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Sample records for aa release induced

  1. Controlled release of bioactive PDGF-AA from a hydrogel/nanoparticle composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott Donaghue, Irja; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-10-01

    Polymer excipients, such as low molar mass poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), have shown contradictory effects on protein stability when co-encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles. To gain further insight into these effects, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AA) was encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles with vs. without PEG. PDGF-AA is a particularly compelling protein, as it has been demonstrated to promote cell survival and induce the oligodendrocyte differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. Here we show, for the first time, the controlled release of bioactive PDGF-AA from an injectable nanoparticle/hydrogel drug delivery system (DDS). PDGF-AA was encapsulated, with high efficiency, in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles, and its release from the drug delivery system was followed over 21 d. Interestingly, the co-encapsulation of low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) increased the PDGF-AA loading but, unexpectedly, accelerated the aggregation of PDGF-AA, resulting in reduced activity and detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the absence of PEG, released PDGF-AA remained bioactive as demonstrated with NSPC oligodendrocyte differentiation, similar to positive controls, and significantly different from untreated controls. This work presents a novel delivery method for differentiation factors, such as PDGF-AA, and provides insights into the contradictory effects reported in the literature of excipients, such as PEG, on the loading and release of proteins from polymeric nanoparticles. Previously, the polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) has been used in many biomaterials applications, from surface coatings to the encapsulation of proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that, unexpectedly, low molecular weight PEG has a deleterious effect on the release of the encapsulated protein platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA). We also demonstrate release of bioactive PDGF-AA (in the absence of PEG

  2. Reaper Induced Cytochrome C Release

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    .... The interaction of reaper with scythe liberates a soluble factor (SCF) that induces apoptosis by effecting the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, a critical step in activating apoptosis in many systems...

  3. Reaper-Induced Cytochrome C Release

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    ...-interacting protein called Scythe that promoted cytochrome c release form the mitochondria. The goal of the proposed research has been to determine the mechanism whereby Reaper and Scythe cooperate to induce mitochondrial cytochrome c release and eventual cell death.

  4. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Akira [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Bainy, Afonso C.D. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Departamento de Bioquímica, CCB, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Stegeman, John J., E-mail: jstegeman@whoi.edu [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily, CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map onto CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificities. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in the intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in the kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In the liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1 expression, but not CYP2AA2 in the liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. - Highlights: • A tandemly duplicated cluster of ten CYP2AA genes was described in zebrafish. • Parsimony and duplication analyses suggest pathways to CYP2AA diversity. • Homology models reveal amino acid positions possibly related to functional diversity. • The CYP2AA locus does not share synteny with

  5. Spontaneous, Experimentally Induced, and Transmissible AA Amyloidosis in Japanese Quail ( Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yumi; Kamiie, Junichi; Watanabe, Gen; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Murakami, Tomoaki

    2017-11-01

    The authors describe a spontaneous case of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis in an adult female Japanese quail ( Coturnix japonica). The bird developed AA amyloidosis secondary to chronic peritonitis caused by a Gram-negative bacillus infection. Mild amyloid deposition was also identified in the intestinal tract of apparently healthy adult individuals, suggesting that quail may develop intestinal amyloidosis with age. Based on these observations, it was hypothesized that quail can develop AA amyloidosis following inflammatory stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Therefore, adult quail were repeatedly injected with LPS and the development of AA amyloidosis was confirmed. The amyloid deposition in this model increased when quail amyloid was intravenously injected as an amyloid-enhancing factor. The experiments were repeated with young quail, but amyloid deposits were not observed following LPS injections. However, AA amyloidosis did develop when quail amyloid was injected in addition to LPS. These results indicated that adult quail develop AA amyloidosis after inflammatory stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, quail AA amyloidosis was shown to have transmissibility regardless of age. Interestingly, the authors found that administration of chicken amyloid fibrils also induced AA amyloidosis in young quail. This is the first report of cross-species transmission of avian AA amyloidosis.

  6. PDGF-AA-induced filamentous mitochondria benefit dermal papilla cells in cellular migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifude, C; Kaseda, K

    2015-06-01

    Human dermal papilla cells (HDPCs) play essential roles in hair follicular morphogenesis and postnatal hair growth cycles. Previous reports demonstrated that platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA) enhanced the formation of dermal condensates in hair follicular development. Additionally, PDGF-AA induces/maintains the anagen phase of the hair cycle. It is likely that mitochondrial morphology and functions are tightly coupled with maintenance of these energy-demanding activities. However, little is known about the mitochondrial regulation in HDPCs. Thus, we investigated the PDGF-involved mitochondrial regulation in HDPCs. The mitochondrial morphologies of HDPCs were examined in the presence or absence of PDGF-AA under a fluorescent microscope. ATP production and cellular motility were investigated. The relationship between mitochondrial morphology and the cellular functions was discussed. We observed that primary HDPCs contained mitochondria with filamentous and/or rounded morphologies. Both types of mitochondria showed similar membrane potentials. Interestingly, in the presence of PDGF-AA, but not PDGF-BB, the balance between the two morphologies shifted towards the filamentous form. Concomitantly, both mitochondrial enzymatic activity and total cellular ATP level were augmented by PDGF-AA. These two parameters were closely correlated, suggesting the mitochondrial involvement in the PDGF-augmented ATP production. Moreover, PDGF-AA accelerated the migration of HDPCs in a gap-filling assay, but did not change the rate of cellular proliferation. Notably, filamentous mitochondria dominated migrating HDPCs. PDGF-AA benefits HDPCs in the process of migration, by increasing the number of filamentous mitochondria. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  7. Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) ameliorates aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury through Nrf2 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Juan; Liu, Xinhui; Fan, Jinjin; Chen, Wenfang; Wang, Juan; Zeng, Youjia; Feng, Xiaorang; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) is an antioxidant modulator that acts through induction of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway. This study aimed to investigate the role of BARD in protecting kidneys from aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Male C57BL/6 mice received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of aristolochic acid I (AAI) (5 mg/kg/day) for 5 days to produce acute AA nephropathy (AAN) model. BARD (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for 7 consecutive days, starting 2 days prior to AAI administration. The mice in the AA group showed AKI as evidenced by worsening kidney function evaluated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) levels, and severe tubulointerstitial injury marked by massive tubule necrosis in kidney tissues. BARD significantly reduced BUN and SCr levels which were elevated by AAI. Additionally, AAI-induced histopathological renal damage was ameliorated by BARD. Furthermore, the expression of Nrf2 was reduced, and its repressor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) was increased significantly, whereas heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was upregulated and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) was barely increased in the cytoplasm of tubules in kidneys after treatment with AAI. BARD significantly upregulated renal Nrf2, NQO1 and HO-1 expression and downregulated Keap1 expression compared with those in the AA group. Moreover, it was found that Nrf2 was expressed both in the cytoplasm and nuclear of glomeruli and tubules, whereas NQO1 and HO-1 were localized in the cytoplasm of tubules only. In conclusion, AA-induced acute renal injury was associated with impaired Nrf2 activation and expression of its downstream target genes in renal tissues. BARD prevented renal damage induced by AAI, and this renoprotective effect may be exerted by activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway and increasing expression of the downstream target genes

  8. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy.

  9. Methamphetamine induces the release of endothelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Jones, Susan M; Hostetter, Trisha A; Iliff, Jeffrey J; West, G Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a potent psychostimulant drug of abuse that increases release and blocks reuptake of dopamine, producing intense euphoria, factors that may contribute to its widespread abuse. It also produces severe neurotoxicity resulting from oxidative stress, DNA damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, microgliosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Intracerebral hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke have been reported after intravenous and oral abuse of methamphetamine. Several studies have shown that methamphetamine causes vasoconstriction of vessels. This study investigates the effect of methamphetamine on endothelin-1 (ET-1) release in mouse brain endothelial cells by ELISA. ET-1 transcription as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and transcription were measured following methamphetamine treatment. We also examine the effect of methamphetamine on isolated cerebral arteriolar vessels from C57BL/6 mice. Penetrating middle cerebral arterioles were cannulated at both ends with a micropipette system. Methamphetamine was applied extraluminally, and the vascular response was investigated. Methamphetamine treatment of mouse brain endothelial cells resulted in ET-1 release and a transient increase in ET-1 message. The activity and transcription of eNOS were only slightly enhanced after 24 hr of treatment with methamphetamine. In addition, methamphetamine caused significant vasoconstriction of isolated mouse intracerebral arterioles. The vasoconstrictive effect of methamphetamine was attenuated by coapplication of the endothelin receptor antagonist PD145065. These findings suggest that vasoconstriction induced by methamphetamine is mediated through the endothelin receptor and may involve an endothelin-dependent pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) ameliorates aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury through Nrf2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Liu, Xinhui; Fan, Jinjin; Chen, Wenfang; Wang, Juan; Zeng, Youjia; Feng, Xiaorang; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2014-04-06

    Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) is an antioxidant modulator that acts through induction of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway. This study aimed to investigate the role of BARD in protecting kidneys from aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Male C57BL/6 mice received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of aristolochic acid I (AAI) (5mg/kg/day) for 5 days to produce acute AA nephropathy (AAN) model. BARD (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for 7 consecutive days, starting 2 days prior to AAI administration. The mice in the AA group showed AKI as evidenced by worsening kidney function evaluated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) levels, and severe tubulointerstitial injury marked by massive tubule necrosis in kidney tissues. BARD significantly reduced BUN and SCr levels which were elevated by AAI. Additionally, AAI-induced histopathological renal damage was ameliorated by BARD. Furthermore, the expression of Nrf2 was reduced, and its repressor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) was increased significantly, whereas heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was upregulated and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) was barely increased in the cytoplasm of tubules in kidneys after treatment with AAI. BARD significantly upregulated renal Nrf2, NQO1 and HO-1 expression and downregulated Keap1 expression compared with those in the AA group. Moreover, it was found that Nrf2 was expressed both in the cytoplasm and nuclear of glomeruli and tubules, whereas NQO1 and HO-1 were localized in the cytoplasm of tubules only. In conclusion, AA-induced acute renal injury was associated with impaired Nrf2 activation and expression of its downstream target genes in renal tissues. BARD prevented renal damage induced by AAI, and this renoprotective effect may be exerted by activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway and increasing expression of the downstream target genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Valsartan reduces AT1-AA-induced apoptosis through suppression oxidative stress mediated ER stress in endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z-C; Qi, J; Liu, L-M; Li, J; Xu, H-Y; Liang, B; Li, B

    2017-03-01

    Valsartan has been reported to have the function of treating hypertension and improving the prognosis of patients. Many studies indicated that valsartan can also increase angiotensin II, andosterone and plasma renin activity (PRA). Autoantibodies against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-AA) have been showed to increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium (Ca2+) and result in apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of valsartan on AT1-AA-induced apoptosis in endothelial progenitor cells. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were cultured. The cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. EPCs apoptosis was determined by DAPI staining and flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium concentration and calpain activity were measured using Fluostar Omega Spectrofluorimeter. The expression of p-ERK, p-eIF-2a, CHOP, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were detected by Western blot. MTT assays showed valsartan significantly inhibited AT1-AA- induced decline of the viability of EPCs. DAPI staining and flow cytometry results indicated valsartan inhibited AT1-AA-induced decline of the viability of EPCs via inhibiting AT1-AA-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the increasing of reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium and calpain activity induced by AT1-AA in EPCs were also recovered after pre-treated with valsartan. Meanwhile, the upregulation of p-ERK, p-eIF-2a and CHOP, downregulation of Bcl-2, and activation of Caspase-3 caused by AT1-AA were reversed after pre-incubated with valsartan. Valsartan could inhibit AT1-AA-induced apoptosis through inhibiting oxidative stress mediated ER stress in EPCs.

  12. Vitamin D supplementation reduces some AT1-AA-induced downstream targets implicated in preeclampsia including hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Jessica L; Amaral, Lorena M; Cornelius, Denise C; Cunningham, Mark W; Ibrahim, Tarek; Heep, Autumn; Campbell, Nathan; Usry, Nathan; Wallace, Kedra; Herse, Florian; Dechend, Ralf; LaMarca, Babbette

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the ANG II type I receptor (AT 1 -AA) are associated with preeclampsia (PE). We found that vitamin D supplementation reduced AT 1 -AA and blood pressure (MAP) in the RUPP rat model of PE. However, it was undetermined whether the decrease in AT 1 -AA was the mechanism whereby vitamin D lowered MAP or if it were through factors downstream of AT 1 -AA. Uterine artery resistance index, placental ET-1, and soluble FMS-like tyrosine kinase-1 are increased with AT 1 -AA-induced hypertension and are considered markers of PE in pregnant women. Therefore, we hypothesized that vitamin D would reduce PE factors during AT 1 -AA-induced hypertension and could lower blood pressure in a model of hypertension during pregnancy without PE features. Either ANG II (50 ng·kg -1 ·day) or AT 1 -AA (1:40) was infused from gestational day (GD) 12-19. vitamin D 2 (VD2, 270 IU/day) or vitamin D 3 (VD3, 15 IU/day) was administered orally from GD14-GD18. MAP (mmHg) increased in AT 1 -AA (121 ± 4) and ANG II (113 ± 1)-infused pregnant rats compared with normal pregnant rats (NP) (101 ± 2) but was lower in AT 1 -AA+VD2 (105 ± 2), AT 1 -AA+VD3 (109 ± 2), ANG II+VD2 (104 ± 4), and ANG II+VD3 (104 ± 3). VD2 and/or VD3 improved PE features associated with AT 1 -AA during pregnancy, while ANG II did not induce such features, supporting the hypothesis that AT 1 -AA induces PE features during pregnancy, and these are improved with vitamin D. In this study, we demonstrate that vitamin D improved many factors associated with PE and reduced blood pressure in a hypertensive model without PE features, indicating that vitamin D could be beneficial for various hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Bone Morphogenic Protein 4-Smad-Induced Upregulation of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor AA Impairs Endothelial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weining; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Li; Lau, Chi Wai; Xu, Jian; Luo, Jiang-Yun; Gou, Lingshan; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) is an important mediator of endothelial dysfunction in cardio-metabolic diseases, whereas platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are major angiogenic and proinflammatory mediator, although the functional link between these 2 factors is unknown. The present study investigated whether PDGF mediates BMP4-induced endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. We generated Ad-Bmp4 to overexpress Bmp4 and Ad-Pdgfa-shRNA to knockdown Pdgfa in mice through tail intravenous injection. SMAD4-shRNA lentivirus, SMAD1-shRNA, and SMAD5 shRNA adenovirus were used for knockdown in human and mouse endothelial cells. We found that PDGF-AA impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aortas and mesenteric resistance arteries. BMP4 upregulated PDGF-AA in human and mouse endothelial cells, which was abolished by BMP4 antagonist noggin or knockdown of SMAD1/5 or SMAD4. BMP4-impared relaxation in mouse aorta was also ameliorated by PDGF-AA neutralizing antibody. Tail injection of Ad-Pdgfa-shRNA ameliorates endothelial dysfunction induced by Bmp4 overexpression (Ad-Bmp4) in vivo. Serum PDGF-AA was elevated in both diabetic patients and diabetic db/db mice compared with nondiabetic controls. Pdgfa-shRNA or Bmp4-shRNA adenovirus reduced serum PDGF-AA concentration in db/db mice. PDGF-AA neutralizing antibody or tail injection with Pdgfa-shRNA adenovirus improved endothelial function in aortas and mesenteric resistance arteries from db/db mice. The effect of PDGF-AA on endothelial function in mouse aorta was also inhibited by Ad-Pdgfra-shRNA to inhibit PDGFRα. The present study provides novel evidences to show that PDGF-AA impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PDGF-AA mediates BMP4-induced adverse effect on endothelial cell function through SMAD1/5- and SMAD4-dependent mechanisms. Inhibition of PGDF-AA ameliorates vascular dysfunction in diabetic mice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. IN VITRO Cr(VI SPECIATION IN SYNTHETIC SALIVA AFTER RELEASING FROM ORTHODONTIC BRACKETS USING SILICA-APTES SEPARATION AND GF AAS DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciel S. Luz

    Full Text Available A method for Cr(VI speciation in synthetic saliva after releasing from orthodontic brackets, using silica nanoparticles organofunctionalized with (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES for Cr(III/Cr(VI separation and GF AAS determination is proposed. Under the optimized conditions, Cr(VI speciation was performed using 150 mg of silica organofunctionalized with 2.0% (v v-1 of APTES at pH 8. It was observed different sensitivity when calibrations of GF AAS were performed using Cr(III or Cr(VI as standard solutions. Consequently, calibrations using stoichiometric mixtures (Cr(III + Cr(VI were used for total Cr determination and calibration using Cr(VI was used only for the determination of this specie. The reliability of the proposed silica-APTES separation procedure and GF AAS determination was checked by addition of both species in synthetic saliva. Recoveries ranging from 97 to 110% were obtained. The repeatability, based on the relative standard deviation (RSD inter days was less than 6%. A corrosion test was carried out on 20 orthodontic brackets from two different models, after immersion in synthetic saliva (pH=6.0 at 37 °C with agitation (125 rpm for 24 h. It was observed that about 40% of the total chromium released from the analyzed orthodontic brackets was Cr(VI.

  15. Quench-Induced Stresses in AA2618 Forgings for Impellers: A Multiphysics and Multiscale Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chobaut, Nicolas; Saelzle, Peter; Michel, Gilles; Carron, Denis; Drezet, Jean-Marie

    2015-05-01

    In the fabrication of heat-treatable aluminum parts such as AA2618 compressor impellers for turbochargers, solutionizing and quenching are key steps to obtain the required mechanical characteristics. Fast quenching is necessary to avoid coarse precipitation as it reduces the mechanical properties obtained after heat treatment. However, fast quenching induces residual stresses that can cause unacceptable distortions during machining. Furthermore, the remaining residual stresses after final machining can lead to unfavorable stresses in service. Predicting and controlling internal stresses during the whole processing from heat treatment to final machining is therefore of particular interest to prevent negative impacts of residual stresses. This problem is multiphysics because processes such as heat transfer during quenching, precipitation phenomena, thermally induced deformations, and stress generation are interacting and need to be taken into account. The problem is also multiscale as precipitates of nanosize form during quenching at locations where the cooling rate is too low. This precipitation affects the local yield strength of the material and thus impacts the level of macroscale residual stresses. A thermomechanical model accounting for precipitation in a simple but realistic way is presented. Instead of modelling precipitation that occurs during quenching, the model parameters are identified using a limited number of tensile tests achieved after representative interrupted cooling paths in a Gleeble machine. The simulation results are compared with as-quenched residual stresses in a forging measured by neutron diffraction.

  16. Arsenic trioxide preferentially induces nonapoptotic cell deaths as well as actin cytoskeleton rearrangement in the CHO AA8 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Izdebska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide (ATO, As2O3 has been investigated for many years. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of ATO are still not fully understood, but seem to depend on cell types, dosage, and duration of exposure. The purpose of this study was to assess the actin cytoskeleton rearrangement during the cell death process induced by arsenic trioxide in the CHO AA8 cells. A better understanding the mechanisms of ATO-action is likely to lead to more rational use of this drug either as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer agents.Material and methods: The effect of ATO on actin cytoskeleton was studied in Chinese Hamster Ovary AA8 cell line. Actin was visualized by fluorescence microscopy and phalloidin conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488. Morphological and ultrastructural alterations in the CHO AA8 cells were evaluated by using light and electron microscope, respectively. For quantitative measurement of cell death, Annexin V-Alexa Fluor® 488 and Propidium Iodide assay was performed. The vital staining of CHO AA8 cells with acridine orange was applied to detect the development of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs.Results: The performed experiments revealed a dose-dependent decrease in the cell survival. The morphological and ultrastructural features acquired by the cells after ATO-treatment were considered as typical for autophagy and mitotic cell death. As was shown by acridine orange staining, arsenic trioxide treatment increased red fluorescence signals in dose-dependent manner, indicating the development of AVOs, a hallmark of autophagy. Low level of apoptosis was induced in the ATO-treated CHO AA8 cells. Furthermore, the rearrangement of actin filaments associated with cell death process was also detected.Conclusions: The obtained results suggest that arsenic trioxide preferentially induces nonapoptotic cell deaths, autophagy and mitotic cell death, in p53

  17. Proton Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) applied in the environmental sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Ion V.; Iordan, M.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Busuioc, G.; Ciupina, V.; Belc, M.; Badica, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the elemental composition of tree leaves using Proton-Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) methods. By PIXE Spectrometry we identified and determined the concentration of S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu Zn, As, Br, Sr and by AAS method the concentration of elements: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd. Pb was identified in only 2 samples from 29. For tree leave samples collected at a large distance to the polluting source the Sr concentration decreased and the Mg, Ca, Se, Zn and Fe concentrations increased. Also, we can observe a small affinity of these leaves for the environmental Pb which was detected for two samples at a small distance to polluting source. (authors)

  18. Dabigatran and rivaroxaban do not affect AA- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation in patients receiving concomitant platelet inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Christoph B; Weik, Patrick; Meyer, Melanie; Weber, Susanne; Diehl, Philipp; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Zhou, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel, vitamin K-independent oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and act via antagonism of the coagulation factor (F) IIa (dabigatran) or FXa (rivaroxaban), respectively. Compared to vitamin-K-antagonists, NOACs have shown non-inferiority of risk and benefit in patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). In clinical practice there is increasing use of NOACs combined with platelet inhibitors in patients with AF and coronary artery disease. However, whether NOACs affect the function of platelet inhibitors remains incompletely known. This observational study aimed to assess the platelet function in patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban and concomitant platelet inhibitors. A single centre observational study was performed analysing the platelet aggregation of patients treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban with or without concomitant platelet inhibitors. Measurements before the initiation of NOAC therapy served as the respective control group. Platelet aggregation was measured by multiple electrode aggregometry and was induced with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 6.5 µM) and arachidonic acid (AA, 0.5 mM), respectively. In order to evaluate whether NOACs interact with platelet inhibition by ASA or the P2Y12-antagonist clopidogrel, 87 patients were grouped according to their concomitant antiplatelet medication. Comparing the ADP- and AA-induced platelet aggregation in patients without concomitant platelet inhibitors (n = 45) no significant differences under therapy with dabigatran (d) or rivaroxaban (r) compared to the control group (c) were observed. In patients taking clopidogrel as a concomitant platelet inhibitor (n = 21), neither dabigatran nor rivaroxaban affected the ADP-induced platelet aggregation (c 20 ± 11, d 21 ± 14, r 18 ± 8 AU*min, p = 0.200). Patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban in combination with ASA (n = 42; 21 ASA only, 21 ASA + clopidogrel) showed no significant differences of the AA-induced

  19. Osteodifferentiation of Human Preadipocytes Induced by Strontium Released from Hydrogels

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    Valeria Nardone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in interactive application principles of biology and engineering for the development of valid biological systems for tissue regeneration, such as for the treatment of bone fractures or skeletal defects. The application of stem cells together with biomaterials releasing bioactive factors promotes the formation of bone tissue by inducing proliferation and/or cell differentiation. In this study, we used a clonal cell line from human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADSCs or preadipocytes, named PA2-E12, to evaluate the effects of strontium (Sr2+ released in the culture medium from an amidated carboxymethylcellulose (CMCA hydrogel enriched with different Sr2+ concentrations on osteodifferentiation. The osteoinductive effect was evaluated through both the expression of alkaline phophatase (ALP activity and the hydroxyapatite (HA production during 42 days of induction. Present data have shown that Sr2+ released from CMCA promotes the osteodifferentiation induced by an osteogenic medium as shown by the increase of ALP activity at 7 and 14 days and of HA production at 14 days. In conclusion, the use of biomaterials able to release in situ osteoinductive agents, like Sr2+, could represent a new strategy for future applications in bone tissue engineering.

  20. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  1. In vivo neurochemical characterization of clothianidin induced striatal dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, L R F; Oliveira, I M; Durán, R; Alfonso, M

    2012-12-16

    Clothianidin (CLO) is a neonicotinoid insecticide with selective action on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The aim of this study was to determine the neurochemical basis for CLO-induced striatal dopamine release using the microdialysis technique in freely moving and conscious rats. Intrastriatal administration of CLO (3.5mM), produced an increase in both spontaneous (2462 ± 627% with respect to basal values) and KCl-evoked (4672 ± 706% with respect to basal values) dopamine release. This effect was attenuated in Ca(2+)-free medium, and was prevented in reserpine pre-treated animals or in presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX). To investigate the involvement of dopamine transporter (DAT), the effect of CLO was observed in presence of nomifensine. The coadministration of CLO and nomifensine produced an additive effect on striatal dopamine release. The results suggest that the effect of CLO on striatal dopamine release is predominantly mediated by an exocytotic mechanism, Ca(2+), vesicular and TTX-dependent and not by a mechanism mediated by dopamine transporter. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-01-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  3. Sulfite induces release of lipid mediators by alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck-Speier, I.; Dayal, N.; Maier, L. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. for Inhalation Biology; Denzlinger, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. II, Medical Clinic; Haberl, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. III, Medical Clinic

    1998-03-01

    Air pollutants are supposed to modulate physiological responses of alveolar macrophages (AM). This study was addressed to the question whether at neutral pH sulfur(IV) species in comparison to sulfur(VI) species cause AM to release proinflammatory mediators and which pathways are involved in their generation. Supernatants obtained from canine AM treated with sulfite (0.1 mM to 2 mM) enhanced the respiratory burst of canine neutrophils, measured by lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence, whereas supernatants derived from AM treated with sulfate (1 mM) did not. The neutrophil-stimulating activity released by sulfite-treated AM consisted of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) as shown by desensitization of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) as shown by desensitization of the corresponding receptors. Inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2} substantially suppressed release of neutrophil-stimulating activity by sulfite-treated AM. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase in sulfite-treated AM also reduced neutrophil-stimulating activity, while inhibition of cyclooxygenase had no effect. In conclusion, sulfite induces AM to release lipid mediators via phospholipase A{sub 2}- and 5-lipoxygenase-dependent pathways. These mediators activate neutrophils via the receptors for PAF and LTB{sub 4}. (orig.)

  4. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Walid; Songmene, Victor; Bocher, Philippe

    2014-02-28

    The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling). For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE) formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  5. Susceptibility for cigarette smoke-induced DAMP release and DAMP-induced inflammation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Simon D; Hesse, Laura; Faiz, Alen; Lubbers, Jaap; Bodha, Priya K; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Nawijn, Martijn C; Heijink, Irene H

    2016-11-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We investigated whether CS-induced damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) release or DAMP-mediated inflammation contributes to susceptibility for COPD. Samples, including bronchial brushings, were collected from young and old individuals, susceptible and nonsusceptible for the development of COPD, before and after smoking, and used for gene profiling and airway epithelial cell (AEC) culture. AECs were exposed to CS extract (CSE) or specific DAMPs. BALB/cByJ and DBA/2J mice were intranasally exposed to LL-37 and mitochondrial (mt)DAMPs. Functional gene-set enrichment analysis showed that CS significantly increases the airway epithelial gene expression of DAMPs and DAMP receptors in COPD patients. In cultured AECs, we observed that CSE induces necrosis and DAMP release, with specifically higher galectin-3 release from COPD-derived compared with control-derived cells. Galectin-3, LL-37, and mtDAMPs increased CXCL8 secretion in AECs. LL-37 and mtDAMPs induced neutrophilic airway inflammation, exclusively in mice susceptible for CS-induced airway inflammation. Collectively, we show that in airway epithelium from COPD patients, the CS-induced expression of DAMPs and DAMP receptors in vivo and the release of galectin-3 in vitro is exaggerated. Furthermore, our studies indicate that a predisposition to release DAMPs and subsequent induction of inflammation may contribute to the development of COPD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Photon and pomeron-induced production of dijets in pp, pA and AA collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basso, E. [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados (UFGD), Faculdade de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologias, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Goncalves, V.P. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Kohara, A.K. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rangel, M.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-09-15

    In this paper we present a detailed comparison of the dijet production by photon-photon, photon-pomeron and pomeron-pomeron interactions in pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC energy. The transverse momentum, pseudo-rapidity and angular dependencies of the cross sections are calculated at LHC energy using the Forward Physics Monte Carlo (FPMC), which allows one to obtain realistic predictions for the dijet production with two leading intact hadrons. We see that the γIP channel is dominant at forward rapidities in pp collisions and in the full kinematical range in the nuclear collisions of heavy nuclei. Our results indicate that the analysis of dijet production at the LHC can be useful to test the resolved pomeron model as well as to constrain the magnitude of the absorption effects. (orig.)

  7. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Jomaa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling. For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  8. Mannose Induces the Release of Cytopathic Factors from Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leher, Henry; Silvany, Robert; Alizadeh, Hassan; Huang, Jing; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    1998-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the cornea which is highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents. The pathogenic mechanisms of this disease are poorly understood. However, it is believed that the initial phases in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis involve parasite binding and lysis of the corneal epithelium. These processes were examined in vitro, using Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites. Parasites readily adhered to Chinese hamster corneal epithelial cells in vitro; however, parasite binding was strongly inhibited by mannose but not by lactose. Although mannose prevented trophozoite binding, it did not affect cytolysis of corneal epithelial cells. Moreover, mannose treatment induced trophozoites to release cytolytic factors that lysed corneal epithelial cells in vitro. These factors were uniquely induced by mannose because supernatants collected from either untreated trophozoites or trophozoites treated with other sugars failed to lyse corneal cells. The soluble factors were size fractionated in centrifugal concentrators and found to be ≥100 kDa. Treatment of the supernatants with the serine protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride inhibited most, but not all, of the cytopathic activity. These data suggest that the binding of Acanthamoeba to mannosylated proteins on the corneal epithelium may exacerbate the pathogenic cascade by initiating the release of cytolytic factors. PMID:9423832

  9. Growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulates GH release while inhibiting ghrelin- and sGnRH-induced LH release from goldfish pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2013-06-01

    Goldfish GH-releasing hormone (gGHRH) has been recently identified and shown to stimulate GH release in goldfish. In goldfish, neuroendocrine regulation of GH release is multifactorial and known stimulators include goldfish ghrelin (gGRLN19) and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), factors that also enhance LH secretion. To further understand the complex regulation of pituitary hormone release in goldfish, we examined the interactions between gGHRH, gGRLN19, and sGnRH on GH and LH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells in perifusion. Treatment with 100nM gGHRH for 55min stimulated GH release. A 5-min pulse of either 1nM gGRLN19 or 100nM sGnRH induced GH release in naïve cells, and these were just as effective in cells receiving gGHRH. Interestingly, gGHRH abolished both gGRLN19- and sGnRH-induced LH release and reduced basal LH secretion levels. These results suggest that gGHRH does not interfere with sGnRH or gGRLN19 actions in the goldfish somatotropes and further reveal, for the first time, that GHRH may act as an inhibitor of stimulated and basal LH release by actions at the level of pituitary cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Susceptibility for cigarette smoke-induced DAMP release and DAMP-induced inflammation in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Simon D.; Hesse, Laura; Faiz, Alen; Lubbers, Jaap; Bodha, Priya K.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Heijink, Irene H.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We investigated whether CS-induced damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) release or DAMP-mediated inflammation contributes to susceptibility for COPD. Samples, including bronchial brushings,

  11. A kinetic account for amphetamine-induced monoamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenhuetl, Peter S; Bhat, Shreyas; Mayer, Felix P; Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2018-02-09

    The plasmalemmal monoamine transporters for dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin (SERT) are targets for amphetamines. In vivo, amphetamines elicit most, if not all, of their actions by triggering monoamine efflux. This is thought to be accomplished by an amphetamine-induced switch from the forward-transport to the substrate-exchange mode. The mechanism underlying this switch has remained elusive; available kinetic models posit that substrates and cosubstrate Na + ions bind either in a random or in a sequential order. Neither can account for all reported experimental observations. We used electrophysiological recordings to interrogate crucial conformational transitions associated with the binding of five different substrates (serotonin, para -chloroamphetamine, and the high-affinity naphthyl-propan-amines PAL-287, PAL-1045, and PAL-1046) to human SERT expressed in HEK293 cells; specifically, we determined the relaxation kinetics of SERT from a substrate-loaded to a substrate-free state at various intracellular and extracellular Na + concentrations. These rates and their dependence on intracellular and extracellular Na + concentrations differed considerably between substrates. We also examined the effect of K + on substrate affinity and found that K + enhanced substrate dissociation. A kinetic model was developed, which allowed for random, but cooperative, binding of substrate and Na + (or K + ). The synthetic data generated by this model recapitulated the experimental observations. More importantly, the cooperative binding model accounted for the releasing action of amphetamines without any digression from alternating access. To the best of our knowledge, this model is the first to provide a mechanistic framework for amphetamine-induced monoamine release and to account for the findings that some substrates are less efficacious than others in promoting the substrate-exchange mode. © 2018 Hasenhuetl et al.

  12. AA Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The geomagnetic aa index provides a long climatology of global geomagnetic activity using 2 antipodal observatories at Greenwich and Melbourne- IAGA Bulletin 37,...

  13. Dipyrone metabolite 4-MAA induces hypothermia and inhibits PGE2 -dependent and -independent fever while 4-AA only blocks PGE2 -dependent fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvar, David do C; Aguiar, Fernando A; Vaz, Artur de L L; Assis, Débora C R; de Melo, Miriam C C; Jabor, Valquíria A P; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Clososki, Giuliano C; de Souza, Glória E P

    2014-08-01

    The antipyretic and hypothermic prodrug dipyrone prevents PGE2 -dependent and -independent fever induced by LPS from Escherichia coli and Tityus serrulatus venom (Tsv) respectively. We aimed to identify the dipyrone metabolites responsible for the antipyretic and hypothermic effects. Male Wistar rats were treated i.p. with indomethacin (2 mg·kg(-1) ), dipyrone, 4-methylaminoantipyrine (4-MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA) (60-360 mg·kg(-1) ), 4-formylaminoantipyrine, 4-acethylaminoantipyrine (120-360 mg·kg(-1) ) or vehicle 30 min before i.p. injection of LPS (50 μg·kg(-1) ), Tsv (150 μg·kg(-1) ) or saline. Rectal temperatures were measured by tele-thermometry and dipyrone metabolite concentrations determined in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus by LC-MS/MS. PGE2 concentrations were determined in the CSF and hypothalamus by elisa. In contrast to LPS, Tsv-induced fever was not followed by increased PGE2 in the CSF or hypothalamus. The antipyretic time-course of 4-MAA and 4-AA on LPS-induced fever overlapped with the period of the highest concentrations of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the hypothalamus, CSF and plasma. These metabolites reduced LPS-induced fever and the PGE2 increase in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus. Only 4-MAA inhibited Tsv-induced fever. The higher doses of dipyrone and 4-MAA also induced hypothermia. The presence of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the CSF and hypothalamus was associated with PGE2 synthesis inhibition and a decrease in LPS-induced fever. 4-MAA was also shown to be an antipyretic metabolite for PGE2 -independent fever induced by Tsv suggesting that it is responsible for the additional antipyretic mechanism of dipyrone. Moreover, 4-MAA is the hypothermic metabolite of dipyrone. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Cigarette smoke-induced damage-associated molecular pattern release from necrotic neutrophils triggers proinflammatory mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Irene H; Pouwels, Simon D; Leijendekker, Carin; de Bruin, Harold G; Zijlstra, G Jan; van der Vaart, Hester; ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Nawijn, Martijn C; van der Toorn, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major causative factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure can induce a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in airway epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized that CS promotes neutrophil necrosis with subsequent release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), alarming the innate immune system. We studied the effect of smoking two cigarettes on sputum neutrophils in healthy individuals and of 5-day CS or air exposure on neutrophil counts, myeloperoxidase, and HMGB1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of BALB/c mice. In human peripheral blood neutrophils, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis/necrosis markers, caspase activity, and DAMP release were studied after CS exposure. Finally, we assessed the effect of neutrophil-derived supernatants on the release of chemoattractant CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in sputum neutrophil numbers after 3 hours. In mice, neutrophil counts were significantly increased 16 hours after repeated CS exposure but reduced 2 hours after an additional exposure. In vitro, CS induced necrotic neutrophil cell death, as indicated by mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of apoptosis, and DAMP release. Supernatants from CS-treated neutrophils significantly increased the release of CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Together, these observations show, for the first time, that CS exposure induces neutrophil necrosis, leading to DAMP release, which may amplify CS-induced airway inflammation by promoting airway epithelial proinflammatory responses.

  15. Bacteria-induced histamine release from human bronchoalveolar cells and blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clementsen, P; Milman, N; Struve-Christensen, E

    1991-01-01

    Histamine release induced by Staphylococcus aureus was examined in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in non-atopic individuals. Approximately half of the individuals responded with mediator release to the bacterium, and the release was found to be time- and concentration dependent. N......23187 resulted in histamine release. S. aureus-induced histamine release from basophils was examined in leukocyte suspensions obtained from the same individuals, and in all experiments release was found. The dose-response curves were similar to those obtained with BAL cells. The bacteria...

  16. Molecular analysis of two mouse dilute locus deletion mutations: Spontaneous dilute lethal20J and radiation-induced dilute prenatal lethal Aa2 alleles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, M.C.; Seperack, P.K.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    The dilute (d) coat color locus of mouse chromosome 9 has been identified by more than 200 spontaneous and mutagen-induced recessive mutations. With the advent of molecular probes for this locus, the molecular lesion associated with different dilute alleles can be recognized and precisely defined. In this study, two dilute mutations, dilute-lethal20J (dl20J) and dilute prenatal lethal Aa2, have been examined. Using a dilute locus genomic probe in Southern blot analysis, we detected unique restriction fragments in dl20J and Aa2 DNA. Subsequent analysis of these fragments showed that they represented deletion breakpoint fusion fragments. DNA sequence analysis of each mutation-associated deletion breakpoint fusion fragment suggests that both genomic deletions were generated by nonhomologous recombination events. The spontaneous dl20J mutation is caused by an interstitial deletion that removes a single coding exon of the dilute gene. The correlation between this discrete deletion and the expression of all dilute-associated phenotypes in dl20J homozygotes defines the dl20J mutation as a functional null allele of the dilute gene. The radiation-induced Aa2 allele is a multilocus deletion that, by complementation analysis, affects both the dilute locus and the proximal prenatal lethal-3 (pl-3) functional unit. Molecular analysis of the Aa2 deletion breakpoint fusion fragment has provided access to a previously undefined gene proximal to d. Initial characterization of this new gene suggests that it may represent the genetically defined pl-3 functional unit

  17. Effects of jet-induced medium excitation in γ-hadron correlation in A+A collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Cao, Shanshan; Luo, Tan; Pang, Long-Gang; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2018-02-01

    Coupled Linear Boltzmann Transport and hydrodynamics (CoLBT-hydro) is developed for co-current and event-by-event simulations of jet transport and jet-induced medium excitation (j.i.m.e.) in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. This is made possible by a GPU parallelized (3 + 1)D hydrodynamics that has a source term from the energy-momentum deposition by propagating jet shower partons and provides real time update of the bulk medium evolution for subsequent jet transport. Hadron spectra in γ-jet events of A+A collisions at RHIC and LHC are calculated for the first time that include hadrons from both the modified jet and j.i.m.e. CoLBT-hydro describes well experimental data at RHIC on the suppression of leading hadrons due to parton energy loss. It also predicts the enhancement of soft hadrons from j.i.m.e. The onset of soft hadron enhancement occurs at a constant transverse momentum due to the thermal nature of soft hadrons from j.i.m.e. which also have a significantly broadened azimuthal distribution relative to the jet direction. Soft hadrons in the γ direction are, on the other hand, depleted due to a diffusion wake behind the jet.

  18. Bacteria-induced histamine release from human bronchoalveolar cells and blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clementsen, P; Milman, N; Struve-Christensen, E

    1991-01-01

    Histamine release induced by Staphylococcus aureus was examined in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in non-atopic individuals. Approximately half of the individuals responded with mediator release to the bacterium, and the release was found to be time- and concentration dependent. N......23187 resulted in histamine release. S. aureus-induced histamine release from basophils was examined in leukocyte suspensions obtained from the same individuals, and in all experiments release was found. The dose-response curves were similar to those obtained with BAL cells. The bacteria......-induced mediator release from superficially lying cells in the airways epithelium might be of importance for the precipitation or exacerbation of bronchial asthma in respiratory tract infections....

  19. Abia, AA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abia, AA. Vol 4, No 6 (2010) - Articles Studies on the kinetics and intraparticle diffusivities of BOD, colour and TSS reduction from palm oil mill effluent (POME) using boiler fly ash. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1996-0786. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More ...

  20. Adejumo, AA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adejumo, AA. Vol 6, No 2 (2014) - Articles Assessment of Tourists Flow and Revenue Generation in Kainji Lake National Park, Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2141-1778. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  1. Adepeju, AA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adepeju, AA. Vol 19, No 2 (2010) - Articles Assessment of Ethical and Other Professional Standards in Private Medical Laboratories; Osun State Experience. Abstract. ISSN: 1116-1043. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  2. Wornyo, AA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wornyo, AA. Vol 2, No 1 (2012) - Articles Addressing the Difficulties of Learners in the Reading Class Abstract. ISSN: 2026-6081. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL ...

  3. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, Brenda; Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N

    2012-09-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin. As digestive peptidases are a determining factor in Cry toxicity and resistance, we evaluated the expression of peptidase transcripts in the midgut of T. molitor larvae fed either a control or Cry3Aa protoxin diet for 24 h (RNA-Seq), or in larvae exposed to the protoxin for 6, 12, or 24 h (microarrays). Cysteine peptidase transcripts (9) were similar to cathepsins B, L, and K, and their expression did not vary more than 2.5-fold in control and Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Serine peptidase transcripts (48) included trypsin, chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-like, elastase 1-like, and unclassified serine peptidases, as well as homologs lacking functional amino acids. Highly expressed trypsin and chymotrypsin transcripts were severely repressed, and most serine peptidase transcripts were expressed 2- to 15-fold lower in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Many serine peptidase and homolog transcripts were found only in control larvae. However, expression of a few serine peptidase transcripts was increased or found only in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Therefore, Bt intoxication significantly impacted the expression of serine peptidases, potentially important in protoxin processing, while the insect maintained the production of critical digestive cysteine peptidases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Suckling-induced prolactin release potentiates mifepristone-induced lactogenesis in pregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deis, R P; Carrizo, D G; Jahn, G A

    1989-09-01

    Suckling, starting at 19:00 h on Day 18 of pregnancy, induced a significant increase in serum prolactin concentration at 20:00 h on Day 19 of pregnancy, but no increase in mammary gland casein or lactose content. Mifepristone (2 mg/kg) injection at 08:00 h on Day 19 of pregnancy induced significant increases in casein, but not in lactose, 24 h after administration. Mifepristone alone did not induce prolactin secretion, indicating that lactogenesis was induced by placental lactogen in the absence of progesterone action. When mifepristone was injected into suckling rats, serum prolactin concentrations were higher than in the untreated suckling rats. Casein in these rats increased significantly 12 h after mifepristone administration and lactose at 24 h after. If the suckling mifepristone-treated rats were given two injections of bromocriptine (1.5 mg/kg) at 12:00 h on Days 18 and 19 of pregnancy, serum prolactin concentrations were not increased by suckling, but casein and lactose concentrations in the mammary gland showed values similar to those obtained in the mifepristone-treated non-suckling rats. Mifepristone can therefore potentiate suckling-induced prolactin release in pregnant rats, demonstrating a direct central inhibitory action of progesterone on prolactin secretion. This suckling-induced prolactin secretion, unable to induce casein or lactose synthesis in the presence of progesterone, enhanced significantly synthesis of these milk components in the absence of progesterone action (rats treated with mifepristone). Fatty acid synthase, which is stimulated by the suckling stimulus in lactating rats, was not modified by mifepristone or suckling in pregnant rats.

  5. Thrombin induces rapid PAR1-mediated non-classical FGF1 release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Maria; Kolev, Vihren; Soldi, Raffaella; Kirov, Alexander; Graziani, Irene; Oliveira, Silvia Marta; Kacer, Doreen; Friesel, Robert; Maciag, Thomas; Prudovsky, Igor

    2006-01-01

    Thrombin induces cell proliferation and migration during vascular injury. We report that thrombin rapidly stimulated expression and release of the pro-angiogenic polypeptide fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1). Thrombin failed to induce FGF1 release from protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) null fibroblasts, indicating that this effect was dependent on PAR1. Similarly to thrombin, FGF1 expression and release were induced by TRAP, a specific oligopeptide agonist of PAR1. These results identify a novel aspect of the crosstalk between FGF and thrombin signaling pathways which both play important roles in tissue repair and angiogenesis

  6. Mechanism of palytoxin-induced [3H]norepinephrine release from a rat pheochromocytoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Ohizumi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Palytoxin, isolated from the zoanthid Palytoha species, is one of the most potent marine toxins. Palytoxin caused a release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine from clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This releasing action of palytoxin was markedly inhibited or abolished by Co 2+ or Ca 2+ -free medium, but was not modified by tetrodotoxin. The release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine induced by a low concentration of palytoxin was abolished in sodium-free medium and increased as the external Na+ concentrations were increased, but the release induced by a high concentration was unaffected by varying the concentration of external Na + . The release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine induced by both concentrations of palytoxin increased with increasing Ca 2+ concentrations. Palytoxin caused a concentration-dependent increase in 22 Na and 45 Ca influxes into pheochromocytoma cells. The palytoxin-induced 45 Ca influx was markedly inhibited by Co 2+ , whereas the palytoxin-induced 22 Na influx was not affected by tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that in pheochromocytoma cells the [ 3 H]norepinephrine release induced by lower concentrations of palytoxin is primarily brought about by increasing tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na + permeability across the cell membrane, whereas that induced by higher concentrations is mainly caused by a direct increase in Ca 2+ influx into them

  7. Wave-induced release of methane : littoral zones as a source of methane in lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Federwisch, Luisa; Peeters, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of surface waves and the associated disturbance of littoral sediments for the release and later distribution of dissolved methane in lakes. Surface wave field, wave-induced currents, acoustic backscatter strength, and the concentration and distribution of dissolved methane were measured simultaneously in Lake Constance, Germany. The data indicate that surface waves enhance the release of dissolved methane in the shallow littoral zone via burst-like releases of...

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the coleopteran-specific Cry3Aa toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Larvae digest protein initially with cysteine peptidases in the anterior midgut and further with serine peptidases in middle and poste...

  9. Stable and biocompatible genipin-inducing interlayer-crosslinked micelles for sustained drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojin, E-mail: zhangxj@cug.edu.cn [China University of Geosciences, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry (China)

    2017-05-15

    To develop the sustained drug release system, here we describe genipin-inducing interlayer-crosslinked micelles crosslinked via Schiff bases between the amines of amphiphilic linear-hyperbranched polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-branched polyethylenimine-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-PEI-PCL) and genipin. The generation of Schiff bases was confirmed by the color changes and UV-Vis absorption spectra of polymeric micelles after adding genipin. The particle size, morphology, stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, drug loading capacity, and in vitro drug release behavior of crosslinked micelles as well as non-crosslinked micelles were characterized. The results indicated that genipin-inducing interlayer-crosslinked micelles had better stability and biocompatibility than non-crosslinked micelles and glutaraldehyde-inducing interlayer-crosslinked micelles. In addition, genipin-inducing interlayer-crosslinked micelles were able to improve drug loading capacity, reduce the initial burst release, and achieve sustained drug release.

