seen due to the strong 22° halo domination in the scattering phase function between 18° and 35°. For solid pyramidal ice crystals randomly oriented horizontally, the 35° arc can be produced and its intensity depends on the incident ray solar angle and the particle aspect ratio.

  16. A study of correlation technique on pyramid processed images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sankar Kishore; K Veerabhadra Rao

    2000-02-01

    The pyramid algorithm is potentially a powerful tool for advanced television image processing and for pattern recognition. An attempt is made to design and develop both hardware and software for a system which performs decomposition and reconstruction of digitized images by implementing the Burt pyramid algorithm. In this work, an attempt is also made to study correlation performance on reconstructed images. That is, the reference image is taken from the original image and correlation is performed on expanded images of the same size. Similarly, correlation performance study is carried out on different pyramid- processed levels. In this paper results are presented in terms of RMS error between original and expanded images. Only still images are considered, and the hardware is designed around an i486 processor and software is developed in PL/M 86.

  17. Ancient Egyptian chronology and the astronomical orientation of pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Kate

    2000-11-01

    The ancient Egyptian pyramids at Giza have never been accurately dated, although we know that they were built approximately around the middle of the third millennium BC. The chronologies of this period have been reconstructed from surviving lists of kings and the lengths of their reigns, but the lists are rare, seldom complete and contain known inconsistencies and errors. As a result, the existing chronologies for that period (the Old Kingdom) can be considered accurate only to about +/-100 years, a figure that radiocarbon dating cannot at present improve. Here I use trends in the orientation of Old Kingdom pyramids to demonstrate that the Egyptians aligned them to north by using the simultaneous transit of two circumpolar stars. Modelling the precession of these stars yields a date for the start of construction of the Great Pyramid that is accurate to +/-5 yr, thereby providing an anchor for the Old Kingdom chronologies.

  18. The establishment of GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses on CA1 pyramidal neurons is sequential and correlates with the development of the apical dendrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, R; Represa, A; Jorquera, I; Ben-Ari, Y; Gozlan, H; Aniksztejn, L

    1999-12-01

    We have performed a morphofunctional analysis of CA1 pyramidal neurons at birth to examine the sequence of formation of GABAergic and glutamatergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) and to determine their relation to the dendritic arborization of pyramidal neurons. We report that at birth pyramidal neurons are heterogeneous. Three stages of development can be identified: (1) the majority of the neurons (80%) have small somata, an anlage of apical dendrite, and neither spontaneous nor evoked PSCs; (2) 10% of the neurons have a small apical dendrite restricted to the stratum radiatum and PSCs mediated only by GABA(A) receptors; and (3) 10% of the neurons have an apical dendrite that reaches the stratum lacunosum moleculare and PSCs mediated both by GABA(A) and glutamate receptors. These three groups of pyramidal neurons can be differentiated by their capacitance (C(m) = 17.9 +/- 0.8; 30.2 +/- 1.6; 43.2 +/- 3.0 pF, respectively). At birth, the synaptic markers synapsin-1 and synaptophysin labeling are present in dendritic layers but not in the stratum pyramidale, suggesting that GABAergic peridendritic synapses are established before perisomatic ones. The present observations demonstrate that GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses are established sequentially with GABAergic synapses being established first most likely on the apical dendrites of the principal neurons. We propose that different sets of conditions are required for the establishment of functional GABA and glutamate synapses, the latter necessitating more developed neurons that have apical dendrites that reach the lacunosum moleculare region.

  19. Radial microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Bindu; Das, Mukul Kumar; Sen, Mrinal; Kumar, Subindu

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a theoretical model for radial p-n junction microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structures in the space between microwires has been developed. Incorporation of pyramidal structures results in reflection of light, which would otherwise be unused, and illuminates side walls of the microwires. This additional illumination enhances absorption and, hence, efficiency of the whole structure. Efficiency enhancement is analyzed by varying different device parameters e.g., radius and length of each microwire and packing fraction of the structure. Results show that the maximum fractional efficiency enhancement can be obtained as 30% by suitable choice of these parameters.

  20. Image fusion based on expectation maximization algorithm and steerable pyramid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Liu(刘刚); Zhongliang Jing(敬忠良); Shaoyuan Sun(孙韶媛); Jianxun Li(李建勋); Zhenhua Li(李振华); Henry Leung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a novel image fusion method based on the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and steerable pyramid is proposed. The registered images are first decomposed by using steerable pyramid.The EM algorithm is used to fuse the image components in the low frequency band. The selection method involving the informative importance measure is applied to those in the high frequency band. The final fused image is then computed by taking the inverse transform on the composite coefficient representations.Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms conventional image fusion methods.

  1. Field emission properties of an array of pyramidal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Assis, Thiago A [Departamento de QuImica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Borondo, F [Departamento de QuImica, Instituto Mixto de Ciencias Matematicas CSIC-UAM-UC3M-UCM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); De Castilho, C M C; Brito Mota, F [Grupo de Fisica de SuperfIcies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Benito, R M, E-mail: t.albuquerque@uam.e, E-mail: f.borondo@uam.e, E-mail: caio@ufba.b, E-mail: fbmota@ufba.b, E-mail: rosamaria.benito@upm.e [Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Fisica y Mecanica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Agronomos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-10-07

    The properties and efficiency of the emission current density produced by a metallic array of pyramidal structures are investigated. The theoretical results obtained by numerical integration of the corresponding Laplace equation using a finite differences scheme offer useful information for the optimization of field emission devices based on cathodes with this geometry. Our study shows that the inter-pyramidal distance strongly affects the current density, and even more important for this issue is the protrusion characteristics of these structures. Another relevant, although less important, parameter determining this density is the anode-cathode distance. The effect of the array characteristics on the maximum local electric field intensity is also discussed.

  2. Metrifonate decreases sI(AHP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, J M; Oh, M M; Disterhoft, J F

    2001-01-01

    Metrifonate, a cholinesterase inhibitor, has been shown to enhance learning in aging rabbits and rats, and to alleviate the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease patients. We have previously determined that bath application of metrifonate reduces the spike frequency adaptation and postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in rabbit CA1 pyramidal neurons in vitro using sharp electrode current-clamp recording. The postburst AHP and accommodation observed in current clamp are the result of four slow outward potassium currents (sI(AHP), I(AHP), I(M), and I(C)) and the hyperpolarization activated mixed cation current, I(h). We recorded from visually identified CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vitro using whole cell voltage-clamp technique to better isolate and characterize which component currents of the AHP are affected by metrifonate. We observed an age-related enhancement of the slow component of the AHP tail current (sI(AHP)), but not of the fast decaying component of the AHP tail current (I(AHP), I(M), and I(C)). Bath perfusion of metrifonate reduced sI(AHP) at concentrations that cause a reduction of the AHP and accommodation in current-clamp recordings, with no apparent reduction of I(AHP), I(M), and I(C). The functional consequences of metrifonate administration are apparently mediated solely through modulation of the sI(AHP).

  3. Performance of resistance gene pyramids to races of rice bacterial blight in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGKangle; ZHUANGJieyun; WANGHanrong

    1998-01-01

    The effect of gene pyramiding on resistance to bacterial blight (BB) in rice was evahlated among the IR24-based near isogenic lines conraining single resistance gene and gene pyramids containing two, three or lour resistancegenes (see table).

  4. 76 FR 15358 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Before the Pyramids: The...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... ``Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following determinations: Pursuant to...

  5. Distinct Physiological Effects of Dopamine D4 Receptors on Prefrontal Cortical Pyramidal Neurons and Fast-Spiking Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ping; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine D4 receptor (D4R), which is strongly linked to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia, is highly expressed in pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC). In this study, we examined the impact of D4R on the excitability of these 2 neuronal populations. We found that D4R activation decreased the frequency of spontaneous action potentials (sAPs) in PFC pyramidal neurons, whereas it induced a transient increase followed by a decrease of sAP frequency in PFC parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons. D4R activation also induced distinct effects in both types of PFC neurons on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents, which drive the generation of sAP. Moreover, dopamine substantially decreased sAP frequency in PFC pyramidal neurons, but markedly increased sAP frequency in PV+ interneurons, and both effects were partially mediated by D4R activation. In the phencyclidine model of schizophrenia, the decreasing effect of D4R on sAP frequency in both types of PFC neurons was attenuated, whereas the increasing effect of D4R on sAP in PV+ interneurons was intact. These results suggest that D4R activation elicits distinct effects on synaptically driven excitability in PFC projection neurons versus fast-spiking interneurons, which are differentially altered in neuropsychiatric disorder-related conditions.

  6. Budding Architects: Exploring the Designs of Pyramids and Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Aisling; Hourigan, Mairéad

    2015-01-01

    The context of students as architects is used to examine the similarities and differences between prisms and pyramids. Leavy and Hourigan use the Van Hiele Model as a tool to support teachers to develop expectations for differentiating geometry in the classroom using practical examples.

  7. The pyramid model as a structured way of quality management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Tuuk Adriani Willem

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Three quality systems that can be used in blood establishments are briefly explained. The Pyramid model is described as a tool to manage the quality systems. Finally, some experiences in other countries are given to prove the validity of the system.

  8. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness.

  9. Building trust at the Base of the Pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootveld, P.; Vermeulen, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    More and more companies are serving the poorest communities of our world, the so-called Base of the Pyramid (BoP). Wal-Mart, for example, moved into the Mexican retail-banking sector, claiming not only to “sell more stuff” but also to compete against the entrenched domestic businesses that are not f

  10. Modelling the Somatic Electrical Response of Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    non-linear, time-varying conductances in the soma, including those that underly three putative sodium currents , (IN.-tr,, INa-tail, and INa-rep), a...for excitation and propagation of the nerve impulse. Biophysics Journal. 6:, 1966. [12] C. French and P. Gage. A threshold sodium current in pyramidal

  11. A Modern Myth - The "Pyramids" of Güímar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Antonio; Esteban, César

    We discuss about the construction of a modern myth where archaeoastronomy has played an essential role: the Pyramids of Güímar, located in the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands). We summarize the results of archaeoastronomical, archaeological, historical, and ethnographic studies devoted to them as well as our hypothesis for explaining the motivation of their astronomical alignments.

  12. Succeeding at the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boxenbaum, Eva; Olsen, Mette

    initiative to build a social impact venture at the interface of a multi-national corporation and a hybrid organization that is operating on the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid market. Our study identifies how corporate social entrepreneurs dynamically use framing and organizational anchoring strategies to build...

  13. KINEMATICS OF 3-DOF PYRAMID MANIPULATOR BY PRINCIPAL SCREWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Kinematics of a 3-RPS parallel pyramid manipulator are investigated by principal screw. Firstly, the principal screws are identified by quadric degeneration. The planar conics representing the relations between the pitches and the three linear inputs are described, and the three-dimensional distribution of the axes of all the twists is illustrated. Finally, a numerical example is given successfully.

  14. Catalyzing new product adoption at the base of the pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinakis, Y.D.; Walsh, S.T.; Harms, R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the more perplexing of the entrepreneurial issues at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) is how to catalyze new product adoption by BoP consumers. Because S-shaped adoption dynamics are the result of cultural transmission bias, the question can be rephrased as, how can an entrepreneur overcome conf

  15. Using the Pyramid Approach to Teaching Marketing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, James W.; Westfall, John; Ainscough, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    Underscores the need for teaching marketing research skills at the secondary level and shows how marketing research fits into marketing education. Provides an example of how to use the pyramid approach to research, which involves review of secondary sources, key informant interviews, focus groups, and quantitative research. (Author/JOW)

  16. Angles of Elevation of the Pyramids of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Arthur F.

    1982-01-01

    The nature and history of the construction of pyramids in Egypt is detailed. It is noted that one can only theorize about why the Egyptians used particular angles of elevation. It is thought, perhaps, that new clues will provide a clear solution to this mystery as additional artifacts and hieroglyphics are discovered. (MP)

  17. Fats, Oils, and Sweets. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and avoiding excesses of fats, oils, and sweets. It presents appealing alternatives to these unhealthy foods. Colorful photographs support…

  18. Correlation between pyramidal signs and the severity of cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikuda, Hirotaka; Seichi, Atsushi; Takeshita, Katsushi; Shoda, Naoki; Ono, Takashi; Matsudaira, Ko; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo

    2010-10-01

    A retrospective study was performed to determine the sensitivities of the pyramidal signs in patients with cervical myelopathy, focusing on those with increased signal intensity (ISI) in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The relationship between prevalence of the pyramidal signs and the severity of myelopathy was investigated. We reviewed the records of 275 patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent surgery. Of these, 143 patients were excluded from this study due to comorbidities that might complicate neurological findings. The MR images of the remaining 132 patients were evaluated in a blinded fashion. The neurological findings of 120 patients with ISI (90 men and 30 women; mean age 61 years) were reviewed for hyperreflexia (patellar tendon reflex), ankle clonus, Hoffmann reflex, and Babinski sign. To assess the severity of myelopathy, the motor function scores of the upper and lower extremities for cervical myelopathy set by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (m-JOA score) were used. The most prevalent signs were hyperreflexia (94%), Hoffmann reflex (81%), Babinski sign (53%), and ankle clonus (35%). Babinski sign (P Babinski sign, and ankle clonus. The prevalence of the pyramidal signs correlated with increasing severity of myelopathy. Considering their low sensitivity in patients with mild disability, the pyramidal signs may have limited utility in early diagnosis of cervical myelopathy.

  19. The FINUT healthy lifestyles guide: Beyond the food pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria Dolores; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    The WHO has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national, and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information to the general population. However, wider recommendations are needed, with information on an active healthy lifestyle, not just healthy eating. The objective of the present work is to propose a three-dimensional pyramid as a new strategy for promoting adequate nutrition and active healthy lifestyles in a sustainable way. Indeed, the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles has been designed as a tetrahedron, with its 3 lateral faces corresponding to the facets of food and nutrition, physical activity and rest, and education and hygiene. Each lateral face is divided into 2 triangles. These faces show the following: 1) food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environment; 2) recommendations for rest and physical activity and educational, social, and cultural issues; and 3) selected hygiene and educational guidelines that, in conjunction with the other 2 faces, would contribute to better health for people in a sustainable planet. The new FINUT pyramid is addressed to the general population of all ages and should serve as a guide for living a healthy lifestyle within a defined social and cultural context. It includes an environmental and sustainability dimension providing measures that should contribute to the prevention of noncommunicable chronic diseases.

  20. [The finut healthy lifestyles guide: beyond the food pyramid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria Dolores; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio

    2015-05-01

    The World Health Organization has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information to the general population. However, wider recommendations are needed, with information on an active, healthy lifestyle, not just healthy eating. The objective of the present work is to propose a three-dimensional pyramid as a new strategy for promoting adequate nutrition and active healthy lifestyles in a sustainable way. Indeed, the Iberomerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles has been designed as a tetrahedron, its three lateral faces corresponding to the binomials food and nutrition, physical activity and rest, and education and hygiene. Each lateral face is divided into two triangles. These faces show the following: 1. food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environment; 2. recommendations for rest and physical activity and educational, social and cultural issues; 3. selected hygiene and educational guidelines that, in conjunction with the other two faces, would contribute to better health and provide measures to promote environmental sustainability. The new FINUT pyramid is addressed to the general population of all ages and should serve as a guide for living a healthy lifestyle within a defined social and cultural context. It includes an environmental and sustainability dimension providing measures that should contribute to the prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases.

  1. An algorithm for benchmarking an SIMD pyramid with the Abingdon Cross

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, W.B.; Duin, R.P.W.

    1990-01-01

    Benchmarking an SIMD pyramid with the Abingdon Cross is discussed. Measured results for a simulated pyramid architecture on a CLIP4 processor array are presented, as well as estimates for a hypothetical hardware pyramid built with CLIP4 like processing elements.

  2. The Learning Pyramid: Does It Point Teachers in the Right Direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalley, James P.; Miller, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper raises serious questions about the reliability of the learning pyramid as a guide to retention among students. The pyramid suggests that certain teaching methods are connected with a corresponding hierarchy of student retention. No specific credible research was uncovered to support the pyramid, which is loosely associated with the…

  3. Nanopore formation on Au coated pyramid under electron beam irradiations (plasmonic nanopore on pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Soo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been tremendous interests about the single molecule analysis using a sold-state nanopore. The solid-state nanopore can be fabricated either by drilling technique, or diffusion technique by using electron beam irradiations. The solid-state SiN nanopore device with electrical detection technique recently fabricated, however, the solid-state Au nanopore with optical detection technique can be better utilized as the next generation single molecule sensor. In this report, the nanometer size openings with its size less than 10 nm on the diffused membrane on the 200 nm Au pyramid were fabricated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM electron beam irradiations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, etc. After the sample was being kept under a room environment for several months, several Au (111 clusters with ~6 nm diameter formed via Ostwald ripening are observed using a high resolution TEM imaging. The nanopore with Au nanoclusters on the diffused membrane can be utilized as an optical nanopore device.

  4. Development and validation of a food pyramid for Swiss athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, Samuel; Mannhart, Christof; Colombani, Paolo C

    2009-10-01

    Food-guide pyramids help translate nutrient goals into a visual representation of suggested food intake on a population level. No such guidance system has ever been specifically designed for athletes. Therefore, the authors developed a Food Pyramid for Swiss Athletes that illustrates the number of servings per food group needed in relation to the training volume of an athlete. As a first step, an average energy expenditure of 0.1 kcal . kg(-1) . min(-1) for exercise was defined, which then was translated into servings of different food groups per hour of exercise per day. Variable serving sizes were defined for athletes' different body-mass categories. The pyramid was validated by designing 168 daily meal plans according to the recommendations of the pyramid for male and female athletes of different body-mass categories and training volumes of up to 4 hr/d. The energy intake of the meal plans met the calculated reference energy requirement by 97% +/- 9%. The carbohydrate and protein intakes were linearly graded from 4.6 +/- 0.6-8.5 +/- 0.8 g . kg(-1) . d(-1) and 1.6 +/- 0.2-1.9 +/- 0.2 g . kg(-1) . d(-1), respectively, for training volumes of 1-4 hr of exercise per day. The average micronutrient intake depended particularly on the dietary energy intake level but was well above the dietary reference intake values for most micronutrients. No tolerable upper intake level was exceeded for any micronutrient. Therefore, this Food Pyramid for Swiss Athletes may be used as a new tool in sports nutrition education (e.g., teaching and counseling).

  5. Presence of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in the broiler production pyramid: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierikx, Cindy M; van der Goot, Jeanet A; Smith, Hilde E; Kant, Arie; Mevius, Dik J

    2013-01-01

    Broilers and broiler meat products are highly contaminated with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and are considered to be a source for human infections. Both horizontal and vertical transmission might play a role in the presence of these strains in broilers. As not much is known about the presence of these strains in the whole production pyramid, the epidemiology of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in the Dutch broiler production pyramid was examined. Cloacal swabs of Grandparent stock (GPS) birds (one-/two-days (breed A and B), 18 and 31 weeks old (breed A)), one-day old Parent stock birds (breed A and B) and broiler chickens of increasing age (breed A) were selectively cultured to detect ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates. ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates were found at all levels in the broiler production pyramid in both broiler breeds examined. Prevalence was already relatively high at the top of the broiler production pyramid. At broiler farms ESBL/AmpC producing E. coli were still present in the environment of the poultry house after cleaning and disinfection. Feed samples taken in the poultry house also became contaminated with ESBL/AmpC producing E. coli after one or more production weeks. The prevalence of ESBL/AmpC-positive birds at broiler farms increased within the first week from 0-24% to 96-100% independent of the use of antibiotics and stayed 100% until slaughter. In GPS breed A, prevalence at 2 days, 18 weeks and 31 weeks stayed below 50% except when beta-lactam antibiotics were administered. In that case prevalence increased to 100%. Interventions minimizing ESBL/AmpC contamination in broilers should focus on preventing horizontal and vertical spread, especially in relation to broiler production farms.

  6. Adenosine A1 Receptor Suppresses Tonic GABAA Receptor Currents in Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells and in a Defined Subpopulation of Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombo, Diogo M; Dias, Raquel B; Duarte, Sofia T; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Lamsa, Karri P; Sebastião, Ana M

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous neuromodulator that decreases excitability of hippocampal circuits activating membrane-bound metabotropic A1 receptor (A1R). The presynaptic inhibitory action of adenosine A1R in glutamatergic synapses is well documented, but its influence on inhibitory GABAergic transmission is poorly known. We report that GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated tonic, but not phasic, transmission is suppressed by A1R in hippocampal neurons. Adenosine A1R activation strongly inhibits GABAAR agonist (muscimol)-evoked currents in Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons and in a specific subpopulation of interneurons expressing axonal cannabinoid receptor type 1. In addition, A1R suppresses tonic GABAAR currents measured in the presence of elevated ambient GABA as well as in naïve slices. The inhibition of GABAergic currents involves both protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways and decreases GABAAR δ-subunit expression. On the contrary, no A1R-mediated modulation was detected in phasic inhibitory postsynaptic currents evoked either by afferent electrical stimulation or by spontaneous quantal release. The results show that A1R modulates extrasynaptic rather than synaptic GABAAR-mediated signaling, and that this modulation selectively occurs in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and in a specific subpopulation of inhibitory interneurons. We conclude that modulation of tonic GABAAR signaling by adenosine A1R in specific neuron types may regulate neuronal gain and excitability in the hippocampus.

  7. Identification of mRNA for endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzymes within hippocampal pyramidal cells and CA1 stratum radiatum interneuron subtypes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, C B; McNeil, M; Williamson, R C; Poole, B R; Nelson, B; Sudweeks, S; Edwards, J G

    2012-08-30

    The hippocampus is required for short-term memory and contains both excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. These cells exhibit various forms of synaptic plasticity, the mechanism underlying learning and memory. More recently, endocannabinoids were identified to be involved in synaptic plasticity. Our goal was to describe the distribution of endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzymes within CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons and CA3/CA1 pyramidal cells. We extracted mRNA from single interneurons and pyramidal cells and used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect the presence of 12-lipoxygenase, N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D, diacylglycerol lipase α, and type I metabotropic glutamate receptors, all known to be involved in endocannabinoid production and plasticity. We observed that the expression of endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzyme mRNA does occur within interneurons and that it is coexpressed with type I metabotropic glutamate receptors, suggesting interneurons have the potential to produce endocannabinoids. We also identified that CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells express endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzyme mRNA. Our data provide the first molecular biological evidence for putative endocannabinoid production in interneurons, suggesting their potential ability to regulate endocannabinoid-mediated processes, such as synaptic plasticity.

  8. Distributed GIS oriented generalized image pyramid and its practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gaussian pyramid framework (GPF) and Laplacian pyramid framework (LPF) are the two main frameworks used for transmission and structure of spatial image and geometric data.LPF is the main approach for progressive transmission of spatial image data.This paper discusses the issues in structure,transmission and storage efficiency of spatial data in the current spatially distributed visualization system.Later in the paper a novel approach is introduced to structure and store spatial data based on the LPF.This new approach builds (spatial) index for transformed frequency data within different ranges based on splitting high-frequency and low-frequency data by biorthogonal transformation.This approach decreases the storage consumption and network data traffic for transmission while enables the progressive transmission of spatial image.

  9. BOUNDING PYRAMIDS AND BOUNDING CONES FOR TRIANGULAR BEZIER SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-song Deng; Fa-lai Chen; Li-li Wang

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes practical approaches on how to construct bounding pyramids and bounding cones for triangular Bézier surfaces. Examples are provided to illustrate the process of construction and comparison is made between various surface bounding volumes. Furthermore, as a starting point for the construction,we provide a way to compute hodographs of triangular Bézier surfaces and improve the algorithm for computing the bounding cone of a set of vectors.

  10. Staircase effect alleviation based on multiscale analysis of Laplacian Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjie; Ye, Yutang; Huang, Yonglin

    2012-01-01

    Image denoising with second order partial differential equations (PDEs) often leads to undesirable staircase effect, namely, the transformation of smooth regions into piecewise constant regions. In this paper, staircase effect is analyzed in spatial frequency domain which is different from previous studies. A method of nonlinear diffusion based on Laplacian Pyramid is proposed. The experimental results show that the proposed method alleviates the staircase effect and leads to more natural restored images.

  11. Pyramid wavefront sensors for astronomy and for the human eye

    OpenAIRE

    Bergomi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    WaveFront Sensors (WFSs) may be defined as the heart of an adaptive optics system since they analyze the radiation coming from reference sources and allow to quantify the distortion of a wavefront. Among the varieties of existing WFSs, my PhD research thesis focuses especially on innovative optical systems taking advantage of the peculiarities of the Pyramid WFS. In my PhD project I have designed, implemented, characterized or studied three different applications characterized by the f...

  12. Puusepp's sign--clinical significance of a forgotten pyramidal sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacik, Pawel; Krasnianski, M; Zierz, S

    2009-12-01

    The pyramidal signs in the lower extremity can be divided into three groups: (1) Babinski's group characterised by dorsoflexion of the great toe, (2) pyramidal signs marked by plantar flexion of the toes (e.g. Rossolimo's sign), and (3) synkinetic movements such as Strümpell's phenomenon. Puusepp's sign described by the Estonian neurologist and neurosurgeon Ludvig Puusepp belongs to none of these three groups. Its eliciting does not differ from that of Babinski's sign. The response, however, is different and consists of a tonic slow abduction of the little toe. We showed its relevance on the basis of clinical examination of six patients: four females aged 29, 50, 43 and 57 years and two males aged 42 and 49 years. The diagnoses were as follows: a new relapse of multiple sclerosis, a secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, a left middle cerebral artery stroke, a lumbago resulting in L3-L4 fusion surgery, an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a left intracerebral haemorrhage respectively. Puusepp's sign was the only elicitable pyramidal sign in all the patients but two. The 50-year-old female patient revealed on neurological examination Babinski's sign on the left side and Puusepp's sign on the right side. The testing of pyramidal signs in the 57-year-old woman displayed a bilateral Strümpell's sign and a left Puusepp's sign. These six cases showed that although rarely recognized in the clinical practice Puusepp's sign contributed to establishing the diagnosis of a central motor neuron involvement in the case of an absent Babinski's sign. Thus, its testing does not differ from that of Babinski's sign which requires only a little attention from the examiner, but provides an important piece of clinical information.

  13. PLAN FOR PERFORMANCE ADMINISTRATION IN PYRAMIDAL STRUCTURE ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Alarcón Ortiz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance administration has become a current strategy in evaluating management within organizations, but its implementation often lacks an action plan, resulting from the valuation of climate and leadership styles embedded in the culture of the organization. This paper proposes a model action plan for performance management, which has been implemented, executed and evaluated in pyramidal organizational structure organizations where a diagnosis of the cultural climate and leadership styles recurring in the organization have been previously made.

  14. Image content authentication technique based on Laplacian Pyramid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a technique of image content authentication based on the Laplacian Pyramid to verify the authenticity of image content.First,the image is decomposed into Laplacian Pyramid before the transformation.Next,the smooth and detail properties of the original image are analyzed according to the Laplacian Pyramid,and the properties are classified and encoded to get the corresponding characteristic values.Then,the signature derived from the encrypted characteristic values is embedded in the original image as a watermark.After the reception,the characteristic values of the received image are compared with the watermark drawn out from the image.The algorithm automatically identifies whether the content is tampered by means of morphologic filtration.The information of tampered location is Presented at the same time.Experimental results show that the pro posed authentication algorithm can effectively detect the event and location when the original image content is tampered.Moreover,it can tolerate some distortions produced by compression,filtration and noise degradation.

  15. Amending Miller's Pyramid to Include Professional Identity Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Steinert, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    In 1990, George Miller published an article entitled "The Assessment of Clinical Skills/Competence/Performance" that had an immediate and lasting impact on medical education. In his classic article, he stated that no single method of assessment could encompass the intricacies and complexities of medical practice. To provide a structured approach to the assessment of medical competence, he proposed a pyramidal structure with four levels, each of which required specific methods of assessment. As is well known, the layers are "Knows," "Knows How," "Shows How," and "Does." Miller's pyramid has guided assessment since its introduction; it has also been used to assist in the assessment of professionalism.The recent emphasis on professional identity formation has raised questions about the appropriateness of "Does" as the highest level of aspiration. It is believed that a more reliable indicator of professional behavior is the incorporation of the values and attitudes of the professional into the identity of the aspiring physician. It is therefore proposed that a fifth level be added at the apex of the pyramid. This level, reflecting the presence of a professional identity, should be "Is," and methods of assessing progress toward a professional identity and the nature of the identity in formation should be guided by currently available methods.

  16. Spatio-temporal Laplacian pyramid coding for action recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ling; Zhen, Xiantong; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2014-06-01

    We present a novel descriptor, called spatio-temporal Laplacian pyramid coding (STLPC), for holistic representation of human actions. In contrast to sparse representations based on detected local interest points, STLPC regards a video sequence as a whole with spatio-temporal features directly extracted from it, which prevents the loss of information in sparse representations. Through decomposing each sequence into a set of band-pass-filtered components, the proposed pyramid model localizes features residing at different scales, and therefore is able to effectively encode the motion information of actions. To make features further invariant and resistant to distortions as well as noise, a bank of 3-D Gabor filters is applied to each level of the Laplacian pyramid, followed by max pooling within filter bands and over spatio-temporal neighborhoods. Since the convolving and pooling are performed spatio-temporally, the coding model can capture structural and motion information simultaneously and provide an informative representation of actions. The proposed method achieves superb recognition rates on the KTH, the multiview IXMAS, the challenging UCF Sports, and the newly released HMDB51 datasets. It outperforms state of the art methods showing its great potential on action recognition.

  17. Degeneration of pyramidal tract of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Harada, Noboru; Gotoh, Yasunobu; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Kinuta, Yuji; Okumura, Teizo; Niijima, Kyo; Taki, Waro; Kikuchi, Haruhiko.

    1988-02-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) examinaion was performed on cases of hemiplegia and hemiparesis. These included seven cases of intracerebral hemorrhage, four cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, one case of cerebral infarct, and two cases of head trauma. The pyramidal tract in the brain stem was studied in five patients with complete hemiplegia and in nine with incomplete hemiparesis. The scanner of the MRI was a resistive type operating at a field of 0.2 Tesla. The inversion recovery (IR) and saturation recovery (SR) techniques were utilized. The pyramidal tract at the level of the midbrain and the pons was recognized as a low intensity area on the T/sub 1/ image (IR 150043) in the cases of complete hemiplegia. However, it was recognized as a high intensity area on the SR image (SR 100060) and the T/sub 2/ image (SR 2000100). No abnormal signal intensity was found in the cases of incomplete hemiparesis. A low intensity area on the T/sub 1/ image and a high intensity area on the T/sub 2/ image were recognized in the ventral portion of the midbrain and the pons on the affected side. These findings indicate a degeneration of the pyramidal tract at the level of the brain stem in patients with complete hemiplegia.

  18. Homeostatic responses by surviving cortical pyramidal cells in neurodegenerative tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimins, Johanna L; Rocher, Anne B; Peters, Alan; Shultz, Penny; Lewis, Jada; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2011-11-01

    Cortical neuron death is prevalent by 9 months in rTg(tau(P301L))4510 tau mutant mice (TG) and surviving pyramidal cells exhibit dendritic regression and spine loss. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of these marked structural changes on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) of layer 3 pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from behaviorally characterized TG and non-transgenic (NT) mice at this age. Frontal lobe function of TG mice was intact following a short delay interval but impaired following a long delay interval in an object recognition test, and cortical atrophy and cell loss were pronounced. Surviving TG cells had significantly reduced dendritic diameters, total spine density, and mushroom spines, yet sEPSCs were increased and sIPSCs were unchanged in frequency. Thus, despite significant regressive structural changes, synaptic responses were not reduced in TG cells, indicating that homeostatic compensatory mechanisms occur during progressive tauopathy. Consistent with this idea, surviving TG cells were more intrinsically excitable than NT cells, and exhibited sprouting of filopodia and axonal boutons. Moreover, the neuropil in TG mice showed an increased density of asymmetric synapses, although their mean size was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that during progressive tauopathy, cortical pyramidal cells compensate for loss of afferent input by increased excitability and establishment of new synapses. These compensatory homeostatic mechanisms may play an important role in slowing the progression of neuronal network dysfunction during neurodegenerative tauopathies.

  19. Fast modulation and dithering on a pyramid wavefront sensor bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten, Maaike; Bradley, Colin; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Herriot, Glen; Lardiere, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    A pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) bench has been setup at NRC-Herzberg (Victoria, Canada) to investigate, first, the feasibility of a double roof prism PWFS, and second, test the proposed pyramid wavefront sensing methodology to be used in NFIRAOS for the Thirty Meter Telescope. Traditional PWFS require shallow angles and strict apex tolerances, making them difficult to manufacture. Roof prisms, on the other hand, are common optical components and can easily be made to the desired specifications. Understanding the differences between a double roof prism PWFS and traditional PWFS will allow for the double roof prism PWFS to become more widely used as an alternative to the standard pyramid, especially in a laboratory setting. In this work, the response of the double roof prism PWFS as the amount of modulation is changed, is compared to an ideal PWFS modelled using the adaptive optics toolbox, OOMAO in MATLAB. The object oriented toolbox uses physical optics to model complete AO systems. Fast modulation and dithering using a PI mirror has been implemented using a micro-controller to drive the mirror and trigger the camera. The various trade offs of this scheme, in a controlled laboratory environment, are studied and reported.

  20. Hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by activating Ca(2+) -permeable TRPC6 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuner, Kristina; Li, Wei; Amaral, Michelle D; Rudolph, Stephanie; Calfa, Gaston; Schuwald, Anita M; Harteneck, Christian; Inoue, Takafumi; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The standardized extract of the St. John's wort plant (Hypericum perforatum) is commonly used to treat mild to moderate depression. Its active constituent is hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative that reduces the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by increasing intracellular Na(+) concentration through the activation of nonselective cationic TRPC6 channels. TRPC6 channels are also Ca(2+) -permeable, resulting in intracellular Ca(2+) elevations. Indeed, hyperforin activates TRPC6-mediated currents and Ca(2+) transients in rat PC12 cells, which induce their differentiation, mimicking the neurotrophic effect of nerve growth factor. Here, we show that hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of hippocampal slice cultures through the activation of TRPC6 channels. Hyperforin also evoked intracellular Ca(2+) transients and depolarizing inward currents sensitive to the TRPC channel blocker La(3+) , thus resembling the actions of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that the antidepressant actions of St. John's wort are mediated by a mechanism similar to that engaged by BDNF.

  1. Aberrant pyramidal tract in a patient with corona radiata infarct A diffusion tensor tractography study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Heon Hong; Sung Ho Jang

    2011-01-01

    The aberrant pyramidal tract refers to the collateral pathway of the pyramidal tract through the medial lemniscus in the brainstem. A 63-year-old male patient presented with severe paralysis of the left extremities due to a right corona radiata infarct. He was able to extend the affected fingers against resistance at 2 months after stroke onset. At 6 months after stroke onset, he was able to perform some fine motor activities, as well as to walk with a nearly normal gait. Functional MRI, which was performed at 6 months after onset, showed that the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was activated during affected (left) hand movements. Diffusion tensor tractography results showed that at 2 weeks after stroke onset, pyramidal tracts of the affected hemisphere originated from the primary motor cortex and descended along the known pathway of the pyramidal tract with an aberrant pyramidal tract, which was bypassed through the medial lemniscus from the midbrain to the lower pons. However, the pyramidal tract from midbrain to pons in the affected hemisphere could not be depicted by diffusion tensor tractography at 6 months after stroke onset; instead, only the aberrant pyramidal tract existed for the course of the disappeared pyramidal tract. Results from this study indicate that the main motor functions of the affected extremities appeared to be controlled via the aberrant pyramidal tract with degeneration of the pyramidal tract in the brainstem of the affected hemisphere.

  2. Clinical characteristics of papillary thyroid carcinoma arising from the pyramidal lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sang Gab; Yi, Jin Wook; Seong, Chan-Yong; Kim, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Su-Jin; Chai, Young Jun; Choi, June Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) arising from the pyramidal lobe is rare; therefore, clinicopathologic evaluation is lacking. In addition, the rate of occult malignancy in the pyramidal lobe after thyroid surgery is unclear. This study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics of PTCs that involve the pyramidal lobe. Methods The study enrolled 1,107 patients who underwent thyroid surgery for PTC at Seoul National University Hospital from 2006 to 2015. Pyramidal lobe status in pathologic reports was clear in all cases. “Pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC” was defined as single pyramidal lobe cancer or multifocal cancer with larger pyramidal lobe tumor. “Incidental pyramidal lobe PTC” was defined as occult cancer identified after thyroidectomy or as multifocal cancer with smaller pyramidal lobe tumor. Results Ten patients were included in the pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC group. The mean age was 58 ± 12.5 years, and the mean tumor size was 0.7 ± 0.7 cm. Cervical lymph node metastasis was found in 5 patients (50%). Three patients had microscopic lymphatic invasion, and 7 had advanced American Joint Comitee on Cancer (AJCC) stage disease (5 with stage III and 2 with stage IV). Compared with conventional PTC (n = 1,058), pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC was significantly associated with lymphatic invasion (P = 0.031) and advanced AJCC stage (P = 0.022). The prevalence of incidental pyramidal lobe PTC was 3.56%. Conclusion Pyramidal lobe PTC is relatively small in size; however, the rate of extrathyroidal extension and lymph node metastasis is high. Preoperative evaluation of nodal status is important, and the extent of surgery should be determined in accordance with the preoperative diagnosis. PMID:28289665

  3. Extrasynaptic glutamate receptor activation as cellular bases for dynamic range compression in pyramidal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina D Oikonomou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly nonlinear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of loud sounds (i.e. strong glut. inputs and amplify quiet sounds (i.e. glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation. Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP states have uniform amplitudes in a

  4. Co-precipitation of dissolved organic matter by calcium carbonate in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Reddy, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous research has demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences calcium carbonate mineral formation in surface and ground water. To better understand DOM mediation of carbonate precipitation and DOM co-precipitation and/or incorporation with carbonate minerals, we characterized the content and speciation of DOM in carbonate minerals and in the lake water of Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA. A 400-gram block of precipitated calcium carbonate from the Pyramid Lake shore was dissolved in 8 liters of 10% acetic acid. Particulate matter not dissolved by acetic acid was removed by centrifugation. DOM from the carbonate rock was fractionated into nine portions using evaporation, dialysis, resin adsorption, and selective precipitations to remove acetic acid and inorganic constituents. The calcium carbonate rock contained 0.23% DOM by weight. This DOM was enriched in polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids in comparison with the present lake water. DOM in lake water was composed of aliphatic, alicyclic polycarboxylic acids. These compound classes were found in previous studies to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation. DOM fractions from the carbonate rock were 14C-age dated at about 3,100 to 3,500 years before present. The mechanism of DOM co-precipitation and/or physical incorporation in the calcium carbonate is believed to be due to formation of insoluble calcium complexes with polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids that have moderately large stability constants at the alkaline pH of the lake. DOM co-precipitation with calcium carbonate and incorporation in precipitated carbonate minerals removes proteinaceous DOM, but nearly equivalent concentrations of neutral and acidic forms of organic nitrogen in DOM remain in solution. Calcium carbonate precipitation during lime softening pretreatment of drinking water may have practical applications for removal of proteinaceous disinfection by-product precursors.

  5. Complete axon arborization of a single CA3 pyramidal cell in the rat hippocampus, and its relationship with postsynaptic parvalbumin-containing interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sik, A; Tamamaki, N; Freund, T F

    1993-12-01

    The complete axon arborization of a single CA3 pyramidal cell has been reconstructed from 32 (60 microns thick) sections from the rat hippocampus following in vivo intracellular injection of neurobiotin. The same sections were double-immunostained for parvalbumin--a calcium-binding protein selectively present in two types of GABAergic interneurons, the basket and chandelier cells--in order to map boutons of the pyramidal cell in contact with dendrites and somata of these specific subsets of interneurons visualized in a Golgi-like manner. The axon of the pyramidal cell formed 15,295 boutons, 63.8% of which were in stratum oriens, 15.4% in stratum pyramidale and 20.8% in stratum radiatum. Only 2.1% of the axon terminals contacted parvalbumin-positive neurons. Most of these were single contacts (84.7%), but double or triple contacts (15.3%) were also found. The majority of the boutons terminated on dendrites (84.1%) of parvalbumin-positive cells, less frequently on cell bodies (15.9%). In order to estimate the proportion of contacts representing synapses, 16 light microscopically identified contacts between boutons of the filled pyramidal cell axon and the parvalbumin-positive targets were examined by correlated electron microscopy. Thirteen of them were found to be asymmetrical synapses, and in the remaining three cases synapses between the labelled profiles could not be confirmed. We conclude that the physiologically effective excitatory connections between single pyramidal cells and postsynaptic inhibitory neurons are mediated by a small number of contacts, mostly by a single synapse. This results in a high degree of convergence and divergence in hippocampal networks.

  6. Activation of pyramidal neurons in mouse medial prefrontal cortex enhances food seeking behavior while reducing impulsivity in the absence of an effect on food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel McAllister Warthen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC is involved in a wide range of executive cognitive functions, including reward evaluation, decision-making, memory extinction, mood, and task switching. Manipulation of the mPFC has been shown to alter food intake and food reward valuation, but whether exclusive stimulation of mPFC pyramidal neurons, which form the principle output of the mPFC, is sufficient to mediate food rewarded instrumental behavior is unknown. We sought to determine the behavioral consequences of manipulating mPFC output by exciting pyramidal neurons in mouse mPFC during performance of a panel of behavioral assays, focusing on food reward. We found that increasing mPFC pyramidal cell output using Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADD enhanced performance in instrumental food reward assays that assess food seeking behavior, while sparing effects in affect and food intake. Specifically, activation of mPFC pyramidal neurons enhanced operant responding for food reward, reinstatement of palatable food seeking, and suppression of impulsive responding for food reward. Conversely, activation of mPFC pyramidal neurons had no effect on unconditioned food intake, social interaction, or behavior in an open field. Furthermore, we found that behavioral outcome is influenced by the degree of mPFC activation, with a low drive sufficient to enhance operant responding and a higher drive required to alter impulsivity. Additionally, we provide data demonstrating that DREADD stimulation involves a nitric oxide synthase dependent pathway, similar to endogenous muscarinic M3 receptor stimulation, a finding that provides novel mechanistic insight into an increasingly widespread method of remote neuronal control.

  7. Synaptic conductances during interictal discharges in pyramidal neurons of rat entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Amakhin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In epilepsy, the balance of excitation and inhibition underlying the basis of neural network activity shifts, resulting in neuronal network hyperexcitability and recurrent seizure-associated discharges. Mechanisms involved in ictal and interictal events are not fully understood, in particular, because of controversial data regarding the dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances. In the present study, we estimated AMPAR-, NMDAR-, and GABAAR-mediated conductances during two distinct types of interictal discharge (IID in pyramidal neurons of rat entorhinal cortex in cortico-hippocampal slices. Repetitively emerging seizure-like events and IIDs were recorded in high extracellular potassium, 4-aminopyridine, and reduced magnesium-containing solution. An original procedure for estimating synaptic conductance during IIDs was based on the differences among the current-voltage characteristics of the synaptic components. The synaptic conductance dynamics obtained revealed that the first type of IID is determined by activity of GABAAR channels with depolarized reversal potential. The second type of IID is determined by the interplay between excitation and inhibition, with prominent early AMPAR and prolonged depolarized GABAAR and NMDAR-mediated components. The study then validated the contribution of these components to IIDs by intracellular pharmacological isolation. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms of seizures generation, development, and cessation.

  8. Glia-derived ATP inversely regulates excitability of pyramidal and CCK-positive neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhibing; Liu, Yu; Xi, Wang; Lou, Hui-fang; Zhu, Liya; Guo, Zhifei; Mei, Lin; Duan, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Astrocyte responds to neuronal activity with calcium waves and modulates synaptic transmission through the release of gliotransmitters. However, little is known about the direct effect of gliotransmitters on the excitability of neuronal networks beyond synapses. Here we show that selective stimulation of astrocytes expressing channelrhodopsin-2 in the CA1 area specifically increases the firing frequency of CCK-positive but not parvalbumin-positive interneurons and decreases the firing rate of pyramidal neurons, phenomena mimicked by exogenously applied ATP. Further evidences indicate that ATP-induced increase and decrease of excitability are caused, respectively, by P2Y1 receptor-mediated inhibition of a two-pore domain potassium channel and A1 receptor-mediated opening of a G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel. Moreover, the activation of ChR2-expressing astrocytes reduces the power of kainate-induced hippocampal ex vivo gamma oscillation. Thus, through distinct receptor subtypes coupled with different K+ channels, astrocyte-derived ATP differentially modulates the excitability of different types of neurons and efficiently controls the activity of neuronal network. PMID:28128211

  9. Technique Based on Image Pyramid and Bayes Rule for Noise Reduction in Unsupervised Change Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-qiang; HUO hong; FANG Tao; ZHU Ju-lian; GE Wei-li

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a technique based on image pyramid and Bayes rule for reducing noise effects in unsupervised change detection is proposed. By using Gaussian pyramid to process two multitemporal images respectively, two image pyramids are constructed. The difference pyramid images are obtained by point-by-point subtraction between the same level images of the two image pyramids. By resizing all difference pyramid images to the size of the original multitemporal image and then making product operator among them, a map being similar to the difference image is obtained. The difference image is generated by point-by-point subtraction between the two multitemporal images directly. At last, the Bayes rule is used to distinguish the changed pixels. Both synthetic and real data sets are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. Experimental results show that the map from the proposed technique is more robust to noise than the difference image.