  10. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented. 6 references, 4 figures

  11. Cigarette smoke induces IL-8, but inhibits eotaxin and RANTES release from airway smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Matthias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke is the leading risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD an inflammatory condition characterised by neutrophilic inflammation and release of proinflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8 (IL-8. Human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC are a source of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We investigated whether cigarette smoke could directly induce the release of chemokines from HASMC. Methods HASMC in primary culture were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE with or without TNFα. Chemokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's t test Results CSE (5, 10 and 15% induced IL-8 release and expression without effect on eotaxin or RANTES release. At 20%, there was less IL-8 release. TNFα enhanced CSE-induced IL-8 release and expression. However, CSE (5–30% inhibited TNFα-induced eotaxin and RANTES production. The effects of CSE on IL-8 release were inhibited by glutathione (GSH and associated with the induction of the oxidant sensing protein, heme oxygenase-1. Conclusion Cigarette smoke may directly cause the release of IL-8 from HASMC, an effect enhanced by TNF-α which is overexpressed in COPD. Inhibition of eotaxin and RANTES by cigarette smoke is consistent with the predominant neutrophilic but not eosinophilic inflammation found in COPD.

  12. Colloid electrochemistry of conducting polymer: towards potential-induced in-situ drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankoh, Supannee; Vagin, Mikhail Yu.; Sekretaryova, Alina N.; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Mak, Wing Cheung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed electrode potential induced an in-situ drug release from dispersion of conducting polymer microcapsules. • Fast detection of the released drug within the colloid microenvironment. • Improved the efficiency of localized drug release at the electrode interface. - Abstract: Over the past decades, controlled drug delivery system remains as one of the most important area in medicine for various diseases. We have developed a new electrochemically controlled drug release system by combining colloid electrochemistry and electro-responsive microcapsules. The pulsed electrode potential modulation led to the appearance of two processes available for the time-resolved registration in colloid microenvironment: change of the electronic charge of microparticles (from 0.5 ms to 0.1 s) followed by the drug release associated with ionic equilibration (1–10 s). The dynamic electrochemical measurements allow the distinction of drug release associated with ionic relaxation and the change of electronic charge of conducting polymer colloid microparticles. The amount of released drug (methylene blue) could be controlled by modulating the applied potential. Our study demonstrated a surface-potential driven controlled drug release of dispersion of conducting polymer carrier at the electrode interfaces, while the bulk colloids dispersion away from the electrode remains as a reservoir to improve the efficiency of localized drug release. The developed new methodology creates a model platform for the investigations of surface potential-induced in-situ electrochemical drug release mechanism.

  13. Influence of complement on neutrophil extracellular trap release induced by bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Lisa Joanne; Damgaard, Christian; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    by Staphylococcus aureus and three oral bacteria: Actinomyces viscosus, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vincettii. Material and Methods Bacteria-stimulated NET release from the neutrophils of healthy donors was measured fluorometrically. Various complement containing....... viscosus, there was no enhancement of NET release induced by F. nucleatum. The serum-mediated enhancement of NET release by A. actinomycetemcomitans was neutralized by heat inactivation of serum complement, while this was not the case for S. aureus. Blockade of CR1, significantly reduced NET release...

  14. Envenomations by Bothrops and Crotalus snakes induce the release of mitochondrial alarmins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornetta, Irene; Caccin, Paola; Fernandez, Julián; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutierrez, José María; Montecucco, Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle necrosis is a common manifestation of viperid snakebite envenomations. Venoms from snakes of the genus Bothrops, such as that of B. asper, induce muscle tissue damage at the site of venom injection, provoking severe local pathology which often results in permanent sequelae. In contrast, the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, induces a clinical picture of systemic myotoxicity, i.e., rhabdomyolysis, together with neurotoxicity. It is known that molecules released from damaged muscle might act as 'danger' signals. These are known as 'alarmins', and contribute to the inflammatory reaction by activating the innate immune system. Here we show that the venoms of B. asper and C. d. terrificus release the mitochondrial markers mtDNA (from the matrix) and cytochrome c (Cyt c) from the intermembrane space, from ex vivo mouse tibialis anterior muscles. Cyt c was released to a similar extent by the two venoms whereas B. asper venom induced the release of higher amounts of mtDNA, thus reflecting hitherto some differences in their pathological action on muscle mitochondria. At variance, injection of these venoms in mice resulted in a different time-course of mtDNA release, with B. asper venom inducing an early onset increment in plasma levels and C. d. terrificus venom provoking a delayed release. We suggest that the release of mitochondrial 'alarmins' might contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory events characteristic of snakebite envenomations.

  15. Platelet activating factor induces dopamine release in PC-12 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussolino, F.; Tessari, F.; Turrini, F.; Braquet, P.; Camussi, G.; Prosdocimi, M.; Bosia, A.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of platelet activating factor (PAF) to stimulate dopamine release and modify calcium homeostasis in PC-12 cell line was studied. PAF-induced dopamine release is related to its molecular form, with only the R-form steric configuration [(R)PAF], but not its S-form or its 2-lyso derivative, effective at being active. In addition, PAF acts at very low concentrations in a dose-dependent manner (0.1-30 nM). Preincubation with PAF receptor antagonists (CV-3988 and BN52021) as well as the specific desensitization of PC-12 cells to (R)PAF abolish the (R)PAF-induced dopamine release. Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine release is dependent on a (R)PAF-induced calcium influx and efflux modulation. Dopamine release by PC-12 cells challenged with (R)PAF is associated with a rapid 45 Ca influx and efflux and a rise in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations ([Ca 2+ ] i ) evaluated by using the calcium indicators fura-2 and quin2. At 30 nM (R)PAF, the absence of extracellular calcium inhibits the dopamine release but not the rise of [Ca 2+ ] i from the internal stores, suggesting the importance of calcium influx in (R)PAF-induced dopamine release. PAF, which has been reported to be synthesized by stimulated neuronal cells may thus have a physiological modulatory role on cells with neurosecretory properties

  16. Envenomations by Bothrops and Crotalus snakes induce the release of mitochondrial alarmins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Zornetta

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle necrosis is a common manifestation of viperid snakebite envenomations. Venoms from snakes of the genus Bothrops, such as that of B. asper, induce muscle tissue damage at the site of venom injection, provoking severe local pathology which often results in permanent sequelae. In contrast, the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, induces a clinical picture of systemic myotoxicity, i.e., rhabdomyolysis, together with neurotoxicity. It is known that molecules released from damaged muscle might act as 'danger' signals. These are known as 'alarmins', and contribute to the inflammatory reaction by activating the innate immune system. Here we show that the venoms of B. asper and C. d. terrificus release the mitochondrial markers mtDNA (from the matrix and cytochrome c (Cyt c from the intermembrane space, from ex vivo mouse tibialis anterior muscles. Cyt c was released to a similar extent by the two venoms whereas B. asper venom induced the release of higher amounts of mtDNA, thus reflecting hitherto some differences in their pathological action on muscle mitochondria. At variance, injection of these venoms in mice resulted in a different time-course of mtDNA release, with B. asper venom inducing an early onset increment in plasma levels and C. d. terrificus venom provoking a delayed release. We suggest that the release of mitochondrial 'alarmins' might contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory events characteristic of snakebite envenomations.

  17. Cigarette smoke-induced necroptosis and DAMP release trigger neutrophilic airway inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Simon D; Zijlstra, G Jan; van der Toorn, Marco; Hesse, Laura; Gras, Renee; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; Krysko, Dmitri V; Vandenabeele, Peter; de Vries, Maaike; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Heijink, Irene H; Nawijn, Martijn C

    2016-02-15

    Recent data indicate a role for airway epithelial necroptosis, a regulated form of necrosis, and the associated release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). DAMPs can activate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), triggering innate immune responses. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS)-induced epithelial necroptosis and DAMP release initiate airway inflammation in COPD. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE), and necrotic cell death (membrane integrity by propidium iodide staining) and DAMP release (i.e., double-stranded DNA, high-mobility group box 1, heat shock protein 70, mitochondrial DNA, ATP) were analyzed. Subsequently, BEAS-2B cells were exposed to DAMP-containing supernatant of CS-induced necrotic cells, and the release of proinflammatory mediators [C-X-C motif ligand 8 (CXCL-8), IL-6] was evaluated. Furthermore, mice were exposed to CS in the presence and absence of the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1, and levels of DAMPs and inflammatory cell numbers were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. CSE induced a significant increase in the percentage of necrotic cells and DAMP release in BEAS-2B cells. Stimulation of BEAS-2B cells with supernatant of CS-induced necrotic cells induced a significant increase in the release of CXCL8 and IL-6, in a myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88-dependent fashion. In mice, exposure of CS increased the levels of DAMPs and numbers of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which was statistically reduced upon treatment with necrostatin-1. Together, we showed that CS exposure induces necrosis of bronchial epithelial cells and subsequent DAMP release in vitro, inducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. In vivo, CS exposure induces neutrophilic airway inflammation that is sensitive to necroptosis inhibition. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. BDNF-Induced Potentiation of Spontaneous Twitching in Innervated Myocytes Requires Calcium Release From Intracellular Stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    KLEIMAN, ROBIN J.; TIAN, NING; KRIZAJ, DAVID; HWANG, THOMAS N.; COPENHAGEN, DAVID R.; REICHARDT, LOUIS F.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can potentiate synaptic release at newly developed frog neuromuscular junctions. Although this potentiation depends on extracellular Ca2+ and reflects changes in acetylcholine release, little is known about the intracellular transduction or calcium signaling pathways. We have developed a video assay for neurotrophin-induced potentiation of myocyte twitching as a measure of potentiation of synaptic activity. We use this assay to show that BDNF-induced synaptic potentiation is not blocked by cadmium, indicating that Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels is not required. TrkB autophosphorylation is not blocked in Ca2+-free conditions, indicating that TrkB activity is not Ca2+ dependent. Additionally, an inhibitor of phospholipase C interferes with BDNF-induced potentiation. These results suggest that activation of the TrkB receptor activates phospholipase C to initiate intracellular Ca2+ release from stores which subsequently potentiates transmitter release. PMID:10899220

  19. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  20. Release of Dengue Virus Genome Induced by a Peptide Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrobowski, Yancey M.; Hoffmann, Andrew R.; Rowe, Dawne K.; Kukkaro, Petra; Holdaway, Heather; Chipman, Paul; Fontaine, Krystal A.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Garry, Robert F.; Kostyuchenko, Victor; Wimley, William C.; Isern, Sharon; Rossmann, Michael G.; Michael, Scott F.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus infects approximately 100 million people annually, but there is no available therapeutic treatment. The mimetic peptide, DN59, consists of residues corresponding to the membrane interacting, amphipathic stem region of the dengue virus envelope (E) glycoprotein. This peptide is inhibitory to all four serotypes of dengue virus, as well as other flaviviruses. Cryo-electron microscopy image reconstruction of dengue virus particles incubated with DN59 showed that the virus particles were largely empty, concurrent with the formation of holes at the five-fold vertices. The release of RNA from the viral particle following incubation with DN59 was confirmed by increased sensitivity of the RNA genome to exogenous RNase and separation of the genome from the E protein in a tartrate density gradient. DN59 interacted strongly with synthetic lipid vesicles and caused membrane disruptions, but was found to be non-toxic to mammalian and insect cells. Thus DN59 inhibits flavivirus infectivity by interacting directly with virus particles resulting in release of the genomic RNA. PMID:23226444

  1. Interleukin-1beta-induced release of matrix proteins into culture media causes inhibition of mineralization of nodules formed by periodontal ligament cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, H H; Lin, W L; Cho, M I

    1999-05-01

    The mechanism by which interleukin-1beta (IL-1) inhibits the formation of mineralized tissue nodules by periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in vitro was investigated through the processes of morphological analysis, immunoprecipitation, and Northern blot analysis. PDL cells were obtained from a 2-day-old coagulum in tooth socket and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing 10% fetal bone serum (FBS) and antibiotics. Confluent cells were grown for up to 3 weeks in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), beta-glycerophosphate (GP), and dexamethasone (Dex), or IL-1. PDL cells cultured in the presence of GP and AA did not differentiate, but those treated with Dex, GP, and AA (Dex group) underwent differentiation, showing four stages (confluent, multilayer, nodule, and mineralization) of disparate morphological characteristics. In contrast, the cells treated with IL-1, Dex, GP, and AA (IL-1 group) did form multilayers but failed to form mineralized nodules. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the Dex-induced mineralized nodules contain multilayers of fibroblastic cells, numerous collagen fibrils, and dense globular as well as fused electron dense patches that are associated with numerous apatite crystals. The nodule-like structures in the IL-1 group were also comprised of multilayered fibroblastic cells, but they contained only a small number of collagen fibrils, and no dense globular or fused patches. Von Kossa staining confirmed the presence of numerous mineralized nodules in the Dex group and their scarceness in the IL-1 group. Northern blot analysis of IL-1-treated cells, however, revealed the presence of mRNAs for type I collagen (Col I), secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), osteopontin (OPN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteocalcin (OC), whose expression patterns and levels were comparable to those of the Dex group. Immunoprecipitation analysis of OPN and BSP in the cell/matrix layers and the culture

  2. Hydroxylated xestospongins block inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ release and sensitize Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mediated by ryanodine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Tram Anh; Feng, Wei; Molinski, Tadeusz F; Pessah, Isaac N

    2006-02-01

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) often coexist within the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) membrane and coordinate precise spatial and temporal coding of Ca(2+) signals in most animal cells. Xestospongin C (XeC) was shown to selectively block IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release and IP(3)R-mediated signaling (Gafni et al., 1997). We have further studied the specificity of xestospongin structures possessing ring hydroxyl (-OH) substituents toward IP(3)R, RyR, and ER/SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activities. XeC potently inhibits IP(3)R, weakly inhibits RyR1, and lacks activity toward SERCA1 and SERCA2. XeD (9-OH XeC), 7-OH-XeA, and araguspongin C isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia species also inhibit IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) release and lack activity toward SERCA. However, these hydroxylated derivatives possess a unique activity in that they enhance Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from SR vesicles by a mechanism involving the sensitization of RyR1 channels within the same concentration range needed to block IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release. These results show that xestospongins and related structures lack direct SERCA inhibitory activity, as suggested by some previous studies. A new finding is that XeD and related structures possessing a hydroxylated oxaquinolizidine ring are IP(3)R blockers that also enhance Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release mediated by RyRs. In intact cells, the actions of XeD are blocked by ryanodine pretreatment and do not interfere with thapsigargin-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization stemming from SERCA block. Hydroxylated bis-oxaquinolizadine derivatives isolated from Xestospongia species are novel bifunctional reagents that may be useful in ascertaining how IP(3)Rs and RyRs contribute to cell signaling.

  3. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45 aa and ab (Gadd45aa and Gadd45 ab) in Ctenopharyngodon idella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Shen, Yubang; Li, Jiale

    2018-03-29

    The Gadd45aa and Gadd45 ab genes are members of the Gadd45 family, which are critically involved in immunological and apoptosis functions. In this study, we isolated and characterized Gadd45aa and Gadd45 ab cDNA from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) (designated CiGadd45aa and CiGadd45 ab). The CiGadd45aa and CiGadd45 ab fragments spanned 1272 bp/1248 bp, which contained 474 bp/480 bp open reading frames encoding 157/159 amino acid proteins. BLAST analysis revealed that CiGadd45aa and CiGadd45 ab shared high similarity with known Gadd45a sequences. qRT-PCR analysis showed widespread and abundant expression of CiGadd45aa in gill, intestine, kidney, brain, blood, skin and fin, but low in liver, spleen, head kidney, heart, and muscle. CiGadd45 ab was expressed highly in liver, spleen and blood but at low levels in gill, intestine, kidney, head kidney, heart, brain, skin, muscle, and fin. Following challenge of grass carp with Aeromonas hydrophila, CiGadd45aa and CiGadd45 ab expression was upregulated. In immune-relevant tissues and MAPK family genes (p38, JNK and ERK) were upregulated by CiGadd45aa and CiGadd45 ab overexpression and partly downregulated by interfered in the CIK grass carp kidney cell line. In addition, transcription of the cytokine-encoding il-8 gene was upregulated/downregulated by CiGadd45aa and CiGadd45 ab overexpression and interference. These results suggest that CiGadd45aa and CiGadd45 ab play roles in innate immune responses against A. hydrophila in grass carp. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The mechanism of gastrin release in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1982-01-01

    Duodenal ulcer can be induced in rats by a single dose of cysteamine. The ulcer formation is accompanied by acid hypersecretion and elevated serum gastrin levels. This study was performed to elucidate the mechanisms of gastrin release after an ulcerogenic dose of cysteamine. Cysteamine induced...

  5. Nitroglycerin-induced headache is not dependent on histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J

    1994-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of migraine pain have not yet been clarified. Monoamine and the peptide neurotransmitters involved in neurogenic inflammation do not cause significant head pain. Our previous studies of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and histamine-induced headaches have suggested that nitric...

  6. Assessment of laser-induced release of drugs from liposomes: An in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoobehi, B.; Char, C.A.; Peyman, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the characteristics of laser-induced release of an antimetabolite (cytosine arabinoside) from temperature-sensitive liposomes. Previous work had shown that a laser would induce breakdown of liposomes when a dye was encapsulated within the liposomes. The present investigation was performed to determine if release could be induced from liposomes that did not contain dye. In vitro, dynamic studies of the release of the drug from liposomes diluted in blood (flowing in a capillary tube at 40 microns/min) were conducted using an argon dye laser operating either in the blue-green mode (488/514 nm) or in the dye mode (577 nm). A radio-labeled marker was used to monitor the drug release. The results showed that the drug could indeed be released from liposomes that did not contain dye, at energy levels that are not likely to be harmful to the tissue. At identical power levels, the release of the drug was greater at 577 nm than at 488/514 nm, probably owing to the greater light absorbance of hemoglobin at the longer wavelength. The results indicate the potential for the site-specific release of a variety of molecules in the ocular vasculature

  7. Tyrosine 402 Phosphorylation of Pyk2 Is Involved in Ionomycin-Induced Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yun; Mou, Zheng; Chu, Shifeng; Chen, Xiaoyu; He, Wenbin; Guo, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Yuhe; Takahashi, Masami; Chen, Naihong

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed in the central nervous system, are implicated in many neural processes. However, the relationship between protein tyrosine kinases and neurotransmitter release remains unknown. In this study, we found that ionomycin, a Ca2+ ionophore, concurrently induced asynchronous neurotransmitter release and phosphorylation of a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), in clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and cerebellar granule cells, whereas introduction of Pyk2 siRNA dramatically suppressed ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release. Further study indicated that Tyr-402 (Y402) in Pyk2, instead of other tyrosine sites, underwent rapid phosphorylation after ionomycin induction in 1 min to 2 min. We demonstrated that the mutant of Pyk2 Y402 could abolish ionomycin-induced dopamine (DA) release by transfecting cells with recombinant Pyk2 and its mutants (Y402F, Y579F, Y580F, and Y881F). In addition, Src inhibition could prolong phosphorylation of Pyk2 Y402 and increase DA release. These findings suggested that Pyk2 was involved in ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release through phosphorylation of Y402. PMID:24718602

  8. Mechanism of histamine release from rat mast cells induced by the ionophore A23187: effects of calcium and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1978-01-01

    1 The mechanism of histamine release from a pure population of rat mast cells induced by the lipid soluble antibiotic, A23187, has been studied and compared with data for anaphylactic histamine release reported in the literature. 2 Histamine release induced by A23187 in the presence of calcium 10...

  9. Alternaria extract activates autophagy that induces IL-18 release from airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Hiroki; Okazaki, Shintaro; Hayashi, Hisako; Kawakita, Akiko; Hosoki, Koa; Yasutomi, Motoko; Sur, Sanjiv; Ohshima, Yusei

    2015-09-04

    Alternaria alternata is a major outdoor allergen that causes allergic airway diseases. Alternaria extract (ALT-E) has been shown to induce airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 and thereby initiate Th2-type responses. We investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in IL-18 release from ALT-E-stimulated airway epithelial cells. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were stimulated with ALT-E in the presence of different inhibitors of autophagy or caspases. IL-18 levels in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. The numbers of autophagosomes, an LC3-I to LC3-II conversion, and p62 degradation were determined by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin, which inhibit the formation of preautophagosomal structures and autolysosomes, respectively, suppressed ALT-E-induced IL-18 release by cells, whereas caspase 1 and 8 inhibitors did not. ALT-E-stimulation increased autophagosome formation, LC-3 conversion, and p62 degradation in airway epithelial cells. LPS-stimulation induced the LC3 conversion in A549 cells, but did not induce IL-18 release or p62 degradation. Unlike LPS, ALT-E induced airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 via an autophagy dependent, caspase 1 and 8 independent pathway. Although autophagy has been shown to negatively regulate canonical inflammasome activity in TLR-stimulated macrophages, our data indicates that this process is an unconventional mechanism of IL-18 secretion by airway epithelial cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Concurrent Synthesis and Release of nod-Gene-Inducing Flavonoids from Alfalfa Roots 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Carl A.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. Alfalfa roots release three major nod-gene inducers: 4′,7-dihydroxyflavanone, 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone. The objective of the present study was to define temporal relationships between synthesis and exudation for those flavonoids. Requirements for concurrent flavonoid biosynthesis were assessed by treating roots of intact alfalfa seedlings with [U-14C]-l-phenylalanine in the presence or absence of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase inhibitor l-2-aminoxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP). In the absence of AOPP, each of the three flavonoids in exudates contained 14C. In the presence of AOPP, 14C labeling and release of all the exuded nod-gene inducers were reduced significantly. AOPP inhibited labeling and release of the strongest nod-gene inducer, methoxychalcone, by more than 90%. Experiments with excised cotyledons, hypocotyls, and roots incubated in solution showed that the flavonoids could be synthesized in and released from each organ. However, the ratio of the three flavonoids in exudates from intact plants was most similar to the ratio recently synthesized and released from excised roots. A portion of recently synthesized flavonoid aglycones was found conjugated, presumably as glycosides, in root extracts and may have been involved in the release process. Data from root extracts showed that formononetin, an isoflavonoid which does not induce nod genes, was present in conjugated and aglycone forms but was not released by normal intact roots. In contrast, roots stressed with CuCl2 did release the aglycone formononetin. Thus, the release process responsible for exudation of nod-gene inducers appears to be specific rather than a general phenomenon such as a sloughing off of cells during root growth. The synthesis and specific concurrent release of flavonoid nod-gene inducers in this study is consistent with

  11. Mechanism of palytoxin-induced [3H]norepinephrine release from a rat pheochromocytoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, M; Takahashi, M; Ohizumi, Y

    1984-05-01

    Palytoxin, isolated from the zoanthid Palytoha species, is one of the most potent marine toxins. Palytoxin (1 nM-1 microM) caused a release of [3H]norepinephrine from clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This releasing action of palytoxin was markedly inhibited or abolished by Co2+ or Ca2+ -free medium, but was not modified by tetrodotoxin. The release of [3H]norepinephrine induced by a low concentration (30 nM) of palytoxin was abolished in sodium-free medium and increased as the external Na+ concentrations were increased from 3 to 100 nM, but the release induced by a high concentration (1 microM) was unaffected by varying the concentration of external Na+ from 0 to 100 mM. The release of [3H]norepinephrine induced by both concentrations of palytoxin increased with increasing Ca2+ concentrations from 0 to 3 mM. Palytoxin caused a concentration-dependent increase in 22Na and 45Ca influxes into pheochromocytoma cells at concentrations of 0.1 nM-10 nM and 1 nM-1 microM, respectively. The palytoxin-induced 45Ca influx was markedly inhibited by Co2+, whereas the palytoxin-induced 22Na influx was not affected by tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that in pheochromocytoma cells the [3H]norepinephrine release induced by lower concentrations of palytoxin is primarily brought about by increasing tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ permeability across the cell membrane, whereas that induced by higher concentrations is mainly caused by a direct increase in Ca2+ influx into them.

  12. Riluzole and gabapentinoids activate glutamate transporters to facilitate glutamate-induced glutamate release from cultured astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshizumi, Masaru; Eisenach, James. C.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the glutamate transporter activator riluzole paradoxically enhanced glutamate-induced glutamate release from cultured astrocytes. We further showed that both riluzole and the α2δ subunit ligand gabapentin activated descending inhibition in rats by increasing glutamate receptor signaling in the locus coeruleus and hypothesized that these drugs share common mechanisms to enhance glutamate release from astrocytes. In the present study, we examined the effects o...

  13. Acetate-induced apoptosis in colorectal carcinoma cells involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin D release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, C; Oliveira, C S F; Alves, S; Chaves, S R; Coutinho, O P; Côrte-Real, M; Preto, A

    2013-02-21

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. Short-chain fatty acids secreted by dietary propionibacteria from the intestine, such as acetate, induce apoptosis in CRC cells and may therefore be relevant in CRC prevention and therapy. We previously reported that acetic acid-induced apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells involves partial vacuole permeabilization and release of Pep4p, the yeast cathepsin D (CatD), which has a protective role in this process. In cancer cells, lysosomes have emerged as key players in apoptosis through selective lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and release of cathepsins. However, the role of CatD in CRC survival is controversial and has not been assessed in response to acetate. We aimed to ascertain whether LMP and CatD are involved in acetate-induced apoptosis in CRC cells. We showed that acetate per se inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. More importantly, we uncovered that acetate triggers LMP and CatD release to the cytosol. Pepstatin A (a CatD inhibitor) but not E64d (a cathepsin B and L inhibitor) increased acetate-induced apoptosis of CRC cells, suggesting that CatD has a protective role in this process. Our data indicate that acetate induces LMP and subsequent release of CatD in CRC cells undergoing apoptosis, and suggest exploiting novel strategies using acetate as a prevention/therapeutic agent in CRC, through simultaneous treatment with CatD inhibitors.

  14. Stress-induced release of GUT peptides in young women classified as restrained or unrestrained eaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilterscheid, Esther; Laessle, Reinhold

    2015-12-01

    Basal release of GUT peptides has been found to be altered in restrained eaters. Stress-induced secretion, however, has not yet been described, but could be a biological basis of overeating that exposes restrained eaters to a higher risk of becoming obese. The aim of the present study was to compare restrained and unrestrained eaters with respect to stress-induced release of the GUT peptides ghrelin and PYY. 46 young women were studied. Blood sampling for peptides was done before and after the Trier Social Stress Test. Ghrelin secretion after stress was significantly elevated in the restrained eaters, whereas no significant differences were detected for PYY. Stress-induced release of GUT peptides can be interpreted as a cause as well as a consequence of restrained eating.

  15. Bacteria-induced histamine release from human bronchoalveolar cells and blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clementsen, P; Milman, N; Struve-Christensen, E

    1991-01-01

    . No difference was found between the patients who responded and those who did not respond in regard to age, sex, smoker/non-smoker, % recovery of BAL-fluid, total cell count, differential cell counts, histamine content per mast cell, or diagnoses. Also stimulation of the BAL-cells with the calcium-ionophore A......23187 resulted in histamine release. S. aureus-induced histamine release from basophils was examined in leukocyte suspensions obtained from the same individuals, and in all experiments release was found. The dose-response curves were similar to those obtained with BAL cells. The bacteria...

  16. Concurrent synthesis and release of nod-gene-inducing flavonoids from alfalfa roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, C.A.; Phillips, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. Alfalfa roots release three major nod-gene inducers: 4',7-dihydroxyflavanone, 4',7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4,4'-dihydroxy-2'-methoxychalcone. The objective of the present study was to define temporal relationships between synthesis and exudation for those flavonoids. Requirements for concurrent flavonoid biosynthesis were assessed by treating roots of intact alfalfa seedlings with [U- 14 C]-L-phenylalanine in the presence or absence of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase inhibitor L-2-aminoxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP). In the absence of AOPP, each of the three flavonoids in exudates contained 14 C. In the presence of AOPP, 14 C labeling and release of all the exuded nod-gene inducers were reduced significantly. AOPP inhibited labeling and release of the strongest nod-gene inducer, methoxychalcone, by more than 90%. The release process responsible for exudation of nod-gene inducers appears to be specific rather than a general phenomenon such as a sloughing off of cells during root growth

  17. Involvement of arachidonate metabolism in neurotensin-induced prolactin release in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, P.L.; Speciale, C.; Sortino, M.A.; Scapagnini, U.

    1985-01-01

    Neurotensin increased in a concentration-dependent manner the level of hypophyseal [ 3 H]arachidonic acid in vitro as well as prolactin release from hemipituitary glands. The effect of 1 microM neurotensin on arachidonate release was already present at 2.5 min, maximal at 5, and disappeared after a 10-min incubation. Neurotensin analogues produced an enhancement of hypophyseal arachidonate similar to their relative potencies in other cellular systems, whereas other peptides (somatostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide) were devoid of any effect on the concentration of the fatty acid in the pituitary. Seventy micromoles RHC 80267, a rather selective inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, completely prevented the neurotensin-stimulated prolactin release and decreased arachidonate release both in basal or in neurotensin-induced conditions. Similar results were obtained with 50 microM quinacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor. To clarify whether arachidonate released by neurotensin requires a further metabolism through specific pathways to stimulate prolactin release, the authors used indomethacin and BW 755c, two blockers of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. Thirty micromoles indomethacin, a dose active to inhibit cyclooxygenase, did not affect unesterified arachidonate levels either in basal or in neurotensin-induced conditions; moreover, the drug did not modify basal prolactin release but slightly potentiated the stimulatory effect of neurotensin on the release of the hormone. On the other hand, 250 microM BW 755c, an inhibitor of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, significantly inhibited both basal and neurotensin-stimulated prolactin release and further potentiated the increase of the fatty acid concentrations produced by 1 microM neurotensin

  18. Genetic variance is associated with susceptibility for cigarette smoke-induced DAMP release in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Simon D; Faiz, Alen; den Boef, Lisette E; Gras, Reneé; van den Berge, Maarten; Boezen, H Marike; Korstanje, Ron; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Heijink, Irene H; Nawijn, Martijn C

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by unresolved neutrophilic airway inflammation and is caused by chronic exposure to toxic gases, such as cigarette smoke (CS), in genetically susceptible individuals. Recent data indicate a role for damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in COPD. Here, we investigated the genetics of CS-induced DAMP release in 28 inbred mouse strains. Subsequently, in lung tissue from a subset of strains, the expression of the identified candidate genes was analyzed. We tested whether small interfering RNA-dependent knockdown of candidate genes altered the susceptibility of the human A549 cell line to CS-induced cell death and DAMP release. Furthermore, we tested whether these genes were differentially regulated by CS exposure in bronchial brushings obtained from individuals with a family history indicative of either the presence or absence of susceptibility for COPD. We observed that, of the four DAMPs tested, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) showed the highest correlation with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Genetic analyses identified 11 candidate genes governing either CS-induced or basal dsDNA release in mice. Two candidate genes ( Elac2 and Ppt1 ) showed differential expression in lung tissue on CS exposure between susceptible and nonsusceptible mouse strains. Knockdown of ELAC2 and PPT1 in A549 cells altered susceptibility to CS extract-induced cell death and DAMP release. In bronchial brushings, CS-induced expression of ENOX1 and ARGHGEF11 was significantly different between individuals susceptible or nonsusceptible for COPD. Our study shows that genetic variance in a mouse model is associated with CS-induced DAMP release, and that this might contribute to susceptibility for COPD. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Longitudinal study of experimental induction of AA amyloidosis in mice seeded with homologous and heterologous AA fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Naeem; Murakami, Tomoaki; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-09-01

    To investigate pathogenesis and kinetics of experimentally induced murine AA amyloidosis seeded with homologous (murine) and heterologous (bovine) AA fibrils. Experimental AA amyloidosis was induced by administration of inflammatory stimulus and preformed AA fibrils to a total of 111 female C57/Black mice. In this longitudinal study, heterologous (bovine) as well as homologous (murine) AA fibrils were injected intraperitoneally to mice in various combinations. Re-stimulation was done at 120 or 300 days post first inoculation. To analyze the intensity of amyloid depositions in mice organs, immunohistochemical techniques and image J software were used. Assessment of cytokines level in sera was done using a Mouse Th1/Th2/Th17 Cytokine CBA Kit. Incidence and severity of AA amyloidosis were quite low in mice inoculated with heterologous bovine AA fibrils than homologous murine one. Homologous AA fibrils administration at first and second inoculation caused maximum amount of amyloid depositions and severe systemic form of amyloidosis. Increase in the level of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was observed after first inoculation, while second inoculation caused a further increase in the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. AA amyloidosis can be induced by heterologous as well as homologous AA fibrils. Severity of AA amyloidosis induced with homologous AA fibrils is higher compared to heterologous AA fibrils.

  20. Thermally induced A'-A site exchange in novel layered perovskites Ag2[Ca1.5M3O10] (M = Nb, Ta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Woodward, Patrick M

    2002-12-04

    We have synthesized and characterized new layered perovskites Ag2[A1.5M3O10] (A = Ca, M = Nb, Ta), from their lithium analogues, by soft-chemical ion exchange. These oxides show topotactic irreversible thermally induced A'-A site exchange, resulting in Ag1.1Ca0.9[Ca0.6Ag0.9M3O10], conferred from our high-temperature X-ray and ionic conductivity studies. The latter phases are the first compounds where Ag+ ions reside in both A' and A sites in layered perovskites. The absence of similar phase transition for A = Sr suggests that these transitions strongly depend on the size, charge, and the coordination preference of A' and A cations. This result provides a new synthetic tool for modifying the occupation of the 12-coordinate A site of layered perovskites using soft chemical routes.

  1. Drug Release Profile from Calcium-Induced Alginate-Phosphate Composite Gel Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Murata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-induced alginate-phosphate composite gel beads were prepared, and model drug release profiles were investigated in vitro. The formation of calcium phosphate in the alginate gel matrix was observed and did not affect the rheological properties of the hydrogel beads. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the calcium phosphate does not exist in crystalline form in the matrix. The initial release amount and release rate of a water-soluble drug, diclofenac, from the alginate gel beads could be controlled by modifying the composition of the matrix with calcium phosphate. In contrast, the release profile was not affected by the modification for hydrocortisone, a drug only slightly soluble in water.

  2. Mechanical stretch induces MMP-2 release and activation in lung endothelium: role of EMMPRIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseneen, Nadia A; Vaday, Gayle G; Zucker, Stanley; Foda, Hussein D

    2003-03-01

    High-volume mechanical ventilation leads to ventilator-induced lung injury. This type of lung injury is accompanied by an increased release and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). To investigate the mechanism leading to the increased MMP release, we systematically studied the effect of mechanical stretch on human microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the lung. We exposed cells grown on collagen 1 BioFlex plates to sinusoidal cyclic stretch at 0.5 Hz using the Flexercell system with 17-18% elongation of cells. After 4 days of cell stretching, conditioned media and cell lysate were collected and analyzed by gelatin, casein, and reverse zymograms as well as Western blotting. RT-PCR of mRNA extracted from stretched cells was performed. Our results show that 1) cyclic stretch led to increased release and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-1; 2) the activation of MMP-2 was accompanied by an increase in membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) and inhibited by a hydroxamic acid-derived inhibitor of MMPs (Prinomastat, AG3340); and 3) the MMP-2 release and activation were preceded by an increase in production of extracellular MMP inducer (EMMPRIN). These results suggest that cyclic mechanical stretch leads to MMP-2 activation through an MT1-MMP mechanism. EMMPRIN may play an important role in the release and activation of MMPs during lung injury.

  3. Lipid-Induced Signaling Causes Release of Inflammatory Extracellular Vesicles From Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H; Krishnan, Anuradha; Verma, Vikas K; Bronk, Steven F; Werneburg, Nathan W; Charlton, Michael R; Shah, Vijay H; Malhi, Harmeet; Gores, Gregory J

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocyte cellular dysfunction and death induced by lipids and macrophage-associated inflammation are characteristics of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The fatty acid palmitate can activate death receptor 5 (DR5) on hepatocytes, leading to their death, but little is known about how this process contributes to macrophage-associated inflammation. We investigated whether lipid-induced DR5 signaling results in the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from hepatocytes, and whether these can induce an inflammatory macrophage phenotype. Primary mouse and human hepatocytes and Huh7 cells were incubated with palmitate, its metabolite lysophosphatidylcholine, or diluent (control). The released EV were isolated, characterized, quantified, and applied to macrophages. C57BL/6 mice were placed on chow or a diet high in fat, fructose, and cholesterol to induce NASH. Some mice also were given the ROCK1 inhibitor fasudil; 2 weeks later, serum EVs were isolated and characterized by immunoblot and nanoparticle-tracking analyses. Livers were collected and analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Incubation of primary hepatocytes and Huh7 cells with palmitate or lysophosphatidylcholine increased their release of EVs, compared with control cells. This release was reduced by inactivating mediators of the DR5 signaling pathway or rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) inhibition. Hepatocyte-derived EVs contained tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and induced expression of interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 messenger RNAs in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Activation of macrophages required DR5 and receptor-interacting protein kinase 1. Administration of the ROCK1 inhibitor fasudil to mice with NASH reduced serum levels of EVs; this reduction was associated with decreased liver injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. Lipids, which stimulate DR5, induce release of hepatocyte EVs, which

  4. Activated protein C induces the release of microparticle-associated endothelial protein C receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Casal, Margarita; Downey, Colin; Fukudome, Kenji; Marx, Gernot; Toh, Cheng Hock

    2005-02-15

    Activated protein C (APC) treatment is now used for patients with severe sepsis. We investigated its effect in vitro on primary, physiologically relevant cells and demonstrate a novel mechanism of endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) release that is not inhibited by metalloproteinase inhibitors. Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells or monocytes to APC (6.25-100 nM) results in the release of EPCR-containing microparticles, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy and characterized through flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay quantitation of isolated microparticles, and Western blotting. The phenomenon is time- and concentration-dependent and requires the APC active site, EPCR, and protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) on endothelial cells. Neither protein C nor boiled or D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone-blocked APC can induce microparticle formation and antibody blockade of EPCR or PAR1 cleavage and activation abrogates this APC action. Coincubation with hirudin does not alter the APC effect. The released microparticle bound is full-length EPCR (49 kDa) and APC retains factor V-inactivating activity. Although tumor necrosis factor-alpha (10 ng/mL) can also induce microparticle-associated EPCR release to a similar extent as APC (100 nM), it is only APC-induced microparticles that contain bound APC. This novel observation could provide new insights into the consequences of APC therapy in the septic patient.

  5. PGE2 induced in and released by dying cells functions as an inhibitory DAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Sho; Ao, Tomoka; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Matsuki, Kosuke; Kawamura, Takeshi; Negishi, Hideo; Nishio, Junko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Yanai, Hideyuki

    2016-04-05

    Cellular components released into the external milieu as a result of cell death and sensed by the body are generally termed damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Although DAMPs are conventionally thought to be protective to the host by evoking inflammatory responses important for immunity and wound repair, there is the prevailing notion that dysregulated release of DAMPs can also underlie or exacerbate disease development. However, the critical issue for how resultant DAMP-mediated responses are regulated has heretofore not been fully addressed. In the present study, we identify prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a DAMP that negatively regulates immune responses. We show that the production of PGE2 is augmented under cell death-inducing conditions via the transcriptional induction of the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) gene and that cell-released PGE2 suppresses the expression of genes associated with inflammation, thereby limiting the cell's immunostimulatory activities. Consistent with this, inhibition of the PGE2 synthesis pathway potentiates the inflammation induced by dying cells. We also provide in vivo evidence for a protective role of PGE2 released upon acetaminophen-induced liver injury as well as a pathogenic role for PGE2 during tumor cell growth. Our study places this classically known lipid mediator in an unprecedented context-that is, an inhibitory DAMP vis-à-vis activating DAMPs, which may have translational implications for designing more effective therapeutic regimens for inflammation-associated diseases.

  6. Ethanol-induced cell damage in cultured rat antral mucosa assessed by chromium-51 release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, R.B.; Ling, T.S.; Yeomans, N.D.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro method for studying ethanol-induced injury to gastric mucosa using organ culture of rat antrum. Cell damage was assessed by measurement of the release of [ 51 Cr]sodium chromate from preloaded cells, a method adapted from a standard immunologic technique. This system provided rapid and highly reproducible quantitation of tissue injury as assessed by 51 Cr release into the culture medium. The threshold concentration for ethanol-induced damage was between 10 and 15% v/v, similar to in vivo thresholds observed by others. 51 Cr release could also be induced by very short exposure to ethanol (5-15 min), and then continued despite ethanol removal. Interestingly, after continuous ethanol exposure, a plateau of maximum 51 Cr release was reached 60 min after exposure to ethanol over the concentration range 20-50%, suggesting tissue adaptation to ethanol damage. This organ culture system, which allows precise control of experimental conditions, may be useful for studying mechanisms of gastric mucosal injury and protection

  7. Mazindol, nomifensine and desmethylimipramine inhibit potassium-induced release of dopamine: effect of stimulus strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembiec-Cohen, D

    1998-01-01

    Catecholamine uptake blockers exhibit a second action: They suppress the potassium (K+)-stimulated release of [3H]-dopamine (DA) from rat striatal tissue in vitro. In the present study, a K+ dose-response curve was obtained for the release of both [3H]-DA and endogenous DA from striatal tissue, in the absence and presence of catecholamine uptake blockers. Three drugs were used, namely, mazindol, nomifensine, and desmethylimipramine. The data showed that diminished release in the presence of mazindol or nomifensine was dependent upon the concentration of K+. Marked inhibition of stimulus-induced release of either 3H-DA or endogenous DA was observed at low concentrations of K+ (15 and 20 mM), but not at higher concentrations of K+ (40 and 60 mM). In contrast, the diminished release of DA in the presence of desmethylimipramine persisted over the K+ range of 20-60 mM. These data show that the drug action observed previously was not restricted to a specific neuronal pool of DA that was labelled with [3H]-DA. Further, the data emphasize the importance of the concentration of the depolarizing stimulus when evaluating the effects of drugs on release of catecholamines.

  8. Cell-swelling-induced taurine release from isolated perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, H S; Meijer, A J; Gustafson, L A; Jörning, G G; Leegwater, A C; Maas, M A; Chamuleau, R A

    1994-01-01

    Astrocytes and lymphocytes are able to release significant amounts of taurine during periods of hypotonicity to reduce the increase in cell volume. To investigate this mechanism in the liver, we studied the release of free amino acids from isolated perfused rat liver during hypotonicity. The osmolarity of the perfusion medium was reduced from 305 to 255 or 205 mosM by decreasing the NaCl concentration 25 or 50 mM, respectively. This induced an 6-8% increase in liver mass and was associated with a specific 1.7-fold (-50 mosM) and 14-fold (-100 mosM) increase of the taurine release. None of the other amino acids measured showed a significant increase in their concentration in the effluent. The increase in taurine release occurred within 30 s after exposure to hypotonicity (maximal after 1-1.5 min) and followed closely the changes in liver mass. The taurine release declined gradually during successive exposures of the isolated liver to -100 mosM. This release was 29 and 17% of the original during the second and third exposure, respectively.

  9. Aa Ah Nak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tha, Na Gya; Wus, Thay

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Aa Ah Nak, the authors' methodology presents not only various reflections but also diverse contradictions about the Aa Nii language as well as language revitalization. This article explores language foundation and how the Aa Nii language revitalization is inextricably linked to the genocide and resulting historic trauma pervasive…

  10. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Hidalgo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP and platelet-activating factor (PAF induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8 release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils.

  11. Carbon black nanoparticles induce type II epithelial cells to release chemotaxins for alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Ken

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are a key cell in dealing with particles deposited in the lungs and in determining the subsequent response to that particle exposure. Nanoparticles are considered a potential threat to the lungs and the mechanism of pulmonary response to nanoparticles is currently under intense scrutiny. The type II alveolar epithelial cell has previously been shown to release chemoattractants which can recruit alveolar macrophages to sites of particle deposition. The aim of this study was to assess the responses of a type II epithelial cell line (L-2 to both fine and nanoparticle exposure in terms of secretion of chemotactic substances capable of inducing macrophage migration. Results Exposure of type II cells to carbon black nanoparticles resulted in significant release of macrophage chemoattractant compared to the negative control and to other dusts tested (fine carbon black and TiO2 and nanoparticle TiO2 as measured by macrophage migration towards type II cell conditioned medium. SDS-PAGE analysis of the conditioned medium from particle treated type II cells revealed that a higher number of protein bands were present in the conditioned medium obtained from type II cells treated with nanoparticle carbon black compared to other dusts tested. Size-fractionation of the chemotaxin-rich supernatant determined that the chemoattractants released from the epithelial cells were between 5 and 30 kDa in size. Conclusion The highly toxic nature and reactive surface chemistry of the carbon black nanoparticles has very likely induced the type II cell line to release pro-inflammatory mediators that can potentially induce migration of macrophages. This could aid in the rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of particle deposition and the subsequent removal of the particles by phagocytic cells such as macrophages and neutrophils. Future studies in this area could focus on the exact identity of the substance(s released by the

  12. Emersion induces nitrogen release and alteration of nitrogen metabolism in the intertidal genus Porphyra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang K; Kraemer, George P; Yarish, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N) release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ(15)N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate) of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion.

  13. Emersion induces nitrogen release and alteration of nitrogen metabolism in the intertidal genus Porphyra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang K Kim

    Full Text Available We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ(15N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion.

  14. Dehydration-induced release of vasopressin involves activation of hypothalamic histaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, A; Knigge, U; Rouleau, A; Garbarg, M; Warberg, J

    1994-08-01

    The hypothalamic neurotransmitter histamine (HA) induces arginine vasopressin (AVP) release when administered centrally. We studied and characterized this effect of HA with respect to receptor involvement. In addition, we studied the possible role of hypothalamic histaminergic neurons in the mediation of a physiological stimulus (dehydration) for AVP secretion. Intracerebroventricular administration of HA, the H1-receptor agonists 2(3-bromophenyl)HA and 2-thiazolylethylamine, or the H2-receptor agonists amthamine or 4-methyl-HA stimulated AVP secretion. The stimulatory action of HA on AVP was inhibited by pretreatment with the H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine or the H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine. Twenty-four hours of dehydration elevated the plasma osmolality from 298 +/- 3 to 310 +/- 3 mmol/liter and increased the plasma AVP concentration 4-fold. The hypothalamic content of HA and its metabolite tele-methyl-HA was elevated in response to dehydration, indicating an increased synthesis and release of hypothalamic HA. Dehydration-induced AVP secretion was lowered when neuronal HA synthesis was inhibited by the administration of (S) alpha-fluoromethylhistidine or when the animals were pretreated with the H3-receptor agonist R(alpha)methylhistamine, which inhibits the release and synthesis of HA, the H1-receptor antagonists mepyramine and cetirizine, or the H2-receptor antagonists cimetidine and ranitidine. We conclude that HA, via activation of both H1- and H2-receptors, stimulates AVP release and that HA is a physiological regulator of AVP secretion.

  15. Effects of arotinolol on hemodynamics and adrenergically induced renin release and renal vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki-Kusaba, M; Hisa, H; Kimura, T; Satoh, S

    1988-05-01

    Effects of 5-[2-[(3-tert-butylamino-2-hydroxypropylthio)-4-thiazolyl]-2- thiophenecarboxamide hydrochloride (arotinolol, S-596) on hemodynamic and adrenergically induced renin release and renal vasoconstriction were investigated in pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Arotinolol (1 mg/kg i.v.) decreased systemic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and renin secretion rate without change in renal blood flow. Degree of hypotension induced by arotinolol and basal plasma renin activity prior to the injection of the drug showed significant correlation. Arotinolol (20 micrograms/min) produced significant suppression of renal nerve stimulation (RNS)-induced renin release and attenuated an increase in renal vascular resistance during RNS at 3 Hz. The same extent of inhibition in the renin secretion response to RNS was also obtained during the infusion of dl-propranolol (100 micrograms/min). The renal vasoconstriction induced by RNS and norepinephrine (NE) was inhibited dose-dependently during the infusion of arotinolol (10, 30 and 100 micrograms/min), phentolamine (3, 10 and 30 micrograms/min) or prazosin (1, 3 and 10 micrograms/min). Arotinolol and prazosin exerted a greater inhibitory effect on RNS- than NE-induced vasoconstriction, and the opposite was true of phentolamine. Arotinolol dose-dependently decreased SBP and HR in a dose range of 0.01 to 3.0 mg/kg. The greater reduction in HR was observed with arotinolol at a lower dose range (0.01 to 0.1 mg/kg) than with propranolol. Arotinolol produced larger reduction of SBP, and less increase in carotid, vertebral, renal and external iliac vascular resistances than propranolol. These results suggest that arotinolol posesses a- and beta-adrenoceptor blocking properties, which effectively contribute to the suppression of the adrenergically induced renin release and renal vasoconstriction, and to the hypotensive effect.

  16. A drug release system induced by near infrared laser using alginate microparticles containing melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ah; Yoon, Soon Do; Lee, Chang-Moon

    2017-10-01

    The photothermal effect is used in a new drug release system to control drug delivery in a specific region. Melanin absorbs near-infrared (NIR) light with a high photothermal conversion efficiency, and as a result, an NIR laser can be used to induced drug release from alginate microparticles containing melanin (ALG-Mel microparticles). The temperature of the ALG-Mel microparticle solution at a concentration of 5mg/mL increased to 38.1°C from 26.0°C after irradiation with 808nm NIR at 1.5W/cm 2 for 5min, and this increase in temperature was found to be independent of the ALG-Mel microparticle concentration. After the NIR laser irradiation, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was released from the ALG-Mel microparticles to 87.4±0.5% of the total loaded drug for 24h. Without NIR laser irradiation, 5-FU was released from the ALG-Mel microparticles to 60.8±1.5% of the total loaded drug for 24h. These results indicate that NIR laser irradiation can be used with ALG-Mel microparticles as a drug delivery system for release within a target region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hsp27 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cytochrome c release and apoptosis in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, Adrienne M.; Szegezdi, Eva; Quigney, Declan J.; Samali, Afshin

    2005-01-01

    Cellular stress may stimulate cell survival pathways or cell death depending on its severity. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin that targets dopaminergic neurons that is often used to induce neuronal cell death in models of Parkinson's disease. Here we present evidence that 6-OHDA induces apoptosis in rat PC12 cells that involves release of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo from mitochondria, caspase-3 activation, cleavage of PARP, and nuclear condensation. 6-OHDA also induced the heat shock response, leading to increased levels of Hsp25 and Hsp70. Increased Hsp25 expression was associated with cell survival. Prior heat shock or overexpression of Hsp27 (human homologue of Hsp25) delayed cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and reduced the level of apoptosis caused by 6-OHDA. We conclude that 6-OHDA induces a variety of responses in cultured PC12 cells ranging from cell survival to apoptosis, and that induction of stress proteins such as Hsp25 may protect cells from undergoing 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis

  18. Bronchoconstriction Induces TGF-β Release and Airway Remodelling in Guinea Pig Lung Slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjitske A Oenema

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling, including smooth muscle remodelling, is a primary cause of airflow limitation in asthma. Recent evidence links bronchoconstriction to airway remodelling in asthma. The mechanisms involved are poorly understood. A possible player is the multifunctional cytokine TGF-β, which plays an important role in airway remodelling. Guinea pig lung slices were used as an in vitro model to investigate mechanisms involved in bronchoconstriction-induced airway remodelling. To address this aim, mechanical effects of bronchoconstricting stimuli on contractile protein expression and TGF-β release were investigated. Lung slices were viable for at least 48 h. Both methacholine and TGF-β1 augmented the expression of contractile proteins (sm-α-actin, sm-myosin, calponin after 48 h. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that increased sm-myosin expression was enhanced in the peripheral airways and the central airways. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction mediated the release of biologically active TGF-β, which caused the increased contractile protein expression, as inhibition of actin polymerization (latrunculin A or TGF-β receptor kinase (SB431542 prevented the methacholine effects, whereas other bronchoconstricting agents (histamine and KCl mimicked the effects of methacholine. Collectively, bronchoconstriction promotes the release of TGF-β, which induces airway smooth muscle remodelling. This study shows that lung slices are a useful in vitro model to study mechanisms involved in airway remodelling.

  19. Caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in honeybee photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, B; Baumann, O; Zimmermann, B; Ciriacy-Wantrup, E V

    1995-04-01

    Light stimulation of invertebrate microvillar photoreceptors causes a large rapid elevation in Cai, shown previously to modulate the adaptational state of the cells. Cai rises, at least in part, as a result of Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced Ca2+ release from the submicrovillar endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we provide evidence for Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) in an insect photoreceptor. In situ microphotometric measurements of Ca2+ fluxes across the ER membrane in permeabilized slices of drone bee retina show that (a) caffeine induces Ca2+ release from the ER; (b) caffeine and Ins(1,4,5)P3 open distinct Ca2+ release pathways because only caffeine-induced Ca2+ release is ryanodine sensitive and heparin insensitive, and because caffeine and Ins(1,4,5)P3 have additive effects on the rate of Ca2+ release; (c) Ca2+ itself stimulates release of Ca2+ via a ryanodine-sensitive pathway; and (d) cADPR is ineffective in releasing Ca2+. Microfluorometric intracellular Ca2+ measurements with fluo-3 indicate that caffeine induces a persistent elevation in Cai. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrate that caffeine mimics all aspects of Ca(2+)-mediated facilitation and adaptation in drone photoreceptors. We conclude that the ER in drone photoreceptors contains, in addition to the Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive release pathway, a CICR pathway that meets key pharmacological criteria for a ryanodine receptor. Coexpression of both release mechanisms could be required for the production of rapid light-induced Ca2+ elevations, because Ca2+ amplifies its own release through both pathways by a positive feedback. CICR may also mediate the spatial spread of Ca2+ release from the submicrovillar ER toward more remote ER subregions, thereby activating Ca(2+)-sensitive cell processes that are not directly involved in phototransduction.

  20. Lytic cell death induced by melittin bypasses pyroptosis but induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; Martínez-García, Juan José; Muñoz-García, María; Martínez-Villanueva, Miriam; Noguera-Velasco, José A; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luís; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2017-08-10

    The nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor with a pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a sensor for different types of infections and alterations of homeostatic parameters, including abnormally high levels of the extracellular nucleotide ATP or crystallization of different metabolites. All NLRP3 activators trigger a similar intracellular pathway, where a decrease in intracellular K + concentration and permeabilization of plasma membrane are key steps. Cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptides and peptide toxins permeabilize the plasma membrane. In fact, some of them have been described to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. Among them, the bee venom antimicrobial toxin peptide melittin is known to elicit an inflammatory reaction via the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to bee venom. Our study found that melittin induces canonical NLRP3 inflammasome activation by plasma membrane permeabilization and a reduction in the intracellular K + concentration. Following melittin treatment, the apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, an adaptor protein with a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), was necessary to activate caspase-1 and induce IL-1β release. However, cell death induced by melittin prevented the formation of large ASC aggregates, amplification of caspase-1 activation, IL-18 release and execution of pyroptosis. Therefore, melittin-induced activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome results in an attenuated inflammasome response that does not result in caspase-1 dependent cell death.

  1. AAS 227: Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  2. AAS 227: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    , think-pair-share style clicker questions, and comparing excerpts from scientific articles and the media. Eventually, students discover that the Earths overall temperature is going up, but observations can vary from year to year because heat is moving between the atmosphere and the oceans.Press Conference: Fermis Vision, First Stars, Massive Galaxy Cluster, and Dark Energy (by Susanna Kohler)Todays afternoon press conference was an exciting assortment of results, difficult to categorize under a single umbrella.First up was Marco Ajello (Clemson University), who spoke about 2FHL, the second Fermi-LAT catalog of high-energy sources. LAT stands for Large Area Telescope, an instrument on board the Fermi gamma-ray space observatory that scans the entire sky every three hours. Ajello described the contents of the 2FHL catalog: 360 gamma-ray sources, of which 75% are blazars (distant galactic nuclei with jets pointed toward us), 11% are sources within the galaxy, and the remaining 14% are unknown. With this catalog, Fermi has expanded into higher energies than ever before, providing the first map of the 50 GeV 2 TeV sky. Heres the press release.OMeara: Im a lowly spectroscopist so I dont have fun pictures to show you, just squiggly lines. #aas227 astrobites (@astrobites) January 7, 2016Next to speak, John OMeara (St. Michaels College) told us about the discovery of a gas cloud that may be a remnant from the first population of stars. OMeara showed us the emission spectrum from a distant quasar, which displays abrupt absorption by a cloud of gas located at a redshift of z~3.5. Absorption by gas clouds is not unusual but what is unusual is that this cloud is extremely metal-poor, with only 1/2500th solar metallicity. This is the lowest heavy-element content ever measured, and a sign that the cloud might have been enriched by Population III stars the theoretical first population of stars, which were born when gas in the universe was still pristine. Heres the press release

  3. Extracellular vesicles released following heat stress induce bystander effect in unstressed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Mulcahy, Laura Ann; Jacobs, Laura Ann; Samuel, Priya; Akbar, Naveed; Pink, Ryan Charles; Carter, David Raul Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Cells naïve to stress can display the effects of stress, such as DNA damage and apoptosis, when they are exposed to signals from stressed cells; this phenomenon is known as the bystander effect. We previously showed that bystander effect induced by ionising radiation are mediated by extracellular vesicles (EVs). Bystander effect can also be induced by other types of stress, including heat shock, but it is unclear whether EVs are involved. Here we show that EVs released from heat shocked cells are also able to induce bystander damage in unstressed populations. Naïve cells treated with media conditioned by heat shocked cells showed higher levels of DNA damage and apoptosis than cells treated with media from control cells. Treating naïve cells with EVs derived from media conditioned by heat shocked cells also induced a bystander effect when compared to control, with DNA damage and apoptosis increasing whilst the level of cell viability was reduced. We demonstrate that treatment of naïve cells with heat shocked cell-derived EVs leads to greater invasiveness in a trans-well Matrigel assay. Finally, we show that naïve cells treated with EVs from heat-shocked cells are more likely to survive a subsequent heat shock, suggesting that these EVs mediate an adaptive response. We propose that EVs released following stress mediate an intercellular response that leads to apparent stress in neighbouring cells but also greater robustness in the face of a subsequent insult.

  4. Activation of JNK triggers release of Brd4 from mitotic chromosomes and mediates protection from drug-induced mitotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Nishiyama

    Full Text Available Some anti-cancer drugs, including those that alter microtubule dynamics target mitotic cells and induce apoptosis in some cell types. However, such drugs elicit protective responses in other cell types allowing cells to escape from drug-induced mitotic inhibition. Cells with a faulty protective mechanism undergo defective mitosis, leading to genome instability. Brd4 is a double bromodomain protein that remains on chromosomes during mitosis. However, Brd4 is released from mitotic chromosomes when cells are exposed to anti-mitotic drugs including nocodazole. Neither the mechanisms, nor the biological significance of drug-induced Brd4 release has been fully understood. We found that deletion of the internal C-terminal region abolished nocodazole induced Brd4 release from mouse P19 cells. Furthermore, cells expressing truncated Brd4, unable to dissociate from chromosomes were blocked from mitotic progression and failed to complete cell division. We also found that pharmacological and peptide inhibitors of the c-jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK pathway, but not inhibitors of other MAP kinases, prevented release of Brd4 from chromosomes. The JNK inhibitor that blocked Brd4 release also blocked mitotic progression. Further supporting the role of JNK in Brd4 release, JNK2-/- embryonic fibroblasts were defective in Brd4 release and sustained greater inhibition of cell growth after nocodazole treatment. In sum, activation of JNK pathway triggers release of Brd4 from chromosomes upon nocodazole treatment, which mediates a protective response designed to minimize drug-induced mitotic stress.

  5. Release of mannoproteins during Saccharomyces cerevisiae autolysis induced by Pulsed Electric Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Martínez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of the application of PEF to induce accelerate autolysis of a commercial strain of Sacharomyces cerevisiae for winemaking use was evaluated. The influence of PEF treatments of different intensity (5-25 kV/cm for 30-240 µs on cell viability, cytoplasmic membrane permeabilization, release of mannoproteins and compounds absorbing at 260 and 280 nm has been investigated.After 8 days of incubation at 25 ºC the Abs600 of the suspension containing the control cells was kept constant while the Abs600 of the suspension containing the cells treated by PEF decreased. The measurement of the absorbance at 260 and 280 nm revealed no release of UV absorbing material from untreated cells after 8 days of incubation but the amount of UV absorbing material released drastically increased in the samples that contained cells treated by PEF after the same storage period. After 18 days of storage the amount of mannoproteins released from the untreated cell was negligible. Conversely, mannoprotein concentration increased linearly for the samples containing cells of S. cerevisiae treated by PEF. After 18 days of incubation the concentration of mannoproteins in the supernatant increased 4.2 times for the samples containing cells treated by PEF at 15 and 25 kV/cm for 45 and 150 µs.Results obtained in this study indicates that PEF could be used in winemaking to accelerate the sur lie aging or to obtain mannoproteins from yeast cultures to be used in winemaking.

  6. Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMonte, Joshua J; Stuckey, Jason W; Sanchez, Joshua Z; Tappero, Ryan; Rinklebe, Jörg; Sparks, Donald L

    2017-06-06

    Climate change-induced perturbations in the hydrologic regime are expected to impact biogeochemical processes, including contaminant mobility and cycling. Elevated levels of geogenic and anthropogenic arsenic are found along many coasts around the world, most notably in south and southeast Asia but also in the United States, particularly along the Mid-Atlantic coast. The mechanism by and the extent to which arsenic may be released in contaminated coastal soils due to sea level rise are unknown. Here we show a series of data from a coastal arsenic-contaminated soil exposed to sea and river waters in biogeochemical microcosm reactors across field-validated redox conditions. We find that reducing conditions lead to arsenic release from historically contaminated coastal soils through reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing mineral oxides in both sea and river water inundations, with less arsenic release from seawater scenarios than river water due to inhibition of oxide dissolution. For the first time, we systematically display gradation of solid phase soil-arsenic speciation across defined redox windows from reducing to oxidizing conditions in natural waters by combining biogeochemical microcosm experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate the threat of sea level rise stands to impact arsenic release from contaminated coastal soils by changing redox conditions.

  7. The effect of sodium ions on the light-induced 86Rb release from the isolated crayfish retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung, K.; Stieve, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low external Na + concentrations on the light-induced K + release from crayfish photoreceptor cells was tested by labelling intracellular K + with the isotope 86 Rb. The amount of isotope released per light, stimulus is roughly proportional to the external Na + concentration if the osmolarity is kept constant by replacing Na + with Tris, choline or sucrose. When sucrose is used to replace the depleted Na + the light-induced K + release is a linear function of the external Na + concentration and is reduced by approx. 95% at an external Na + concentration of 5 mmol/l. For choline and Tris substitutions the relationships are less clear but at Na + concentrations + release is smaller in a Tris solution and larger in a choline solution. It is suggested that the light-induced K + release is due mainly to an activation of voltage sensitive K + channels. (orig.)

  8. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarze Per E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α, a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr, with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm, but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm. The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm and quartz (≤ 2 μm to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses

  9. Mechanism of palytoxin-induced (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine release from a rat pheochromocytoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsumi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Ohizumi, Y.

    1984-05-01

    Palytoxin, isolated from the zoanthid Palytoha species, is one of the most potent marine toxins. Palytoxin caused a release of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine from clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This releasing action of palytoxin was markedly inhibited or abolished by Co/sup 2 +/ or Ca/sup 2 +/ -free medium, but was not modified by tetrodotoxin. The release of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine induced by a low concentration of palytoxin was abolished in sodium-free medium and increased as the external Na+ concentrations were increased, but the release induced by a high concentration was unaffected by varying the concentration of external Na/sup +/. The release of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine induced by both concentrations of palytoxin increased with increasing Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations. Palytoxin caused a concentration-dependent increase in /sup 22/Na and /sup 45/Ca influxes into pheochromocytoma cells. The palytoxin-induced /sup 45/Ca influx was markedly inhibited by Co/sup 2 +/, whereas the palytoxin-induced /sup 22/Na influx was not affected by tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that in pheochromocytoma cells the (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine release induced by lower concentrations of palytoxin is primarily brought about by increasing tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na/sup +/ permeability across the cell membrane, whereas that induced by higher concentrations is mainly caused by a direct increase in Ca/sup 2 +/ influx into them.

  10. Changes in presynaptic release, but not reuptake, of bioamines induced by long-term antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolzhenko, A.T.; Komissarov, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the effect of long-term administration of antidepressants on neuronal uptake of NA and 5-HT and on their release, induced by electrical stimulation, in rat brain slices. The effects of the test substances on neuronal uptake of 14 C-NA and 3 H-5-HT by the slices was investigated. Values of IC 50 and EC 2 were found and compared in the experiments and control. The inhibitory effect of clonidine (10 -4 M) and of 5-HT (10 -5 M) on presynaptic release of 14 C-NA and 3 H-5-HT also was studied in brain slices from intact rats and rats treated for two weeks with antidepressants

  11. Assessment of chronic spontaneous urticaria by serum-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha and matrix metalloproteinase-9 release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkencrone, Sidsel; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Skov, Per Stahl

    BACKGROUND Previous studies from our group have demonstrated that IgE-mediated basophil activation leads to release of TNFα that in turn can induce matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP-9) release from monocytes. We wished to investigate if serum from chronic spontaneous urticaria-patients with auto-a....... Release levels appeared to be positive correlated to ASST reaction in ASST+ patients but not to disease severity for CSU patients in general....

  12. Calcium-Induced calcium release during action potential firing in developing inner hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J

    2015-03-10

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  13. Novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine, prevents STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Xin [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Xinghui [Departments of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Shanghai College of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ma, Fenfen; Luo, Shanshan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ge, Ruowen [Departmentof Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Zhu, Yizhun, E-mail: zhuyz@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Departmentof Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-05-13

    In this work, we demonstrated for the first time that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC, also named as ZYZ-802), a novel hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S)-releasing compound, had renoprotective effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic kidney injury. SPRC treatment significantly reduced the level of creatinine, kidney to body weight ratio and in particular, markedly decreased 24-h urine microalbuminuria excretion. SPRC suppressed the mRNA expression of fibronectin and type IV collagen. In vitro, SPRC inhibited mesangial cells over-proliferation and hypertrophy induced by high glucose. Additionally, SPRC attenuated inflammation in diabetic kidneys. SPRC also reduced transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling and expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3) pathway. Moreover, SPRC inhibited phosphorylation of ERK, p38 protein. Taken together, SPRC was demonstrated to be a potential therapeutic candidate to suppress diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • We synthesized a novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC). • SPRC was preliminarily demonstrated to prevent STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy (DN). • SPRC may exert potential therapeutic candidate to suppress DN.

  14. Obstructive Apneas Induce Early Release of Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Circulating Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Almendros, Isaac; Acerbi, Irene; Montserrat, Josep M.; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether noninvasive application of recurrent airway obstructions induces early release of mesenchymal stem cells into the circulating blood in a rat model of obstructive sleep apnea. Design: Prospective controlled animal study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Participants: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g). Interventions: A specially designed nasal mask was applied to the anesthetized rats. Ten rats were subjected to a pattern of recurrent obstructive apneas (60 per hour, lasting 15 seconds each) for 5 hours. Ten anesthetized rats were used as controls. Measurements and Results: Mesenchymal stem cells from the blood and bone marrow samples were isolated and cultured to count the total number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-F) of adherent cells after 9 days in culture. The number of CFU-F from circulating blood was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in the rats subjected to recurrent obstructive apneas (5.00 ± 1.16; mean ± SEM) than in controls (1.70 ± 0.72). No significant (P = 0.54) differences were observed in CFU-F from bone marrow. Conclusions: Application of a pattern of airway obstructions similar to those experienced by patients with sleep apnea induced an early mobilization of mesenchymal stem cells into circulating blood. Citation: Carreras A; Almendros I; Acerbi I; Montserrat JM; Navajas D; Farré R. Obstructive apneas induce early release of mesenchymal stem cells into circulating blood. SLEEP 2009;32(1):117-119. PMID:19189787

  15. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  16. Identified Serotonin-Releasing Neurons Induce Behavioral Quiescence and Suppress Mating in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooryasin, Atefeh; Fiala, André

    2015-09-16

    Animals show different levels of activity that are reflected in sensory responsiveness and endogenously generated behaviors. Biogenic amines have been determined to be causal factors for these states of arousal. It is well established that, in Drosophila, dopamine and octopamine promote increased arousal. However, little is known about factors that regulate arousal negatively and induce states of quiescence. Moreover, it remains unclear whether global, diffuse modulatory systems comprehensively affecting brain activity determine general states of arousal. Alternatively, individual aminergic neurons might selectively modulate the animals' activity in a distinct behavioral context. Here, we show that artificially activating large populations of serotonin-releasing neurons induces behavioral quiescence and inhibits feeding and mating. We systematically narrowed down a role of serotonin in inhibiting endogenously generated locomotor activity to neurons located in the posterior medial protocerebrum. We identified neurons of this cell cluster that suppress mating, but not feeding behavior. These results suggest that serotonin does not uniformly act as global, negative modulator of general arousal. Rather, distinct serotoninergic neurons can act as inhibitory modulators of specific behaviors. An animal's responsiveness to external stimuli and its various types of endogenously generated, motivated behavior are highly dynamic and change between states of high activity and states of low activity. It remains unclear whether these states are mediated by unitary modulatory systems globally affecting brain activity, or whether distinct neurons modulate specific neuronal circuits underlying particular types of behavior. Using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, we find that activating large proportions of serotonin-releasing neurons induces behavioral quiescence. Moreover, distinct serotonin-releasing neurons that we genetically isolated and identified negatively affect

  17. Caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in honeybee photoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Light stimulation of invertebrate microvillar photoreceptors causes a large rapid elevation in Cai, shown previously to modulate the adaptational state of the cells. Cai rises, at least in part, as a result of Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced Ca2+ release from the submicrovillar endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we provide evidence for Ca(2+)- induced Ca2+ release (CICR) in an insect photoreceptor. In situ microphotometric measurements of Ca2+ fluxes across the ER membrane in permeabilized slices of dron...

  18. Striatal dopamine release induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: effect of aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Seong Ae; Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    We previously demonstrated dopamine (DA) release in the bilateral striatal regions following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in young subjects. Several lines of evidence support substantial age-related changes in human dopaminergic neurotransmission. One possible explanation is alteration of cortico striatal neural connection with aging. Therefore, we investigated how frontal activation by rTMS influences striatal DA release in the elderly with SPECT measurements of striatal binding of [123I]iodobenzamide (lBZM), a DA D2 receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous DA. Five healthy elderly male subjects (age, 64 3 y) were studied with brain [123I]IBZM SPECT under three conditions (resting, sham stimulation, and active rTMS over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)), while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of [123I]IBZM. rTMS session consisted of three blocks. In each block, 15 trains of 2 sec duration were delivered with 10 Hz stimulation frequency and 100% motor threshold. Striatal V3', calculated as (striatal - occipital)/occipital radioactivity, was measured under equilibrium condition at baseline and after sham and active rTMS. Sham stimulation did not affect striatal V3'. rTMS over left DLPFC induced no significant change in V3' in the right striatum compared with baseline condition (0.91 0.25 vs. 0.96 0.25, P = NS). Interestingly, left striatal V3' showed a significant increase after rTMS over left DLPFC compared with sham condition (1.09 0.33 vs. 0.93 0.27, P < 0.05; 17.0 11.1% increase). These results are discrepant from previous ones from young subjects, who showed frontal rTMS-induced reduction of striatal V3', indicating rTMS-induced striatal DA release. We found no significant striatal DA release induced by rTMS over DLPFC in healthy elderly subjects using in vivo binding competition techniques. These results may support an altered cortico striatal circuit in normal aging.

  19. Phenolic excipients of insulin formulations induce cell death, pro-inflammatory signaling and MCP-1 release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Weber

    2015-01-01

    Insulin solutions displayed cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory potential caused by phenol or m-cresol. We speculate that during insulin pump therapy phenol and m-cresol might induce cell death and inflammatory reactions at the infusion site in vivo. Inflammation is perpetuated by release of MCP-1 by activated monocytic cells leading to enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells. To minimize acute skin complications caused by phenol/m-cresol accumulation, a frequent change of infusion sets and rotation of the infusion site is recommended.

  20. Different serotonin receptor types participate in 5-hydroxytryptophan-induced gonadotropins and prolactin release in the female infantile rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacau-Mengido, I M; Libertun, C; Becú-Villalobos, D

    1996-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can be classified into at least three, possibly up to seven, classes of receptors. They comprise the 5-HT1, 5-HT2, and 5-HT3 classes, the "uncloned' 5-HT4 receptor and the recombinant receptors 5-ht5, 5-ht6 and 5-ht7. We investigated the role of different serotonin receptor types in a neuroendocrine response to the activation of the serotonergic system. Female immature rats were chosen as an experimental model as it has been shown that during the 3rd week of life, and not at later developmental stages, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, a serotonin precursor) induces gonadotropin release in females and not in males. Besides, at this age, serotonin releases prolactin in both sexes. 5-HTP (50 mg/kg) released prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) as expected. Ketanserin (5-HT2A antagonist) and methysergide (5-HT2C antagonist) blocked 5-HTP-induced prolactin release, but did not block the LH or FSH responses. Ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist) did not modify prolactin response to 5-HTP, whereas it blocked 5-HTP-induced LH and FSH release. Propranolol (5-HT1 and beta-adrenergic antagonist) blocked prolactin, LH and FSH release induced by 5-HTP. The 5-HT2C agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine dihydrochloride released prolactin, without modifying LH or FSH release. Methyl-quipazine and phenylbiguanide (5-HT3 agonists) increased both LH and FSH levels, without altering prolactin secretion. The present experiments indicate that serotonin acting at the 5-HT3 receptor mediates LH and FSH release in infantile female rats, whereas 5-HT2C or 2A receptor types participate in the release of prolactin at this age. 5-HT1 receptor type may be involved in the release of the three hormones, though a beta-adrenergic component of the response cannot be discarded.

  1. AA under construction

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The AA at an early stage of construction, in the newly built AA-Hall. Cable-trays already outline the shape of the accumulator ring. To the right are huge cable-drums for the pulse-forming-network (PFN) of the injection kicker. Seeing this picture, can one imagine that only 8 months later beams were circulating in the completed accumulator ring ?

  2. Lysophosphatidate induces chemo-resistance by releasing breast cancer cells from taxol-induced mitotic arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Samadi

    Full Text Available Taxol is a microtubule stabilizing agent that arrests cells in mitosis leading to cell death. Taxol is widely used to treat breast cancer, but resistance occurs in 25-69% of patients and it is vital to understand how Taxol resistance develops to improve chemotherapy. The effects of chemotherapeutic agents are overcome by survival signals that cancer cells receive. We focused our studies on autotaxin, which is a secreted protein that increases tumor growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and metastasis. We discovered that autotaxin strongly antagonizes the Taxol-induced killing of breast cancer and melanoma cells by converting the abundant extra-cellular lipid, lysophosphatidylcholine, into lysophosphatidate. This lipid stimulates specific G-protein coupled receptors that activate survival signals.In this study we determined the basis of these antagonistic actions of lysophosphatidate towards Taxol-induced G2/M arrest and cell death using cultured breast cancer cells. Lysophosphatidate does not antagonize Taxol action in MCF-7 cells by increasing Taxol metabolism or its expulsion through multi-drug resistance transporters. Lysophosphatidate does not lower the percentage of cells accumulating in G2/M by decreasing exit from S-phase or selective stimulation of cell death in G2/M. Instead, LPA had an unexpected and remarkable action in enabling MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which had been arrested in G2/M by Taxol, to normalize spindle structure and divide, thus avoiding cell death. This action involves displacement of Taxol from the tubulin polymer fraction, which based on inhibitor studies, depends on activation of LPA receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.This work demonstrates a previously unknown consequence of lysophosphatidate action that explains why autotaxin and lysophosphatidate protect against Taxol-induced cell death and promote resistance to the action of this important therapeutic agent.

  3. Inhibition of Rac1 reduces store overload-induced calcium release and protects against ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Lu, Xiangru; Gui, Le; Wu, Yan; Sims, Stephen M; Wang, Guoping; Feng, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Rac1 is a small GTPase and plays key roles in multiple cellular processes including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether Rac1 activation during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) contributes to arrhythmogenesis is not fully understood. We aimed to study the effects of Rac1 inhibition on store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Adult Rac1(f/f) and cardiac-specific Rac1 knockdown (Rac1(ckd) ) mice were subjected to myocardial I/R and their electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored for ventricular arrhythmia. Myocardial Rac1 activity was increased and ventricular arrhythmia was induced during I/R in Rac1(f/f) mice. Remarkably, I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia was significantly decreased in Rac1(ckd) compared to Rac1(f/f) mice. Furthermore, treatment with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 decreased I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Ca(2+) imaging analysis showed that in response to a 6 mM external Ca(2+) concentration challenge, SOICR was induced with characteristic spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) waves in Rac1(f/f) cardiomyocytes. Notably, SOICR was diminished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rac1 in adult cardiomyocytes. Moreover, I/R-induced ROS production and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) oxidation were significantly inhibited in the myocardium of Rac1(ckd) mice. We conclude that Rac1 activation induces ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Inhibition of Rac1 suppresses SOICR and protects against ventricular arrhythmia. Blockade of Rac1 activation may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in ischaemic heart disease. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  4. Mechanical perturbation-induced ethylene releases apical dominance in Pharbitis nil by restricting shoot growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical perturbation (MP, rubbing) or internodes of Pharbitis nil shoots initiates release of lateral buds (LB) from apical dominance within 48 h. Evidence is presented which suggests that MP promotion of LB outgrowth is mediated by ethylene-induced restriction of main shoot growth. Ethylene production in the internodes is stimulated by MP within 2 h. Effects of MP are mimicked by treatments with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and are negated by the inhibitors of ethylene production or action, aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) and AgNO3. The fact that effects of MP, ACC, and ethylene inhibitors are observed to occur on main shoot growth at least 24 h before they are observed to occur on LB growth suggests a possible cause and effect relationship. MP also causes an increase in internode diameter. MP stimulation of ethylene production appears to be mediated by ACC synthase. The results of this study and our previous studies suggest that apical dominance may be released by any mechanism which induces ethylene restriction of main shoot growth.

  5. The effects of Haemophilus influenzae vaccination on an aphylactic mediator release and isoprenaline-induced inhibition of mediator release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, A.J.M.; Terpstra, G.K.; Raaijmakers, J.A.M.; Nijkamp, F.P.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of Haemophilus influenzae on anaphylactic mediator from ovalbumin-sensitized isolated guinea pig lungs was investigated. Lungs from H. influenzae-vaccinated animals released protaglandins and thromboxanes following a smaller dose of ovalbumin than was effective in non-vaccinated

  6. Utilization of adenosine triphosphate in rat mast cells during histamine release induced by the ionophore A23187

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    The role of endogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in histamine release from rat mast cells induced by the ionophore A23187 in vitro has been studied. 2 The amount of histamine released by calcium from rat mast cells primed with the ionophore A23187 was dependent on the ATP content of the mast...... cells. 3 In aerobic experiments a drastic reduction in mast cell ATP content was found during the time when histamine release induced by A23187 takes place. 4 Anaerobic experiments were performed with metabolic inhibitors (antimycin A, oligomycin, and carbonyl cyanide p...... The observations are consistent with the view that energy requiring processes are involved in ionophore-induced histamine release from rat mast cells although part of the ATP reduction in the aerobic experiments may be due to an uncoupling effect of calcium on the oxidative phosphorylation....

  7. Smoking-induced dopamine release studied with [11C]raclopride PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong; Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Do Hoon

    2005-01-01

    It has been postulated that dopamine release in the striatum underlies the reinforcing properties of nicotine. Substantial evidence in the animal studies demonstrates that nicotine interacts with and regulates the activation of the dopaminergic neuron. The aim of this study was to visualize the dopamine release by smoking in human brain using PET scan with [ 11 C]raclopride. Four male non-smokers or ex-smokers with an abstinence period longer than 1 year (mean age of 24.3±2.6 years) were enrolled in this study. Dopamine D2 receptor radioligand, [ 11 C]raclopride was administrated with bolus-plus-constant infusion. Dynamic PET was performed during 120 minutes (3x20s, 2x60s, 2x120s, 1x180s and 22x300s). Following the 50 minute-scanning, subjects smoked a cigarette containing 1 mg of nicotine while in the scanner. Blood samples for the measurements of plasma nicotine levels were collected at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60, and 90 minute after smoking. Regions for striatal structures were drawn on the coronal summed PET images guided with co-registered MRI. Binding potential, calculated as striatal-cerebellar/cerebellar activity, was measured under equilibrium condition at baseline and smoking session. The mean change in binding potential between the baseline and smoking in caudate, Putamen and ventral striatum was 3.7 % , 4.0 % and 8.6 %, respectively. This indicated the striatal dopamine release by smoking. The reduction in binding potential in the ventral striatum was significantly correlated with the cumulated plasma level of the nicotine (r 2 =0.91, p=0.04). These data demonstrate that in vivo imaging with [ 11 C]raclopride PET could measure nicotine-induced dopamine release in the human brain, which has a significant positive correlation with the amount of nicotine administered by smoking

  8. Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Localization of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor: Mechanistic Implications for Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Woon Yu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  9. Th17 cytokines induce pro-fibrotic cytokines release from human eosinophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Subepithelial fibrosis is one of the most critical structural changes affecting bronchial airway function during asthma. Eosinophils have been shown to contribute to the production of pro-fibrotic cytokines, TGF-β and IL-11, however, the mechanism regulating this process is not fully understood. Objective In this report, we investigated whether cytokines associated with inflammation during asthma may induce eosinophils to produce pro-fibrotic cytokines. Methods Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of 10 asthmatics and 10 normal control subjects. Eosinophils were stimulated with Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines and the production of TGF-β and IL-11 was determined using real time PCR and ELISA assays. Results The basal expression levels of eosinophil derived TGF-β and IL-11 cytokines were comparable between asthmatic and healthy individuals. Stimulating eosinophils with Th1 and Th2 cytokines did not induce expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines. However, stimulating eosinophils with Th17 cytokines resulted in the enhancement of TGF-β and IL-11 expression in asthmatic but not healthy individuals. This effect of IL-17 on eosinophils was dependent on p38 MAPK activation as inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not other kinases, inhibited IL-17 induced pro-fibrotic cytokine release. Conclusions Th17 cytokines might contribute to airway fibrosis during asthma by enhancing production of eosinophil derived pro-fibrotic cytokines. Preventing the release of pro-fibrotic cytokines by blocking the effect of Th17 cytokines on eosinophils may prove to be beneficial in controlling fibrosis for disorders with IL-17 driven inflammation such as allergic and autoimmune diseases. PMID:23496774

  10. Chrysoeriol and Luteolin Released from Alfalfa Seeds Induce nod Genes in Rhizobium meliloti1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Maxwell, Carl A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seed and root exudates induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The flavone luteolin previously was isolated from alfalfa seeds by other workers and identified as the first nod gene inducer for R. meliloti. Our recent study of `Moapa 69' alfalfa root exudates found no luteolin but did identify three other nod gene inducers: 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone, 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4′,7-dihydroxyflavanone. The goal of the current study was to identify and quantify nod gene-inducing flavonoids that may influence Rhizobium populations around a germinating alfalfa seed. Aqueous rinses of Moapa 69 alfalfa seeds were collected and assayed for induction of a nodABC-lacZ fusion in R. meliloti. During the first 4 hours of imbibition, total nod gene-inducing activity was released from seeds at 100-fold higher rates than from roots of 72-hour-old seedlings. Five flavonoids were purified and identified by spectroscopic analyses (ultraviolet/visible absorbance, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy) and comparison with authentic standards. Two very active nod gene-inducing flavonoids, chrysoeriol (3′-methoxyluteolin) and luteolin, were identified in seed rinses. Luteolin required a higher concentration (18 nanomolar) than chrysoeriol (5 nanomolar) for half-maximum induction of nodABC-lacZ in R. meliloti, and both were less active than 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone (2 nanomolar) from root exudates. Seeds exuded three other luteolin derivatives: luteolin-7-O-glucoside, 5-methoxyluteolin, and 3′,5-dimethoxyluteolin. Their combined quantities were 24-fold greater than that of luteolin plus chrysoeriol. Most nod gene-inducing activity of these luteolin derivatives apparently is associated with degradation to luteolin and chrysoeriol. However, their presence in large quantities suggests that they may contribute significantly to nod gene-inducing activity in the

  11. Biosensor cell assay for measuring real-time aldosterone-induced release of histamine from mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, E G; Andersen, K; Svenningsen, P; Hansen, P B L

    2017-01-01

    The aims were to develop a method for real-time detection of histamine release and to test whether incubation with aldosterone induces histamine release from isolated, perfused mice mesenteric arteries. Fura-2-loaded HEK-293 cells transfected with the histamine H1 receptor was used as a sensitive biosensor assay for histamine release from isolated mouse mesenteric arteries. Activation of the H1 receptor by histamine was measured as an increased number of intracellular Ca 2+ transient peaks using fluorescence imaging. The developed biosensor was sensitive to histamine in physiological relevant concentrations and responded to substances released by the artery preparation. Aldosterone treatment of mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice for 50 min resulted in an increased number of intracellular Ca 2+ transient peaks in the biosensor cells, which was significantly inhibited by the histamine H1 blocker pyrilamine. Mesenteric arteries from mast cell-deficient SASH mice induced similar pyrilamine-sensitive Ca 2+ transient response in the biosensor cells. Mesenteric arteries from wild-type and SASH mice expressed histamine decarboxylase mRNA, indicating that mast cells are not the only source of histamine release. The developed biosensor assay can measure release of substances from vascular preparations. Histamine is released from the vessel preparation in response to aldosterone treatment independently of mast cells. The assay enables us to study a new signaling mechanism for vascular responses induced by aldosterone. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Phagocytosis-induced 51Cr release from activated macrophages and blood mononuclears. Effect of colchicine and antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGee, M.P.; Hale, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    The chromium-release test was adapted to the measurement of the cellular injury induced when activated macrophages phagocytose particulates. Macrophages obtained from rabbit lungs undergoing BCG-induced chronic inflammation released more chromium when incubated in the presence of phagocytosable particles than when incubated under resting conditions. Blood mononuclear cells, 40-60% monocytes, procured from the same BCG-injected animals, were less susceptible to phagocytosis-induced injury than the macrophages obtained from the lungs. The amount of chromium released by the activated macrophages was proportional to the number of particles present during incubation. In the presence of catalase, the amounts of chromium released by phagocytosing and resting macrophages were similar; in the presence of superoxide dismutase and cytochrome c, the amount of chromium released by phagocytosing macrophages was 13-35% less than the amount of chromium released by macrophages incubated without the antioxidants. In addition, colchicine, an inhibitor of degranulation also exerted partial inhibition of the chromium release. These results suggest that oxygen radicals and lysosomal contents contribute to the cellular injury that results from phagocytosis

  13. Fluoxetine-induced inhibition of synaptosomal ( sup 3 H)5-HT release: Possible Ca sup 2+ -channel inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauderman, K.A. (Marion Merrell Dow Research Inst., Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Gandhi, V.C.; Jones, D.J. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective 5-Ht uptake inhibitor, inhibited 15 mM K{sup +}-induced ({sup 3}H)5-HT release from rat spinal cord and cortical synaptosomes at concentrations > 0.5 uM. This effect reflected a property shared by another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor paroxetine but not by less selective uptake inhibitors such as amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine or nortriptyline. Inhibition of release by fluoxetine was inversely related to both the concentration of K{sup +} used to depolarize the synaptosomes and the concentration of external Ca{sup 2+}. Experiments aimed at determining a mechanism of action revealed that fluoxetine did not inhibit voltage-independent release of ({sup 3}H)5-HT release induced by the Ca{sup 2+}-ionophore A 23187 or Ca{sup 2+}-independent release induced by fenfluramine. Moreover the 5-HT autoreceptor antagonist methiothepin did not reverse the inhibitory actions of fluoxetine on K{sup +}-induced release. Further studies examined the effects of fluoxetine on voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels and Ca{sup 2+} entry.

  14. Mechanisms involved in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-induced neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerve terminals in the mouse vas deferens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Williams

    Full Text Available Prejunctional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs amplify postganglionic sympathetic neurotransmission, and there are indications that intraterminal Ca(2+ stores might be involved. However, the mechanisms by which nAChR activation stimulates neurotransmitter release at such junctions is unknown. Rapid local delivery (picospritzing of the nAChR agonist epibatidine was combined with intracellular sharp microelectrode recording to monitor spontaneous and field-stimulation-evoked neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerve terminals in the mouse isolated vas deferens. Locally applied epibatidine (1 µM produced 'epibatidine-induced depolarisations' (EIDs that were similar in shape to spontaneous excitatory junction potentials (SEJPs and were abolished by nonselective nAChR antagonists and the purinergic desensitizing agonist α,β-methylene ATP. The amplitude distribution of EIDs was only slightly shifted towards lower amplitudes by the selective α7 nAChR antagonists α-bungarotoxin and methyllcaconitine, the voltage-gated Na(+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin or by blocking voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels with Cd(2+. Lowering the extracellular Ca(2+ concentration reduced the frequency of EIDs by 69%, but more surprisingly, the Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release blocker ryanodine greatly decreased the amplitude (by 41% and the frequency of EIDs by 36%. Ryanodine had no effect on electrically-evoked neurotransmitter release, paired-pulse facilitation, SEJP frequency, SEJP amplitude or SEJP amplitude distribution. These results show that activation of non-α7 nAChRs on sympathetic postganglionic nerve terminals induces high-amplitude junctional potentials that are argued to represent multipacketed neurotransmitter release synchronized by intraterminal Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release, triggered by Ca(2+ influx directly through the nAChR. This nAChR-induced neurotransmitter release can be targeted pharmacologically without affecting spontaneous or electrically

  15. Ceramide-enriched LDL induces cytokine release through TLR4 and CD14 in monocytes. Similarities with electronegative LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Montserrat; Sánchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Benítez, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    In vitro ceramide-enriched LDL (CER-LDL) reproduces most of the properties of electronegative LDL (LDL(-)), a heterogeneous subfraction of LDL found in plasma. LDL(-) comprises several modifications of LDL and has an increased content in ceramide (CER). It promotes cytokine release in monocytes through CD14 and TLR4. CER-LDL also induces cytokine release in these cells but the mechanism is unknown. To evaluate TLR4 and CD14 as the putative receptors involved in cytokine release induced by CER-LDL. CER-LDL was obtained by incubating native LDL with CER-enriched liposomes. CER content in CER-LDL was assessed by thin layer chromatography of lipid extracts. CER-LDL and LDL(-) were incubated for 20 h with human monocytes in the presence or absence of a TLR4 signaling inhibitor. Both LDLs were also incubated with two human monocytic cell lines, normal and THP1 overexpressing CD14 (THP1-CD14) cells. The release of IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 was evaluated by ELISA in culture medium. The release of IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 induced by CER-LDL in monocytes was inhibited by VIPER (90% inhibition), a specific TLR4 inhibitor. The cytokine release induced by CER-LDL was negligible in THP1, cells presenting a very low CD14 expression. In contrast, the induction of cytokine release in THP1-CD14 was high and dependent on the CER content in LDL. CER-LDL induces IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 release through the activation of CD14 and TLR4 in monocytes, reproducing the behavior of LDL(-). The increased content of CER in LDL(-) is then related to the inflammatory action of LDL(-). Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Cigarette Smoke-Induced Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern Release from Necrotic Neutrophils Triggers Proinflammatory Mediator Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Hilde; Pouwels, Simon D.; Leijendekker, Carin; de Bruin, Harold G.; Zijlstra, G. Jan; van der Vaart, Hester; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; van der Toorn, Marco

    Cigarette smoking, the major causative factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure can induce a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in airway epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized

  17. Geomagnetic aa Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The geomagnetic aa indices are the continuation of the series beginning in the year 1868. A full description of these indices is given in the International...

  18. Outward potassium current oscillations in macrophage polykaryons: extracellular calcium entry and calcium-induced calcium release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraiva R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Outward current oscillations associated with transient membrane hyperpolarizations were induced in murine macrophage polykaryons by membrane depolarization in the absence of external Na+. Oscillations corresponded to a cyclic activation of Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (IKCa probably correlated with variations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Addition of external Na+ (8 mM immediately abolished the outward current oscillations, suggesting that the absence of the cation is necessary not only for their induction but also for their maintenance. Oscillations were completely blocked by nisoldipine. Ruthenium red and ryanodine reduced the number of outward current cycles in each episode, whereas quercetin prolonged the hyperpolarization 2- to 15-fold. Neither low molecular weight heparin nor the absence of a Na+ gradient across the membrane had any influence on oscillations. The evidence suggests that Ca2+ entry through a pathway sensitive to Ca2+ channel blockers is elicited by membrane depolarization in Na+-free medium and is essential to initiate oscillations, which are also dependent on the cyclic release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+-sensitive stores; Ca2+ ATPase acts by reducing intracellular Ca2+, thus allowing slow deactivation of IKCa. Evidence is presented that neither a Na+/Ca2+ antiporter nor Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores participate directly in the mechanism of oscillation

  19. BMP-2 promotes oral squamous carcinoma cell invasion by inducing CCL5 release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-joo Kim

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2-containing bone grafts are useful regenerative materials for oral and maxillofacial surgery; however, several in vitro and in vivo studies previously reported cancer progression-related adverse effects caused by BMP-2. In this study, by quantifying the rhBMP-2 content released from bone grafts, the rhBMP-2 concentration that did not show cytotoxicity in each cell line was determined and applied to the in vitro monoculture or coculture model in the invasion assay. Our results showed that 1 ng/ml rhBMP-2, while not affecting cancer cell viability, significantly increased the invasion ability of the cancer cells cocultured with fibroblasts. Cocultured medium with rhBMP-2 also contained increased levels of matrix metalloproteinases. rhBMP-2-treated cocultured fibroblasts did not show a prominent difference in mRNA expression profile. Some cytokines, however, were detected in the conditioned medium by a human cytokine antibody array. Among them, the cancer invasion-related factor CCL5 was quantified by ELISA. Interestingly, CCL5 neutralizing antibodies significantly reduced the invasion of oral cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that 1 ng/ml rhBMP-2 may induce invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC cells by CCL5 release in coculture models. Therefore, we propose that a careful clinical examination before the use of rhBMP-2-containing biomaterials is indispensable for using rhBMP-2 treatment to prevent cancer progression.