  10. Enumeration of pyramids of one-dimensional pieces of arbitrary fixed integer length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, Bergfinnur; Eilers, Søren

    We consider pyramids made of one-dimensional pieces of fixed integer length a and which may have pairwise overlaps of integer length from 1 to a. We prove that the number of pyramids of size m, i.e. consisting of m pieces, equals (am-1,m-1) for each a >= 2. This generalises a well known result...... for a = 2. A bijective correspondence between so-called right (or left) pyramids and a-ary trees is pointed out, and it is shown that asymptotically the average width of pyramids is proportional to the square root of the size....

  11. Rezension zu: Emily Teeter (Hg.), Before the pyramids. The origins of Egyptian civilization

    OpenAIRE

    Köpp-Junk, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Rezension zu: Emily Teeter (Hg.), Before the Pyramids. The Origins of Egyptian Civilization. The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, Oriental Institute Museum Publications 33 (Chicago 2011)

  12. Astronomical Orientation of Pyramid Tombs in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusell Tiede, Vance

    2010-01-01

    Two ancient Chinese texts, the Chou Bei Suan Ching and Chou Li (Western Han Dynasty, ca. 100 BC), record that the Imperial Astronomer (Feng Hsian Shin) made solar observations to determine the solstices and equinoxes, and for determining the cardinal directions with a circle and gnomon. By combining the techniques of astro-archaeology (G. S. Hawkins, 1968) with both overhead imagery and ground survey, the present study seeks to link historical Chinese descriptions of astronomical phenomena with contemporary architectural orientation. In the process, several unexpected astronomical orientation patterns emerged which apparently do not appear in the surviving historical record. For example, at the imperial Western Han capital of Ch'ang-an (N 34° latitude), the diagonals of cardinally oriented square pyramid mounds (ling) align to zenith (+34° declination) and nadir (-34° declination) star rise and set points on the skyline. This is in accord with the Chou (Zhou) Dynasty's name of Chung-Kuo, meaning Central Country or Middle Kingdom. That is, the imperial capital is centered both politico-geographically with respect to its vassal states of the Eastern Yi, Southern Man, Western Rong, and Northern Di, as well as astro-geomantically regarding the color-coded Five Sacred Directions East-South-West-North-Zenith/Nadir in the Cosmos. Our ground survey also confirmed pyramid orientation to the lunar standstills (+28°, +18° and +5° declination) that we reported from overhead imagery in 1980 (155th AAS Meeting, HAD 18.CE.12, Lunar and Solar Alignments of Ancient Chinese Pyramids). Grateful acknowledgment is given to the Chinese Academy of Sciences for the invitation to conduct an astro-archaeological survey of the Wei-ho valley, Shensi (Shaanxi) Province.

  13. A threshold sodium current in pyramidal cells in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, C R; Gage, P W

    1985-05-23

    Maintained, inward currents were activated by small depolarizations from the resting membrane potential (-50 to -60 mV) in voltage-clamped, pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices. The currents were apparently Na currents as they were blocked by tetrodotoxin or removal of extracellular Na and were not affected by Cd. They showed little decrease in amplitude during prolonged depolarizations. The increase in Na conductance with depolarization was sigmoidal, with half-maximum conductance at about -50 mV, and saturated at -20 to -30 mV. This 'threshold' Na current may be involved in setting patterns of repetitive firing of action potentials.

  14. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma in a thyroid pyramidal lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Tae Kwan; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Ha Kyoung; Jung, Soo Jin [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We report an extremely rare case of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) in the thyroid pyramidal lobe (TPL). A 48-year-old woman underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for a small thyroid nodule in the right lobe in local clinic, and it revealed a malignant cytology. On preoperative ultrasonography for tumor staging in our hospital, another small suspiciously malignant hypoechoic nodule was detected in the left TPL. Total thyroidectomy and central nodal dissection were performed. Histopathology confirmed PTMCs in the left TPL and both thyroid lobes. Ultrasonography for TPL should be required for complete evaluation of possible multifocality of thyroid malignancy.

  15. Catalyzing new product adoption at the base of the pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Marinakis, Y.D.; Walsh, S. T.; Harms, R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the more perplexing of the entrepreneurial issues at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) is how to catalyze new product adoption by BoP consumers. Because S-shaped adoption dynamics are the result of cultural transmission bias, the question can be rephrased as, how can an entrepreneur overcome conformity bias. We modified the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to include conformity bias. We then qualitatively applied the model to three examples from the literature, namely fuel stoves in Darfu...

  16. The Maslowian Portfolio Theory Versus the Pyramid Portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majewski Sebastian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to De Brouwer’s modification of portfolio selection from 2009. He modified the existing portfolio’s theories so that they could take into account the Maslov’s hierarchy of needs. This proposal could be also an alternative concept to the behavioural portfolio theory. Another theoretical concept which includes not only the hierarchy of needs but the pyramid portfolio is presented in this paper as well. The base point in this case is Markowitz’s model and the safety-first criterion by Roy. Such a construction should be a starting point for building an application in this field.

  17. Value Chain and Innovation at the Base of the Pyramid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esko, Siim; Zeromskis, Mindaugas; Hsuan, Juliana

    2013-01-01

    and financial measurements. Working in the value chain requires diverse thinking in terms of interactivity, partners, setup, and governance. Involving customers and consumers in the innovation process is crucial. The venture also needs to make its offerings accessible, affordable, acceptable, available......Purpose – This paper aims to investigate the factors a multinational corporation should adapt when doing business at the bottom of the pyramid (BoP) markets. Design/methodology/approach – Based on a systematic literature review on BoP, value chain and innovation, an integrative framework...

  18. FPGA implementation of a pyramidal Weightless Neural Networks learning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Raida

    2003-08-01

    A hardware architecture of a Probabilistic Logic Neuron (PLN) is presented. The suggested model facilitates the on-chip learning of pyramidal Weightless Neural Networks using a modified probabilistic search reward/penalty training algorithm. The penalization strategy of the training algorithm depends on a predefined parameter called the probabilistic search interval. A complete Weightless Neural Network (WNN) learning system is modeled and implemented on Xilinx XC4005E Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), allowing its architecture to be configurable. Various experiments have been conducted to examine the feasibility and performance of the WNN learning system. Results show that the system has a fast convergence rate and good generalization ability.

  19. Specificity and actions of an arylaspartate inhibitor of glutamate transport at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinan Sun

    Full Text Available In this study we characterized the pharmacological selectivity and physiological actions of a new arylaspartate glutamate transporter blocker, L-threo-ß-benzylaspartate (L-TBA. At concentrations up to 100 µM, L-TBA did not act as an AMPA receptor (AMPAR or NMDA receptor (NMDAR agonist or antagonist when applied to outside-out patches from mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. L-TBA had no effect on the amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs recorded at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapse. Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in CA1 pyramidal neurons were unaffected by L-TBA in the presence of physiological extracellular Mg(2+ concentrations, but in Mg(2+-free solution, EPSCs were significantly prolonged as a consequence of increased NMDAR activity. Although L-TBA exhibited approximately four-fold selectivity for neuronal EAAT3 over glial EAAT1/EAAT2 transporter subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the L-TBA concentration-dependence of the EPSC charge transfer increase in the absence of Mg(2+ was the same in hippocampal slices from EAAT3 +/+ and EAAT3 -/- mice, suggesting that TBA effects were primarily due to block of glial transporters. Consistent with this, L-TBA blocked synaptically evoked transporter currents in CA1 astrocytes with a potency in accord with its block of heterologously expressed glial transporters. Extracellular recording in the presence of physiological Mg(2+ revealed that L-TBA prolonged fEPSPs in a frequency-dependent manner by selectively increasing the NMDAR-mediated component of the fEPSP during short bursts of activity. The data indicate that glial glutamate transporters play a dominant role in limiting extrasynaptic transmitter diffusion and binding to NMDARs. Furthermore, NMDAR signaling is primarily limited by voltage-dependent Mg(2+ block during low-frequency activity, while the relative contribution of transport increases during short bursts of higher frequency

  20. Loss of sensory input increases the intrinsic excitability of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Jean-Didier; Stuart, Greg J

    2009-11-01

    Development of the cortical map is experience dependent, with different critical periods in different cortical layers. Previous work in rodent barrel cortex indicates that sensory deprivation leads to changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in layer 2/3 and 4. Here, we studied the impact of sensory deprivation on the intrinsic properties of layer 5 pyramidal neurons located in rat barrel cortex using simultaneous somatic and dendritic recording. Sensory deprivation was achieved by clipping all the whiskers on one side of the snout. Loss of sensory input did not change somatic active and resting membrane properties, and did not influence dendritic action potential (AP) backpropagation. In contrast, sensory deprivation led to an increase in the percentage of layer 5 pyramidal neurons showing burst firing. This was associated with a reduction in the threshold for generation of dendritic calcium spikes during high-frequency AP trains. Cell-attached recordings were used to assess changes in the properties and expression of dendritic HCN channels. These experiments indicated that sensory deprivation caused a decrease in HCN channel density in distal regions of the apical dendrite. To assess the contribution of HCN down-regulation on the observed increase in dendritic excitability following sensory deprivation, we investigated the impact of blocking HCN channels. Block of HCN channels removed differences in dendritic calcium electrogenesis between control and deprived neurons. In conclusion, these observations indicate that sensory loss leads to increased dendritic excitability of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, they suggest that increased dendritic calcium electrogenesis following sensory deprivation is mediated in part via down-regulation of dendritic HCN channels.

  1. The orientations of the Giza pyramids and associated structures

    CERN Document Server

    Nell, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Ever since Flinders Petrie undertook a theodolite survey on the Giza plateau in 1881 and drew attention to the extraordinary degree of precision with which the three colossal pyramids are oriented upon the four cardinal directions, there have been a great many suggestions as to how this was achieved and why it was of importance. Surprisingly, given the many astronomical hypotheses and speculations that have been offered in the intervening 130 years, there have been remarkably few attempts to reaffirm or improve on the basic survey data concerning the primary orientations. This paper presents the results of a week-long Total Station survey undertaken by the authors during December 2006 whose principal aim was to clarify the basic data concerning the orientation of each side of the three large pyramids and to determine, as accurately as possible, the orientations of as many as possible of the associated structures. The principal difference between this and all previous surveys is that it focuses upon measuremen...

  2. Flexible solar cells based on curved surface nano-pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Anil; Mizuno, Genki; Oduor, Patrick; Dutta, Achyut K.; Dhar, Nibir K.; Lewis, Jay

    2016-05-01

    The advent of ultrathin crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells has significantly reduced the cost of silicon solar cells by consuming less material. However, the very small thickness of ultrathin solar cells poses a challenge to the absorption of sufficient light to provide efficiency that is competitive to commercial solar cells. Light trapping mechanisms utilizing nanostructure technologies have been utilized to alleviate this problem. Unfortunately, a significant portion of light is still being lost even before entering the solar cells because of reflection. Different kinds of nanostructures have been employed to reduce reflection from solar cells, but reflection losses still prevail. In an effort to reduce reflection loss, we have used an array of modified nanostructures based cones or pyramids with curved sides, which matches the refractive index of air to that of silicon. Moreover, use of these modified nano-pyramids provides a quintic (fifth power) gradient index layer between air and silicon, which significantly reduces reflection. The solar cells made of such nanostructures not only significantly increase conversion efficiency at reduced usage of crystalline silicon material (e.g. thinner), but it also helps to make the c-Si based solar cell flexible. Design and optimization of flexible c-Si solar cell is presented in the paper.

  3. Renal Pelviceal Keratinizing Squamous Metaplasia with Sparing of Pyramidal Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Siderits

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metaplastic changes in the urothelium of the upper urinary tract are relatively infrequent. Metaplasia may present as either squamous or less often glandular differentiation. The process may be associated with chronic inflammation or associated chronic infections. There may be malignant transformation to either squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. The demarcation of the metaplastic process in the minor calyces has not been well documented to date. We report the case of a 74-year-old female patient who presented with a history of chronic renal disease and acute pyohydronephrosis. The patient underwent a nephroureterectomy which revealed keratinizing desquamative squamous metaplasia throughout the renal pelvis and upper urinary tract with abrupt termination of metaplasia at the junction of the renal pelvis and the minor calyx (pyramidal zone. Immunohistochemical evaluation documents metaplastic urothelium stained positive for CK5, before converting sharply to simple cuboidal epithelium in the minor calyx (pyramidal zones which stained positive CK7. At the junction of the metaplastic components and low cuboidal lined minor calyceal surfaces, the underlying stroma showed loss of ureteral muscularis mucosa with transition to renal parenchymal type stroma. We believe that this observation is unique and potentially relevant to the etiology and pathophysiology of pelviceal metaplasia.

  4. Sensory deprivation differentially impacts the dendritic development of pyramidal versus non-pyramidal neurons in layer 6 of mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Tam, Danny; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2012-04-01

    Early postnatal sensory experience can have profound impacts on the structure and function of cortical circuits affecting behavior. Using the mouse whisker-to-barrel system we chronically deprived animals of normal sensory experience by bilaterally trimming their whiskers every other day from birth for the first postnatal month. Brain tissue was then processed for Golgi staining and neurons in layer 6 of barrel cortex were reconstructed in three dimensions. Dendritic and somatic parameters were compared between sensory-deprived and normal sensory experience groups. Results demonstrated that layer 6 non-pyramidal neurons in the chronically deprived group showed an expansion of their dendritic arbors. The pyramidal cells responded to sensory deprivation with increased somatic size and basilar dendritic arborization but overall decreased apical dendritic parameters. In sum, sensory deprivation impacted on the neuronal architecture of pyramidal and non-pyramidal neurons in layer 6, which may provide a substrate for observed physiological and behavioral changes resulting from whisker trimming.

  5. Pyramid of Interventions: Results of a School Counselor's Action Research Study at One Suburban Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the implementation of the Pyramid of Interventions (POI) at a suburban Georgia Middle School through an examination of teacher understanding, assessment of overall effectiveness, and the need for further professional development. The Pyramid of Interventions is the response to intervention (RTI) component of the Individuals…

  6. Left common basal pyramid torsion following left upper lobectomy/segmentectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Li; Cheng, Yen-Po; Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2015-05-01

    Lobar or segmental lung torsion is a severe complication of lung resection. To the best of our knowledge, common basal pyramid torsion has never been reported. We describe a case of left basal pyramid torsion after left upper lobectomy and superior segmentectomy, which was successfully treated by thoracoscopic surgery.

  7. Effect of varying durations of pyramid exposure - an indication towards a possibility of overexposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2009-10-01

    Miniature replicas modeled after the Great Pyramid of Giza are believed to concentrate geoelectromagnetic energy within their cavities and hence act as antistressors in humans and animals. Although there are not many reports of adverse effects of 'overexposure' in the pyramid, subjects have claimed to feel uneasy after certain duration of staying in the pyramid. The present study was aimed to analyze the effects of prolonged pyramid exposure on plasma cortisol level, markers of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense in erythrocytes of adult female Wistar rats. Rats were divided into three groups, normal controls (NC, n=6) that were maintained under standard laboratory conditions in their home cages, pyramid exposed group-2 (PE-2, n=6) & pyramid exposed group-4 (PE-4, n=6) where the rats were housed under the pyramid for 6 hours/day for 2 weeks and 4 weeks respectively. Plasma cortisol and erythrocyte TBARS levels were significantly lower in both PE-2 and PE-4 rats and erythrocyte GSH levels and GSH-Px activity were significantly higher in them as compared to the NC rats. There was no significant difference in the results for these parameters between the PE-2 and PE-4 rats except for erythrocyte GSH-Px activity which was significantly more in the PE-2 rats than in the PE-4 rats. Although these results don't confirm any adverse effects of prolonged exposure in pyramids, they indicate a possibility of such adverse effects.

  8. Integrating Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation with the Pyramid Model. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Deborah F.; Kaufmann, Roxane K.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of states and communities are implementing the Pyramid Model in early care and education settings, and in many of these places there are also early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) programs operating. This policy brief provides an overview of ECMHC, how it can support the implementation of the Pyramid Model and the…

  9. The Conflict Pyramid: A Holistic Approach to Structuring Conflict Resolution in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakvoort, Ilse

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how the conflict pyramid, originally defined and used by Richard Cohen, can be used as a model to describe the relations between different conflict resolution education programs and activities included in the programs. The central questions posed in the paper are: How can Richard Cohen's conflict pyramid be used as a model for…

  10. Pyramidal anchor stone from Baga waters of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    . Pyramidal anchor stones have an apex hole which goes up to the round hole, however Goa anchor stone has no such perforation, but, instead has a rectangular cutting on the apex. The anchor stone is compared with Greek pyramidal anchor stones, and probably...

  11. Provisions for the pyramid builders: new evidence from the ancient site of Giza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Murray

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The great pyramids of Giza are famous emblems of ancient Egyptian civilization, but until recently little was known about where and how the pyramid builders lived. The site of their large settlement has now been found, and excavation is revealing its complex layout and providing evidence of the plants and animals on which the builders depended for their food supply.

  12. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  13. Renal pyramid echogenicity in ureteropelvic junction obstruction: correlation between altered echogenicity and differential renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavhan, Govind; Daneman, Alan; Lim, Ruth; Traubici, Jeffrey [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Langlois, Valerie [University of Toronto, Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Improvement in resolution and use of high-frequency transducers in US has enabled visualization of previously unreported changes in medullary pyramid echogenicity in children with obstructive hydronephrosis. To determine whether these unreported changes in echogenicity and morphology of the renal pyramids in ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction correlate with differential renal function (DRF) of the kidney as determined by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ({sup 99m}Tc-MAG3) scan. Renal sonograms in 60 children with UPJ obstruction were retrospectively reviewed. Children were divided into three groups based on the echogenicity of the pyramids: (1) normal echogenicity of the pyramids, (2) increased echogenicity of the pyramids with maintained corticomedullary differentiation (CMD), and (3) loss of CMD. DRF, as determined by {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 scan, of the obstructed kidney of {>=}45% was considered normal and of {<=}44% was considered abnormal based on a published study correlating histological changes with DRF. Fisher's exact test was performed for assessing the association between DRF and altered echogenicity of the pyramids. In group 1, which consisted of 13 patients with normal pyramids on US, DRF was normal in 11 and abnormal in two. In group 2, which consisted of 33 patients with echogenic pyramids and preserved CMD, DRF was normal in 15 and abnormal in 18. In group 3, which consisted of 14 patients with complete loss of CMD, DRF was normal in 2 and abnormal in 12. There was a strong correlation between abnormal pyramids and DRF (P=0.0009). The risk ratio (RR) of DRF becoming abnormal for those kidneys with abnormal echogenicity of the pyramids with preserved CMD (group 2) compared to normal pyramid echogenicity (group 1) was 1.56 (95% CI 1.088-2.236). The RR of DRF becoming abnormal for those kidneys with loss of CMD (group 3) compared to normal pyramid echogenicity (group 1) was 5.571 (95% CI 1.530-20.294). We observed that in obstructed kidneys

  14. The roles of exploration and exploitation in the export market integration of Beninese producers at the base of the pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adékambi, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Base of the pyramid, Bottom of the pyramid, Supply chains, Export market integration, Market learning, Developing and Emerging countries, Exploitation and Exploration, Institutional arrangements, Transaction cost economics, Livelihood performance, BoP producers Abs

  15. Variation around a Pyramid theme: optical recombination and optimal use of photons

    CERN Document Server

    Fauvarque, O; Fusco, T; Sauvage, J F

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new type of Wave Front Sensor (WFS) derived from the Pyramid WFS (PWFS). This new WFS, called the Flattened Pyramid-WFS (FPWFS), has a reduced Pyramid angle in order to optically overlap the four pupil images into an unique intensity. This map is then used to derive the phase information. In this letter this new WFS is compared to three existing WFSs, namely the PWFS, the Modulated PWFS (MPWFS) and the Zernike WFS (ZWFS) following tests about sensitivity, linearity range and low photon flux behavior. The FPWFS turns out to be more linear than a modulated pyramid for the high-spatial order aberrations but it provides an improved sensitivity compared to the non-modulated pyramid. The noise propagation may even be as low as the ZWFS for some given radial orders. Furthermore, the pixel arrangement being more efficient than for the PWFS, the FPWFS seems particularly well suited for high-contrast applications.

  16. Variation around a pyramid theme: optical recombination and optimal use of photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvarque, Olivier; Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry; Sauvage, Jean-Francois

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new type of wave-front sensor (WFS) derived from the pyramid WFS (PWFS). This new WFS, called the flattened pyramid-WFS (FPWFS), has a reduced pyramid angle in order to optically overlap the four pupil images into an unique intensity. This map is then used to derive the phase information. In this Letter, this new WFS is compared to three existing WFSs, namely the PWFS, the modulated PWFS (MPWFS), and the Zernike WFS (ZWFS) following tests about sensitivity, linearity range, and low-photon-flux behavior. The FPWFS turns out to be more linear than a modulated pyramid for the high-spatial order aberrations, but it provides an improved sensitivity compared to the non-modulated pyramid. The noise propagation may even be as low as the ZWFS for some given radial orders. Furthermore, the pixel arrangement being more efficient than for the PWFS, the FPWFS seems particularly well suited for high-contrast applications.

  17. The architectonic encoding of the minor lunar standstills in the horizon of the Giza pyramids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossam, M. K. Aboulfotouh

    The paper is an attempt to show the architectonic method of the ancient Egyptian designers for encoding the horizontal-projections of the moon's declinations during two events of the minor lunar standstills, in the design of the site-plan of the horizon of the Giza pyramids, using the methods of descriptive geometry. It shows that the distance of the eastern side of the second Giza pyramid from the north-south axis of the great pyramid encodes a projection of a lunar declination, when earth's obliquity-angle was ~24.10°. Besides, it shows that the angle of inclination of the causeway of the second Giza pyramid, of ~13.54° south of the cardinal east, encodes the projection of another lunar declination when earth's obliquity-angle reaches ~22.986°. In addition, it shows the encoded coordinate system in the site-plan of the horizon of the Giza pyramids.

  18. Extracellular calcium modulates persistent sodium current-dependent burst-firing in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H; Alroy, G; Kirson, E D; Yaari, Y

    2001-06-15

    The generation of high-frequency spike bursts ("complex spikes"), either spontaneously or in response to depolarizing stimuli applied to the soma, is a notable feature in intracellular recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells (PCs) in vivo. There is compelling evidence that the bursts are intrinsically generated by summation of large spike afterdepolarizations (ADPs). Using intracellular recordings in adult rat hippocampal slices, we show that intrinsic burst-firing in CA1 PCs is strongly dependent on the extracellular concentration of Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](o)). Thus, lowering [Ca(2+)](o) (by equimolar substitution with Mn(2+) or Mg(2+)) induced intrinsic bursting in nonbursters, whereas raising [Ca(2+)](o) suppressed intrinsic bursting in native bursters. The induction of intrinsic bursting by low [Ca(2+)](o) was associated with enlargement of the spike ADP. Low [Ca(2+)](o)-induced intrinsic bursts and their underlying ADPs were suppressed by drugs that reduce the persistent Na(+) current (I(NaP)), indicating that this current mediates the slow burst depolarization. Blocking Ca(2+)-activated K(+) currents with extracellular Ni(2+) or intracellular chelation of Ca(2+) did not induce intrinsic bursting. This and other evidence suggest that lowering [Ca(2+)](o) may induce intrinsic bursting by augmenting I(NaP). Because repetitive neuronal activity in the hippocampus is associated with marked decreases in [Ca(2+)](o), the regulation of intrinsic bursting by extracellular Ca(2+) may provide a mechanism for preferential recruitment of this firing mode during certain forms of hippocampal activation.

  19. Distinct and synergistic feedforward inhibition of pyramidal cells by basket and bistratified interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eFerrante

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Feedforward inhibition (FFI enables pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus (CA1PCs to remain easily excitable while faithfully representing a broad range of excitatory inputs without quickly saturating. Despite the cortical ubiquity of FFI, its specific function is not completely understood. FFI in CA1PCs is mediated by two physiologically and morphologically distinct GABAergic interneurons: fast-spiking, perisomatic-targeting basket cells and regular-spiking, dendritic-targeting bistratified cells. These two FFI pathways might create layer-specific computational sub-domains within the same CA1PC, but teasing apart their specific contributions remains experimentally challenging. We implemented a biophysically realistic model of CA1PCs using 40 digitally reconstructed morphologies and constraining synaptic numbers, locations, amplitude, and kinetics with available experimental data. First, we validated the model by reproducing the known combined basket and bistratified FFI of CA1PCs at the population level. We then analyzed how the two interneuron types independently affected the CA1PC spike probability and timing as a function of inhibitory strength. Separate FFI by basket and bistratified respectively modulated CA1PC threshold and gain. Concomitant FFI by both interneuron types synergistically extended the dynamic range of CA1PCs by buffering their spiking response to excitatory stimulation. These results suggest testable hypotheses on the precise effects of GABAergic diversity on cortical computation.

  20. Calcium-activated potassium conductances contribute to action potential repolarization at the soma but not the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, N P; Johnston, D

    1999-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating that voltage-gated channels are distributed nonuniformly throughout neurons and that this nonuniformity underlies regional differences in excitability within the single neuron. Previous reports have shown that Ca2+, Na+, A-type K+, and hyperpolarization-activated, mixed cation conductances have varying distributions in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, with significantly different densities in the apical dendrites compared with the soma. Another important channel mediates the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ current (IC), which is responsible in part for repolarization of the action potential (AP) and generation of the afterhyperpolarization that follows the AP recorded at the soma. We have investigated whether this current is activated by APs retrogradely propagating in the dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons using whole-cell dendritic patch-clamp recording techniques. We found no IC activation by back-propagating APs in distal dendritic recordings. Dendritic APs activated IC only in the proximal dendrites, and this activation decayed within the first 100-150 micrometer of distance from the soma. The decay of IC in the proximal dendrites occurred despite AP amplitude, plus presumably AP-induced Ca2+ influx, that was comparable with that at the soma. Thus we conclude that IC activation by action potentials is nonuniform in the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, which may represent a further example of regional differences in neuronal excitability that are determined by the nonuniform distribution of voltage-gated channels in dendrites.

  1. Glutamate-bound NMDARs arising from in vivo-like network activity extend spatio-temporal integration in a L5 cortical pyramidal cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Farinella

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, cortical pyramidal cells are bombarded by asynchronous synaptic input arising from ongoing network activity. However, little is known about how such 'background' synaptic input interacts with nonlinear dendritic mechanisms. We have modified an existing model of a layer 5 (L5 pyramidal cell to explore how dendritic integration in the apical dendritic tuft could be altered by the levels of network activity observed in vivo. Here we show that asynchronous background excitatory input increases neuronal gain and extends both temporal and spatial integration of stimulus-evoked synaptic input onto the dendritic tuft. Addition of fast and slow inhibitory synaptic conductances, with properties similar to those from dendritic targeting interneurons, that provided a 'balanced' background configuration, partially counteracted these effects, suggesting that inhibition can tune spatio-temporal integration in the tuft. Excitatory background input lowered the threshold for NMDA receptor-mediated dendritic spikes, extended their duration and increased the probability of additional regenerative events occurring in neighbouring branches. These effects were also observed in a passive model where all the non-synaptic voltage-gated conductances were removed. Our results show that glutamate-bound NMDA receptors arising from ongoing network activity can provide a powerful spatially distributed nonlinear dendritic conductance. This may enable L5 pyramidal cells to change their integrative properties as a function of local network activity, potentially allowing both clustered and spatially distributed synaptic inputs to be integrated over extended timescales.

  2. Dopamine Inhibits High-Frequency Stimulation-Induced Long-Term Potentiation of Intrinsic Excitability in CA1 Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-ling Wei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of neural circuits is modified by changes not only in synaptic strength, but also in intrinsic excitability of neurons. In CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, bidirectional changes in the intrinsic excitability are often presented after induction of synaptic long-term potentiation or depression. This plasticity of intrinsic excitability has been identified as a cellular correlate of learning. Besides, behavioral learning often involves action of reinforcement or rewarding mediated by dopamine (DA. Here, we examined how DA influences the intrinsic plasticity of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons when high-frequency stimulation (HFS was applied to Schaffer collaterals. The results showed that DA inhibits the decrease in rheobase and increase in mean firing rate of pyramidal neurons induced by HFS, and that this inhibition was abolished by the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH23390 but not by the D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride. The results suggest that DA inhibits the potentiation of excitability induced by presynaptic HFS, and that this inhibition depends on the activation of D1-like receptors.

  3. 78 FR 21703 - Extension of Public Review and Comment Period for the Pyramid Way and McCarran Boulevard...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Federal Highway Administration Extension of Public Review and Comment Period for the Pyramid Way and Mc... Department of Transportation (NDOT), is extending the review and comment period of the DEIS for the Pyramid... available for review at the Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Sparks, NV; the...

  4. Mediterranean Diet Pyramid: A Proposal for Italian People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annunziata D'Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top.

  5. Mediterranean Diet Pyramid: A Proposal for Italian People

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI) and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top. PMID:25325250

  6. Mediterranean diet pyramid: a proposal for Italian people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2014-10-16

    Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI) and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top.

  7. Segmented telescopes co-phasing using Pyramid Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Simone; Devaney, Nicholas

    The high resolution performance of present segmented mirror telescopes like 10m Keck and GTC or the future generation of ELT's like 100m OWL, 50m MAXAT, and 30 CELT will depend critically an the accurate co-phasing of the mirror segments. This paper describes the use of a Pyramid wavefron sensor to detect and correct the segments misalignement. The sensing operation is performed using light from a natural reference star. Our simulations take into account various effects like the atmospheric wavefront disturbances that take place during the sensing process, the bandwith of the detected light and wavefront perturbation static aberration of the telescope optics due to decentering, tilting and so on. The achieved results in terms of the segmented mirror residual phase rms are shown and discussed.

  8. Spatial Pyramid Pooling in Deep Convolutional Networks for Visual Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kaiming; Zhang, Xiangyu; Ren, Shaoqing; Sun, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Existing deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) require a fixed-size (e.g., 224 × 224) input image. This requirement is "artificial" and may reduce the recognition accuracy for the images or sub-images of an arbitrary size/scale. In this work, we equip the networks with another pooling strategy, "spatial pyramid pooling", to eliminate the above requirement. The new network structure, called SPP-net, can generate a fixed-length representation regardless of image size/scale. Pyramid pooling is also robust to object deformations. With these advantages, SPP-net should in general improve all CNN-based image classification methods. On the ImageNet 2012 dataset, we demonstrate that SPP-net boosts the accuracy of a variety of CNN architectures despite their different designs. On the Pascal VOC 2007 and Caltech101 datasets, SPP-net achieves state-of-the-art classification results using a single full-image representation and no fine-tuning. The power of SPP-net is also significant in object detection. Using SPP-net, we compute the feature maps from the entire image only once, and then pool features in arbitrary regions (sub-images) to generate fixed-length representations for training the detectors. This method avoids repeatedly computing the convolutional features. In processing test images, our method is 24-102 × faster than the R-CNN method, while achieving better or comparable accuracy on Pascal VOC 2007. In ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge (ILSVRC) 2014, our methods rank #2 in object detection and #3 in image classification among all 38 teams. This manuscript also introduces the improvement made for this competition.

  9. Development of the stapedius muscle and pyramidal eminence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to systematize the key developmental phases of the stapedius muscle and the pyramidal eminence to clarify their formation, as well as to understand the variations and anomalies that can affect these structures. Sixty human embryos and fetuses between 38 days and 17 weeks of development were studied. The stapedius muscle is formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale, and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch medial to the facial nerve and near the interhyale but forming a completely independent anlage. In the interhyale, two segments were differentiated, these forming an angle; at the vertex, the belly of the stapedius muscle is attached. The internal segment is located from the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle to the anlage of the stapes, forming the anlage of the tendon of the stapedius muscle. The external segment completely disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The pyramidal eminence is formed by an anlage independent of Reichert's cartilage, from the mesenchymal tissue of the tympanic cavity, which condenses around the belly of the stapedius muscle from 12 weeks of post-conception development. The length of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in adults varies, depending on the attachment site of the belly of the stapedius muscle in the interhyale, which would determine the length of the internal segment (anlage of the tendon) and consequently the tendon length. This variation depends on the greater or lesser persistence of the angulation observed during development, between the tendon and the belly of the stapedius muscle.

  10. Adenosine actions on CA1 pyramidal neurones in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, R W; Haas, H L

    1985-09-01

    Intracellular recordings with a bridge amplifier of CA1 pyramidal neurones in vitro were employed to study the mechanisms of action of exogenously applied adenosine in the hippocampal slice preparation of the rat. Adenosine enhanced the calcium-dependent, long-duration after-hyperpolarization (a.h.p.) at least in part by a reduction in the rate of decay of the a.h.p. Both the reduced rate of decay and that of the control can be described with a single exponential. Antagonism of the calcium-dependent potassium current (and as a result, the a.h.p.) by bath application of CdCl2 or intracellular injection of EGTA (ethyleneglycolbis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetraacetic acid) did not reduce the adenosine-evoked hyperpolarization or decrease in input resistance. Similarly, TEA (tetraethylammonium), which antagonizes both the voltage- and calcium-sensitive, delayed, outward rectification, had no effect on the adenosine-evoked changes in resting membrane properties. Adenosine did not affect the early, transient, outward rectification. During exposure to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in concentrations sufficient to antagonize this early rectification, the changes in resting membrane properties evoked by adenosine were unaffected. We conclude that the enhancement of the a.h.p. and accommodation by adenosine may be mediated by a change in the regulation of intracellular calcium. However, the mechanism responsible for the hyperpolarization and decrease in input resistance evoked by adenosine is both calcium and voltage insensitive. Thus, it appears distinct from that mediating the enhancement of the a.h.p. and accommodation.

  11. Selective shunting of the NMDA EPSP component by the slow afterhyperpolarization in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de Sevilla, David; Fuenzalida, Marco; Porto Pazos, Ana B; Buño, Washington

    2007-05-01

    Pyramidal neuron dendrites express voltage-gated conductances that control synaptic integration and plasticity, but the contribution of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-mediated currents to dendritic function is not well understood. Using dendritic and somatic recordings in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in vitro, we analyzed the changes induced by the slow Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-mediated afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) generated by bursts of action potentials on excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked at the apical dendrites by perforant path-Schaffer collateral stimulation. Both the amplitude and decay time constants of EPSPs (tau(EPSP)) were reduced by the sAHP in somatic recordings. In contrast, the dendritic EPSP amplitude remained unchanged, whereas tau(EPSP) was reduced. Temporal summation was reduced and spatial summation linearized by the sAHP. The amplitude of the isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate component of EPSPs (EPSP(NMDA)) was reduced, whereas tau(NMDA) was unaffected by the sAHP. In contrast, the sAHP did not modify the amplitude of the isolated EPSP(AMPA) but reduced tau(AMPA) both in dendritic and somatic recordings. These changes are attributable to a conductance increase that acted mainly via a selective "shunt" of EPSP(NMDA) because they were absent under voltage clamp, not present with imposed hyperpolarization simulating the sAHP, missing when the sAHP was inhibited with isoproterenol, and reduced under block of EPSP(NMDA). EPSPs generated at the basal dendrites were similarly modified by the sAHP, suggesting both a somatic and apical dendritic location of the sAHP channels. Therefore the sAHP may play a decisive role in the dendrites by regulating synaptic efficacy and temporal and spatial summation.

  12. Pyramidal tract abnormalities in the human fetus and infant with trisomy 18 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Hajime; Miyata, Mio; Ohama, Eisaku

    2014-06-01

    Trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome is known to exhibit various developmental abnormalities in the central nervous system. We report dominant uncrossed pyramidal tract in trisomy 18 syndrome, based on the postmortem neuropathologic study of eight consecutive autopsied fetuses and infants with trisomy 18 ranging in age from 16 to 39 weeks of gestation, including six males and two females, along with autopsy cases of a stillborn triploid infant with 69XXX and two stillborn infants without chromosomal or neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Five out of eight cases with trisomy 18 showed a larger proportion of uncrossed than crossed pyramidal tract. All of these cases were male, and the anterior corticospinal tract on one side was constantly larger than the contralateral lateral corticospinal tract in the spinal cord on both sides, while the pyramidal tract was hypoplastic in female cases with trisomy 18 and a case with 69XXX. Abnormal pyramidal decussation has been found in cases with posterior fossa malformations such as occipital encephaloceles, Dandy-Walker malformation, Joubert syndrome and Möbius syndrome, but has not been described in cases with trisomy 18. Our data, together with the previous reports describing uncrossed aberrant ipsilateral pyramidal tract in patients with congenital mirror movements caused by DCC gene mutation in chromosome 18, and hypolasia and hyperplasia of the pyramidal tract in X-linked recessive disorders caused by L1CAM and Kal1 gene mutations, respectively, suggest a role of trisomy 18 in association with X-chromosome in the abnormal development of the pyramidal tract.

  13. Dendritic development of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in a neonatal hypoxia-ischemia injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan Dong; Ou, Shan; Cheng, Sai Yu; Xiao, Zhi; He, Wen Juan; Zhang, Jin Hai; Ruan, Huai Zhen

    2013-09-01

    It is believed that neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) brain injury causes neuron loss and brain functional defects. However, the effect of HI brain injury on dendritic development of the remaining pyramidal cells of the hippocampus and the reaction of contralateral hippocampal neurons require further studies. The Morris water maze and Golgi-Cox staining were used to evaluate the learning and memory and dendritic morphology of pyramidal cells. The results of Golgi-Cox staining showed CA1 pyramidal neurons of HI injury models with fewer bifurcations and shorter dendrite length than the naive control group. The density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was significantly lower in the HI brain injury group than in controls. With respect to hippocampal function, the HI brain injury group presented cognitive deficits in the reference memory task and probe trail. In the HI group, the pyramidal cells of left hippocampus that did not experienced ischemia but did experience hypoxia had more complex dendrites and higher density of spine than the HI injury side and control. The functional implementation of injured hippocampus might depend mainly on the hypertrophy of contralateral hippocampus after HI brain injury. Corticosterone can partially prevent the hippocampal pyramidal cells from HI injury and reduce the difference of the bilateral hippocampus pyramidal cells, but there was no improvement in learning and memory.

  14. The offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid of P-waves in homogeneous orthorhombic media

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Qi

    2016-07-18

    The offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid describes the diffraction traveltime of a point diffractor in homogeneous media. We have developed an analytic approximation for the P-wave offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid for homogeneous orthorhombic media. In this approximation, a perturbation method and the Shanks transform were implemented to derive the analytic expressions for the horizontal slowness components of P-waves in orthorhombic media. Numerical examples were shown to analyze the proposed traveltime pyramid formula and determined its accuracy and the application in calculating migration isochrones and reflection traveltime. The proposed offset-midpoint traveltime formula is useful for Kirchhoff prestack time migration and migration velocity analysis for orthorhombic media.

  15. Introduction of a pyramid guiding process for general musculoskeletal physical rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark Timothy W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Successful instruction of a complicated subject as Physical Rehabilitation demands organization. To understand principles and processes of such a field demands a hierarchy of steps to achieve the intended outcome. This paper is intended to be an introduction to a proposed pyramid scheme of general physical rehabilitation principles. The purpose of the pyramid scheme is to allow for a greater understanding for the student and patient. As the respected Food Guide Pyramid accomplishes, the student will further appreciate and apply supported physical rehabilitation principles and the patient will understand that there is a progressive method to their functional healing process.

  16. THE MORPHOLOGICAL PYRAMID AND ITS APPLICATIONS TO REMOTE SENSING: MULTIRESOLUTION DATA ANALYSIS AND FEATURES EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laporterie Florence

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In remote sensing, sensors are more and more numerous, and their spatial resolution is higher and higher. Thus, the availability of a quick and accurate characterisation of the increasing amount of data is now a quite important issue. This paper deals with an approach combining a pyramidal algorithm and mathematical morphology to study the physiographic characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems. Our pyramidal strategy involves first morphological filters, then extraction at each level of resolution of well-known landscapes features. The approach is applied to a digitised aerial photograph representing an heterogeneous landscape of orchards and forests along the Garonne river (France. This example, simulating very high spatial resolution imagery, highlights the influence of the parameters of the pyramid according to the spatial properties of the studied patterns. It is shown that, the morphological pyramid approach is a promising attempt for multi-level features extraction by modelling geometrical relevant parameters.

  17. The diversity pyramid: an organizational model to structure diversity recruitment and retention in nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Lisa; O'Rourke, Marilyn E

    2011-10-01

    The literature on increasing the diversity of individuals who enter and practice the nursing profession comes with sound argument, yet we have seen only modest gains in diversification over the past 10 years. This article addresses how to develop a sustainable program to increase the recruitment and retention of underrepresented students. The diversity pyramid is suggested as a conceptual planning model for increasing diversity that is matched to an institution and its resources. The foundation of the pyramid is an organizational commitment to attracting and retaining diverse students. The middle level addresses financial support for underrepresented students. From the top of the pyramid, one chooses appropriate media and relational tactics necessary to attract the underrepresented students a program seeks. All three elements of the pyramid-organizational commitment to diversity, significant financial support, and a targeted use of resources-play important and sequential roles in building a sustainable diversity initiative.

  18. Plasmon hybridization in pyramidal metamaterials: a route towards ultra-broadband absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Lobet, Michael; Sarrazin, Michael; Deparis, Olivier; Henrard, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal metamaterials are currently developed for ultra-broadband absorbers. They consist of periodic arrays of alternating metal/dielectric layers forming truncated square-based pyramids. The metallic layers of increasing lengths play the role of vertically and, to a less extent, laterally coupled plasmonic resonators. Based on detailed numerical simulations, we demonstrate that plasmon hybridization between such resonators helps in achieving ultra-broadband absorption. The dipolar modes of individual resonators are shown to be prominent in the electromagnetic coupling mechanism. Lateral coupling between adjacent pyramids and vertical coupling between alternating layers are proven to be key parameters for tuning of plasmon hybridization. Following optimization, the operational bandwidth of Au/Ge pyramids, i.e. the bandwidth within which absorption is higher than 90%, extends over a 0.2-5.8 micrometers wavelength range, i.e. from UV-visible to mid-infrared, and total absorption (integrated over the operatio...

  19. The azimuth-dependent offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid in 3D HTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Qi

    2013-09-22

    Analytical representation of offset-midpoint traveltime equation is very important for pre-stack Kirchhoff migration and velocity inversion in anisotropic media. For VTI media, the offset-midpoint traveltime resembles the shape of Cheop\\'s pyramid. In this study, we extend the offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid to the case of 3D HTI media. We employ the stationary phase method to derive the analytical representation of traveltime equation, and then use Shanks transformation to improve the accuracy of horizontal and vertical slownesses. The traveltime pyramid is derived in both the depth- and time-domain. Numerical examples indicate that the azimuthal characteristics of both the traveltime pyramid and the migration isochrones are very obvious in HTI media due to the effect of anisotropy.

  20. Indian Reservations, Pyramid lake tribal boundary, reno/sparks tribal boundary, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Indian Reservations dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'Pyramid lake tribal boundary,...

  1. Experimental study of an optimised Pyramid wave-front sensor for Extremely Large Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Charlotte Z.; El Hadi, Kacem; Sauvage, Jean-François; Correia, Carlos; Fauvarque, Olivier; Rabaud, Didier; Lamb, Masen; Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Over the last few years the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM) has been heavily involved in R&D for adaptive optics systems dedicated to future large telescopes, particularly in preparation for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Within this framework an investigation into a Pyramid wave-front sensor is underway. The Pyramid sensor is at the cutting edge of high order, high precision wave-front sensing for ground based telescopes. Investigations have demonstrated the ability to achieve a greater sensitivity than the standard Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor whilst the implementation of a Pyramid sensor on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has provided compelling operational results.1, 2 The Pyramid now forms part of the baseline for several next generation Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). As such its behaviour under realistic operating conditions must be further understood in order to optimise performance. At LAM a detailed investigation into the performance of the Pyramid aims to fully characterise the behaviour of this wave-front sensor in terms of linearity, sensitivity and operation. We have implemented a Pyramid sensor using a high speed OCAM2 camera (with close to 0 readout noise and a frame rate of 1.5kHz) in order to study the performance of the Pyramid within a full closed loop adaptive optics system. This investigation involves tests on all fronts, from theoretical models and numerical simulations to experimental tests under controlled laboratory conditions, with an aim to fully understand the Pyramid sensor in both modulated and non-modulated configurations. We include results demonstrating the linearity of the Pyramid signals, compare measured interaction matrices with those derived in simulation and evaluate the performance in closed loop operation. The final goal is to provide an on sky comparison between the Pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor, at Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (ONERA-ODISSEE bench). Here we

  2. The Indoor Radon Concentration within the Tunnels of the Cholula Pyramid Through a Nuclear Tracks Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lima Flores

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global organizations, including the World Health Organization (WHO, the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (US-EPA and the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM recognize that radon gas as one of the main contributors to environmental radiation exposure for humans. Accordingly, a study and analysis of the indoors radon concentrate in the Cholula Pyramid contributes to understand the Radon dynamic inside of the Pyramid tunnels and to evaluate the radiological health risk to visitors, archaeologists, anthropologists and persons who spend extended periods inside the Pyramid. In this paper, the radon measurements along the Pyramid tunnels are presented. The Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM was chosen for the measurements, using a close end-cup device developed at the Dosimetry Application Project (DAP of the Physics Institute UNAM, following very well established protocols for the chemical etching and reading with the Counting Analysis Digital Imaging System (CADIS. The Cholula Pyramid consists of eight stages of constructions, each built in different periods of time. Cholula Pyramid is recognized as the pyramid with the largest base in the World, with 400 meters per side and 65 meters high. The tunnels of the pyramid were built in 1931 by architect Ignacio Marquina, with the aim of exploring and studying the structure. The results show an important indoor radon concentration in the measured tunnels, several times higher than levels recommended by United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA. The recommendation will be to mitigate the radon concentration levels, in order to avoid unnecessary exposition to the people.