  20. Bacterial antigen induced release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGFR1 before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N; Lykke, J; Werther, Kim

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The influence of surgery on release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (sVEGF) and the soluble inhibitory receptor (sVEGFR1) is unknown. The effect of major and minor surgery on variations in sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations in vivo was studied, and on bacterial antigen...... concentrations in plasma changed during surgery. In vitro stimulation of blood samples with bacteria-derived antigens resulted in a significant increase in sVEGF (p Bacterial antigen-induced release of sVEGF correlated...... significantly with neutrophil cell counts (0.53 Bacterial antigen-induced sVEGFR1 release did not correlate with cell counts. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations did not change during surgery. In vitro bacterial stimulation led to increased release of sVEGF, which...

  1. Subchronic apocynin treatment attenuates methamphetamine-induced dopamine release and hyperactivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dennis K; Oelrichs, Clark E; Sun, Grace Y; Simonyi, Agnes

    2014-03-07

    The effects of methamphetamine are linked to stimulation of dopaminergic neurons, which can be accompanied by production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone) is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase (NOX) inhibitor shown to mitigate oxidative stress in a number of models. The present study aimed at testing whether apocynin suppresses the dopamine-releasing and locomotor-activating properties of methamphetamine. (1) Apocynin (0.01-100μM) was applied to rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine and its efficacy to evoke [(3)H]overflow and to alter methamphetamine (3μM)-evoked [(3)H]overflow was measured. (2) Groups of rats received apocynin (15 or 50mg/kg/day) or vehicle injection for seven consecutive days, and the efficacy and potency of methamphetamine to evoke [(3)H]overflow were determined. (3) Groups of apocynin-treated rats were administered methamphetamine (0.5 or 1mg/kg) or saline to determine the effect of apocynin on stimulant-induced hyperactivity. (1) Apocynin applied to striatal slices did not evoke [(3)H]overflow or alter methamphetamine-evoked [(3)H]overflow. (2) However, subchronic apocynin treatment significantly and dose-dependently decreased methamphetamine's potency and efficacy to evoke [(3)H]overflow. (3) Subchronic apocynin treatment also decreased the locomotor activity evoked by methamphetamine. Subchronic apocynin treatment diminished methamphetamine induced dopamine-release and its locomotor-activating properties. The pattern of results indicates that apocynin is more effective after repeated, rather than after acute, treatment. The findings also suggest that NOX inhibitors or agents suppressing oxidative stress may constitute a new area for research to understand how methamphetamine produces its deleterious and neurotoxic outcomes in the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of propofol on lipopolysaccharide-induced expression and release of HMGB1 in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.; Wei, X.Y.; Liu, B.; Wang, L.J.; Jiang, L.H. [Department of Anesthesiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)

    2015-02-24

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations of propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression and release of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) in mouse macrophages. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells were randomly divided into 5 treatment groups. Expression levels of HMGB1 mRNA were detected using RT-PCR, and cell culture supernatant HMGB1 protein levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in macrophages was observed by Western blotting and activity of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the nucleus was detected using ELISA. HMGB1 mRNA expression levels increased significantly in the cell culture supernatant and in cells after 24 h of stimulating RAW264.7 cells with LPS (500 ng/mL). However, HMGB1 mRNA expression levels in the P2 and P3 groups, which received 500 ng/mL LPS with 25 or 50 μmol/mL propofol, respectively, were significantly lower than those in the group receiving LPS stimulation (P<0.05). After stimulation by LPS, HMGB1 protein levels were reduced significantly in the nucleus but were increased in the cytoplasm (P<0.05). Simultaneously, the activity of NF-κB was enhanced significantly (P<0.05). After propofol intervention, HMGB1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and NF-κB activity were inhibited significantly (each P<0.05). Thus, propofol can inhibit the LPS-induced expression and release of HMGB1 by inhibiting HMGB1 translocation and NF-κB activity in RAW264.7 cells, suggesting propofol may be protective in patients with sepsis.

  3. Saturated fatty acid palmitate induces extracellular release of histone H3: A possible mechanistic basis for high-fat diet-induced inflammation and thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Chandan [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Ito, Takashi [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, Osaka (Japan); Shrestha, Binita; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Hashiguchi, Teruto [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Maruyama, Ikuro, E-mail: rinken@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •High-fat diet feeding and palmitate induces the release of nuclear protein histone H3. •ROS production and JNK signaling mediates the release of histone H3. •Extracellular histones induces proinflammatory and procoagulant response. -- Abstract: Chronic low-grade inflammation is a key contributor to high-fat diet (HFD)-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and atherosclerosis. The inflammation is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages, into obese adipose tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms by which a HFD induces low-grade inflammation are poorly understood. Here, we show that histone H3, a major protein component of chromatin, is released into the extracellular space when mice are fed a HFD or macrophages are stimulated with the saturated fatty acid palmitate. In a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, palmitate activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK signaling. Inhibitors of these pathways dampened palmitate-induced histone H3 release, suggesting that the extracellular release of histone H3 was mediated, in part, through ROS and JNK signaling. Extracellular histone activated endothelial cells toexpress the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and the procoagulant molecule tissue factor, which are known to contribute to inflammatory cell recruitment and thrombosis. These results suggest the possible contribution of extracellular histone to the pathogenesis of HFD-induced inflammation and thrombosis.

  4. Saturated fatty acid palmitate induces extracellular release of histone H3: A possible mechanistic basis for high-fat diet-induced inflammation and thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Chandan; Ito, Takashi; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Shrestha, Binita; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •High-fat diet feeding and palmitate induces the release of nuclear protein histone H3. •ROS production and JNK signaling mediates the release of histone H3. •Extracellular histones induces proinflammatory and procoagulant response. -- Abstract: Chronic low-grade inflammation is a key contributor to high-fat diet (HFD)-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and atherosclerosis. The inflammation is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages, into obese adipose tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms by which a HFD induces low-grade inflammation are poorly understood. Here, we show that histone H3, a major protein component of chromatin, is released into the extracellular space when mice are fed a HFD or macrophages are stimulated with the saturated fatty acid palmitate. In a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, palmitate activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK signaling. Inhibitors of these pathways dampened palmitate-induced histone H3 release, suggesting that the extracellular release of histone H3 was mediated, in part, through ROS and JNK signaling. Extracellular histone activated endothelial cells toexpress the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and the procoagulant molecule tissue factor, which are known to contribute to inflammatory cell recruitment and thrombosis. These results suggest the possible contribution of extracellular histone to the pathogenesis of HFD-induced inflammation and thrombosis

  5. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation

  6. AAS 227: Day 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    the latest from #aas227: https://t.co/HiPbm9eW6J pic.twitter.com/DqG6NNsPTU jonathan jb webb (@jjbw) January 8, 2016Francesco Belfiore (University of Cambridge) gave the next talk, cleverly titled Proof That Some Galaxies Are LIERs. The title is a play on the astrophysical source known as a LINER, or Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region an area within a galactic center that displays line emission from weakly ionized or neutral atoms. These have commonly been interpreted as being a wimpy active galactic nucleus (AGN). But a closer look with MaNGA, which is able to take spectroscopic data for the whole galaxy at once, has revealed that these sources are actually distributed throughout the galaxy, rather than being nuclear hence, no N: these galaxies are LIERs. Instead of AGN, the sources may be newly born white dwarfs. Heres the press release.Artists conception of the changing look quasar as it appeared in early 2015. [Dana Berry / SkyWorks Digital, Inc.; SDSS collaboration]The final speaker was Jessie Runnoe (Pennsylvania State University), who captured everyones attention with the topic of changing look quasars. We know that quasars can transition from a bright state, where active accretion onto the galaxys central supermassive black hole is visible in their emission spectrum, to a dim state, where they look like a normal galaxy. But SDSS has just observed the quasar SDSS J1011+5442 turn off within the span of just 10 years. Based on the data, the team concludes that this quasar exhausted the supply of gas in its immediate vicinity, turning off when there was no longer anything available to accrete. Runnoe showed an awesome animation of this process, which you can check out here. Heres the press release.Coffee, Black Holes, Editors and Beer: The Science-Writing Life (by Susanna Kohler)This talk was a part of the series Beyond the Academy: Showcasing Astronomy Alumni in Non-Academic Careers. Matthew Francis is a former academic scientist (with a PhD in physics

  7. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis of antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms based on receptor occupancy theory incorporating endogenous dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui-Sakata, Akiko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2005-06-01

    We aimed to analyze the risks of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) induced by typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs using a common pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model based on the receptor occupancy. We collected the data for EPS induced by atypical antipsychotics, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine, and a typical antipsychotic, haloperidol from literature and analyzed the following five indices of EPS, the ratio of patients obliged to take anticholinergic medication, the occurrence rates of plural extrapyramidal symptoms (more than one of tremor, dystonia, hypokinesia, akathisia, extrapyramidal syndrome, etc.), parkinsonism, akathisia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. We tested two models, i.e., a model incorporating endogenous dopamine release owing to 5-HT2A receptor inhibition and a model not considering the endogenous dopamine release, and used them to examine the relationship between the D2 receptor occupancy of endogenous dopamine and the extent of drug-induced EPS. The model incorporating endogenous dopamine release better described the relationship between the mean D2 receptor occupancy of endogenous dopamine and the extent of EPS than the other model, as assessed by the final sum of squares of residuals (final SS) and Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC). Furthermore, the former model could appropriately predict the risks of EPS induced by two other atypical antipsychotics, clozapine and ziprasidone, which were not incorporated into the model development. The developed model incorporating endogenous dopamine release owing to 5-HT2A receptor inhibition may be useful for the prediction of antipsychotics-induced EPS.

  8. Antidopaminergic-induced hypothalamic LHRH release and pituitary gonadotrophin secretion in 12 day-old female and male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacau-Mengido, I M; Becú-Villalobos, D; Thyssen, S M; Rey, E B; Lux-Lantos, V A; Libertun, C

    1993-12-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the developing rat provides an interesting physiologic model in which the dopaminergic control of both LH and FSH is well defined in contrast to the controversial results obtained in adult rats. We wished to establish the role of testosterone in antidopaminergic induced gonadotrophins release in 12 day-old male and female rats, and evaluate the effect of antidopaminergic drugs at the hypothalamic level during this developmental stage. Haloperidol, an antidopaminergic drug, increased both LH and FSH in female 12 day-old rats but not in male littermates. The effect was blocked by bromocriptine and not by phentolamine indicating that haloperidol acted on the dopaminergic receptor, and that unspecific stimulation of the noradrenergic system was not involved. Haloperidol was ineffective when female rats were previously ovariectomized and injected with testosterone propionate at 9 days of age. If females were treated on the day of birth with testosterone propionate, haloperidol-induced FSH and LH release was also abolished. In control males haloperidol had no effect on the release of LH or FSH. But if males were orchidectomized at birth or at 9 days of age, haloperidol released both LH and FSH during the infantile period. In an attempt to establish the site of action of antidopaminergic drugs on gonadotrophin release, hypothalami (mediobasal and preoptic-suprachiasmatic area) from 12 day-old infant female rats were perifused with either haloperidol or domperidone (2*10(-6) M). Both drugs increased LHRH release into the perifusate. Besides haloperidol did not modify the release of LH or FSH from adenohypophyseal cells incubated in vitro. We therefore conclude that antidopaminergic-induced gonadotrophins release is modulated by serum testosterone concentrations, and that the site of action is probably the LHRH-secreting neuron of the hypothalamus.

  9. Biotransformation of arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) into lipoxins and lipoxenes by porcine leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, P.Y.K.; Spur, B.; Hirai, A.; Yoshida, S.; Tamura, Y.; Lam, B.K.

    1986-03-05

    Lipoxins and lipoxenes have been reported to be formed after incubation of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 15-hydroperoxyeicosapentaenoic acid with human leukocytes and porcine leukocytes, respectively. The authors examined the ability of porcine leukocytes to metabolize (/sup 14/C)-AA and (/sup 14/C)-EPA (100 ..mu..M) to lipoxins and lipoxenes. Incubation products were separated by RP-HPLC and identified by U.V. spectrum and GC/MS. Porcine leukocytes metabolized both AA and EPA to form lipoxins and lipoxenes in addition to mono- and di-hydroxyl fatty acids. Quantitative analysis from U.V. absorbance after RP-HPLC revealed that about 0.05% of AA was converted to lipoxins A and B and 0.1% of EPA was converted to lipoxenes A and B. In addition, treatment of leukotriene A/sub 4/ and leukotriene A/sub 5/ with 15-lipoxygenase also gave rise to several isomers of lipoxin and lipoxene. Thus, lipoxins and lipoxenes would have been derived from AA and EPA after dioxygenation by 5-lipoxygenase and 15-lipoxygenase, respectively. When tested for biological activity, lipoxene A (2 ..mu..M), like lipoxin A, induced superoxide anion generation in canine neutrophils but had no effect on lysosomal enzyme release on neutrophil aggregation.

  10. GSH Induced Controlled Release of Levofloxacin from a Purpose-Built Prodrug: Luminescence Response for Probing the Drug Release in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Suman; Ramu, Vadde; Taye, Nandaraj; Mogare, Devraj G; Yeware, Amar M; Sarkar, Dhiman; Reddy, D Srinivasa; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Das, Amitava

    2016-09-21

    Fluoroquinolones are third-generation broad spectrum bactericidal antibiotics and work against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Levofloxacin (L), a fluoroquinolone, is widely used in anti-infective chemotherapy and treatment of urinary tract infection and pneumonia. The main pathogen for urinary tract infections is Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for pneumonia, predominantly a lower respiratory tract infection. Poor permeability of L leads to the use of higher dose of this drug and excess drug in the outer cellular fluid leads to central nervous system (CNS) abnormality. One way to counter this is to improve the lipophilicity of the drug molecule, and accordingly, we have synthesized two new Levofloxacin derivatives, which participated in the spatiotemporal release of drug via disulfide bond cleavage induced by glutathione (GSH). Recent studies with Streptococcus mutants suggest that it is localized in epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the normal lower respiratory tract and the effective [GSH] in ELF is ∼430 μM. E. coli typically cause urinary tract infections and the concentration of GSH in porcine bladder epithelium is reported as 0.6 mM for a healthy human. Thus, for the present study we have chosen two important bacteria (Gram + ve and Gram - ve), which are operational in regions having high extracellular GSH concentration. Interestingly, this supports our design of new lipophilic Levofloxacin based prodrugs, which released effective drug on reaction with GSH. Higher lipophilicity favored improved uptake of the prodrugs. Site specific release of the drug (L) could be achieved following a glutathione mediated biochemical transformation process through cleavage of a disulfide bond of these purpose-built prodrugs. Further, appropriate design helped us to demonstrate that it is possible also to control the kinetics of the drug release from respective prodrugs. Associated luminescence enhancement helps in probing the

  11. The Roles of Dopamine Transport Inhibition and Dopamine Release Facilitation in Wake Enhancement and Rebound Hypersomnolence Induced by Dopaminergic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, John A.; Marcy, Val R.; Lin, Yin-Guo; Bozyczko-Coyne, Donna; Marino, Michael J.; Gasior, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: Rebound hypersomnolence (RHS: increased sleep following increased wake) is a limiting side-effect of many wake-promoting agents. In particular, RHS in the first few hours following wake appears to be associated with dopamine (DA)-releasing agents, e.g., amphetamine, but whether it can also be produced by DA transporter (DAT) inhibition alone is unknown. In these studies, DA-releasing and DAT-inhibiting agents and their interaction were systematically examined for their ability to increase wake and induce RHS. Design: Chronically implanted rats were evaluated in a blinded, pseudo-randomized design. Participants: 237 rats were used in these studies with 1 week between repeat tests. Interventions: Animals were habituated overnight and dosed the next day, 5 h after lights on, with test agents. Measurements and Results: Sleep/wake activity and RHS were evaluated using EEG/EMG recording up to 22 h post dosing. In vitro dopamine release was evaluated in rat synaptosomes. At doses that produced equal increases in wake, DA-releasing (amphetamine, methamphetamine, phentermine) and several DAT-inhibiting agents (cocaine, bupropion, and methylphenidate) produced RHS during the first few hours after the onset of sleep recovery. However, other DAT-inhibiting agents (mazindol, nomifensine, GBR-12909, and GBR-12935) did not produce RHS. Combination treatment with amphetamine and nomifensine produced waking activity greater than the sum of their individual activities alone while ameliorating the amphetamine-like RHS. In rat synaptosomes, nomifensine reduced the potency of amphetamine to induce DA release ∼270-fold, potentially explaining its action in ameliorating amphetamine-induced RHS. Conclusions: All DA releasing agents tested, and some DAT-inhibiting agents, produced RHS at equal wake-promoting doses. Thus amphetamine-like DA release appears sufficient for inducing RHS, but additional properties (pharmacologic and/or pharmacokinetic) evidently underlie RHS

  12. Depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from GABAergic neurons caused by reversal of glutamate transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Pickering, D S; Schousboe, A

    2000-01-01

    Cultured neocortical neurons, which predominantly consist of GABAergic neurons exhibit a pronounced stimulus-coupled GABA release. Since the cultures may contain a small population of glutamatergic neurons and the GABAergic neurons have a high content of glutamate it was of interest to examine...... if glutamate in addition to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) could be released from these cultures. The neurons were preloaded with [(3)H]D-aspartate and subsequently its release was followed during depolarization induced by a high potassium concentration or the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4......-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonists, AMPA and kainate. Depolarization of the neurons with 55 mM potassium increased the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate by more than 10-fold. When the non-specific calcium-channel blockers cobalt or lanthanum were included in the stimulation buffer with potassium...

  13. Dopamine mediated iron release from ferritin is enhanced at higher temperatures: Possible implications for fever-induced Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babincova, Melania; Babinec, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A new molecular mechanism is proposed to explain the pathogenesis of fever-induced Parkinson's disease. This proposal is based on dopamine and 6-hydroxydopamine-mediated free iron release from ferritin magnetic nanoparticles, which is enhanced at higher temperatures, and which may lead to substantial peroxidation and injury of lipid biomembranes of the substantia nigra in the brain

  14. Reduced cocaine-induced serotonin, but not dopamine and noradrenaline, release in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, M.M.M.; Karel, P.; Cools, A.R.; Homberg, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the increased reinforcing properties of cocaine and ecstasy observed in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters are the result of a reduction in the psychostimulant-induced release of serotonin. Here we provide the neurochemical evidence in favor of

  15. Differential response to dexamethasone on the TXB2 release in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages induced by zymosan and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Salgueiro

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticosteroids reduce the production of inflammatory mediators but this effect may depend on the stimulus. We have compared the time course of the effect of dexamethasone on the thromboxane B2 (TXB2 release induced by cytokine stimulation and zymosan in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and opsonized zymosan (OZ, all stimulate TXB2 release. High concentrations of dexamethasone (1–10 μM inhibit the TXB2 production induced by both cytokines and OZ, but the time course of this response is different. Four hours of incubation with dexamethasone reduce the basal TXB2 release and that induced by IL-1β and TNF-α, but do not modify the TXB2 release induced by OZ. However, this stimulus was reduced after 24 h incubation. Our results suggest that the antiinflammatory activity of glucocorticosteroids shows some dependence on stimulus and, therefore, may have more than one mechanism involved.

  16. Rifaximin-extended intestinal release induces remission in patients with moderately active Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantera, Cosimo; Lochs, Herbert; Grimaldi, Maria; Danese, Silvio; Scribano, Maria Lia; Gionchetti, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria might be involved in the development and persistence of inflammation in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), and antibiotics could be used in therapy. We performed a clinical phase 2 trial to determine whether a gastroresistant formulation of rifaximin (extended intestinal release [EIR]) induced remission in patients with moderately active CD. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial of the efficacy and safety of 400, 800, and 1200 mg rifaximin-EIR, given twice daily to 402 patients with moderately active CD for 12 weeks. Data from patients given rifaximin-EIR were compared with those from individuals given placebo, and collected during a 12-week follow-up period. The primary end point was remission (Crohn's Disease Activity Index <150) at the end of the treatment period. At the end of the 12-week treatment period, 62% of patients who received the 800-mg dosage of rifaximin-EIR (61 of 98) were in remission, compared with 43% of patients who received placebo (43 of 101) (P = .005). A difference was maintained throughout the 12-week follow-up period (45% [40 of 89] vs 29% [28 of 98]; P = .02). Remission was achieved by 54% (56 of 104) and 47% (47 of 99) of the patients given the 400-mg and 1200-mg dosages of rifaximin-EIR, respectively; these rates did not differ from those of placebo. Patients given the 400-mg and 800-mg dosages of rifaximin-EIR had low rates of withdrawal from the study because of adverse events; rates were significantly higher among patients given the 1200-mg dosage (16% [16 of 99]). Administration of 800 mg rifaximin-EIR twice daily for 12 weeks induced remission with few adverse events in patients with moderately active CD. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. cAMP potentiates InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in blowfly salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walz Bernd

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotonin induces fluid secretion from Calliphora salivary glands by the parallel activation of the InsP3/Ca2+ and cAMP signaling pathways. We investigated whether cAMP affects 5-HT-induced Ca2+ signaling and InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Results Increasing intracellular cAMP level by bath application of forskolin, IBMX or cAMP in the continuous presence of threshold 5-HT concentrations converted oscillatory [Ca2+]i changes into a sustained increase. Intraluminal Ca2+ measurements in the ER of β-escin-permeabilized glands with mag-fura-2 revealed that cAMP augmented InsP3-induced Ca2+ release in a concentration-dependent manner. This indicated that cAMP sensitized the InsP3 receptor Ca2+ channel for InsP3. By using cAMP analogs that activated either protein kinase A (PKA or Epac and the application of PKA-inhibitors, we found that cAMP-induced augmentation of InsP3-induced Ca2+ release was mediated by PKA not by Epac. Recordings of the transepithelial potential of the glands suggested that cAMP sensitized the InsP3/Ca2+ signaling pathway for 5-HT, because IBMX potentiated Ca2+-dependent Cl- transport activated by a threshold 5-HT concentration. Conclusion This report shows, for the first time for an insect system, that cAMP can potentiate InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from the ER in a PKA-dependent manner, and that this crosstalk between cAMP and InsP3/Ca2+ signaling pathways enhances transepithelial electrolyte transport.

  18. The celiac ganglion modulates LH-induced inhibition of androstenedione release in late pregnant rat ovaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastrilla Ana M

    2006-12-01

    was found on day 21 of pregnancy resulting in the inhibition of androstenedione release from the ovarian compartment. In addition on day 15 of pregnancy, LH placed in the ovarian compartment led to an inhibition of the release of androstenedione, and this inhibitory effect was further reinforced by the joint action of noradrenaline in the celiac ganglion and LH in the ovary. The levels of catecholamines in the ovarian compartment showed differences among the experiments; of significance, the joint treatment of noradrenaline in the celiac ganglion and LH in the ovary resulted in a remarkable increase in the ovarian levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline when compared to the effect achieved by either one of the compounds added alone. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the noradrenergic stimulation of the celiac ganglion reinforces the LH-induced inhibition of androstenedione production by the ovary of late pregnant rats, and that this effect is associated with marked changes in the release of catecholamines in the ovary.

  19. Software papers and citation in the AAS Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Thomas; Lintott, Chris

    2018-01-01

    At the start of 2016, AAS Publishing released a policy statement that officially opened the door for papers describing novel software to be published in the AAS Journals without a requirement for novel results to also be included. This statement also describes how the use of software should be cited in articles. In this talk, I will give an overview of this policy and will give an overview of the growth of software papers and software citation in AAS Journals over the last two years.

  20. Fred-Jaiyesimi, AA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fred-Jaiyesimi, AA. Vol 12 (2008) - Articles Hypoglycaemic And Alpha-Amylase Inhibitory Activities Of Fermented Seeds Of Parkia Biglobosa (Jacq) Benth Abstract. ISSN: 1118-6267. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  1. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release induced by adenosine at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Silvana; Veggetti, Mariela; Muchnik, Salomón; Losavio, Adriana

    2004-05-01

    1. At the mouse neuromuscular junction, adenosine (AD) and the A(1) agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyl-adenosine (CCPA) induce presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release by activation of A(1) AD receptors through a mechanism that is still unknown. To evaluate whether the inhibition is mediated by modulation of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) associated with tonic secretion (L- and N-type VDCCs), we measured the miniature end-plate potential (mepp) frequency in mouse diaphragm muscles. 2. Blockade of VDCCs by Cd(2+) prevented the effect of the CCPA. Nitrendipine (an L-type VDCC antagonist) but not omega-conotoxin GVIA (an N-type VDCC antagonist) blocked the action of CCPA, suggesting that the decrease in spontaneous mepp frequency by CCPA is associated with an action on L-type VDCCs only. 3. As A(1) receptors are coupled to a G(i/o) protein, we investigated whether the inhibition of PKA or the activation of PKC is involved in the presynaptic inhibition mechanism. Neither N-(2[p-bromocinnamylamino]-ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, a PKA inhibitor), nor 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine (H-7, a PKC antagonist), nor phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PHA, a PKC activator) modified CCPA-induced presynaptic inhibition, suggesting that these second messenger pathways are not involved. 4. The effect of CCPA was eliminated by the calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexil)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W-7) and by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester epsilon6TDelta-BM, which suggests that the action of CCPA to modulate L-type VDCCs may involve Ca(2+)-calmodulin. 5. To investigate the action of CCPA on diverse degrees of nerve terminal depolarization, we studied its effect at different external K(+) concentrations. The effect of CCPA on ACh secretion evoked by 10 mm K(+) was prevented by the P/Q-type VDCC antagonist omega-agatoxin IVA. 6. CCPA failed to

  2. AL SAHLI, AA; OKOLI, JU

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    bioline.org.br/ja. The Use of Soil Palynomorphs in Forensics. *. 1. ABDULRAHAMAN, AA;. 2. AL SAHLI, AA;. 1. OKOLI, JU. 1Applied Plant Anatomy and Wood Technology Laboratory, Department of Plant Biology, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria.

  3. The mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate reduces histamine release and status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Santana-Gómez, César Emmanuel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate changes in the histamine release, mast cell number and neuronal damage in hippocampus induced by status epilepticus. We also evaluated if sodium cromoglycate, a stabilizer of mast cells with a possible stabilizing effect on the membrane of neurons, was able to prevent the release of histamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate during the status epilepticus. During microdialysis experiments, rats were treated with saline (SS-SE) or sodium cromoglycate (CG-SE) and 30 min later received the administration of pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours after the status epilepticus, the brains were used to determine the neuronal damage and the number of mast cells in hippocampus. During the status epilepticus, SS-SE group showed an enhanced release of histamine (138.5%, p = 0.005), GABA (331 ± 91%, p ≤ 0.001) and glutamate (467%, p ≤ 0.001), even after diazepam administration. One day after the status epilepticus, SS-SE group demonstrated increased number of mast cells in Stratum pyramidale of CA1 (88%, p histamine (but not GABA and glutamate) release, lower number of mast cells (p = 0.008) and reduced neuronal damage in hippocampus. Our data revealed that histamine, possibly from mast cells, is released in hippocampus during the status epilepticus. This effect may be involved in the subsequent neuronal damage and is diminished with sodium cromoglycate pretreatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved wound healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Wei; Wang Hailun; Jin Faguang; Yu Chunyan; Chu Dongling; Wang Lin; Lu Xian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of the wound dressing containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded microspheres on promoting healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer. In this study, the pressure-induced ulcer in swine was used as a model to demonstrate the hypothesis that controlled release of bFGF has the potential to provide optimal healing milieu for chronic wounds in the repair process. Average size of the microspheres was 14.36 ± 3.56 μm and the network gelatin sponges were characterized with an average pore size of 80-160 μm. Both the in vitro release efficiency and the protein bioactivity revealed that bFGF was released from the microspheres in a controlled manner and it was biologically active as assessed by its ability to induce the proliferation of fibroblasts. Pressure-induced ulcer was created at 500 g/cm 2 pressure loaded on swine dorsal skin 12 h daily for 2 consecutive days. After removal of the pressure load, the gelatin sponge containing bFGF gelatin microspheres or bFGF in solution was implanted into the wound. Swine were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days after implantation, and a full-thickness biopsy was taken and stained for histological analysis. It was observed that controlled release of bFGF provided an accelerated recovery in the wound areas. Histological investigations showed that the dressings were biocompatible and had capability of proliferating fibroblasts and inducing neovascularisation. The present study implied the clinical potential of gelatin sponge with bFGF microspheres to promote the healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer

  5. Activation of nicotinic ACh receptors with alpha4 subunits induces adenosine release at the rat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Sílvia V; Monteiro, Emília C

    2006-04-01

    The effect of ACh on the release of adenosine was studied in rat whole carotid bodies, and the nicotinic ACh receptors involved in the stimulation of this release were characterized. ACh and nicotinic ACh receptor agonists, cytisine, DMPP and nicotine, caused a concentration-dependent increase in adenosine production during normoxia, with nicotine being more potent and efficient in stimulating adenosine release from rat CB than cytisine and DMPP. D-Tubocurarine, mecamylamine, DHbetaE and alpha-bungarotoxin, nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists, caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the release of adenosine evoked by hypoxia. The rank order of potency for nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists that inhibit adenosine release was DHbetaE>mecamylamine>D-tubocurarine>alpha-bungarotoxin. The effect of the endogenous agonist, ACh, which was mimicked by nicotine, was antagonized by DHbetaE, a selective nicotinic receptor antagonist. The ecto-5'-nucleotidase inhibitor AOPCP produces a 72% inhibition in the release of adenosine from CB evoked by nicotine. Taken together, these data indicate that ACh induced the production of adenosine, mainly from extracellular ATP catabolism at the CB through a mechanism that involves the activation of nicotinic receptors with alpha4 and beta2 receptor subunits.

  6. D-2 dopamine receptor activation reduces free [3H]arachidonate release induced by hypophysiotropic peptides in anterior pituitary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, P.L.

    1989-01-01

    Dopamine reduces the stimulation of intracellular [ 3 H]arachidonate release produced by the two PRL-stimulating peptides angiotensin-II and TRH. This effect is concentration dependent and is mediated by stimulation of D-2 dopamine receptors. D-2 receptor agonists (bromocriptine, dihydroergocryptine, and dihydroergocristine) inhibit the release of fatty acid induced by angiotensin-II with a potency that parallels their ability to inhibit PRL release in vitro. Conversely, the selective D-2 receptor antagonist L-sulpiride completely prevents dopamine's effect, whereas SCH 23390 (a D-1 receptor antagonist) is ineffective. The inhibitory action of dopamine does not seem to be consequent to an action on the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system, as 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM) does not affect either basal or dopamine-inhibited [ 3 H]arachidonate release. However, a 24-h pertussis toxin pretreatment significantly reduces the action of dopamine on fatty acid release. Collectively, these results suggest that D-2 dopamine receptor-mediated inhibition of intracellular [ 3 H]arachidonate release requires the action of a GTP-binding protein, but is not a consequence of an inhibitory action on cAMP levels

  7. Inflammation induced by Bothrops asper venom: release of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids, and role of adhesion molecules in leukocyte infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuner, Stella Regina; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan; Fernandes, Cristina Maria; Gutiérrez, José Maria; de Fátima Pereira Teixeira, Catarina

    2005-12-01

    Bothrops asper venom (BaV) causes systemic and local effects characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction with accumulation of leukocytes and release of endogenous mediators. In this study, the effects of BaV on the release of the cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-alpha and the eicosanoids LTB4 and TXA2 in the peritoneal cavity of mice were analyzed. We also investigated the participation of beta2 integrin chain, l-selectin, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 adhesion molecules in the BaV-induced leukocyte accumulation. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha, as well as eicosanoids LTB4 and TXA2 were significantly increased after BaV injection (250 microg/kg), whereas no increment in IL-1 was observed. Anti-mouse l-selectin, LFA-1, ICAM-1, PECAM-1 and beta2 integrin chain monoclonal antibodies resulted in a reduction of neutrophil accumulation induced by BaV injection compared with isotype-matched control injected animals. These data suggest that BaV is able to induce the activation of leukocytes and endothelium to express adhesion molecules involved in the recruitment of neutrophils into the inflammed site. Furthermore, these results showed that BaV induces the release of cytokines and eicosanoids in the local of the venom injection; these inflammatory mediators may be important for the initiation and amplification of the inflammatory reaction characteristic from Bothrops sp envenomation.

  8. Gravity loading induces adenosine triphosphate release and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mai; Arakawa, Toshiya; Okayama, Miki; Shitara, Akiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Takuma, Taishin

    2014-11-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) receives mechanical stress (MS) from dental occlusion or orthodontic tooth movement. Mechanical stress is thought to be a trigger for remodeling of the PDL and alveolar bone, although its signaling mechanism is still unclear. So we investigated the effect of MS on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation in PDL cells. Mechanical stress was applied to human PDL cells as centrifugation-mediated gravity loading. Apyrase, Ca(2+)-free medium and purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists were utilized to analyze the contribution of purinergic receptors to ERK phosphorylation. Gravity loading and ATP increased ERK phosphorylation by 5 and 2.5 times, respectively. Gravity loading induced ATP release from PDL cells by tenfold. Apyrase and suramin diminished ERK phosphorylation induced by both gravity loading and ATP. Under Ca(2+)-free conditions the phosphorylation by gravity loading was partially decreased, whereas ATP-induced phosphorylation was unaffected. Receptors P2Y4 and P2Y6 were prominently expressed in the PDL cells. Gravity loading induced ATP release and ERK phosphorylation in PDL fibroblasts, and ATP signaling via P2Y receptors was partially involved in this phosphorylation, which in turn would enhance gene expression for the remodeling of PDL tissue during orthodontic tooth movement. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. A reaction-diffusion model of ROS-induced ROS release in a mitochondrial network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufang Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of mitochondrial function is a fundamental determinant of cell injury and death. In heart cells under metabolic stress, we have previously described how the abrupt collapse or oscillation of the mitochondrial energy state is synchronized across the mitochondrial network by local interactions dependent upon reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here, we develop a mathematical model of ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR based on reaction-diffusion (RD-RIRR in one- and two-dimensional mitochondrial networks. The nodes of the RD-RIRR network are comprised of models of individual mitochondria that include a mechanism of ROS-dependent oscillation based on the interplay between ROS production, transport, and scavenging; and incorporating the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and Ca(2+ handling. Local mitochondrial interaction is mediated by superoxide (O2.- diffusion and the O2.(--dependent activation of an inner membrane anion channel (IMAC. In a 2D network composed of 500 mitochondria, model simulations reveal DeltaPsi(m depolarization waves similar to those observed when isolated guinea pig cardiomyocytes are subjected to a localized laser-flash or antioxidant depletion. The sensitivity of the propagation rate of the depolarization wave to O(2.- diffusion, production, and scavenging in the reaction-diffusion model is similar to that observed experimentally. In addition, we present novel experimental evidence, obtained in permeabilized cardiomyocytes, confirming that DeltaPsi(m depolarization is mediated specifically by O2.-. The present work demonstrates that the observed emergent macroscopic properties of the mitochondrial network can be reproduced in a reaction-diffusion model of RIRR. Moreover, the findings have uncovered a novel aspect of the synchronization mechanism, which is that clusters of mitochondria that are oscillating can entrain mitochondria that would otherwise display stable dynamics. The work identifies the

  10. H-isotope retention and thermal/ion-induced release in boronized films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Wampler, W.R.; Hays, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has been clearly demonstrated that the composition of the very near surface (∼100nm) of plasma-interactive components plays a determinant role in most processes which occur in the plasma-edge of Tokamaks. Two very successful techniques to effect control of the plasma-wall interaction are (1) in-situ deposition of amorphous carbon or boron-carbon films and (2) the use of He/C conditioning discharges or He glow discharge cleaning to modify the near surface of bulk graphite components. We have deposited boronized layers into Si using plasma-assisted CVD and sputter deposition. The PCVD deposition conditions were as close as possible to those used in TFTR, and some films deposited in TFTR have also been studied. Using these two deposition techniques, B x CH y films have been produced with x varying from 1/2 -- 4, and y from ∼1 (sputtered) to ∼3 (PCVD). Most films also contained significant amounts of 0. Thermal and ion-induced release of H-isotopes from BC films is qualitatively similar to that measured for graphite. Implanted H saturates in these films at a H/host atom ratio of 0.7 which is considerably higher than that of graphite(∼0.4). As-deposited PCVD films are already saturated with H, while sputtered films are not. Sputtered BC films therefore possess an inherent H-pumping capability which could prove to be extremely beneficial to TFTR. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. Pergolide inhibition of calcium-induced 3H-dopamine release from striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, J.F.; Weiner, N.

    1986-01-01

    Several investigators have reported that dopamine agonists or antagonists are unable to modulate the K + -evoked release of 3 H-dopamine ( 3 H-DA) from striatal synaptosomes. To further assess the role of DA in regulating its release, they have examined the effects of pergolide on Ca ++ (1.25 mM)-evoked release of 3 H-DA from partially K + -depolarized striatal synaptosomes. Synaptosomes (P2 pellet) were isolated from rat striatum and incubated for 5 min at 37 0 C in a Ca ++ -free Krebs-Ringer buffer containing 25 nM 3 H-DA. After radiolabeling, the synaptosomes were superfused for 12 min with Ca ++ -free 6 mM Krebs-Ringer buffer to determine basal release of 3 H-DA. Synaptosomes were then exposed to test drugs for 8 min prior to Ca ++ challenge. Ca ++ addition resulted in a 3-fold increase in 3 H-DA release within 2-4 min. Pergolide inhibited the release of 3 H-DA in a concentration-dependent manner. Release was inhibited to 56% of control by 10 nM pergolide. This was largely reversed by 0.1 μM S-sulpiride. Ca ++ -evoked release was inhibited over 70% by 1 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX), indicating that voltage-dependent Na + channels may play a role in the release process. The combination of pergolide and TTX inhibited release to a degree similar to TTX alone. These results suggest that pergolide may inhibit 3 H-DA release by a TTX-sensitive mechanism and that the dopaminergic autoreceptors may be linked to voltage-sensitive Na + channels

  12. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR Modulates Cockroach Allergen-Induced Immune Responses through Active TGFβ1 Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, a multifunctional regulator that senses and responds to environmental stimuli, plays a role in normal cell development and immune regulation. Recent evidence supports a significant link between environmental exposure and AhR in the development of allergic diseases. We sought to investigate whether AhR plays a role in mediating cockroach allergen-induced allergic immune responses. Methods. AhR expression in human lung fibroblasts from asthmatic and healthy individuals and in cockroach extract (CRE treated human lung fibroblasts (WI-38 was examined. The role of AhR in modulating CRE induced TGFβ1 production was investigated by using AhR agonist, TCDD, antagonist CH122319, and knockdown of AhR. The role of latent TGFβ1 binding protein-1 (LTBP1 in mediating TCDD induced active TGFβ1 release was also examined. Results. AhR expression was higher in airway fibroblasts from asthmatic subjects as compared to healthy controls. AhR in fibroblasts was activated by TCDD with an increased expression of cyp1a1 and cyp1b1. Increased AhR expression was observed in CRE-treated fibroblasts. Importantly, CRE induced TGFβ1 production in fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by TCDD but inhibited by CH122319. Reduced TGFβ1 production was further confirmed in fibroblasts with AhR knockdown. Moreover, AhR knockdown inhibited CRE induced fibroblast differentiation. Furthermore, TCDD induced active TGFβ1 release was significantly inhibited by LTBP1 knockdown. Conclusion. These results provide evidence for the role of AhR in modulating cockroach allergen-induced immune responses through controlling the active TGFβ1 release, suggesting a possible synergistic effect between exposure to allergens and environmental chemicals on the development of allergic diseases.

  13. Toluene-induced, Ca2+-dependent vesicular catecholamine release in rat PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.; Vijverberg, H.P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Acute effects of toluene on vesicular catecholamine release from intact PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells have been investigated using carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry. The frequency of vesicles released is low under basal conditions and is enhanced by depolarization. Toluene causes an increase in

  14. Cell-swelling-induced taurine release from isolated perfused rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H. S.; Meijer, A. J.; Gustafson, L. A.; Jörning, G. G.; Leegwater, A. C.; Maas, M. A.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Astrocytes and lymphocytes are able to release significant amounts of taurine during periods of hypotonicity to reduce the increase in cell volume. To investigate this mechanism in the liver, we studied the release of free amino acids from isolated perfused rat liver during hypotonicity. The

  15. Nutrient-induced glucagon like peptide-1 release is modulated by serotonin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripken, Dina; Wielen, van der Nikkie; Wortelboer, Heleen M.; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F.; Hendriks, Henk F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serotonin are both involved in food intake regulation. GLP-1 release is stimulated upon nutrient interaction with G-protein coupled receptors by enteroendocrine cells (EEC), whereas serotonin is released from enterochromaffin cells (ECC). The central hypothesis

  16. Nutrient-induced glucagon like peptide-1 release is modulated by serotonin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripken, D.; Wielen, N. van der; Wortelboer, H.M.; Meijerink, J.; Witkamp, R.F.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serotonin are both involved in food intake regulation. GLP-1 release is stimulated upon nutrient interaction with G-protein coupled receptors by enteroendocrine cells (EEC), whereas serotonin is released from enterochromaffin cells (ECC). The central hypothesis

  17. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  18. Ultraviolet B irradiation of skin induces mast cell degranulation and release of tumour necrosis factor-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, L.J. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Dentistry, Immunopathology Unit

    1995-06-01

    In the `sunburn` response in skin, dermal blood vessels are activated and traffic of dendritic Langerhans` cells altered. While these changes have been attributed to the cytokine TNF-{alpha}, the source of this acutely released TNF has not been identified. This report demonstrates that the `sunburn` response, both in vivo and in vitro, is accompanied by rapid degranulation of cutaneous mast cells, with consequential release of intracellular stores of TNF. Epidermal keratinocytes were only minor contributors to local TNF production. Expression of the TNF-inducible CD62E (E-selectin/ELAM-1) and CD54 adhesion molecules on cutaneous endothelium occurred 2 hours following mast cell degranulation, and this event was sensitive to blockade of mast cells with disodium cromoglycate. These results indicate that TNF release in skin in the acute sunburn response can largely be attributed to mast cells. 47 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  19. Enzyme-induced shedding of a poly(amino acid)-coating triggers contents release from dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, Birgit; Flesch, Frits M; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2008-05-01

    The enzymatically degradable poly(amino acid)-lipid conjugate poly(hydroxyethyl l-glutamine)-N-succinyl-dioctadecylamine (PHEG-DODASuc) has been shown to effectively prolong liposome circulation times. In this paper, we investigated whether PHEG-DODASuc can stabilize liposomes composed of the fusogenic, non-bilayer-forming lipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Moreover, we evaluated the release of an entrapped compound after enzyme-induced shedding of the PHEG-coating, interbilayer contact and membrane destabilizing phase changes. Contents release was monitored using the fluorescent model compound calcein. Liposome destabilization and lipid mixing was studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and cryogenic-temperature transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). It was shown that PHEG-DODASuc is able to stabilize DOPE-based liposomes and that contents release can be triggered by shedding of the PHEG-coating.

  20. Enhancement of radiation-induced base release from nucleosides in alkaline solution: essential role of the O.- radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholes, M.L.; Schuchmann, M.N.; Sonntag, C. von

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pH on base release in the γ-radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated solutions of a number of nucleosides (including uridine, 3-methyluridine, 2', 3' -O-isopropylidene-uridine, and adenosine) has been investigated. For all these nucleosides, independent of the base or sugar moiety, base release is very low at pH below 10 (G∼(0.3-0.7) x 10 -7 mol J -1 ), but increases drastically to G∼(3-4) x 10 -7 mol J -1 at pH ≥ 13. It is concluded that the increase in base release at high pH is caused by the increasing participation of O .- , which, unlike . OH, attacks the nucleosides preferentially at their sugar moieties, and is not due to an OH - -induced radical transfer from the base to the sugar moiety. (author)

  1. Escin Increases the Survival Rate of LPS-Induced Septic Mice Through Inhibition of HMGB1 Release from Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajun Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have described the effects of Escin on improving the survival rate of endotoxemic animals. The purpose of this study was to explore the molecular mechanisms of this potentially beneficial treatment. Methods: First, the survival rate of endotoxemic mice was monitored for up to 2 weeks after Escin pretreatment, Escin post-treatment, or Escin post-treatment + rHMGB1. The effects of Escin on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 and HMGB1 in the serum of endotoxemic mice and LPS-induced macrophages were evaluated by ELISA. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of HMGB1 in LPS-induced macrophages were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Additionally, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 was evaluated by ELISA in rHMGB1-induced macrophages. Finally, the protein levels and the activity of NF-κB in macrophages were checked by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Results: Both pretreatment and post-treatment with Escin could improve the survival rate of endotoxemic mice, while exogenous rHMGB1 reversed this effect. In addition, Escin decreased the level of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 and HMGB1 in endotoxemic mice and in LPS-induced macrophages. Escin could also inhibit the mRNA levels and activity of HMGB1. The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 could be suppressed in rHMGB1-induced macrophages by Escin. Finally, Escin could suppress the activation of NF-κB in LPS-induced macrophages. Conclusion: Escin could improve the survival of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. This effect maybe meditated by reducing the release of HMGB1, resulting in the suppression of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  2. Escin Increases the Survival Rate of LPS-Induced Septic Mice Through Inhibition of HMGB1 Release from Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yajun; Wang, Hongrui; Mao, Min; Liang, Chao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Deijun; Wei, Ziran; Gao, Shunxiang; Hu, Bo; Wang, Lianghua; Cai, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have described the effects of Escin on improving the survival rate of endotoxemic animals. The purpose of this study was to explore the molecular mechanisms of this potentially beneficial treatment. First, the survival rate of endotoxemic mice was monitored for up to 2 weeks after Escin pretreatment, Escin post-treatment, or Escin post-treatment + rHMGB1. The effects of Escin on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1 in the serum of endotoxemic mice and LPS-induced macrophages were evaluated by ELISA. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of HMGB1 in LPS-induced macrophages were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Additionally, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 was evaluated by ELISA in rHMGB1-induced macrophages. Finally, the protein levels and the activity of NF-κB in macrophages were checked by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Both pretreatment and post-treatment with Escin could improve the survival rate of endotoxemic mice, while exogenous rHMGB1 reversed this effect. In addition, Escin decreased the level of the pro-inflammatory cytokinesTNF-α,IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1 in endotoxemic mice and in LPS-induced macrophages. Escin could also inhibit the mRNA levels and activity of HMGB1. The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokinesTNF-α,IL-1β, IL-6 could be suppressed in rHMGB1-induced macrophages by Escin. Finally, Escin could suppress the activation of NF- κB in LPS-induced macrophages. Escin could improve the survival of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. This effect maybe meditated by reducing the release of HMGB1, resulting in the suppression of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. AA, bending magnet, BLG

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The very particular lattice of the AA required 2 types of dipole (bending magnets; BLG, long and narrow; BST, short and wide). The BLG had a steel length of 4.70 m, a good field width of 0.24 m, and a weight of about 70 t. Jean-Claude Brunet inspects the lower half of a BLG. For the BST magnets see 7811105 and 8006036.

  4. The effect of endogenous essential and nonessential fatty acids on the uptake and subsequent agonist-induced release of arachidonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, E.E.; Hurtubise, V.; Schott, M.A.; Laposata, M.

    1989-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the uptake and agonist-induced release of a pulse of arachidonate are influenced by the size and composition of preexisting endogenous fatty acid pools. EFD-1 cells, an essential fatty acid-deficient mouse fibrosarcoma cell line, were incubated with radiolabeled (14C or 3H) arachidonate, linoleate, eicosapentaenoate (EPA), palmitate, or oleate in concentrations of 0-33 microM for 24 h. After 24 h, the cells were pulsed with 0.67 microM radiolabeled (3H or 14C, opposite first label) arachidonate for 15 min and then stimulated with 10 microM bradykinin for 4 min. Because EFD-1 cells contain no endogenous essential fatty acids, we were able to create essential fatty acid-repleted cells for which the specific activity of the newly constructed endogenous essential fatty acid pool was known. Loading the endogenous pool with the essential fatty acids arachidonate, eicosapentaenoate, or linoleate (15-20 nmol of fatty acid incorporated/10(6) cells) decreased the uptake of a pulse of arachidonate from 200 to 100 pmol/10(6) cells but had no effect on palmitate uptake. The percent of arachidonate incorporated during the pulse which was released upon agonist stimulation increased 2-fold (4-8%) as the endogenous pool of essential fatty acids was increased from 0 to 15-20 nmol/10(6) cells. This 8% release was at least 3-fold greater than the percent release from the various endogenous essential fatty acid pools. In contrast, loading the endogenous pool with the nonessential fatty acids oleate or palmitate to more than 2-3 times their preexisting cellular level had no effect on the uptake of an arachidonate pulse. Like the essential fatty acids, increasing endogenous oleate increased (by 2-fold) the percent release of arachidonate incorporated during the pulse, whereas endogenous palmitate had no effect on subsequent agonist-induced release from this arachidonate pool

  5. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  6. Effect of micropatterning induced surface hydrophobicity on drug release from electrospun cellulose acetate nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepu, Shivakalyani; Gaydhane, Mrunalini K.; Kakunuri, Manohar; Sharma, Chandra S.; Khandelwal, Mudrika; Eichhorn, Stephen J.

    2017-12-01

    Sustained release and prevention of burst release for low half-life drugs like Diclofenac sodium is crucial to prevent drug related toxicity. Electrospun nanofibers have emerged recently as potential carrier materials for controlled and sustained drug release. Here, we present a facile method to prevent burst release by tuning the surface wettability through template assisted micropatterning of drug loaded electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers. A known amount of drug (Diclofenac sodium) was first mixed with CA and then electrospun in the form of a nanofabric. This as-spun network was hydrophilic in nature. However, when electrospinning was carried out through non-conducting templates, viz nylon meshes with 50 and 100 μm size openings, two kinds of hydrophobic micro-patterned CA nanofabrics were produced. In vitro transdermal testing of our nanofibrous mats was carried out; these tests were able to show that it would be possible to create a patch for transdermal drug release. Further, our results show that with optimized micro-patterned dimensions, a zero order sustained drug release of up to 12 h may be achieved for the transdermal system when compared to non-patterned samples. This patterning caused a change in the surface wettability, to a hydrophobic surface, resulting in a controlled diffusion of the hydrophilic drug. Patterning assisted in controlling the initial burst release, which is a significant finding especially for low half-life drugs.

  7. Effect of heating on the stability of amyloid A (AA) fibrils and the intra- and cross-species transmission of AA amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Saki; Murakami, Tomoaki; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease characterized by extracellular deposition of AA fibrils. AA fibrils are found in several tissues from food animals with AA amyloidosis. For hygienic purposes, heating is widely used to inactivate microbes in food, but it is uncertain whether heating is sufficient to inactivate AA fibrils and prevent intra- or cross-species transmission. We examined the effect of heating (at 60 °C or 100 °C) and autoclaving (at 121 °C or 135 °C) on murine and bovine AA fibrils using Western blot analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and mouse model transmission experiments. TEM revealed that a mixture of AA fibrils and amorphous aggregates appeared after heating at 100 °C, whereas autoclaving at 135 °C produced large amorphous aggregates. AA fibrils retained antigen specificity in Western blot analysis when heated at 100 °C or autoclaved at 121 °C, but not when autoclaved at 135 °C. Transmissible pathogenicity of murine and bovine AA fibrils subjected to heating (at 60 °C or 100 °C) was significantly stimulated and resulted in amyloid deposition in mice. Autoclaving of murine AA fibrils at 121 °C or 135 °C significantly decreased amyloid deposition. Moreover, amyloid deposition in mice injected with murine AA fibrils was more severe than that in mice injected with bovine AA fibrils. Bovine AA fibrils autoclaved at 121 °C or 135 °C did not induce amyloid deposition in mice. These results suggest that AA fibrils are relatively heat stable and that similar to prions, autoclaving at 135 °C is required to destroy the pathogenicity of AA fibrils. These findings may contribute to the prevention of AA fibril transmission through food materials to different animals and especially to humans.

  8. Resolution of methylphenidate osmotic release oral system-induced hair loss in two siblings after dose escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Ulku Akyol; Ercan, Eyup Sabri

    2017-11-01

    This report describes the cases of two siblings who experienced hair loss after treatment with methylphenidate (MPH) osmotic release oral system (OROS). Hair loss was resolved after discontinuation of the drug, but the children re-initiated treatment, after which hair loss again occurred, but they continued the treatment. After dose escalation, the hair loss resolved. This is the first report to describe resolution of OROS-MPH-induced hair loss after dose escalation. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Stretch-induced biodegradation of polyelectrolyte multilayer films for drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Julien; Mertz, Damien; Bach, Charlotte; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Hélène; Senger, Bernard; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Lavalle, Philippe

    2012-09-25

    The design of stimuli-responsive polymer assemblies for the controlled release of bioactive molecules has raised considerable interest these two last decades. Herein, we report the design of mechanically responsive drug-releasing films made of polyelectrolyte multilayers. A layer-by-layer (LbL) reservoir containing biodegradable polyelectrolytes is capped with a mechanosensitive LbL barrier and responds to stretching by a total enzymatic degradation of the film. This strategy is successfully applied for the release in solution of an anticancer drug initially loaded within the architecture.

  10. Correlation of individual differences in schizotypal personality traits with amphetamine-induced dopamine release in striatal and extrastriatal brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Neil D; Cowan, Ronald L; Park, Sohee; Ansari, M Sib; Baldwin, Ronald M; Li, Rui; Doop, Mikisha; Kessler, Robert M; Zald, David H

    2011-04-01

    Schizotypal personality traits are associated with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders demonstrate increased dopamine transmission in the striatum. The authors sought to determine whether individual differences in normal variation in schizotypal traits are correlated with dopamine transmission in the striatum and in extrastriatal brain regions. Sixty-three healthy volunteers with no history of psychiatric illness completed the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and underwent positron emission tomography imaging with [(18)F]fallypride at baseline and after administration of oral d-amphetamine (0.43 mg/kg). Dopamine release, quantified by subtracting each participant's d-amphetamine scan from his or her baseline scan, was correlated with Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire total and factor scores using region-of-interest and voxel-wise analyses. Dopamine release in the striatum was positively correlated with overall schizotypal traits. The association was especially robust in the associative subdivision of the striatum. Voxel-wise analyses identified additional correlations between dopamine release and schizotypal traits in the left middle frontal gyrus and left supramarginal gyrus. Exploratory analyses of Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire factor scores revealed correlations between dopamine release and disorganized schizotypal traits in the striatum, thalamus, medial prefrontal cortex, temporal lobe, insula, and inferior frontal cortex. The association between dopamine signaling and psychosis phenotypes extends to individual differences in normal variation in schizotypal traits and involves dopamine transmission in both striatal and extrastriatal brain regions. Amphetamine-induced dopamine release may be a useful endophenotype for investigating the genetic basis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  11. Exendin-4, a new peptide from Heloderma suspectum venom, potentiates cholecystokinin-induced amylase release from rat pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, R; Singh, L; Eng, J; Raufman, J P

    1992-09-22

    We examined the actions of exendin-4, a new peptide isolated from Heloderma suspectum venom, on dispersed acini from rat pancreas. Exendin-4 caused a 3-fold increase in cAMP but did not alter cellular calcium concentration. Exendin-4-induced increases in cAMP were inhibited by an exendin-receptor antagonist, exendin (9-39)NH2, but not by VIP-receptor antagonists. Whereas up to 1 microM exendin-4 alone did not alter amylase release, potentiation of enzyme release was observed when the peptide (greater than 30 pM) was combined with cholecystokinin. Potentiation of amylase release was also observed when exendin-4 was combined with carbamylcholine, bombesin or a calcium ionophore, A23187. These results indicate that stimulation of exendin receptors on rat pancreatic acini causes an increase in cellular cAMP. Although this increase in cAMP alone does not result in amylase release, combination of exendin-4 with agents that increase cell calcium results in potentiation of amylase release.

  12. AAS 228: Day 3 afternoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    ?).Peebles: expect surprises and think outside the box yes! #aas228 Kevin Schawinski (@kevinschawinski) June 15, 2016His comparison of local vs. high-redshift cosmology in terms of scales of problems was outstanding, and he encouraged the audience and the community to keep an open mind. After all, in Sean Carrolls words, we do live in a preposterous universe, and the time is almost right to explain it all.This The Limits of Scientific Cosmology series at #aas228 has been absolutely fantastic. @AAS_Office please put videos on youtube! Kevin Schawinski (@kevinschawinski) June 15, 2016Press Conference Black Holes and Gamma-Ray Bursts (by Susanna Kohler)The final press conference of the meeting covered three topics from the categories of black holes and gamma-ray bursts.Fred Rasio (CIERA/Northwestern University) opened the conference with a discussion of how the systems that LIGO detected might have formed. There are two primary models for how these black-hole binaries are created. In the first, they start out as binary systems of two massive stars. If the binary survives the process of both stars collapsing into black holes, then a binary black hole system results.Rasio focused on the second theory, in which that black holes are formed in dense stellar clusters. These black holes then sink (via dynamical friction) to the centers of the clusters like dust particles settling on the floor of a room, where they form binaries in a black hole mosh pit eventually getting kicked out of the cluster by dynamical interactions. You can read more about their research in the press release here.Rasio presents a pretty awesome animation of this black hole mosh pit. https://t.co/AkewctI7uK#aas228 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The effects of a spinning black hole on the spacetime around it. [J.P. Eekels J.M. Overduin]Next up was Richard Henry (Johns Hopkins University), who spoke about the internal structure of spinning black holes (known as Kerr black holes). Because no light can escape from

  13. Aspirin induces nitric oxide release from vascular endothelium: a novel mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Taubert, D; Berkels, R; Grosser, N; Schröder, H; Gründemann, D; Schömig, E

    2004-01-01

    The study was designed to test the hypothesis that aspirin may stimulate nitric oxide (NO) release from vascular endothelium, a pivotal factor for maintenance of vascular homeostasis.Clinical evidence suggests that low-dose aspirin may improve vascular endothelial function. Since other cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors showed no beneficial vascular effects, aspirin may exhibit a vasculoprotective, COX-independent mechanism.Luminal NO release was monitored in real time on dissected porcine coron...

  14. Release of proteins from intact chloroplasts induced by reactive oxygen species during biotic and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Verma, Dheeraj; Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress) or paraquat (abiotic stress), GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II) made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide), which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These results suggest a

  15. Release of proteins from intact chloroplasts induced by reactive oxygen species during biotic and abiotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Chul Kwon

    Full Text Available Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress or paraquat (abiotic stress, GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide, which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These

  16. Release of Proteins from Intact Chloroplasts Induced by Reactive Oxygen Species during Biotic and Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress) or paraquat (abiotic stress), GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II) made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide), which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These results suggest a

  17. Wound-induced Ca2+wave propagates through a simple release and diffusion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handly, L Naomi; Wollman, Roy

    2017-06-01

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are critical mediators of information concerning tissue damage from damaged cells to neighboring healthy cells. ATP acts as an effective DAMP when released into extracellular space from damaged cells. Extracellular ATP receptors monitor tissue damage and activate a Ca 2+ wave in the surrounding healthy cells. How the Ca 2+ wave propagates through cells after a wound is unclear. Ca 2+ wave activation can occur extracellularly via external receptors or intracellularly through GAP junctions. Three potential mechanisms to propagate the Ca 2+ wave are source and sink, amplifying wave, and release and diffusion. Both source and sink and amplifying wave regulate ATP levels using hydrolysis or secretion, respectively, whereas release and diffusion relies on dilution. Here we systematically test these hypotheses using a microfluidics assay to mechanically wound an epithelial monolayer in combination with direct manipulation of ATP hydrolysis and release. We show that a release and diffusion model sufficiently explains Ca 2+ -wave propagation after an epithelial wound. A release and diffusion model combines the benefits of fast activation at short length scales with a self-limiting response to prevent unnecessary inflammatory responses harmful to the organism. © 2017 Handly et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. AAS 228: Day 1 morning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Society, which was the culmination of several years of supportive interaction. This new relationship is described further in the press release just issued by AAS.First plenary: The Ocean World Enceladus (by Chris Faesi)Enceladus takes its place in the lineup of potential life-bearing solar system bodies.In the first plenary session of the AAS 228th meeting, Christopher Glein of the University of Toronto took the audience on an exciting tour of the ocean world Enceladus. This small, icy moon of Saturn had been thought rather unremarkable for most of the 2+ centuries since its discovery in 1789, but theCassini spacecrafts extended visit over the last decade has revealed it to be a surprisingly dynamic and unique little world. From Cassinis 23 flybys, we now know that Enceladus is composed of roughly equal parts rock and ice, and, with analbedo of 99%, is the most reflective body in the solar system.The moons surface is not entirely cratered, as are most solar system objects such as our own Moon, but has a southern hemisphere with long fissures that look like tiger stripes on an otherwise smooth surface. Follow-up with the satellites highly sensitive instruments revealed that these stripes were heated up to 200 K much hotter than Enceladuss typical 75 K surface temperature. There seems to be an energy shortage: the heating expected from Saturns tidal influence on the moon is a factor of about ten smaller than what would be required to heat the surface this much. Unraveling this discrepancy is still an area of active study today.Learning about the chemistry of Enceladuss plumes. It always amazes me how much we can learn from light! #aas228 pic.twitter.com/yklpClPjRD astrobites (@astrobites) June 13, 2016Enceladus also spews powerful jets of salty water and water ice far into space viacryovolcanism, making it the smallest geologically active body in the solar system. Perhaps most intriguingly, this 500 km-diameter moon may be a promising target in the search for

  19. Distinct Dasatinib-Induced Mechanisms of Apoptotic Response and Exosome Release in Imatinib-Resistant Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although dasatinib is effective in most imatinib mesylate (IMT-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients, the underlying mechanism of its effectiveness in eliminating imatinib-resistant cells is only partially understood. This study investigated the effects of dasatinib on signaling mechanisms driving-resistance in imatinib-resistant CML cell line K562 (K562RIMT. Compared with K562 control cells, exsomal release, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling and autophagic activity were increased significantly in K562RIMT cells and mTOR-independent beclin-1/Vps34 signaling was shown to be involved in exosomal release in these cells. We found that Notch1 activation-mediated reduction of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN was responsible for the increased Akt/mTOR activities in K562RIMT cells and treatment with Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor prevented activation of Akt/mTOR. In addition, suppression of mTOR activity by rapamycin decreased the level of activity of p70S6K, induced upregulation of p53 and caspase 3, and led to increase of apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. Inhibition of autophagy by spautin-1 or beclin-1 knockdown decreased exosomal release, but did not affect apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. In summary, in K562RIMT cells dasatinib promoted apoptosis through downregulation of Akt/mTOR activities, while preventing exosomal release and inhibiting autophagy by downregulating expression of beclin-1 and Vps34. Our findings reveal distinct dasatinib-induced mechanisms of apoptotic response and exosomal release in imatinib-resistant CML cells.

  20. Shiga toxin and lipopolysaccharide induce platelet-leukocyte aggregates and tissue factor release, a thrombotic mechanism in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-lie Ståhl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aggregates formed between leukocytes and platelets in the circulation lead to release of tissue factor (TF-bearing microparticles contributing to a prothrombotic state. As enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC may cause hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, in which microthrombi cause tissue damage, this study investigated whether the interaction between blood cells and EHEC virulence factors Shiga toxin (Stx and lipopolysaccharide (LPS led to release of TF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The interaction between Stx or LPS and blood cells induced platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation and tissue factor (TF release, as detected by flow cytometry in whole blood. O157LPS was more potent than other LPS serotypes. Aggregates formed mainly between monocytes and platelets and less so between neutrophils and platelets. Stimulated blood cells in complex expressed activation markers, and microparticles were released. Microparticles originated mainly from platelets and monocytes and expressed TF. TF-expressing microparticles, and functional TF in plasma, increased when blood cells were simultaneously exposed to the EHEC virulence factors and high shear stress. Stx and LPS in combination had a more pronounced effect on platelet-monocyte aggregate formation, and TF expression on these aggregates, than each virulence factor alone. Whole blood and plasma from HUS patients (n = 4 were analyzed. All patients had an increase in leukocyte-platelet aggregates, mainly between monocytes and platelets, on which TF was expressed during the acute phase of disease. Patients also exhibited an increase in microparticles, mainly originating from platelets and monocytes, bearing surface-bound TF, and functional TF was detected in their plasma. Blood cell aggregates, microparticles, and TF decreased upon recovery. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By triggering TF release in the circulation, Stx and LPS can induce a prothrombotic state contributing to the pathogenesis of

  1. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eElgueta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acetylcholine (ACh is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline, suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetyl-cholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram, suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing.

  2. Effects of calcium buffering on glucose-induced insulin release in mouse pancreatic islets: an approximation to the calcium sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertusa, J A; Sanchez-Andres, J V; Martín, F; Soria, B

    1999-10-15

    1. The properties of the calcium sensor for glucose-induced insulin secretion have been studied using cell-permeant Ca2+ buffers with distinct kinetics and affinities. In addition, submembrane cytosolic Ca2+ distribution has been modelled after trains of glucose-induced action potential-like depolarizations. 2. Slow Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l-1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (EGTA and Calcium Orange-5N) did not significantly affect glucose-induced insulin release. Modelling showed no effect on cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations at the outermost shell (0.05 microm), their effects being observed in the innermost shells dependent on Ca2+ affinity. 3. In contrast, fast Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l-1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (BAPTA and Calcium Green-5N) caused a 50 % inhibition of early insulin response and completely blocked the late phase of glucose-induced insulin response, their simulations showing a decrease of [Ca2+]i at both the inner and outermost shells. 4. These data are consistent with the existence in pancreatic beta-cells of a higher affinity Ca2+ sensor than that proposed for neurons. Moreover, these data are consistent with the proposed existence of two distinct pools of granules: (i) 'primed' vesicles, colocalized with Ca2+ channels and responsible of the first phase of insulin release; and (ii) 'reserved pool' vesicles, not colocalized and responsible for the second phase.

  3. Silymarin Ameliorates Diabetes-Induced Proangiogenic Response in Brain Endothelial Cells through a GSK-3β Inhibition-Induced Reduction of VEGF Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alhusban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Additionally, it was found to induce a dysfunctional angiogenic response in the brain that was attributed to oxidative stress. Milk thistle seed extract (silymarin has potent antioxidant properties, though its potential use in ameliorating diabetes-induced aberrant brain angiogenesis is unknown. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is a regulator of angiogenesis that is upregulated by diabetes. Its involvement in diabetes-induced angiogenesis is unknown. To evaluate the potential of silymarin to ameliorate diabetes-induced aberrant angiogenesis, human brain endothelial cells (HBEC-5i were treated with 50 μg/mL advanced glycation end (AGE products in the presence or absence of silymarin (50, 100 μM. The angiogenic potential of HBEC-5i was evaluated in terms of migration and in vitro tube formation capacities. The involvement of GSK-3β was also evaluated. AGE significantly increased the migration and tube formation rates of HBEC-5i by about onefold (p=0.0001. Silymarin reduced AGE-induced migration in a dose-dependent manner where 50 μM reduced migration by about 50%, whereas the 100 μM completely inhibited AGE-induced migration. Similarly, silymarin 50 μg/mL blunted AGE-induced tube formation (p=0.001. This effect was mediated through a GSK-3β-dependent inhibition of VEGF release. In conclusion, silymarin inhibits AGE-induced aberrant angiogenesis in a GSK-3β-mediated inhibition of VEGF release.

  4. Hydration-Induced Phase Separation in Amphiphilic Polymer Matrices and its Influence on Voclosporin Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Kohn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Voclosporin is a highly potent, new cyclosporine-A derivative that is currently in Phase 3 clinical trials in the USA as a potential treatment for inflammatory diseases of the eye. Voclosporin represents a number of very sparingly soluble drugs that are difficult to administer. We therefore selected it as a model drug that is dispersed within amphiphilic polymer matrices, and investigated the changing morphology of the matrices using neutron and x-ray scattering during voclosporin release and polymer resorption. The hydrophobic segments of the amphiphilic polymer chain are comprised of desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester (DTE and desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine (DT, and the hydrophilic component is poly(ethylene glycol (PEG. Water uptake in these matrices resulted in the phase separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains that are a few hundred Angstroms apart. These water-driven morphological changes influenced the release profile of voclosporin and facilitated a burst-free release from the polymer. No such morphological reorganization was observed in poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA, which exhibits an extended lag period, followed by a burst-like release of voclosporin when the polymer was degraded. An understanding of the effect of polymer composition on the hydration behavior is central to understanding and controlling the phase behavior and resorption characteristics of the matrix for achieving long-term controlled release of hydrophobic drugs such as voclosporin.

  5. Physical exercise induces rapid release of small extracellular vesicles into the circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Frühbeis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs by default and in response to diverse stimuli for the purpose of cell communication and tissue homeostasis. EVs are present in all body fluids including peripheral blood, and their appearance correlates with specific physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we show that physical activity is associated with the release of nano-sized EVs into the circulation. Healthy individuals were subjected to an incremental exercise protocol of cycling or running until exhaustion, and EVs were isolated from blood plasma samples taken before, immediately after and 90 min after exercise. Small EVs with the size of 100–130 nm, that carried proteins characteristic of exosomes, were significantly increased immediately after cycling exercise and declined again within 90 min at rest. In response to treadmill running, elevation of small EVs was moderate but appeared more sustained. To delineate EV release kinetics, plasma samples were additionally taken at the end of each increment of the cycling exercise protocol. Release of small EVs into the circulation was initiated in an early phase of exercise, before the individual anaerobic threshold, which is marked by the rise of lactate. Taken together, our study revealed that exercise triggers a rapid release of EVs with the characteristic size of exosomes into the circulation, initiated in the aerobic phase of exercise. We hypothesize that EVs released during physical activity may participate in cell communication during exercise-mediated adaptation processes that involve signalling across tissues and organs.

  6. Viral release from HIV-I-induced syncytia of CD4+ C8166 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J R; Kitchen, A D; Harrison, J F; Tovey, G

    1989-06-01

    Infection of the permissive C8166 CD4+ lymphoid cell line with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-I rapidly leads to syncytium formation. Ultrastructural features of medium-sized (40 to 60 microns) syncytia and larger syncytia are presented, with emphasis upon HIV-I release from the syncytial surface and into intrasyncytial vacuoles. Although surface release of HIV-I is shown to diminish with increasing syncytial size, it does not totally stop. Massive HIV-I release and entrapment within intrasyncytial vacuoles is clearly apparent within the "foamy" multivacuolated zones within medium and large syncytia. Numerous multicored aberrant viruses are routinely detected within the intrasyncytial vacuoles, and double-budding events likewise are readily detectable at the vacuolar membranes, but less so at the syncytial surface. It is suggested that this observation may be a reflection of the more restricted availability of vacuolar membrane area for excessive viral budding as compared with that at the syncytial surface.

  7. Estradiol induces dendritic spines by enhancing glutamate release independent of transcription: A mechanism for organizational sex differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M.; Liang, Shu-Ling; Thompson, Scott M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The naturally occurring sex difference in dendritic spine number on hypothalamic neurons offers a unique opportunity to investigate mechanisms establishing synaptic patterning during perinatal sensitive periods. A major advantage of the model is the ability to treat neonatal females with estradiol to permanently induce the male phenotype. During the development of other systems, exuberant innervation is followed by activity-dependent pruning necessary for elimination of spurious synapses. In contrast, we demonstrate that estradiol-induced organization in the hypothalamus involves the induction of new synapses on dendritic spines. Activation of estrogen receptors by estradiol triggers a non-genomic activation of PI3 kinase that results in enhanced glutamate release from presynaptic neurons. Subsequent activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors activates MAP kinases inducing dendritic spine formation. These results reveal a trans-neuronal mechanism by which estradiol acts during a sensitive period to establish a profound and lasting sex difference in hypothalamic synaptic patterning. PMID:18498739

  8. Release of Periplasmic Nucleotidase Induced by Human Antimicrobial Peptide in E. coli Causes Accumulation of the Immunomodulator Adenosine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Bergamo Estrela

    Full Text Available Previous work by our group described that human β-defensin-2 induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine (Ado in E. coli cultures through a non-lytic mechanism causing severe plasmolysis. Here, we investigate the presence of AMP as a direct precursor and the involvement of a bacterial enzyme in the generation of extracellular Ado by treated bacteria. Following hBD-2 treatment, metabolites were quantified in the supernatants using targeted HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Microbial growth was monitored by optical density and cell viability was determined by colony forming units counts. Phosphatase activity was measured using chromogenic substrate pNPP. The results demonstrate that defensin-treated E. coli strain W releases AMP in the extracellular space, where it is converted to Ado by a bacterial soluble factor. An increase in phosphatase activity in the supernatant was observed after peptide treatment, similar to the effect of sucrose-induced osmotic stress, suggesting that the periplasmic 5'nucleotidase (5'-NT is released following the plasmolysis event triggered by the peptide. Ado accumulation was enhanced in the presence of Co2+ ion and inhibited by EDTA, further supporting the involvement of a metallo-phosphatase such as 5'-NT in extracellular AMP conversion into Ado. The comparative analysis of hBD-induced Ado accumulation in different E. coli strains and in Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed that the response is not correlated to the peptide's effect on cell viability, but indicates it might be dependent on the subcellular distribution of the nucleotidase. Taken together, these data shed light on a yet undescribed mechanism of host-microbial interaction: a human antimicrobial peptide inducing selective release of a bacterial enzyme (E. coli 5'-NT, leading to the formation of a potent immunomodulator metabolite (Ado.

  9. [Gluteal muscle contracture release for the treatment of gluteal muscle contracture induced knee osteoarthritis: a report of 52 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-xiang; Gong, Yu-suo; Li, Sheng-hua; Liu, Hai-ping; Chai, Xi-ping

    2011-07-01

    To investigate clinical efficacy and significance of gluteal muscle contracture release for the treatment of gluteal muscle contracture induced knee osteoarthritis. From January 2008 to June 2010,52 patients with gluteal muscle contracture induced knee osteoarthritis were reviewed. Among the patients,15 patients were male and 37 patients were female, ranging in age from 15 to 45 years, with an average of 35 years. Eighteen patients had left knee osteoarthritis, 30 patients had right osteoarthritis, and 4 patients had double knee osteoarthritis. All the patients were treated with gluteal muscle contracture release. Lysholm knee score was used to evaluate therapeutic effects before and after operation. All the patients were followed up,and the duration ranged from 12 to 37 years,with a mean of 15 months. The Lysholm knee score improved from preoperative (68.12 +/- 0.78) points to postoperative (91.23 +/- 0.47) points at the last follow-up, the difference had statistical difference (t=31.269, Pmuscle contracture release is effective to relieve symptoms of gluteal muscles contracture and knee osteoarthritis. The patients with gluteal muscle contracture should be treated early so as to prevent effects of gluteal muscle contracture on knee joint, slow down degeneration of knee joint at early stage, and prevent occurrence of knee osteoarthritis.

  10. β-lactam antibiotic-induced release of lipoteichoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus leads to activation of neutrophil granulocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartung Thomas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN are phagocytes of the first line of antimicrobial defense. Previously we demonstrated that lipoteichoic acid (LTA from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus directly activates neutrophil granulocytes. Others have reported that exposure of S. aureus to β-lactam antibiotics leads to LTA release. In the present study we addressed the question whether exposure of S. aureus to β-lactam antibiotics or antibiotics of other groups results in the generation of PMN-stimulating activity and whether this activity can be attributed to LTA. Methods S. aureus were exposed to flucloxacillin, a β-lactam antibiotic or to the protein synthesis-inhibitors erythromycin and gentamicin, or to ciprofloxacin, a gyrase inhibitor. Supernatants of the antibiotic-treated bacteria were assayed for their LTA content and for their effect on PMN functions. Results We observed that exposure of S. aureus to flucloxacillin and, to a lesser degree to ciprofloxacin, but not to erythromycin or gentamicin led to LTA release. Co-incubation of neutrophil granulocytes with LTA-containing supernatants led to PMN activation as assed by morphological changes, release of IL-8, delay of spontaneous apoptosis and enhanced phagocytic activity. Depletion of LTA from the supernatants markedly reduced their PMN-activating capacity. Conclusion The findings suggest that, via the activation of PMN, antibiotic-induced LTA release from S. aureus leads to enhanced antimicrobial activity of the innate immune defense mechanisms.

  11. Naegleria fowleri lysate induces strong cytopathic effects and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in rat microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang-Jin; Park, Chang-Eun; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Jung, Suk-Yul; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2011-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a ubiquitous free-living ameba, causes fatal primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. N. fowleri trophozoites are known to induce cytopathic changes upon contact with microglial cells, including necrotic and apoptotic cell death and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In this study, we treated rat microglial cells with amebic lysate to probe contact-independent mechanisms for cytotoxicity, determining through a combination of light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy whether N. fowleri lysate could effect on both necrosis and apoptosis on microglia in a time- as well as dose-dependent fashion. A (51)Cr release assay demonstrated pronounced lysate induction of cytotoxicity (71.5%) toward microglial cells by 24 hr after its addition to cultures. In an assay of pro-inflammatory cytokine release, microglial cells treated with N. fowleri lysate produced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, though generation of the former 2 cytokines was reduced with time, and that of the last increased throughout the experimental period. In summary, N. fowleri lysate exerted strong cytopathic effects on microglial cells, and elicited pro-inflammatory cytokine release as a primary immune response.

  12. Dopamine D2/3 receptor availability and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Celik, Funda; Schweitzer, Dave H.; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine is important in the regulation of food intake. It is hypothesised that obese people experience less reward from food due to lower striatal dopamine release, which consequently leads to overeating. This study is the first to assess whether obese subjects have blunted

  13. Effect of Leu-enkephalin and delta sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) on endogenous noradrenaline release by rat brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozhanets, V.V.; Anosov, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonapeptide delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) causes specific changes in the encephalogram of recipient animals: It prolongs the phase of long-wave or delta sleep. The cellular mechanism of action of DSIP has not yet been explained. To test the hyporhesis that this peptide or its degradation product may be presynaptic regulators of catecholamine release, the action of Leu-enkephaline, DSIP, and amino acids composing DSIP on release of endogenous noradrenalin (NA) from synaptosomes during depolarization was compared. Subcellular fractions from cerebral hemisphere of noninbred male albino rats were isolated. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was determined in the suspension of synaptosomes before and after addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test.

  14. Effect of Leu-enkephalin and delta sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) on endogenous noradrenaline release by rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozhanets, V.V.; Anosov, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonapeptide delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) causes specific changes in the encephalogram of recipient animals: It prolongs the phase of long-wave or delta sleep. The cellular mechanism of action of DSIP has not yet been explained. To test the hyporhesis that this peptide or its degradation product may be presynaptic regulators of catecholamine release, the action of Leu-enkephaline, DSIP, and amino acids composing DSIP on release of endogenous noradrenalin (NA) from synaptosomes during depolarization was compared. Subcellular fractions from cerebral hemisphere of noninbred male albino rats were isolated. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was determined in the suspension of synaptosomes before and after addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test

  15. Extracellular ATP induces the rapid release of HIV-1 from virus containing compartments of human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Francesca; Desdouits, Marion; Garzetti, Livia; Podini, Paola; Alfano, Massimo; Rubartelli, Anna; Furlan, Roberto; Benaroch, Philippe; Poli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infects CD4+ T lymphocytes and tissue macrophages. Infected macrophages differ from T cells in terms of decreased to absent cytopathicity and for active accumulation of new progeny HIV-1 virions in virus-containing compartments (VCC). For these reasons, infected macrophages are believed to act as “Trojan horses” carrying infectious particles to be released on cell necrosis or functional stimulation. Here we explored the hypothesis that extracellular ATP (eATP) could represent a microenvironmental signal potentially affecting virion release from VCC of infected macrophages. Indeed, eATP triggered the rapid release of infectious HIV-1 from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) acutely infected with the CCR5-dependent HIV-1 strain. A similar phenomenon was observed in chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated to macrophage-like cells (D-U1) by costimulation with phorbol esters and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Worthy of note, eATP did not cause necrotic, apoptotic, or pyroptotic cell death, and its effect on HIV-1 release was suppressed by Imipramine (an antidepressant agent known to inhibit microvesicle formation by interfering with membrane-associated acid sphingomyelinase). Virion release was not triggered by oxidized ATP, whereas the effect of eATP was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Thus, eATP triggered the discharge of virions actively accumulating in VCC of infected macrophages via interaction with the P2X7R in the absence of significant cytopathicity. These findings suggest that the microvesicle pathway and P2X7R could represent exploitable targets for interfering with the VCC-associated reservoir of infectious HIV-1 virions in tissue macrophages. PMID:26056317

  16. Extracellular ATP induces the rapid release of HIV-1 from virus containing compartments of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Francesca; Desdouits, Marion; Garzetti, Livia; Podini, Paola; Alfano, Massimo; Rubartelli, Anna; Furlan, Roberto; Benaroch, Philippe; Poli, Guido

    2015-06-23

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes and tissue macrophages. Infected macrophages differ from T cells in terms of decreased to absent cytopathicity and for active accumulation of new progeny HIV-1 virions in virus-containing compartments (VCC). For these reasons, infected macrophages are believed to act as "Trojan horses" carrying infectious particles to be released on cell necrosis or functional stimulation. Here we explored the hypothesis that extracellular ATP (eATP) could represent a microenvironmental signal potentially affecting virion release from VCC of infected macrophages. Indeed, eATP triggered the rapid release of infectious HIV-1 from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) acutely infected with the CCR5-dependent HIV-1 strain. A similar phenomenon was observed in chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated to macrophage-like cells (D-U1) by costimulation with phorbol esters and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Worthy of note, eATP did not cause necrotic, apoptotic, or pyroptotic cell death, and its effect on HIV-1 release was suppressed by Imipramine (an antidepressant agent known to inhibit microvesicle formation by interfering with membrane-associated acid sphingomyelinase). Virion release was not triggered by oxidized ATP, whereas the effect of eATP was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Thus, eATP triggered the discharge of virions actively accumulating in VCC of infected macrophages via interaction with the P2X7R in the absence of significant cytopathicity. These findings suggest that the microvesicle pathway and P2X7R could represent exploitable targets for interfering with the VCC-associated reservoir of infectious HIV-1 virions in tissue macrophages.

  17. Turbulence-induced resonance vibrations cause pollen release in wind-pollinated Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timerman, David; Greene, David F; Urzay, Javier; Ackerman, Josef D

    2014-12-06

    In wind pollination, the release of pollen from anthers into airflows determines the quantity and timing of pollen available for pollination. Despite the ecological and evolutionary importance of pollen release, wind-stamen interactions are poorly understood, as are the specific forces that deliver pollen grains into airflows. We present empirical evidence that atmospheric turbulence acts directly on stamens in the cosmopolitan, wind-pollinated weed, Plantago lanceolata, causing resonant vibrations that release episodic bursts of pollen grains. In laboratory experiments, we show that stamens have mechanical properties corresponding to theoretically predicted ranges for turbulence-driven resonant vibrations. The mechanical excitation of stamens at their characteristic resonance frequency caused them to resonate, shedding pollen vigorously. The characteristic natural frequency of the stamens increased over time with each shedding episode due to the reduction in anther mass, which increased the mechanical energy required to trigger subsequent episodes. Field observations of a natural population under turbulent wind conditions were consistent with these laboratory results and demonstrated that pollen is released from resonating stamens excited by small eddies whose turnover periods are similar to the characteristic resonance frequency measured in the laboratory. Turbulence-driven vibration of stamens at resonance may be a primary mechanism for pollen shedding in wind-pollinated angiosperms. The capacity to release pollen in wind can be viewed as a primary factor distinguishing animal- from wind-pollinated plants, and selection on traits such as the damping ratio and flexural rigidity may be of consequence in evolutionary transitions between pollination systems. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and functionalization of chitosan built hydrogel with induced hydrophilicity for extended release of sparingly soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Faheem; Javed, Fatima; Othman, M B H; Khan, Abbas; Gul, Rukhsana; Ahmad, Zulkifli; Md Akil, Hazizan

    2018-03-01

    Addressing the functional biomaterials as next-generation therapeutics, chitosan and alginic acid were copolymerized in the form of chemically crosslinked interpenetrating networks (IPNs). The native hydrogel was functionalized via carbodiimide (EDC), catalyzed coupling of soft ligand (1,2-Ethylenediamine) and hard ligand (4-aminophenol) to replace -OH groups in alginic acid units for extended hydrogel- interfaces with the aqueous and sparingly soluble drug solutions. The chemical structure, Lower solution critical temperature (LCST ≈ 37.88 °C), particle size (Z h,app  ≈ 150-200 nm), grain size (160-360 nm), surface roughness (85-250 nm), conductivity (37-74 mv) and zeta potential (16-32 mv) of native and functionalized hydrogel were investigated by using FT-IR, solid state- 13 C-NMR, TGA, DSC, FESEM, AFM and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The effective swelling, drug loading (47-78%) and drug release (53-86%) profiles were adjusted based on selective functionalization of hydrophobic IPNs due to electrostatic complexation and extended interactions of hydrophilic ligands with the aqueous and drug solutions. Drug release from the hydrogel matrices with diffusion coefficient n ≈ 0.7 was established by Non- Fickian diffusion mechanism. In vitro degradation trials of the hydrogel with a 20% loss of wet mass in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and 38% loss of wet mass in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), were investigated for 400 h through bulk erosion. Consequently, a slower rate of drug loading and release was observed for native hydrogel, due to stronger H-bonding, interlocking and entanglement within the IPNs, which was finely tuned and extended by the induced hydrophilic and functional ligands. In the light of induced hydrophilicity, such functional hydrogel could be highly attractive for extended release of sparingly soluble drugs.

  19. Gliadin induces an increase in intestinal permeability and zonulin release by binding to the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Karen M; Lu, Ruliang; Brownley, Julie; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Craig; Thomas, Karen; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Tamiz, Amir; Alkan, Sefik; Netzel-Arnett, Sarah; Antalis, Toni; Vogel, Stefanie N; Fasano, Alessio

    2008-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gliadin, a component of the grain protein gluten. Gliadin induces an MyD88-dependent zonulin release that leads to increased intestinal permeability, a postulated early element in the pathogenesis of celiac disease. We aimed to establish the molecular basis of gliadin interaction with intestinal mucosa leading to intestinal barrier impairment. Alpha-gliadin affinity column was loaded with intestinal mucosal membrane lysates to identify the putative gliadin-binding moiety. In vitro experiments with chemokine receptor CXCR3 transfectants were performed to confirm binding of gliadin and/or 26 overlapping 20mer alpha-gliadin synthetic peptides to the receptor. CXCR3 protein and gene expression were studied in intestinal epithelial cell lines and human biopsy specimens. Gliadin-CXCR3 interaction was further analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy, laser capture microscopy, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunoprecipitation/Western blot analysis. Ex vivo experiments were performed using C57BL/6 wild-type and CXCR3(-/-) mouse small intestines to measure intestinal permeability and zonulin release. Affinity column and colocalization experiments showed that gliadin binds to CXCR3 and that at least 2 alpha-gliadin 20mer synthetic peptides are involved in this binding. CXCR3 is expressed in mouse and human intestinal epithelia and lamina propria. Mucosal CXCR3 expression was elevated in active celiac disease but returned to baseline levels following implementation of a gluten-free diet. Gliadin induced physical association between CXCR3 and MyD88 in enterocytes. Gliadin increased zonulin release and intestinal permeability in wild-type but not CXCR3(-/-) mouse small intestine. Gliadin binds to CXCR3 and leads to MyD88-dependent zonulin release and increased intestinal permeability.

  20. Pneumococcal DNA-binding proteins released through autolysis induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines via toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kosuke; Domon, Hisanori; Maekawa, Tomoki; Oda, Masataka; Hiyoshi, Takumi; Tamura, Hikaru; Yonezawa, Daisuke; Arai, Yoshiaki; Yokoji, Mai; Tabeta, Koichi; Habuka, Rie; Saitoh, Akihiko; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada; Terao, Yutaka

    2018-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia. Our previous study suggested that S. pneumoniae autolysis-dependently releases intracellular pneumolysin, which subsequently leads to lung injury. In this study, we hypothesized that pneumococcal autolysis induces the leakage of additional intracellular molecules that could increase the pathogenicity of S. pneumoniae. Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry analysis identified that chaperone protein DnaK, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were released with pneumococcal DNA by autolysis. We demonstrated that recombinant (r) DnaK, rEF-Tu, and rGAPDH induced significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor production in peritoneal macrophages and THP-1-derived macrophage-like cells via toll-like receptor 4. Furthermore, the DNA-binding activity of these proteins was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance assay. We demonstrated that pneumococcal DnaK, EF-Tu, and GAPDH induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages, and might cause host tissue damage and affect the development of pneumococcal diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. PKA and Epac cooperate to augment bradykinin-induced interleukin-8 release from human airway smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halayko Andrew J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases by secreting inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8 (IL-8. IL-8 production is in part regulated via activation of Gq-and Gs-coupled receptors. Here we study the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP effectors protein kinase A (PKA and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac1 and Epac2 in the bradykinin-induced IL-8 release from a human airway smooth muscle cell line and the underlying molecular mechanisms of this response. Methods IL-8 release was assessed via ELISA under basal condition and after stimulation with bradykinin alone or in combination with fenoterol, the Epac activators 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP and Sp-8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMPS, the PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP and the cGMP analog 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cGMP. Where indicated, cells were pre-incubated with the pharmacological inhibitors Clostridium difficile toxin B-1470 (GTPases, U0126 (extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2 and Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS (PKA. The specificity of the cyclic nucleotide analogs was confirmed by measuring phosphorylation of the PKA substrate vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. GTP-loading of Rap1 and Rap2 was evaluated via pull-down technique. Expression of Rap1, Rap2, Epac1 and Epac2 was assessed via western blot. Downregulation of Epac protein expression was achieved by siRNA. Unpaired or paired two-tailed Student's t test was used. Results The β2-agonist fenoterol augmented release of IL-8 by bradykinin. The PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP and the Epac activator 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly increased bradykinin-induced IL-8 release. The hydrolysis-resistant Epac activator Sp-8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMPS mimicked the effects of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, whereas the negative control 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cGMP did not. Fenoterol, forskolin and 6-Bnz-cAMP induced VASP phosphorylation, which was diminished by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. 6-Bnz-cAMP and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP induced GTP

  2. High efficiency transformation of banana [Musa acuminata L. cv. Matti (AA)] for enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stress through overexpression of a peanut salinity-induced pathogenesis-related class 10 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Anjana; Jain, Shalu; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Jain, Mukesh; Bhat, Vishnu; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2015-01-01

    Bananas and plantains (Musa spp. L.) are important subsistence crops and premium export commodity in several countries, and susceptible to a wide range of environmental and biotic stress conditions. Here, we report efficient, rapid, and reproducible Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and regeneration of an Indian niche cultivar of banana [M. acuminata cv. Matti (AA)]. Apical meristem-derived highly proliferative multiple shoot clump (MSC) explants were transformed with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harboring a binary vector pCAMBIA-1301 carrying hptII and uidA. Sequential agro-infiltration (10 min, 400 mmHg), infection (additional 35 min, Agrobacterium density A 600 = 0.8) and co-cultivation (18 h) regimen in 100 µM acetosyringone containing liquid medium were critical factors yielding high transformation efficiency (~81 %) corroborated by transient GUS expression assay. Stable transgenic events were recovered following two cycles of meristem initiation and selection on hygromycin containing medium. Histochemical GUS assay in several tissues of transgenic plants and molecular analyses confirmed stable integration and expression of transgene. The protocol described here allowed recovery of well-established putative transgenic plantlets in as little as 5 months. The transgenic banana plants could be readily acclimatized under greenhouse conditions, and were phenotypically similar to the wild-type untransformed control plants (WT). Transgenic plants overexpressing Salinity-Induced Pathogenesis-Related class 10 protein gene from Arachis hypogaea (AhSIPR10) in banana cv. Matti (AA) showed better photosynthetic efficiency and less membrane damage (P < 0.05) in the presence of NaCl and mannitol in comparison to WT plants suggesting the role of AhSIPR10 in better tolerance of salt stress and drought conditions.