  3. The Indoor Radon Concentration within the Tunnels of the Cholula Pyramid Through a Nuclear Tracks Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    A. Lima Flores; Palomino-Merino, R.; Espinosa, E; V. M. Castaño; E. Merlo Juárez; M. Cruz Sanchez; G. Espinosa

    2016-01-01

    Global organizations, including the World Health Organization (WHO), the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (US-EPA) and the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) recognize that radon gas as one of the main contributors to environmental radiation exposure for humans. Accordingly, a study and analysis of the indoors radon concentrate in the Cholula Pyramid contributes to understand the Radon dynamic inside of the Pyramid tunnels and to evaluate the radiological health...

  4. Color center fluorescence and spin manipulation in single crystal, pyramidal diamond tips

    CERN Document Server

    Nelz, Richard; Opaluch, Oliver; Sonusen, Selda; Savenko, Natalia; Podgursky, Vitali; Neu, Elke

    2016-01-01

    We investigate bright fluorescence of nitrogen (NV)- and silicon-vacancy color centers in pyramidal, single crystal diamond tips which are commercially available as atomic force microscope probes. We coherently manipulate NV electronic spin ensembles with $T_2 = 7.7(3)\\,\\mu$s. Color center lifetimes in different tip heights indicate effective refractive index effects and quenching. Using numerical simulations, we verify enhanced photon rates from emitters close to the pyramid apex; a situation promising for scanning probe sensing.

  5. Color center fluorescence and spin manipulation in single crystal, pyramidal diamond tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelz, Richard; Fuchs, Philipp; Opaluch, Oliver; Sonusen, Selda; Savenko, Natalia; Podgursky, Vitali; Neu, Elke

    2016-11-01

    We investigate bright fluorescence of nitrogen (NV)- and silicon-vacancy color centers in pyramidal, single crystal diamond tips, which are commercially available as atomic force microscope probes. We coherently manipulate NV electronic spin ensembles with T2 = 7.7(3) μs. Color center lifetimes in different tip heights indicate effective refractive index effects and quenching. Using numerical simulations, we verify enhanced photon rates from emitters close to the pyramid apex rendering them promising as scanning probe sensors.

  6. Synthesis and morphology of triangular pyramid-shaped puerarin microparticle with nanostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A type of triangular pyramid-shaped microparticles of puerarin was synthesized by using oil-in-oil microemulsion approach which is simple and economical under the action of copper substrate.The pyramid-shaped microparticles would be made up of deposit of nanospheres or nanorods and have two significant characters.One is its complex surface morphology like coral reef.The other is a lot of nanopores in existence in the microparticle body.Two possible formation routes were speculated.

  7. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J.; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic dom...

  8. Existence and uniqueness for a class of double pyramidal central configurations with a concave pentagonal base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Based on some necessary conditions for double pyramidal central configurations with a concave pentagonal base, for any given ratio of masses, the existence and uniqueness of a class of double pyramidal central configurations with a concave pentagonal base in 7-body problems are proved and the range of the ratio between radius and half-height is obtained, within which the 7 bodies involved form a central configuration or form uniquely a central configuration.

  9. GaN nano-pyramid arrays as an efficient photoelectrode for solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y.; Yu, X.; Syed, Z. Ahmed; Shen, S.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2016-11-01

    A prototype photoelectrode has been fabricated using a GaN nano-pyramid array structure grown on a cost-effective Si (111) substrate, demonstrating a significant improvement in performance of solar-powered water splitting compared with any planar GaN photoelectrode. Such a nano-pyramid structure leads to enhanced optical absorption as a result of a multi-scattering process which can effectively produce a reduction in reflectance. A simulation based on a finite-difference time-domain approach indicates that the nano-pyramid architecture enables incident light to be concentrated within the nano-pyramids as a result of micro-cavity effects, further enhancing optical absorption. Furthermore, the shape of the nano-pyramid further facilitates the photo-generated carrier transportation by enhancing a hole-transfer efficiency. All these features as a result of the nano-pyramid configuration lead to a large photocurrent of 1 mA cm-2 under an illumination density of 200 mW cm-2, with a peak incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 46.5% at ˜365 nm, around the band edge emission wavelength of GaN. The results presented are expected to pave the way for the fabrication of GaN based photoelectrodes with a high energy conversion efficiency of solar powered water splitting.

  10. Morphological and electrophysiological properties of atypically oriented layer 2 pyramidal cells of the juvenile rat neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brederode, J F; Foehring, R C; Spain, W J

    2000-01-01

    We used whole-cell patch clamp recordings combined with intracellular dye-filling to examine the morphological and electrophysiological properties of atypically oriented pyramidal cells located at the layer 1/2 border of the juvenile rat neocortex. Orientation of the apical dendrite varied from oblique (>20 degrees from vertical) to truly horizontal (90 degrees from vertical). The length of the apical dendrite ranged from 150 to 400 microm. The total horizontal domain of the dendritic tree (including basal dendrites) of the longest horizontal pyramids exceeded 500 microm, but we also found short horizontal cells with horizontal dendritic domains of less than 300 microm. In addition, atypically oriented pyramids had long horizontal axon collaterals in layer 1/2. Electrophysiologically, atypically oriented pyramidal cells had intrinsic membrane properties similar to regularly oriented pyramids that have been described in the superficial layers at this age in the rat. Cells that fired repetitively were all regular spiking. In addition, we identified a subgroup of neurons (20%) in this sample, which were unable to fire more than a few spikes at the beginning of the current pulse. We suggest that the unique orientation and size of their dendritic trees and the length and arrangement of their local axons collaterals make atypically oriented pyramids in layer 2 ideally suited to perform horizontal integration of synaptic inputs in the neocortex.

  11. Design of wide bandwidth pyramidal microwave absorbers using ferrite composites with broad magnetic loss spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myung-Jun; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Wide bandwidth microwave absorbers with a pyramidal shape and a significantly reduced thickness can be designed using high lossy ferrite materials with broad magnetic loss spectra. The microwave absorbing properties of pyramidal cone absorbers are analyzed using the transmission line approximation, which provides the reflection loss as a function of the material parameters and absorber geometry. Three types of ferrite materials (NiZn spinel ferrite, Co2Z hexaferrite, and RuCoM hexaferrite) are used as the absorbent fillers in a rubber matrix. Among these, Co2Z ferrite is the most suitable material for wide bandwidth pyramidal absorbers, due to its broad magnetic loss spectrum in the GHz frequency range. The optimal geometry of the pyramidal absorber is also determined using the transmission line theory. With the reduced total height of the pyramidal absorber (approximately 60 mm), a wide bandwidth (1.5-18 GHz with respect to the -20 dB reflection loss) can be realized. The proposed absorbers have a thickness advantage over the classical pyramidal ohmic absorbers; thus, they are suitable for small and semi-anechoic chambers.

  12. Pyramidal Cells in Prefrontal Cortex of Primates: Marked Differences in Neuronal Structure Among Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Elston, Alejandra; Manger, Paul R.; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The most ubiquitous neuron in the cerebral cortex, the pyramidal cell, is characterized by markedly different dendritic structure among different cortical areas. The complex pyramidal cell phenotype in granular prefrontal cortex (gPFC) of higher primates endows specific biophysical properties and patterns of connectivity, which differ from those in other cortical regions. However, within the gPFC, data have been sampled from only a select few cortical areas. The gPFC of species such as human and macaque monkey includes more than 10 cortical areas. It remains unknown as to what degree pyramidal cell structure may vary among these cortical areas. Here we undertook a survey of pyramidal cells in the dorsolateral, medial, and orbital gPFC of cercopithecid primates. We found marked heterogeneity in pyramidal cell structure within and between these regions. Moreover, trends for gradients in neuronal complexity varied among species. As the structure of neurons determines their computational abilities, memory storage capacity and connectivity, we propose that these specializations in the pyramidal cell phenotype are an important determinant of species-specific executive cortical functions in primates. PMID:21347276

  13. Two-Sided Pyramid Wavefront Sensor in the Direct Phase Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillion, D; Baker, K

    2006-04-12

    The two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor has been extensively simulated in the direct phase mode using a wave optics code. The two-sided pyramid divides the focal plane so that each half of the core only interferes with the speckles in its half of the focal plane. A relayed image of the pupil plane is formed at the CCD camera for each half. Antipodal speckle pairs are separated so that a pure phase variation causes amplitude variations in the two images. The phase is reconstructed from the difference of the two amplitudes by transforming cosine waves into sine waves using the Hilbert transform. There are also other corrections which have to be applied in Fourier space. The two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor performs extremely well: After two or three iterations, the phase error varies purely in y. The two-sided pyramid pair enables the phase to be completely reconstructed. Its performance has been modeled closed loop with atmospheric turbulence and wind. Both photon noise and read noise were included. The three-sided and four-sided pyramid wavefront sensors have also been studied in direct phase mode. Neither performs nearly as well as does the two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor.

  14. GABAergic interneurons targeting dendrites of pyramidal cells in the CA1 area of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausberger, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The dendrites of pyramidal cells are active compartments capable of independent computations, input/output transformation and synaptic plasticity. Pyramidal cells in the CA1 area of the hippocampus receive 92% of their GABAergic input onto dendrites. How does this GABAergic input participate in dendritic computations of pyramidal cells? One key to understanding their contribution to dendritic computation lies in the timing of GABAergic input in relation to excitatory transmission, back-propagating action potentials, Ca(2+) spikes and subthreshold membrane dynamics. The issue is further complicated by the fact that dendritic GABAergic inputs originate from numerous distinct sources operating with different molecular machineries and innervating different subcellular domains of pyramidal cell dendrites. The GABAergic input from distinct sources is likely to contribute differentially to dendritic computations. In this review, I describe four groups of GABAergic interneuron according to their expression of parvalbumin, cholecystokinin, axonal arborization density and long-range projections. These four interneuron groups contain at least 12 distinct cell types, which innervate mainly or exclusively the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells. Furthermore, I summarize the different spike timing of distinct interneuron types during gamma, theta and ripple oscillations in vivo, and I discuss some of the open questions on how GABAergic input modulates dendritic operations in CA1 pyramidal cells.

  15. Calsyntenin-1 regulates targeting of dendritic NMDA receptors and dendritic spine maturation in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Jeanne; Steuble, Martin; Orlando, Clara; Diep, Tu-My; Akhmedov, Alexander; Raineteau, Olivier; Pernet, Vincent; Sonderegger, Peter; Gerber, Urs

    2014-06-25

    Calsyntenin-1 is a transmembrane cargo-docking protein important for kinesin-1-mediated fast transport of membrane-bound organelles that exhibits peak expression levels at postnatal day 7. However, its neuronal function during postnatal development remains unknown. We generated a knock-out mouse to characterize calsyntenin-1 function in juvenile mice. In the absence of calsyntenin-1, synaptic transmission was depressed. To address the mechanism, evoked EPSPs were analyzed revealing a greater proportion of synaptic GluN2B subunit-containing receptors typical for less mature synapses. This imbalance was due to a disruption in calsyntenin-1-mediated dendritic transport of NMDA receptor subunits. As a consequence of increased expression of GluN2B subunits, NMDA receptor-dependent LTP was enhanced at Schaffer collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses. Interestingly, these defects were accompanied by a decrease in dendritic arborization and increased proportions of immature filopodia-like dendritic protrusions at the expense of thin-type dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal cells. Thus, these results highlight a key role for calsyntenin-1 in the transport of NMDA receptors to synaptic targets, which is necessary for the maturation of neuronal circuits during early development.

  16. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  17. 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptor-activation hyperpolarizes pyramidal cells and suppresses hippocampal gamma oscillations via Kir3 channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, April; McBain, Chris J; Fisahn, André

    2014-10-01

    Rhythmic cortical neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30-80 Hz, gamma oscillations) have been associated with cognitive processes such as sensory perception and integration, attention, learning, and memory. Gamma oscillations are disrupted in disorders for which cognitive deficits are hallmark symptoms such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.In vitro, various neurotransmitters have been found to modulate gamma oscillations. Serotonin(5-HT) has long been known to be important for both behavioural and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes are expressed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and high doses of 5-HT reduce the power of induced gamma oscillations.Hypothesizing that 5-HT may have cell- and receptor subtype-specific modulatory effects, we investigated the receptor subtypes, cell types and cellular mechanisms engaged by 5-HT in the modulation of gamma oscillations in mice and rats. We found that 5-HT decreases the power of kainate-induced hippocampal gamma oscillations in both species via the 5-HT1A receptor subtype. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings demonstrated that this decrease was caused by a hyperpolarization of CA3 pyramidal cells and a reduction of their firing frequency, but not by alteration of inhibitory neurotransmission. Finally, our results show that the effect on pyramidal cells is mediated via the G protein-coupled receptor inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir3.Our findings suggest this novel cellular mechanism as a potential target for therapies that are aimed at alleviating cognitive decline by helping the brain to maintain or re-establish normal gamma oscillation levels in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Low concentrations of the solvent dimethyl sulphoxide alter intrinsic excitability properties of cortical and hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tamagnini

    Full Text Available Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO is a widely used solvent in biology. It has many applications perhaps the most common of which is in aiding the preparation of drug solutions from hydrophobic chemical entities. Recent studies have suggested that this molecule may be able to induce apoptosis in neural tissues urging caution regarding its introduction into humans, for example as part of stem cell transplants. Here we have used in vitro electrophysiological methods applied to murine brain slices to examine whether a few hours treatment with 0.05% DMSO (a concentration regarded by many as innocuous alters intrinsic excitability properties of neurones. We investigated pyramidal neurones in two distinct brain regions, namely area CA1 of the hippocampus and layer 2 of perirhinal cortex. In the former there was no effect on resting potential but input resistance was decreased by DMSO pre-treatment. In line with this action potential count for any level of depolarizing current stimulus was reduced by ∼25% following DMSO treatment. Ih-mediated "sag" was also increased in CA1 pyramids and action potential waveform analysis demonstrated that DMSO treatment moved action potential threshold towards resting potential. In perirhinal cortex a decreased action potential output for various depolarizing current stimuli was also seen. In these cells action potential threshold was unaltered by DMSO but a significant increase in action potential width was apparent. These data indicate that pre-treatment with this widely employed solvent can elicit multifaceted neurophysiological changes in mammalian neurones at concentrations below those frequently encountered in the published literature.

  19. Distinctive transcriptome alterations of prefrontal pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arion, Dominique; Corradi, John P.; Tang, Shaowu; Datta, Dibyadeep; Boothe, Franklyn; He, Aiqing; Cacace, Angela M.; Zaczek, Robert; Albright, Charles F.; Tseng, George; Lewis, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with alterations in working memory that reflect dysfunction of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) circuitry. Working memory depends on the activity of excitatory pyramidal cells in DLPFC layer 3, and to a lesser extent in layer 5. Although many studies have profiled gene expression in DLPFC gray matter in schizophrenia, little is known about cell type-specific transcript expression in these two populations of pyramidal cells. We hypothesized that interrogating gene expression specifically in DLPFC layer 3 or 5 pyramidal cells would reveal new and/or more robust schizophrenia-associated differences that would provide new insights into the nature of pyramidal cell dysfunction in the illness. We also sought to determine the impact of other variables, such as a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder or medication use at time of death, on the patterns of gene expression in pyramidal neurons. Individual pyramidal cells in DLPFC layers 3 or 5 were captured by laser microdissection from 36 subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and matched normal comparison subjects. The mRNA from cell collections was subjected to transcriptome profiling by microarray followed by qPCR validation. Expression of genes involved in mitochondrial (MT) or ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) functions were markedly down-regulated in the patient group (p values for MT-related and UPS-related pathways were <10−7 and <10−5 respectively). MT-related gene alterations were more prominent in layer 3 pyramidal cells, whereas UPS-related gene alterations were more prominent in layer 5 pyramidal cells. Many of these alterations were not present, or found to a lesser degree, in samples of DLPFC gray matter from the same subjects, suggesting that they are pyramidal cell-specific. Furthermore, these findings principally reflected alterations in the schizophrenia subjects, were not present or present to a lesser degree in the schizoaffective disorder subjects

  20. A square-pyramidal organochromium(V) compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Monforte, M Angeles; Alonso, Pablo J; Arauzo, Ana B; Martín, Antonio; Menjón, Babil; Rillo, Conrado

    2012-01-28

    The mononuclear, five-coordinate organochromium(V) compound [NBu(4)][CrO(C(6)F(5))(4)] (1) has been obtained as a dark red solid in moderate yield by treatment of the homoleptic organochromium(III) derivative [NBu(4)](2)[Cr(C(6)F(5))(5)] with NO[BF(4)] in CH(2)Cl(2) solution under an oxygen atmosphere. The Cr(V) centre in the [CrO(C(6)F(5))(4)](-) anion shows a square-pyramidal geometry with the four C(6)F(5) groups in the basal positions and the oxo ligand in the apical one (X-ray). The short Cr-O distance (153.8(2) pm) suggests a high degree of triple bond character for the chromyl unit. The EPR spectrum of 1 in solution shows an isotropic signal with g(iso) = 1.995(1) and a rich hyperfine structure due to coupling with the (53)Cr isotope [a(Cr) = 46.95(4) MHz] as well as with the ortho-F and meta-F substituents of the C(6)F(5) rings [a(F) = 4.20(2) MHz and a'(F) = 2.12(2) MHz] in keeping with the presence of non-interacting, fast tumbling, paramagnetic [CrO(C(6)F(5))(4)](-) units (d(1)). In the solid state, however, both the microscopic (EPR) and macroscopic magnetic properties (isothermal magnetisation and thermal dependence of the magnetic susceptibility) suggest the existence of weak ferromagnetic interactions with T(C) = 0.20(2) K. Such magnetic interactions may probably be favoured by π interactions between C(6)F(5) rings of neighbour [CrO(C(6)F(5))(4)](-) units in the crystal.

  1. Ablation of SNX6 leads to defects in synaptic function of CA1 pyramidal neurons and spatial memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yang; Dai, Zhonghua; Liu, Wenxue; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Yanrui; Guo, Zhenzhen; Li, Xiaoyu; Xu, Chenchang; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Shi, Yun S; Liu, Jia-Jia

    2017-01-01

    SNX6 is a ubiquitously expressed PX-BAR protein that plays important roles in retromer-mediated retrograde vesicular transport from endosomes. Here we report that CNS-specific Snx6 knockout mice exhibit deficits in spatial learning and memory, accompanied with loss of spines from distal dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. SNX6 interacts with Homer1b/c, a postsynaptic scaffold protein crucial for the synaptic distribution of other postsynaptic density (PSD) proteins and structural integrity of dendritic spines. We show that SNX6 functions independently of retromer to regulate distribution of Homer1b/c in the dendritic shaft. We also find that Homer1b/c translocates from shaft to spines by protein diffusion, which does not require SNX6. Ablation of SNX6 causes reduced distribution of Homer1b/c in distal dendrites, decrease in surface levels of AMPAR and impaired AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. These findings reveal a physiological role of SNX6 in CNS excitatory neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20991.001 PMID:28134614

  2. Latent N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the recurrent excitatory pathway between hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons: Ca(2+)-dependent activation by blocking A1 adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klishin, A; Tsintsadze, T; Lozovaya, N; Krishtal, O

    1995-01-01

    When performed at increased external [Ca2+]/[Mg2+] ratio (2.5 mM/0.5 mM), temporary block of A1 adenosine receptors in hippocampus [by 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT)] leads to a dramatic and irreversible change in the excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) evoked by Schaffer collateral/commissural (SCC) stimulation and recorded by in situ patch clamp in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The duration of the EPSC becomes stimulus dependent, increasing with increase in stimulus strength. The later occurring component of the EPSC is carried through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-operated channels but disappears under either the NMDA antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) or the non-NMDA antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). These findings indicate that the late component of the SCC-evoked EPSC is polysynaptic: predominantly non-NMDA receptor-mediated SCC inputs excite CA1 neurons that recurrently excite each other by predominantly NDMA receptor-mediated synapses. These recurrent connections are normally silent but become active after CPT treatment, leading to enhancement of the late component of the EPSC. The activity of these connections is maintained for at least 2 hr after CPT removal. When all functional NMDA receptors are blocked by dizocilpine maleate (MK-801), subsequent application of CPT leads to a partial reappearance of NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs evoked by SCC stimulation, indicating that latent NMDA receptors are recruited. Altogether, these findings indicate the existence of a powerful system of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic contacts in SCC input to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and probably also in reciprocal connections between these neurons, which in the usual preparation are kept latent by activity of A1 receptors. PMID:8618915

  3. Motor recovery via aberrant pyramidal tract in a patient with traumatic brain injury A diffusion tensor tractography study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang Seok Yeo; Sung Ho Jang

    2013-01-01

    The aberrant pyramidal tract is the collateral pathway of the pyramidal tract through the medial lemniscus in the brainstem. A 21-year-old man presented with right hemiparesis due to a traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage in the left corona radiata. His motor function recovered almost to the normal state at 10 months after onset. Through diffusion tensor tractography, the pyramidal tract in the affected (left) hemisphere showed discontinuation at the pontine level at 13 months after onset. An aberrant pyramidal tract was observed, which originated from the primary motor cortex and the supplementary motor area and descended through the corona radiata, then through the posterior limb of the internal capsule and the medial lemniscus pathway from the midbrain to the pons, finally entered into the pyramidal tract area at the pontomedullary junction. It suggests that the motor functions of the right extremities in this patient had recovered by this aberrant pyramidal tract.

  4. The mammalian neocortical pyramidal cell: a new theory on prenatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eMarín-Padilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals’ new cerebral cortex (neocortex and the new type of pyramidal neuron are mammalian innovations that have evolved for operating their increasing motor capabilities using essentially analogous anatomical and neural makeups. The human neocortex starts to develop in the 6-week-old embryo with the establishment of a primordial cortical organization that resembles the primitive cortices of amphibian and reptiles that operated his early motor activities. From the 8th to the 15th week of age, the new pyramidal neurons, of ependymal origin, are progressively incorporated within this primordial cortex forming a cellular plate that divide its components into those above it (neocortex first lamina and those below it (neocortex subplate elements. From the 16th week of age to birth and postnatally, the new pyramidal neurons continue to elongate functionally their apical dendrite by adding synaptic membrane to incorporate the needed sensory information for operating the animal muscular activities. The new pyramidal neuron’ distinguishing feature is the capacity of elongating anatomically and functionally its apical dendrite (its main receptive surface without losing its original attachment to first lamina or the location of its soma retaining its essential nature. The number of pyramidal cell functional strata established in the motor cortex increases and reflects each mammalian species motor capabilities: the hedgehog needs 2 pyramidal cell functional strata to carry out all its motor activities, the mouse three, cat four, primates 5 and humans 6. The presence of six pyramidal cell functional strata distinguish the human motor cortex from that of others primates. Homo sapiens represent a new evolutionary stage that have transformed his primate brain for operating his unique motor capabilities, such as speaking, writing, painting, sculpturing including thinking as a premotor activity.

  5. Phase precession in hippocampal interneurons showing strong functional coupling to individual pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Andrew P; Cowen, Stephen L; Burke, Sara N; Barnes, Carol A; McNaughton, Bruce L

    2006-12-27

    Although hippocampal interneurons typically do not show discrete regions of elevated firing in an environment, such as seen in pyramidal cell place fields, they do exhibit significant spatial modulation (McNaughton et al., 1983a). Strong monosynaptic coupling between pyramidal neurons and nearby interneurons in the CA1 stratum pyramidale has been strongly implicated on the basis of significant, short-latency peaks in cross-correlogram plots (Csicsvari et al., 1998). Furthermore, interneurons receiving a putative monosynaptic connection from a simultaneously recorded pyramidal cell appear to inherit the spatial modulation of the latter (Marshall et al., 2002). Buzsaki and colleagues hypothesize that interneurons may also adopt the firing phase dynamics of their afferent place cells, which show a phase shift relative to the hippocampal theta rhythm as a rat passes through the place field ("phase precession"). This study confirms and extends the previous reports by showing that interneurons in the dorsal and middle hippocampus with putative monosynaptic connections with place cells recorded on the same tetrode share other properties with their pyramidal cell afferents, including the spatial scale of the place field of pyramidal cell, a characteristic of the septotemporal level of the hippocampus from which the cells are recorded, and the rate of phase precession, which is slower in middle regions. Furthermore, variations in pyramidal cell place field scale within each septotemporal level attributable to task variations are similarly associated with variations in interneuron place field scale. The available data strongly suggest that spatial selectivity of CA1 stratum pyramidale interneurons is inherited from a small cluster of local pyramidal cells and is not a consequence of spatially selective synaptic input from CA3 or other sources.

  6. High-efficiency si/polymer hybrid solar cells based on synergistic surface texturing of Si nanowires on pyramids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lining; Lai, Donny; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Changyun; Rusli

    2012-06-11

    An efficient Si/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cell using synergistic surface texturing of Si nanowires (SiNWs) on pyramids is demonstrated. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.9% is achieved from the cells using the SiNW/pyramid binary structure, which is much higher than similar cells based on planar Si, pyramid-textured Si, and SiNWs. The PCE is the highest reported to-date for hybrid cells based on Si nanostructures and PEDOT.

  7. What's a Pregnant Woman to Eat? A Review of Current USDA Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramid

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to clarify the nutritional recommendations for pregnant women in light of the new Food Guide Pyramid, known as “MyPyramid,” along with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 and recommendations by the Institute of Medicine. The differences between the Food Guide Pyramid (introduced in 1992) and the more recent, color-coded MyPyramid (introduced in 2005) are discussed. A list of nutritional recommendations for pregnant women is presented, which may serve as a ...

  8. Early establishment of multiple release site connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groc, Laurent; Gustafsson, Bengt; Hanse, Eric

    2003-05-01

    The strength of the synaptic transmission between two neurons critically depends on the number of release sites connecting the neurons. Here we examine the development of connectivity between gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. GABAergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) were recorded in whole-cell voltage-clamped CA1 pyramidal neurons. By comparing spontaneous and miniature (action potential-independent) GABAergic PSCs, we found that multiple release site connectivity is established already at the first postnatal day and that the degree of connectivity remains unaltered into adulthood. During the same time there is a dramatic increase in the number of GABAergic synapses on each pyramidal neuron as indicated by the increase in frequency of miniature GABAergic PSCs. These results indicate that during development a given interneuron contacts an increasing number of target pyramidal neurons but with the same multiple release site connectivity. It has been shown previously that the connectivity between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons is initially restricted to one release site, and develops gradually. The present result thus suggests different mechanisms to govern the maturation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmissions.

  9. Pyramid projection - validation of a new method of skin defect measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růzicka, J; Nový, P; Vávra, F; Bolek, L; Benes, J

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for the determination of the volume, surface area and depth of skin defects. The method is based on the description of a spatial defect using a pyramid (made, for example, from injection needles), which is placed over the defect. The projection of the pyramid on to the defect is photographed using a digital camera and subsequently compared with the projection of the same pyramid on to a sheet of grid paper. The defect is mathematically reconstructed on a computer, and an optimal body shape describing the defect is found, using a number of simplifications and assumptions. The method was then validated using a plaster mold of a real foot with 19 defects simulating real wounds. These plaster wounds were molded using alginate hydrocolloid, and the volume, surface area and depth were measured and compared with the results of the pyramid projection by means of regression analysis.This method correlates in all variables with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9. It can be concluded that the projection pyramid method correlates well with the reference mold method and can be used with good results for a whole range of variables.

  10. Dense and overlapping innervation of pyramidal neurons by neocortical chandelier cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Melis; Blázquez-Llorca, Lidia; Merchán-Perez, Angel; Anderson, Stewart A.; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Chandelier (or axo-axonic) cells are a distinct group of GABAergic interneurons that innervate the axon initial segments of pyramidal cells and thus could have an important role controlling the activity of cortical circuits. To understand their connectivity we labeled upper layers chandelier cells (ChCs) from mouse neocortex with a genetic strategy and studied how their axons contact local populations of pyramidal neurons, using immunohistochemical detection of axon initial segments. We studied ChCs located in the border of layers 1 and 2 from primary somatosensory cortex and find that practically all ChC axon terminals contact axon initial segments with an average of 3–5 boutons per cartridge. By measuring the number of putative synapses in initial segments we estimate that each pyramidal neuron is innervated, on average, by at least 4 ChCs. Additionally, each individual ChC contacts 35–50% of pyramidal neurons within its axonal arbor, with pockets of high innervation density. Finally, we find that ChC axons seems to have a conserved innervation pattern at different postnatal ages (P18–90), with only relatively small lateral expansions of their arbor and increases in the total number of their cartridges during the developmental period analyzed. We conclude that ChCs innervate neighboring pyramidal neurons in a dense and overlapping manner, an innervation pattern which could enable ChCs exert a widespread influence on their local circuits. PMID:23365230

  11. Characterization of intrinsic properties of cingulate pyramidal neurons in adult mice after nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tao

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC is important for cognitive and sensory functions including memory and chronic pain. Glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission undergo long-term potentiation in ACC pyramidal cells after peripheral injury. Less information is available for the possible long-term changes in neuronal action potentials or intrinsic properties. In the present study, we characterized cingulate pyramidal cells in the layer II/III of the ACC in adult mice. We then examined possible long-term changes in intrinsic properties of the ACC pyramidal cells after peripheral nerve injury. In the control mice, we found that there are three major types of pyramidal cells according to their action potential firing pattern: (i regular spiking (RS cells (24.7%, intrinsic bursting (IB cells (30.9%, and intermediate (IM cells (44.4%. In a state of neuropathic pain, the population distribution (RS: 21.3%; IB: 31.2%; IM: 47.5% and the single action potential properties of these three groups were indistinguishable from those in control mice. However, for repetitive action potentials, IM cells from neuropathic pain animals showed higher initial firing frequency with no change for the properties of RS and IB neurons from neuropathic pain mice. The present results provide the first evidence that, in addition to synaptic potentiation reported previously, peripheral nerve injury produces long-term plastic changes in the action potentials of cingulate pyramidal neurons in a cell type-specific manner.

  12. Pyramidal cells make specific connections onto smooth (GABAergic neurons in mouse visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Bopp

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of neocortical circuits is the predominance of recurrent excitation between pyramidal neurons, which is balanced by recurrent inhibition from smooth GABAergic neurons. It has been previously described that in layer 2/3 of primary visual cortex (V1 of cat and monkey, pyramidal cells filled with horseradish peroxidase connect approximately in proportion to the spiny (excitatory, 95% and 81%, respectively and smooth (GABAergic, 5% and 19%, respectively dendrites found in the neuropil. By contrast, a recent ultrastructural study of V1 in a single mouse found that smooth neurons formed 51% of the targets of the superficial layer pyramidal cells. This suggests that either the neuropil of this particular mouse V1 had a dramatically different composition to that of V1 in cat and monkey, or that smooth neurons were specifically targeted by the pyramidal cells in that mouse. We tested these hypotheses by examining similar cells filled with biocytin in a sample of five mice. We found that the average composition of the neuropil in V1 of these mice was similar to that described for cat and monkey V1, but that the superficial layer pyramidal cells do form proportionately more synapses with smooth dendrites than the equivalent neurons in cat or monkey. These distributions may underlie the distinct differences in functional architecture of V1 between rodent and higher mammals.

  13. Different patterns of synaptic transmission revealed between hippocampal CA3 stratum oriens and stratum lucidum interneurons and their pyramidal cell targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, G B; Wilcox, K S; Dichter, M A

    2003-01-01

    Stratum lucidum (SL) interneurons likely mediate feedforward inhibition between the dentate gyrus mossy fibers and CA3 pyramidal cells, while stratum oriens (SO) interneurons likely provide both feedforward and feedback inhibition within the CA3 commissural/associational network. Using dual whole-cell patch-clamp recordings between interneurons and CA3 pyramidal cells, we have examined SL and SO interneurons and their synapses within organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Biocytin staining revealed different morphologies between these interneuron groups, both being very similar to those found previously in acute slices. The kinetics of IPSCs were similar between the two groups, but the reliability of synaptic transmission of SL interneuron (SL-INT) IPSCs was significantly lower than the virtually 100% reliability (non-existent failure rates) of SO-INT IPSCs. The SL-INT IPSCs also had a lower quantal content than the SO-INT IPSCs. In addition, SL-INTs were less likely than SO-INTs to innervate or to be innervated by nearby CA3 pyramidal cells. Paired-pulse stimulation at 100 ms interstimulus intervals produced similar paired-pulse depression in both interneuron synapses, despite the significantly higher failure rate of IPSCs produced by the SL-INTs compared with SO-INTs. CV analysis supported the hypothesis that paired-pulse depression was presynaptic. During repetitive, high frequency stimulation (>10 Hz for 500 ms) the two different synapses exhibited distinctly different forms of short-term plasticity: all SL interneurons displayed significant short-term facilitation (mean 113% facilitation, n=4), while, by contrast, SO interneuron synapses displayed either short-term depression (mean 42% depression, n=5 of 8) or no net facilitation or depression (n=3 of 8). These results indicate that the synaptic properties of interneurons can be quite different for interneurons in different hippocampal circuits.

  14. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits the slow afterhyperpolarizing current sIAHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons by activating multiple signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ruth D T; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Krause, Michael; Sampedro-Castañeda, Marisol; Stocker, Martin; Pedarzani, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarizing current (sIAHP ) is a calcium-dependent potassium current that underlies the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in hippocampal and neocortical neurons. sIAHP is a well-known target of modulation by several neurotransmitters acting via the cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the hippocampal formation. In this study we have investigated the effect of PACAP on the sIAHP and the signal transduction pathway used to modulate intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We show that PACAP inhibits the sIAHP , resulting in a decrease of spike frequency adaptation, in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP is mediated by PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Inhibition of PKA reduced the effect of PACAP on sIAHP, suggesting that PACAP exerts part of its inhibitory effect on sIAHP by increasing cAMP and activating PKA. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP was also strongly hindered by the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK). Concomitant inhibition of PKA and p38 MAPK indicates that these two kinases act in a sequential manner in the same pathway leading to the suppression of sIAHP. Conversely, protein kinase C is not part of the signal transduction pathway used by PACAP to inhibit sIAHP in CA1 neurons. Our results show that PACAP enhances the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by inhibiting the sIAHP through the activation of multiple signaling pathways, most prominently cAMP/PKA and p38 MAPK. Our findings disclose a novel modulatory action of p38 MAPK on intrinsic excitability and the sIAHP, underscoring the role of this current as a neuromodulatory hub regulated by multiple protein kinases in cortical neurons.

  15. Intercultural Mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Marian Radulescu; Denisa Mitrut

    2012-01-01

    The Intercultural Mediator facilitates exchanges between people of different socio-cultural backgrounds and acts as a bridge between immigrants and national and local associations, health organizations, services and offices in order to foster integration of every single individual. As the use mediation increases, mediators are more likely to be involved in cross-cultural mediation, but only the best mediators have the opportunity to mediate cross border business disputes or international poli...

  16. Fractal Analysis of Laplacian Pyramidal Filters Applied to Segmentation of Soil Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. de Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The laplacian pyramid is a well-known technique for image processing in which local operators of many scales, but identical shape, serve as the basis functions. The required properties to the pyramidal filter produce a family of filters, which is unipara metrical in the case of the classical problem, when the length of the filter is 5. We pay attention to gaussian and fractal behaviour of these basis functions (or filters, and we determine the gaussian and fractal ranges in the case of single parameter a. These fractal filters loose less energy in every step of the laplacian pyramid, and we apply this property to get threshold values for segmenting soil images, and then evaluate their porosity. Also, we evaluate our results by comparing them with the Otsu algorithm threshold values, and conclude that our algorithm produce reliable test results.

  17. Fabrication and Photoluminescence Properties of Hexagonal Micro-pyramids ZnO Powders by Combustion Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ai; ZHANG Ying; MENG Fancheng; WANG Hairong; LI Zesong; SHEN Yingping

    2011-01-01

    The ZnO powder with hexagonal-pyramids structure was prepared by the low-temperature combustion process.Ammonium acetate was used as the fuels,whereas zinc nitrate acted as the oxidant.The effect of different ration between fuel and oxidant on the morphology and photoluminescence(PL)characteristic was studied.The formation of hexagonal-pyramids structure was discussed.The optimum preparing parameter for fine morphology is that the ratio of zinc nitrate and ammonium acetate is 1:5,and ignition temperature is 500 ℃.The PL measurement indicates all samples have the strong blue and yellow emission peak.The changes of surface energy of the polar surfaces result in the formation of micro-pyramids structure.

  18. Brief dopaminergic stimulations produce transient physiological changes in prefrontal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Anna R; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Potapenko, Evgeniy S; Kim, Eun-Ji; Antic, Srdjan D

    2011-01-25

    In response to food reward and other pertinent events, midbrain dopaminergic neurons fire short bursts of action potentials causing a phasic release of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex (rapid and transient increases in cortical dopamine concentration). Here we apply short (2s) iontophoretic pulses of glutamate, GABA, dopamine and dopaminergic agonists locally, onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons in brain slices of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Unlike glutamate and GABA, brief dopaminergic pulses had negligible effects on the resting membrane potential. However, dopamine altered action potential firing in an extremely rapid (iontophoresis current artifact. Our present data imply that one population of PFC pyramidal neurons receiving direct synaptic contacts from midbrain dopaminergic neurons would stall during the 0.5s of the phasic dopamine burst. The spillover dopamine, on the other hand, would act as a positive stimulator of cortical excitability (30% increase) to all D2-receptor carrying pyramidal cells, for the next 40s.

  19. Existence and uniqueness of a class of double pyramidal central configurations in six-body problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xuefei

    2004-01-01

    Under the necessary conditions for a double pyramidal central configuration with a diamond base to exist in the real number space, the existence and uniqueness of such configurations were studied by employing combinedly the algebraic method and numerical calculation. It is found that there exists a planar curl triangle region G in a square Q such that any point in G and given by the ratio of the two diagonal lengths of the diamond base and the ratio of one diagonal length of the base to the height of the double pyramid configuration determines a unique double pyramid central configuration, while all points in Q-G have no referance to any central configuration.

  20. A cognitive approach to the topography of the 12th dynasty pyramids

    CERN Document Server

    Magli, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    The topography of the royal pyramids of the 12th dynasty is investigated in its historical and chronological context, in order to highlight connections between the architectural choices, the religious ideas and the traditions inspiring the reign of the corresponding pharaohs. A close, explicit connection with the double building projects carried out more than six centuries before by Snefru at Dahshur and at Meidum-Seila comes out. This connection involved geometry, perspective and astronomical alignments in the progressive planning of the pyramidal complexes. In such a context, the architectural choices of the last great king of the dynasty, Amenemhet III - who built two pyramids, one at Dahshur and the other at Hawara - appear to be due mostly to symbolic, as opposed to practical, reasons.

  1. Lower Cambrian yolk-pyramid embryos from Southern Shaanxi,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Junyuan; Andreas BRAUN; Dieter WALOSZEK; PENG Qingqing; Andreas MAAS

    2004-01-01

    Phosphatized globules with radially arranged pillars were recently recorded from the Lower Cambrian phosphate deposit, Ningqiang, Shaanxi by Yue and Bengtson. These authors interpreted the globules as blastula stage of embryos and the pillars as blastomeres. On the basis of new additional material, we reinterpret these structures as yolk-pyramid stages of possible arthropod eggs. The 20 embryos under present study range from 380 μm to 600 μm in diameter and contain about 120 pyramids. Some embryos having a higher number of pyramids are tentatively interpreted as slightly later developmental stages of the same animal. These 543-million-year-old embryos may push back the evolutionary history of the arthropods to a deeper time and also suggest that one important pattern of arthropod development was already present at the beginning of the Cambrian.

  2. Broadband Absorption Enhancement in Thin Film Solar Cells Using Asymmetric Double-Sided Pyramid Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshal, Mohamed A.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2016-11-01

    A design for a highly efficient modified grating crystalline silicon (c-Si) thin film solar cell is demonstrated and analyzed using the two-dimensional (2-D) finite element method. The suggested grating has a double-sided pyramidal structure. The incorporation of the modified grating in a c-Si thin film solar cell offers a promising route to harvest light into the few micrometers active layer. Furthermore, a layer of silicon nitride is used as an antireflection coating (ARC). Additionally, the light trapping through the suggested design is significantly enhanced by the asymmetry of the top and bottom pyramids. The effects of the thickness of the active layer and facet angle of the pyramid on the spectral absorption, ultimate efficiency ( η), and short-circuit current density ( J sc) are investigated. The numerical results showed 87.9% efficiency improvement over the conventional thin film c-Si solar cell counterpart without gratings.

  3. The food pyramid adapted to physically active adolescents as a nutrition education tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Brandão Gonçalves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the understanding of the Food Pyramid Adapted to Physically Active Adolescents as an educational tool to improve nutrition knowledge. Adolescents engaged in sport training responded to a nutrition knowledge questionnaire before and after the intervention. The pyramid intervention group received the printed educational material, and the broad intervention group received the printed material followed by a lecture. As a result, mean initial nutrition knowledge was average (59.9 ± 18 points, increasing (p<0.001 after the intervention (69.1 ± 20 points without significant difference between interventions. In conclusion, adolescents' nutrition knowledge improved, even with the use of the Food Pyramid alone, indicating its use to promote nutritional knowledge.

  4. Investigation of mechanism: spoof SPPs on periodically textured metal surface with pyramidal grooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lili; Liu, Jianlong; Zhou, Keya; Gao, Yang; Liu, Shutian

    2016-08-01

    In microwave and terahertz frequency band, a textured metal surface can support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs). In this paper, we explore a SSPPs waveguide composed of a metal block with pyramidal grooves. Under the deep subwavelength condition, theoretical formulas for calculation of dispersion relations are derived based on the modal expansion method (MEM). Using the obtained formulas, a general analysis is given about the properties of the SSPPs in the waveguides with upright and downward pyramidal grooves. It is demonstrated that the SSPPs waveguides with upright pyramidal grooves give better field-confinement. Numerical simulations are used to check the theoretical analysis and show good agreement with the analytical results. In addition, the group velocity of the SSPPs propagating along the waveguide is explored and two structures are designed to show how to trap the SSPPs on the metal surface. The calculation methodology provided in this paper can also be used to deal with the SSPPs waveguides with irregular grooves.

  5. Dynamic chest image analysis: model-based pulmonary perfusion analysis with pyramid images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianming; Haapanen, Arto; Jaervi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro J.; Kormano, Martti; Svedstrom, Erkki; Virkki, Raimo

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study 'Dynamic Chest Image Analysis' is to develop computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected at different phases of the respiratory/cardiac cycles in a short period of time. We have proposed a framework for ventilation study with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images. In this paper, we extend the framework to pulmonary perfusion study. A perfusion model and the truncated pyramid are introduced. The perfusion model aims at extracting accurate, geographic perfusion parameters, and the truncated pyramid helps in understanding perfusion at multiple resolutions and speeding up the convergence process in optimization. Three cases are included to illustrate the experimental results.

  6. Nanoreplicated positive and inverted sub-micron polymer pyramids array for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhida

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate gold coated polymer surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with a pair of complementary structures--positive and inverted pyramids array structures fabricated by multiple-step molding and replication process. The uniform SERS enhancement factors over the entire device surfaces were measured as 7.2 X 10^4 for positive pyramids substrate while 1.6 X 10^6 for inverted pyramids substrate with Rhodamine 6G as the target analyte. Based on the optical reflection measurement and FDTD simulation result, the enhancement factor difference is attributed to plasmon resonance matching and to SERS "hot spots ". With this simple, fast and versatile complementary molding process, we can produce polymer SERS substrates with extremely low cost, high throughput and high repeatability.

  7. Sparse aperture differential piston measurements using the pyramid wave-front sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Yan, Zhaojun; Zheng, Lixin; Agapito, Guido; Wang, Chaoyan; Zhu, Nenghong; Zhu, Liyun; Cai, Jianqing; Tang, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the laboratory experiment we settled in the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) to investigate the pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS) ability to measure the differential piston on a sparse aperture. The ultimate goal is to verify the ability of the pyramid WFS work in closed loop to perform the phasing of the primary mirrors of a sparse Fizeau imaging telescope. In the experiment we installed on the optical bench we performed various test checking the ability to flat the wave-front using a deformable mirror and to measure the signal of the differential piston on a two pupils setup. These steps represent the background from which we start to perform full closed loop operation on multiple apertures. These steps were also useful to characterize the achromatic double pyramids (double prisms) manufactured in the SHAO optical workshop.