  3. Exposure to wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2006-04-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized to be a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries were studded tires are used. In this work, we investigated the inflammatory effect of PM10 generated from the wear of studded tires on two different types of pavement. As comparison, we also investigated PM10 from a traffic-intensive street, a subway station, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Human monocyte-derived macrophages, nasal epithelial cells (RPMI 2650), and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to the different types of particles, and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha into the culture medium was measured. The results show a significant release of cytokines from macrophages after exposure for all types of particles. When particles generated from asphalt/granite pavement were compared to asphalt/quartzite pavement, the granite pavement had a significantly higher capacity to induce the release of cytokines. The granite pavement particles induced cytokine release at the same magnitude as the street particles did, which was higher than what particles from both a subway station and DEP did. Exposure of epithelial cells to PM10 resulted in a significant increase of TNF-alpha secreted from BEAS-2B cells for all types of particles used (DEP was not tested), and the highest levels were induced by subway particles. None of the particle types were able to evoke detectable cytokine release from RPMI 2650 cells. The results indicate that PM10 generated by the wear of studded tires on the street surface is a large contributor to the cytokine-releasing ability of particles in traffic-intensive areas and that the type of pavement used is important for the level of this contribution

  4. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi; Tancharoen, Salunya; Morimoto, Yoko; Matsuda, Fumiyo; Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori; Miura, Naoki; Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro

    2009-01-01

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  5. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Omuta City General Hospital, 2-19-1 Takarazaka, Omuta-City, Fukuoka 836-8567 (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tancharoen, Salunya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, 6 Yothe Rd., Rajthevee Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Morimoto, Yoko [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Matsuda, Fumiyo [Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8560 (Japan); Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Miura, Naoki [Laboratory of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); and others

    2009-07-24

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  6. AAS 227: Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  7. Foxa2 (HNF3beta) controls multiple genes implicated in metabolism-secretion coupling of glucose-induced insulin release

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haiyan; Gauthier, Benoît; Hagenfeldt-Johansson, Kerstin Arlette; Iezzi-Bakhtiari, Mariella; Wollheim, Claes

    2002-01-01

    The transcription factor Foxa2 is implicated in blood glucose homeostasis. Conditional expression of Foxa2 or its dominant-negative mutant DN-Foxa2 in INS-1 cells reveals that Foxa2 regulates the expression of genes important for glucose sensing in pancreatic beta-cells. Overexpression of Foxa2 results in blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, whereas induction of DN-Foxa2 causes a left shift of glucose-induced insulin release. The mRNA levels of GLUT2 and glucokinase are drastically d...

  8. Temperature effect on carbachol-induced depression of spontaneous quantal transmitter release in frog neuromuscular junction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strunsky, E. G.; Borisover, M. D.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, 8-9 (2001), s. 891-897 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011902; GA MŠk OK 267 Grant - others:RFBR(RU) 99-04-48286; EU(XX) Nesting Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : carbachol * temperature * acetylcholine release Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.638, year: 2001

  9. Pharmacological or genetic orexin 1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah eAluisio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors. The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C. which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient or genetic (permanent inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states.

  10. Repeated supra-maximal sprint cycling with and without sodium bicarbonate supplementation induces endothelial microparticle release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Richard J; Peart, Daniel J; Madden, Leigh A; Vince, Rebecca V

    2014-01-01

    Under normal homeostatic conditions, the endothelium releases microparticles (MPs), which are known to increase under stressful conditions and in disease states. CD105 (endoglin) and CD106 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) are expressed on the surface of endothelial cells and increased expression in response to stress may be observed. A randomised-controlled double-blinded study aimed to examine the use of endothelial MPs as a marker for the state of one's endothelium, as well as whether maintaining acid-base homeostasis affects the release of these MPs. This study tested seven healthy male volunteers, who completed a strenuous cycling protocol, with venous blood analysed for CD105+ and CD106+ MPs by flow cytometry at regular intervals. Prior to each trial participants consumed either 0.3 g·kg(-1) body mass of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), or 0.045 g·kg(-1) body mass of sodium chloride (NaCl). A significant rise in endothelial CD105+ MPs and CD106+ MPs (p<0.05) was observed at 90 min post-exercise. A significant trend was shown for these MPs to return to resting levels 180 min post-exercise in both groups. No significance was found between experimental groups, suggesting that maintaining acid-base variables closer to basal levels has little effect upon the endothelial stress response for this particular exercise mode. In conclusion, strenuous exercise is accompanied by MP release and the endothelium is able to rapidly recover in healthy individuals, whilst maintaining acid-base homeostasis does not attenuate the MP release from the endothelium after exercise.

  11. Dopamine release from serotonergic nerve fibers is reduced in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    OpenAIRE

    Nevalainen, Nina; af Bjerkén, Sara; Lundblad, Martin; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Strömberg, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    L-DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine) is the most commonly used treatment for symptomatic control in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Unfortunately, most patients develop severe side effects, such as dyskinesia, upon chronic L-DOPA treatment. The patophysiology of dyskinesia is unclear, however, involvement of serotonergic nerve fibers in converting L-DOPA to dopamine has been suggested. Therefore, potassium-evoked dopamine release was studied after local application of L-DOPA in the stria...

  12. Experimental transmission of AA amyloidosis by injecting the AA amyloid protein into interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Uchida, K; Chambers, J K; Tei, M; Shoji, A; Ushio, N; Nakayama, H

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of AA amyloidosis is high in humans with rheumatoid arthritis and several animal species, including cats and cattle with prolonged inflammation. AA amyloidosis can be experimentally induced in mice using severe inflammatory stimuli and a coinjection of AA amyloid; however, difficulties have been associated with transmitting AA amyloidosis to a different animal species, and this has been attributed to the "species barrier." The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mouse, a rodent model of human rheumatoid arthritis, has been used in the transmission of AA amyloid. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with mouse AA amyloid together with a subcutaneous pretreatment of 2% AgNO3, all mice from both strains that were injected with crude or purified murine AA amyloid developed AA amyloidosis. However, the amyloid index, which was determined by the intensity of AA amyloid deposition, was significantly higher in IL-1raKO mice than in BALB/c mice. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified bovine AA amyloid together with the pretreatment, 83% (5/6 cases) and 38% (3/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 17% (1/6 cases) and 0% (0/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. Similarly, when IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified feline AA amyloid, 33% (2/6 cases) and 88% (7/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 0% (0/6 cases) and 29% (2/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. These results indicated that IL-1raKO mice are a useful animal model for investigating AA amyloidogenesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. AhV_aPA-induced vasoconstriction involves the IP₃Rs-mediated Ca²⁺ releasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fuxing; Zou, Zhisong; Niu, Liwen; Li, Xu; Teng, Maikun

    2013-08-01

    AhV_aPA, the acidic PLA₂ purified from Agkistrodon halys pallas venom, was previously reported to possess a strong enzymatic activity and can remarkably induce a further contractile response on the 60 mM K⁺-induced contraction with an EC₅₀ in 369 nM on mouse thoracic aorta rings. In the present study, we found that the p-bromo-phenacyl-bromide (pBPB), which can completely inhibit the enzymatic activity of AhV_aPA, did not significantly reduce the contractile response on vessel rings induced by AhV_aPA, indicating that the vasoconstrictor effects of AhV_aPA are independent of the enzymatic activity. The inhibitor experiments showed that the contractile response induced by AhV_aPA is mainly attributed to the Ca²⁺ releasing from Ca²⁺ store, especially sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Detailed studies showed that the Ca²⁺ release from SR is related to the activation of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP₃Rs) rather than ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Furthermore, the vasoconstrictor effect could be strongly reduced by pre-incubation with heparin, indicating that the basic amino acid residues on the surface of AhV_aPA may be involved in the interaction between AhV_aPA and the molecular receptors. These findings offer new insights into the functions of snake PLA₂ and provide a novel pathogenesis of A. halys pallas venom. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Histamine induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts, via pannexin-1 hemichannels, leading to Ca2+ mobilization and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana Rita; Paramos-de-Carvalho, Diogo; Certal, Mariana; Costa, Maria Adelina; Costa, Cristina; Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Sévigny, Jean; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2013-09-20

    Changes in the regulation of connective tissue ATP-mediated mechano-transduction and remodeling may be an important link to the pathogenesis of chronic pain. It has been demonstrated that mast cell-derived histamine plays an important role in painful fibrotic diseases. Here we analyzed the involvement of ATP in the response of human subcutaneous fibroblasts to histamine. Acute histamine application caused a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) and ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts via H1 receptor activation. Histamine-induced [Ca(2+)]i rise was partially attenuated by apyrase, an enzyme that inactivates extracellular ATP, and by blocking P2 purinoceptors with pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid) tetrasodium salt and reactive blue 2. [Ca(2+)]i accumulation caused by histamine was also reduced upon blocking pannexin-1 hemichannels with (10)Panx, probenecid, or carbenoxolone but not when connexin hemichannels were inhibited with mefloquine or 2-octanol. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular exocytosis, also did not block histamine-induced [Ca(2+)]i mobilization. Prolonged exposure of human subcutaneous fibroblast cultures to histamine favored cell growth and type I collagen synthesis via the activation of H1 receptor. This effect was mimicked by ATP and its metabolite, ADP, whereas the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist, MRS2179, partially attenuated histamine-induced cell growth and type I collagen production. Expression of pannexin-1 and ADP-sensitive P2Y1 receptor on human subcutaneous fibroblasts was confirmed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In conclusion, histamine induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts, via pannexin-1 hemichannels, leading to [Ca(2+)]i mobilization and cell growth through the cooperation of H1 and P2 (probably P2Y1) receptors.

  15. Histamine Induces ATP Release from Human Subcutaneous Fibroblasts, via Pannexin-1 Hemichannels, Leading to Ca2+ Mobilization and Cell Proliferation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana Rita; Paramos-de-Carvalho, Diogo; Certal, Mariana; Costa, Maria Adelina; Costa, Cristina; Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Sévigny, Jean; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the regulation of connective tissue ATP-mediated mechano-transduction and remodeling may be an important link to the pathogenesis of chronic pain. It has been demonstrated that mast cell-derived histamine plays an important role in painful fibrotic diseases. Here we analyzed the involvement of ATP in the response of human subcutaneous fibroblasts to histamine. Acute histamine application caused a rise in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts via H1 receptor activation. Histamine-induced [Ca2+]i rise was partially attenuated by apyrase, an enzyme that inactivates extracellular ATP, and by blocking P2 purinoceptors with pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid) tetrasodium salt and reactive blue 2. [Ca2+]i accumulation caused by histamine was also reduced upon blocking pannexin-1 hemichannels with 10Panx, probenecid, or carbenoxolone but not when connexin hemichannels were inhibited with mefloquine or 2-octanol. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular exocytosis, also did not block histamine-induced [Ca2+]i mobilization. Prolonged exposure of human subcutaneous fibroblast cultures to histamine favored cell growth and type I collagen synthesis via the activation of H1 receptor. This effect was mimicked by ATP and its metabolite, ADP, whereas the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist, MRS2179, partially attenuated histamine-induced cell growth and type I collagen production. Expression of pannexin-1 and ADP-sensitive P2Y1 receptor on human subcutaneous fibroblasts was confirmed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In conclusion, histamine induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts, via pannexin-1 hemichannels, leading to [Ca2+]i mobilization and cell growth through the cooperation of H1 and P2 (probably P2Y1) receptors. PMID:23918924

  16. Glucose-induced time-dependent potentiation of insulin release, but not islet blood perfusion, in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Leif; Bodin, Birgitta; Källskog, Orjan

    2008-01-01

    Repeated administration of glucose in vivo leads to a time-dependent potentiation of insulin release. Glucose is also known to stimulate pancreatic islet blood flow, but whether this is associated with a time-dependent potentiation is unknown. We therefore repeatedly administered glucose to anesthetized rats and evaluated effects on insulin release and islet blood flow. Male Wistar-Furth rats, anesthetized with thiobutabarbital, were injected intravenously with 1 ml of saline or glucose at times 0, 30 and 60 min. The combinations used were saline + saline + saline (SSS), glucose + saline + saline (GSS), saline + saline + glucose (SSG) and glucose + glucose + glucose (GGG). Regional organ blood flow values were measured 3 min after the final injection with a microsphere technique, and at this time also serum insulin concentrations were determined with ELISA. Serum insulin concentrations as well as total pancreatic, pancreatic islet and duodenal blood flow were higher in SSG and GGG-treated rats when compared to those given SSS and GSS. However, only insulin concentrations, not blood flow values, were higher in GGG rats when compared to SSG animals. Glucose-induced time-dependent potentiation of insulin release occurs in vivo in thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats, but is not associated with a further increase in islet blood flow.

  17. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R; Ashmore, Jonathan F; Ahmed, Aamir

    2017-02-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca 2+ ] i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca 2+ ] i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca 2+ ] i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca 2+ ] i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca 2+ ] i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca 2+ ] i We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  18. Feeding induced by increasing doses of neuropeptide Y: dual effect on hypothalamic serotonin release in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Rosana C T; Telles, Monica M; Guimarães, Regina B; Novo, Neil F; Juliano, Yara; Nascimento, Cláudia M O; Ribeiro, Eliane B

    2004-08-01

    Endogenous neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels increase during fasting and before dark onset in rats. The feeding that follows these states elicits the release of serotonin in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), as part of the physiological mechanisms controlling satiety. With the hypothesis that exogenous NPY-induced feeding should also stimulate serotonin, we measured its release in the LH of non-fasted rats, which received a single intracerebroventricular injection of either 1.0, 2.0, or 5.0 microg of NPY. After 1.0 microg, the cumulative 2-h intake was of 13 g and serotonin release significantly increased (54% peak). These feeding and serotonergic responses were highly similar to the ones we observed in a previous study, in which feeding followed an overnight fast. Thus, the 1.0 microg NPY dose stimulated intake while preserving the normal serotonergic activation. Contrarily, as the NPY dose was increased to either 2.0 or 5.0 microg, the cumulative 2-h intakes were of 18 g, but the serotonergic stimulation was absent. It is suggested that this dual NPY effect relies on a finely tuned control mechanism, reflecting the existence of a narrow range of NPY levels within which the serotonergic stimulation resembles those seen in physiological states.

  19. Sound Waves Induce Neural Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ryanodine Receptor-Induced Calcium Release and Pyk2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yura; Park, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Jong Seob; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil; Jeon, Songhee

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown considerable promise as an adaptable cell source for use in tissue engineering and other therapeutic applications. The aims of this study were to develop methods to test the hypothesis that human MSCs could be differentiated using sound wave stimulation alone and to find the underlying mechanism. Human bone marrow (hBM)-MSCs were stimulated with sound waves (1 kHz, 81 dB) for 7 days and the expression of neural markers were analyzed. Sound waves induced neural differentiation of hBM-MSC at 1 kHz and 81 dB but not at 1 kHz and 100 dB. To determine the signaling pathways involved in the neural differentiation of hBM-MSCs by sound wave stimulation, we examined the Pyk2 and CREB phosphorylation. Sound wave induced an increase in the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and CREB at 45 min and 90 min, respectively, in hBM-MSCs. To find out the upstream activator of Pyk2, we examined the intracellular calcium source that was released by sound wave stimulation. When we used ryanodine as a ryanodine receptor antagonist, sound wave-induced calcium release was suppressed. Moreover, pre-treatment with a Pyk2 inhibitor, PF431396, prevented the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and suppressed sound wave-induced neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs. These results suggest that specific sound wave stimulation could be used as a neural differentiation inducer of hBM-MSCs.

  20. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in brominated diphenyl ether-47-induced inflammatory cytokine release from human extravillous trophoblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae-Ryung, E-mail: heaven@umich.edu; Kamau, Patricia W.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2014-01-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant compounds. Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47 is one of the most prevalent PBDE congeners found in human breast milk, serum and placenta. Despite the presence of PBDEs in human placenta, effects of PBDEs on placental cell function are poorly understood. The present study investigated BDE-47-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and its role in BDE-47-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine release in a first trimester human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. Exposure of HTR-8/SVneo cells for 4 h to 20 μM BDE-47 increased ROS generation 1.7 fold as measured by the dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay. Likewise, superoxide anion production increased approximately 5 fold at 10 and 15 μM and 9 fold at 20 μM BDE-47 with a 1-h exposure, as measured by cytochrome c reduction. BDE-47 (10, 15 and 20 μM) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 47–64.5% at 4, 8 and 24 h as assessed with the fluorescent probe Rh123. Treatment with 15 and 20 μM BDE-47 stimulated cellular release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 after 12 and 24-h exposures: the greatest increases were a 35-fold increased mRNA expression at 12 h and a 12-fold increased protein concentration at 24 h for IL-6. Antioxidant treatments (deferoxamine mesylate, (±)α-tocopherol, or tempol) suppressed BDE-47-stimulated IL-6 release by 54.1%, 56.3% and 37.7%, respectively, implicating a role for ROS in the regulation of inflammatory pathways in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Solvent (DMSO) controls exhibited statistically significantly decreased responses compared with non-treated controls for IL-6 release and IL-8 mRNA expression, but these responses were not consistent across experiments and times. Nonetheless, it is possible that DMSO (used to dissolve BDE-47) may have attenuated the stimulatory actions of BDE-47 on cytokine responses. Because abnormal activation of proinflammatory responses can disrupt trophoblast functions

  1. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in brominated diphenyl ether-47-induced inflammatory cytokine release from human extravillous trophoblasts in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hae-Ryung; Kamau, Patricia W.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant compounds. Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47 is one of the most prevalent PBDE congeners found in human breast milk, serum and placenta. Despite the presence of PBDEs in human placenta, effects of PBDEs on placental cell function are poorly understood. The present study investigated BDE-47-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and its role in BDE-47-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine release in a first trimester human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. Exposure of HTR-8/SVneo cells for 4 h to 20 μM BDE-47 increased ROS generation 1.7 fold as measured by the dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay. Likewise, superoxide anion production increased approximately 5 fold at 10 and 15 μM and 9 fold at 20 μM BDE-47 with a 1-h exposure, as measured by cytochrome c reduction. BDE-47 (10, 15 and 20 μM) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 47–64.5% at 4, 8 and 24 h as assessed with the fluorescent probe Rh123. Treatment with 15 and 20 μM BDE-47 stimulated cellular release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 after 12 and 24-h exposures: the greatest increases were a 35-fold increased mRNA expression at 12 h and a 12-fold increased protein concentration at 24 h for IL-6. Antioxidant treatments (deferoxamine mesylate, (±)α-tocopherol, or tempol) suppressed BDE-47-stimulated IL-6 release by 54.1%, 56.3% and 37.7%, respectively, implicating a role for ROS in the regulation of inflammatory pathways in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Solvent (DMSO) controls exhibited statistically significantly decreased responses compared with non-treated controls for IL-6 release and IL-8 mRNA expression, but these responses were not consistent across experiments and times. Nonetheless, it is possible that DMSO (used to dissolve BDE-47) may have attenuated the stimulatory actions of BDE-47 on cytokine responses. Because abnormal activation of proinflammatory responses can disrupt trophoblast functions

  2. Thrombin induces macrophage migration inhibitory factor release and upregulation in urothelium: a possible contribution to bladder inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L Vera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed by urothelial cells that mediates bladder inflammation. We investigated the effect of stimulation with thrombin, a Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR1 agonist, on MIF release and MIF mRNA upregulation in urothelial cells.MIF and PAR1 expression was examined in normal human immortalized urothelial cells (UROtsa using real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting and dual immunostaining. MIF and PAR1 immunostaining was also examined in rat urothelium. The effect of thrombin stimulation (100 nM on urothelial MIF release was examined in UROtsa cells (in vitro and in rats (in vivo. UROtsa cells were stimulated with thrombin, culture media were collected at different time points and MIF amounts were determined by ELISA. Pentobarbital anesthetized rats received intravesical saline (control, thrombin, or thrombin +2% lidocaine (to block nerve activity for 1 hr, intraluminal fluid was collected and MIF amounts determined by ELISA. Bladder or UROtsa MIF mRNA was measured using real time RT-PCR.UROtsa cells constitutively express MIF and PAR1 and immunostaining for both was observed in these cells and in the basal and intermediate layers of rat urothelium. Thrombin stimulation of urothelial cells resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent increase in MIF release both in vitro (UROtsa; 2.8-fold increase at 1 hr and in vivo (rat; 4.5-fold while heat-inactivated thrombin had no effect. In rats, thrombin-induced MIF release was reduced but not abolished by intravesical lidocaine treatment. Thrombin also upregulated MIF mRNA in UROtsa cells (3.3-fold increase and in the rat bladder (2-fold increase where the effect was reduced (1.4-fold by lidocaine treatment.Urothelial cells express both MIF and PAR1. Activation of urothelial PAR1 receptors, either by locally generated thrombin or proteases present in the urine, may mediate bladder inflammation by inducing urothelial MIF release and

  3. Differential effects of nitric oxide gas and nitric oxide donors on depolarization-induced release of [3H]norepinephrine from rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, A K; Woodward, J J

    1994-11-01

    The NO-generating compounds sodium nitroprusside (NP), nitroglycerin (NTG), and isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) all significantly inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-stimulated release of tritiated norepinephrine ([3H]NA) from preloaded hippocampal slices of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with IC50's of 114 microM, 1.2 mM, and 1.7 mM respectively. NTG and ISDN also inhibited KCl-stimulated release, while NP had no significant effect on KCl-stimulated release. Although these results suggest that the inhibitory effects of these compounds were mediated by release of NO, NTG and ISDN did not generate detectable levels of NO, and iron-cyanide complexes similar in structure to NP but lacking NO also inhibited release. In contrast, both S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) and authentic NO gas significantly enhanced NMDA-stimulated release of [3H]NA (EC50's: 331 and 3.4 microM respectively). This enhancement was not selective for NMDA-stimulated release, since both SNAP and NO potentiated KCl-stimulated release as well. In addition, NO gas significantly enhanced NMDA-stimulated release of tritiated dopamine ([3H]DA) from striatal slices and [3H]NA from cortical and cerebellar slices. Analogs of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) had no significant effect on NMDA-stimulated transmitter release, suggesting that the observed increase in release is via a cGMP-independent mechanism. While exogenous NO enhanced both NMDA- and KCl-stimulated neurotransmitter release, it appears that endogenous NO does not play a role in this depolarization-induced release since NO synthase inhibitors did not significantly reduce NMDA-stimulated [3H]NA release. The possibility remains that endogenous NO could modulate neurotransmitter release in other circumstances.

  4. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ by Rosiglitazone Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Release of High Mobility Group Box 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Seok Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are shown to modulate the pathological status of sepsis by regulating the release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a well-known late proinflammatory mediator of sepsis. Ligand-activated PPARs markedly inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS induced release of HMGB1 in RAW 264.7 cells. Among the ligands of PPAR, the effect of rosiglitazone, a specific ligand for PPARγ, was superior in the inhibition of HMGB1 release induced by LPS. This effect was observed in cells that received rosiglitazone before LPS or after LPS treatment, indicating that rosiglitazone is effective in both treatment and prevention. Ablation of PPARγ with small interfering RNA or GW9662-mediated inhibition of PPARγ abolished the effect of rosiglitazone on HMGB1 release. Furthermore, the overexpression of PPARγ markedly potentiated the inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on HMGB1 release. In addition, rosiglitazone inhibited LPS-induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 signal molecules, suggesting a possible mechanism by which rosiglitazone modulates HMGB1 release. Notably, the administration of rosiglitazone to mice improved survival rates in an LPS-induced animal model of endotoxemia, where reduced levels of circulating HMGB1 were demonstrated. Taken together, these results suggest that PPARs play an important role in the cellular response to inflammation by inhibiting HMGB1 release.

  5. Canine neutrophil extracellular traps release induced by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora Caninum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengkai Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neosporosis is considered as one of the main causes of abortion and severe economic losses in dairy industry. The Canis genus serving as one of the confirmed definitive hosts of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum (N. caninum plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, the effects of N. caninum on its definitive hosts of neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs formation remain unclear. In the present study, N. caninum tachyzoite-induced canine NETs formation was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Visualization of DNA decorated with H3, NE and MPO within N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs were examined using fluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. Furthermore, the formation of canine NETs was quantified using Sytox Green staining, and the LDH levels in supernatants were examined by an LDH Cytotoxicity Assay® kit. The results clearly showed that NETs-like structures were induced by N. caninum tachyzoites, and the major components within these structures induced by N. caninum tachyzoite were further confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy visualization. These results suggest that N. caninum tachyzoites strongly induced NETs formation in canine PMN. In functional inhibition assays, the blockings of NADPH oxidase, NE, MPO, SOCE, ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways significantly inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation, which suggests that N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation is a NADPH oxidase-, NE-, MPO-, SOCE-, ERK 1/2- and p38 MAPK-dependent cell death process. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the formation of NETs in canine PMN against N. caninum infection.

  6. Optogenetic release of ACh induces rhythmic bursts of perisomatic IPSCs in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagode, Daniel A; Tang, Ai-Hui; Karson, Miranda A; Klugmann, Matthias; Alger, Bradley E

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) influences a vast array of phenomena in cortical systems. It alters many ionic conductances and neuronal firing behavior, often by regulating membrane potential oscillations in populations of cells. Synaptic inhibition has crucial roles in many forms of oscillation, and cholinergic mechanisms regulate both oscillations and synaptic inhibition. In vitro investigations using bath-application of cholinergic receptor agonists, or bulk tissue electrical stimulation to release endogenous ACh, have led to insights into cholinergic function, but questions remain because of the relative lack of selectivity of these forms of stimulation. To investigate the effects of selective release of ACh on interneurons and oscillations, we used an optogenetic approach in which the light-sensitive non-selective cation channel, Channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2), was virally delivered to cholinergic projection neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DBB) of adult mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the control of the choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) promoter. Acute hippocampal slices obtained from these animals weeks later revealed ChR2 expression in cholinergic axons. Brief trains of blue light pulses delivered to untreated slices initiated bursts of ACh-evoked, inhibitory post-synaptic currents (L-IPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal cells that lasted for 10's of seconds after the light stimulation ceased. L-IPSC occurred more reliably in slices treated with eserine and a very low concentration of 4-AP, which were therefore used in most experiments. The rhythmic, L-IPSCs were driven primarily by muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs), and could be suppressed by endocannabinoid release from pyramidal cells. Finally, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) of local field potentials (LFPs) were significantly cross-correlated with the L-IPSCs, and reversal of the LFPs near s. pyramidale confirmed that the LFPs were driven by perisomatic inhibition. This optogenetic approach may be a

  7. Potassium currents induced by hydrostatic pressure modulate membrane potential and transmitter release in vestibular type II hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong Dinh, Thien An; Haasler, Thorsten; Homann, Georg; Jüngling, Eberhard; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    Vestibular type II hair cells respond to increases in the hydrostatic pressure with pressure-dependent K(+) currents. We examined whether such currents may modulate transmitter release (assessed as membrane capacitance increments) by altering membrane potentials and voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents. Capacitance increments were dependent on voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx. Stimulating currents (0.7 nA) in current clamp induced depolarisations that were more negative by 8.7 +/- 2.1 mV when the bath height was elevated from 0.2 to 0.5 cm. In voltage clamp, protocols were used that simulated the time course of the membrane potential in current clamp at either low (control) or high hydrostatic pressure (high bath). The low bath protocol induced significantly larger Ca(2+) currents and increases in capacitance than the high bath protocol. We conclude that pressure-dependent K(+) currents may alter the voltage response of vestibular hair cells to an extent critical for Ca(2+) currents and transmitter release. This mechanism may contribute to vestibular dysfunction in Meniere's disease.

  8. Laser-induced-breakdown-spectroscopy-based detection of metal particles released into the air during combustion of solid propellants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Morgan; Niemiec, Nicholas A; Demko, Andrew R; Petersen, Eric L; Kulatilaka, Waruna D

    2018-03-10

    Numerous metals and metal compounds are often added to propellants and explosives to tailor their properties such as heat release rate and specific impulse. When these materials combust, these metals can be released into the air, causing adverse health effects such as pulmonary and cardiovascular disease, particulate-matter-induced allergies, and cancer. Hence, robust, field-deployable methods are needed to detect and quantify these suspended metallic particles in air, identify their sources, and develop mitigation strategies. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique for elemental detection, commonly used on solids and liquids. In this study, we explored nanosecond-duration LIBS for detecting airborne metals during reactions of solid propellant strands, resulting from additives of aluminum (Al), copper, lead, lead stearate, and mercury chloride. Using the second harmonic of a 10-ns-duration 10-Hz, Nd:YAG laser, plasma was generated in the gas-phase exhaust plume of burning propellant strands containing the target metals. Under the current experimental conditions, the ns-LIBS scheme was capable of detecting Al at concentrations of 5%, 10%, and 16% by weight in the propellant strand. As the weight percentage increased, the LIBS signal was detected by more laser shots, up to a point where the system transition from being nonhomogeneous to a more-uniform distribution of particles. Further measurements and increased understanding of the reacting flow field are necessary to quantify the effects of other metal additives besides Al.

  9. Arachidonic acid triggers [Ca2+]i increases in rat round spermatids by a likely GPR activation, ERK signalling and ER/acidic compartments Ca2+ release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillamanque, Joaquin; Sanchez-Tusie, Ana; Carmona, Emerson M; Treviño, Claudia L; Sandoval, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Osses, Nelson; Reyes, Juan G

    2017-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a compound secreted by Sertoli cells (SC) in a FSH-dependent manner, is able to induce the release of Ca2+ from internal stores in round spermatids and pachytene spermatocytes. In this study, the possible site(s) of action of AA in round spermatids, the signalling pathways associated and the intracellular Ca2+ stores targeted by AA-induced signalling were pharmacologically characterized by measuring intracellular Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ probes. Our results suggest that AA acts by interacting with a fatty acid G protein coupled receptor, initiating a G protein signalling cascade that may involve PLA2 and ERK activation, which in turn opens intracellular ryanodine-sensitive channels as well as NAADP-sensitive channels in acidic intracellular Ca2+ stores. The results presented here also suggest that AMPK and PKA modulate this AA-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores in round spermatids. We propose that unsaturated free fatty acid lipid signalling in the seminiferous tubule is a novel regulatory component of rat spermatogenesis.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing hormone induces depression-like changes of sleep electroencephalogram in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler, P; Kluge, M; Gamringer, W; Wetter, T C; Yassouridis, A; Uhr, M; Rupprecht, R; Steiger, A

    2016-12-01

    We reported previously that repetitive intravenous injections of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) around sleep onset prompt depression-like changes in certain sleep and endocrine activity parameters (e.g. decrease of slow-wave sleep during the second half of the night, blunted growth hormone peak, elevated cortisol concentration during the first half of the night). Furthermore a sexual dimorphism of the sleep-endocrine effects of the hormones growth hormone-releasing hormone and ghrelin was observed. In the present placebo-controlled study we investigated the effect of pulsatile administration of 4×50μg CRH on sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) and nocturnal cortisol and GH concentration in young healthy women. After CRH compared to placebo, intermittent wakefulness increased during the total night and the sleep efficiency index decreased. During the first third of the night, REM sleep and stage 2 sleep increased and sleep stage 3 decreased. Cortisol concentration was elevated throughout the night and during the first and second third of the night. GH secretion remained unchanged. Our data suggest that after CRH some sleep and endocrine activity parameters show also depression-like changes in healthy women. These changes are more distinct in women than in men. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermal desorption and bombardment-induced release of deuterium implanted into stainless steels at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, G.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectra have been obtained for low energy (15-750 eV) deuterons implanted into types 321 and 304 stainless steel, to total fluences in the range 10 13 - 10 17 deuterons/cm 2 . In each case the spectra show a peak at about 350 K, but in the 321 steel there is a second peak in the region of 900 K, the population and peak temperature of which increase with energy. Activation energies of 0.99 and 2.39 eV and a rate constant of 7 x 10 15 /s have been derived for the peaks and it is thought that the first peak corresponds to release from sites close to the surface, while the second peak may be related to trapping at impurities such as Ti. Measurements have also been made of the release of deuterium resulting from post-implantation bombardment with hydrogen ions. It is found that depletion of the first peak in the 321 steel is the result of gas sputtering, but depletion of the second peak is the result of the formation of HD during desorption, while depletion of the peak in the 304 stainless steel also results from HD formation even though this peak is the same as the first peak in the 321 steel. Estimates have also been made of the deuterium self-sputtering cross section at various energies, which show a monotonic decrease as energy increases. (Auth.)

  12. Leishmania infantum Induces the Release of sTREM-1 in Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, Lays G. S.; Magalhães, Lucas S.; Santos-Filho, Marcello A. A.; Peres, Nalu T. A.; Corrêa, Cristiane B.; Tanajura, Diego M.; Silva, Angela M.; Lipscomb, Michael W.; Borges, Valéria M.; Jesus, Amélia R.; Almeida, Roque P.; de Moura, Tatiana R.

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a systemic transmissible disease that remains to be a major global health problem. The inflammatory response during VL is characterized by the release of several cytokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators. Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM) are a group of evolutionarily conserved membrane-bound surface receptors expressed on neutrophils and monocytes. Engagement of TREM-1 directs intracellular signaling events that drive cytokine production, degranulation, and phagocytosis. In certain inflammatory-associated diseases, TREM-1 can also be found as a soluble form (sTREM-1), which can negatively regulate TREM-1 receptor signaling. In these studies, we now find that high levels of circulating sTREM-1 correlate directly with VL disease severity. In particular, high levels of sTREM-1 were observed in non-survivor VL patients. Furthermore, these levels of sTREM-1 positively correlated with liver size and negatively correlated with leukocyte counts and hemoglobin concentration. Moreover, we found that neutrophils exposure in vitro to Leishmania infantum modulates TREM-1, DAP12, and IL-8 gene expression, while also increasing release of sTREM-1. Finally, results revealed that higher sTREM-1 levels are associated with increasing parasite ratio. Taken together, these studies suggest that L. infantum may modulate TREM-1 in neutrophils and high levels of this molecule is associated with severe VL. PMID:29201022

  13. Characterization of abrasion-induced nanoparticle release from paints into liquids and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanski, L.; Gaborieau, A.; Guiot, A.; Uzu, G.; Chatenet, J.; Tardif, F.

    2011-07-01

    Two standard methods for the characterization of the abrasion nanoparticle release into air and liquid from coatings containing nanoparticles were developed. Details of the abrasion processes and the measurement methods are shown. Paints were formulated in an industrial facility. Standard abrasion conditions in wet environments were simulated. The size distribution of the particles abraded into liquid was analyzed by a laser granulometer: submicrometric and micrometric particles were observed, but no nanometric particles. The nanoparticles released in liquid were deposited on filters for SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis. No free or agglomerated nanoparticles were observed by SEM: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix. The same coatings were abraded in the air using another standard method. The ELPI (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor) was used to determine the number size distribution of the dust generated. Abrasion is found to produce submicrometric and micrometric particles in the air but no nanoparticles. Further characterizations by SEM confirmed that no free or agglomerated nanoparticles were emitted: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix.

  14. Characterization of abrasion-induced nanoparticle release from paints into liquids and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golanski, L; Guiot, A; Uzu, G; Tardif, F; Gaborieau, A; Chatenet, J

    2011-01-01

    Two standard methods for the characterization of the abrasion nanoparticle release into air and liquid from coatings containing nanoparticles were developed. Details of the abrasion processes and the measurement methods are shown. Paints were formulated in an industrial facility. Standard abrasion conditions in wet environments were simulated. The size distribution of the particles abraded into liquid was analyzed by a laser granulometer: submicrometric and micrometric particles were observed, but no nanometric particles. The nanoparticles released in liquid were deposited on filters for SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis. No free or agglomerated nanoparticles were observed by SEM: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix. The same coatings were abraded in the air using another standard method. The ELPI (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor) was used to determine the number size distribution of the dust generated. Abrasion is found to produce submicrometric and micrometric particles in the air but no nanoparticles. Further characterizations by SEM confirmed that no free or agglomerated nanoparticles were emitted: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix.

  15. Analysis of explosion-induced releases of toxic materials at an environmental restoration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, S.G.; Moon, W.H. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Prior to 1988, a variety of materials were buried on the US DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. Records of the disposal operations are incomplete and toxic materials may have been placed adjacent to potential explosives. One of the safety concerns in conducting an environmental restoration project at the burial sites, is the possibility of an explosion which could release toxic materials to the atmosphere. A safety analysis examined the consequences of such releases by first postulating an upper bound for the strength of an explosive. A correlation, developed by Steindler and Seefeldt of Argonne National Laboratory, was then used to estimate the amount and particle-size distribution of the material that could become airborne from the explosion. The estimated amount of airborne material was the source term in an atmospheric dispersion model which was used to calculate infinite-time, concentration-time integrals and 5-minute, time- weighted average concentrations at locations down-wind from the explosion. The dispersion model includes particle deposition as a function of particle-size distribution class. The concentration-time integrals and average concentrations were compared to published guidelines to assess the consequences of an accidental explosion

  16. Adiponectin Inhibits LPS-Induced HMGB1 Release through an AMP Kinase and Heme Oxygenase-1-Dependent Pathway in RAW 264 Macrophage Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elfeky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1 is a late inflammatory mediator that exaggerates septic symptoms. Adiponectin, an adipokine, has potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible effects of adiponectin on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced HMGB1 release are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of full length adiponectin on HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated RAW 264 macrophage cells. Treatment of the cells with LPS alone significantly induced HMGB1 release associated with HMGB1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytosol. However, prior treatment with adiponectin suppressed LPS-induced HMGB1 release and translocation. The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin- (IL- 10 similarly suppressed LPS-induced HMGB1 release. Adiponectin treatment decreased toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 mRNA expression and increased heme oxygenase- (HO- 1 mRNA expression without inducing IL-10 mRNA, while IL-10 treatment decreased TLR2 and HMGB1 mRNA expression and increased the expression of IL-10 and HO-1 mRNA. Treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP completely prevented the suppression of HMGB1 release by adiponectin but only partially inhibited that induced by IL-10. Treatment with compound C, an AMP kinase (AMPK inhibitor, abolished the increase in HO-1 expression and the suppression of HMGB1 release mediated by adiponectin. In conclusion, our results indicate that adiponectin suppresses HMGB1 release by LPS through an AMPK-mediated and HO-1-dependent IL-10-independent pathway.

  17. Shoot inversion-induced ethylene in Pharbitis nil induces the release of apical dominance by restricting shoot elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    Shoot inversion induces outgrowth of the highest lateral bud (HLB) adjacent to the bend in the stem in Pharbitis nil. In order to determine whether or not ethylene produced by shoot inversion plays a direct role in promoting or inhibiting bud outgrowth, comparisons were made of endogenous levels of ethylene in the HLB and HLB node of plants with and without inverted shoots. That no changes were found suggests that the control of apical dominance does not involve the direction action of ethylene. This conclusion is further supported by evidence that the direct application of ethylene inhibitors or ethrel to inactive or induced lateral buds has no significant effect on bud outgrowth. The hypothesis that ethylene evolved during shoot inversion indirectly promotes the outgrowth of the highest lateral bud (HLB) in restricting terminal bud (TB) growth is found to be supported by the following observations: (1) the restriction of TB growth appears to occur before the beginning of HLB outgrowth; (2) the treatment of the inverted portion of the shoot with AgNO3, an inhibitor of ethylene action, dramatically eliminates both the restriction of TB growth and the promotion of HLB outgrowth which usually accompany shoot inversion; and (3) the treatment of the upper shoot of an upright plant with ethrel mimics shoot inversion by retarding upper shoot growth and inducing outgrowth of the lateral bud basipetal to the treated region.

  18. DsbA-L prevents obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance by suppressing the mtDNA release-activated cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic inflammation in adipose tissue plays a key role in obesity-induced insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms underlying obesity-induced inflammation remain elusive. Here we show that obesity promotes mtDNA release into the cytosol, where it triggers inflammatory responses by activating the...

  19. Lysophosphatidylserine-induced release of intra-cellular amines in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Bigon, E.; Bruni, A.; Mietto, L.; Toffano, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the presence of mouse plasma, lysophosphatidylserine stimulates histamine secretion from isolated mast cells. The extensive modification of carbohydrate metabolism produced by lysophosphatidylserine in mice was largely prevented by the antihistaminic drug, pyrilamine. However, to prevent completely the change in carbohydrate metabolism induced by lysophosphatidylserine the administration of an antihistamine and an adrenoceptor antagonist was required. It is concluded that the effect of lys...

  20. Validation of basophil histamine release against the autologous serum skin test and outcome of serum-induced basophil histamine release studies in a large population of chronic urticaria patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, M H; Grattan, C E H; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous histamine-releasing factors (HRFs) are involved in 30-60% of patients with chronic urticaria (CU). Evidence for their existence comes from in vivo studies of autoreactivity with the autologous serum skin test (ASST), in vitro immunoassays demonstrating autoantibodies against the immuno......Endogenous histamine-releasing factors (HRFs) are involved in 30-60% of patients with chronic urticaria (CU). Evidence for their existence comes from in vivo studies of autoreactivity with the autologous serum skin test (ASST), in vitro immunoassays demonstrating autoantibodies against...... the immunoglobulin E (IgE) or the high affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRI) and serum-induced histamine release (HR) from basophils and mast cells. We have examined the correlation between the ASST and a new basophil histamine-releasing assay (the HR-Urtikaria test) in a group of well-characterized CU patients...

  1. Role and mechanism of AT1-AA in the pathogenesis of HELLP syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Shurui; Wang, Yuxian; Sun, Shuqing; Zheng, Yanqian; Jin, Zhu; Zhi, Jianming

    2018-01-10

    HELLP syndrome remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide, which symptoms include hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count. The objective of this study was to determine whether HELLP is associated with AT1-AA. The positive rate and titer of AT1-AA in plasma from pregnant women were determined, and the correlation of AT1-AA titer with the grade of HELLP was analyzed. A HELLP rat model established by intravenous injection of AT1-AA. Our experimental results show the AT1-AA titer and positive rate were significantly higher in HELLP group, and AT1-AA titer were positively correlated with the level of TNF-α and ET-1 in plasma and the grade of HELLP syndrome. The results of animal experiments showed that the typical features of HELLP in the pregnant rats after AT1-AA injection. The levels of TNF-α and ET-1 in plasma and liver tissue were significantly increased in AT1-AA-treated rats compared with control rats. The HELLP syndrome induced by AT1-AA was attenuated markedly after administration of losartan. These data support the hypothesis that one the potential pathway that AT1-AA induce damage to capillary endothelial cells and liver during pregnancy is through activation of TNF-α and ET-1.

  2. Experimental immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice: cyclosporin A fails to protect against AA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knospe, W.H.; Steinberg, D.; Gratwohl, A.; Speck, B.

    1984-01-01

    Immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice was induced by the i.v. injection of 10(7) lymph node cells (LNC) from H-2k identical but Mls mismatched CBA/J donor mice into previously irradiated (600 rad total body gamma) C3H/HeJ mice. Cyclosporin A (CsA), 25 mg/kg, was administered subcutaneously from day -1 to day 30. Control mice included C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad alone, C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad plus CsA as above, and C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad total body irradiation followed by 10(7) LNC from CBA/J donors. CsA failed to prevent lethal AA. These results suggest that the pathogenetic mechanisms operating in immunologically mediated AA differ from the mechanisms operating in rodents transplanted with allogeneically mismatched marrow or spleen cells which develop graft-versus-host disease. The results are consistent with a non-T cell-dependent mechanism causing the AA

  3. Inhibition of breast cancer-cell glutamate release with sulfasalazine limits cancer-induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungard, Robert G; Seidlitz, Eric P; Singh, Gurmit

    2014-01-01

    Cancer in bone is frequently a result of metastases from distant sites, particularly from the breast, lung, and prostate. Pain is a common and often severe pathological feature of cancers in bone, and is a significant impediment to the maintenance of quality of life of patients living with bone metastases. Cancer cell lines have been demonstrated to release significant amounts of the neurotransmitter and cell-signalling molecule l-glutamate via the system xC(-) cystine/glutamate antiporter. We have developed a novel mouse model of breast cancer bone metastases to investigate the impact of inhibiting cancer cell glutamate transporters on nociceptive behaviour. Immunodeficient mice were inoculated intrafemorally with the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, then treated 14days later via mini-osmotic pumps inserted intraperitoneally with sulfasalazine, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine, or vehicle. Both sulfasalazine and (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine attenuated in vitro cancer cell glutamate release in a dose-dependent manner via the system xC(-) transporter. Animals treated with sulfasalazine displayed reduced nociceptive behaviours and an extended time until the onset of behavioural evidence of pain. Animals treated with a lower dose of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine did not display this reduction in nociceptive behaviour. These results suggest that a reduction in glutamate secretion from cancers in bone with the system xC(-) inhibitor sulfasalazine may provide some benefit for treating the often severe and intractable pain associated with bone metastases. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Release of atrial natriuretic peptide from rat myocardium in vitro: effect of minoxidil-induced hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, P.; Taskinen, T.; Leppäluoto, J.; Ruskoaho, H.

    1990-01-01

    1. Ventricular hypertrophy is characterized by stimulation of ventricular synthesis of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). To examine the role of ventricular ANP levels in the secretion of ANP into the circulation, atrial and ventricular levels of immunoreactive-ANP (IR-ANP) as well as ANP messenger RNA (mRNA), and the release of IR-ANP from isolated perfused hearts, both before and after atrialectomy, were measured simultaneously in control and minoxidil-treated Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. 2. IR-ANP levels in the ventricles of untreated, 12 month-old SHR with severe ventricular hypertrophy were increased when compared to age-matched WKY rats. Minoxidil treatment for 8 weeks in both strains resulted in a decrease in mean arterial pressure and increases in ventricular weight to body weight ratios, plasma IR-ANP concentrations (in WKY from 133 +/- 20 to 281 +/- 34 pg ml-1, P less than 0.01; in SHR from 184 +/- 38 to 339 +/- 61 pg ml-1, P less than 0.05), and in ventricular IR-ANP contents (in WKY: 53%; in SHR: 41%). A highly significant correlation was found between ventricular IR-ANP content and ventricular weight to body weight ratio (r = 0.59, P less than 0.001, n = 26). 3. When studied in vitro, in isolated perfused heart preparations, the hypertrophied ventricular tissue after atrialectomy secreted more ANP into the perfusate than ventricles of the control hearts; ventricles contributed 28%, 22%, 18% and 15% of the total ANP release to perfusate in the minoxidil-treated SHR, control SHR, minoxidil-treated WKY and control WKY, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2141796

  5. AAS 228: Day 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  6. Macrophages induce resistance to 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in colorectal cancer through the release of putrescine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Yujuan; Hao, Lijun; Hou, Along; Chen, Xiaozhen; Li, Yifei; Wang, Rui; Luo, Peng; Ruan, Zhihua; Ou, Juanjuan; Shi, Chunmeng; Miao, Hongming; Liang, Houjie

    2016-10-28

    The development of chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a major obstacle for sustained effective treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), with the mechanisms being not fully understood. Here we demonstrated that tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) became activated during treatment with 5-FU and secreted factors that protected the CRC cells against chemotherapy with 5-FU. By performing metabolomics analysis, we identified putrescine, a member of polyamines, inducing resistance to 5-FU-triggered CRC apoptosis and tumor suppression via JNK-caspase-3 pathway. Noteworthily, either pharmacological or genetic blockage of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) prevented TAMs-induced chemoresistance to 5-FU in vitro and in vivo. Our findings show that TAMs are potent mediators of resistance to 5-FU chemotherapy and uncover potential targets to enhance chemotherapy sensitivity in patients with CRC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 modulates NOD2-induced cytokine release and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R Spalinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 are associated with the risk to develop inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. PTPN22 is involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell receptor signaling, but although it is highly expressed in innate immune cells, its function in other signaling pathways is less clear. Here, we study whether loss of PTPN22 controls muramyl-dipeptide (MDP-induced signaling and effects in immune cells. MATERIAL & METHODS: Stable knockdown of PTPN22 was induced in THP-1 cells by shRNA transduction prior to stimulation with the NOD2 ligand MDP. Cells were analyzed for signaling protein activation and mRNA expression by Western blot and quantitative PCR; cytokine secretion was assessed by ELISA, autophagosome induction by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC were obtained from PTPN22 knockout mice or wild-type animals. RESULTS: MDP-treatment induced PTPN22 expression and activity in human and mouse cells. Knockdown of PTPN22 enhanced MDP-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-isoforms p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase as well as canonical NF-κB signaling molecules in THP-1 cells and BMDC derived from PTPN22 knockout mice. Loss of PTPN22 enhanced mRNA levels and secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in THP-1 cells and PTPN22 knockout BMDC. Additionally, loss of PTPN22 resulted in increased, MDP-mediated autophagy in human and mouse cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that PTPN22 controls NOD2 signaling, and loss of PTPN22 renders monocytes more reactive towards bacterial products, what might explain the association of PTPN22 variants with IBD pathogenesis.

  8. Ammonia Released by Streptomyces aburaviensis Induces Droplet Formation in Streptomyces violaceoruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kathrin; Spiteller, Dieter

    2017-08-01

    Streptomyces violaceoruber grown in co-culture with Streptomyces aburaviensis produces an about 17-fold higher volume of droplets on its aerial mycelium than in single-culture. Physical separation of the Streptomyces strains by either a plastic barrier or by a dialysis membrane, which allowed communication only by the exchange of volatile compounds or diffusible compounds in the medium, respectively, still resulted in enhanced droplet formation. The application of molecular sieves to bioassays resulted in the attenuation of the droplet-inducing effect of S. aburaviensis indicating the absorption of the compound. 1 H-NMR analysis of molecular-sieve extracts and the selective indophenol-blue reaction revealed that the volatile droplet-inducing compound is ammonia. The external supply of ammonia in biologically relevant concentrations of ≥8 mM enhanced droplet formation in S. violaceoruber in a similar way to S. aburaviensis. Ammonia appears to trigger droplet production in many Streptomyces strains because four out of six Streptomyces strains exposed to ammonia exhibited induced droplet production.

  9. Lateral hypothalamus orexinergic system modulates the stress effect on pentylenetetrazol induced seizures through corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpour, Maryam; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoud; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Abrari, Kataneh; Goudarzi, Iran

    2016-11-01

    Stress is a trigger factor for seizure initiation which activates hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis as well other brain areas. In this respect, corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and lateral hypothalamus (LH) orexinergic system are involved in seizure occurrence. In this study, we investigated the role of LH area and orexin expression in (mediation of) stress effect on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) -induced seizures with hippocampal involvement. Two mild foot shock stresses were applied to intact and adrenalectomized animals; with or without CRHr1 blocking (NBI 27914) in the LH area. Then, changes in orexin production were evaluated by RT-PCR. Intravenous PTZ infusion (25 mg/ml) -induced convulsions were scored upon modified Racine scale. Finally, hippocampal glutamate and GABA were evaluated to study excitability changes. We demonstrated that the duration and severity of convulsions in stress-induced as well as adrenalectomized group were increased. Plasma corticosterone (CRT) level and orexin mRNA expression were built up in the stress and/or seizure groups. Furthermore, glutamate and GABA content was increased and decreased respectively due to stress and seizures. In contrast, rats receiving CRHr1 inhibitor showed reduced severity and duration of seizures, increased GABA, decreased glutamate and corticosterone and also orexin mRNA compared to the inhibitor free rats. Stress and adrenalectomy induced augmenting effect on seizure severity and duration and the subsequent reduction due to CRHr1 blocking with parallel orexin mRNA changes, indicated the likely involvement of CRH1r induced orexin expression of the LH in gating stress effect on convulsions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Drentsche Aa valley system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, W. de.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis is composed of five papers concerned with Late Quaternary geology and geomorphology of the Aa valley system. The correlation and chronostratigraphic position of the layers have been established by radiocarbon dating. (Auth.)

  11. Enkephalinase inhibitors potentiate tackykinin-induced release of /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled macromolecules from ferret trachea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borson, D.B.; Gold, M.; Varsano, S.; Caughey, G.; Ramachandran, J.; Nadel, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    To study the roles of tachykinins and endogenous proteinases in regulating secretion from ferret tracheal glands, the authors measured the release of /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled macromolecules after incubating segments of trachea in Ussing chambers in the presence of /sup 35/SO/sub 4/. 85% of the total macromolecular radioactivity was in fractions of molecular weights greater than or equal to 10/sup 6/. The response to substance P (SP) was concentration-dependent, with a threshold of 10/sup -9/ M, and responses to 10/sup -6/M and 10/sup -5/M of 87 +/- 9 and 156 +/- 26 pmol/cm/sup 2//h, respectively (n = 6 ea). The enkephalinase inhibitor, thiorphan, increased the secretory response to SP (10/sup -6/M) in a concentration-dependent fashion, with a threshold of 10/sup -8/M, and a response to SP after 10/sup -4/M thiorphan of 268 +/- 58 pmol/cm/sup 2//h (p < 0.05; n = 6). Phosphoramidon also increased SP-induced secretion to 334 +/- 69 pmol/cm/sup 2//h (p < 0.005; n = 4), and also potentiated the secretory responses to neurokinins A and B, physalaemin, eledoisin, and kassinin, but did not potentiate the secretory responses to either bradykinin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. Other proteinase inhibitors did not potentiate SP-induced secretion. These results suggest that enkephalinase in the airway degrades tachykinins, and may therefore play a role in regulating tachykinin-induced effects.

  12. Cadmium-induced calcium release and prostaglandin E[sub 2] production in neonatal mouse calvaria are dependent on cox-2 induction and protein kinase C activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romare, A. (Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Univ. of Linkoeping (Sweden)); Lundholm, C.E. (Department of Pharmacology, Univ. of Linkoeping (Sweden) Astra Haessle AB, Regulatory Affairs, Moendal (Sweden))

    The mechanisms by which cadmium (Cd) causes skeletal impairment have not been fully clarified. Release of calcium from neonatal mouse calvaria in organ culture is stimulated by submicromolar concentrations of Cd, an effect that is associated with increased production of prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]). The prostaglandin-synthesising enzyme cyclooxygenase (cox) exists in two forms, one constitutive (cox-1) and the other inducible (cox-2). Cox-2 can be induced by mitogenic stimuli and inflammatory cytokines, such as parathyroid hormone (PTH), interleukin-1[alpha] and tumour necrosis factor-[alpha]. Cd potently activates protein kinase C (PKC), which in turn induces cox-2 production in several cell types. Our aim was to determine whether Cd-induced Ca release and PGE[sub 2] production in neonatal mouse calvaria involve induction of cox-2 and, if so, to ascertain whether that effect is mediated by activation of PKC. Cd dose-dependently stimulated Ca release from cultured neonatal mouse calvaria, with a maximal effect at 0.4-0.8 [mu]M. Different sensitivity was observed to Cd-induced Ca release between two breeds of mice suggesting that the susceptibility to Cd may be genetically determined. Dexamethasone (10 [mu]M) added to the culture medium abolished the Ca releasing effect of Cd, an effect not overcome by addition of arachidonic acid (10 [mu]M). The cox-2-selective inhibitors NS-398 and DFU and the less selective inhibitor meloxicam, potently impeded Cd-induced Ca release (IC[sub 50] of 1 nM, 41 nM and 7 nM, respectively) and calvarial production of PGE[sub 2]. Cd-induced and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 20 nM)-induced Ca release was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (0.5 [mu]M) and by NS-398. The effects of PMA and Cd on Ca release were not additive, suggesting that both operated via the PKC pathway. We suggest that Cd-induced Ca release from neonatal mouse calvaria in culture depends on induction of cox-2 that occurs via the PKC signalling

  13. Surrogate MRI markers for hyperthermia-induced release of doxorubicin from thermosensitive liposomes in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Michael; Willerding, Linus; Limmer, Simone; Hossann, Martin; Dietrich, Olaf; Ingrisch, Michael; Sroka, Ronald; Lindner, Lars H

    2016-09-10

    The efficacy of systemically applied, classical anti-cancer drugs is limited by insufficient selectivity to the tumor and the applicable dose is limited by side effects. Efficacy could be further improved by targeting of the drug to the tumor. Using thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as a drug carrier, targeting is achieved by control of temperature in the target volume. In such an approach, effective local hyperthermia (40-43°C) (HT) of the tumor is considered essential but technically challenging. Thus, visualization of local heating and drug release using TSL is considered an important tool for further improvement. Visualization and feasibility of chemodosimetry by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been demonstrated using TSL encapsulating both, contrast agent (CA) and doxorubicin (DOX) simultaneously in the same TSL. Dosimetry has been facilitated using T1-relaxation time change as a surrogate marker for DOX deposition in the tumor. To allow higher loading of the TSL and to simplify clinical development of new TSL formulations a new approach using a mixture of TSL either loaded with DOX or MRI-CA is suggested. This was successfully tested using phosphatidyldiglycerol-based TSL (DPPG2-TSL) in Brown Norway rats with syngeneic soft tissue sarcomas (BN175) implanted at both hind legs. After intravenous application of DOX-TSL and CA-TSL, heating of one tumor above 40°C for 1h using laser light resulted in highly selective DOX uptake. The DOX-concentration in the heated tumor tissue compared to the non-heated tumor showed an almost 10-fold increase. T1 and additional MRI surrogate parameters such as signal phase change were correlated to intratumoral DOX concentration. Visualization of DOX delivery in the sense of a chemodosimetry was demonstrated. Although phase-based MR-thermometry was affected by CA-TSL, phase information was found suitable for DOX concentration assessment. Local differences of DOX concentration in the tumors indicated the need for

  14. Voltage-Induced Ca²⁺ Release in Postganglionic Sympathetic Neurons in Adult Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Sun

    Full Text Available Recent studies have provided evidence that depolarization in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ can trigger Ca2+ release from internal stores in a variety of neuron subtypes. Here we examine whether postganglionic sympathetic neurons are able to mobilize Ca2+ from intracellular stores in response to depolarization, independent of Ca2+ influx. We measured changes in cytosolic ΔF/F0 in individual fluo-4 -loaded sympathetic ganglion neurons in response to maintained K+ depolarization in the presence (2 mM and absence of extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e. Progressive elevations in extracellular [K+]e caused increasing membrane depolarizations that were of similar magnitude in 0 and 2 mM [Ca2+]e. Peak amplitude of ΔF/F0 transients in 2 mM [Ca2+]e increased in a linear fashion as the membrane become more depolarized. Peak elevations of ΔF/F0 in 0 mM [Ca2+]e were ~5-10% of those evoked at the same membrane potential in 2 mM [Ca2+]e and exhibited an inverse U-shaped dependence on voltage. Both the rise and decay of ΔF/F0 transients in 0 mM [Ca2+]e were slower than those of ΔF/F0 transients evoked in 2 mM [Ca2+]e. Rises in ΔF/F0 evoked by high [K+]e in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ were blocked by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, or the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 receptor antagonists 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin C, but not by extracellular Cd2+, the dihydropyridine antagonist nifedipine, or by ryanodine at concentrations that caused depletion of ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ stores. These results support the notion that postganglionic sympathetic neurons possess the ability to release Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive internal stores in response to membrane depolarization, independent of Ca2+ influx.

  15. Music and methamphetamine: conditioned cue-induced increases in locomotor activity and dopamine release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polston, J E; Rubbinaccio, H Y; Morra, J T; Sell, E M; Glick, S D

    2011-03-01

    Associations between drugs of abuse and cues facilitate the acquisition and maintenance of addictive behaviors. Although significant research has been done to elucidate the role that simple discriminative or discrete conditioned stimuli (e.g., a tone or a light) play in addiction, less is known about complex environmental cues. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of a musical conditioned stimulus by assessing locomotor activity and in vivo microdialysis. Two groups of rats were given non-contingent injections of methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) or vehicle and placed in standard conditioning chambers. During these conditioning sessions both groups were exposed to a continuous conditioned stimulus, in the form of a musical selection ("Four" by Miles Davis) played repeatedly for 90 min. After seven consecutive conditioning days subjects were given one day of rest, and subsequently tested for locomotor activity or dopamine release in the absence of drugs while the musical conditioned stimulus was continually present. The brain regions examined included the basolateral amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and prefrontal cortex. The results show that music is an effective contextual conditioned stimulus, significantly increasing locomotor activity after repeated association with methamphetamine. Furthermore, this musical conditioned stimulus significantly increased extracellular dopamine levels in the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens. These findings support other evidence showing the importance of these brain regions in conditioned learning paradigms, and demonstrate that music is an effective conditioned stimulus warranting further investigation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stress Alone or associated with Ethanol Induces Prostanoid Release in Rat Aorta via α2-Adrenoceptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira; Taipeiro, Elane de Fátima; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Chies, Agnaldo Bruno; Cordellini, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Stress and ethanol are both, independently, important cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the cardiovascular risk of ethanol consumption and stress exposure, isolated and in association, in male adult rats. Rats were separated into 4 groups: Control, ethanol (20% in drinking water for 6 weeks), stress (immobilization 1h day/5 days a week for 6 weeks) and stress/ethanol. Concentration-responses curves to noradrenaline - in the absence and presence of yohimbine, L-NAME or indomethacin - or to phenylephrine were determined in thoracic aortas with and without endothelium. EC50 and maximum response (n=8-12) were compared using two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni method. Either stress or stress in association with ethanol consumption increased the noradrenaline maximum responses in intact aortas. This hyper-reactivity was eliminated by endothelium removal or by the presence of either indomethacin or yohimbine, but was not altered by the presence of L-NAME. Meanwhile, ethanol consumption did not alter the reactivity to noradrenaline. The phenylephrine responses in aortas both with and without endothelium also remained unaffected regardless of protocol. Chronic stress increased rat aortic responses to noradrenaline. This effect is dependent upon the vascular endothelium and involves the release of vasoconstrictor prostanoids via stimulation of endothelial alpha-2 adrenoceptors. Moreover, chronic ethanol consumption appeared to neither influence noradrenaline responses in rat thoracic aorta, nor did it modify the increase of such responses observed as a consequence of stress exposure

  17. Stress Alone or associated with Ethanol Induces Prostanoid Release in Rat Aorta via α2-Adrenoceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira; Taipeiro, Elane de Fátima; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Chies, Agnaldo Bruno; Cordellini, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress and ethanol are both, independently, important cardiovascular risk factors. Objective To evaluate the cardiovascular risk of ethanol consumption and stress exposure, isolated and in association, in male adult rats. Methods Rats were separated into 4 groups: Control, ethanol (20% in drinking water for 6 weeks), stress (immobilization 1h day/5 days a week for 6 weeks) and stress/ethanol. Concentration-responses curves to noradrenaline - in the absence and presence of yohimbine, L-NAME or indomethacin - or to phenylephrine were determined in thoracic aortas with and without endothelium. EC50 and maximum response (n=8-12) were compared using two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni method. Results Either stress or stress in association with ethanol consumption increased the noradrenaline maximum responses in intact aortas. This hyper-reactivity was eliminated by endothelium removal or by the presence of either indomethacin or yohimbine, but was not altered by the presence of L-NAME. Meanwhile, ethanol consumption did not alter the reactivity to noradrenaline. The phenylephrine responses in aortas both with and without endothelium also remained unaffected regardless of protocol. Conclusion Chronic stress increased rat aortic responses to noradrenaline. This effect is dependent upon the vascular endothelium and involves the release of vasoconstrictor prostanoids via stimulation of endothelial alpha-2 adrenoceptors. Moreover, chronic ethanol consumption appeared to neither influence noradrenaline responses in rat thoracic aorta, nor did it modify the increase of such responses observed as a consequence of stress exposure. PMID:24676223

  18. Stress Alone or associated with Ethanol Induces Prostanoid Release in Rat Aorta via α2-Adrenoceptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Taipeiro, Elane de Fátima [Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa [Departamento de Análise Clínica - Toxicológica e Ciência de Alimentos - Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas - USP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chies, Agnaldo Bruno [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Cordellini, Sandra, E-mail: cordelli@ibb.unesp.br [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Stress and ethanol are both, independently, important cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the cardiovascular risk of ethanol consumption and stress exposure, isolated and in association, in male adult rats. Rats were separated into 4 groups: Control, ethanol (20% in drinking water for 6 weeks), stress (immobilization 1h day/5 days a week for 6 weeks) and stress/ethanol. Concentration-responses curves to noradrenaline - in the absence and presence of yohimbine, L-NAME or indomethacin - or to phenylephrine were determined in thoracic aortas with and without endothelium. EC50 and maximum response (n=8-12) were compared using two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni method. Either stress or stress in association with ethanol consumption increased the noradrenaline maximum responses in intact aortas. This hyper-reactivity was eliminated by endothelium removal or by the presence of either indomethacin or yohimbine, but was not altered by the presence of L-NAME. Meanwhile, ethanol consumption did not alter the reactivity to noradrenaline. The phenylephrine responses in aortas both with and without endothelium also remained unaffected regardless of protocol. Chronic stress increased rat aortic responses to noradrenaline. This effect is dependent upon the vascular endothelium and involves the release of vasoconstrictor prostanoids via stimulation of endothelial alpha-2 adrenoceptors. Moreover, chronic ethanol consumption appeared to neither influence noradrenaline responses in rat thoracic aorta, nor did it modify the increase of such responses observed as a consequence of stress exposure.

  19. Heat-induced release of epigenetic silencing reveals the concealed role of an imprinted plant gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego H Sanchez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms suppress the transcription of transposons and DNA repeats; however, this suppression can be transiently released under prolonged heat stress. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana imprinted gene SDC, which is silent during vegetative growth due to DNA methylation, is activated by heat and contributes to recovery from stress. SDC activation seems to involve epigenetic mechanisms but not canonical heat-shock perception and signaling. The heat-mediated transcriptional induction of SDC occurs particularly in young developing leaves and is proportional to the level of stress. However, this occurs only above a certain window of absolute temperatures and, thus, resembles a thermal-sensing mechanism. In addition, the re-silencing kinetics during recovery can be entrained by repeated heat stress cycles, suggesting that epigenetic regulation in plants may conserve memory of stress experience. We further demonstrate that SDC contributes to the recovery of plant biomass after stress. We propose that transcriptional gene silencing, known to be involved in gene imprinting, is also co-opted in the specific tuning of SDC expression upon heat stress and subsequent recovery. It is therefore possible that dynamic properties of the epigenetic landscape associated with silenced or imprinted genes may contribute to regulation of their expression in response to environmental challenges.

  20. Glutathione induces GABA release through P2X7R activation on Müller glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Hércules Rezende; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2017-01-01

    The retinal tissue of warm-blooded vertebrates performs surprisingly complex and accurate transduction of visual information. To achieve precision, a multilayered neuroglia structure is established throughout the embryonic development, and the presence of radial Müller (glial) cells ensure differentiation, growth and survival for the neuronal elements within retinal environment. It is assumed that Müller cells serve as a dynamic reservoir of progenitors, capable of expressing transcription factors, differentiating and proliferating as either neuronal or glial cells depending on extrinsic cues. In the postnatal period, Müller glia may re-enter cell cycle and produce new retinal neurons in response to acute damage. In this context, glutathione (GSH), a virtually ubiquitous tripeptide antioxidant, which is found at milimolar concentrations in central glial cells, plays a vital role as a reducing agent, buffering radical oxygen species (ROS) and preventing cell death in severely injured retinal tissues. Despite its antioxidant role, data also point to GSH as a signaling agent, suggesting that GABA release and P2X 7 R-mediated calcium inwards occur in Müller cells in a GSH-enriched environment. These phenomena indicate a novel mechanistic response to damage in the vertebrate retinal tissue, particularly in neuron-glia networks.

  1. Development and release of gamma ray induced sesame mutant ANK-S2 in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathirane, R.; Weerasena, L.A; Bandara, P.

    2000-01-01

    Epiphytotic conditions and non-availability of resistant germplasm prompted the use of mutation induction technique to develop a variety resistant to phytophthora blight caused by Phytophthora nicotianae var. parasitica in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.). Dry seeds of three varieties were irradiated with six doses of Co-60 gamma rays in the range 100-700 Gy. The mutant line 182/3 of variety MI 3 selected from 200 Gy dose treatment in the M2 showed tolerance to the disease at Angunakolapelessa in the disease nursery. The mutant line was tested in the advanced yield trial, National Co-ordinated Varietal Trials and in the National Coordinated Varietal Adaptability Trials. It was superior to MI 3 in yield and plant survival during the seasons favouring development of the disease and was similar to MI 3 and other recommended varieties during the other seasons. the variety has cream coloured seeds, branched stem, The mutant was released as ANK S2 in 1993 and may be used to increase the declining sesame area due to low yield of existing varieties and their susceptibility to disease. It should also serve as valuable parent material in cross-breeding programmes

  2. Development and release of gamma ray induced sesame mutant ANK-S2 in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weerasena, L.A.; Bandara, Priyanthi; Pathirana, R.

    2001-01-01

    Epiphytotic conditions and lack of resistant germplasm in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) prompted the use of mutation induction techniques to develop a variety resistant to Phytophthora blight caused by Phytophthora nicotianae var. parasitica. Dry seeds of three varieties were irradiated with six doses of 60 Co gamma rays in the range 100-700 Gy. The mutant line 182/3 of variety MI-3 selected from 200 Gy dose treatment in M 2 showed tolerance to the disease in subsequent testing at Angunakolapelessa in the disease nursery. The mutant line was tested in the major yield trial, National Co-ordinated Variety Trials and in the National Co-ordinated Variety Adaptability Trials. It was superior to MI-3 in yield and plant survival during the seasons favouring development of the disease and was similar to MI-3 and other recommended varieties in other seasons. The mutant has cream colour seeds, branched stem, and recorded 1890 kg/ha at Girandurukotte, 1593 kg ha -1 at Maha Illuppallama and 1151 kg/ha at Angunakolapelessa under rainfed conditions. The mutant was released as ANK-S2 in 1993 and may be used to increase the declining sesame area due to low yield of existing varieties and their susceptibility to disease. It should serve as a valuable parent material in cross-breeding programmes too. (author)

  3. Further human evidence for striatal dopamine release induced by administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC): selectivity to limbic striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Mehta, Mitul A; van Berckel, Bart N M; Howes, Oliver D; Kahn, René S; Stokes, Paul R A

    2015-08-01

    Elevated dopamine function is thought to play a key role in both the rewarding effects of addictive drugs and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates that cannabis use is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. However, human neurochemical imaging studies that examined the impact of ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component in cannabis, on striatal dopamine release have provided inconsistent results. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of a THC challenge on human striatal dopamine release in a large sample of healthy participants. We combined human neurochemical imaging data from two previous studies that used [(11)C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) (n = 7 and n = 13, respectively) to examine the effect of THC on striatal dopamine neurotransmission in humans. PET images were re-analysed to overcome differences in PET data analysis. THC administration induced a significant reduction in [(11)C]raclopride binding in the limbic striatum (-3.65 %, from 2.39 ± 0.26 to 2.30 ± 0.23, p = 0.023). This is consistent with increased dopamine levels in this region. No significant differences between THC and placebo were found in other striatal subdivisions. In the largest data set of healthy participants so far, we provide evidence for a modest increase in human striatal dopamine transmission after administration of THC compared to other drugs of abuse. This finding suggests limited involvement of the endocannabinoid system in regulating human striatal dopamine release and thereby challenges the hypothesis that an increase in striatal dopamine levels after cannabis use is the primary biological mechanism underlying the associated higher risk of schizophrenia.

  4. Intramuscular administration of paliperidone palmitate extended-release injectable microsuspension induces a subclinical inflammatory reaction modulating the pharmacokinetics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darville, Nicolas; van Heerden, Marjolein; Vynckier, An; De Meulder, Marc; Sterkens, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2014-07-01

    The present study aims at elucidating the intricate nature of the drug release and absorption following intramuscular (i.m.) injection of sustained-release prodrug nanocrystals/microcrystals. A paliperidone palmitate (PPP) long-acting suspension was characterized with regard to particle size (Dv,50 = 1.09 μm) and morphology prior to i.m. injection in rats. The local disposition was rigorously investigated by means of (immuno)histochemistry and transmission electron microscopy while the concurrent multiphasic pharmacokinetics was linked to the microanatomy. A transient (24 h) trauma-induced inflammation promptly evolved into a subclinical but chronic granulomatous inflammatory reaction initiated by the presence of solid material. The dense inflammatory envelope (CD68(+) macrophages) led to particle agglomeration with subsequent drop in dissolution rate beyond 24 h postinjection. This was associated with a decrease in apparent paliperidone (PP) absorption (near-zero order) until 96 h and a delayed time of occurrence of observed maximum drug plasma concentration (168 h). The infiltrating macrophages phagocytosed large fractions of the depot, thereby influencing the (pro)drug release. Radial angiogenesis (CD31(+)) was observed throughout the inflammatory rim from 72 h onwards and presumably contributed to the sustained systemic PP concentrations by maintaining a sufficient absorptive capacity. No solid-state transitions of the retrieved formulation were recorded with X-ray diffraction analysis. In summary, the initial formulation-driven prodrug (PPP) dissolution and drug (PP) absorption were followed by a complex phase determined by the relative contribution of formulation factors and dynamic physiological variables. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. Reduced cocaine-induced serotonin, but not dopamine and noradrenaline, release in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Michel M M; Karel, Peter; Cools, Alexander R; Homberg, Judith R

    2014-11-01

    It has recently been proposed that the increased reinforcing properties of cocaine and ecstasy observed in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters are the result of a reduction in the psychostimulant-induced release of serotonin. Here we provide the neurochemical evidence in favor of this hypothesis and show that changes in synaptic levels of dopamine or noradrenaline are not very likely to play an important role in the previously reported enhanced psychostimulant intake of these serotonin transporter knockout rats. The results may very well explain why human subjects displaying a reduced expression of serotonin transporters have an increased risk to develop addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Taurine inhibits interleukin-6 expression and release induced by ultraviolet B exposure to human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayang, Wu; Jinsong, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The massive uptake of compatible osmolytes is a self-protective response shared by retina exposed to hypertonic stress and ultraviolet stress. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of taurine against ultraviolet damage in human retinal pigment epithelium cells. Real-time PCR, radioimmunoassay, ELISA and immunoassay were used to measure osmolyte uptake and IL-6 expression. Compared with normotonic stress, hypertonic stress led to an induction of osmolyte uptake including betaine, myoinositol and taurine. UVB exposure upregulated osmolyte transporter mRNA expression and increased osmolyte uptake respectively. Especially, taurine suppressed UVB-induced IL-6 mRNA expression significantly. The accumulation of IL-6 in UVB-exposed human retinal pigment epithelial cells supernatant was much slower when the cells were preincubated with taurine. Moreover, taurine suppressed IL-6 concentration in aqueous humour. The effect of compatible osmolyte taurine on IL-6 expression and release may play an important role in cell resistance and adaption to UVB exposure.

  7. Trophic cascade induced by molluscivore predator alters pore-water biogeochemistry via competitive release of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Jan A; van der Geest, Matthijs; Jansen, Erik J; Govers, Laura L; de Fouw, Jimmy; Piersma, Theunis

    2012-05-01

    Effects of predation may cascade down the food web. By alleviating interspecific competition among prey, predators may promote biodiversity, but the precise mechanisms of how predators alter competition have remained elusive. Here we report on a predator-exclosure experiment carried out in a tropical intertidal ecosystem, providing evidence for a three-level trophic cascade induced by predation by molluscivore Red Knots (Calidris canutus) that affects pore water biogeochemistry. In the exclosures the knots' favorite prey (Dosinia isocardia) became dominant and reduced the individual growth rate in an alternative prey (Loripes lucinalis). Dosinia, a suspension feeder, consumes suspended particulate organic matter (POM), whereas Loripes is a facultative mixotroph, partly living on metabolites produced by sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic bacteria, but also consuming suspended POM. Reduced sulfide concentrations in the exclosures suggest that, without predation on Dosinia, stronger competition for suspended POM forces Loripes to rely on energy produced by endosymbiotic bacteria, thus leading to an enhanced uptake of sulfide from the surrounding pore water. As sulfide is toxic to most organisms, this competition-induced diet shift by Loripes may detoxify the environment, which in turn may facilitate other species. The inference that predators affect the toxicity of their environment via a multi-level trophic cascade is novel, but we believe it may be a general phenomenon in detritus-based ecosystems.

  8. Hydrogen sulphide-releasing diclofenac derivatives inhibit breast cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevent osteolysis ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzias, J; Logan, J G; Mollat, P; Sparatore, A; Del Soldato, P; Ralston, S H; Idris, A I

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) and prostaglandins are both involved in inflammation, cancer and bone turnover, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and H(2)S donors exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour properties. H(2)S-releasing diclofenac (S-DCF) derivatives are a novel class of NSAIDs combining the properties of a H(2)S donor with those of a conventional NSAID. We studied the effects of the S-DCF derivatives ACS15 and ACS32 on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and activity in vitro, human and mouse breast cancer cells support for osteoclast formation and signalling in vitro, and osteolysis ex vivo. The S-diclofenac derivatives ACS15 and ACS32 inhibited the increase in osteoclast formation induced by human MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 and mouse 4T1 breast cancer cells without affecting breast cancer cell viability. Conditioned media from human MDA-MB-231 cells enhanced IκB phosphorylation and osteoclast formation and these effects were significantly inhibited following treatment by ACS15 and ACS32, whereas the parent compound diclofenac had no effects. ACS15 and ACS32 inhibited receptor activator of NFκB ligand-induced osteoclast formation and resorption, and caused caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in mature osteoclasts via a mechanism dependent on IKK/NFκB inhibition. In calvaria organ culture, human MDA-MB-231 cells caused osteolysis, and this effect was completely prevented following treatment with ACS15 and ACS32. S-diclofenac derivatives inhibit osteoclast formation and activity, suppress breast cancer cell support for osteoclastogenesis and prevent osteolysis. This suggests that H(2)S-releasing diclofenac derivatives exhibit anti-resorptive properties, which might be of clinical value in the treatment of osteolytic bone disease. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Endogenous opioids released during non-nociceptive environmental stress induce latent pain sensitization Via a NMDA-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Chloé; Laboureyras, Emilie; Gavello-Baudy, Stéphanie; Chateauraynaud, Jérémy; Laulin, Jean-Paul; Simonnet, Guy

    2011-10-01

    Although stress induces analgesia, there is evidence that stressful events may exacerbate pain syndromes. Here, we studied the effects of 1 to 3 prestressful events (days 0, 2, and 7), such as non-nociceptive environmental stress, on inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by a carrageenan injection (day 14) in 1 rat hind paw. Changes in nociceptive threshold were evaluated by the paw pressure vocalization test. The higher the number of stress sessions presented to the rats, the greater was the inflammatory hyperalgesia. Blockade of opioid receptors by naltrexone before each stress inhibited stress-induced analgesia and suppressed the exaggerated inflammatory hyperalgesia. Stressed versus nonstressed animals could be discriminated by their response to a fentanyl ultra-low dose (fULD), that produced hyperalgesia or analgesia, respectively. This pharmacological test permitted the prediction of the pain vulnerability level of prestressed rats because fULD analgesic or hyperalgesic indices were positively correlated with inflammatory hyperalgesic indices (r(2) = .84). In prestressed rats, fULD-induced hyperalgesia and the exaggerated inflammatory hyperalgesia were prevented NMDA receptor antagonists. This study provides some preclinical evidence that pain intensity is not only the result of nociceptive input level but is also dependent on the individual history, especially prior life stress events associated with endogenous opioid release. Based on these preclinical data, it would be of clinical interest to evaluate whether prior stressful events may also affect further pain sensation in humans. Moreover, this preclinical model could be a good tool for evaluating new therapeutic strategies for relieving pain hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevention of infection after induced abortion: release date October 2010: SFP guideline 20102.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, Sharon L; Reeves, Matthew F

    2011-04-01

    One known complication of induced abortion is upper genital tract infection, which is relatively uncommon in the current era of safe, legal abortion. Currently, rates of upper genital tract infection in the setting of legal induced abortion in the United States are generally less than 1%. Randomized controlled trials support the use of prophylactic antibiotics for surgical abortion in the first trimester. For medical abortion, treatment-dose antibiotics may lower the risk of serious infection. However, the number-needed-to-treat is high. Consequently, the balance of risk and benefits warrants further investigation. Perioperative oral doxycycline given up to 12 h before a surgical abortion appears to effectively reduce infectious risk. Antibiotics that are continued after the procedure for extended durations meet the definition for a treatment regimen rather than a prophylactic regimen. Prophylactic efficacy of antibiotics begun after abortion has not been demonstrated in controlled trials. Thus, the current evidence supports pre-procedure but not post-procedure antibiotics for the purpose of prophylaxis. No controlled studies have examined the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis for induced surgical abortion beyond 15 weeks of gestation. The risk of infection is not altered when an intrauterine device is inserted immediately post-procedure. The presence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae or acute cervicitis carries a significant risk of upper genital tract infection; this risk is significantly reduced with antibiotic prophylaxis. Women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) also have an elevated risk of post-procedural infection as compared with women without BV; however, additional prophylactic antibiotics for women with known BV has not been shown to reduce their risk further than with use of typical pre-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis. Accordingly, evidence to support pre-procedure screening for BV is lacking. Neither povidone-iodine nor chlorhexidine have

  11. Corticotropin-releasing factor-1 receptor activation mediates nicotine withdrawal-induced deficit in brain reward function and stress-induced relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W; Prado, Melissa; Isaac, Shani

    2009-07-15

    Tobacco addiction is a chronic brain disorder that is characterized by a negative affective state upon smoking cessation and relapse after periods of abstinence. Previous research has shown that blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors with a nonspecific CRF1/CRF2 receptor antagonist prevents the deficit in brain reward function associated with nicotine withdrawal and stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished nicotine-seeking in rats. The aim of these studies was to investigate the role of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the deficit in brain reward function associated with precipitated nicotine withdrawal and stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking. The intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure was used to assess the negative affective state of nicotine withdrawal. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a deficit in brain reward function. Stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking was investigated in animals in which responding for intravenously infused nicotine was extinguished by substituting saline for nicotine. In the ICSS experiments, the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine elevated the brain reward thresholds of the nicotine-dependent rats but not those of the control rats. The CRF1 receptor antagonist R278995/CRA0450 but not the CRF2 receptor antagonist astressin-2B prevented the elevations in brain reward thresholds associated with precipitated nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, R278995/CRA0450 but not astressin-2B prevented stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished nicotine-seeking. Neither R278995/CRA0450 nor astressin-2B affected operant responding for chocolate-flavored food pellets. These studies indicate that CRF(1) receptors but not CRF(2) receptors play an important role in the anhedonic-state associated with acute nicotine withdrawal and stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking.

  12. Peripheral kisspeptin reverses short photoperiod-induced gonadal regression in Syrian hamsters by promoting GNRH release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansel, L; Bentsen, A H; Ancel, C

    2011-01-01

    In seasonal breeders, reproduction is synchronised by day length via the pineal hormone melatonin. In short winter days (short day, SD), the Syrian hamster displays a complete gonadal atrophy together with a marked reduction in expression of kisspeptins (Kp), a family of potent hypothalamic...... stimulators of GNRH neurons. Both central and peripheral acute injections of Kp have been reported to activate the gonadotropic axis in mammals. The aim of this study was to determine if and how peripheral administration of Kp54 could restore gonadal function in photo-inhibited hamsters. Testicular activity...... of hamsters kept in SD was reactivated by two daily i.p. injections of Kp54 but not by chronic subcutaneous delivery of the same peptide via mini-pumps. Acute i.p. injection of Kp54-induced FOS (c-Fos) expression in a large number of GNRH neurons and pituitary gonadotrophs together with a strong increase...

  13. Escitalopram prolonged fear induced by simulated public speaking and released hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Leal, C; Del-Ben, C M; Leal, F M; Graeff, F G; Guimarães, F S

    2010-05-01

    Simulated public speaking (SPS) test is sensitive to drugs that interfere with serotonin-mediated neurotransmission and is supposed to recruit neural systems involved in panic disorder. The study was aimed at evaluating the effects of escitalopram, the most selective serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor available, in SPS. Healthy males received, in a double-blind, randomized design, placebo (n = 12), 10 (n = 17) or 20 (n = 14) mg of escitalopram 2 hours before the test. Behavioural, autonomic and neuroendocrine measures were assessed. Both doses of escitalopram did not produce any effect before or during the speech but prolonged the fear induced by SPS. The test itself did not significantly change cortisol and prolactin levels but under the higher dose of escitalopram, cortisol and prolactin increased immediately after SPS. This fear-enhancing effect of escitalopram agrees with previously reported results with less selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the receptor antagonist ritanserin, indicating that serotonin inhibits the fear of speaking in public.

  14. Higher dopamine release induced by less rather than more preferred reward during a working memory task in the primate prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tohru; Hikosaka, Kazuo; Honda, Yoshiko; Kojima, Takashi; Watanabe, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    An optimal level of dopamine (DA) in the mammalian prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical for higher cognitive control of behavior. Too much or too little DA in the PFC induces impairment in working memory (WM) task performance. PFC DA is also concerned with motivation. When reward is anticipated and/or delivered, an increase in PFC DA release is observed. In the primate, more preferred reward induces enhanced WM-related neuronal activity in the dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC). We hypothesized that there would be more DA release in the primate DLPFC when more preferred, as compared with less preferred, reward is delivered during a WM task. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found higher DA release in the DLPFC when less rather than more preferred reward was used during a WM task, while unpredictable free reward delivery induced an increase in DLPFC DA release irrespective of the difference in the incentive value of the reward. Behaviorally, the monkey was more motivated with preferred than with less preferred reward, although it performed the task almost without error irrespective of the difference in the reward. Considering that mild stress induces an increase in DA release in the mammalian PFC, performing a WM task for less preferred reward could have been mildly stressful, and this mild stress may have induced more DLPFC DA release in the present study. The higher DA release in the DLPFC with less preferred reward may be beneficial for monkeys to cope with mildly stressful and unfavorable situations to achieve proficient WM task performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Acquisition of MDMA self-administration: pharmacokinetic factors and MDMA-induced serotonin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Sarah; Bird, Judith; Colussi-Mas, Joyce; Mueller, Melanie; Ricaurte, George; Schenk, Susan

    2014-09-01

    The current study aimed to elucidate the role of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and neurotransmitter efflux in explaining variability in (±) 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) self-administration in rats. PK profiles of MDMA and its major metabolites were determined after the administration of 1.0 mg/kg MDMA (iv) prior to, and following, the acquisition of MDMA self-administration. Synaptic levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) and dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens were measured following administration of MDMA (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, iv) using in vivo microdialysis and compared for rats that acquired or failed to acquire MDMA self-administration. Effects of the 5HT neurotoxin, 5,7 dihydroxytryptamine (5, 7-DHT), on the acquisition of MDMA and cocaine self-administration were also determined. In keeping with previous findings, approximately 50% of rats failed to meet a criterion for acquisition of MDMA self-administration. The PK profiles of MDMA and its metabolites did not differ between rats that acquired or failed to acquire MDMA self-administration. MDMA produced more overflow of 5HT than DA. The MDMA-induced 5HT overflow was lower in rats that acquired MDMA self-administration compared with those that did not acquire self-administration. In contrast, MDMA-induced DA overflow was comparable for the two groups. Prior 5,7-DHT lesions reduced tissue levels of 5HT and markedly increased the percentage of rats that acquired MDMA self-administration and also decreased the latency to acquisition of cocaine self-administration. These data suggest that 5HT limits the initial sensitivity to the positively reinforcing effects of MDMA and delays the acquisition of reliable self-administration. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. The cytotoxic macrolide FD-891 induces caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and subsequent apoptosis in human leukemia Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Susumu; Eguchi, Tadashi; Motegi, Atsushi; Mizoue, Kazutoshi; Usui, Takeo; Nagai, Kazuo; Kataoka, Takao

    2009-09-01

    The 16-membered macrolide FD-891 exerts cytotoxicity toward several cancer cell lines. In this study, we showed that FD-891 induces apoptosis in various human cancer cell lines. Human leukemia Jurkat cells were highly sensitive to FD-891, exhibiting caspase activation and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c into the cytosol at early time points after exposure to FD-891. By contrast, Jurkat cells deficient in caspase-8 were resistant to FD-891-induced apoptosis and manifested little induction of cytochrome c release as well as caspase-9 processing. Consistent with these results, the overexpression of the Bcl-2 family member Bcl-x(L) or the caspase-8 modulator c-FLIP(L) markedly prevented FD-891-induced apoptosis. These results clearly demonstrate that FD-891 triggers caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and subsequent apoptosis in Jurkat cells.

  17. Role of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor in the enhancement of fluvoxamine-induced increases in prefrontal dopamine release by adrenalectomy/castration in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Hasebe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We have found that fluvoxamine-induced increases in prefrontal dopamine release are enhanced by adrenalectomy/castration and 5-HT1A receptors are involved in the enhancement. This study examined which 5-HT1A autoreceptors or postsynaptic receptor play a key role in the enhancement in mice. Adrenalectomy/castration-induced enhancement of fluvoxamine-induced increase in the dopamine release was not blocked by local perfusion with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (10 μM, while it was blocked by systemic administration of WAY100635 at low dose (0.1 mg/kg which blocked preferentially autoreceptor-mediated responses. These finding suggests that 5-HT1A autoreceptors play a key role in the enhancement of prefrontal dopamine release.

  18. The effects of the oral administration of fish oil concentrate on the release and the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid and (/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, A.; Terano, T.; Hamazaki, T.; Sajiki, J.; Kondo, S.; Ozawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tamura, Y.; Kumagai, A.

    1982-11-01

    It has been suggested by several investigators that eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 omega 3, EPA) might have anti-thrombotic effects. In this experiment, the effect of the oral administration of EPA rich fish oil concentrate on platelet aggregation and the release and the metabolism of (/sup 1 -14/C)arachidonic acid and ((U)-/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets was studied. Eight healthy male subjects ingested 18 capsules of fish oil concentrate (EPA 1.4 g) per day for 4 weeks. Plasma and platelet concentrations of EPA markedly increased, while those of arachidonic acid (C20:4 omega 6, AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 omega 3, DHA) did not change. Platelet aggregation induced by collagen and ADP was reduced. Collagen induced (/sup 14/C)thromboxane B2 (TXB2) formation from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets decreased. There was no detectable formation of (/sup 14/C)TXB3 from (/sup 14/C)EPA prelabeled platelets, and the conversion of exogenous (/sup 14/C)EPA to (/sup 14/C)TXB3 was lower than that of (/sup 14/C)AA to (/sup 14/C)TXB2. The release of (/sup 14/C)AA from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets by collagen was significantly decreased. These observations raise the possibility that the release of arachidonic acid from platelet lipids might be affected by the alteration of EPA content in platelets.

  19. Localization of aristolochic acid in mouse kidney tissues by immunohistochemistry using an anti-AA-I and AA-II monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Yokota, Sadaki; Wang, Dan; Wang, Xuan; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Aristolochic acids (AAs) are found in herbal medicines of Aristolochiaceae plants, including Aristolochia and Asarum species. AAs are associated with a rapidly progressive interstitial nephritis, which is called aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). However, the in-situ localization of AAs in the target organ, the kidney, has not been investigated yet. In the present study, the accumulation of aristolochic acid I (AA-I) in mouse kidney was revealed by immunoperoxidase light microscopy as well as colloidal gold immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) based on an anti-AA-I and AA-II monoclonal antibody (mAb). Male BALB/c mice were treated with 1.25 or 2.50 mg kg(-1) of AA-I per day for 5 days. Paraffin sections and ultra-thin sections of kidney tissue were respectively prepared. Under light microscopy, the apical surface of proximal tubules was strongly stained for AA-I, whereas no obvious immunostaining was found in the distal tubules and glomerulus, which remained relatively intact. Under electron microscopy, epithelial cells of the proximal tubules, distal tubules and collecting tubules were broken to various degrees. Gold labeling in the proximal and distal tubules was stronger than that in the collecting tubules. In renal tubules, immunogold signals of AA-I tended to accumulate in the mitochondria and peroxisomes, though the signals could be observed all over the cell. Gold signals were also found in the erythrocytes of glomeruli. The MAb against AA-I and AA-II provides a clue for the identification of proteins or factors which might interact with AA-I and thus induce targeted damage of kidney.

  20. Changed preference for sweet taste in adulthood induced by perinatal exposure to bisphenol A-A probable link to overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Tan, Luei; Himi, Toshiyuki; Sadamatsu, Miyuki; Tsutsumi, Shunsuke; Akaike, Masashi; Kato, Nobumasa

    2011-01-01

    The preference of obesity has risen dramatically worldwide over the past decades. Some latest reports showed significant increase of obesity in men compared to women. Implication of environmental endocrine disruptors has been focused more and more. Numerous studies in vitro and vivo implied metabolic actions of bisphenol A (BPA), however much less consideration is given to the possibility of BPA exposure-induced change in gender-specific behaviors which result in obesity and overweight. To examine whether perinatal exposure to BPA at relative dose to environmental levels can influence sweet preference of male and female rats and consequently lead to alteration in bodyweight. Rats perinatally exposed to BPA at doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L were tested sweet preference for 0.25%, 0.5% saccharin and 15% sucrose by two-bottle choice (water vs. saccharin/sucrose). The food intake, liquid consumption and bodyweight of each rat were monitored daily. At the end of the test, the fat percentage and tail blood pressure were measured. Significant sex difference of preference for 0.25% and 0.5% saccharin was shown in control and all BPA-treated groups (p researches concerning the mechanism are required, the results of the present study are particularly important with regards to the more significant increasing prevalence of obesity in men and the environmental endocrine disruptors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Presymbiotic factors released by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita induce starch accumulation in Lotus japonicus roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, Caroline; Novero, Mara; Guether, Mike; Montanari, Ombretta; Udvardi, Michael; Bonfante, Paola

    2009-01-01

    * Nutrient exchange is the key symbiotic feature of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM). As evidence is accumulating that plants sense presymbiotic factors from AM fungi and prepare for colonization, we investigated whether modifications in plant sugar metabolism might be part of the precolonization program. * Inoculation of Lotus japonicus roots in a double Millipore sandwich with the AM fungus Gigaspora margarita prevented contact between the symbionts but allowed exchange of signal molecules. Starch content was used as a marker for root carbohydrate status. * Mycorrhizal colonization of L. japonicus roots led to a decrease in starch concentration. In roots inoculated in the double sandwich, the polysaccharide accumulated after 1 wk and persisted for at least 4 wk. The response was absent in the castor myc(-) mutant, sym4-2, while transcript levels of both CASTOR and POLLUX were slightly enhanced in the wild-type L. japonicus roots, suggesting a requirement of the corresponding proteins for the starch-accumulation response. Exudates obtained from fungal spores germinated in the absence of the plant also induced starch accumulation in wild-type L. japonicus roots. * We conclude that factors released from germinating AM fungal spores induce changes in the root carbon status, possibly by enhancing sugar import, which leads to starch accumulation when colonization is prevented.