  8. Effect of Pyramidal Dome Geometry on the Acoustical Characteristics in A Mosque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dg. H. Kassim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As an important symbol in Islam, a mosque is built with architectural grandeur. Among the characteristics is its high ceiling and it is usually constructed with a typical spherical dome shape. Some mosques, however, are influenced by the local culture and the dome can be of a different shape, such as pyramidal, as found in mosques in Malacca, Malaysia. This paper presents an assessment of the internal acoustical characteristics of a mosque having a pyramidal dome. The study is conducted by means of computer simulation using CATT indoor acoustic software. Reverberation time and clarity are taken to evaluate the intelligibility of speech. The effect of the angle and height of the dome on the acoustical parameters is discussed. It is found that a pyramidal dome with a steeper angle contributes to poor acoustic clarity.

  9. Housing in Pyramid Counteracts Neuroendocrine and Oxidative Stress Caused by Chronic Restraint in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Surekha Bhat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  10. [INCIDENCE AND SURGICAL IMPORTANCE OF PYRAMIDAL LOBE AND TUBERCLE OF THE THYROID GLAND: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovadcić, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The pyramidal lobe and tubercles are common anatomic variations of the thyroid gland, and their frequency is highly represented. While pyramidal lobe requires additional seriousness in identifying and its removal, especially in patients with hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer, the presence of tubercles is desirable. Tubercle is covered by recurrent laryngeal nerve and directs the surgeon in his search and besides this, serves to facilitate detection of the upper parathyroid glands. In this prospective study we analysed 342 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy in the period from January 2009 to March 2015. We looked at the incidence and anatomic characteristics of pyramidal lobe and tubercles of the thyroid gland. The pyramidal lobe was present in 52.3% of the patients with more frequent central and left placement. Bilateral tubercles were present in 14.9%, while position right-sided phenomenon was represented in 39.5% and 18.5% in lower left (64.3% patients). Their prevalence by gender showed no significant difference (p = 0.59; p = 0.2). Associated presence of pyramidal lobe and tubercles on one or both sides is highly represented in our group of patients (34%), also with no differences by gender (p = 0.29). Length of the pyramidal lobe ranged from 1.3 to 4.7 cm (average 2.3 cm), and the size of tubercles in 36% of patients was over 1 cm. Recurrent laryngeal nerve was only in 1.8% placed laterally of tubercles, and the upper parathyroid gland in 95.4% was located above tubercle. Considering that only 16.5% of our patients did not have any of these anatomical variations, their presence during surgery is the rule, not the exception.

  11. Housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, M Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2007-03-01

    The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC) housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups) subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC) having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP) being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS) in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  12. A pyramid-based approach to visual exploration of a large volume of vehicle trajectory data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing SUN; Xiang LI

    2012-01-01

    Advances in positioning and wireless communicating technologies make it possible to collect large volumes of trajectory data of moving vehicles in a fast and convenient fashion.These data can be applied to traffic studies.Behind this application,a methodological issue that still requires particular attention is the way these data should be spatially visualized.Trajectory data physically consists of a large number of positioning points.With the dramatic increase of data volume,it becomes a challenge to display and explore these data.Existing commercial software often employs vector-based indexing structures to facilitate the display of a large volume of points,but their performance downgrades quickly when the number of points is very large,for example,tens of millions.In this paper,a pyramid-based approach is proposed.A pyramid method initially is invented to facilitate the display of raster images through the tradeoff between storage space and display time.A pyramid is a set of images at different levels with different resolutions.In this paper,we convert vector-based point data into raster data,and build a gridbased indexing structure in a 2D plane.Then,an image pyramid is built.Moreover,at the same level of a pyramid,image is segmented into mosaics with respect to the requirements of data storage and management.Algorithms or procedures on grid-based indexing structure,image pyramid,image segmentation,and visualization operations are given in this paper.A case study with taxi trajectory data in Shanghai is conducted.Results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the existing commercial software.

  13. De novo expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor in spinal lamina I pyramidal neurons in polyarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarestani, L; Waters, S M; Krause, J E; Bennett, G J; Ribeiro-da-Silva, A

    2009-05-20

    Spinal lamina I (LI) neurons play a major role in the transmission and integration of pain-related information that is relayed to higher centers. Alterations in the excitability of these neurons influence chronic pain development, and expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1r) is thought to play a major role in such changes. Novel expression of NK-1r may underlie hyperexcitability in new populations of LI neurons. LI projection neurons can be classified morphologically into fusiform, pyramidal, and multipolar cells, differing in their functional properties, with the pyramidal type being nonnociceptive. In agreement with this, we have shown that spinoparabrachial pyramidal neurons seldom express NK-1r, in contrast with the other two cell types. In this study we investigated in the rat the long-term changes in NK-1r expression by spinoparabrachial LI neurons following the unilateral injection in the hindpaw plantar surface of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) was injected unilaterally into the parabrachial nucleus. Our results revealed that, ipsilaterally, pyramidal neurons were seldom immunoreactive for NK-1r both in saline-injected and in CFA-injected rats, up to 10 days post-CFA. However, a considerable number of pyramidal cells were immunoreactive for NK-1r at 15, 21, and 30 days post-CFA. Our data raise the possibility -- which needs to be confirmed by electrophysiology -- that most LI projection neurons of the pyramidal type are likely nonnociceptive in naive animals but might become nociceptive following the development of arthritis.

  14. EFFECTS OF GLUTAMATE ON SODIUM CHANNEL IN ACUTELY DISSOCIATED HIPPOCAMPAL CA1 PYRAMIDAL NEURONS OF RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高宾丽; 伍国锋; 杨艳; 刘智飞; 曾晓荣

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of glutamate on sodium channel in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of rats.Methods Voltage-dependent sodium currents (INa) in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of neonate rats were recorded by whole-cell patchclamp of the brain slice technique when a series of doses of glutamate (100-1000μmol/L) were applied.Results Different concentrations of glutamate could inhibit INa,and higher concentration of glutamate affected greater inhibitio...

  15. Innovation Intensity and Adoption at the Base of the Pyramid Market: A Study of Household Appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Koki da Costa Nogami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the innovation intensity and adoption characteristics at the base of the pyramid market. The innovation intensity is configured as radical and incremental, while the innovation adoption is configured as early and tardy. As an empirical approach it was conducted a study type survey. Data analysis is based on non-parametric statistics. The results indicate that the base of the pyramid consumers is characterized by adopting incremental innovations tardily, as pointed out by the literature. Furthermore, it was also observed that women have greater decision-making power in the families of this segment.

  16. Mechanical Response of All-composite Pyramidal Lattice Truss Core Sandwich Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Linzhi Wu; Li Ma; Bing Wang; Zhengxi Guan

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical performance of an all-composite pyramidal lattice truss core sandwich structure was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Sandwich structures were fabricated with a hot compression molding method using carbon fiber reinforced composite T700/3234. The out-of-plane compression and shear tests were conducted. Experimental results showed that the all-composite pyramidal lattice truss core sandwich structures were more weight efficient than other metallic lattice truss core sandwich structures. Failure modes revealed that node rupture dominated the mechanical behavior of sandwich structures.

  17. Numerical study on the mechanisms of the SERS of gold-coated pyramidal tip substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Wang, Qiao; Li, Hong; Liu, Kun; Pan, Shi; Zhan, Weishen; Chen, Maodu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the physical enhancement mechanisms of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of pyramidal tip substrates are studied theoretically. We structure the periodic square-based arrays of adjacent nanometer pyramidal gold-coated tips on silicon. In order to determine the contribution of plasmonic or diffraction effects on the SERS, three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations are implemented by taking into account the substrate coated with a gold thin film or a perfect electrical conductor thin film. The tip distance, metal coating thickness and incident light polarization angle are also optimized to investigate whether the further SERS signal can be enhanced.

  18. PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION BASED ON PYRAMID MODEL FOR SATELLITE MODULE LAYOUT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bao; Teng Hongfei

    2005-01-01

    To improve the global search ability of particle swarm optimization (PSO), a multi-population PSO based on pyramid model (PPSO) is presented. Then, it is applied to solve the layout optimization problems against the background of an international commercial communication satellite (INTELSAT-Ⅲ) module. Three improvements are developed, including multi-population search based on pyramid model, adaptive collision avoidance among particles, and mutation of degraded particles. In the numerical examples of the layout design of this simplified satellite module, the performance of PPSO is compared to global version PSO and local version PSO (ring and Neumann PSO). The results show that PPSO has higher computational accuracy, efficiency and success ratio.

  19. Electronic microscopy and EDX characterization of teotihuacan prehispanic mortar from the cave under the sun pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, T. [Faculty of Chemistry, National University of Mexico, Building D, CU (O4510) Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: tmc@servidor.unam.mx; Martinez, G. [Coordinacion Nacional de Conservacion del Patrimonio Cultural. Xicontencatl y General Anaya s/n. (04120) Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza, D. [National Institute of Nuclear Research.. Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5 (52045), Salazar, Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Juarez, F. [Institute of Geophysics, National University of Mexico, Circuito Institutos, CU (04510) Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Cabrera, L. [Faculty of Chemistry, National University of Mexico, Building D, CU (O4510) Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-12-01

    A cave (102 m long) under the structure of the Sun pyramid of the prehispanic Teotihuacan City indicates the importance of the pyramid. Studies of the cave mortar samples using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed no difference in the chemical elemental composition. The elements can be distributed in three groups: major, minor and trace elements. The minerals identified were compatible with the origins of the cave and with the magnetic pattern.

  20. Loss of functional A-type potassium channels in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Brandy N; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2013-12-11

    Despite the critical importance of voltage-gated ion channels in neurons, very little is known about their functional properties in Fragile X syndrome: the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. Using three complementary approaches, we investigated the physiological role of A-type K(+) currents (I(KA)) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Direct measurement of I(KA) using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings revealed that there was significantly less I(KA) in the dendrites of CA1 neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Interestingly, the midpoint of activation for A-type K(+) channels was hyperpolarized for fmr1-/y neurons compared with wild-type, which might partially compensate for the lower current density. Because of the rapid time course for recovery from steady-state inactivation, the dendritic A-type K(+) current in CA1 neurons from both wild-type and fmr1-/y mice is likely mediated by K(V)4 containing channels. The net effect of the differences in I(KA) was that back-propagating action potentials had larger amplitudes producing greater calcium influx in the distal dendrites of fmr1-/y neurons. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice had a lower threshold for LTP induction. These data suggest that loss of I(KA) in hippocampal neurons may contribute to dendritic pathophysiology in Fragile X syndrome.

  1. Conditional ablation of neuroligin-1 in CA1 pyramidal neurons blocks LTP by a cell-autonomous NMDA receptor-independent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Man; Polepalli, Jai; Chen, Lulu Y.; Zhang, Bo; Südhof, Thomas C.; Malenka, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules implicated in autism and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite extensive work, the role of neuroligins in synapse function and plasticity, especially NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent LTP, remains unclear. To establish which synaptic functions unequivocally require neuroligins, we analyzed single and triple conditional knockout (cKO) mice for all three major neuroligin isoforms (NL1-NL3). We inactivated neuroligins by stereotactic viral expression of Cre-recombinase in hippocampal CA1 region pyramidal neurons at postnatal day 0 (P0) or day 21 (P21), and measured synaptic function, synaptic plasticity, and spine numbers in acute hippocampal slices 2–3 weeks later. Surprisingly, we find that ablation of neuroligins in newborn or juvenile mice only modestly impaired basal synaptic function in hippocampus, and caused no alteration in postsynaptic spine numbers. However, triple cKO of NL1-NL3 or single cKO of NL1 impaired NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (NMDAR EPSCs), and abolished NMDAR-dependent LTP. Strikingly, the NL1 cKO also abolished LTP elicited by activation of L-type Ca2+-channels during blockade of NMDARs. These findings demonstrate that neuroligins are generally not essential for synapse formation in CA1 pyramidal neurons but shape synaptic properties and that NL1 specifically is required for LTP induced by postsynaptic Ca2+-elevations, a function which may contribute to the pathophysiological role of neuroligins in brain disorders. PMID:27217145

  2. Evaluating the Implementation of the "Pyramid Model for Promoting Social-Emotional Competence" in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Snyder, Patricia A.; Fox, Lise; Algina, James

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a potential efficacy trial examining the effects of classroom-wide implementation of the "Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence" on teachers' implementation of "Pyramid Model" practices and children's social-emotional skills and challenging behavior. Participants were 40 preschool…

  3. Coaching Early Educators to Implement Effective Practices: Using the Pyramid Model to Promote Social-Emotional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lise; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

    2011-01-01

    The Pyramid Model is a conceptual framework for organizing practices for promoting young children's social-emotional development and preventing and addressing challenging behavior. The authors describe a coaching approach that is focused on supporting early educators' implementation of the Pyramid Model. The authors provide a description of the…

  4. The "Teaching Pyramid": A Model for the Implementation of Classroom Practices within a Program-Wide Approach to Behavior Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Fox, Lise

    2009-01-01

    The "Teaching Pyramid" (Fox, Dunlap, Hemmeter, Joseph, & Strain, 2003) is a framework for organizing evidence-based practices for promoting social-emotional development and preventing and addressing challenging behavior in preschool programs. In this article, we briefly describe the "Teaching Pyramid" as a framework for implementing effective…

  5. Moving beyond the Three Tier Intervention Pyramid toward a Comprehensive Framework for Student and Learning Supports. A Center Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Introduction into federal policy of response to intervention (RTI) and positive behavior intervention and supports (PBIS) led to widespread adoption and adaptation of the three tier intervention pyramid. As originally presented, the pyramid highlights three different levels of intervention and suggests the percent of students at each level. While…

  6. Motor recovery in a patient with an infarct in the medullary pyramid via the corticospinal tract passing through the small spared area within the infarcted medullary pyramid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyeok Gyu Kwon; Sung Ho Jang

    2011-01-01

    The present study reported a 58-year-old male patient who exhibited complete paralysis of the right extremities at stroke onset.Brain MR images showed an infarct in the left medullary pyramid and a small spared area on the medial side of the infarct.He gained the ability to extend the affected fingers against gravity and to dorsiflex the affected ankle without gravity at 3 months after stroke onset.Diffusion tensor imaging results showed that at 6 months after stroke onset,the corticospinal tract of the affected (left) hemisphere descended through the small spared area of the infarcted medullary pyramid.No motor-evoked potential was elicited from the affected (left) hemisphere at 2 weeks after stroke onset;however,motor-evoked potential was elicited at 6 months as shown by transcranial magnetic stimulation results.The motor function of the affected side of this patient appears to have been recovered via the corticospinal tract that passed through the small spared area within the infarcted medullary pyramid.

  7. Neonatal Propofol and Etomidate Exposure Enhance Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in Hippocampal Cornus Ammonis 1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Qiang Zhang; Wan-Ying Xu; Chang-Qing Xu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Propofol and etomidate are the most important intravenous general anesthetics in the current clinical use and that mediate gamma-aminobutyric acid's (GABAergic) synaptic transmission.However,their long-term effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission induced by neonatal propofol or etomidate exposure remain unclear.We investigated the long-term GABAergic neurotransmission alterations,following neonatal propofol and etomidate administration.Methods:Sprague-Dawley rat pups at postnatal days 4 6 were underwent 6-h-long propofol-induced or 5-h-long etomidate-induced anesthesia.We performed whole-cell patch-clamp recording from pyramidal cells in the cornus ammonis 1 area of acute hippocampal slices of postnatal 80-90 days.Spontaneous and miniature inhibitory GABAergic currents (spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents [sIPSCs] and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents [mIPSCs]) and their kinetic characters were measured.The glutamatergic tonic effect on inhibitory transmission and the effect of bumetanide on neonatal propofol exposure were also examined.Results:Neonatal propofol exposure significantly increased the frequency of mIPSCs (from 1.87 ± 0.35 Hz to 3.43 ± 0.51 Hz,P < 0.05) and did not affect the amplitude of mIPSCs and sIPSCs.Both propofol and etomidate slowed the decay time of mIPSCs kinetics (168.39 ± 27.91 ms and 267.02 ± 100.08 ms vs.68.18 ± 12.43 ms;P < 0.05).Bumetanide significantly blocked the frequency increase and reversed the kinetic alteration of mIPSCs induced by neonatal propofol exposure (3.01 ± 0.45 Hz and 94.30 ± 32.56 ms).Conclusions:Neonatal propofol and etomidate exposure has long-term effects on inhibitory GABAergic transmission.Propofol might act at pre-and post-synaptic GABA receptor A (GABAA) receptors within GABAergic synapses and impairs the glutamatergic tonic input to GABAergic synapses;etomidate might act at the postsynaptic site.

  8. Effectively Improved Field Emission Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Graphenes Composite Field Emitter by Covering on the Si Pyramidal Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Yu, Hua; Zhong, Jiasong;

    2015-01-01

    The composite nanostructure emitter of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphenes was deposited on pyramidal silicon substrate by the simple larger scale electrophoretic deposition process. The field emission (FE) properties of the composite/pyramidal Si device were greatly improved compared...

  9. Fabrication of dodecagonal pyramid on nitrogen face GaN and its effect on the light extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Wet etching has been widely used in defect evaluation for Ga-face GaN and surface roughness for N-face GaN dodecagonal pyramids has been fabricated on laser-lift-off N-face GaN by hot phosphor acid etching.The dodecagonal pyramid shows twelve facets including six{20-2-3}and six{22-4-5}planes.From cross-sectional TEM image,it is shown that the pyramid corresponds to the top of the edge dislocation.Compared with hexagonal pyramid-surface light emitting diodes(LEDs)etched by commonly used photoelectrochemical(PEC)process in KOH aqueous,the dodecagonal pyramid-surface LEDs show improved light extraction efficiency because of more facets,which effectively reduces the total internal reflection.

  10. Light extraction efficiency of GaN-based LED with pyramid texture by using ray path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jui-Wen; Wang, Chia-Shen

    2012-09-10

    We study three different gallium-nitride (GaN) based light emitting diode (LED) cases based on the different locations of the pyramid textures. In case 1, the pyramid texture is located on the sapphire top surface, in case 2, the pyramid texture is locate on the P-GaN top surface, while in case 3, the pyramid texture is located on both the sapphire and P-GaN top surfaces. We study the relationship between the light extraction efficiency (LEE) and angle of slant of the pyramid texture. The optimization of total LEE was highest for case 3 among the three cases. Moreover, the seven escape paths along which most of the escaped photon flux propagated were selected in a simulation of the LEDs. The seven escape paths were used to estimate the slant angle for the optimization of LEE and to precisely analyze the photon escape path.

  11. Influence of Deposition Pressure on the Properties of Round Pyramid Textured a-Si:H Solar Cells for Maglev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Wonseok; Lee, Kyuil; Lee, Daedong; Kang, Hyunil

    2016-05-01

    HIT (Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin-layer) photovoltaic cells is one of the highest efficiencies in the commercial solar cells. The pyramid texturization for reducing surface reflectance of HIT solar cells silicon wafers is widely used. For the low leakage current and high shunt of solar cells, the intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on substrate must be uniformly thick of pyramid structure. However, it is difficult to control the thickness in the traditional pyramid texturing process. Thus, we textured the intrinsic a-Si:H thin films with the round pyramidal structure by using HNO3, HF, and CH3COOH solution. The characteristics of round pyramid a-Si:H solar cells deposited at pressure of 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 mTorr by PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) was investigated. The lifetime, open circuit voltage, fill factor and efficiency of a-Si:H solar cells were investigated with respect to various deposition pressure.

  12. Occurrence of complement protein C3 in dying pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampus after systemic administration of kainic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Mori, Norio; Yasuhara, Osamu

    2006-11-27

    To evaluate the roles of complement in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damages, the immunohistochemical localization of the complement protein C3 was examined in rat hippocampus after systemic KA injection. The immunoreactivity for C3 was found in glial cells in control rats, and such glial cells were increased in number after KA injection. Our confocal study showed that C3-positive glial cells were microglia. Three to seven days after KA, C3 immunoreactivity appeared in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons. Double staining for C3 combined with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling showed that occurrence of C3 immunoreactivity in neurons coincided well with that of DNA fragmentation. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR experiments suggested local synthesis of C3 by brain cells. Our results suggest that C3 contributes greatly to neuronal death after systemic KA administration, and that microglia and neurons are the local source of C3 in KA-induced brain injury.

  13. β-Adrenergic activation enhances NMDA-induced current in pyramidal cells of the basolateral nucleus of amygdala

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xinqiu; CAO Xiaohua; LI Bao-ming

    2005-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDA-R) in the amygdala complex is critical for both long-term potentiation (LTP) and formation of conditioned fear memory. It is reported that activation of β-adrenoceptors (β-AR) in the amygdala facilitates LTP and enhances memory consolidation. The present study examined the regulatory effect of β-AR activation on NMDA-R mediated current in pyramidal cells of the basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA), using whole-cell recording technique. Bath application of the β-AR agonist isoproterenol enhanced NMDA-induced current, and this facilitatory effect was blocked by co-administered propranolol, a β-AR antagonist. The facilitatory effect of isoproterenol on NMDA-induced current could not be induced when the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-cAMPs was added in electrode internal solution.The present results suggest that β-AR activation in the BLA could modulate NMDA-R activity directly and positively, probably via PKA.

  14. Muscarinic Long-Term Enhancement of Tonic and Phasic GABAA Inhibition in Rat CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Soledad; Fernández de Sevilla, David; Buño, Washington

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates network operation in the hippocampus by controlling excitation and inhibition in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons (PCs), the latter through gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs). Although, the enhancing effects of ACh on GABAARs have been reported (Dominguez et al., 2014, 2015), its role in regulating tonic GABAA inhibition has not been explored in depth. Therefore, we aimed at determining the effects of the activation of ACh receptors on responses mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAARs. Here, we show that under blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors ACh, acting through muscarinic type 1 receptors, paired with post-synaptic depolarization induced a long-term enhancement of tonic GABAA currents (tGABAA) and puff-evoked GABAA currents (pGABAA). ACh combined with depolarization also potentiated IPSCs (i.e., phasic inhibition) in the same PCs, without signs of interactions of synaptic responses with pGABAA and tGABAA, suggesting the contribution of two different GABAA receptor pools. The long-term enhancement of GABAA currents and IPSCs reduced the excitability of PCs, possibly regulating plasticity and learning in behaving animals. PMID:27833531

  15. Bidirectional Hebbian Plasticity Induced by Low-Frequency Stimulation in Basal Dendrites of Rat Barrel Cortex Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-García, Andrea; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Núñez, Ángel; Buño, Washington; Fernández de Sevilla, David

    2017-01-01

    According to Hebb's original hypothesis (Hebb, 1949), synapses are reinforced when presynaptic activity triggers postsynaptic firing, resulting in long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic efficacy. Long-term depression (LTD) is a use-dependent decrease in synaptic strength that is thought to be due to synaptic input causing a weak postsynaptic effect. Although the mechanisms that mediate long-term synaptic plasticity have been investigated for at least three decades not all question have as yet been answered. Therefore, we aimed at determining the mechanisms that generate LTP or LTD with the simplest possible protocol. Low-frequency stimulation of basal dendrite inputs in Layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat barrel cortex induces LTP. This stimulation triggered an EPSP, an action potential (AP) burst, and a Ca2+ spike. The same stimulation induced LTD following manipulations that reduced the Ca2+ spike and Ca2+ signal or the AP burst. Low-frequency whisker deflections induced similar bidirectional plasticity of action potential evoked responses in anesthetized rats. These results suggest that both in vitro and in vivo similar mechanisms regulate the balance between LTP and LTD. This simple induction form of bidirectional hebbian plasticity could be present in the natural conditions to regulate the detection, flow, and storage of sensorimotor information. PMID:28203145

  16. The spatio-temporal characteristics of action potential initiation in layer 5 pyramidal neurons: a voltage imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Marko A; Foust, Amanda J; McCormick, David A; Zecevic, Dejan

    2011-09-01

    The spatial pattern of Na(+) channel clustering in the axon initial segment (AIS) plays a critical role in tuning neuronal computations, and changes in Na(+) channel distribution have been shown to mediate novel forms of neuronal plasticity in the axon. However, immunocytochemical data on channel distribution may not directly predict spatio-temporal characteristics of action potential initiation, and prior electrophysiological measures are either indirect (extracellular) or lack sufficient spatial resolution (intracellular) to directly characterize the spike trigger zone (TZ). We took advantage of a critical methodological improvement in the high sensitivity membrane potential imaging (V(m) imaging) technique to directly determine the location and length of the spike TZ as defined in functional terms. The results show that in mature axons of mouse cortical layer 5 pyramidal cells, action potentials initiate in a region ∼20 μm in length centred between 20 and 40 μm from the soma. From this region, the AP depolarizing wave invades initial nodes of Ranvier within a fraction of a millisecond and propagates in a saltatory fashion into axonal collaterals without failure at all physiologically relevant frequencies. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to the saltatory conduction in mature axons, AP propagation is non-saltatory (monotonic) in immature axons prior to myelination.

  17. Spatial Pyramids and Two-layer Stacking SVM classifiers for Image Categorization: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdullah, Azizi; Veltkamp, Remco C.; Wiering, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Recent research in image recognition has shown that combining multiple descriptors is a very useful way to improve classification performance. Furthermore, the use of spatial pyramids that compute descriptors at multiple spatial resolution levels generally increases the discriminative power of the d

  18. Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, Colton; Dorsey, Alison; Louie, John [UNR; Schwering, Paul; Pullammanappallil, Satish

    2016-08-01

    Colton Dudley, Alison Dorsey, Paul Opdyke, Dustin Naphan, Marlon Ramos, John Louie, Paul Schwering, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2013, Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at Amer. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists, Pacific Section Annual Meeting, Monterey, Calif., April 19-25.

  19. Bidirectional shift in the cornu ammonis 3 pyramidal dendritic organization following brief stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, MHP; Costoli, T; Koolhaas, JM; Fuchs, E

    2004-01-01

    The negative impact of chronic stress at the structure of apical dendrite branches of cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) pyramidal neurons is well established. However, there is no information available on the CA3 dendritic organization related to short-lasting stress, which suffices to produce longterm habituat

  20. Thrombin modulates persistent sodium current in CA1 pyramidal neurons of young and adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunko, O O; Isaev, D S; Krishtal, O O; Isaeva, E V

    2015-01-01

    Serine protease thrombin, a key factor of blood coagulation, participates in many neuronal processes important for normal brain functioning and during pathological conditions involving abnormal neuronal synchronization, neurodegeneration and inflammation. Our previous study on CA3 pyramidal neurons showed that application ofthrombin through the activation of specific protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) produces a significant hyperpolarizing shift of the activation of the TTX-sensitive persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (I(Nap)) thereby affecting membrane potential and seizure threshold at the network level. It was shown that PAR1 is also expressed in CA1 area of hippocampus and can be implicated in neuronal damage in this area after status epilepticus. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of thrombin on I(NaP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons from adult and young rats. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique we demonstrate that thrombin application results in the hyperpolarization shift of I(NaP) activation as well as increase in the I(NaP) amplitude in both age groups. We have found that I(NaP) in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal CA 1 region is more vulnerable to the thrombin action than I(NaP) in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal CA3 region. We have also found that the immature hippocampus is more sensitive to thrombin action which emphasizes the contribution of thrombin-dependent pathway to the regulation of neuronal activity in immature brain.

  1. Factors Affecting Energy Barriers for Pyramidal Inversion in Amines and Phosphines: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate exercise in computational chemistry that investigates the energy barrier for pyramidal inversion of amines and phosphines is presented. Semiempirical calculations (PM3) of the ground-state and transition-state energies for NR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] and PR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] allow…

  2. Pyramid wavefront sensing with a laser guide star for an ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Brice

    2010-07-01

    The wavefront sensor [WFS] is a key element of an Adaptive Optics [AO] system. It gives access to a direct measurement of the turbulent phase, its curvature or its slope, from which the mirror voltages are computed. The ability of the system to correct efficiently the atmospheric turbulence is strongly dependent on the performance of the WFS in estimating the turbulent phase. The Shack-Hartmann [SH] WFS has been for a long time the standard used in AO systems. In 1996, it has been proposed1 a new generation WFS, the pyramid WFS. It is a focal plane WFS, based on the principle of a Foucault knife-edge. It has been demonstrated that it provides a consistent gain with respect to the Shack-Hartmann.2,5-7 More recently, improvements were proposed to increase the pyramid performance.3, 4 On the framework of the developpement of extremely large telescopes, the interest of a pyramid wave front sensor appears clearly. But its behaviour with laser guide stars [LGS], most probably necessary in any Extremely Large Telescope [ELT], is still relatively unknown. Some WFS dedicated to LGS wave front sensing has already been proposed8,9 but a full study of the pyramid WFS behaviour is still necessary. This work's aim is to bring answers to this topic.

  3. z calibration of the atomic force microscope by means of a pyramidal tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    A new method for imaging the probe tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever by the atomic force microscope itself (self-imaging) is presented. The self-imaging is accomplished by scanning the probe tip across a sharper tip on the surface. By using a pyramidal probe tip with a very well...

  4. Strengthening Socio-Emotional Competencies in a School Setting: Data from the Pyramid Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Madeleine; Fox, Pauline; Mitchell, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Background: Development of socio-emotional competencies is key to children's successful social interaction at home and at school. Aims: This study examines the efficacy of a UK primary school-based intervention, the Pyramid project, in strengthening children's socio-emotional competencies. Sample: Participants were 385 children from seven schools…

  5. The Bottom of the Pyramid: Much ado, but is it enough?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crabtree, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Although Prahalad does not address the issues surrounding multidimensional poverty, many of his cases fit the notion of multidimensional poverty better than they suit income poverty suggesting that we should re-focus BOP from the Bottom of the Pyramid to Multidimensional Poverty solutions....

  6. "Reaching Every Student" with a Pyramid of Intervention Approach: One District's Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howery, Kathy; McClellan, Tony; Pedersen-Bayus, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a description of ongoing work of an Alberta school district that is working to support and enhance effective inclusive practices that reach and teach every student. The district is implementing a Pyramid of Supports model that is built upon four critical elements: a belief in social justice and the value of every child, a…

  7. Culturally Responsive Pyramid Model Practices: Program-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rosemarie; Steed, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual article reviews current research on racial disparities in disciplinary practices in early childhood education and work to address these issues within a positive behavior support (PBS) framework. Building largely on the Pyramid Model, recommendations and a culturally responsive approach are suggested for use within a program-wide…

  8. Science Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure on the Concept of "Food Pyramid"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çinar, Derya

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to determine science student teachers' cognitive structure on the concept of food pyramid. Qualitative research method was applied in this study. Fallacies detected in the pre-service teachers' conceptual structures are believed to result in students' developing misconceptions in their future classes and will adversely…

  9. High temperatures alter physiological properties of pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons in hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eKim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Temperature has multiple effects on neurons, yet little is known about the effects of high temperature on the physiology of mammalian central neurons. Hyperthermia can influence behavior and cause febrile seizures. We studied the effects of acute hyperthermia on the immature hippocampus in vitro by recording from pyramidal neurons and inhibitory oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM interneurons (identified by green fluorescent protein expression in the GIN mouse line. Warming to 41°C caused depolarization, spontaneous action potentials, reduced input resistance and membrane time constant, and increased spontaneous synaptic activity of most pyramidal cells and O-LM interneurons. Pyramidal neurons of area CA3 were more strongly excited by hyperthermia than those of area CA1. About 90% of O-LM interneurons in both CA1 and CA3 increased their firing rates at hyperthermic temperatures; interneurons in CA3 fired faster than those in CA1 on average. Blockade of fast synaptic transmission did not abolish the effect of hyperthermia on neuronal excitability. Our results suggest that hyperthermia increases hippocampal excitability, particularly in seizure-prone area CA3, by altering the intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal cells and interneurons.

  10. High temperatures alter physiological properties of pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jennifer A; Connors, Barry W

    2012-01-01

    Temperature has multiple effects on neurons, yet little is known about the effects of high temperature on the physiology of mammalian central neurons. Hyperthermia can influence behavior and cause febrile seizures. We studied the effects of acute hyperthermia on the immature hippocampus in vitro by recording from pyramidal neurons and inhibitory oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons (identified by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the GIN mouse line). Warming to 41°C caused depolarization, spontaneous action potentials, reduced input resistance and membrane time constant, and increased spontaneous synaptic activity of most pyramidal cells and O-LM interneurons. Pyramidal neurons of area CA3 were more strongly excited by hyperthermia than those of area CA1. About 90% of O-LM interneurons in both CA1 and CA3 increased their firing rates at hyperthermic temperatures; interneurons in CA3 fired faster than those in CA1 on average. Blockade of fast synaptic transmission did not abolish the effect of hyperthermia on neuronal excitability. Our results suggest that hyperthermia increases hippocampal excitability, particularly in seizure-prone area CA3, by altering the intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal cells and interneurons.

  11. The Diffusion of the Learning Pyramid Myths in Academia: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letrud, Kåre; Hernes, Sigbjørn

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the diffusion and present day status of a family of unsubstantiated learning-retention myths, some of which are referred to as "the learning pyramid". We demonstrate through an extensive search in academic journals and field-specific encyclopaedias that these myths are indeed widely publicised in academia and that…

  12. Expected gain in the pyramid wavefront sensor with limited Strehl ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotto, V.; Ragazzoni, R.; Bergomi, M.; Magrin, D.; Farinato, J.

    2016-09-01

    Context. One of the main properties of the pyramid wavefront sensor is that, once the loop is closed, and as the reference star image shrinks on the pyramid pin, the wavefront estimation signal-to-noise ratio can considerably improve. This has been shown to translate into a gain in limiting magnitude when compared with the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, in which the sampling on the wavefront is performed before the light is split into four quadrants, which does not allow the quality of the focused spot to increase. Since this property is strictly related to the size of the re-imaged spot on the pyramid pin, the better the wavefront correction, the higher the gain. Aims: The goal of this paper is to extend the descriptive and analytical computation of this gain that was given in a previous paper, to partial wavefront correction conditions, which are representative for most of the wide field correction adaptive optics systems. Methods: After focusing on the low Strehl ratio regime, we analyze the minimum spatial sampling required for the wavefront sensor correction to still experience a considerable gain in sensitivity between the pyramid and the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Results: We find that the gain can be described as a function of the sampling in terms of the Fried parameter.

  13. Spiking patterns of neocortical L5 pyramidal neurons in vitro change with temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan eHedrick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A subset of pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the mammalian neocortex can fire action potentials in brief, high-frequency bursts while others fire spikes at regularly-spaced intervals. Here we show that individual layer 5 pyramidal neurons in acute slices from mouse primary motor cortex can adopt both regular and burst spiking patterns. During constant current injection at the soma, neurons displayed a regular firing pattern at 36-37 °C, but switched to burst spiking patterns upon cooling the slice to 24-26 °C. This change in firing pattern was reversible and repeatable and was independent of the somatic resting membrane potential. Hence these spiking patterns are not inherent to discrete populations of pyramidal neurons and are more interchangeable than previously thought. Burst spiking in these neurons is the result of electrical interactions between the soma and distal apical dendritic tree. Presumably the interactions between soma and distal dendrite are temperature-sensitive, suggesting that the manner in which layer 5 pyramidal neurons translate synaptic input into an output spiking pattern is fundamentally altered at sub-physiological temperatures.

  14. Designing a framework to design a business model for the 'bottom of the pyramid' population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ver loren van Themaat, Tanye; Schutte, Cornelius S.L.; Lutters, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a framework for developing and designing a business model to target the bottom of the pyramid (BoP) population. Using blue ocean strategy and business model literature, integrated with research on the BoP, the framework offers a systematic approach for organisations to analyse

  15. Reviewing a decade of research on the "Base/Bottom of the Pyramid" (BOP) concept.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Rivera-Santos, M.; Rufín, C.

    2014-01-01

    In 1998-1999, Prahalad and colleagues introduced the base/bottom of the pyramid (BOP) concept in an article and a working paper. This article’s goal is to answer the following question: What has become of the concept over the decade following its first systematic exposition in 1999? To answer this q

  16. Large pyramid shaped single crystals of BiFeO{sub 3} by solvothermal synthesis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sornadurai, D.; Ravindran, T. R.; Paul, V. Thomas; Sastry, V. Sankara [Condensed Matter Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Physical Metallurgy Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Condensed Matter Physics Division, Materials Science Group (India)

    2012-06-05

    Synthesis parameters are optimized in order to grow single crystals of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}. 2 to 3 mm size pyramid (tetrahedron) shaped single crystals were successfully obtained by solvothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy with EDAX confirmed the phase formation. Raman scattering spectra of bulk BiFeO3 single crystals have been measured which match well with reported spectra.

  17. Recursive, in-place algorithm for the hexagonal orthogonal oriented quadrature image pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1989-01-01

    Pyramid image transforms have proven useful in image coding and pattern recognition. The hexagonal orthogonal oriented quadrature image pyramid (HOP), transforms an image into a set of orthogonal, oriented, odd and even bandpass subimages. It operates on a hexagonal input lattice and employs seven kernels, each of which occupies a neighborhood consisting of a point and a hexagon of six nearest neighbors. The kernels consist of one lowpass and six bandpass kernels that are orthogonal, self-similar, and localized in space, spatial frequency, orientation, and phase. The kernels are first applied to the image samples to create the first level of the pyramid, then to the lowpass coefficients to create the next level. The resulting pyramid is a compact, efficient image code. Here, a recursive, in-place algorithm for computation of the HOP transform is described. The transform may be regarded as a depth-first traversal of a tree structure. It is shown that the algorithm requires a number of operations that is on the order of the number of pixels.

  18. Effects of Distance Coaching on Teachers' Use of Pyramid Model Practices: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artman-Meeker, Kathleen; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Snyder, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effects of 2 professional development approaches on teachers' implementation of the "Pyramid" model, a classroom-wide approach for fostering social-emotional development and addressing challenging behavior. The study had 2 goals: (a) to examine the differential effects of workshop…

  19. Investigations into early rift development and geothermal resources in the Pyramid Lake fault zone, Western Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. [UCSD; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R. [USGS; Louie, J. [UNR; Pullammanappallil, S. [Optim

    2016-08-01

    A. K. Eisses, A. M. Kell, G. Kent, N. W. Driscoll, R. E. Karlin, R. L. Baskin, J. N. Louie, S. Pullammanappallil, 2010, Investigations into early rift development and geothermal resources in the Pyramid Lake fault zone, Western Nevada: Abstract T33C-2278 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

  20. Towards a Framework of Cooperation Issues in Base of the Pyramid Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.; Sheombar, A.; Silvius, A.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in the notion that there is an untapped market with significant buying power hidden at the base of the economic pyramid (BOP) has enjoyed increased attention over the last few years. The discourse on this matter is lively and abounds with opposing opinions. Although this discourse is acknow

  1. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You Kure; Fujishima, Kazuto; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s) from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  2. Spectral-spatial hyperspectral image classification using super-pixel-based spatial pyramid representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiayuan; Tan, Hui Li; Toomik, Maria; Lu, Shijian

    2016-10-01

    Spatial pyramid matching has demonstrated its power for image recognition task by pooling features from spatially increasingly fine sub-regions. Motivated by the concept of feature pooling at multiple pyramid levels, we propose a novel spectral-spatial hyperspectral image classification approach using superpixel-based spatial pyramid representation. This technique first generates multiple superpixel maps by decreasing the superpixel number gradually along with the increased spatial regions for labelled samples. By using every superpixel map, sparse representation of pixels within every spatial region is then computed through local max pooling. Finally, features learned from training samples are aggregated and trained by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The proposed spectral-spatial hyperspectral image classification technique has been evaluated on two public hyperspectral datasets, including the Indian Pines image containing 16 different agricultural scene categories with a 20m resolution acquired by AVIRIS and the University of Pavia image containing 9 land-use categories with a 1.3m spatial resolution acquired by the ROSIS-03 sensor. Experimental results show significantly improved performance compared with the state-of-the-art works. The major contributions of this proposed technique include (1) a new spectral-spatial classification approach to generate feature representation for hyperspectral image, (2) a complementary yet effective feature pooling approach, i.e. the superpixel-based spatial pyramid representation that is used for the spatial correlation study, (3) evaluation on two public hyperspectral image datasets with superior image classification performance.

  3. Pyramidal texturing of silicon surface via inorganic-organic hybrid alkaline liquor for heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyou; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wang, Liguo; Jiang, Yuanjian; Wei, Changchun; Zhao, Ying

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a new class of silicon texturing approach based on inorganic (sodium hydroxide, NaOH) and organic (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, TMAH) alkaline liquor etching processes for photovoltaic applications. The first stage of inorganic alkaline etching textures the silicon surface rapidly with large pyramids and reduces the cost. The subsequent organic alkaline second-etching improves the coverage of small pyramids on the silicon surface and strip off the metallic contaminants produced by the first etching step. In addition, it could smoothen the surface of the pyramids to yield good morphology. In this study, the texturing duration of both etching steps was controlled to optimize the optical and electrical properties as well as the surface morphology and passivation characteristics of the silicon substrates. Compared with traditional inorganic NaOH texturing, this hybrid process yields smoother (111) facets of the pyramids, fewer residual Na+ ions on the silicon surface, and a shorter processing period. It also offers the advantage of lower cost compared with the organic texturing method based on the use of only TMAH. We applied this hybrid texturing process to fabricate silicon heterojunction solar cells, which showed a remarkable improvement compared with the cells based on traditional alkaline texturing processes.

  4. Neuregulin 3 Mediates Cortical Plate Invasion and Laminar Allocation of GABAergic Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Bartolini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits in the cerebral cortex consist of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. These two main classes of cortical neurons follow largely different genetic programs, yet they assemble into highly specialized circuits during development following a very precise choreography. Previous studies have shown that signals produced by pyramidal cells influence the migration of cortical interneurons, but the molecular nature of these factors has remained elusive. Here, we identified Neuregulin 3 (Nrg3 as a chemoattractive factor expressed by developing pyramidal cells that guides the allocation of cortical interneurons in the developing cortical plate. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that Nrg3 modulates the migration of interneurons into the cortical plate in a process that is dependent on the tyrosine kinase receptor ErbB4. Perturbation of Nrg3 signaling in conditional mutants leads to abnormal lamination of cortical interneurons. Nrg3 is therefore a critical mediator in the assembly of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  5. Low concentrations of alcohol inhibit BDNF-dependent GABAergic plasticity via L-type Ca2+ channel inhibition in developing CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Stefano; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2010-05-12

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is associated with learning and memory alterations that could be, in part, a consequence of hippocampal damage. The CA3 hippocampal subfield is one of the regions affected by ethanol (EtOH), including exposure during the third trimester-equivalent (i.e., neonatal period in rats). However, the mechanism of action of EtOH is poorly understood. In CA3 pyramidal neurons from neonatal rats, dendritic BDNF release causes long-term potentiation of the frequency of GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous postsynaptic currents (LTP-GABAA) and this mechanism is thought to play a role in GABAergic synapse maturation. Here, we show that short- and long-term exposure of neonatal male rats to low EtOH concentrations abolishes LTP-GABAA by inhibiting L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These findings support the recommendation that even light drinking should be avoided during pregnancy.

  6. Motor recovery via aberrant pyramidal tract in a patient with a cerebral peduncle infarct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang Seok Yeo; Sung Ho Jang

    2011-01-01

    The presence of the aberrant pyramidal tract has been demonstrated by several studies; however, little is known about its role in motor recovery in stroke patients. In the present study, we reported a 69-year-old right-handed female patient with an infarct in the mid to lateral portion of the left cerebral peduncle, who showed an aberrant pyramidal tract by diffusion tensor tractography. The patient presented with severe weakness of the right extremities at stroke onset. The patient showed progressive motor recovery as much as being able to extend the affected extremities against some resistance at 6 months after onset. At 20 months after stroke onset, motor function of the left extremities had recovered to a nearly normal state. Diffusion tensor tractography results showed that the PT was disrupted at the lower midbrain of the affected (left) hemisphere at 3 weeks after stroke onset and this disruption was not changed at 20 months. An aberrant pyramidal tract in the left hemisphere was also observed, which originated from the primary motor cortex and descended through the corona radiata, posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, the medial lemniscus pathway from the midbrain to the pons, and then entered into the pyramidal tract area at the pontomedullary junction. Transcranial magnetic stimulation did not elicit motor evoked potential from the affected hand muscle at 3 weeks, but it elicited motor evoked potential with mildly delayed latency and low amplitude in the affected hand muscle at 20 months. The main motor functions of the affected extremities in this patient appeared to be recovered via this aberrant pyramidal tract.

  7. AMPA receptor modulators have different impact on hippocampal pyramidal cells and interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y-F; Arai, A C

    2005-01-01

    Positive modulators of AMPA receptors enhance synaptic plasticity and memory encoding. Facilitation of AMPA receptor currents not only results in enhanced activation of excitatory neurons but also increases the activity of inhibitory interneurons by up-modulating their excitatory input. However, little is known about the effects of these modulators on cells other than pyramidal neurons and about their impact on local microcircuits. This study examined the effects of members from three subfamilies of modulators (mainly CX516, CX546 and cyclothiazide) on excitatory synaptic responses in four classes of hippocampal CA1 neurons and on excitatory and disynaptically induced inhibitory field potentials in hippocampal slices. Effects on excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were examined in pyramidal cells, in two types of inhibitory interneurons located in stratum radiatum and oriens, and in stratum radiatum giant cells, a novel type of excitatory neuron. With CX516, increases in EPSC amplitude in pyramidal cells were two to three times larger than in interneurons and six times larger than in radiatum giant cells. The effects of CX546 on response duration similarly were largest in pyramidal cells. However, this drug also strongly differentiated between stratum oriens and radiatum interneurons with increases being four times larger in the latter. In contrast, cyclothiazide had similar effects on response duration in all cell types. In field recordings, CX516 was several times more potent in enhancing excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) than feedback or feedforward circuits, as expected from its larger influence on pyramidal cells. In contrast, BDP-20, a CX546 analog, was more potent in enhancing feedforward inhibition than either EPSPs or feedback inhibition. This preference for feedforward over feedback circuits is probably related to its higher potency in stratum radiatum versus oriens interneurons. Taken together, AMPA receptor modulators differ substantially

  8. Pyramid-Shaped Wurtzite CdSe Nanocrystals with Inverted Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sandeep; Gaspari, Roberto; Bertoni, Giovanni; Spadaro, Maria Chiara; Prato, Mirko; Turner, Stuart; Cavalli, Andrea; Manna, Liberato; Brescia, Rosaria

    2015-08-25

    We report on pyramid-shaped wurtzite cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanocrystals (NCs), synthesized by hot injection in the presence of chloride ions as shape-directing agents, exhibiting reversed crystal polarity compared to former reports. Advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques (image-corrected high-resolution TEM with exit wave reconstruction and probe-corrected high-angle annular dark field-scanning TEM) unequivocally indicate that the triangular base of the pyramids is the polar (0001̅) facet and their apex points toward the [0001] direction. Density functional theory calculations, based on a simple model of binding of Cl(-) ions to surface Cd atoms, support the experimentally evident higher thermodynamic stability of the (0001̅) facet over the (0001) one conferred by Cl(-) ions. The relative stability of the two polar facets of wurtzite CdSe is reversed compared to previous experimental and computational studies on Cd chalcogenide NCs, in which no Cl-based chemicals were deliberately used in the synthesis or no Cl(-) ions were considered in the binding models. Self-assembly of these pyramids in a peculiar clover-like geometry, triggered by the addition of oleic acid, suggests that the basal (polar) facet has a density and perhaps type of ligands significantly different from the other three facets, since the pyramids interact with each other exclusively via their lateral facets. A superstructure, however with no long-range order, is observed for clovers with their (0001̅) facets roughly facing each other. The CdSe pyramids were also exploited as seeds for CdS pods growth, and the peculiar shape of the derived branched nanostructures clearly arises from the inverted polarity of the seeds.

  9. Can astronomy enhance UNESCO World Heritage recognition? The paradigm of 4th Dynasty Egyptian pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The pyramids of Egypt, notably those of the 4th Dinasty as Giza, have always be considered an unmistikable part of human world heritage as the only surviving wonders of the Ancient World. Their majesty, technical hability and innovative character have always beeen considered as representative of ancient Egyptian ingenuity. However, past and present fringe theories about the pyramids and astronomy have always polluted the role of our discipline in the design, construction and symbolism of these impressive monuments. This is indeed unfear. Fortunately, things have started to change in the last couple of decades and now astronomy is interpreted as a neccessary tool for the correct interpretation of the astral eschatology present in the 5th and 6th Dynasty Texts of the Pyramids. Although the pyramid complexes of the 4th Dynasty are mute, there is however recent research showing that a strong astral symbolism could be hidden in many aspects of the complex architecture and in the design of these exceptional monuments. This idea comes from several hints obtained not only from planning and construction, but also from epigraphy and the analysis of celestial and local landscapes. Chronology also plays a most relevant role on this. The pyramid complexes of the 4th Dynasty at Meidum, Dahshur, Giza and Abu Rowash -- all of which enjoy UNESCO World Heritage recognition -- willl be scrutinized. As a consequence, we will show how astronomy can certainly enhance the face value of these extraordinary monuments as a definitive proof of the ancient Egyptian quest for Ma'at, i.e. their perennial obsesion for Cosmic Order.

  10. XAFS study of copper(II) complexes with square planar and square pyramidal coordination geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, A.; Klysubun, W.; Nitin Nair, N.; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure of six Cu(II) complexes, Cu2(Clna)4 2H2O (1), Cu2(ac)4 2H2O (2), Cu2(phac)4 (pyz) (3), Cu2(bpy)2(na)2 H2O (ClO4) (4), Cu2(teen)4(OH)2(ClO4)2 (5) and Cu2(tmen)4(OH)2(ClO4)2 (6) (where ac, phac, pyz, bpy, na, teen, tmen = acetate, phenyl acetate, pyrazole, bipyridine, nicotinic acid, tetraethyethylenediamine, tetramethylethylenediamine, respectively), which were supposed to have square pyramidal and square planar coordination geometries have been investigated. The differences observed in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) features of the standard compounds having four, five and six coordination geometry points towards presence of square planar and square pyramidal geometry around Cu centre in the studied complexes. The presence of intense pre-edge feature in the spectra of four complexes, 1-4, indicates square pyramidal coordination. Another important XANES feature, present in complexes 5 and 6, is prominent shoulder in the rising part of edge whose intensity decreases in the presence of axial ligands and thus indicates four coordination in these complexes. Ab initio calculations were carried out for square planar and square pyramidal Cu centres to observe the variation of 4p density of states in the presence and absence of axial ligands. To determine the number and distance of scattering atoms around Cu centre in the complexes, EXAFS analysis has been done using the paths obtained from Cu(II) oxide model and an axial Cu-O path from model of a square pyramidal complex. The results obtained from EXAFS analysis have been reported which confirmed the inference drawn from XANES features. Thus, it has been shown that these paths from model of a standard compound can be used to determine the structural parameters for complexes having unknown structure.

  11. Tailored keyhole surgery for basal ganglia cavernous malformation with preoperative three-dimensional pyramidal tracts assessment and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Quan; Geng Xu; Fan Zhao; Wei Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Accurately mapping the pyramidal tracts preoperatively and intraoperatively is the primary concern when operating on cavernous malformations (CMS) in the basal ganglia.We have conducted new methods for preoperative planning and have tailored lesion resection to prevent the damage of pyramidal tracts.Patients and methods:Eleven patients harboring cavernous malformations in basal ganglia were treated surgically from April 2008 to January 2015.Surgical planning was based on three-dimensional diffusion tensor pyramidal tractography and Virtual Reality system.Intraoperative detecting of pyramidal tracts with subcortical stimulation mapping and motor evoked potential monitoring were performed.The extent of resection and postoperative neurological function were assessed in each case.Results:Total removal of the cavernous malformations were achieved in each case.Four of the total eleven cases presented temporary neurological deficits,including one occurrence of hemiparesis and three occurrences of hemianesthesia.No permanent neurological deficit was developed in this series of cases.Conclusion:Three-dimensional diffusion tensor pyramidal tractography is quite helpful for preoperative planning of basal ganglia cavernous malformations,especially in choosing a suitable surgical approach.Intraoperative detection of pyramidal tracts with subcortical stimulation mapping and motor evoked potential monitoring play important roles in preventing damage to pyramidal tracts during lesion resection.

  12. Characterization of the porcine FBX07 gene: the first step towards generation of a pig model for Parkinsonian pyramidal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud; Bendixen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Parkinsonian pyramidal syndrome, also named pallido-pyramidal syndrome (PKPS), is the combination of early-onset progressive Parkinsonism with pyramidal tract signs. FBXO7, an F-box protein, is a component of modular E3 ubiquitin protein ligases called SCFs (SKP1, cullin, F-box proteins), which f......). Using a radiation hybrid map the FBXO7 gene was mapped to pig chromosome 5. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that FBXO7 mRNA is differentially expressed in many tissues and organs, and that FBXO7 transcript can be detected early in embryo development....

  13. From ¡°Double Pyramid¡± Thoughts to Corporate Social Responsibility for Enterprise Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Guiling Wei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study corporate social responsibility for staffs based on the pyramid of Maslow¡¯s hierarchy of human needs and the pyramid of Carroll¡¯s corporate social responsibility. This research takes advantage of ¡°double pyramid¡± thoughts to discuss some enterprises lack of corporate social responsibility for their employees. Today, we are building of a harmonious society, each enterprise should not only realize the profit maximization, but also to meet the individual...

  14. Development of a pyramidal wavefront sensor test-bench at INO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min; Gauvin, Jonny; Martin, Olivier; Savard, Maxime; Bourqui, Pascal; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Deschenes, William; Anctil, Genevieve; Chateauneuf, François

    2013-12-01

    The key technical element of the adaptive optics in astronomy is the wavefront sensing (WFS). One of the advantages of the pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) over the widely used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor seems to be the increased sensitivity in closed-loop applications. A high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range WFS, such as P-WFS technology, still needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes application. At INO, we have recently carried out the optical design, testing and performance evaluation of a P-WFS bench setup. The optical design of the bench setup mainly consists of the super-LED fiber source, source collimator, spatial light modulator (SLM), relay lenses, tip-tilt mirror, Fourier-transforming lens, and a four-faceted glass pyramid with a large vertex angle as well as pupil re-imaged optics. The phase-only SLM has been introduced in the bench setup to generate atmospheric turbulence with a maximum phase shift of more than 2π at each pixel (256 grey levels). Like a modified Foucault knife-edge test, the refractive pyramid element is used to produce four images of the entrance pupil on a CCD camera. The Fourier-transforming lens, which is used before the pyramid prism, is designed for telecentric output to allow dynamic modulation (rotation of the beam around the pyramid-prism center) from a tip-tilt mirror. Furthermore, a P-WFS diffraction-based model has been developed. This model includes most of the system limitations such as the SLM discrete voltage steps and the CCD pixel pitch. The pyramid effects (edges and tip) are considered as well. The modal wavefront reconstruction algorithm relies on the construction of an interaction matrix (one for each modulation's amplitude). Each column of the interaction matrix represents the combination of the four pupil images for a given wavefront aberration. The nice agreement between the data and the model suggest that the limitation of the system is not the P

  15. Synaptic integration in tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons: a new unifying principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkum, Matthew E; Nevian, Thomas; Sandler, Maya; Polsky, Alon; Schiller, Jackie

    2009-08-07

    Tuft dendrites are the main target for feedback inputs innervating neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons, but their properties remain obscure. We report the existence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) spikes in the fine distal tuft dendrites that otherwise did not support the initiation of calcium spikes. Both direct measurements and computer simulations showed that NMDA spikes are the dominant mechanism by which distal synaptic input leads to firing of the neuron and provide the substrate for complex parallel processing of top-down input arriving at the tuft. These data lead to a new unifying view of integration in pyramidal neurons in which all fine dendrites, basal and tuft, integrate inputs locally through the recruitment of NMDA receptor channels relative to the fixed apical calcium and axosomatic sodium integration points.

  16. Morphology cluster and prediction of growth of human brain pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Yu; Zengxin Han; Wencong Zeng; Shenquan Liu

    2012-01-01

    Predicting neuron growth is valuable to understand the morphology of neurons, thus it is helpful in the research of neuron classification. This study sought to propose a new method of predicting the growth of human neurons using 1 907 sets of data in human brain pyramidal neurons obtained from the website of NeuroMorpho.Org. First, we analyzed neurons in a morphology field and used an expectation-maximization algorithm to specify the neurons into six clusters. Second, naive Bayes classifier was used to verify the accuracy of the expectation-maximization algorithm. Experiment results proved that the cluster groups here were efficient and feasible. Finally, a new method to rank the six expectation-maximization algorithm clustered classes was used in predicting the growth of human pyramidal neurons.

  17. Pyramidal Edge Detection Method Based on AWFM Filtering and Fuzzy Linking Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel multiresolution pyramidal edge detector, based on adaptive weighted fuzzy mean(AWFM)filtering and fuzzy linking model, is presented in this paper. The algorithm first constructs a pyramidal structure by repetitive AWFM filtering and subsampling of original image. Then it utilizes multiple heuristic linking criteria between the edge nodes of two adjacent levels and considers the linkage as a fuzzy model, which is trained offline. Through this fuzzy linking model, the boundaries detected at coarse resolution are propagated and refined to the bottom level from the coarse-to fine edge detection. The validation experiment results demonstrate that the proposed approach has superior performance compared with standard fixed resolution detector andprevious multiresolution approach, especially in impulse noise environment.

  18. Indledende hydrauliske undersøgelser af bølgeenergianlægget Power Pyramid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter

    Power Pyramid er et flydende overskyls-bølgeenergianlæg, dvs. energien udvindes af bølgerne ved at bølgerne overskyller reservoirer beliggende over middelvandstanden og det således opsamlede vand ledes tilbage til havet via en eller flere turbiner. Turbinen driver en generator, hvorved den opnåede...... centralt rør via klapventiler. Disse ventiler har til fomål at sørge for, at vandet opsamlet i et reservoir på et højere niveau ikke løber ud i et lavere, men passerer turbinen der er placeret i bunden af røret. Det er effekten af denne lagdeling, der her undersøges vha. modelforsøg med Power Pyramid....

  19. Performances analysis and comparison of the CCPC and pyramid shaped solar concentrators for CPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Himer, S.; El Yahyaoui, S.; Benmohammad, Z.; Mechaqrane, A.; Ahaitouf, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a comparison of two optical concentrators: A crossed Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CCPC) and a pyramidused as a secondary optical element with and without the primary stage, a Fresnel lens. Results show that the optical efficiency is higher in the case of the pyramid if used alone, andevidently decreases when a primary stage is added. Compared to CCPC, the pyramid as secondary optical element is more efficient. Regarding the size of the elements, it is found thatthe length and the inlet radius of each optical element decrease when the acceptance angle increases. The CPC presents the larger inlet radius and the longer length for as long as the acceptance angle is less than 45°, beyond this value, the two lengths are equal.

  20. Conditions for entangled photon emission from (111)B site-controlled pyramidal quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juska, G., E-mail: gediminas.juska@tyndall.ie; Murray, E.; Dimastrodonato, V.; Chung, T. H.; Moroni, S. T.; Gocalinska, A.; Pelucchi, E. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-04-07

    A study of highly symmetric site-controlled pyramidal In{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As quantum dots (QDs) is presented. It is discussed that polarization-entangled photons can be also obtained from pyramidal QDs of different designs from the one already reported in Juska et al. [Nat. Photonics 7, 527 (2013)]. Moreover, some of the limitations for a higher density of entangled photon emitters are addressed. Among these issues are (1) a remaining small fine-structure splitting and (2) an effective QD charging under non-resonant excitation conditions, which strongly reduce the number of useful biexciton-exciton recombination events. A possible solution of the charging problem is investigated exploiting a dual-wavelength excitation technique, which allows a gradual QD charge tuning from strongly negative to positive and, eventually, efficient detection of entangled photons from QDs, which would be otherwise ineffective under a single-wavelength (non-resonant) excitation.

  1. Structured Dendritic Inhibition Supports Branch-Selective Integration in CA1 Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Erik B; Cembrowski, Mark S; Karsh, Bill; Colonell, Jennifer; Fetter, Richard D; Spruston, Nelson

    2016-03-02

    Neuronal circuit function is governed by precise patterns of connectivity between specialized groups of neurons. The diversity of GABAergic interneurons is a hallmark of cortical circuits, yet little is known about their targeting to individual postsynaptic dendrites. We examined synaptic connectivity between molecularly defined inhibitory interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites using correlative light-electron microscopy and large-volume array tomography. We show that interneurons can be highly selective in their connectivity to specific dendritic branch types and, furthermore, exhibit precisely targeted connectivity to the origin or end of individual branches. Computational simulations indicate that the observed subcellular targeting enables control over the nonlinear integration of synaptic input or the initiation and backpropagation of action potentials in a branch-selective manner. Our results demonstrate that connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal cell dendrites is more precise and spatially segregated than previously appreciated, which may be a critical determinant of how inhibition shapes dendritic computation.

  2. Gravitational attraction of a vertical pyramid model of flat top-and-bottom with depth-wise parabolic density variation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anand P Gokula; Rambhatla G Sastry

    2015-12-01

    In 3D gravity modelling, right rectangular vertical prism model with linear and nonlinear density and polyhedral bodies with linear density variation exist in geophysical literature. Here, we propose a vertical pyramid model with depth-wise parabolic density contrast variation. Initially, we validate our analytic expression against the gravity effect of a right rectangular parallelepiped of constant density contrast. We provide two synthetic examples and a case study for illustrating the effectiveness of our pyramid model in gravity modelling. The included case study of Los Angeles basin, California demonstrates the comparative advantages of our pyramid model over a conventional right rectangular vertical prism model. Our pyramid model could be quite effective as a building block for evaluating the gravity effect of an arbitrarily-shaped 3D or 2.5-D source(s).

  3. Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus c92 Protein Responsible for the Formation of Pyramid-Like Cellular Lysis Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, Jamie C; Brumfield, Susan K; Peng, Nan;

    2011-01-01

    Host cells infected by Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) have been shown to produce unusual pyramid-like structures on the cell surface. These structures represent a virus-induced lysis mechanism that is present in Archaea and appears to be distinct from the holin/endolysin system...... described for DNA bacteriophages. This study investigated the STIV gene products required for pyramid formation in its host Sulfolobus solfataricus. Overexpression of STIV open reading frame (ORF) c92 in S. solfataricus alone is sufficient to produce the pyramid-like lysis structures in cells. Gene...... disruption of c92 within STIV demonstrates that c92 is an essential protein for virus replication. Immunolocalization of c92 shows that the protein is localized to the cellular membranes forming the pyramid-like structures....

  4. Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus c92 protein responsible for the formation of pyramid-like cellular lysis structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jamie C; Brumfield, Susan K; Peng, Nan; She, Qunxin; Young, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    Host cells infected by Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) have been shown to produce unusual pyramid-like structures on the cell surface. These structures represent a virus-induced lysis mechanism that is present in Archaea and appears to be distinct from the holin/endolysin system described for DNA bacteriophages. This study investigated the STIV gene products required for pyramid formation in its host Sulfolobus solfataricus. Overexpression of STIV open reading frame (ORF) c92 in S. solfataricus alone is sufficient to produce the pyramid-like lysis structures in cells. Gene disruption of c92 within STIV demonstrates that c92 is an essential protein for virus replication. Immunolocalization of c92 shows that the protein is localized to the cellular membranes forming the pyramid-like structures.

  5. Static Posturography and Falls According to Pyramidal, Sensory and Cerebellar Functional Systems in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Givon, Uri; Frid, Lior; Dolev, Mark; Achiron, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Balance impairment is common in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and frequently impacts quality of life by decreasing mobility and increasing the risk of falling. However, there are only scarce data examining the contribution of specific neurological functional systems on balance measures in MS. Therefore, the primary aim of our study was to examine the differences in posturography parameters and fall incidence according to the pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory systems functional systems in PwMS. The study included 342 PwMS, 211 women and mean disease duration of 8.2 (S.D = 8.3) years. The study sample was divided into six groups according to the pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory functional system scores, derived from the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) data. Static postural control parameters were obtained from the Zebris FDM-T Treadmill (zebris® Medical GmbH, Germany). Participants were defined as "fallers" and "non-fallers" based on their fall history. Our findings revealed a trend that PwMS affected solely in the pyramidal system, have reduced stability compared to patients with cerebellar and sensory dysfunctions. Moreover, the addition of sensory impairments to pyramidal dysfunction does not exacerbate postural control. The patients in the pure sensory group demonstrated increased stability compared to each of the three combined groups; pyramidal-cerebellar, pyramidal-sensory and pyramidal-cerebellar-sensory groups. As for fall status, the percentage of fallers in the pure pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory groups were 44.3%, 33.3% and 19.5%, respectively. As for the combined functional system groups, the percentage of fallers in the pyramidal-cerebellar, pyramidal-sensory and pyramidal-cerebellar-sensory groups were 59.7%, 40.7% and 65%, respectively. This study confirms that disorders in neurological functional systems generate different effects on postural control and incidence of falls in the MS population. From a clinical standpoint, the

  6. Modeling pyramidal sensors in ray-tracing software by a suitable user-defined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antichi, Jacopo; Munari, Matteo; Magrin, Demetrio; Riccardi, Armando

    2016-04-01

    Following the unprecedented results in terms of performances delivered by the first light adaptive optics system at the Large Binocular Telescope, there has been a wide-spread and increasing interest on the pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS), which is the key component, together with the adaptive secondary mirror, of the adaptive optics (AO) module. Currently, there is no straightforward way to model a PWFS in standard sequential ray-tracing software. Common modeling strategies tend to be user-specific and, in general, are unsatisfactory for general applications. To address this problem, we have developed an approach to PWFS modeling based on user-defined surface (UDS), whose properties reside in a specific code written in C language, for the ray-tracing software ZEMAX™. With our approach, the pyramid optical component is implemented as a standard surface in ZEMAX™, exploiting its dynamic link library (DLL) conversion then greatly simplifying ray tracing and analysis. We have utilized the pyramid UDS DLL surface-referred to as pyramidal acronyms may be too risky (PAM2R)-in order to design the current PWFS-based AO system for the Giant Magellan Telescope, evaluating tolerances, with particular attention to the angular sensitivities, by means of sequential ray-tracing tools only, thus verifying PAM2R reliability and robustness. This work indicates that PAM2R makes the design of PWFS as simple as that of other optical standard components. This is particularly suitable with the advent of the extremely large telescopes era for which complexity is definitely one of the main challenges.

  7. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Kure Wu

    Full Text Available Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  8. Next-generation transgenic cotton: pyramiding RNAi and Bt counters insect resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Mi; Ma, Wei; Wang, Xiaofang; Gao, Meijing; Dai, Yan; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lei; Peng, Yonggang; Chen, Shuyuan; Ding, Lingyun; Tian, Yue; Li, Jie; Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Guowang; Guo, Wangzhen; Yang, Yihua; Wu, Yidong; Heuberger, Shannon; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Zhang, Tianzhen; Zhu, Zhen

    2017-02-15

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are extensively cultivated worldwide. To counter rapidly increasing pest resistance to crops that produce single Bt toxins, transgenic plant 'pyramids' producing two or more Bt toxins that kill the same pest have been widely adopted. However, cross-resistance and antagonism between Bt toxins limit the sustainability of this approach. Here we describe development and testing of the first pyramids of cotton combining protection from a Bt toxin and RNA interference (RNAi). We developed two types of transgenic cotton plants producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) from the global lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera designed to interfere with its metabolism of juvenile hormone (JH). We focused on suppression of JH acid methyltransferase (JHAMT), which is crucial for JH synthesis, and JH-binding protein (JHBP), which transports JH to organs. In 2015 and 2016, we tested larvae from a Bt-resistant strain and a related susceptible strain of H. armigera on seven types of cotton: two controls, Bt cotton, two types of RNAi cotton (targeting JHAMT or JHBP) and two pyramids (Bt cotton plus each type of RNAi). Both types of RNAi cotton were effective against Bt-resistant insects. Bt cotton and RNAi acted independently against the susceptible strain. In computer simulations of conditions in northern China, where millions of farmers grow Bt cotton as well as abundant non-transgenic host plants of H. armigera, pyramided cotton combining a Bt toxin and RNAi substantially delayed resistance relative to using Bt cotton alone.

  9. Delayed oedema in the pyramidal tracts remote from intracerebral missile path following gunshot injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiex, R.; Uhl, E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Thron, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    A 60-year-old man developed a severe left hemiparesis and central facial palsy, accompanied by somnolence and dysarthria 9 days after a gunshot wound to the right temporal region, from which he slowly recovered over 3 months. MRI disclosed bilateral oedema of the pyramidal tracts. This was interpreted as a consequence of the impact of the pressure wave caused by the bullet, after excluding an infectious or vascular cause. (orig.)

  10. Tomographic imaging of transparent biological samples using the pyramid phase microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We show how a pyramid phase microscope can be used to obtain tomographic information of the spatial variation of refractive index in biological samples using the Radon transform. A method that uses the information provided by the phase microscope for axial and lateral repositioning of the sample when it rotates is also described. Its application to the reconstruction of mouse embryos in the blastocyst stage is demonstrated.

  11. Extreme Inverted Trophic Pyramid of Reef Sharks Supported by Spawning Groupers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, Johann; Maynard, Jeffrey; Parravicini, Valeriano; Ballesta, Laurent; Clua, Eric; Domeier, Michael L; Planes, Serge

    2016-08-08

    The extent of the global human footprint [1] limits our understanding of what is natural in the marine environment. Remote, near-pristine areas provide some baseline expectations for biomass [2, 3] and suggest that predators dominate, producing an inverted biomass pyramid. The southern pass of Fakarava atoll-a biosphere reserve in French Polynesia-hosts an average of 600 reef sharks, two to three times the biomass per hectare documented for any other reef shark aggregations [4]. This huge biomass of predators makes the trophic pyramid inverted. Bioenergetics models indicate that the sharks require ∼90 tons of fish per year, whereas the total fish production in the pass is ∼17 tons per year. Energetic theory shows that such trophic structure is maintained through subsidies [5-9], and empirical evidence suggests that sharks must engage in wide-ranging foraging excursions to meet energy needs [9, 10]. We used underwater surveys and acoustic telemetry to assess shark residency in the pass and feeding behavior and used bioenergetics models to understand energy flow. Contrary to previous findings, our results highlight that sharks may overcome low local energy availability by feeding on fish spawning aggregations, which concentrate energy from other local trophic pyramids. Fish spawning aggregations are known to be targeted by sharks, but they were previously believed to play a minor role representing occasional opportunistic supplements. This research demonstrates that fish spawning aggregations can play a significant role in the maintenance of local inverted pyramids in pristine marine areas. Conservation of fish spawning aggregations can help conserve shark populations, especially if combined with shark fishing bans.

  12. Nonlinear optics and spectroscopy at the nanoscale with a hollow-pyramid aperture SNOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagioni, P [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Celebrano, M [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Polli, D [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Labardi, M [PolyLab CNR-INFM, largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Zavelani-Rossi, M [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Cerullo, G [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Finazzi, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Duo, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    We report on a novel near-field microscope in which ultrashort laser pulses are coupled into hollow-pyramid cantilever probes. The high throughput, absence of polarization pinning and absence of chirping, which are premium features of such probes, enable obtaining sufficient peak power in the near-field to perform nonlinear optical experiments. We show experimental results on second-harmonic generation from metal nanostructures and two-photon excitation of fluorescent conjugated polymers on the subwavelength scale.

  13. High temperatures alter physiological properties of pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons in hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jennifer A; Barry W Connors

    2012-01-01

    Temperature has multiple effects on neurons, yet little is known about the effects of high temperature on the physiology of mammalian central neurons. Hyperthermia can influence behavior and cause febrile seizures. We studied the effects of acute hyperthermia on the immature hippocampus in vitro by recording from pyramidal neurons and inhibitory oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons (identified by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the GIN mouse line). Warming to 41°C cau...

  14. Phase transitions and interface fluctuations in double wedges and bi-pyramids with competing surface fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M.; Milchev, A.; Binder, K.; Landau, D. P.

    2008-08-01

    The interplay between surface and interface effects on binary AB mixtures that are confined in unconventional geometries is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations and phenomenological considerations. Both double-wedge and bi-pyramid confinements are considered and competing surface fields are applied at the two opposing halves of the system. Below the bulk critical temperature, domains of opposite order parameter are stabilized at the corresponding corners and an interface runs across the middle of the bi-partite geometry. Upon decreasing the temperature further one encounters a phase transition at which the AB symmetry is broken. The interface is localized in one of the two wedges or pyramids, respectively, and the order parameter is finite. In both cases, the transition becomes discontinuous in the thermodynamic limit but it is not a first-order phase transition. In an antisymmetric double wedge geometry the transition is closely related to the wedge-filling transition. Choosing the ratio of the cross-section L × L of the wedge and its length L y according to L y / L 3 = const., simulations and phenomenological consideration show that the new type of phase transition is characterized by critical exponents α = 3/4, β = 0, and γ = 5/4 for the specific heat, order parameter, and susceptibility, respectively. In an antisymmetric bi-pyramid the transition occurs at the cone-filling transition of a single pyramid. The important critical fluctuations are associated with the uniform translation of the interface and they can be described by a Landau-type free energy. Monte Carlo results provide evidence that the coefficients of this Landau-type free energy exhibit a system-size dependence, which gives rise to critical amplitudes that diverge with system size and result in a transition that becomes discontinuous in the thermodynamic limit.

  15. PIXE, PIGE and NMR study of the masonry of the pyramid of Cheops at Giza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demortier, Guy E-mail: guy.demortier@fundp.ac.be

    2004-11-01

    The mystery of the construction of the great pyramids of Egypt could be elucidated by physico-chemical measurements on small pieces of the material. In this paper, we give several arguments against the present point of view of most Egyptologists who do not admit another method than hewn blocks. We give several pieces of evidence that the masonry was entirely built by a moulding procedure involving the use of ingredients that were all available in the region of Cairo.

  16. Facilitating and nonfacilitating synapses on pyramidal cells: a correlation between physiology and morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, J M; Haberly, L B

    1986-01-01

    Pyramidal cells in piriform cortex receive excitatory inputs from two different sources that are segregated onto adjacent segments of their apical dendrites. The present studies show that excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by primary olfactory tract afferents that terminate on distal apical segments display paired shock facilitation whereas ESPSs evoked by intrinsic association fibers that terminate on proximal apical segments do not. An ultrastructural comparison of the presyn...

  17. Penicillin-induced epileptogenesis in immature rat CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, J W; Brady, R J

    1984-02-01

    Penicillin's ability to produce epileptiform discharges in the CA3 region of hippocampus was examined both extracellularly and intracellularly in slices taken from immature rats 3-25 days of age. Comparisons were made to similar recordings from slices taken from mature rats. Between postnatal days 9 and 19 penicillin treatment resulted in spontaneous extracellular epileptiform bursts and coincident intracellular depolarization shifts. These events were more prolonged and less frequent than in slices from mature rats, and the bursts were followed by prolonged afterdischarges, often 20-30 s in duration. Intracellularly these afterdischarges consisted of large, rhythmic slow depolarizing potentials, which resulted in one or more action potentials in individual CA3 pyramidal cells. Extracellular field recordings showed these events to be simultaneous with synchronous discharges of a large population of CA3 pyramidal cells. In pups 1-2 weeks of age the ability of hippocampus to produce prolonged afterdischarges was associated with a slow depolarizing afterpotential, which followed the downstroke of the depolarization shift. Coincident with this afterpotential was a prolonged negative field in the CA3 pyramidal cell body layer. By postnatal days 24 and 25 the tendency to generate afterdischarges was greatly reduced. In addition, afterdischarges were observed infrequently in slices taken during the first postnatal week. Spike trains produced by prolonged intracellular current injection in slices taken on postnatal days 9-19 were followed by large afterhyperpolarizations and were unable to produce afterdischarges in individual CA3 pyramidal cells. Intracellular recordings from presumed glial cells suggest that extracellular K+ accumulation may play a role in the pronounced capacity of hippocampus from 1- and 2-week-old rat pups to generate prolonged afterdischarges.

  18. Renovating the Pyramid of Needs: Contemporary Extensions Built Upon Ancient Foundations

    OpenAIRE

    Kenrick, Douglas T.; Griskevicius, Vladas; Neuberg, Steven L.; Schaller, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Maslow’s pyramid of human needs, proposed in 1943, has been one of the most cognitively contagious ideas in the behavioral sciences. Anticipating later evolutionary views of human motivation and cognition, Maslow viewed human motives as based in innate and universal predispositions. We revisit the idea of a motivational hierarchy in light of theoretical developments at the interface of evolutionary biology, anthropology, and psychology. After considering motives at three different levels of a...

  19. The optimum layer number of multi-layer pyramidal core sandwich columns under in-plane compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Jia Feng; Lin-Zhi Wu∗; Guo-Cai Yu

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the face thickness to core height ratio on different multi-layer pyramidal core sandwich columns under in-plane compression is investigated theoretically and numerically. Numerical simulation is in good agreement with theory. Results indicate that one specified face thickness to core height ratio corresponds to one optimum layer number of multi-layer pyramidal core sandwich columns in consideration of engineering application. This result can guide the sandwich structure design.

  20. A computational study on plasticity during theta cycles at Schaffer collateral synapses on CA1 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudargiene, Ausra; Cobb, Stuart; Graham, Bruce P

    2015-02-01

    Cellular activity in the CA1 area of the hippocampus waxes and wanes at theta frequency (4-8 Hz) during exploratory behavior of rats. Perisomatic inhibition onto pyramidal cells tends to be strongest out of phase with pyramidal cell activity, whereas dendritic inhibition is strongest in phase with pyramidal cell activity. Synaptic plasticity also varies across the theta cycle, from strong long-term potentiation (LTP) to long-term depression (LTD), putatively corresponding to encoding and retrieval phases for information patterns encoded by pyramidal cell activity (Hasselmo et al. (2002a) Neural Comput 14:793-817). The mechanisms underpinning the phasic changes in plasticity are not clear, but it is likely that inhibition plays a role by affecting levels of electrical activity and calcium concentration at synapses. We explore the properties of synaptic plasticity during theta at Schaffer collateral synapses on CA1 pyramidal neurons and the influence of spatially and temporally targeted inhibition using a detailed multicompartmental model of the CA1 pyramidal neuron microcircuit and a phenomenological model of synaptic plasticity. The results suggest CA3-CA1 synapses are potentiated on one phase of theta due to high calcium levels provided by paired weak CA3 and layer III entorhinal cortex (EC) inputs even when somatic spiking is inhibited by perisomatic interneuron activity. Weak CA3 inputs alone induce lower calcium transients and result in depression of the CA3-CA1 synapses. These synapses are depressed if activated in phase with dendritic inhibition as strong CA3 inputs alone are not able to cause high calcium in this theta phase even though the CA1 pyramidal neuron shows somatic spiking. Dendritic inhibition acts as a switch that prevents LTP and promotes LTD during the retrieval phases of the theta rhythm in CA1 pyramidal cell. This may be important for not overly reinforcing recalled memories and in forgetting no longer relevant memories.

  1. Dependence of the apex angle of an inverted pyramidal-shaped container on crystallization of Brownian particles

    OpenAIRE

    Kanatsu, Youhei; Sato, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Large grains of a close-packed colloidal crystal have been experimentally shown to form in an inverted pyramidal pit by sedimentation [S. Matsuo et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 4285 (2003)]. Keeping this experiment in mind, we study the crystallization of Brownian particles. We carry out Brownian dynamics simulations in an inverted pyramidal-shaped container. The Brownian particles settle out toward the apex of the container by a uniform external force. If the apex angle is suitable, large grai...

  2. Mediatized Humanitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts to legiti......The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts...... legitimation by accountancy, legitimation by institutionalization, and legitimation by compensation. The analysis relates these changes to a problem of trust associated with mediatization through processes of mediation....

  3. The "phosphorus pyramid": a visual tool for dietary phosphate management in dialysis and CKD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Claudia; Piccoli, Giorgina B; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2015-01-20

    Phosphorus retention plays a pivotal role in the onset of mineral and bone disorders (MBD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Phosphorus retention commonly occurs as a result of net intestinal absorption exceeding renal excretion or dialysis removal. The dietary phosphorus load is crucial since the early stages of CKD, throughout the whole course of the disease, up to dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease.Agreement exits regarding the need for dietary phosphate control, but it is quite challenging in the real-life setting. Effective strategies to control dietary phosphorus intake include restricting phosphorus-rich foods, preferring phosphorus sourced from plant origin, boiling as the preferred cooking procedure and avoiding foods with phosphorus-containing additives. Nutritional education is crucial in this regard.Based on the existing literature, we developed the "phosphorus pyramid", namely a novel, visual, user-friendly tool for the nutritional education of patients and health-care professionals. The pyramid consists of six levels in which foods are arranged on the basis of their phosphorus content, phosphorus to protein ratio and phosphorus bioavailability. Each has a colored edge (from green to red) that corresponds to recommended intake frequency, ranging from "unrestricted" to "avoid as much as possible".The aim of the phosphorus pyramid is to support dietary counseling in order to reduce the phosphorus load, a crucial aspect of integrated CKD-MBD management.

  4. Controllable shrinking of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopore arrays by dry-oxygen oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tao; Chen, Jian; Li, Mengwei; Wang, Yifan; Zhao, Chenxu; Zhang, Zhonghui; Liu, Zewen

    2013-12-20

    A novel and simple technique for the controllable shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon (Si) nanopore arrays is reported. The Si nanopore arrays with sizes from 60 to 150 nm, made using a combination of dry and wet etching, were shrunk to sub 10 nm, or even closed, using direct dry-oxygen oxidation at 900 ° C. The shrinkage process of the pyramidal nanopore induced by oxidation was carefully modeled and simulated. The simulation was found to be in good agreement with the experimental data within most of the oxidation time range. Using this method, square nanopore arrays with an average size of 30 nm, and rectangular nanopores and nanoslits with feature sizes as small as 8 nm, have been obtained. Furthermore, focused ion beam cutting experiments revealed that the inner structure of the nanopore after the shrinkage kept its typical inverted-pyramid shape, which is of importance in many fields such as biomolecular sensors and ionic analogs of electronic devices, as well as nanostencils for surface nano-patterning.

  5. Instability of the Characteristic Emissions of Dopant Tb in ZnO Hexagonal Pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Bao-gai; Ma, Qing-lan; Huang, Yuan Ming

    2016-10-01

    Tb-doped ZnO hexagonal pyramids with the doping level of 0.1 mol.% were synthesized by thermal decomposing the mixture of zinc nitrate and terbium nitrate at 500°C in an air-filled furnace. The crystal structures and photoluminescent properties of Tb-doped ZnO hexagonal pyramids were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffractometer, fluorescence spectrophotometer and photoluminescence excitation spectrophotometer. Four characteristic emission peaks of Tb3+ ions were recorded over the broad green luminescent band of ZnO, at 488 nm, 544 nm, 584 nm and 620 nm for Tb-doped ZnO hexagonal pyramids. The characteristic emissions of the rare-earth dopant in Tb-doped ZnO were found to be unstable when stored in air. The 544-nm emission of dopant Tb in ZnO lost 12%, 37%, 78%, and 100% of its original intensity after stored in air for 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 8 months, respectively. With the help of calculated band structures, our results suggest that the instability of the characteristic emissions of dopant Tb in ZnO can be attributed to the possible expulsion of Tb out of the ZnO host.

  6. A fluorescent aptasensor based on a DNA pyramid nanostructure for ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nameghi, Morteza Alinezhad; Danesh, Noor Mohammad; Ramezani, Mohammad; Hassani, Faezeh Vahdati; Abnous, Khalil; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Analytical techniques for detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in food products and blood serum are of great significance. In this study, a fluorescent aptasensor was developed for sensitive and specific detection of OTA, based on a DNA pyramid nanostructure (DPN) and PicoGreen (PG) dye. The designed aptasensor inherits characteristics of DPN, such as high stability and capacity for PG loading. PG, as a fluorescent dye, could bind to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). In the absence of OTA, the pyramid structure of DPN remains intact, leading to a very strong fluorescence emission. Because of higher affinity of aptamer for its target relative to its complementary strand, upon addition of target, the pyramid structure of DPN is disassembled, leading to a weak fluorescence emission. The presented aptasensor showed high specificity toward OTA with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.135 nM. Besides, the designed sensing strategy was successfully utilized to recognize OTA in serum and grape juice with LODs of 0.184 and 0.149 nM, respectively.

  7. Electrophysiological actions of cyclosporin A and tacrolimus on rat hip-pocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong YU; Xue-qin CHEN; Yao-yuan CUI; Guo-yuan HU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the electrophysiological actions of cyclosporin A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) on neurons in the brain, and to elucidate the relevant mechanisms. Methods: Whole-cell current-clamp recording was made in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices; whole- cell voltage-clamp recording was made in dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyrami- dal neurons of rats. Results: CsA (100 μmol/L) and FKS06 (50 μmol/L) did not significantly alter the passive electrical properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, but slowed down the repolarizing phase of the action potential. CsA (10-100 μmol/L) selectively inhibited the delayed rectifier K~ current (IK,) in a concentration-dependent manner. CsA did not affect the kinetic properties of IK. Intracellular dialysis of CsA (100 μmol/L) had no effect on IK. The inhibition of IK by CsA (100/μmol/L) persisted under the low Ca2+ conditions that blocked the basal activity of calcineurin. Conclusion: CsA exerted calcineurin-independent inhibition on the IK in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Taken together with our previous finding with FK506, it is conceivable that the spike broadening caused by the immunosuppressant drugs is due to direct inhibition on the IK.

  8. Topography, Astronomy And Dynastic History In The Alignments Of The Pyramid Fields Of The Old Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magli, G.

    It is known since the 19 century that in the layout of the pyramid field of the pharaohs of the 4th Egyptian dynasty at Giza, a "main axis" exists. Indeed, the south-east corners of these monuments align towards the site of the temple of Heliopolis, which was plainly visible in ancient times. It was later discovered that a similar situation occurs in the main pyramid field of the subsequent dynasty at Abu Sir. Here, the north-west corners of three chronologically successive pyramids again voluntarily align towards Heliopolis. However, the temple was in this case not visible, due to the rock outcrop- today occupied by the Cairo citadel - which blocks the view. In the present paper, a interdisciplinary approach based on historical, topographical and archaeoastronomical analysis is developed in an attempt at understanding such peculiar features, which governed from the very beginning the planning of these wonderful monuments. A general pattern actually arises, which appears to have inspired the choice of the sites and the disposition on the ground of almost all the funerary complexes of the kings during the Old Kingdom. In particular, this pattern helps to explain the choices in the location of the funerary complexes of Niuserre in Abusir, of Unas in Saqqara and of the kings of the 6th dynasty at south Saqqara.

  9. Image-guided preoperative prediction of pyramidal tract side effect in deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, C.; Zhao, Y.; Sauleau, P.; Malrain, C.; Jannin, P.; Haegelen, C.

    2016-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the medial globus pallidus is a surgical procedure for treating patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Its therapeutic effect may be limited by the presence of pyramidal tract side effect (PTSE). PTSE is a contraction time-locked to the stimulation when the current spreading reaches the motor fibers of the pyramidal tract within the internal capsule. The lack of side-effect predictive model leads the neurologist to secure an optimal electrode placement by iterating clinical testing on an awake patient during the surgical procedure. The objective of the study was to propose a preoperative predictive model of PTSE. A machine learning based method called PyMAN (for Pyramidal tract side effect Model based on Artificial Neural network) that accounted for the current of the stimulation, the 3D electrode coordinates and the angle of the trajectory, was designed to predict the occurrence of PTSE. Ten patients implanted in the medial globus pallidus have been tested by a clinician to create a labeled dataset of the stimulation parameters that trigger PTSE. The kappa index value between the data predicted by PyMAN and the labeled data was .78. Further evaluation studies are desirable to confirm whether PyMAN could be a reliable tool for assisting the surgeon to prevent PTSE during the preoperative planning.

  10. Somatosensory stimulation suppresses the excitability of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wang; Zhouyan Feng; Jing Wang; Xiaojing Zheng

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampal region of the brain is important for encoding environment inputs and memory formation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. To investigate the behavior of indi-vidual neurons in response to somatosensory inputs in the hippocampal CA1 region, we recorded and analyzed changes in local ifeld potentials and the ifring rates of individual pyramidal cells and interneurons during tail clamping in urethane-anesthetized rats. We also explored the mechanisms underlying the neuronal responses. Somatosensory stimulation, in the form of tail clamping, chan-ged local ifeld potentials into theta rhythm-dominated waveforms, decreased the spike ifring of py-ramidal cells, and increased interneuron ifring. In addition, somatosensory stimulation attenuated orthodromic-evoked population spikes. These results suggest that somatosensory stimulation sup-presses the excitability of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region. Increased inhibition by local interneurons might underlie this effect. These ifndings provide insight into the mechanisms of signal processing in the hippocampus and suggest that sensory stimulation might have thera-peutic potential for brain disorders associated with neuronal hyperexcitability.

  11. A general formalism for Fourier based Wave Front Sensing: application to the Pyramid wave front sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Fauvarque, Olivier; Fusco, Thierry; Sauvage, Jean-François; Giraut, Orion

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we compare a set of Wave Front Sensors (WFS) based on Fourier filtering technique. In particular, this study explores the "class of pyramidal WFS" defined as the 4 faces pyramid WFS, all its recent variations (6, 8 faces, the flattened PWFS, etc.) and also some new WFSs as the flattened cone WFS or the 3 faces pyramid WFS. In the first part, we describe such a sensors class thanks to the optical parameters of the Fourier filtering mask and the modulation parameters. In the second part, we use the unified formalism to create a set of performance criteria: size of the signal on the detector, efficiency of incoming flux, sensitivity, linear range and chromaticity. In the third part, we show the influence of the previous optical and modulation parameters on these performance criteria. This exhaustive study allows to know how to optimize the sensor regarding to performance specifications. We show in particular that the number of faces has influence on the number of pixels required to do the wave f...

  12. Dielectrophoresis-Assisted Raman Spectroscopy of Intravesicular Analytes on Metallic Pyramids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Avijit; Cherukulappurath, Sudhir; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-02-02

    Chemical analysis of membrane-bound containers such as secretory vesicles, organelles, and exosomes can provide insights into subcellular biology. These containers are loaded with a range of important biomolecules, which further underscores the need for sensitive and selective analysis methods. Here we present a metallic pyramid array for intravesicular analysis by combining site-selective dielectrophoresis (DEP) and Raman spectroscopy. Sharp pyramidal tips act as a gradient force generator to trap nanoparticles or vesicles from the solution, and the tips are illuminated by a monochromatic light source for concurrent spectroscopic detection of trapped analytes. The parameters suitable for DEP trapping were optimized by fluorescence microscopy, and the Raman spectroscopy setup was characterized by a nanoparticle based model system. Finally, vesicles loaded with 4-mercaptopyridine were concentrated at the tips and their Raman spectra were detected in real time. These pyramidal tips can perform large-area array-based trapping and spectroscopic analysis, opening up possibilities to detect molecules inside cells or cell-derived vesicles.

  13. Turtle Dorsal Cortex Pyramidal Neurons Comprise Two Distinct Cell Types with Indistinguishable Visual Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Crockett

    Full Text Available A detailed inventory of the constituent pieces in cerebral cortex is considered essential to understand the principles underlying cortical signal processing. Specifically, the search for pyramidal neuron subtypes is partly motivated by the hypothesis that a subtype-specific division of labor could create a rich substrate for computation. On the other hand, the extreme integration of individual neurons into the collective cortical circuit promotes the hypothesis that cellular individuality represents a smaller computational role within the context of the larger network. These competing hypotheses raise the important question to what extent the computational function of a neuron is determined by its individual type or by its circuit connections. We created electrophysiological profiles from pyramidal neurons within the sole cellular layer of turtle visual cortex by measuring responses to current injection using whole-cell recordings. A blind clustering algorithm applied to these data revealed the presence of two principle types of pyramidal neurons. Brief diffuse light flashes triggered membrane potential fluctuations in those same cortical neurons. The apparently network driven variability of the visual responses concealed the existence of subtypes. In conclusion, our results support the notion that the importance of diverse intrinsic physiological properties is minimized when neurons are embedded in a synaptic recurrent network.

  14. Instability of the Characteristic Emissions of Dopant Tb in ZnO Hexagonal Pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Bao-gai; Ma, Qing-lan; Huang, Yuan Ming

    2017-02-01

    Tb-doped ZnO hexagonal pyramids with the doping level of 0.1 mol.% were synthesized by thermal decomposing the mixture of zinc nitrate and terbium nitrate at 500°C in an air-filled furnace. The crystal structures and photoluminescent properties of Tb-doped ZnO hexagonal pyramids were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffractometer, fluorescence spectrophotometer and photoluminescence excitation spectrophotometer. Four characteristic emission peaks of Tb3+ ions were recorded over the broad green luminescent band of ZnO, at 488 nm, 544 nm, 584 nm and 620 nm for Tb-doped ZnO hexagonal pyramids. The characteristic emissions of the rare-earth dopant in Tb-doped ZnO were found to be unstable when stored in air. The 544-nm emission of dopant Tb in ZnO lost 12%, 37%, 78%, and 100% of its original intensity after stored in air for 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 8 months, respectively. With the help of calculated band structures, our results suggest that the instability of the characteristic emissions of dopant Tb in ZnO can be attributed to the possible expulsion of Tb out of the ZnO host.

  15. Layer 4 pyramidal neurons exhibit robust dendritic spine plasticity in vivo after input deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelajauregui, Amaya; Kribakaran, Sahana; Mostany, Ricardo; Badaloni, Aurora; Consalez, G Giacomo; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos

    2015-05-06

    Pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5 of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) exhibit somewhat modest synaptic plasticity after whisker input deprivation. Whether neurons involved at earlier steps of sensory processing show more or less plasticity has not yet been examined. Here, we used longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy to investigate dendritic spine dynamics in apical tufts of GFP-expressing layer 4 (L4) pyramidal neurons of the vibrissal (barrel) S1 after unilateral whisker trimming. First, we characterize the molecular, anatomical, and electrophysiological properties of identified L4 neurons in Ebf2-Cre transgenic mice. Next, we show that input deprivation results in a substantial (∼50%) increase in the rate of dendritic spine loss, acutely (4-8 d) after whisker trimming. This robust synaptic plasticity in L4 suggests that primary thalamic recipient pyramidal neurons in S1 may be particularly sensitive to changes in sensory experience. Ebf2-Cre mice thus provide a useful tool for future assessment of initial steps of sensory processing in S1.

  16. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits the slow afterhyperpolarizing current sIAHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons by activating multiple signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ruth DT; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Krause, Michael; Sampedro-Castañeda, Marisol; Stocker, Martin; Pedarzani, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarizing current (sIAHP) is a calcium-dependent potassium current that underlies the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in hippocampal and neocortical neurons. sIAHP is a well-known target of modulation by several neurotransmitters acting via the cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the hippocampal formation. In this study we have investigated the effect of PACAP on the sIAHP and the signal transduction pathway used to modulate intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We show that PACAP inhibits the sIAHP, resulting in a decrease of spike frequency adaptation, in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP is mediated by PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Inhibition of PKA reduced the effect of PACAP on sIAHP, suggesting that PACAP exerts part of its inhibitory effect on sIAHP by increasing cAMP and activating PKA. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP was also strongly hindered by the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK). Concomitant inhibition of PKA and p38 MAPK indicates that these two kinases act in a sequential manner in the same pathway leading to the suppression of sIAHP. Conversely, protein kinase C is not part of the signal transduction pathway used by PACAP to inhibit sIAHP in CA1 neurons. Our results show that PACAP enhances the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by inhibiting the sIAHP through the activation of multiple signaling pathways, most prominently cAMP/PKA and p38 MAPK. Our findings disclose a novel modulatory action of p38 MAPK on intrinsic excitability and the sIAHP, underscoring the role of this current as a neuromodulatory hub regulated by multiple protein kinases in cortical neurons. © 2013 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23996525

  17. The evolution of resistance to two-toxin pyramid transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Anthony R; Glaum, Paul R; Ziebarth, Nicolas L; Andow, David A

    2011-03-01

    Pyramid transgenic crops that express two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins hold great potential for reducing insect damage and slowing the evolution of resistance to the toxins. Here, we analyzed a suite of models for pyramid Bt crops to illustrate factors that should be considered when implementing the high dose-refuge strategy for resistance management; this strategy involves the high expression of toxins in Bt plants and use of non-Bt plants as refuges. Although resistance evolution to pyramid Bt varieties should in general be slower, resistance to pyramid Bt varieties is nonetheless driven by the same evolutionary processes as single Bt-toxin varieties. The main advantage of pyramid varieties is the low survival of insects heterozygous for resistance alleles. We show that there are two modes of resistance evolution. When populations of purely susceptible insects persist, leading to density dependence, the speed of resistance evolution changes slowly with the proportion of refuges. However, once the proportion of non-Bt plants crosses the threshold below which a susceptible population cannot persist, the speed of resistance evolution increases rapidly. This suggests that adaptive management be used to guarantee persistence of susceptible populations. We compared the use of seed mixtures in which Bt and non-Bt plants are sown in the same fields to the use of spatial refuges. As found for single Bt varieties, seed mixtures can speed resistance evolution if larvae move among plants. Devising optimal management plans for deploying spatial refuges is difficult because they depend on crop rotation patterns, whether males or females have limited dispersal, and other characteristics. Nonetheless, the effects of spatial refuges on resistance evolution can be understood by considering the three mechanisms determining the rate of resistance evolution: the force of selection (the proportion of insects killed by Bt), assortative mating (deviations of the proportion of

  18. Unique somato-dendritic distribution pattern of Kv4.2 channels on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerti, Katalin; Lorincz, Andrea; Nusser, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    A-type K(+) current (I(A)) plays a critical role in controlling the excitability of pyramidal cell (PC) dendrites. In vitro dendritic patch-pipette recordings have demonstrated a prominent, sixfold increase in I(A) density along the main apical dendrites of rat hippocampal CA1 PCs. In these cells, I(A) is mediated by Kv4.2 subunits, whose precise subcellular distribution and densities in small-diameter oblique dendrites and dendritic spines are still unknown. Here we examined the densities of the Kv4.2 subunit in 13 axo-somato-dendritic compartments of CA1 PCs using a highly sensitive, high-resolution quantitative immunogold localization method (sodium dodecyl sulphate-digested freeze-fracture replica-labelling). Only an approximately 70% increase in Kv4.2 immunogold density was observed along the proximo-distal axis of main apical dendrites in the stratum radiatum with a slight decrease in density in stratum lacunosum-moleculare. A similar pattern was detected for all dendritic compartments, including main apical dendrites, small-diameter oblique dendrites and dendritic spines. The specificity of the somato-dendritic labelling was confirmed in Kv4.2(-/-) tissue. No specific immunolabelling for the Kv4.2 subunit was found in SNAP-25-containing presynaptic axons. Our results demonstrate a novel distribution pattern of a voltage-gated ion channel along the somato-dendritic surface of CA1 PCs, and suggest that the increase in the I(A) along the proximo-distal axis of PC dendrites cannot be solely explained by a corresponding increase in Kv4.2 channel number.

  19. Norepinephrine modulates pyramidal cell synaptic properties in the anterior piriform cortex of mice: age-dependent effects of β-adrenoceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinaba eGhosh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Early odor preference learning in rodents occurs within a sensitive period (≤postnatal day (P10-12, during which pups show a heightened ability to form an odor preference when a novel odor is paired with a tactile stimulation (e.g. stroking. Norepinephrine (NE release from the locus coeruleus during stroking mediates this learning. However, in older pups, stroking loses its ability to induce learning. The cellular and circuitry mechanisms underpinning the sensitive period for odor preference learning is not well understood. We first established the sensitive period learning model in mice - odor paired with stroking induced odor preference in P8 but not P14 mice. This learning was dependent on NE-β-adrenoceptors as it was prevented by propranolol injection prior to training. We then tested whether there are developmental changes in pyramidal cell excitability and NE responsiveness in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC in mouse pups. Although significant differences of pyramidal cell intrinsic properties were found in two age groups (P8-11 and P14+, NE at two concentrations (0.1 and 10 μM did not alter intrinsic properties in either group. In contrast, in P8-11 pups, NE at 0.1 μM presynaptically decreased miniature IPSC and increased miniature EPSC frequencies. These effects were reversed with a higher dose of NE (10 μM, suggesting involvement of different adrenoceptor subtypes. In P14+ pups, NE at higher doses (1 and 10 μM acted both pre- and postsynaptically to promote inhibition. These results suggest that enhanced synaptic excitation and reduced inhibition by NE in the aPC network may underlie the sensitive period.

  20. Norepinephrine Modulates Pyramidal Cell Synaptic Properties in the Anterior Piriform Cortex of Mice: Age-Dependent Effects of β-adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhinaba; Purchase, Nicole C; Chen, Xihua; Yuan, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Early odor preference learning in rodents occurs within a sensitive period [≤postnatal day (P)10-12], during which pups show a heightened ability to form an odor preference when a novel odor is paired with a tactile stimulation (e.g., stroking). Norepinephrine (NE) release from the locus coeruleus during stroking mediates this learning. However, in older pups, stroking loses its ability to induce learning. The cellular and circuitry mechanisms underpinning the sensitive period for odor preference learning is not well understood. We first established the sensitive period learning model in mice - odor paired with stroking induced odor preference in P8 but not P14 mice. This learning was dependent on NE-β-adrenoceptors as it was prevented by propranolol injection prior to training. We then tested whether there are developmental changes in pyramidal cell excitability and NE responsiveness in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC) in mouse pups. Although significant differences of pyramidal cell intrinsic properties were found in two age groups (P8-11 and P14+), NE at two concentrations (0.1 and 10 μM) did not alter intrinsic properties in either group. In contrast, in P8-11 pups, NE at 0.1 μM presynaptically decreased miniature IPSC and increased miniature EPSC frequencies. These effects were reversed with a higher dose of NE (10 μM), suggesting involvement of different adrenoceptor subtypes. In P14+ pups, NE at higher doses (1 and 10 μM) acted both pre- and postsynaptically to promote inhibition. These results suggest that enhanced synaptic excitation and reduced inhibition by NE in the aPC network may underlie the sensitive period.

  1. Activation of Pyramidal Neurons in Mouse Medial Prefrontal Cortex Enhances Food-Seeking Behavior While Reducing Impulsivity in the Absence of an Effect on Food Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warthen, Daniel M; Lambeth, Philip S; Ottolini, Matteo; Shi, Yingtang; Barker, Bryan Scot; Gaykema, Ronald P; Newmyer, Brandon A; Joy-Gaba, Jonathan; Ohmura, Yu; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Güler, Ali D; Patel, Manoj K; Scott, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in a wide range of executive cognitive functions, including reward evaluation, decision-making, memory extinction, mood, and task switching. Manipulation of the mPFC has been shown to alter food intake and food reward valuation, but whether exclusive stimulation of mPFC pyramidal neurons (PN), which form the principle output of the mPFC, is sufficient to mediate food rewarded instrumental behavior is unknown. We sought to determine the behavioral consequences of manipulating mPFC output by exciting PN in mouse mPFC during performance of a panel of behavioral assays, focusing on food reward. We found that increasing mPFC pyramidal cell output using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) enhanced performance in instrumental food reward assays that assess food seeking behavior, while sparing effects on affect and food intake. Specifically, activation of mPFC PN enhanced operant responding for food reward, reinstatement of palatable food seeking, and suppression of impulsive responding for food reward. Conversely, activation of mPFC PN had no effect on unconditioned food intake, social interaction, or behavior in an open field. Furthermore, we found that behavioral outcome is influenced by the degree of mPFC activation, with a low drive sufficient to enhance operant responding and a higher drive required to alter impulsivity. Additionally, we provide data demonstrating that DREADD stimulation involves a nitric oxide (NO) synthase dependent pathway, similar to endogenous muscarinic M3 receptor stimulation, a finding that provides novel mechanistic insight into an increasingly widespread method of remote neuronal control.

  2. Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eKratzer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH plays an important role in a substantial number of patients with stress-related mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression. CRH has been shown to increase neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effects of CRH on neuronal excitability were investigated in acute hippocampal brain slices. Population spikes (PS and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP were evoked by stimulating Schaffer-collaterals and recorded simultaneously from the somatic and dendritic region of CA1 pyramidal neurons. CRH was found to increase PS amplitudes (mean  Standard error of the mean; 231.8  31.2% of control; n=10 while neither affecting fEPSPs (104.3 ± 4.2%; n=10 nor long-term potentiation (LTP. However, when Schaffer-collaterals were excited via action potentials (APs generated by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons, CRH increased fEPSP amplitudes (119.8 ± 3.6%; n=8 and the magnitude of LTP in the CA1 region. Experiments in slices from transgenic mice revealed that the effect on PS amplitude is mediated exclusively by CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons. The effects of CRH on PS were dependent on phosphatase-2B, L- and T-type calcium channels and voltage-gated potassium channels but independent on intracellular Ca2+-elevation. In patch-clamp experiments, CRH increased the frequency and decay times of APs and decreased currents through A-type and delayed-rectifier potassium channels. These results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity.

  3. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  4. Activity-dependent release of endogenous BDNF from mossy fibers evokes a TRPC3 current and Ca2+ elevations in CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Calfa, Gaston; Inoue, Takafumi; Amaral, Michelle D; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2010-05-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of neuronal structure and function in the hippocampus. However, the majority of studies to date have relied on the application of recombinant BDNF. We herein report that endogenous BDNF, released via theta burst stimulation of mossy fibers (MF), elicits a slowly developing cationic current and intracellular Ca(2+) elevations in CA3 pyramidal neurons with the same pharmacological profile of the transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3)-mediated I(BDNF) activated in CA1 neurons by brief localized applications of recombinant BDNF. Indeed, sensitivity to both the extracellular BDNF scavenger tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB)-IgG and small hairpin interference RNA-mediated TRPC3 channel knockdown confirms the identity of this conductance as such, henceforth-denoted MF-I(BDNF). Consistent with such activity-dependent release of BDNF, these MF-I(BDNF) responses were insensitive to manipulations of extracellular Zn(2+) concentration. Brief theta burst stimulation of MFs induced a long-lasting depression in the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) mediated by both AMPA and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors without changes in the NMDA receptor/AMPA receptor ratio, suggesting a reduction in neurotransmitter release. This depression of NMDAR-mediated EPSCs required activity-dependent release of endogenous BDNF from MFs and activation of Trk receptors, as it was sensitive to the extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-IgG and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor k-252b. These results uncovered the most immediate response to endogenously released--native--BDNF in hippocampal neurons and lend further credence to the relevance of BDNF signaling for synaptic function in the hippocampus.

  5. Spatial distributions of GABA receptors and local inhibition of Ca2+ transients studied with GABA uncaging in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Kanemoto

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-amino-butylic acid-mediated inhibition in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons was characterized by two-photon uncaging of a caged-GABA compound, BCMACM-GABA, and one-photon uncaging of RuBi-GABA in rat hippocampal slice preparations. Although we found that GABA(A-mediated currents were diffusely distributed along the dendrites, currents elicited at the branch points of the apical dendritic trunk were approximately two times larger than those elsewhere in the dendrite. We examined the inhibitory action of the GABA-induced currents on Ca(2+ transients evoked with a single back-propagating action potential (bAP in oblique dendrites. We found that GABA uncaging selectively inhibited the Ca(2+ transients in the region adjacent (20 µm. Our data indicate that GABA inhibition results in spatially confined inhibition of Ca(2+ transients shortly after bAP, and suggest that this effect is particularly potent at the dendritic branch points where GABA receptors cluster.

  6. A protein phosphatase is involved in the cholinergic suppression of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current sI(AHP) in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, M; Pedarzani, P

    2000-04-27

    The slow calcium-activated potassium current sI(AHP) underlies spike-frequency adaptation and has a substantial impact on the excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Among other neuromodulatory substances, sI(AHP) is modulated by acetylcholine acting via muscarinic receptors. The second-messenger systems mediating the suppression of sI(AHP) by muscarinic agonists are largely unknown. Both protein kinase C and A do not seem to be involved, whereas calcium calmodulin kinase II has been shown to take part in the muscarinic action on sI(AHP). We re-examined the mechanism of action of muscarinic agonists on sI(AHP) combining whole-cell recordings with the use of specific inhibitors or activators of putative constituents of the muscarinic pathway. Our results suggest that activation of muscarinic receptors reduces sI(AHP) in a G-protein-mediated and phospholipase C-independent manner. Furthermore, we obtained evidence for the involvement of the cGMP-cGK pathway and of a protein phosphatase in the cholinergic suppression of sI(AHP), whereas release of Ca(2+) from IP(3)-sensitive stores seems to be relevant neither for maintenance nor for modulation of sI(AHP).

  7. Intracellular activities related to in vitro hippocampal sharp waves are altered in CA3 pyramidal neurons of aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi-Chameh, H; Peng, J; Wu, C; Zhang, L

    2014-09-26

    Pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 area interconnect intensively via recurrent axonal collaterals, and such CA3-to-CA3 recurrent circuitry plays important roles in the generation of hippocampal network activities. In particular, the CA3 circuitry is able to generate spontaneous sharp waves (SPWs) when examined in vitro. These in vitro SPWs are thought to result from the network activity of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons as SPW-correlating intracellular activities are featured with strong IPSPs in pyramidal neurons and EPSPs or spikes in GABAergic interneurons. In view of accumulating evidence indicating a decrease in subgroups of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in aged animals, we test the hypothesis that the intracellular activities related to in vitro SPWs are altered in CA3 pyramidal neurons of aged mice. Hippocampal slices were prepared from adult and aged C57 black mice (ages 3-6 and 24-28months respectively). Population and single-cell activities were examined via extracellular and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. CA3 SPW frequencies were not significantly different between the slices of adult and aged mice but SPW-correlating intracellular activities featured weaker IPSC components in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons compared to adult neurons. It was unlikely that this latter phenomenon was due to general impairments of GABAergic synapses in the aged CA3 circuitry as evoked IPSC responses and pharmacologically isolated IPSCs were observed in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons. In addition, aged CA3 pyramidal neurons displayed more positive resting potentials and had a higher propensity of burst firing than adult neurons. We postulate that alterations of GABAergic network activity may explain the reduced IPCS contributions to in vitro SPWs in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons. Overall, our present observations are supportive of the notion that excitability of hippocampal CA3 circuitry is increased in aged mice.

  8. Extrinsic and local glutamatergic inputs of the rat hippocampal CA1 area differentially innervate pyramidal cells and interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Virág T; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter; Freund, Tamás F; Gulyás, Attila I

    2012-06-01

    The two main glutamatergic pathways to the CA1 area, the Schaffer collateral/commissural input and the entorhinal fibers, as well as the local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells innervate both pyramidal cells and interneurons. To determine whether these inputs differ in their weights of activating GABAergic circuits, we have studied the relative proportion of pyramidal cells and interneurons among their postsynaptic targets in serial electron microscopic sections. Local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells, intracellularly labeled in vitro or in vivo, innervated a relatively high proportion of interneuronal postsynaptic targets (65.9 and 53.8%, in vitro and in vivo, respectively) in stratum (str.) oriens and alveus. In contrast, axons of in vitro labeled CA3 pyramidal cells in str. oriens and str. radiatum of the CA1 area made synaptic junctions predominantly with pyramidal cell spines (92.9%). The postsynaptic targets of anterogradely labeled medial entorhinal cortical boutons in CA1 str. lacunosum-moleculare were primarily pyramidal neuron dendritic spines and shafts (90.8%). The alvear group of the entorhinal afferents, traversing str. oriens, str. pyramidale, and str. radiatum showed a higher preference for innervating GABAergic cells (21.3%), particularly in str. oriens/alveus. These data demonstrate that different glutamatergic pathways innervate CA1 GABAergic cells to different extents. The results suggest that the numerically smaller CA1 local axonal inputs together with the alvear part of the entorhinal input preferentially act on GABAergic interneurons in contrast to the CA3, or the entorhinal input in str. lacunosum-moleculare. The results highlight differences in the postsynaptic target selection of the feed-forward versus recurrent glutamatergic inputs to the CA1 and CA3 areas.

  9. Effects of Pyramided Bt Corn and Blended Refuges on Western Corn Rootworm and Northern Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keweshan, Ryan S; Head, Graham P; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-04-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, and the northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), are major pests of corn (Zea mays L). Several transgenic corn events producing insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) kill corn rootworm larvae and reduce injury to corn roots. However, planting of Bt corn imposes selection on rootworm populations to evolve Bt resistance. The refuge strategy and pyramiding of multiple Bt toxins can delay resistance to Bt crops. In this study, we assessed the impact of four treatments--1) non-Bt corn, 2) Cry3Bb1 corn, 3) corn pyramided with Cry3Bb1 and Cry34/35Ab1, and 4) pyramided corn with a blended refuge--on survival, time of adult emergence, and size of western and northern corn rootworm. All treatments with Bt corn led to significant reductions in the number of adults that emerged per plot. However, at one location, we identified Cry3Bb1-resistant western corn rootworm. In some cases Bt treatments reduced size of adults and delayed time of adult emergence, with effects most pronounced for pyramided corn. For both species, the number of adults that emerged from pyramided corn with a blended refuge was significantly lower than expected, based solely on emergence from pure stands of pyramided corn and non-Bt corn. The results of this study indicate that pyramided corn with a blended refuge substantially reduces survival of both western and northern corn rootworm, and as such, should be a useful tool within the context of a broader integrated pest management strategy.

  10. Persistent sodium current drives conditional pacemaking in CA1 pyramidal neurons under muscarinic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason; Bean, Bruce P

    2013-09-18

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are normally quiescent but can fire spontaneously when stimulated by muscarinic agonists. In brain slice recordings from mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, we examined the ionic basis of this activity using interleaved current-clamp and voltage-clamp experiments. Both in control and after muscarinic stimulation, the steady-state current-voltage curve was dominated by inward TTX-sensitive persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) that activated near -75 mV and increased steeply with depolarization. In control, total membrane current was net outward (hyperpolarizing) near -70 mV so that cells had a stable resting potential. Muscarinic stimulation activated a small nonselective cation current so that total membrane current near -70 mV shifted to become barely net inward (depolarizing). The small depolarization triggers regenerative activation of I(NaP), which then depolarizes the cell from -70 mV to spike threshold. We quantified the relative contributions of I(NaP), hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I(h)), and calcium current to pacemaking by using the cell's own firing as a voltage command along with specific blockers. TTX-sensitive sodium current was substantial throughout the entire interspike interval, increasing as the membrane potential approached threshold, while both Ih and calcium current were minimal. Thus, spontaneous activity is driven primarily by activation of I(NaP) in a positive feedback loop starting near -70 mV and providing increasing inward current to threshold. These results show that the pacemaking "engine" from I(NaP) is an inherent property of CA1 pyramidal neurons that can be engaged or disengaged by small shifts in net membrane current near -70 mV, as by muscarinic stimulation.

  11. Dopamine control of pyramidal neuron activity in the primary motor cortex via D2 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément eVitrac

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary motor cortex (M1 is involved in fine voluntary movements control. Previous studies have shown the existence of a dopamine (DA innervation in M1 of rats and monkeys that could directly modulate M1 neuronal activity. However, none of these studies have described the precise distribution of DA terminals within M1 functional region nor have quantified the density of this innervation. Moreover, the precise role of DA on pyramidal neuron activity still remains unclear due to conflicting results from previous studies regarding D2 effects on M1 pyramidal neurons.In this study we assessed in mice the neuroanatomical characteristics of DA innervation in M1 using unbiased stereological quantification of dopamine transporter-immunostained fibers. We demonstrated for the first time in mice that DA innervates the deep layers of M1 targeting preferentially the forelimb representation area of M1. To address the functional role of the DA innervation on M1 neuronal activity, we performed electrophysiological recordings of single neurons activity in vivo and pharmacologically modulated D2 receptors activity. Local D2 receptors activation by quinpirole enhanced pyramidal neurons spike firing rate without changes in spike firing pattern. Altogether, these results indicate that DA innervation in M1 can increase neuronal activity through D2 receptors activation and suggest a potential contribution to the modulation of fine forelimb movement. Given the demonstrated role for DA in fine motor skill learning in M1, our results suggest that altered D2 modulation of M1 activity may be involved in the pathophysiology of movement disorders associated with disturbed DA homeostasis.

  12. Transient increase in Zn2+ in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons causes reversible memory deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takeda

    Full Text Available The translocation of synaptic Zn(2+ to the cytosolic compartment has been studied to understand Zn(2+ neurotoxicity in neurological diseases. However, it is unknown whether the moderate increase in Zn(2+ in the cytosolic compartment affects memory processing in the hippocampus. In the present study, the moderate increase in cytosolic Zn(2+ in the hippocampus was induced with clioquinol (CQ, a zinc ionophore. Zn(2+ delivery by Zn-CQ transiently attenuated CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP in hippocampal slices prepared 2 h after i.p. injection of Zn-CQ into rats, when intracellular Zn(2+ levels was transiently increased in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer, followed by object recognition memory deficit. Object recognition memory was transiently impaired 30 min after injection of ZnCl(2 into the CA1, but not after injection into the dentate gyrus that did not significantly increase intracellular Zn(2+ in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Object recognition memory deficit may be linked to the preferential increase in Zn(2+ and/or the preferential vulnerability to Zn(2+ in CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the case of the cytosolic increase in endogenous Zn(2+ in the CA1 induced by 100 mM KCl, furthermore, object recognition memory was also transiently impaired, while ameliorated by co-injection of CaEDTA to block the increase in cytosolic Zn(2+. The present study indicates that the transient increase in cytosolic Zn(2+ in CA1 pyramidal neurons reversibly impairs object recognition memory.

  13. Type I TARPs promote dendritic growth of early postnatal neocortical pyramidal cells in organotypic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mohammad I K; Jack, Alexander; Klatt, Oliver; Lorkowski, Markus; Strasdeit, Tobias; Kott, Sabine; Sager, Charlotte; Hollmann, Michael; Wahle, Petra

    2014-04-01

    The ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate glutamate receptors (AMPARs) have been implicated in the establishment of dendritic architecture. The transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) regulate AMPAR function and trafficking into synaptic membranes. In the current study, we employ type I and type II TARPs to modulate expression levels and function of endogenous AMPARs and investigate in organotypic cultures (OTCs) of rat occipital cortex whether this influences neuronal differentiation. Our results show that in early development [5-10 days in vitro (DIV)] only the type I TARP γ-8 promotes pyramidal cell dendritic growth by increasing spontaneous calcium amplitude and GluA2/3 expression in soma and dendrites. Later in development (10-15 DIV), the type I TARPs γ-2, γ-3 and γ-8 promote dendritic growth, whereas γ-4 reduced dendritic growth. The type II TARPs failed to alter dendritic morphology. The TARP-induced dendritic growth was restricted to the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells and it did not affect interneurons. Moreover, we studied the effects of short hairpin RNA-induced knockdown of endogenous γ-8 and showed a reduction of dendritic complexity and amplitudes of spontaneous calcium transients. In addition, the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of γ-8 was required for dendritic growth. Single-cell calcium imaging showed that the γ-8 CT domain increases amplitude but not frequency of calcium transients, suggesting a regulatory mechanism involving the γ-8 CT domain in the postsynaptic compartment. Indeed, the effect of γ-8 overexpression was reversed by APV, indicating a contribution of NMDA receptors. Our results suggest that selected type I TARPs influence activity-dependent dendritogenesis of immature pyramidal neurons.

  14. Frequency-dependent signal processing in apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Tsubokawa, H; Tsukada, M; Aihara, T

    2014-10-10

    Depending on an animal's behavioral state, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells receive distinct patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The time-dependent changes in the frequencies of these inputs and the nonuniform distribution of voltage-gated channels lead to dynamic fluctuations in membrane conductance. In this study, using a whole-cell patch-clamp method, we attempted to record and analyze the frequency dependencies of membrane responsiveness in Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells following noise current injection directly into dendrites and somata under pharmacological blockade of all synaptic inputs. To estimate the frequency-dependent properties of membrane potential, membrane impedance was determined from the voltage response divided by the input current in the frequency domain. The cell membrane of most neurons showed low-pass filtering properties in all regions. In particular, the properties were strongly expressed in the somata or proximal dendrites. Moreover, the data revealed nonuniform distribution of dendritic impedance, which was high in the intermediate segment of the apical dendritic shaft (∼220-260μm from the soma). The low-pass filtering properties in the apical dendrites were more enhanced by membrane depolarization than those in the somata. Coherence spectral analysis revealed high coherence between the input signal and the output voltage response in the theta-gamma frequency range, and large lags emerged in the distal dendrites in the gamma frequency range. Our results suggest that apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells integrate synaptic inputs according to the frequency components of the input signal along the dendritic segments receiving the inputs.

  15. A simulation study on the effects of dendritic morphology on layer V PFC pyramidal cell firing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Psarrou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of neuronal cells found in the cerebral cortex are pyramidal neurons. Their function has been associated with higher cognitive and emotional functions. Pyramidal neurons have a characteristic structure, consisting of a triangular shaped soma whereon descend two extended and complex dendritic trees, and a long bifurcated axon. All the morphological components of the pyramidal neurons exhibit significant variability across different brain areas and layers. Pyramidal cells receive numerous synaptic inputs along their structure, integration of which in space and in time generates local dendritic spikes that shape their firing pattern. In addition, synaptic integration is influenced by voltage-gated and ion channels, which are expressed in a large repertoire by pyramidal neurons. Electrophysiological categories of pyramidal cells can be established, based on the action potential frequency, generated from a fixed somatic stimulus: (1 cells that fire repetitive action potentials (Regular Spiking – RS, (2 cells that fire clusters of 2 – 5 action potentials with short ISIs (Intrinsic Bursting – IB, and (3 cells that fire in repetitive clusters of 2 – 5 action potentials with short ISIs (Repetitive Oscillatory Bursts – ROB. In vitro and in silico scientific studies, correlate the firing patterns of the pyramidal neurons to their morphological features. This study provides a quantitatively analysis via compartmental neuronal modelling of the effects of dendritic morphology and distribution and concentration of ionic mechanisms, along the basal and/or apical dendrites on the firing behavior of a 112-set of layer V rat PFC pyramidal cells. We focus on how particular morphological and passive features of the dendritic trees shape the neuronal firing patterns. Our results suggest that specific morphological parameters (such as total length, volume and branch number can discriminate the cells as RS or IB, regardless of what is the

  16. Selective Pyramidal Cell Reduction of GABAA Receptor α1 Subunit Messenger RNA Expression in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Glausier, Jill R; Lewis, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) for the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor, which is present in 60% of cortical GABAA receptors, have been reported to be lower in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in subjects with schizophrenia. This subunit is expressed in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, and thus lower α1 subunit levels in each cell population would have opposite effects on net cortical excitation. We used dual-label in situ hybridization to quantify GABAA α1 subunit mRNA expression...

  17. Transient hyperechogenicity of the renal medullary pyramids: incidence in the healthy term newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoory, B J; Andreis, I A; Vino, L; Fanos, V

    1999-01-01

    A screening program was performed on 1881 clinically healthy term newborns, aimed at detecting eventual pathological conditions not diagnosed during pregnancy. Seventy-three cases of transient hyperechogenicity of the renal medullary pyramids were observed, involving one or both kidneys with either sectorial or diffuse pattern. None of the neonates examined had evidence of renal dysfunction and follow-up ultrasound scans demonstrated complete resolution of the sonographic picture. Medullary hyperechogenicity is not rare in healthy term newborns (3.9%); it presents rapid resolution and should be considered in differential diagnosis of pathological conditions.

  18. Image segmentation of pyramid style identifier based on Support Vector Machine for colorectal endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takumi; Koide, Tetsushi; Sugi, Koki; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Anh-Tuan Hoang; Tamaki, Toru; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi; Kominami, Yoko; Yoshida, Shigeto; Mieno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    With the increase of colorectal cancer patients in recent years, the needs of quantitative evaluation of colorectal cancer are increased, and the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system which supports doctor's diagnosis is essential. In this paper, a hardware design of type identification module in CAD system for colorectal endoscopic images with narrow band imaging (NBI) magnification is proposed for real-time processing of full high definition image (1920 × 1080 pixel). A pyramid style image segmentation with SVMs for multi-size scan windows, which can be implemented on an FPGA with small circuit area and achieve high accuracy, is proposed for actual complex colorectal endoscopic images.

  19. Marketing Mix Strategies towards the Bottom of the Pyramid: a study of the Brazilian market

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Teresa; Mårdh, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Prahalad has started a debate in the last decade regarding the opportunities of doing business towards the low-income consumers of emerging markets, which he called Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP) markets. The purpose of this study is to investigate how companies adapt their marketing mix strategies in order to target this type of market. The research is developed as case studies within the Brazilian telecom market in order to offer a new BOP setting as previous research has been focusing on Asia...

  20. Hexagonal Shaped Ultra Wide Band Patch Antenna with Pyramid Shaped fractal in Ground Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astt.Prof. Abhishek Choubey,

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper a hexagonal patch antenna with pyramid shaped fractal in ground plane, is presented which has been designed to radiate into human breast tissue. The antenna is shown by means of simulation and practical measurement to possess a wide input bandwidth, stable radiation patterns. Consideration is also given to its ability to radiate a pulse, and in this respect it is also found to be suitable for the proposed application. The proposed geometry is simulated with IE3D and in results return loss, gain, and VSWR are calculated. The simulated results are shown to illustrate the performances of the proposed antenna.

  1. [Controllability pyramid: an integrated control system of quality for traditional Chinese medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao-He; Zhang, Ding-Kun; Wang, Jia-Bo; Yang, Ming; Peng, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Quality control is one of the key scientific tissues in the modernization of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM). In order to overcome the deficiencies of assessment indexes, including little systematization and quantification, as well as loose association with clinical efficacy and dosage, a new integrated method named controllability pyramid ( CP) is first proposed in this paper. In addition, some study cases are used to explain how this model is constructed. We hope the establishment of CP could promote the clinical-orien- ted integrated innovation research of TCM, and provide control strategy and technology examples for improving the quality of Chinese medicines and clinical efficacy.

  2. Real-time phasing and co-phasing of a ground-based interferometer with a pyramid wavefront sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vérinaud, Christophe; Esposito, Simone

    The feasibility and remarkable performances of pyramid wavefront sensing in adaptive optics have already been demonstrated. In this paper, we investigate another potential of the pyramid wavefront sensor which is differential piston sensing in interferometry: this can be done by using a glass pyramid placed in a combined focal plane of the interferometer, and a CCD sampling the usual four diffracted images of the pupil, composed here by the interferometer apertures. From a purely geometrical point of view, no information about the differential phase between two pupils could be retrieved. However, as the sensor main component, the pyramid, is located directly in the interference pattern of the interferometer, the piston information present in the electric field of the combined focal plane modifies, after diffraction by the pyramid, the intensity distribution in the pupil plane. Thus, with only one sensor, the differential piston can be measured, in addition to the classical local tilts determination. In this paper we present the concept and give some simulation results showing the performances of a closed-loop adaptive optics correction for a ground-based two-telescope interferometer like the Large Binocular Telescope.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA copy numbers in pyramidal neurons are decreased and mitochondrial biogenesis transcriptome signaling is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease hippocampi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Ann C; Keeney, Paula M; Algarzae, Norah K; Ladd, Amy C; Thomas, Ravindar R; Bennett, James P

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of adult-onset dementia and is characterized in its pre-diagnostic stage by reduced cerebral cortical glucose metabolism and in later stages by reduced cortical oxygen uptake, implying reduced mitochondrial respiration. Using quantitative PCR we determined the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene copy numbers from multiple groups of 15 or 20 pyramidal neurons, GFAP(+) astrocytes and dentate granule neurons isolated using laser capture microdissection, and the relative expression of mitochondrial biogenesis (mitobiogenesis) genes in hippocampi from 10 AD and 9 control (CTL) cases. AD pyramidal but not dentate granule neurons had significantly reduced mtDNA copy numbers compared to CTL neurons. Pyramidal neuron mtDNA copy numbers in CTL, but not AD, positively correlated with cDNA levels of multiple mitobiogenesis genes. In CTL, but not in AD, hippocampal cDNA levels of PGC1α were positively correlated with multiple downstream mitobiogenesis factors. Mitochondrial DNA copy numbers in pyramidal neurons did not correlate with hippocampal Aβ1-42 levels. After 48 h exposure of H9 human neural stem cells to the neurotoxic fragment Aβ25-35, mtDNA copy numbers were not significantly altered. In summary, AD postmortem hippocampal pyramidal neurons have reduced mtDNA copy numbers. Mitochondrial biogenesis pathway signaling relationships are disrupted in AD, but are mostly preserved in CTL. Our findings implicate complex alterations of mitochondria-host cell relationships in AD.

  4. Visible Color Tunable Emission in Three-Dimensional Light Emitting Diodes by MgO Passivation of Pyramid Tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Ye, Byeong Uk; Park, Joonmo; Yoo, Chul Jong; Kim, Buem Joon; Jeong, Hu Young; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Kim, Jong Kyu; Lee, Jong-Lam; Baik, Jeong Min

    2015-12-23

    We demonstrated visible color tunable three-dimensional (3D) pyramidal light emitting diodes by depositing the MgO on and near the tip of the pyramid as an insulating layer. Here, we show that the degradation of the materials (i.e., p-GaN) crystallinity and the built-in electric field due to the nanoscale geometry of the tip region is responsible for the large leakage current observed in LEDs. Confocal scanning electroluminescence microscopy images clearly showed that the intensity of the light emitted out of the side facet of the pyramid is much higher than that of the light extracted out of the tip surface, indicating that the MgO layer prohibited the carrier injection to the MQWs layer, suppressing the leakage occurring at or near the tip region of the pyramids. The color range of the LEDs can be also tuned by using the MgO layer, a blue-shift by 10.3 nm in the wavelength. This technique is simple and scalable, providing a promising solution for developing 3D pyramidal LEDs with low leakage current and controllable light emission.

  5. De novo expression of neurokinin-1 receptors by spinoparabrachial lamina I pyramidal neurons following a peripheral nerve lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Abeer W; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo

    2013-06-01

    Lamina I of the spinal dorsal horn is a major site of integration and transmission to higher centers of nociceptive information from the periphery. One important primary afferent population that transmits such information to the spinal cord expresses substance P (SP). These fibers terminate in contact with lamina I projection neurons that express the SP receptor, also known as the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1r). Three types of lamina I projection neurons have been described: multipolar, fusiform, and pyramidal. Most neurons of the first two types are thought to be nociceptive and express the NK-1r, whereas most pyramidal neurons are nonnociceptive and do not express the NK-1r. In this immunocytochemical and behavioral study, we induced a neuropathic pain-like condition in the rat by means of a polyethylene cuff placed around in the sciatic nerve. We document that this lesion led to a de novo expression of NK-1r on pyramidal neurons as well as a significant increase in SP-immunoreactive innervation onto these neurons. These phenotypic changes were evident at the time of onset of neuropathic pain-related behavior. Additionally, we show that, after a noxious stimulus (intradermal capsaicin injection), these NK-1r on pyramidal neurons were internalized, providing evidence that these neurons become responsive to peripheral noxious stimulation. We suggest that the changes following nerve lesion in the phenotype and innervation pattern of pyramidal neurons are of significance for neuropathic pain and/or limb temperature regulation.

  6. Development and dissection of diagnostic SNP markers for the downy mildew resistance genes Pl Arg and Pl 8 and maker-assisted gene pyramiding in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, L L; Talukder, Z I; Hulke, B S; Foley, M E

    2017-02-03

    Diagnostic DNA markers are an invaluable resource in breeding programs for successful introgression and pyramiding of disease resistance genes. Resistance to downy mildew (DM) disease in sunflower is mediated by Pl genes which are known to be effective against the causal fungus, Plasmopara halstedii. Two DM resistance genes, Pl Arg and Pl 8 , are highly effective against P. halstedii races in the USA, and have been previously mapped to the sunflower linkage groups (LGs) 1 and 13, respectively, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In this study, we developed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) maps encompassing the Pl arg and Pl 8 genes and identified diagnostic SNP markers closely linked to these genes. The specificity of the diagnostic markers was validated in a highly diverse panel of 548 sunflower lines. Dissection of a large marker cluster co-segregated with Pl Arg revealed that the closest SNP markers NSA_007595 and NSA_001835 delimited Pl Arg to an interval of 2.83 Mb on the LG1 physical map. The SNP markers SFW01497 and SFW06597 delimited Pl 8 to an interval of 2.85 Mb on the LG13 physical map. We also developed sunflower lines with homozygous, three gene pyramids carrying Pl Arg , Pl 8 , and the sunflower rust resistance gene R 12 using the linked SNP markers from a segregating F2 population of RHA 340 (carrying Pl 8 )/RHA 464 (carrying Pl Arg and R 12 ). The high-throughput diagnostic SNP markers developed in this study will facilitate marker-assisted selection breeding, and the pyramided sunflower lines will provide durable resistance to downy mildew and rust diseases.

  7. Axion Mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Baryakhtar, Masha; March-Russell, John

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility that supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the Standard Model sector through the interactions of a generalized axion multiplet that gains a F-term expectation value. Using an effective field theory framework we enumerate the most general possible set of axion couplings and compute the Standard Model sector soft-supersymmetry-breaking terms. Unusual, non-minimal spectra, such as those of both natural and split supersymmetry are easily implemented. We discuss example models and low-energy spectra, as well as implications of the particularly minimal case of mediation via the QCD axion multiplet. We argue that if the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong-CP problem is realized in string theory then such axion-mediation is generic, while in a field theory model it is a natural possibility in both DFSZ- and KSVZ-like regimes. Axion mediation can parametrically dominate gravity-mediation and is also cosmologically beneficial as the constraints arising from axino and gravitino overproduction ...

  8. Expression of Kv3.1b potassium channel is widespread in macaque motor cortex pyramidal cells: A histological comparison between rat and macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, David; Goldrick, Isabelle; Lemon, Roger N; Kraskov, Alexander; Greensmith, Linda; Kalmar, Bernadett

    2017-02-18

    There are substantial differences across species in the organisation and function of the motor pathways. These differences extend to basic electrophysiological properties. Thus, in rat motor cortex, pyramidal cells have long duration action potentials, while in the macaque, some pyramidal neurons exhibit short duration 'thin' spikes. These differences may be related to the expression of the fast potassium channel Kv3.1b, which in rat interneurons is associated with generation of thin spikes. Rat pyramidal cells typically lack these channels, while there are reports that they are present in macaque pyramids. Here we made a systematic, quantitative comparison of the expression of Kv3.1b in sections from macaque and rat motor cortex, using two different antibodies (NeuroMab, Millipore). As our standard reference, we examined, in the same sections, Kv3.1b staining in parvalbumin-positive interneurons, which show strong Kv3.1b immunoreactivity. In macaque motor cortex, a large sample of pyramidal neurons were nearly all found to express Kv3.1b in their soma membranes. These labelled neurons were identified as pyramidal based either by expression of SMI32 (a pyramidal marker), or by their shape and size, lack of expression of parvalbumin (a marker for some classes of interneuron). Large (Betz cells), medium and small pyramidal neurons all expressed Kv3.1b. In rat motor cortex, SMI32-postive pyramidal neurons expressing Kv3.1b were very rare and weakly stained. Thus, there is a marked species difference in the immunoreactivity of Kv3.1b in pyramidal neurons, and this may be one of the factors explaining the pronounced electrophysiological differences between rat and macaque pyramidal neurons. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-24

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (∼0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  10. NK-3 receptor activation depolarizes and induces an after-depolarization in pyramidal neurons in gerbil cingulate cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C

    2004-01-01

    The involvement of tachykinins in cortical function is poorly understood. To study the actions of neurokinin-3 (NK3) receptor activation in frontal cortex, whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed from pyramidal neurons in slices of cingulate cortex from juvenile gerbils. Senktide (500n......M), a selective NK3 receptor agonist, induced a transient increase in spontaneous EPSPs in layer V pyramidal neurons, accompanied by a small depolarization ( approximately 4 mV). EPSPs during senktide had a larger amplitude and faster 10-90% rise time than during control. Senktide induced a transient...... depolarization in layer II/III pyramidal neurons, which often reached threshold for spikes. The depolarization ( approximately 6 mV) persisted in TTX, and was accompanied by an increase in input resistance. Senktide also transiently induced a slow after-depolarization, which appeared following a depolarizing...

  11. The offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid in 3D transversely isotropic media with a horizontal symmetry axis

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Qi

    2014-12-30

    Analytic representation of the offset-midpoint traveltime equation for anisotropy is very important for prestack Kirchhoff migration and velocity inversion in anisotropic media. For transversely isotropic media with a vertical symmetry axis, the offset-midpoint traveltime resembles the shape of a Cheops’ pyramid. This is also valid for homogeneous 3D transversely isotropic media with a horizontal symmetry axis (HTI). We extended the offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid to the case of homogeneous 3D HTI. Under the assumption of weak anellipticity of HTI media, we derived an analytic representation of the P-wave traveltime equation and used Shanks transformation to improve the accuracy of horizontal and vertical slownesses. The traveltime pyramid was derived in the depth and time domains. Numerical examples confirmed the accuracy of the proposed approximation for the traveltime function in 3D HTI media.

  12. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (˜0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  13. Fabrication of GaAs symmetric pyramidal mesas prepared by wet-chemical etching using AlAs interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicin, S.; Cambel, V.; Kuliffayová, M.; Gregušová, D.; Kováčová, E.; Novák, J.; Kostič, I.; Förster, A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a wet-chemical-etching method developed for the preparation of GaAs four-sided pyramid-shaped mesas. The method uses a fast lateral etching of AlAs interlayer that influences the cross-sectional profiles of etched structures. We have tested the method using H3PO4:H2O2:H2O etchant for the (100) GaAs patterning. The sidewalls of the prepared pyramidal structures together with the (100) bottom facet formed the cross-sectional angles 25° and 42° for mask edges parallel, resp. perpendicular to {011} cleavage planes. For mask edges turned in 45° according to the cleavage planes, 42° cross-sectional angles were obtained. Using the method, symmetric and more than 10-μm-high GaAs "Egyptian" pyramids with smooth tilted facets were prepared.

  14. Zbtb20-Induced CA1 Pyramidal Neuron Development and Area Enlargement in the Cerebral Midline Cortex of Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Blom, Jonas B; Noraberg, Jens

    2010-01-01

    that are innervated by Schaffer collateral projections in ectopic strata oriens and radiatum. The Zbtb20-transformed neurons express Bcl11B, Satb2, and Calbindin-D28k, which are markers of adult CA1 pyramidal neurons. Downregulation of Zbtb20 expression by RNA interference impairs the normal maturation of CA1...... pyramidal neurons resulting in deficiencies in Calbindin-D28k expression and in reduced apical dendritic arborizations in stratum lacunosum moleculare. Overall, the results show that Zbtb20 is required for various aspects of CA1 pyramidal neuron development such as the postnatal extension of apical...... dendritic arbors in the distal target zone and the subtype differentiation of Calbindin-D28k-positive subsets. They further suggest that Zbtb20 plays a role in arealization of the midline cortex....

  15. Mediatized Parenthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne Damkjær, Maja

    2017-01-01

    to parenthood? The dissertation explores this question on the basis of a synchronous study within an overall mediatization perspective. The first part of the dissertation focuses on a conceptualization of the relationship between digital media and parenting as well as an exploration of theoretical perspectives...... and methods that make it possible to study the interactions between the two. Concretely, the dissertation builds on a number of key studies within audience research, which have contributed knowledge about the media’s role in the family and the home. This is done by including three approaches to mediatization......) a family-oriented, b) a peer-oriented, c) an oppositional, and d) non-use. Secondary contribution: Based on qualitative audience research and mediatization theory, the dissertation contributes a conceptualization of the relationship between media and parenthood. This is carried out in a study design...

  16. Multi-Toxin Resistance Enables Pink Bollworm Survival on Pyramided Bt Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Unnithan, Gopalan C; Yelich, Alex J; DeGain, Ben; Masson, Luke; Zhang, Jie; Carrière, Yves; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2015-11-12

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins kill key insect pests, providing economic and environmental benefits. However, the evolution of pest resistance threatens the continued success of such Bt crops. To delay or counter resistance, transgenic plant "pyramids" producing two or more Bt proteins that kill the same pest have been adopted extensively. Field populations of the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) in the United States have remained susceptible to Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab, but field-evolved practical resistance to Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has occurred widely in India. Here we used two rounds of laboratory selection to achieve 18,000- to 150,000-fold resistance to Cry2Ab in pink bollworm. Inheritance of resistance to Cry2Ab was recessive, autosomal, conferred primarily by one locus, and independent of Cry1Ac resistance. We created a strain with high resistance to both toxins by crossing the Cry2Ab-resistant strain with a Cry1Ac-resistant strain, followed by one selection with Cry2Ab. This multi-toxin resistant strain survived on field-collected Bt cotton bolls producing both toxins. The results here demonstrate the risk of evolution of resistance to pyramided Bt plants, particularly when toxins are deployed sequentially and refuges are scarce, as seen with Bt cotton and pink bollworm in India.

  17. Power to the poor: sustainable energy at the base of the pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarsky, Lyuba [Monterey Institute of International Studies, Monterey, CA (United States); Wilson, Emma

    2009-11-15

    Four billion people – over half of humanity – live on less than US$2 a day, effectively forming the bottom of the world economic pyramid. This majority may have minimal access to cash but they need, and will pay for, essential goods and services – including energy. 'The fortune at the bottom of the pyramid,' a 2002 article, argues that if global corporations target this 4 billion, they can reduce poverty and make profit. That the private sector is already playing a key role in meeting development challenges, such as energy poverty, is increasingly recognised. 'Inclusive' and 'shared value' business approaches have begun to multiply. International energy companies, including hydrocarbon and renewable energy producers, can (and do) facilitate local access to energy in poorer regions of the world. To reach the poorest and to effectively contribute to sustainable local development in the long term, however, standard business models need to be modified, and alliances forged with government, local enterprises, donors and NGOs. Smaller local firms are often the ones that reach the poor more effectively. They just need the right support.

  18. Color Face Recognition Based on Steerable Pyramid Transform and Extreme Learning Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Uçar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel color face recognition algorithm by means of fusing color and local information. The proposed algorithm fuses the multiple features derived from different color spaces. Multiorientation and multiscale information relating to the color face features are extracted by applying Steerable Pyramid Transform (SPT to the local face regions. In this paper, the new three hybrid color spaces, YSCr, ZnSCr, and BnSCr, are firstly constructed using the Cb and Cr component images of the YCbCr color space, the S color component of the HSV color spaces, and the Zn and Bn color components of the normalized XYZ color space. Secondly, the color component face images are partitioned into the local patches. Thirdly, SPT is applied to local face regions and some statistical features are extracted. Fourthly, all features are fused according to decision fusion frame and the combinations of Extreme Learning Machines classifiers are applied to achieve color face recognition with fast and high correctness. The experiments show that the proposed Local Color Steerable Pyramid Transform (LCSPT face recognition algorithm improves seriously face recognition performance by using the new color spaces compared to the conventional and some hybrid ones. Furthermore, it achieves faster recognition compared with state-of-the-art studies.

  19. American white pelican predation on Cui-ui in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoppettone, Gayton G.; Rissler, Peter H.; Fabes, Mark C.; Withers, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic changes to the Pyramid Lake–Truckee River ecosystem in Nevada are suspected to have altered the predator–prey balance between American white pelican Pelecanus erythrorhynchos and Cui-ui Chasmistes cujus. We estimated the loss of the adult Cui-ui population to pelican predation over a 13-year period by netting and tagging Cui-uis as they aggregated at the mouth of the Truckee River prior to their spawning migration into the Truckee River. Cui-ui access to the Truckee River typically required traversing a shallow delta (a foraging advantage for these American white pelicans). Dams and greater frequency of low stream flows also contributed to American white pelican foraging success. We used tag recoveries from Pyramid Lake's nesting colony of American white pelicans along with an experiment to estimate the chance of tag recovery within the colony to calculate the number of tagged fish taken by American white pelicans. We also used numbered tags to test whether there was a size preference for Cui-uis taken. Our results showed that the primary source of adult Cui-ui mortality was from American white pelican predation in the Truckee River. Within a 13-year period American white pelicans had taken 90% of the tags deployed during the first 7 years of the interval. There was no preference for the size of Cui-uis taken. A better understanding of the effects of heavy cropping by American white pelicans on Cui-ui population dynamics is still needed.

  20. Renovating the Pyramid of Needs: Contemporary Extensions Built Upon Ancient Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenrick, Douglas T.; Griskevicius, Vladas; Neuberg, Steven L.; Schaller, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Maslow’s pyramid of human needs, proposed in 1943, has been one of the most cognitively contagious ideas in the behavioral sciences. Anticipating later evolutionary views of human motivation and cognition, Maslow viewed human motives as based in innate and universal predispositions. We revisit the idea of a motivational hierarchy in light of theoretical developments at the interface of evolutionary biology, anthropology, and psychology. After considering motives at three different levels of analysis, we argue that the basic foundational structure of the pyramid is worth preserving, but that it should be buttressed with a few architectural extensions. By adding a contemporary design feature, connections between fundamental motives and immediate situational threats and opportunities should be highlighted. By incorporating a classical element, these connections can be strengthened by anchoring the hierarchy of human motives more firmly in the bedrock of modern evolutionary theory. We propose a renovated hierarchy of fundamental motives that serves as both an integrative framework and a generative foundation for future empirical research. PMID:21874133

  1. Parallel Aligned Mesopore Arrays in Pyramidal-Shaped Gallium Nitride and Their Photocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jun; Park, Joonmo; Ye, Byeong Uk; Yoo, Chul Jong; Lee, Jong-Lam; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Lee, Heon; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Baik, Jeong Min

    2016-07-20

    Parallel aligned mesopore arrays in pyramidal-shaped GaN are fabricated by using an electrochemical anodic etching technique, followed by inductively coupled plasma etching assisted by SiO2 nanosphere lithography, and used as a promising photoelectrode for solar water oxidation. The parallel alignment of the pores of several tens of micrometers scale in length is achieved by the low applied voltage and prepattern guided anodization. The dry etching of single-layer SiO2 nanosphere-coated GaN produces a pyramidal shape of the GaN, making the pores open at both sides and shortening the escape path of evolved gas bubbles produced inside pores during the water oxidation. The absorption spectra show that the light absorption in the UV range is ∼93% and that there is a red shift in the absorption edge by 30 nm, compared with the flat GaN. It also shows a remarkable enhancement in the photocurrent density by 5.3 times, compared with flat GaN. Further enhancement (∼40%) by the deposition of Ni was observed due to the generation of an electric field, which increases the charge separation ratio.

  2. Modeling Geometric-Temporal Context With Directional Pyramid Co-Occurrence for Action Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chunfeng; Li, Xi; Hu, Weiming; Ling, Haibin; Maybank, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new geometric-temporal representation for visual action recognition based on local spatio-temporal features. First, we propose a modified covariance descriptor under the log-Euclidean Riemannian metric to represent the spatio-temporal cuboids detected in the video sequences. Compared with previously proposed covariance descriptors, our descriptor can be measured and clustered in Euclidian space. Second, to capture the geometric-temporal contextual information, we construct a directional pyramid co-occurrence matrix (DPCM) to describe the spatio-temporal distribution of the vector-quantized local feature descriptors extracted from a video. DPCM characterizes the co-occurrence statistics of local features as well as the spatio-temporal positional relationships among the concurrent features. These statistics provide strong descriptive power for action recognition. To use DPCM for action recognition, we propose a directional pyramid co-occurrence matching kernel to measure the similarity of videos. The proposed method achieves the state-of-the-art performance and improves on the recognition performance of the bag-of-visual-words (BOVWs) models by a large margin on six public data sets. For example, on the KTH data set, it achieves 98.78% accuracy while the BOVW approach only achieves 88.06%. On both Weizmann and UCF CIL data sets, the highest possible accuracy of 100% is achieved.

  3. Combined Effects of Pyramid-Like Structures and Antireflection Coating on Si Solar Cell Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chanseob; Oh, Junghwa; Lee, Byeungleul; Kim, Bonghwan

    2015-10-01

    We developed a novel process for synthesizing Si solar cells with improved efficiencies. The process involved the formation of pyramid-like structures on the Si substrate and the deposition and subsequent thermal annealing of an antireflection coating. The process consisted of three main stages. First, pyramid-like structures were textured on the Si substrate by reactive ion etching and subsequently etched using a mixture of HF, HNO3, and deionized water for 300 s. Next, an antireflection coating was deposited on the substrate and was subsequently thermally annealed in a furnace in a N2 atmosphere. After the annealing process, the minority carrier lifetime increased by approximately 40 μs. Further, because of the increase in the minority carrier lifetime and the uniform doping of the substrate, the leakage current decreased. As a result, the efficiency of resulting solar cell increased to 17.24%, in contrast to that of the reference cell, which was only 15.89%. Thus, uniform doping and the thermal annealing of the antireflective coating improved solar cell efficiency.

  4. Template-Stripped Multifunctional Wedge and Pyramid Arrays for Magnetic Nanofocusing and Optical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shailabh; Johnson, Timothy W; Wood, Christopher K; Qu, Tao; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Otto, Lauren M; Shaver, Jonah; Long, Nicholas J; Victora, Randall H; Edel, Joshua B; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-04-13

    We present large-scale reproducible fabrication of multifunctional ultrasharp metallic structures on planar substrates with capabilities including magnetic field nanofocusing and plasmonic sensing. Objects with sharp tips such as wedges and pyramids made with noble metals have been extensively used for enhancing local electric fields via the lightning-rod effect or plasmonic nanofocusing. However, analogous nanofocusing of magnetic fields using sharp tips made with magnetic materials has not been widely realized. Reproducible fabrication of sharp tips with magnetic as well as noble metal layers on planar substrates can enable straightforward application of their material and shape-derived functionalities. We use a template-stripping method to produce plasmonic-shell-coated nickel wedge and pyramid arrays at the wafer-scale with tip radius of curvature close to 10 nm. We further explore the magnetic nanofocusing capabilities of these ultrasharp substrates, deriving analytical formulas and comparing the results with computer simulations. These structures exhibit nanoscale spatial control over the trapping of magnetic microbeads and nanoparticles in solution. Additionally, enhanced optical sensing of analytes by these plasmonic-shell-coated substrates is demonstrated using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. These methods can guide the design and fabrication of novel devices with applications including nanoparticle manipulation, biosensing, and magnetoplasmonics.

  5. Fast and Efficient Black Box Optimization Using the Parameter-less Population Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, B W; Punch, W F

    2015-01-01

    The parameter-less population pyramid (P3) is a recently introduced method for performing evolutionary optimization without requiring any user-specified parameters. P3's primary innovation is to replace the generational model with a pyramid of multiple populations that are iteratively created and expanded. In combination with local search and advanced crossover, P3 scales to problem difficulty, exploiting previously learned information before adding more diversity. Across seven problems, each tested using on average 18 problem sizes, P3 outperformed all five advanced comparison algorithms. This improvement includes requiring fewer evaluations to find the global optimum and better fitness when using the same number of evaluations. Using both algorithm analysis and comparison, we find P3's effectiveness is due to its ability to properly maintain, add, and exploit diversity. Unlike the best comparison algorithms, P3 was able to achieve this quality without any problem-specific tuning. Thus, unlike previous parameter-less methods, P3 does not sacrifice quality for applicability. Therefore we conclude that P3 is an efficient, general, parameter-less approach to black box optimization which is more effective than existing state-of-the-art techniques.

  6. A generalized pyramid matching kernel for human action recognition in realistic videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhou, Quan; Zou, Weijia; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wenjun

    2013-10-24

    Human action recognition is an increasingly important research topic in the fields of video sensing, analysis and understanding. Caused by unconstrained sensing conditions, there exist large intra-class variations and inter-class ambiguities in realistic videos, which hinder the improvement of recognition performance for recent vision-based action recognition systems. In this paper, we propose a generalized pyramid matching kernel (GPMK) for recognizing human actions in realistic videos, based on a multi-channel "bag of words" representation constructed from local spatial-temporal features of video clips. As an extension to the spatial-temporal pyramid matching (STPM) kernel, the GPMK leverages heterogeneous visual cues in multiple feature descriptor types and spatial-temporal grid granularity levels, to build a valid similarity metric between two video clips for kernel-based classification. Instead of the predefined and fixed weights used in STPM, we present a simple, yet effective, method to compute adaptive channel weights of GPMK based on the kernel target alignment from training data. It incorporates prior knowledge and the data-driven information of different channels in a principled way. The experimental results on three challenging video datasets (i.e., Hollywood2, Youtube and HMDB51) validate the superiority of our GPMK w.r.t. the traditional STPM kernel for realistic human action recognition and outperform the state-of-the-art results in the literature.

  7. Functional changes in piriform cortex pyramidal neurons in the chronic methamphetamine-treated rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Nobuaki; Kadota, Tomoko; Akaike, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic treatment of rats with methamphetamine (MAP) causes a range of functional changes to the central nervous system (CNS), including a toxicity that is widespread throughout the brain (Frost and Cadet 2000; Fasihpour et al. 2013). In this report, we examined the effect of chronic MAP treatment on pyramidal neurons of the rat piriform cortex, an area involved in sensory processing, associative learning and a model system for studies on synaptic plasticity. MAP treatment significantly depolarized the membrane potential and decreased neuronal input resistance. Furthermore, the voltage-dependence of both AMPA and NMDA responses was disturbed by chronic MAP treatment, and the extent of long-term potentiation (LTP) was decreased. Morphological changes of MAP-treated rat pyramidal neurons were observed as blebbing of the dendrite trees. The changes we observed represent detrimental effects on the function of piriform cortical neurons further illustrating deficits in synaptic plasticity extend beyond the hippocampus. These changes may contribute to behavioural deficits in chronic MAP-treated animals.

  8. Thalamocortical input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons measured using quantitative large-scale array tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Cheol eRah

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The subcellular locations of synapses on pyramidal neurons strongly influences dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity. Despite this, there is little quantitative data on spatial distributions of specific types of synaptic input. Here we use array tomography (AT, a high-resolution optical microscopy method, to examine thalamocortical (TC input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We first verified the ability of AT to identify synapses using parallel electron microscopic analysis of TC synapses in layer 4. We then use large-scale AT to measure TC synapse distribution on L5 pyramdial neurons in a 1.00 x 0.83 x 0.21 mm^3 volume of mouse somatosensory cortex. We found that TC synapses primarily target basal dendrites in layer 5, but also make a considerable input to proximal apical dendrites in L4, consistent with previous work. Our analysis further suggests that TC inputs are biased towards certain branches and, within branches, synapses show significant clustering with an excess of TC synapse nearest neighbors within 5-15 μm compared to a random distribution. Thus, we show that AT is a sensitive and quantitative method to map specific types of synaptic input on the dendrites of entire neurons. We anticipate that this technique will be of wide utility for mapping functionally-relevant anatomical connectivity in neural circuits.

  9. The paradox of inverted biomass pyramids in kelp forest fish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebilco, Rowan; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Anderson, Sean C; Salomon, Anne K

    2016-06-29

    Theory predicts that bottom-heavy biomass pyramids or 'stacks' should predominate in real-world communities if trophic-level increases with body size (mean predator-to-prey mass ratio (PPMR) more than 1). However, recent research suggests that inverted biomass pyramids (IBPs) characterize relatively pristine reef fish communities. Here, we estimated the slope of a kelp forest fish community biomass spectrum from underwater visual surveys. The observed biomass spectrum slope is strongly positive, reflecting an IBP. This is incongruous with theory because this steep positive slope would only be expected if trophic position decreased with increasing body size (consumer-to-resource mass ratio, less than 1). We then used δ(15)N signatures of fish muscle tissue to quantify the relationship between trophic position and body size and instead detected strong evidence for the opposite, with PPMR ≈ 1650 (50% credible interval 280-12 000). The natural history of kelp forest reef fishes suggests that this paradox could arise from energetic subsidies in the form of movement of mobile consumers across habitats, and from seasonally pulsed production inputs at small body sizes. There were four to five times more biomass at large body sizes (1-2 kg) than would be expected in a closed steady-state community providing a measure of the magnitude of subsidies.

  10. Color face recognition based on steerable pyramid transform and extreme learning machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Ayşegül

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel color face recognition algorithm by means of fusing color and local information. The proposed algorithm fuses the multiple features derived from different color spaces. Multiorientation and multiscale information relating to the color face features are extracted by applying Steerable Pyramid Transform (SPT) to the local face regions. In this paper, the new three hybrid color spaces, YSCr, ZnSCr, and BnSCr, are firstly constructed using the Cb and Cr component images of the YCbCr color space, the S color component of the HSV color spaces, and the Zn and Bn color components of the normalized XYZ color space. Secondly, the color component face images are partitioned into the local patches. Thirdly, SPT is applied to local face regions and some statistical features are extracted. Fourthly, all features are fused according to decision fusion frame and the combinations of Extreme Learning Machines classifiers are applied to achieve color face recognition with fast and high correctness. The experiments show that the proposed Local Color Steerable Pyramid Transform (LCSPT) face recognition algorithm improves seriously face recognition performance by using the new color spaces compared to the conventional and some hybrid ones. Furthermore, it achieves faster recognition compared with state-of-the-art studies.

  11. Dynamic Expression Patterns of Progenitor and Pyramidal Neuron Layer Markers in the Developing Human Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Sara; Nardelli, Jeannette; Verney, Catherine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Guimiot, Fabien; Gressens, Pierre; Adle-Biassette, Homa

    2016-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of hippocampus are unknown in humans. To improve our knowledge of molecules that potentially regulate pyramidal neurogenesis and layering in various hippocampal fields, we investigated the expression of progenitor markers and cell fate molecules from gestational week (GW) 9 to GW 20. At GW 9, the progenitor cell compartment of the hippocampal formation mainly consisted of PAX6(+) cells in the ventricular zone. Between GW 9 and 11, a second germinal area, the subventricular zone (SVZ), was formed, as shown by TBR2 labeling. Postmitotic markers (TBR1, CTIP2, SATB2, and CUX1) might reflect the inside-out layering of the plate from GW 11 onwards. TBR1(+) neurons appeared in the deep plate, whereas CTIP2(+), SATB2(+), and CUX1(+) neurons occupied the upper layers. From GW 16, differences in layer segregation were observed between the ammonic and subicular plates. Moreover, an ammonic-to-subicular maturation gradient was observed in germinal/postmitotic areas. Taken together, these findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of an SVZ in the hippocampus of human fetuses and laminar differences in transcription factor expression in the pyramidal layer of the human ammonic and subicular plate, and provide new information to further investigate the connectivity of the hippocampal formation.

  12. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of boron diffusion for pyramidally textured silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Fa-Jun, E-mail: Fajun.Ma@nus.edu.sg; Duttagupta, Shubham [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, 117574 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117576 (Singapore); Shetty, Kishan Devappa; Meng, Lei; Hoex, Bram; Peters, Ian Marius [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, 117574 (Singapore); Samudra, Ganesh S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117576 (Singapore); Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, 117574 (Singapore)

    2014-11-14

    Multidimensional numerical simulation of boron diffusion is of great relevance for the improvement of industrial n-type crystalline silicon wafer solar cells. However, surface passivation of boron diffused area is typically studied in one dimension on planar lifetime samples. This approach neglects the effects of the solar cell pyramidal texture on the boron doping process and resulting doping profile. In this work, we present a theoretical study using a two-dimensional surface morphology for pyramidally textured samples. The boron diffusivity and segregation coefficient between oxide and silicon in simulation are determined by reproducing measured one-dimensional boron depth profiles prepared using different boron diffusion recipes on planar samples. The established parameters are subsequently used to simulate the boron diffusion process on textured samples. The simulated junction depth is found to agree quantitatively well with electron beam induced current measurements. Finally, chemical passivation on planar and textured samples is compared in device simulation. Particularly, a two-dimensional approach is adopted for textured samples to evaluate chemical passivation. The intrinsic emitter saturation current density, which is only related to Auger and radiative recombination, is also simulated for both planar and textured samples. The differences between planar and textured samples are discussed.

  13. Setting aside Transactions from Pyramid Schemes as Impeachable Dispositions under South African Insolvency Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zingapi Mabe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available South African courts have experienced a rise in the number of cases involving schemes that promise a return on investment with interest rates which are considerably above the maximum amount allowed by law, or schemes which promise compensation from the active recruitment of participants. These schemes, which are often referred to as pyramid or Ponzi schemes, are unsustainable operations and give rise to problems in the law of insolvency. Investors in these schemes are often left empty-handed upon the scheme’s eventual collapse and insolvency. Investors who received pay-outs from the scheme find themselves in the defence against the trustee’s claims for the return of the pay-outs to the insolvent estate. As the schemes are illegal and the pay-outs are often in terms of void agreements, the question arises whether they can be returned to the insolvent estate. A similar situation arose in Griffiths v Janse van Rensburg 2015 ZASCA 158 (26 October 2015. The point of contention in this case was whether the illegality of the business of the scheme was a relevant consideration in determining whether the pay-outs were made in the ordinary course of business of the scheme. This paper discusses pyramid schemes in the context of impeachable dispositions in terms of the Insolvency Act 24 of 1936.

  14. Pyramiding blast, bacterial blight and brown planthopper resistance genes in rice restorer lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Zhi-juan; Yang Shu-dong; ZENG Yu-xiang; LIANG Yan; YANG Chang-deng; QIAN Qian

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast, bacterial blight (BB) and brown planthopper (BPH) are the three main pests of rice. This study investigated pyr-amiding genes resistant to blast, BB and BPH to develop restorer lines. Ten new lines with blast, BB and/or BPH resistance genes were developed using marker-assisted selection (MAS) technique and agronomic trait selection (ATS) method. Only HR13 with resistance genes to blast, BB and BPH was obtained. In addition to blast and BB resistance, four lines (HR39, HR41, HR42, HR43) demonstrated moderate resistance to BPH, but MAS for BPH resistance genes were not conducted in developing these four lines. These data suggested that there were unknown elite BPH resistance genes in the Zhongzu 14 donor parent. A more effective defense was demonstrated in the lines withPi1 andPi2 genes although the weather in 2012 was favorable to disease incidence. Blast resistance of the lines with a single resistance gene,Pita, was easily inlfuenced by the weather. Overal, the information obtained through pyramiding multiple resistance genes on developing the restorer lines is helpful for rice resistance breeding.

  15. In vivo blockade of neural activity alters dendritic development of neonatal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groc, Laurent; Petanjek, Zdravko; Gustafsson, Bengt; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Hanse, Eric; Khazipov, Roustem

    2002-11-01

    During development, neural activity has been proposed to promote neuronal growth. During the first postnatal week, the hippocampus is characterized by an oscillating neural network activity and a rapid neuronal growth. In the present study we tested in vivo, by injecting tetanus toxin into the hippocampus of P1 rats, whether this neural activity indeed promotes growth of pyramidal cells. We have previously shown that tetanus toxin injection leads to a strong reduction in the frequency of spontaneous GABA and glutamatergic synaptic currents, and to a complete blockade of the early neural network activity during the first postnatal week. Morphology of neurobiotin-filled CA1 pyramidal cells was analyzed at the end of the first postnatal week (P6-10). In activity-reduced neurons, the total length of basal dendritic tree was three times less than control. The number, but not the length, of basal dendritic branches was affected. The growth impairment was restricted to the basal dendrites. The apical dendrite, the axons, or the soma grew normally during activity deprivation. Thus, the in vivo neural activity in the neonate hippocampus seems to promote neuronal growth by initiating novel branches.

  16. Renovating the Pyramid of Needs: Contemporary Extensions Built Upon Ancient Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenrick, Douglas T; Griskevicius, Vladas; Neuberg, Steven L; Schaller, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Maslow's pyramid of human needs, proposed in 1943, has been one of the most cognitively contagious ideas in the behavioral sciences. Anticipating later evolutionary views of human motivation and cognition, Maslow viewed human motives as based in innate and universal predispositions. We revisit the idea of a motivational hierarchy in light of theoretical developments at the interface of evolutionary biology, anthropology, and psychology. After considering motives at three different levels of analysis, we argue that the basic foundational structure of the pyramid is worth preserving, but that it should be buttressed with a few architectural extensions. By adding a contemporary design feature, connections between fundamental motives and immediate situational threats and opportunities should be highlighted. By incorporating a classical element, these connections can be strengthened by anchoring the hierarchy of human motives more firmly in the bedrock of modern evolutionary theory. We propose a renovated hierarchy of fundamental motives that serves as both an integrative framework and a generative foundation for future empirical research.

  17. Mendelizing all components of a pyramid of three yield QTL in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eGur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular markers allowed breeders to Mendelize quantitative trait loci (QTL providing another demonstration that quantitative traits are governed by the same principles as single qualitative genes. This research extends the QTL analysis to two and three QTL and tests our ability to Mendelize an oligogenic trait. In tomato, agricultural yield is determined by the weight of the fruits harvested per unit area and the total soluble solids (% Brix–sugars and acids. The current study explores the segregation of multiple independent yield-related QTL that were identified and mapped using introgression lines (IL of Solanum pennellii in cultivated processing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. We screened 45 different double and triple IL-QTL combinations for agricultural yield, to identify QTL pyramids that behaved in an additive manner and were suitable substrate for Mendelizing an oligogenic trait. A pyramid of three independent QTL that significantly improved Brix*Yield (BXY - the soluble solids output per unit area compared to M82 was selected. In the progenies of the tri-hybrid we bred using markers a nearly isogenic 'immortalized F2'. While the common mode of QTL-QTL interactions across the 45 IL-QTLs combinations was less than additive, the three QTLs in the selected triple-stack performed in an additive manner which made it an exceptional material for breeding. This study demonstrates that using the phenotypic effect of all 27 possible QTL-alleles combinations it is possible to make reliable predictions about the genotypes that will maximize the yield.

  18. Mediating Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    "Mediating Business" is a study of the expansion of business journalism. Building on evidence from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, "Mediating Business" is a comparative and multidisciplinary study of one of the major transformations of the mass media and the realm of business - nationally...... and globally. The book explores the history of key innovations and innovators in the business press. It analyzes changes in the discourse of business journalism associated with the growth in business news and the development of new ways of framing business issues and events. Finally, it examines...... the organizational implications of the increased media visibility of business and, in particular, the development of corporate governance and media relations....

  19. Mediatized play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    Children’s play must nowadays be understood as a mediatized field in society and culture. Media – understood in a very broad sense - holds severe explanatory power in describing and understanding the practice of play, since play happens both with, through and inspired by media of different sorts....... In this presentation the case of ‘playing soccer’ will be outlined through its different mediated manifestations, including soccer games and programs on TV, computer games, magazines, books, YouTube videos and soccer trading cards....

  20. Optimized breeding strategies for multiple trait integration: II. Process efficiency in event pyramiding and trait fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ting; Sun, Xiaochun; Mumm, Rita H

    2014-01-01

    Multiple trait integration (MTI) is a multi-step process of converting an elite variety/hybrid for value-added traits (e.g. transgenic events) through backcross breeding. From a breeding standpoint, MTI involves four steps: single event introgression, event pyramiding, trait fixation, and version testing. This study explores the feasibility of marker-aided backcross conversion of a target maize hybrid for 15 transgenic events in the light of the overall goal of MTI of recovering equivalent performance in the finished hybrid conversion along with reliable expression of the value-added traits. Using the results to optimize single event introgression (Peng et al. Optimized breeding strategies for multiple trait integration: I. Minimizing linkage drag in single event introgression. Mol Breed, 2013) which produced single event conversions of recurrent parents (RPs) with ≤8 cM of residual non-recurrent parent (NRP) germplasm with ~1 cM of NRP germplasm in the 20 cM regions flanking the event, this study focused on optimizing process efficiency in the second and third steps in MTI: event pyramiding and trait fixation. Using computer simulation and probability theory, we aimed to (1) fit an optimal breeding strategy for pyramiding of eight events into the female RP and seven in the male RP, and (2) identify optimal breeding strategies for trait fixation to create a 'finished' conversion of each RP homozygous for all events. In addition, next-generation seed needs were taken into account for a practical approach to process efficiency. Building on work by Ishii and Yonezawa (Optimization of the marker-based procedures for pyramiding genes from multiple donor lines: I. Schedule of crossing between the donor lines. Crop Sci 47:537-546, 2007a), a symmetric crossing schedule for event pyramiding was devised for stacking eight (seven) events in a given RP. Options for trait fixation breeding strategies considered selfing and doubled haploid approaches to achieve homozygosity

  1. Network excitability in a model of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy critically depends on SK channel-mediated AHP currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Robert; Kirschstein, Timo; Brehme, Hannes; Porath, Katrin; Mikkat, Ulrike; Köhling, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons generate an after-hyperpolarization (AHP) whose medium component is thought to be generated by small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK channels). Neuronal excitability is increased in epilepsy, and the AHP in turn is fundamentally involved in regulation of cellular excitability. We therefore investigated the involvement of the SK channel-mediated AHP in controlling cell and network excitability in the pilocarpine model epilepsy. Both acutely isolated CA1 pyramidal cells and isolated hippocampal slices were investigated in terms of the impact of SK channel-mediated AHP on hyperexcitability. Our findings show that pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats exhibit significantly reduced SK channel-mediated hyperpolarizing outward current which was accompanied by a significant decrease in the somatic AHP. Paradoxically, inhibiting SK channels strongly exacerbated 0-Mg(2+)-induced epileptiform activity in slices from pilocarpine-treated animals, while having a significantly smaller effect in control tissue. This suggests that in chronically epileptic tissue, network excitability very critically depends on the remaining SK-channel mediated AHP. Additional real-time RT-PCR and semiquantitative Western blot experiments revealed that both the SK2 channel transcript and protein were significantly downregulated in the epileptic CA1 region. We conclude that SK2 channels are down-regulated in chronic epilepsy underlying the impaired SK channel function in CA1 pyramidal cells, and a further reduction of the remaining critical mass of SK channels results in an acute network decompensation.

  2. 某些缩影为棱锥的棱的图式流形同胚类的代表元%Homeomorphic Classes of Graphlike Manifolds with Contractions 6,7,8-pyramid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张群; 宋中山

    2005-01-01

    In this note, we reported some results of homeomorphic classification of graphlikemanifolds of which contractions are edges of pyramids, and the number of vertexes of thebase of a pyramid, equal to 6 or 7 or 8.

  3. THE COMPETITIVENESS AND ITS MEASUREMENT BY MEANS OF THE PYRAMID MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Tunde Orsolya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The competition itself, the fighting for the scarce resources is as old as the mankind. However, the naming ‘competitiveness’ has been present in the specialized literature since the 1980s. Nowadays, by crescendo of the international competition, concept of the competitiveness has become increasingly important among the decision makers at national economic and corporate levels alike. However, almost everyone means something different by competitiveness, even the researchers dealing with it have not created a uniform definition accepted by everyone. Most of them have worded their competitiveness definition with regard to corporate and national economic levels. The localization appears more pronouncedly in the economic formed and changed by effect of the globalization; economic roles of the regions, sub-regions are increasingly revaluated. This procedure is also mirrored by the competitiveness-themed theoretical and practical researches of the recent years; a significant part of them is aimed at some local levels. Topic of present treatise is the investigation of competitiveness of the regional level, among the local levels. This choice is justified by the fact the European Union decides about disbursement of the financial sources improving the competitiveness, with regard to the regional level NUTS 2. Models dealing with examination of the regional competitiveness can basically be grouped around two basic models. Members of the model family built on the benefits have largely a case study nature while the pyramid model to be presented belongs to the so called input-performance-output models. Basis of the model is the success factors which influence the region’s competitiveness in a long term through metastases. And the success factors determine such basic factors as the research-development; the organizational background of the region’s economy; investments from the outside; infrastructure and human capital; as well as the institutions and

  4. Effect of etomidate on voltage-dependent potassium currents in rat isolated hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Hong-yu; SUN Li-na; WANG Xiao-liang; YE Tie-hu

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies demonstrated general anesthetics affect potassium ion channels, which may be one of the mechanisms of general anesthesia. Because the effect of etomidate on potassium channels in rat hippocampus which is involved in memory function has not been studied, we investigated the effects of etomidate on both delayed rectifier potassium current (I_((K(DR))) and transient outward potassium current (I_((K(A))) in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons.Methods Single rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons from male Wistar rats of 7-10 days were acutely dissociated by enzymatic digestion and mechanical dispersion according to the methods of Kay and Wong with slight modification. Voltage-clamp recordings were performed in the whole-cell patch clamp configuration. Currents were recorded with a List EPC-10 amplifier and data were stored in a computer using Pulse 8.5. Student's paired two-tail t test was used for data analysis. Results At the concentration of 100 μmol/L, etomidate significantly inhibited I_(K(DR)) by 49.2% at +40 mV when depolarized from -110 mV (P 0.05). The IC_(50) value of etomidate for blocking I_(K(DR)) was calculated as 5.4 μmol/L, with a Hill slope of 2.45. At the presence of 10 μmol/L etomidate, the V_(1/2) of activation curve was shifted from (17.3±1.5) mV to (10.7±9.9) mV (n=8, P <0.05), the V_(1/2) of inactivation curve was shifted from (-18.3±2.2) mV to (-45.3±9.4) mV (n=8, P <0.05). Etomidate 10 μmol/L shifted both the activation curve and inactivation curve of I_(K(DR)) to negative potential, but mainly affected the inactivation kinetics.Conclusions Etomidate potently inhibited I_(K(DR)) but not I_(K(A)) in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons. I_(K(DR)) was inhibited by etomidate in a concentration-dependent manner, while I_(K(A)) remained unaffected.

  5. Fractal dimension of apical dendritic arborization differs in the superficial and the deep pyramidal neurons of the rat cerebral neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puškaš, Nela; Zaletel, Ivan; Stefanović, Bratislav D; Ristanović, Dušan

    2015-03-04

    Pyramidal neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex have specific structure and pattern of organization that involves the presence of apical dendrite. Morphology of the apical dendrite is well-known, but quantification of its complexity still remains open. Fractal analysis has proved to be a valuable method for analyzing the complexity of dendrite morphology. The aim of this study was to establish the fractal dimension of apical dendrite arborization of pyramidal neurons in distinct neocortical laminae by using the modified box-counting method. A total of thirty, Golgi impregnated neurons from the rat brain were analyzed: 15 superficial (cell bodies located within lamina II-III), and 15 deep pyramidal neurons (cell bodies situated within lamina V-VI). Analysis of topological parameters of apical dendrite arborization showed no statistical differences except in total dendritic length (p=0.02), indicating considerable homogeneity between the two groups of neurons. On the other hand, average fractal dimension of apical dendrite was 1.33±0.06 for the superficial and 1.24±0.04 for the deep cortical neurons, showing statistically significant difference between these two groups (pfractal dimension values, apical dendrites of the superficial pyramidal neurons tend to show higher structural complexity compared to the deep ones.

  6. Simple method for evaluation of planum temporale pyramidal neurons shrinkage in postmortem tissue of Alzheimer disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutová, Martina; Mrzílková, Jana; Kirdajová, Denisa; Řípová, Daniela; Zach, Petr

    2014-01-01

    We measured the length of the pyramidal neurons in the cortical layer III in four subregions of the planum temporale (transitions into superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, insular cortex, and Sylvian fissure) in control group and Alzheimer disease patients. Our hypothesis was that overall length of the pyramidal neurons would be smaller in the Alzheimer disease group compared to controls and also there would be right-left asymmetry in both the control and Alzheimer disease groups. We found pyramidal neuron length asymmetry only in controls--in the transition into the Sylvian fissure--and the rest of the subregions in the control group and Alzheimer disease patients did not show size difference. However, control-Alzheimer disease group pyramidal neuron length comparison revealed (a) no length difference in superior temporal gyrus transition area, (b) reversal of asymmetry in the insular transition area with left insular transition significantly shorter in the Alzheimer disease group compared to the control group, (c) both right and left Heschl's gyrus transitions significantly shorter in the Alzheimer disease group compared to the control group, and (d) right Sylvian fissure transition significantly shorter in the Alzheimer disease group compared to the control group. This neuronal length measurement method could supplement already existing neuropathological criteria for postmortem Alzheimer disease diagnostics.

  7. Storyline and Associations Pyramid as Methods of Creativity Enhancement: Comparison of Effectiveness in 5-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smogorzewska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study comparing the originality, the length, the number of neologisms and the syntactic complexity of fairy tales created with "Storyline" and "Associations Pyramid." Both methods were developed to enhance children's language abilities and their creative thinking. One hundred twenty eight 5-year-old children…

  8. Different populations of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive interneurons are specialized to control pyramidal cells or interneurons in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acsády, L; Görcs, T J; Freund, T F

    1996-07-01

    The postsynaptic targets of three vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing GABAergic interneuron types were examined in the rat hippocampus. Two of them showed remarkable target selectivity for other GABAergic neurons, while the third contacted the somata and proximal dendrites of pyramidal cells. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive interneurons innervating the stratum oriens/alveus border in the CA1 region were shown to establish multiple contacts with horizontal GABAergic interneurons immunoreactive for type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor. Similarly, identified axons of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive interneurons projecting to stratum radiatum were found to establish symmetrical synapses largely on GABAergic dendrites. The majority of these postsynaptic GABAergic neurons were shown to contain calbindin or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. In contrast to the first two vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing cell populations, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive interneurons arborizing in stratum pyramidale formed baskets around pyramidal cells. These results revealed a new element in cortical microcircuits, interneurons which are specialized to innervate other GABAergic interneurons. The role of this new component may be the synchronization of dendritic inhibition, or an input-specific disinhibition of pyramidal cells in various dendritic domains. In contrast, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing basket cells are likely to be involved in perisomatic inhibition of pyramidal neurons, and represents a new basket cell type different from that containing parvalbumin.

  9. Food quality in the late postoperative period of bariatric surgery: an evaluation using the bariatric food pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Fernando Lucas; Bissoni de Sousa, Larissa; Corradi-Perini, Carla; Ramos da Cruz, Magda Rosa; Nunes, Mario Gilberto Jesus; Branco-Filho, Alcides José

    2014-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective intervention in the treatment of obesity, but lifestyle and diet should be monitored after this procedure to ensure success. The Bariatric Food Pyramid was created basing on long-term nutritional care that proposes a standard of healthy living and eating habits considering gastric capacity and specific nutritional needs. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the life habits and diet quality of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery (who have been recovering for at least 6 months) based on the specific food pyramid. Retrospective data analysis was performed using medical records of patients who had been followed for at least 6 months after bariatric surgery. The following data were collected from patient records: age, gender, education level (years), BMI (preoperative and postoperative), percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) relative to the time of surgery, frequency of physical activity, use of nutritional supplements, usual dietary intake history, and fluid intake. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We evaluated 172 patient records. In this study, there was a low prevalence of physical activity, use of vitamin-mineral supplements, and water intake. There also was low consumption of protein, fruit, vegetables, and vegetable oils. In addition, intake of carbohydrates, sugars, and fats were higher than the recommendations established by the pyramid. The results indicate that patients who have undergone bariatric surgery have an inadequate diet according to food evaluation with the specific pyramid. In the long term, this may lead to weight gain and vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

  10. Childhood Obesity Study: A Pilot Study of the Effect of the Nutrition Education Program "Color My Pyramid"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jean Burley; Pawloski, Lisa Renee; Goldberg, Patricia; Oh, Kyeung Mi; Stoehr, Ana; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2009-01-01

    The need for successful nutrition interventions is critical as the prevalence of childhood obesity increases. Thus, this pilot project examines the effect of a nutrition education program, "Color My Pyramid", on children's nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, activity levels, and nutrition status. Using a pretest-posttest,…

  11. Administrator Strategies that Support High Fidelity Implementation of the Pyramid Model for Promoting Social-Emotional Competence & Addressing Challenging Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincic, Melissa; Smith, Barbara J.; Strain, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Implementing the Pyramid Model with fidelity and achieving positive outcomes for children and their families requires that administrators understand their roles in the implementation process. Every administrative decision impacts program quality and sustainability. This Policy Brief underscores the importance of facilitative administrative…

  12. ERK1/2 Activation Is Necessary for BDNF to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Mariana; Medina, Jorge H.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS, acting both pre- and postsynaptically. We demonstrated recently that BDNF/TrkB signaling increases dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we tested whether activation of the prominent ERK (MAPK) signaling…

  13. The effect of pyramiding Phytophthora infestans resistance genes R Pi-mcd1 and R Pi-ber in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, M.Y.A.; Hutten, R.C.B.; Visser, R.G.F.; Eck, van H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite efforts to control late blight in potatoes by introducing R(pi)-genes from wild species into cultivated potato, there are still concerns regarding the durability and level of resistance. Pyramiding R(pi)-genes can be a solution to increase both durability and level of resistance. In this stu

  14. Looking at the smoking epidemic through the lens of population pyramids: Sociodemographic patterns of smoking in Italy, 1983 to 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Federico; C. Capelli (Chiara); G. Costa (Giuseppe); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); A.E. Kunst (Anton)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Surveillance systems often present data by means of summary measures, like age-standardised rates. In this study, we aimed at comparing information derived from commonly used measures of smoking with that presented in modified population pyramids (PPs), using the example of t

  15. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagsma, J. A.; Geenen, P. L.; Ethelberg, S.

    2013-01-01

    , underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach...

  16. Childhood Obesity Study: A Pilot Study of the Effect of the Nutrition Education Program "Color My Pyramid"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jean Burley; Pawloski, Lisa Renee; Goldberg, Patricia; Oh, Kyeung Mi; Stoehr, Ana; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2009-01-01

    The need for successful nutrition interventions is critical as the prevalence of childhood obesity increases. Thus, this pilot project examines the effect of a nutrition education program, "Color My Pyramid", on children's nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, activity levels, and nutrition status. Using a pretest-posttest, quasiexperimental…

  17. US adolescents and MyPyramid: Associations between fast-food consumption and lower likelihood of meeting recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goals of this study were to determine the effect of fast food consumption on adolescents’ food group intakes and likelihood of meeting recommendations outlined in USDA’s MyPyramid Food Guidance System. Two days of 24-hour recall data from 1,956 adolescents 12-19 years of age collected in What W...

  18. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G. [UNR; Driscoll, N. [UCSD; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R. [USGS; Louie, J. [UNR; Pullammanappallil, S. [Optim

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie M. Kell, Graham Kent, Neal W. Driscoll, Robert E. Karlin, Robert L. Baskin, John N. Louie, Kenneth D. Smith, Sathish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract NS14A-08.

  19. First Measurements of Ambient Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM at the EvK2CNR Pyramid Observatory in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gratz L. E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, a global-scale network of ground-based atmospheric monitoring sites is being developed with the objective of expanding the global coverage of atmospheric mercury (Hg measurements and improving our understanding of global atmospheric Hg transport. An important addition to the GMOS monitorng network has been the high altitude EvK2CNR Pyramid Observatory, located at an elevation of 5,050 meters a.s.l. in the eastern Himalaya Mountains of Nepal. Monitoring of total gaseous mercury (TGM using the Tekran 2537A Mercury Vapor Analyzer began at the EvK2CNR Pyramid Observatory in November 2011. From 17 November 2011 to 23 April 2012, the mean concentration of TGM at the Pyramid was 1.2 ng m−3. A range of concentrations from 0.7 to 2.6 ng m−3 has been observed. These are the first reported measurements of atmospheric Hg in Nepal, and currently this is the highest altitude monitoring station for atmospheric Hg in the world. It is anticipated that these high quality measurements, in combination with the other continuous atmospheric measurments being collected at the Pyramid station, will help to further our understanding of Hg concentrations in the free troposphere and the transport of atmospheric Hg on the global scale.

  20. Reading across My Pyramid, a Nutrition and Health Education Curriculum, Increases the Health Behavior Knowledge of Lower Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneman, Karrie; Junge, Sharon K.; Zidenberg-­Cherr, Sheri

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this investigation was to complete a formal evaluation of Reading Across My Pyramid (RAMP), a literacy promoting nutrition and health education curriculum. Methods: To meet this need, a short survey, the "Child Survey," based on topics covered in RAMP lessons was developed and tested for clarity in a group of…

  1. The Environmental (Un)sustainability of the Base-of-the-Pyramid (BOP) Philosophy: A Governance Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H. Wijen (Frank)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe Base- or Bottom-of-the-Pyramid (BOP) philosophy has rapidly gained currency in business, following seminal articles and books in the popular management literature (Prahalad and Hammond, 2002; Hart and Christensen, 2002; Prahalad, 2005; Hart, 2005). The thrust of the BOP philosophy is

  2. Ephrin-B1 controls the columnar distribution of cortical pyramidal neurons by restricting their tangential migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimidschstein, Jordane; Passante, Lara; Dufour, Audrey; van den Ameele, Jelle; Tiberi, Luca; Hrechdakian, Tatyana; Adams, Ralf; Klein, Rüdiger; Lie, Dieter Chichung; Jossin, Yves; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre

    2013-09-18

    Neurons of the cerebral cortex are organized in layers and columns. Unlike laminar patterning, the mechanisms underlying columnar organization remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that ephrin-B1 plays a key role in this process through the control of nonradial steps of migration of pyramidal neurons. In vivo gain of function of ephrin-B1 resulted in a reduction of tangential motility of pyramidal neurons, leading to abnormal neuronal clustering. Conversely, following genetic disruption of ephrin-B1, cortical neurons displayed a wider lateral dispersion, resulting in enlarged ontogenic columns. Dynamic analyses revealed that ephrin-B1 controls the lateral spread of pyramidal neurons by limiting neurite extension and tangential migration during the multipolar phase. Furthermore, we identified P-Rex1, a guanine-exchange factor for Rac3, as a downstream ephrin-B1 effector required to control migration during the multipolar phase. Our results demonstrate that ephrin-B1 inhibits nonradial migration of pyramidal neurons, thereby controlling the pattern of cortical columns.

  3. Resistance to Asian soybean rust in soybean lines with the pyramided three Rpp genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Yamanaka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the influence of genetic background on the resistance level of a soybean line carrying Rpp2, Rpp4, and Rpp5 was evaluated by backcrossing it with a susceptible variety. It was also evaluated eight lines which carry these Rpp genes against five Asian soybean rust (ASR isolates, in order to determine the likely range of resistance against ASR isolates differing in pathogenicity. The results indicated that a high level of resistance against various ASR isolates could be retained in lines carrying the three Rpp genes in susceptible genetic backgrounds, although minor influences of plant genetic background and ASR pathogenicity to the ASR resistance could occur. Thus, lines with the pyramided three Rpp genes should be effective against a complex pathogen population consisting of diverse Phakopsora pachyrhizi isolates.

  4. Tonal response on the stairway of the main pyramid at La Ciudadela, Teotihuacan archaeological site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain, Sergio; Coss, Cecilia; Aquino, Gabriela; Negrete, Jose; Lizana, Pablo

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents new research on the very interesting audible effects produced by the stairways of many archaeological sites in Mexico. This investigation was made at the main stairway of the pyramid at La Ciudadela, Teotihuacan archaeological site. The effect previously studied was a chirped echo reflected from the stairway at normal incidence, which resembles the singing of the Quetzal. Now it is presented with the impulsive sound source and the listeners located at different angles, where apart from the characteristic chirped sound, several musical notes could be obtained and identified, covering a range of at least one half an octave. This evaluation was made at the site, where the effect is clearly audible, and it is supported with simple mathematics.

  5. IKCa channels are a critical determinant of the slow AHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brian; Rizwan, Arsalan P; Asmara, Hadhimulya; Heath, Norman C; Engbers, Jordan D T; Dykstra, Steven; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Hameed, Shahid; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2015-04-14

    Control over the frequency and pattern of neuronal spike discharge depends on Ca2+-gated K+ channels that reduce cell excitability by hyperpolarizing the membrane potential. The Ca2+-dependent slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) is one of the most prominent inhibitory responses in the brain, with sAHP amplitude linked to a host of circuit and behavioral functions, yet the channel that underlies the sAHP has defied identification for decades. Here, we show that intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IKCa) channels underlie the sAHP generated by trains of synaptic input or postsynaptic stimuli in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells. These findings are significant in providing a molecular identity for the sAHP of central neurons that will identify pharmacological tools capable of potentially modifying the several behavioral or disease states associated with the sAHP.

  6. Pyramid Research发布法国网络融合进展状况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    电信调研机构Pyramid Research发布的最新报告显示,随着运营商纷纷投资FTTH来保持竞争优势,到2014年,法国50%的家庭将预订三合一服务。该报告的作者Janten Sythoff表示:“Pyramid预计到2009年末.法国30%的家庭将预订三合一服务,到2014年.这一比例将增加至近50%。”

  7. Performance Simulation of a Flat-Plate Thermoelectric Module Consisting of Square Truncated Pyramid Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Sae; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of a flat-plate thermoelectric (TE) module consisting of square truncated pyramid elements is simulated using commercial software and original TE programs. Assuming that the temperatures of both the hot and cold surfaces are constant, the performance can be varied by changing the element shape and element alignment pattern. When the angle between the edge and the base is 85° and the small square surfaces of all n-type element faces are connected to the low-temperature surface, the efficiency becomes the largest among all the 17 examined shapes and patterns. By changing the shape to match the temperature distribution, the performance of the TE module is maximized.

  8. Ultrathin dendritic Pt3Cu triangular pyramid caps with enhanced electrocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yun; Cai, Zhao; Zhang, Ying; He, Dongsheng; Yan, Xiuling; Bi, Yongmin; Li, Yaping; Li, Ziyou; Sun, Xiaoming

    2014-10-22

    Here we report on the synthesis of novel dendritic Pt3Cu triangular pyramid caps via a solvothermal coreduction method. These caps had three-dimensional caved structures with ultrathin branches, as evidenced by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and HAADF-STEM characterization. Tuning the reduction kinetics of two metal precursors by an iodide ion was believed to be the key for the formation of an alloyed nanostructure. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid showed dramatically improved electrocatalytic activities and poison-tolerance for these nanoalloys as compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts, which was attributed to their unique open porous structure with interconnected network, ultrahigh surface areas, as well as synergetic effect of the two metallic components.

  9. Anatomy and Physiology of the Thick-tufted Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth eRamaswamy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thick-tufted layer 5 (TTL5 pyramidal neuron is one of the most extensively studied neuron types in the mammalian neocortex and has become a benchmark for understanding information processing in excitatory neurons. By virtue of having the widest local axonal and dendritic arborization, the TTL5 neuron encompasses various local neocortical neurons and thereby defines the dimensions of neocortical microcircuitry. The TTL5 neuron integrates input across all neocortical layers and is the principal output pathway funneling information flow to subcortical structures. Several studies over the past decades have investigated the anatomy, physiology, synaptology, and pathophysiology of the TTL5 neuron. This review summarizes key discoveries and identifies potential avenues of research to facilitate an integrated and unifying understanding on the role of a central neuron in the neocortex.

  10. Correlation-induced network oscillations of pyramidal cells in the weakly electric fish - theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Benjamin; Doiron, Brent; Longtin, Andre; Maler, Leonard; Bastian, Joseph

    2004-03-01

    The spiking activity of pyramidal cells in the weakly electric fish is studied. It is experimentally shown that the oscillatory spiking activity of these cells increases with the spatial correlations of external stochastic input. A model network of integrate-and-fire (IF) neurons with delayed inhibitory feedback reproduces this effect. Moreover, a novel analytical approach for stochastic neuron models with weak feedback is presented that leads to a simple expression for the power spectrum of the spike train of a single neuron. The analytical results agree well with simulation results of the leaky IF neurons; they also show the same qualitative features as the experimental spectra and are helpful in understanding the deeper origin of the correlation-induced oscillations.

  11. Filtering of the Radon transform to enhance linear signal features via wavelet pyramid decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckley, John R.

    1995-09-01

    The information content in many signal processing applications can be reduced to a set of linear features in a 2D signal transform. Examples include the narrowband lines in a spectrogram, ship wakes in a synthetic aperture radar image, and blood vessels in a medical computer-aided tomography scan. The line integrals that generate the values of the projections of the Radon transform can be characterized as a bank of matched filters for linear features. This localization of energy in the Radon transform for linear features can be exploited to enhance these features and to reduce noise by filtering the Radon transform with a filter explicitly designed to pass only linear features, and then reconstructing a new 2D signal by inverting the new filtered Radon transform (i.e., via filtered backprojection). Previously used methods for filtering the Radon transform include Fourier based filtering (a 2D elliptical Gaussian linear filter) and a nonlinear filter ((Radon xfrm)**y with y >= 2.0). Both of these techniques suffer from the mismatch of the filter response to the true functional form of the Radon transform of a line. The Radon transform of a line is not a point but is a function of the Radon variables (rho, theta) and the total line energy. This mismatch leads to artifacts in the reconstructed image and a reduction in achievable processing gain. The Radon transform for a line is computed as a function of angle and offset (rho, theta) and the line length. The 2D wavelet coefficients are then compared for the Haar wavelets and the Daubechies wavelets. These filter responses are used as frequency filters for the Radon transform. The filtering is performed on the wavelet pyramid decomposition of the Radon transform by detecting the most likely positions of lines in the transform and then by convolving the local area with the appropriate response and zeroing the pyramid coefficients outside of the response area. The response area is defined to contain 95% of the total

  12. Pyramidal texturing of silicon solar cell with TMAH chemical anisotropic etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papet, P.; Nichiporuk, O.; Kaminski, A.; Rozier, Y.; Kraiem, J.; Lelievre, J.-F.; Chaumartin, A.; Fave, A.; Lemiti, M. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR-CNRS 5511, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Bat Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-09-22

    High-efficiency silicon solar cells need a textured front surface to reduce reflectance and to improve light trapping. Texturing of monocrystalline silicon is usually done in alkaline solutions. These solutions are cheaper, but are pollutants of silicon technologies. In this paper, we investigate an alternative solution containing tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide ((CH{sub 3}){sub 4}NOH, TMAH ). This study shows the influence of different parameters (concentration, agitation, duration and temperature), to obtain uniform and reliable pyramidal texturization on different silicon surfaces (as cut, etched and polished). Under optimized conditions, TMAH-textured surface led to an average weighted reflectance of 13%, without any antireflection coating independent of the initial silicon surface. Unlike potassium hydroxide (KOH) texturing solution, characterization of silicon oxide layer contamination after TMAH texturing process revealed no pollution, and passivation is less affected by TMAH than by KOH texturization. (author)

  13. High efficiency thermophotovoltaic emitter by metamaterial-based nano-pyramid array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wei; Tang, Guihua; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-11-30

    A 2D pyramidal metamaterial-based nano-structure is proposed as a wavelength-selective Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) emitter. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis complemented with normal field method is used to predict the emittance as well as the electromagnetic field and Poynting vector distributions. The proposed emitter is shown to be wavelength-selective, polarization-insensitive, and direction-insensitive in emittance. The mechanisms supporting the emittance close to 1.0 in the wavelength range of 0.3-2.0 μm are elucidated by the distribution of electromagnetic field and Poynting vectors in the proposed structure. Finally, thermal stability and radiant heat-to-electricity TPV efficiency for a realistic InGaAsSb TPV system are discussed.

  14. Parallel two-level domain decomposition based Jacobi-Davidson algorithms for pyramidal quantum dot simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Hwang, Feng-Nan; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-07-01

    We consider a quintic polynomial eigenvalue problem arising from the finite volume discretization of a quantum dot simulation problem. The problem is solved by the Jacobi-Davidson (JD) algorithm. Our focus is on how to achieve the quadratic convergence of JD in a way that is not only efficient but also scalable when the number of processor cores is large. For this purpose, we develop a projected two-level Schwarz preconditioned JD algorithm that exploits multilevel domain decomposition techniques. The pyramidal quantum dot calculation is carefully studied to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method. Numerical experiments confirm that the proposed method has a good scalability for problems with hundreds of millions of unknowns on a parallel computer with more than 10,000 processor cores.

  15. Phorbol esters broaden the action potential in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, J F

    1987-03-20

    Intracellular recordings were made from CA1 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slices. Single action potentials were elicited by injection of brief current pulses. Bath application of phorbol esters (4 beta-phorbol-12,13-diacetate, 0.3-5 microM; or 4 beta-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate, 5-10 microM) broadened the action potential in each of the cells tested (n = 9). The broadening reflected slowing of the repolarization, whereas the upstroke of the spike was unchanged. This effect may enhance transmitter release from synaptic terminals, and contribute to enhancement of synaptic transmission through activation of protein kinase C, a mechanism which has been associated with long term potentiation.

  16. Designing A Framework To Design A Business Model For The 'Bottom Of The Pyramid' Population

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    Ver Loren van Themaat, Tanye

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a framework for developing and designing a business model to target the bottom of the pyramid (BoP population. Using blue ocean strategy and business model literature, integrated with research on the BoP, the framework offers a systematic approach for organisations to analyse and understand all aspects of the BoP and their environment, and then design a business model that minimises the risk of failure and fulfils the core requirements of the BoP. A case study on Capitec Bank demonstrates how the framework can be applied to the real world. The case study shows the practical examples that Capitec uses to target the BoP successfully, and the logic behind these actions. Further validation was done through interviews with experts in the relevant fields used in this study.

  17. A Simulation-Based Study of Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Pyramidal Cell Firing Patterns

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    Mohammad Reza Daliri

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A two-variable integrate and fire model is presented to study the role of transient outward potassium currents in producing temporal aspects of dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN pyramidal cells with different profiles namely the chopper, the pauser and the buildup. This conductance based model is a reduced version of KM-LIF model (Meng & Rinzel, 2010 which captures qualitative firing features of a detailed physiological model (Kanold & Manis, 2000.For our development we benefit from transient potassium currents properties i.e.fast activation and slow inactivation to generate long latency before start of firing.We compare our minimal model outputs in response to a hyperpolarizing stimulus fallowed by a depolarizing one with the data of KM-LIF model.The results conform well to the KM-LIF model with lower complexity.

  18. Membrane Potential Dynamics of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons during Hippocampal Ripples in Awake Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Brad K; Moreaux, Laurent C; Lubenov, Evgueniy V; Siapas, Athanassios G

    2016-02-17

    Ripples are high-frequency oscillations associated with population bursts in area CA1 of the hippocampus that play a prominent role in theories of memory consolidation. While spiking during ripples has been extensively studied, our understanding of the subthreshold behavior of hippocampal neurons during these events remains incomplete. Here, we combine in vivo whole-cell and multisite extracellular recordings to characterize the membrane potential dynamics of identified CA1 pyramidal neurons during ripples. We find that the subthreshold depolarization during ripples is uncorrelated with the net excitatory input to CA1, while the post-ripple hyperpolarization varies proportionately. This clarifies the circuit mechanism keeping most neurons silent during ripples. On a finer timescale, the phase delay between intracellular and extracellular ripple oscillations varies systematically with membrane potential. Such smoothly varying delays are inconsistent with models of intracellular ripple generation involving perisomatic inhibition alone. Instead, they suggest that ripple-frequency excitation leading inhibition shapes intracellular ripple oscillations.

  19. Performance simulation of the ERIS pyramid wavefront sensor module in the VLT adaptive optics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Agapito, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis based on numerical simulations of the Pyramid Wavefront sensor Module (PWM) to be included in ERIS, the new Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). We have analyzed the performance of the PWM working either in a low-order or in a high-order wavefront sensing mode of operation. We show that the PWM in the high-order sensing mode can provide SR > 90% in K band using bright guide stars under median seeing conditions (0.85 arcsec seeing and 15 m/s of wind speed). In the low-order sensing mode, the PWM can sense and correct Tip-Tilt (and if requested also Focus mode) with the precision required to assist the LGS observations to get an SR > 60% and > 20% in K band, using up to a ~16.5 and ~19.5 R-magnitude guide star, respectively.

  20. Calibration strategy of the pyramid wavefront sensor module of ERIS with the VLT deformable secondary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, A.; Briguglio, R.; Pinna, E.; Agapito, G.; Quiros-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.

    2012-07-01

    ERIS is a new Adaptive Optics Instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility of the VLT that foresees, in its design phase, a Pyramid Wavefront Sensor Module (PWM) to be used with the VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror (VLT-DSM) as corrector. As opposite to the concave secondary mirrors currently in use (e.g. at LBT), VLT-DSM is convex and calibration of the interaction matrix (IM) between the PWM and the DSM is not foreseen on-telescope during day-time. In this paper different options of calibration are evaluated and compared with particular attention on the synthetic evaluation and on-sky calibration of the IM. A trade-off of the calibration options, the optimization techniques and the related validation with numerical simulations are also provided.

  1. Understanding socio-economic inequalities in food choice behaviour: can Maslow's pyramid help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lenthe, Frank J; Jansen, Tessa; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M

    2015-04-14

    Socio-economic groups differ in their material, living, working and social circumstances, which may result in different priorities about their daily-life needs, including the priority to make healthy food choices. Following Maslow's hierarchy of human needs, we hypothesised that socio-economic inequalities in healthy food choices can be explained by differences in the levels of need fulfilment. Postal survey data collected in 2011 (67·2 % response) from 2903 participants aged 20-75 years in the Dutch GLOBE (Gezondheid en Levens Omstandigheden Bevolking Eindhoven en omstreken) study were analysed. Maslow's hierarchy of human needs (measured with the Basic Need Satisfaction Inventory) was added to age- and sex-adjusted linear regression models that linked education and net household income levels to healthy food choices (measured by a FFQ). Most participants (38·6 %) were in the self-actualisation layer of the pyramid. This proportion was highest among the highest education group (47·6 %). Being in a higher level of the hierarchy was associated with a higher consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as more healthy than unhealthy bread, snack and dairy consumption. Educational inequalities in fruit and vegetable intake (B= -1·79, 95 % CI -2·31, -1·28 in the lowest education group) were most reduced after the hierarchy of needs score was included (B= -1·57, 95 % CI - ·09, -1·05). Inequalities in other healthy food choices hardly changed after the hierarchy of needs score was included. People who are satisfied with higher-level needs make healthier food choices. Studies aimed at understanding socio-economic inequalities in food choice behaviour need to take differences in the priority given to daily-life needs by different socio-economic groups into account, but Maslow's pyramid offers little help.

  2. A hexagonal orthogonal-oriented pyramid as a model of image representation in visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells represent the visual image with a spatial code, in which each cell conveys information about a small region in the image. In contrast, cells of the primary visual cortex use a hybrid space-frequency code in which each cell conveys information about a region that is local in space, spatial frequency, and orientation. A mathematical model for this transformation is described. The hexagonal orthogonal-oriented quadrature pyramid (HOP) transform, which operates on a hexagonal input lattice, uses basis functions that are orthogonal, self-similar, and localized in space, spatial frequency, orientation, and phase. The basis functions, which are generated from seven basic types through a recursive process, form an image code of the pyramid type. The seven basis functions, six bandpass and one low-pass, occupy a point and a hexagon of six nearest neighbors on a hexagonal lattice. The six bandpass basis functions consist of three with even symmetry, and three with odd symmetry. At the lowest level, the inputs are image samples. At each higher level, the input lattice is provided by the low-pass coefficients computed at the previous level. At each level, the output is subsampled in such a way as to yield a new hexagonal lattice with a spacing square root of 7 larger than the previous level, so that the number of coefficients is reduced by a factor of seven at each level. In the biological model, the input lattice is the retinal ganglion cell array. The resulting scheme provides a compact, efficient code of the image and generates receptive fields that resemble those of the primary visual cortex.

  3. Potential Synaptic Connectivity of Different Neurons onto Pyramidal Cells in a 3D Reconstruction of the Rat Hippocampus

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    Deepak eRopireddy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Most existing connectomic data and ongoing efforts focus either on individual synapses (e.g. with electron microscopy or on regional connectivity (tract tracing. An individual pyramidal cell extends thousands of synapses over macroscopic distances (~cm. The contrasting requirements of high resolution and large field of view make it too challenging to acquire the entire synaptic connectivity for even a single typical cortical neuron. Light microscopy can image whole neuronal arbors and resolve dendritic branches. Analyzing connectivity in terms of close spatial appositions between axons and dendrites could thus bridge the opposite scales, from synaptic level to whole systems. In the mammalian cortex, structural plasticity of spines and boutons makes these ‘potential synapses’ functionally relevant to learning capability and memory capacity. To date, however, potential synapses have only been mapped in the surrounding of a neuron and relative to its local orientation rather than in a system-level anatomical reference. Here we overcome this limitation by estimating the potential connectivity of different neurons embedded into a detailed 3D reconstruction of the rat hippocampus. Axonal and dendritic trees were oriented with respect to hippocampal cytoarchitecture according to longitudinal and transversal curvatures. We report the potential connectivity onto pyramidal cell dendrites from the axons of a dentate granule cell, three CA3 pyramidal cells, one CA2 pyramidal cell, and 13 CA3b interneurons. The numbers, densities, and distributions of potential synapses were analyzed in each sub-region (e.g. CA3 vs. CA1, layer (e.g. oriens vs. radiatum, and septo-temporal location (e.g. dorsal vs. ventral. The overall ratio between the numbers of actual and potential synapses was ~0.20 for the granule and CA3 pyramidal cells. All potential connectivity patterns are strikingly dependent on the anatomical location of both pre-synaptic and post

  4. Neuronal Dystroglycan Is Necessary for Formation and Maintenance of Functional CCK-Positive Basket Cell Terminals on Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früh, Simon; Romanos, Jennifer; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Bürgisser, Daniela; Tyagarajan, Shiva K; Campbell, Kevin P; Santello, Mirko; Fritschy, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-05

    Distinct types of GABAergic interneurons target different subcellular domains of pyramidal cells, thereby shaping pyramidal cell activity patterns. Whether the presynaptic heterogeneity of GABAergic innervation is mirrored by specific postsynaptic factors is largely unexplored. Here we show that dystroglycan, a protein responsible for the majority of congenital muscular dystrophies when dysfunctional, has a function at postsynaptic sites restricted to a subset of GABAergic interneurons. Conditional deletion of Dag1, encoding dystroglycan, in pyramidal cells caused loss of CCK-positive basket cell terminals in hippocampus and neocortex. PV-positive basket cell terminals were unaffected in mutant mice, demonstrating interneuron subtype-specific function of dystroglycan. Loss of dystroglycan in pyramidal cells had little influence on clustering of other GABAergic postsynaptic proteins and of glutamatergic synaptic proteins. CCK-positive terminals were not established at P21 in the absence of dystroglycan and were markedly reduced when dystroglycan was ablated in adult mice, suggesting a role for dystroglycan in both formation and maintenance of CCK-positive terminals. The necessity of neuronal dystroglycan for functional innervation by CCK-positive basket cell axon terminals was confirmed by reduced frequency of inhibitory events in pyramidal cells of dystroglycan-deficient mice and further corroborated by the inefficiency of carbachol to increase IPSC frequency in these cells. Finally, neurexin binding seems dispensable for dystroglycan function because knock-in mice expressing binding-deficient T190M dystroglycan displayed normal CCK-positive terminals. Together, we describe a novel function of dystroglycan in interneuron subtype-specific trans-synaptic signaling, revealing correlation of presynaptic and postsynaptic molecular diversity.

  5. Pirâmides alimentares: uma leitura semiótica Food guide pyramids: a semiotic way of reading

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    Haydée Serrão Lanzillotti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A semiótica é uma ciência que sistematiza e desvela o mundo dos signos, descrevendo-os e classificando-os segundo uma lógica. Existem três espécies de signos: ícones, índices e símbolos. As pirâmides alimentares são, primeiramente, ícones que podem se desenvolver até símbolos. Sob o enfoque da Nutrição, as pirâmides alimentares são consideradas ferramentas de orientação que podem transmitir conhecimentos relativos a uma alimentação considerada adequada. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial comunicativo da pirâmide alimentar na perspectiva da semiótica. Neste ensaio, foram analisadas três pirâmides alimentares: United State Departament of Agriculture de 1992, de Philippi, de 1999 e de Willet e Stampfer, de 2003. O nível hierárquico em que o grupo de alimentos se encontra é o elemento informativo fundamental.Semiotics is a science that systematizes and reveals the world of signs, describing and classifying them according to logic. There are three kinds of sign: icons, indexes and symbols. The food guide pyramids are, in first place, icons, which can develop into symbols. Considering the focus of Nutrition, the food guide pyramids are considered as orientation tools that can transmit knowledge related to feeding considered adequate. The objective of this paper was to show the communicative potential of the food guide pyramids from the semiotics perspective. In this trial, three food guide pyramids were analyzed. The United States Department of Agriculture, 1992, Philippi, 1999 and Willet & Stampfer, 2003. In every food guide pyramid the hierarchic "level" in which a group of foods is found is the primordial informative element.

  6. Electrophysiological effects of SKF83959 on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons: potential mechanisms for the drug's neuroprotective effects.

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    Hong-Yuan Chu

    Full Text Available Although the potent anti-parkinsonian action of the atypical D₁-like receptor agonist SKF83959 has been attributed to the selective activation of phosphoinositol(PI-linked D₁ receptor, whereas the mechanism underlying its potent neuroprotective effect is not fully understood. In the present study, the actions of SKF83959 on neuronal membrane potential and neuronal excitability were investigated in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. SKF83959 (10-100 µM caused a concentration-dependent depolarization, associated with a reduction of input resistance in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The depolarization was blocked neither by antagonists for D₁, D₂, 5-HT(2A/2C receptors and α₁-adrenoceptor, nor by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S. However, the specific HCN channel blocker ZD7288 (10 µM antagonized both the depolarization and reduction of input resistance caused by SKF83959. In voltage-clamp experiments, SKF83959 (10-100 µM caused a concentration-dependent increase of Ih current in CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was independent of D₁ receptor activation. Moreover, SKF83959 (50 µM caused a 6 mV positive shift in the activation curve of Ih and significantly accelerated the activation of Ih current. In addition, SKF83959 also reduced the neuronal excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was manifested by the decrease in the number and amplitude of action potentials evoked by depolarizing currents, and by the increase of firing threshold and rhoebase current. The above results suggest that SKF83959 increased Ih current through a D₁ receptor-independent mechanism, which led to the depolarization of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. These findings provide a novel mechanism for the drug's neuroprotective effects, which may contributes to its therapeutic benefits in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation prevents kindling-induced changes in electrophysiological properties of rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, A; Semnanian, S; Janahmadi, M; Moradi-Chameh, H; Firoozabadi, S M; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, J

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying antiepileptic or antiepileptogenic effects of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of rTMS applied during rapid amygdala kindling on some electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Male Wistar rats were kindled by daily electrical stimulation of the basolateral amygdala in a semi-rapid manner (12 stimulations/day) until they achieved stage-5 seizure. One group (kindled+rTMS (KrTMS)) of animals received rTMS (1Hz for 4min) 5min after termination of daily kindling stimulations. Twenty four hours following the last kindling stimulation electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Amygdala kindling significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential and increased the input resistance, spontaneous firing activity, number of evoked spikes and half-width of the first evoked spike. Kindling also decreased the first-spike latency and amplitude significantly. Application of rTMS during kindling somehow prevented the development of seizures and protected CA1 pyramidal neurons of hippocampus against deleterious effect of kindling on both passive and active neuronal electrophysiological properties. Interestingly, application of rTMS alone enhanced the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons significantly. Based on the results of our study, it may be suggested that rTMS exerts its anticonvulsant effect, in part, through preventing the amygdala kindling-induced changes in electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. It seems that rTMS exerts protective effects on the neural circuits involved in spreading the seizures from the focus to other parts of the brain.

  8. Accelerated dendritic development of rat cortical pyramidal cells and interneurons after biolistic transfection with BDNF and NT4/5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Marcus J; Brun, Annika; Grabert, Jochen; Patz, Silke; Wahle, Petra

    2003-12-01

    Neurotrophins are candidate molecules for regulating dendritogenesis. We report here on dendritic growth of rat visual cortex pyramidal and interneurons overexpressing 'brain-derived neurotrophic factor' BDNF and 'neurotrophin 4/5' NT4/5. Neurons in organotypic cultures were transfected with plasmids encoding either 'enhanced green fluorescent protein' EGFP, BDNF/EGFP or NT4/5/EGFP either at the day of birth with analysis at 5 days in vitro, or at 5 days in vitro with analysis at 10 days in vitro. In pyramidal neurons, both TrkB ligands increased dendritic length and number of segments without affecting maximum branch order and number of primary dendrites. In the early time window, only infragranular neurons were responsive. Neurons in layers II/III became responsive to NT4/5, but not BDNF, during the later time window. BDNF and NT4/5 transfectants at 10 days in vitro had still significantly shorter dendrites than adult pyramidal neurons, suggesting a massive growth spurt after 10 days in vitro. However, segment numbers were already in the range of adult neurons. Although this suggested a role for BDNF, long-term activity-deprived, and thus BDNF-deprived, pyramidal cells developed a dendritic complexity not different from neurons in active cultures except for higher spine densities on neurons of layers II/III and VI. Neutralization of endogenous NT4/5 causes shorter and less branched dendrites at 10 days in vitro suggesting an essential role for NT4/5. Neutralization of BDNF had no effect. Transfected multipolar interneurons became identifiable during the second time window. Both TrkB ligands significantly increased number of segments and branch order towards the adult state with little effects on dendritic length. The results suggested that early in development BDNF and NT4/5 probably accelerate dendritogenesis in an autocrine fashion. In particular, branch formation was advanced towards the adult pattern in pyramidal cells and interneurons.

  9. Streptozotocin Inhibits Electrophysiological Determinants of Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Rat Hippocampal Slices: Reduction of These Effects by Edaravone

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    Ting Ju

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptozotocin (STZ has served as an agent to generate an Alzheimer's disease (AD model in rats, while edaravone (EDA, a novel free radical scavenger, has recently emerged as an effective treatment for use in vivo and vitro AD models. However, to date, these beneficial effects of EDA have only been clearly demonstrated within STZ-induced animal models of AD and in cell models of AD. A better understanding of the mechanisms of EDA may provide the opportunity for their clinical application in the treatment of AD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of STZ and EDA as assessed upon electrophysiological alterations in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. Methods: Through measures of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs, AMPAR-mediated eEPSCs (eEPSCsAMPA, evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs, evoked excitatory postsynaptic current paired pulse ratio (eEPSC PPR and evoked inhibitory postsynaptic current paired pulse ratio (eIPSC PPR, it was possible to investigate mechanisms as related to the neurotoxicity of STZ and reductions in these effects by EDA. Results: Our results showed that STZ (1000 µM significantly inhibited peak amplitudes of eEPSCs, eEPSCsAMPA and eIPSCs, while EDA (1000 µM attenuated these STZ-induced changes at holding potentials ranging from -60mV to +40 mV for EPSCs and -60mV to +20 mV for IPSCs. Our work also indicated that mean eEPSC PPR were substantially altered by STZ, effects which were partially restored by EDA. In contrast, no significant effects upon eIPSC PPR were obtained in response to STZ and EDA. Conclusion: Our data suggest that STZ inhibits glutamatergic transmission involving pre-synaptic mechanisms and AMPAR, and that STZ inhibits GABAergic transmission by post-synaptic mechanisms within CA1 pyramidal neurons. These effects are attenuated by EDA.

  10. Texturing a pyramid-like structure on a silicon surface via the synergetic effect of copper and Fe(III) in hydrofluoric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ming; Li, Shaoyuan; Deng, Jianxin; Li, Yuping; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang

    2016-05-01

    An innovative approach is proposed to texture a pyramid structure on a silicon surface via Cu-catalyzed chemical etching in the HF/FeCl3 system. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the formed pyramid structure were examined by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results revealed that numerous silicon pyramid-like structures with hemlines of 0.1 ∼ 3 μm and height of 0.1 ∼ 2 μm are close together, and the top angle of the pyramid structure is 90°. Additionally, the systematic study of the effects of the etching time and the concentration of FeCl3 on the pyramid-like structures by the atom configuration model of silicon crystal faces demonstrated that the etching proceeds preferentially along the directions of silicon. A formation mechanism of the pyramid-like structure is proposed. The results imply that the synergetic effect of Cu nanoparticles and Fe(III) could conveniently generate a pyramid-like architecture on the surface of silicon in hydrofluoric acid solution.

  11. Fish tag recovery from Anaho Island nesting colony, Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoppettone, G. Gary; Fabes, Mark C.; Rissler, Peter H.; Withers, Donna

    2016-01-06

    In 2001, tags applied to the federally endangered species cui-ui (Chasmistes cujus) to study their population dynamics were discovered strewn throughout the American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) nesting colony on Anaho Island, Pyramid Lake, Nevada. Cui-ui are endemic to Pyramid Lake, and Anaho Island harbors one of North America’s largest nesting colonies of American White Pelican. Cui-ui are consumed by pelicans during the fish’s spring migration into the Truckee River to reproduce. The predatory success of pelican has been validated by determining the odds of finding a tag from a predated cui-ui within the Anaho Island nesting colony. It is unknown how many cui-ui tags are eliminated by birds before arrival to the colony versus how many are brought to the colony but never recovered. The focus of this study was to improve the estimate of the chances of collecting a tag from a predated adult cui-ui in the pelican nesting colony by feeding dead tagged Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to pelican and subsequently searching for these tags within the colony. We also randomly deployed 1,000 dispersal tags throughout the nesting colony, searching for these after one and two breeding seasons. After adding 1,027 fed fish to 547 previously fed fish, we estimated 5.3 percent of the tagged cui-ui taken by pelican were recovered during tag searches. A study of dispersal tags randomly deployed within the pelican nesting colony showed that 51.5 percent would be expected to be recovered after at least one breeding season after being deployed. Results of our studies indicate that more than 90 percent of tags from adult cui-ui are eliminated by birds outside the pelican nesting colony. Tags recovered from other species and the site at which they were tagged are also reported. Most notable were recovered Lahontan cutthroat trout tags, which were the highest in number, but their proximity to double

  12. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tanya J; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Milner, Teresa A

    2011-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  13. Freestanding carbon nanodots/poly (vinyl alcohol) films with high photoluminescent quantum yield realized by inverted-pyramid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Linna; Ba, Lixiang; Pan, Wei; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots) have attracted great attention for their biocompatibility and strong tunable photoluminescence (PL). However, aggregation-induced PL quenching blocks their practical application in solid-state optoelectronics. Here, we report a luminescent C-dots freestanding film with a substantially enhanced high quantum yield (QY) of 72.3%. A facile template method, rather than complicate lithography and etching technique is proposed to fabricate the C-dots composite films with large-area (8 inch × 8 inch) ordered micro-scale inverted-pyramid patterns on the surface. The control experiment and theoretical analysis demonstrate the key success to QY enhancement lies in the separation of C-dots and the pattern of surface inverted-pyramid structure. This work realizes the QY enhancement simply by geometrical optics, not the chemical treatment of luminescent particles. It provides a general approach to fabricate large-area freestanding luminescent composite film with high QY.

  14. Diamagnetic susceptibility of an off-center hydrogenic donor in pyramid-like and cone-like quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avazzadeh, Z.; Bahramiyan, H.; Khordad, R.; Mohammadi, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the diamagnetic susceptibility of an off-center hydrogenic donor impurity confined by pyramid and cone-like quantum dots has been investigated. To this end, the finite-element method and the Arnoldi algorithm are used to find energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the systems. Then, the effect of impurity position and dot size has been investigated on the diamagnetic susceptibility. We have found that the diamagnetic susceptibility has a maximum around the impurity position 4nm for two quantum dots. The diamagnetic susceptibility in the cone-like quantum dot is smaller than that in the pyramid quantum dot. Numerical studies reveal that the diamagnetic susceptibility depends strongly on the geometry of the dot.

  15. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagsma, J A; Geenen, P L; Ethelberg, S; Fetsch, A; Hansdotter, F; Jansen, A; Korsgaard, H; O'Brien, S J; Scavia, G; Spitznagel, H; Stefanoff, P; Tam, C C; Havelaar, A H

    2013-08-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the healthcare system in seven European Union member states in relation to pathogen characteristics that influence healthcare seeking. Data on healthcare usage were obtained by harmonized cross-sectional surveys. The degree of under-diagnosis and underreporting varied by pathogen and country. Overall, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach are adjusted for biases due to different surveillance systems and are therefore a better basis for international comparisons than reported data.

  16. SERS detection of R6G based on a novel graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/silicon pyramid arrays structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Jiang, S Z; Huo, Y Y; Liu, A H; Xu, S C; Liu, X Y; Sun, Z C; Xu, Y Y; Li, Z; Man, B Y

    2015-09-21

    We present a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/silicon pyramid arrays structure (GO/Ag/PSi). The SERS behaviors are discussed and compared by the detection of R6G. Based on the contrast experiments with PSi, GO/PSi, Ag/PSi and GO/AgA/PSi as SERS substrate, the perfect bio-compatibility, good homogeneity and chemical stability were confirmed. We also calculated the electric field distributions using Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis to further understand the GO/Ag/PSi structure as a perfect SERS platform. These experimental and theoretical results imply that the GO/Ag/PSi with regular pyramids array is expected to be an effective substrate for label-free sensitive SERS detections in areas of medicine, food safety and biotechnology.

  17. Effect of size on electronic states in a strained pyramidal InAs-GaAs quantum dot system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripan, G. H., E-mail: gregoryhr@gmail.com [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Applied Science & Foundation Studies, Infrastructure University Kuala Lumpur, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Woon, C. Y.; Gopir, G. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    The effect of size on electronic states in a strained pyramidal InAs-GaAs quantum dot system was studied. A comparison was made between two InAs quantum pyramids of different sizes embedded inside a cubic GaAs susbtrate material. Strain relaxation was carried out via the Metropolis Monte Carlo method and the calculated local strain tensors were then included to solve the energy values and the wave functions of the electronic states inside the two simulation cube. The 3D finite difference scheme was employed to solve the time independent Schrödinger equation based on the decoupled electron-hole model. Calculated energy values of the four lowest electronic states showed that the transitions between the electron and hole states widen as the size of the dot becomes smaller especially between the ground states. The confinement of electrons and holes become weaker as the size of the dot reduces.

  18. Growth and structural characterization of pyramidal site-controlled quantum dots with high uniformity and spectral purity

    CERN Document Server

    Dimastrodonato, Valeria; Young, Robert J; Pelucchi, Emanuele

    2010-01-01

    This work presents some fundamental features of pyramidal site-controlled InGaAs Quantum Dots (QDs) grown by MetalOrganic Vapour Phase Epitaxy on patterned GaAs (111)B substrate. The dots self-form inside pyramidal recesses patterned on the wafer via pre-growth processing. The major advantage of this growth technique is the control it provides over the dot nucleation posi-tion and the dimensions of the confined structures onto the sub-strate. The fundamental steps of substrate patterning and the QD forma-tion mechanism are described together with a discussion of the structural particulars. The post-growth processes, including sur-face etching and substrate removal, which are required to facili-tate optical characterization, are discussed. With this approach extremely high uniformity and record spectral purity are both achieved.

  19. A theoretical study of special acoustic effects caused by the staircase of the El Castillo pyramid at the Maya ruins of Chichen-Itza in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Nico F.; Degrieck, Joris; Briers, Rudy; Leroy, Oswald

    2004-12-01

    It is known that a handclap in front of the stairs of the great pyramid of Chichen Itza produces a chirp echo which sounds more or less like the sound of a Quetzal bird. The present work describes precise diffraction simulations and attempts to answer the critical question what physical effects cause the formation of the chirp echo. Comparison is made with experimental results obtained from David Lubman. Numerical simulations show that the echo shows a strong dependence on the kind of incident sound. Simulations are performed for a (delta function like) pulse and also for a real handclap. The effect of reflections on the ground in front of the pyramid is also discussed. The present work also explains why an observer seated on the lowest step of the pyramid hears the sound of raindrops falling in a water filled bucket instead of footstep sounds when people, situated higher up the pyramid, climb the stairs. .

  20. Activation of Ih and TTX-sensitive sodium current at subthreshold voltages during CA1 pyramidal neuron firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-10-01

    We used dynamic clamp and action potential clamp techniques to explore how currents carried by tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and HCN channels (Ih) regulate the behavior of CA1 pyramidal neurons at resting and subthreshold voltages. Recording from rat CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we found that the apparent input resistance and membrane time constant were strongly affected by both conductances, with Ih acting to decrease apparent input resistance and time constant and sodium current acting to increase both. We found that both Ih and sodium current were active during subthreshold summation of artificial excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) generated by dynamic clamp, with Ih dominating at less depolarized voltages and sodium current at more depolarized voltages. Subthreshold sodium current-which amplifies EPSPs-was most effectively recruited by rapid voltage changes, while Ih-which blunts EPSPs-was maximal for slow voltage changes. The combined effect is to selectively amplify rapid EPSPs. We did similar experiments in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, doing voltage-clamp experiments using experimental records of action potential firing of CA1 neurons previously recorded in awake, behaving animals as command voltages to quantify flow of Ih and sodium current at subthreshold voltages. Subthreshold sodium current was larger and subthreshold Ih was smaller in mouse neurons than in rat neurons. Overall, the results show opposing effects of subthreshold sodium current and Ih in regulating subthreshold behavior of CA1 neurons, with subthreshold sodium current prominent in both rat and mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons and additional regulation by Ih in rat neurons.