  2. A feedback regulatory loop between G3P and lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1 mediates azelaic-acid-induced systemic immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Keshun; Soares, Juliana Moreira; Mandal, Mihir Kumar; Wang, Caixia; Chanda, Bidisha; Gifford, Andrew N; Fowler, Joanna S; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2013-04-25

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a highly desirable form of plant defense, provides broad-spectrum immunity against diverse pathogens. The recent identification of seemingly unrelated chemical inducers of SAR warrants an investigation of their mutual interrelationships. We show that SAR induced by the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid (AA) requires the phosphorylated sugar derivative glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Pathogen inoculation induced the release of free unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) and thereby triggered AA accumulation, because these FAs serve as precursors for AA. AA accumulation in turn increased the levels of G3P, which is required for AA-conferred SAR. The lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1, both of which are required for G3P- and AA-induced SAR, were essential for G3P accumulation. Conversely, reduced G3P resulted in decreased AZI1 and DIR1 transcription. Our results demonstrate that an intricate feedback regulatory loop among G3P, DIR1, and AZI1 regulates SAR and that AA functions upstream of G3P in this pathway. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Feedback Regulatory Loop between G3P and Lipid Transfer Proteins DIR1 and AZI1 Mediates Azelaic-Acid-Induced Systemic Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshun Yu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic acquired resistance (SAR, a highly desirable form of plant defense, provides broad-spectrum immunity against diverse pathogens. The recent identification of seemingly unrelated chemical inducers of SAR warrants an investigation of their mutual interrelationships. We show that SAR induced by the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid (AA requires the phosphorylated sugar derivative glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P. Pathogen inoculation induced the release of free unsaturated fatty acids (FAs and thereby triggered AA accumulation, because these FAs serve as precursors for AA. AA accumulation in turn increased the levels of G3P, which is required for AA-conferred SAR. The lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1, both of which are required for G3P- and AA-induced SAR, were essential for G3P accumulation. Conversely, reduced G3P resulted in decreased AZI1 and DIR1 transcription. Our results demonstrate that an intricate feedback regulatory loop among G3P, DIR1, and AZI1 regulates SAR and that AA functions upstream of G3P in this pathway.

  4. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session: From Space Archeology to Serving the World Today: A 20-year Journey from the Jungles of Guatemala to a Network of Satellite Remote Sensing Facilities Around the World(by Michael Zevin)In the conferences second plenary session, NASAs Daniel Irwin turned the eyes of the conference back to Earth by highlighting the huge impact that NASA missions play in protecting and developing our own planet.Daniel Irwin: using satellite imagery to detect differences in vegetation and find ancient Mayan cities. #aas228 pic.twitter.com/9LFPQdCHTM astrobites (@astrobites) June 13, 2016Irwin came to be involved in NASA through his work mapping Guatemalan jungles, where he would spend 22 days at a time exploring the treacherous jungles on foot armed with a 1st generation GPS, a compass, and a machete. A colleague introduced Irwin to the satellite imagery thathe was exploring, demonstratinghow these images are a strong complement to field work. The sharing of this satellite data with nearby villages helped to show the encroachment of agriculture and the necessity of connecting space to the village. Satellite imagery also played a role in archeological endeavors, uncovering dozens of Mayan cities that have been buried for over a millennia by vegetation, and it provided evidence that the fall of the Mayan civilization may have been due to massive deforestation that ledto drought.Glacial retreat in Chile imaged by ISERV.Irwin displayed the constellation of NASAs Earth-monitoring satellites that have played an integral role in conserving our planet and alerting the world of natural disasters. He also showed

  5. Amiloride interferes with platelet- activating factor-induced respiratory burst and MMP-9 release in bovine neutrophils independent of Na+/H+ exchanger 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrazabal, C S; Carretta, M D; Hidalgo, M A; Burgos, R A

    2017-09-01

    Cytoplasmic pH homeostasis is required for an appropriate response in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). In these cells, chemotaxis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are reduced by the use of Na + /H + exchanger (NHE-1) inhibitors, but these results are mainly obtained using amiloride, a non-selective NHE-1 inhibitor. In bovine PMNs, the role of NHE-1 in functional responses has not been confirmed yet. The aim of this study was to determine the role of NHE-1 using amiloride and zoniporide in pH regulation, ROS production, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) release and calcium flux in bovine PMNs induced by the platelet activation factor (PAF), additionally we evaluated the presence of NHE-1 and NHE-2 mRNA Our data show the presence only of NHE-1 but not NHE-2 in bovine PMNs. Amiloride or zoniporide inhibited the intracellular alkalization induced by PAF without affecting calcium flux. Amiloride diminished ROS production and MMP-9 release, while zoniporide enhanced ROS production without change the MMP-9 release induced by PAF. Our work led us to conclude that changes in intracellular pH induced by PAF are regulated by NHE-1 in bovine neutrophils, but the effects of amiloride on ROS production and MMP-9 release induced by PAF are not NHE-1 dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Arginine vasopressin induces periaqueductal gray release of enkephalin and endorphin relating to pain modulation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Yang, Yu; Xu, Hong-Tao; Chen, Jian-Min; Liu, Wen-Yan; Lin, Bao-Cheng

    2007-07-05

    Previous study has proven that microinjection of arginine vasopressin (AVP) into periaqueductal gray (PAG) raises the pain threshold, in which the antinociceptive effect of AVP can be reversed by PAG pretreatment with V2 rather than V1 or opiate receptor antagonist. The present work investigated the AVP effect on endogenous opiate peptides, oxytocin (OXT) and classical neurotransmitters in the rat PAG. The results showed that AVP elevated the concentrations of leucine-enkephalin (L-Ek), methionine-enkephalin (M-Ek) and beta-endorphin (beta-Ep), but did not change the concentrations of dynorphinA(1-13) (DynA(1-13)), OXT, classical neurotransmitters including achetylcholine (Ach), choline (Ch), serotonin (5-HT), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E), and their metabolic products in PAG perfusion liquid. Pain stimulation increased the concentrations of AVP, L-EK, M-Ek, beta-Ep, 5-HT and 5-HIAA (5-HT metabolic product), but did not influence the concentrations of DynA(1-13), OXT, the other classical neurotransmitters and their metabolic products. PAG pretreatment with naloxone - an opiate receptor antagonist completely attenuated the pain threshold increase induced by PAG administration of AVP, but local pretreatment of OXT or classical neurotransmitter receptor antagonist did not influence the pain threshold increase induced by PAG administration of AVP. The data suggested that AVP in PAG could induce the local release of enkephalin and endorphin rather than dynophin, OXT and classical neurotransmitters to participate in pain modulation.

  7. PAR-2 activation enhances weak acid-induced ATP release through TRPV1 and ASIC sensitization in human esophageal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liping; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Sei, Hiroo; Tomita, Toshihiko; Ohda, Yoshio; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-10-15

    Esophageal visceral hypersensitivity has been proposed to be the pathogenesis of heartburn sensation in nonerosive reflux disease. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is expressed in human esophageal epithelial cells and is believed to play a role in inflammation and sensation. PAR-2 activation may modulate these responses through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release, which is involved in transduction of sensation and pain. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are both acid-sensitive nociceptors. However, the interaction among these molecules and the mechanisms of heartburn sensation are still not clear. We therefore examined whether ATP release in human esophageal epithelial cells in response to acid is modulated by TRPV1 and ASICs and whether PAR-2 activation influences the sensitivity of TRPV1 and ASICs. Weak acid (pH 5) stimulated the release of ATP from primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). This effect was significantly reduced after pretreatment with 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), a TRPV1-specific antagonist, or with amiloride, a nonselective ASIC blocker. TRPV1 and ASIC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection also decreased weak acid-induced ATP release. Pretreatment of HEECs with trypsin, tryptase, or a PAR-2 agonist enhanced weak acid-induced ATP release. Trypsin treatment led to the phosphorylation of TRPV1. Acid-induced ATP release enhancement by trypsin was partially blocked by IRTX, amiloride, or a PAR-2 antagonist. Conversely, acid-induced ATP release was augmented by PAR-2 activation through TRPV1 and ASICs. These findings suggested that the pathophysiology of heartburn sensation or esophageal hypersensitivity may be associated with the activation of PAR-2, TRPV1, and ASICs. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Contribution to comprehensive study of aluminium alloy Aa 5083 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion induced by elemental mercury in aqueous media of industrial Aluminium alloys AA5083 used in heat exchanger industries of natural gas liquefaction has been studied by linear sweep voltammétry on rotating amalgamated disk electrode. Corrosion process depends on: • Chemical processes of amalgamation of ...

  9. Nitric oxide-releasing sulindac is a novel skin cancer chemopreventive agent for UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Singh, Tripti; Kapur, Puneet; Weng, Zhiping; Arumugam, Aadithya; Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd, Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) which have been synthesized to reduce gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular toxicities of NSAIDs, possess anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activities. Here, we show that NO-sulindac inhibited UVB-induced skin tumorigenesis in SKH-1 hairless mice. Topical application of NO-sulindac reduced tumor incidence, number (p < 0.05) and volume (p < 0.005) as compared to UVB (alone)-irradiated vehicle-treated mice. An increase in TUNEL-positive cells in skin lesions was accompanied by the enhanced Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The expression of pro-apoptotic Bax was increased whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 reduced. However, proliferation was identified as the major target of NO-sulindac in this study. A reduced expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 associated with the dampening of cell cycle progression was observed. The mechanism of this inhibition was related to the reduction in UVB-induced Notch signaling pathway. UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by NO-sulindac as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases Erk1/2, p38 and JNK1/2. In this regard, NO-sulindac also inhibited NFκB by enhancing IκBα as evidenced by the reduced expression of iNOS and COX-2, the direct NFκB transcription target proteins. NO-sulindac significantly diminished the progression of benign lesions to invasive carcinomas by suppressing the tumor aggressiveness and retarding epithelial–mesenchymal transition. A marked decrease in the expression of mesenchymal markers such as Fibronectin, N-cadherin, SNAI, Slug and Twist and an increase in epithelial cell polarity marker E-cadherin were noted in NO-sulindac-treated tumors. Our data suggest that NO-sulindac is a potent inhibitor of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis and acts by targeting proliferation-regulatory pathways. - Highlights: ► NO-sulindac is a potent chemopreventive agent for UVB-induced skin cancer. ► NO

  10. Drp1 is dispensable for apoptotic cytochrome c release in primed MCF10A and fibroblast cells but affects Bcl-2 antagonist-induced respiratory changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, P; Ge, S X; Hwang, H; Waddell, J; Roelofs, B A; Karbowski, M; Sesaki, H; Polster, B M

    2014-04-01

    Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) mediates mitochondrial fission and is thought to promote Bax/Bak-induced cytochrome c release during apoptosis. Conformationally active Bax, Bak and Bax/Bak-activating BH3-only proteins, such as Bim, are restrained by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in cells that are 'primed for death'. Inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Bcl-w by the antagonist ABT-737 causes rapid apoptosis of primed cells. Hence, we determined whether Drp1 is required for cytochrome c release, respiratory alterations and apoptosis of cells that are already primed for death. We tested the Drp1 inhibitor mdivi-1 for inhibition of cytochrome c release in MCF10A cells primed by Bcl-2 overexpression. We measured ATP synthesis-dependent, -independent and cytochrome c-limited maximal oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) and cell death of immortalized wild-type (WT) and Drp1 knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) treated with ABT-737. Mdivi-1 failed to attenuate ABT-737-induced cytochrome c release. ABT-737 decreased maximal OCR measured in the presence of uncoupler in both WT and Drp1 KO MEF, consistent with respiratory impairment due to release of cytochrome c. However, Drp1 KO MEF were slightly less sensitive to this ABT-737-induced respiratory inhibition compared with WT, and were resistant to an initial ABT-737-induced increase in ATP synthesis-independent O2 consumption. Nevertheless, caspase-dependent cell death was not reduced. Pro-apoptotic Bax was unaltered, whereas Bak was up-regulated in Drp1 KO MEF. The findings indicate that once fibroblast cells are primed for death, Drp1 is not required for apoptosis. However, Drp1 may contribute to ABT-737-induced respiratory changes and the kinetics of cytochrome c release. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-17-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-17-0052 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 1e-117 60% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-08-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-08-0014 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 1e-178 87% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0391 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0391 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 1e-154 76% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-05-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-05-0010 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 0.0 97% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-22-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-22-0015 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 1e-103 56% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0068 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 1e-101 55% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-15-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-15-0002 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 1e-100 56% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0684 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0684 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 3e-44 55% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-13-0068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-13-0068 ref|NP_001019756.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like [Ga...llus gallus] gb|AAS77862.1| prolactin releasing peptide receptor-like protein [Gallus gallus] NP_001019756.1 1e-100 54% ...

  20. Protein-releasing polymeric scaffolds induce fibrochondrocytic differentiation of endogenous cells for knee meniscus regeneration in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang H.; Rodeo, Scott A.; Fortier, Lisa Ann; Lu, Chuanyong; Erisken, Cevat

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of complex tissues, such as kidney, liver, and cartilage, continues to be a scientific and translational challenge. Survival of ex vivo cultured, transplanted cells in tissue grafts is among one of the key barriers. Meniscus is a complex tissue consisting of collagen fibers and proteoglycans with gradient phenotypes of fibrocartilage and functions to provide congruence of the knee joint, without which the patient is likely to develop arthritis. Endogenous stem/progenitor cells regenerated the knee meniscus upon spatially released human connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor–β3 (TGFβ3) from a three-dimensional (3D)–printed biomaterial, enabling functional knee recovery. Sequentially applied CTGF and TGFβ3 were necessary and sufficient to propel mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, as a heterogeneous population or as single-cell progenies, into fibrochondrocytes that concurrently synthesized procollagens I and IIα. When released from microchannels of 3D–printed, human meniscus scaffolds, CTGF and TGFβ3 induced endogenous stem/progenitor cells to differentiate and synthesize zone-specific type I and II collagens. We then replaced sheep meniscus with anatomically correct, 3D–printed scaffolds that incorporated spatially delivered CTGF and TGFβ3. Endogenous cells regenerated the meniscus with zone-specific matrix phenotypes: primarily type I collagen in the outer zone, and type II collagen in the inner zone, reminiscent of the native meniscus. Spatiotemporally delivered CTGF and TGFβ3 also restored inhomogeneous mechanical properties in the regenerated sheep meniscus. Survival and directed differentiation of endogenous cells in a tissue defect may have implications in the regeneration of complex (heterogeneous) tissues and organs. PMID:25504882

  1. Microcapsular imaging of malignant tumors and radiation induced release of liquid-core microcapsules for their treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, S.; Ehara, S.; Ishii, K.; Sato, T.; Enatsu, M.; Kamiya, T.; Sera, K.; Goto, S.

    2013-01-01

    accumulation could be detected by CT. These accumulated microcapsules released P-selectin and PSGL-1 in response to the first irradiation. P-selectin, which was released from the microcapsules and whose expression was induced by the first irradiation, showed peak expression 6 h after irradiation: it was 78.2 ± 3.4% with the 1O-Gy radiation dose and 86.3 ± 4.6% with the 20-Gy radiation dose. The microcapsules for radiosensitizing the metastasis were injected 5 h after the first session. Their accumulation was maximum at 3 h after the injection. After the second session, the microcapsules released carboplatin, which increased significant regression of tumors. Thus, better diagnosis and treatment of incipient metastasis are possible with our microcapsules. [1] S. Harada, S. Ehara, K.lshii, el.al. Inl. J. Radial. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 75 (2) (2009) 455-462. (author)

  2. Microcapsular imaging of malignant tumors and radiation induced release of liquid-core microcapsules for their treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, S.; Ehara, S. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, Iwate (Japan); Ishii, K. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan); Sato, T.; Enatsu, M.; Kamiya, T. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Gunma (Japan); Sera, K. [Cyclotron Center, Iwate Medical University, Iwate (Japan); Goto, S. [Nishina Memorial Cyclotron Center (NMCC), Japan Radioisotope Association, Iwate (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    metastasis, and their kinetics and accumulation could be detected by CT. These accumulated microcapsules released P-selectin and PSGL-1 in response to the first irradiation. P-selectin, which was released from the microcapsules and whose expression was induced by the first irradiation, showed peak expression 6 h after irradiation: it was 78.2 ± 3.4% with the 1O-Gy radiation dose and 86.3 ± 4.6% with the 20-Gy radiation dose. The microcapsules for radiosensitizing the metastasis were injected 5 h after the first session. Their accumulation was maximum at 3 h after the injection. After the second session, the microcapsules released carboplatin, which increased significant regression of tumors. Thus, better diagnosis and treatment of incipient metastasis are possible with our microcapsules. [1] S. Harada, S. Ehara, K.lshii, el.al. Inl. J. Radial. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 75 (2) (2009) 455-462. (author)

  3. L-type calcium channels and MAP kinase contribute to thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced depolarization in thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li; Renaud, Leo P

    2016-06-01

    In rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) neurons, activation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors enhances neuronal excitability via concurrent decrease in a G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K (GIRK)-like conductance and opening of a cannabinoid receptor-sensitive transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)-like conductance. Here, we investigated the calcium (Ca(2+)) contribution to the components of this TRH-induced response. TRH-induced membrane depolarization was reduced in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, also in media containing nominally zero [Ca(2+)]o, suggesting a critical role for both intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) influx. TRH-induced inward current was unchanged by T-type Ca(2+) channel blockade, but was decreased by blockade of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels (HVACCs). Both the pharmacologically isolated GIRK-like and the TRPC-like components of the TRH-induced response were decreased by nifedipine and increased by BayK8644, implying Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels. Only the TRPC-like conductance was reduced by either thapsigargin or dantrolene, suggesting a role for ryanodine receptors and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release in this component of the TRH-induced response. In pituitary and other cell lines, TRH stimulates MAPK. In PVT neurons, only the GIRK-like component of the TRH-induced current was selectively decreased in the presence of PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor. Collectively, the data imply that TRH-induced depolarization and inward current in PVT neurons involve both a dependency on extracellular Ca(2+) influx via opening of L-type Ca(2+) channels, a sensitivity of a TRPC-like component to intracellular Ca(2+) release via ryanodine channels, and a modulation by MAPK of a GIRK-like conductance component. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by Prostate Cancer Cells Cause Castrate-Resistant Cell Growth by Inducing B-cell Lymphotoxin Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    produced by NADPH oxidase , xanthine oxidase , and mitochondrial electron transport system mediate heat shock-induced MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression. Free...FADH2-bound enzyme acetyl polyamine oxidase (APAO). APAO generates H2O2 during FADH2 ↔ FAD interconversion and releases bound FAD [9]. We have silenced...small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor blocks androgen-induced oxidative stress and delays prostate cancer progression in the transgenic

  5. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  6. Short communication: genetic ablation of L-type Ca2+ channels abolishes depolarization-induced Ca2+ release in arterial smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tenorio, Miguel; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Porras, Cristina; Castellano, Antonio; Moosmang, Sven; Hofmann, Franz; Ureña, Juan; López-Barneo, José

    2010-04-16

    In arterial myocytes, membrane depolarization-induced Ca(2+) release (DICR) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) occurs through a metabotropic pathway that leads to inositol trisphosphate synthesis independently of extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Despite the fundamental functional relevance of DICR, its molecular bases are not well known. Biophysical and pharmacological data have suggested that L-type Ca(2+) channels could be the sensors coupling membrane depolarization to SR Ca(2+) release. This hypothesis was tested using smooth muscle-selective conditional Ca(v)1.2 knockout mice. In aortic myocytes, the decrease of Ca(2+) channel density was paralleled by the disappearance of SR Ca(2+) release induced by either depolarization or Ca(2+) channel agonists. Ca(v)1.2 channel deficiency resulted in almost abolition of arterial ring contraction evoked by DICR. Ca(2+) channel-null cells showed unaltered caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release and contraction. These data suggest that Ca(v)1.2 channels are indeed voltage sensors coupled to the metabolic cascade, leading to SR Ca(2+) release. These findings support a novel, ion-independent, functional role of L-type Ca(2+) channels linked to intracellular signaling pathways in vascular myocytes.

  7. Examination of Mechanisms Responsible for Organic Dust-related Diseases: Mediator Release induced by Microorgansims. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norn, Svend; Clementsen, Paul; Kristensen, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores......Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores...

  8. Sex and exercise interact to alter the expression of anabolic androgenic steroid-induced anxiety-like behaviors in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onakomaiya, Marie M; Porter, Donna M; Oberlander, Joseph G; Henderson, Leslie P

    2014-07-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are taken by both sexes to enhance athletic performance and body image, nearly always in conjunction with an exercise regime. Although taken to improve physical attributes, chronic AAS use can promote negative behavior, including anxiety. Few studies have directly compared the impact of AAS use in males versus females or assessed the interaction of exercise and AAS. We show that AAS increase anxiety-like behaviors in female but not male mice and that voluntary exercise accentuates these sex-specific differences. We also show that levels of the anxiogenic peptide corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) are significantly greater in males, but that AAS selectively increase CRF levels in females, thus abrogating this sex-specific difference. Exercise did not ameliorate AAS-induced anxiety or alter CRF levels in females. Exercise was anxiolytic in males, but this behavioral outcome did not correlate with CRF levels. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has also been implicated in the expression of anxiety. As with CRF, levels of hippocampal BDNF mRNA were significantly greater in males than females. AAS and exercise were without effect on BDNF mRNA in females. In males, anxiolytic effects of exercise correlated with increased BDNF mRNA, however AAS-induced changes in BDNF mRNA and anxiety did not. In sum, we find that AAS elicit sex-specific differences in anxiety and that voluntary exercise accentuates these differences. In addition, our data suggest that these behavioral outcomes may reflect convergent actions of AAS and exercise on a sexually differentiated CRF signaling system within the extended amygdala. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sex and Exercise Interact to Alter the Expression of Anabolic Androgenic Steroid-Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onakomaiya, Marie M.; Porter, Donna M.; Oberlander, Joseph G.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are taken by both sexes to enhance athletic performance and body image, nearly always in conjunction with an exercise regime. Although taken to improve physical attributes, chronic AAS use can promote negative behavior, including anxiety. Few studies have directly compared the impact of AAS use in males versus females or assessed the interaction of exercise and AAS. We show that AAS increase anxiety-like behaviors in female but not male mice and that voluntary exercise accentuates these sex-specific differences. We also show that levels of the anxiogenic peptide corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) are significantly greater in males, but that AAS selectively increase CRF levels in females, thus abrogating this sex-specific difference. Exercise did not ameliorate AAS-induced anxiety or alter CRF levels in females. Exercise was anxiolytic in males, but this behavioral outcome did not correlate with CRF levels. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has also been implicated in the expression of anxiety. As with CRF, levels of hippocampal BDNF mRNA were significantly greater in males than females. AAS and exercise were without effect on BDNF mRNA in females. In males, anxiolytic effects of exercise correlated with increased BDNF mRNA, however AAS-induced changes in BDNF mRNA and anxiety did not. In sum, we find that AAS elicit sex-specific differences in anxiety and that voluntary exercise accentuates these differences. In addition, our data suggest that these behavioral outcomes may reflect convergent actions of AAS and exercise on a sexually differentiated CRF signaling system within the extended amygdala. PMID:24768711

  10. Synthesis and characterization of superabsorbent polymer prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylamide onto carboxymethyl cellulose for controlled release of agrochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemvichian, Kasinee; Chanthawong, Auraruk; Suwanmala, Phiriyatorn

    2014-10-01

    Superabsorbent polymer (SAP) was synthesized by radiation-induced grafting of acrylamide (AM) onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in the presence of a crosslinking agent, N,N‧-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA). The effects of various parameters, such as dose, the amount of CMC, AM, MBA and ionic strength on the swelling ratio were investigated. In order to evaluate its controlled release potential, SAP was loaded with potassium nitrate (KNO3) as an agrochemical model and its potential for controlled release of KNO3 was studied. The amount of released KNO3 was analyzed by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results from controlled release experiment agreed very well with the results from swelling experiment. The synthesized SAP was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The obtained SAP exhibited a swelling ratio of 190 g/g of dry gel.

  11. Involvement of medial septal glutamate and GABA(A) receptors in behaviour-induced acetylcholine release in the hippocampus : A dual probe microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; Schirm, E; Jacso, J; Westerink, BHC

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, the role of medial septal receptors in behaviour-induced increase in acetylcholine (ACh) release in hippocampus was investigated using dual-probe microdialysis in combination with a simple behavioural procedure, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate receptor agonists and

  12. Controlled Release of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist from Hyaluronic Acid-Chitosan Microspheres Attenuates Interleukin-1β-Induced Inflammation and Apoptosis in Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the protective effect of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra released from hyaluronic acid chitosan (HA-CS microspheres in a controlled manner on IL-1β-induced inflammation and apoptosis in chondrocytes. The IL-1Ra release kinetics was characterized by an initial burst release, which was reduced to a linear release over eight days. Chondrocytes were stimulated with 10 ng/ml IL-1β and subsequently incubated with HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres. The cell viability was decreased by IL-1β, which was attenuated by HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres as indicated by an MTT assay. ELISA showed that HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres inhibited IL-1β-induced inflammation by attenuating increases in NO2- and prostaglandin E2 levels as well as increase in glycosaminoglycan release. A terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assay revealed that the IL-1β-induced chondrocyte apoptosis was decreased by HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres. Moreover, HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres blocked IL-1β-induced chondrocyte apoptosis by increasing B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 and decreasing Bcl-2-associated X protein and caspase-3 expressions at mRNA and protein levels, as indicated by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres as a controlled release system of IL-1Ra possess potential anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties in rat chondrocytes due to their ability to regulate inflammatory factors and apoptosis associated genes.

  13. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  14. Clinical evaluation of the intraoral fluoride releasing system in radiation-induced xerostomic subjects. Part 2: Phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Mark S; Mellberg, James R; Keene, Harris J; Bouwsma, Otis J; Garden, Adam S; Sipos, Tibor; Fleming, Terence J

    2006-10-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia can result in the rapid onset and progression of dental caries in head and neck cancer patients. Topically applied fluorides have been successfully used to inhibit the formation of dental caries in this population. However, because intensive daily self-application is required, compliance is an issue. The intraoral fluoride-releasing system (IFRS) containing a sodium fluoride core is a newly developed, sustained-release, passive drug delivery system that does not require patient involvement except for periodic replacement, thus reducing the effect of patient compliance on its effectiveness in dental caries prevention. Twenty-two head and neck cancer patients from U. T. M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, with radiation-induced xerostomia, were entered into a pilot study to contrast the daily home use of a 0.4% stannous fluoride-gel-containing tray (control group) to IFRS (study group) with respect to tolerability and adherence, and to obtain information on relative caries preventive efficacy. Participants were stratified on the basis of radiation exposure and randomly assigned to treatment with either IFRS or stannous fluoride gel. Patients in both groups were fitted with two IFRS retainers and also were instructed to use a 1100-ppm fluoride conventional sodium fluoride dentifrice twice daily. The study was conducted as a single-blinded, parallel-cell trial. Pre-existing carious lesions were restored prior to the beginning of the study. The efficacy variable was determined by the mean number of new or recurrent decayed surfaces. Patients were examined for caries 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks after initiation of treatment. Reports of adverse reactions were based on information volunteered by patients and that were elicited during interviews. At baseline, the resting and stimulated salivary flow rates (g/5min) were significantly greater in the control group than in the study group (pIFRS groups during the study period. The rate of new or

  15. Hindbrain cytoglucopenia-induced increases in systemic blood glucose levels by 2-deoxyglucose depend on intact astrocytes and adenosine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Richard C; Ritter, Sue; Hermann, Gerlinda E

    2016-06-01

    The hindbrain contains critical neurocircuitry responsible for generating defensive physiological responses to hypoglycemia. This counter-regulatory response (CRR) is evoked by local hindbrain cytoglucopenia that causes an autonomically mediated increase in blood glucose, feeding behavior, and accelerated digestion; that is, actions that restore glucose homeostasis. Recent reports suggest that CRR may be initially triggered by astrocytes in the hindbrain. The present studies in thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats show that exposure of the fourth ventricle (4V) to 2-deoxyglucose (2DG; 15 μmol) produced a 35% increase in circulating glucose relative to baseline levels. While the 4V application of the astrocytic signal blocker, fluorocitrate (FC; 5 nmol), alone, had no effect on blood glucose levels, 2DG-induced increases in glucose were blocked by 4V FC. The 4V effect of 2DG to increase glycemia was also blocked by the pretreatment with caffeine (nonselective adenosine antagonist) or a potent adenosine A1 antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine; DPCPX) but not the NMDA antagonist (MK-801). These results suggest that CNS detection of glucopenia is mediated by astrocytes and that astrocytic release of adenosine that occurs after hypoglycemia may cause the activation of downstream neural circuits that drive CRR. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Benzophenone 1 induced photogenotoxicity and apoptosis via release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO at environmental UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Saroj Kumar; Goyal, Shruti; Dubey, Divya; Srivastav, Ajeet K; Chopra, Deepti; Singh, Jyoti; Shankar, Jai; Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2015-12-15

    Solar UV radiation is main factor of photocarcinogenesis, photoageing, and phototoxicity; thus, protection from UV radiation is major concern. Sunscreens containing UV filters are suggested as sun safe practices, but safety of UV filters remains in controversies. Benzophenone-1 (BP1) is commonly used in sunscreens as UV blocker. We assessed the photogenotoxicity and apoptotic parameters in human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) by western blot, immunocytochemistry, flowcytometry, comet assay and TEM imaging. Our results exposed that BP1 photosensitized and generated intracellular ROS (2.02 folds) under sunlight/UVR. Decrease in cell viability was recorded as 80.06%, 60.98% and 56.24% under sunlight, UVA and UVB, respectively. Genotoxic potential of BP1 was confirmed through photomicronuclei and CPDs formation. BP1 enhanced lipid peroxidation and leakage of LDH enzyme (61.7%). Apoptotic cells were detected by AnnexinV/PI staining and sub G1 population of cell cycle. BP1 induced up regulation of apoptotic proteins Bax/Bcl2 ratio, Apaf-1, cytochrome c, Smac/DIABLO and cleaved caspase 3 was noticed. Down regulation of pro caspase 3 was inhibited by Z-VAD-fmk (inhibitor of caspase). Thus, study established the involvement of BP1 in photogenotoxicity and apoptosis via release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. These findings suggest sunscreen user to avoid BP1 in cosmetics preparation for its topical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ischemia Induces Release of Endogenous Amino Acids from the Cerebral Cortex and Cerebellum of Developing and Adult Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo S. Oja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia enhanced release of endogenous neuroactive amino acids from cerebellar and cerebral cortical slices. More glutamate was released in adult than developing mice. Taurine release enhanced by K+ stimulation and ischemia was more than one magnitude greater than that of GABA or glutamate in the developing cerebral cortex and cerebellum, while in adults the releases were almost comparable. Aspartate release was prominently enhanced by both ischemia and K+ stimulation in the adult cerebral cortex. In the cerebellum K+ stimulation and ischemia evoked almost 10-fold greater GABA release in 3-month olds than in 7-day olds. The release of taurine increased severalfold in the cerebellum of 7-day-old mice in high-K+ media, whereas the K+-evoked effect was rather small in adults. In 3-month-old mice no effects of K+ stimulation or ischemia were seen in the release of aspartate, glycine, glutamine, alanine, serine, or threonine. The releases from the cerebral cortex and cerebellum were markedly different and also differed between developing and adult mice. In developing mice only the release of inhibitory taurine may be large enough to counteract the harmful effects of excitatory amino acids in ischemia in both cerebral cortex and cerebellum, in particular since at that age the release of glutamate and aspartate cannot be described as massive.

  18. Antiangiogenic effects of AA-PMe on HUVECs in vitro and zebrafish in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Y

    2018-04-01

    phosphatase assay. VEGFR2 expression in whole embryos following AA-PMe treatment was also determined. Results: We found AA-PMe decreased cell viability and inhibited migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent manner in HUVECs. Similarly, AA-PMe disrupted the formation of intersegmental vessels, the dorsal aorta, and the posterior cardinal vein in zebrafish embryos. Both in vitro and in vivo AA-PMe surpassed AA in its ability to block angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and disrupting downstream extracellular regulated protein kinase and AKT signaling. Conclusion: For the first time, this study reveals that AA-PMe acts as a potent VEGFR2 kinase inhibitor and exerts powerful antiangiogenic activity, suggesting it to be a promising therapeutic candidate for further research. Keywords: AA-PMe, angiogenesis inhibitor, zebrafish, HUVEC

  19. RNAi induced knockdown of a cadherin-like protein (EF531715) does not affect toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 or Cry3Aa to Diabrotica virgifera virgifera larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sek Yee; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Wang, Haichuan; Vélez, Ana María; Hasler, James; McCaskill, David; Xu, Tao; Chen, Hong; Jurzenski, Jessica; Kelker, Matthew; Xu, Xiaoping; Narva, Kenneth; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is an important maize pest throughout most of the U.S. Corn Belt. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins including modified Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic maize to protect against WCR feeding damage. To date, there is limited information regarding the WCR midgut target sites for these proteins. In this study, we examined whether a cadherin-like gene from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (DvvCad; GenBank accession # EF531715) associated with WCR larval midgut tissue is necessary for Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 toxicity. Experiments were designed to examine the sensitivity of WCR to trypsin activated Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 after oral feeding of the DvvCad dsRNA to knockdown gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that DvvCad mRNA transcript levels were reduced in larvae treated with cadherin dsRNA. Relative cadherin expression by immunoblot analysis and nano-liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) of WCR neonate brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) preparations exposed to DvvCad dsRNA confirmed reduced cadherin expression when compared to BBMV from untreated larvae. However, the larval mortality and growth inhibition of WCR neonates exposed to cadherin dsRNA for two days followed by feeding exposure to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 for four days was not significantly different to that observed in insects exposed to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 alone. In combination, these results suggest that cadherin is unlikely to be involved in the toxicity of Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 to WCR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Anti-inflammatory homoeopathic drug dilutions restrain lipopolysaccharide-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines: In vitro and in vivo evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh B Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced cytokine release and oxidative stress are validated experimental parameters used to test anti-inflammatory activity. We investigated the effects of homoeopathic mother tinctures, 6 CH, 30 CH and 200 CH dilutions of Arnica montana, Thuja occidentalis and Bryonia alba against LPS (1 μg/ml-induced cytokine release from RAW-264.7 cells and human whole-blood culture. Materials and Methods: For in vivo evaluations, mice were orally treated with 0.1 ml drug dilutions twice a day for 5 days followed by an intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 mg/kg LPS. After 24 h, the mice were sacrificed and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide were determined. The extent of oxidative stress was determined in the liver homogenates as contents of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase. Results: The tested drug dilutions significantly reduced in vitro LPS-induced release of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1 (IL-1 and IL-6 from the RAW-264.7 cells and human whole blood culture. Similar suppression of cytokines was evident in mice serum samples. These drugs also protected mice from the LPS-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue. Conclusions: Our findings substantiate the protective effects of Arnica, Thuja and Bryonia homoeopathic dilutions against LPS-induced cytokine elevations and oxidative stress. This study authenticates the claims of anti-inflammatory efficacy of these homoeopathic drugs.

  1. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bin; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Xu; Feldman, Morris; Dong, Xian-zhi; Doran, Robert; Zhao, Bao-Lu; Yin, Wen-xuan; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Ji, Guangju

    2008-06-25

    Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+) release occurs in the form of Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+) waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown. We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+) release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+) sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+) sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+) sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level. Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  2. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wei

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+ release occurs in the form of Ca(2+ sparks and Ca(2+ waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown.We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+ release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+ sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+ sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+ sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level.Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  3. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; pcaffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Streptolysin-O induces release of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored alkaline phosphatase from ROS cells by vesiculation independently of phospholipase action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M; Low, M G

    1995-01-01

    Streptolysin-O (SLO), a cholesterol-binding agent, was used for studies on the release of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored alkaline phosphatase (AP) from ROS cells. Treatment of cells with SLO resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent release of AP into the extracellular medium. This release was potentiated by Ca2+ and bovine serum, but not by GPI-specific phospholipase D (GPI-PLD) purified from bovine serum. The released AP distributed to the detergent phase after Triton X-114 phase separation. This result suggested that the released AP contained an intact GPI anchor, and thus both proteolysis and anchor degradation by anchor-specific hydrolases, including GPI-PLD, as the potential mechanisms for SLO-mediated AP release were ruled out. The released AP sedimented at 100,000 g. A substantial amount of lipids was detected in the 100,000 g pellet. Cholesterol and sphingomyelin were enriched in SLO-released material, compared with intact cells. These results were consistent with vesiculation as the mechanism for SLO induction of AP release. Two other cholesterol-binding agents, saponin and digitonin, were also able to release AP, possibly by a similar vesiculation mechanism, whereas others, including nystatin, filipin and beta-escin, failed to elicit any AP release. Eight GPI-anchored proteins were identified in ROS cells, and all were substantially enriched in the vesicles released by SLO. Taken together, these results do not provide any support for the hypothesis that the clustering of GPI-anchored proteins in the plasma membrane is responsible for their resistance to GPI-PLD cleavage. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7832771

  5. Pneumocystis carinii major surface glycoprotein induces interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release from a human alveolar epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Lundgren, Bettina; Shelhamer, J H

    1999-01-01

    (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from an alveolar epithelial cell line (A549). RESULTS: Incubation of A549 cells with MSG in concentrations from 0.4 to 10 microg mL-1 for 24 h caused dose-dependent increases in IL-8 release (3.4-fold above control, P ..., suggesting that MSG stimulates A549 cells in part through carbohydrate moieties. Dexamethasone significantly inhibited MSG-induced IL-8 release in concentrations of 10-6-10-8 mol L-1 compared with control experiments (P

  6. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced dopamine release as a function of psychosis risk: 18F-fallypride positron emission tomography study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Kuepper

    Full Text Available Cannabis use is associated with psychosis, particularly in those with expression of, or vulnerability for, psychotic illness. The biological underpinnings of these differential associations, however, remain largely unknown. We used Positron Emission Tomography and (18F-fallypride to test the hypothesis that genetic risk for psychosis is expressed by differential induction of dopamine release by Δ(9-THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis. In a single dynamic PET scanning session, striatal dopamine release after pulmonary administration of Δ(9-THC was measured in 9 healthy cannabis users (average risk psychotic disorder, 8 patients with psychotic disorder (high risk psychotic disorder and 7 un-related first-degree relatives (intermediate risk psychotic disorder. PET data were analyzed applying the linear extension of the simplified reference region model (LSRRM, which accounts for time-dependent changes in (18F-fallypride displacement. Voxel-based statistical maps, representing specific D2/3 binding changes, were computed to localize areas with increased ligand displacement after Δ(9-THC administration, reflecting dopamine release. While Δ(9-THC was not associated with dopamine release in the control group, significant ligand displacement induced by Δ(9-THC in striatal subregions, indicative of dopamine release, was detected in both patients and relatives. This was most pronounced in caudate nucleus. This is the first study to demonstrate differential sensitivity to Δ(9-THC in terms of increased endogenous dopamine release in individuals at risk for psychosis.

  7. Effect of Amino Acid Substitutions in the GerAA Protein on the Function of the Alanine-Responsive Germinant Receptor of Bacillus subtilis Spores▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongkolthanaruk, Wiyada; Cooper, Gareth R.; Mawer, Julia S. P.; Allan, Raymond N.; Moir, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis require the GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC receptor proteins for l-alanine-induced germination. Mutations in gerAA, both random and site directed, result in phenotypes that identify amino acid residues important for receptor function in broad terms. They highlight the functional importance of two regions in the central, integral membrane domain of GerAA. A P324S substitution in the first residue of a conserved PFPP motif results in a 10-fold increase in a spore's sensitivity to alanine; a P326S change results in the release of phase-dark spores, in which the receptor may be in an “activated” or “quasigerminated” state. Substitutions in residues 398 to 400, in a short loop between the last two likely membrane-spanning helices of this central domain, all affect the germination response, with the G398S substitution causing a temperature-sensitive defect. In others, there are wider effects on the receptor: if alanine is substituted for conserved residue N146, H304, or E330, a severe defect in l-alanine germination results. This correlates with the absence of GerAC, suggesting that the assembly or stability of the entire receptor complex has been compromised by the defect in GerAA. In contrast, severely germination-defective mutants such as E129K, L373F, S400F, and M409N mutants retain GerAC at normal levels, suggesting more local and specific effects on the function of GerAA itself. Further interpretation will depend on progress in structural analysis of the receptor proteins. PMID:21378197

  8. Antiangiogenic effects of AA-PMe on HUVECs in vitro and zebrafish in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Qi; Zhou, Yachun; Wei, Yingjie; Gong, Zhunan

    2018-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a vital role in many physiological and pathological processes and several diseases are connected with its dysregulation. Asiatic acid (AA) has demonstrated anticancer properties and we suspect this might be attributable to an effect on angio-genesis. A modified derivative of AA, N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-L-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), has improved efficacy over its parent compound, but its effect on blood vessel development remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the antiangiogenic activity of AA and AA-PMe in zebrafish embryos and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). First of all, we treated HUVECs with increasing concentrations of AA-PMe or AA, with or without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) present, and assessed cell viability, tube formation, and cell migration and invasion. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were later used to determine the role of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-mediated signaling in AA-PMe inhibition of angiogenesis. We extended these studies to follow angiogenesis using Tg(fli:EGFP) transgenic zebrafish embryos. For these experiments, embryos were treated with varying concentrations of AA-PMe or AA from 24 to 72 hours postfertilization prior to morphological observation, angiogenesis assessment, and endogenous alkaline phosphatase assay. VEGFR2 expression in whole embryos following AA-PMe treatment was also determined. We found AA-PMe decreased cell viability and inhibited migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent manner in HUVECs. Similarly, AA-PMe disrupted the formation of intersegmental vessels, the dorsal aorta, and the posterior cardinal vein in zebrafish embryos. Both in vitro and in vivo AA-PMe surpassed AA in its ability to block angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and disrupting downstream extracellular regulated protein kinase and AKT signaling. For the first time

  9. Effect of fluoride-releasing restorative materials on bacteria-induced pH fall at the bacteria-material interface: an in vitro model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanagi, Gen; Igarashi, Koei; Washio, Jumpei; Domon-Tawaraya, Hitomi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial acid production by dental restorative materials is one of the strategies for secondary caries prevention. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of fluoride-releasing restorative materials on bacteria-induced pH fall at the bacteria-material interface. Four fluoride-releasing restorative materials, glass-ionomer cement (GIC), resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC), resin composite (RC) and flowable resin composite (FRC) were used. Each specimen was immersed in potassium phosphate buffer at pH 7.0 for 10min and 4 weeks, and in potassium acetate buffer at pH 5.5 for 4 weeks. An experimental apparatus was made of polymethyl methacrylate and had a well with restorative materials or polymethyl methacrylate (control) at the bottom. The well was packed with cells of Streptococcus mutans, and the pH at the interface between cells and materials was monitored using a miniature pH electrode after the addition of 1% glucose for 90min, and the fluoride released into the well was quantified using a fluoride ion electrode. The pH of GIC (4.98-5.18), RMGIC (4.77-4.99), RC (4.62-4.75) and FRC (4.54-4.84) at 90min were higher than that of control (4.31-4.49). The fluoride amounts released from GIC were the highest, followed by RMGIC, RC and FRC, irrespective of immersion conditions. Saliva coating on materials had no significant effect. The fluoride-releasing restorative materials inhibited pH fall at the bacteria-material interface. The degree of inhibition of pH fall seemed to correspond to the amount of fluoride detected, suggesting that the inhibition was due to the fluoride released from these materials. A little amount of fluoride actually released from the fluoride-releasing materials may have caries preventive potential for oral bacteria. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Detection of Ca2+-induced acetylcholine released from leukemic T-cells using an amperometric microfluidic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mahmood H; Hussain, Khalil K; Gurudatt, N G; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2017-12-15

    A microfluidic structured-dual electrodes sensor comprising of a pair of screen printed carbon electrodes was fabricated to detect acetylcholine, where one of them was used for an enzyme reaction and another for a detection electrode. The former was coated with gold nanoparticles and the latter with a porous gold layer, followed by electropolymerization of 2, 2:5,2-terthiophene-3-(p-benzoic acid) (pTTBA) on both the electrodes. Then, acetylcholinesterase was covalently attached onto the reaction electrode, and hydrazine and choline oxidase were co-immobilized on the detection electrode. The layers of both modified electrodes were characterized employing voltammetry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and quartz crystal microscopy. After the modifications of both electrode surfaces, they were precisely faced each other to form a microfluidic channel structure, where H 2 O 2 produced from the sequential enzymatic reactions was reduced by hydrazine to obtain the analytical signal which was analyzed by the detection electrode. The microfluidic sensor at the optimized experimental conditions exhibited a wide dynamic range from 0.7nM to 1500μM with the detection limit of 0.6 ± 0.1nM based on 3s (S/N = 3). The biomedical application of the proposed sensor was evaluated by detecting acetylcholine in human plasma samples. Moreover, the Ca 2+ -induced acetylcholine released in leukemic T-cells was also investigated to show the in vitro detection ability of the designed microfluidic sensor. Interference due to the real component matrix were also studied and long term stability of the designed sensor was evaluated. The analytical performance of the designed sensor was also compared with commercially available ACh detection kit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An orally administered butyrate-releasing derivative reduces neutrophil recruitment and inflammation in dextran sulphate sodium-induced murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeoli, Raffaele; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Pirozzi, Claudio; Lama, Adriano; Santoro, Anna; Russo, Roberto; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Berni Canani, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Perretti, Mauro; Meli, Rosaria

    2017-06-01

    Butyrate has shown benefits in inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it is not often administered orally because of its rancid smell and unpleasant taste. The efficacy of a more palatable butyrate-releasing derivative, N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenylethyl) butyramide (FBA), was evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). Male 10 week-old BALB/c mice received DSS (2.5%) in drinking water (for 5 days) followed by DSS-free water for 7 days (DSS group). Oral FBA administration (42.5 mg·kg -1 ) was started 7 days before DSS as preventive (P-FBA), or 2 days after DSS as therapeutic (T-FBA); both treatments lasted 19 days. One DSS-untreated group received only tap water (CON). FBA treatments reduced colitis symptoms and colon damage. P-FBA and T-FBA significantly decreased polymorphonuclear cell infiltration score compared with the DSS group. FBA reversed the imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (reducing inducible NOS protein expression, CCL2 and IL-6 transcripts in colon and increasing TGFβ and IL-10). Morever, P-FBA and T-FBA limited neutrophil recruitment (by expression and localization of the neutrophil granule protease Ly-6G), restored deficiency of the butyrate transporter and improved intestinal epithelial integrity, preventing tight-junction impairment (zonulin-1 and occludin). FBA, similar to its parental compound sodium butyrate, inhibited histone deacetylase-9 and restored H3 histone acetylation, exerting an anti-inflammatory effect through NF-κB inhibition and the up-regulation of PPARγ. FBA reduces inflammatory intestinal damage in mice indicating its potential as a postbiotic derivative without the problems associated with the oral administration of sodium butyrate. This article is part of a themed section on Principles of Pharmacological Research of Nutraceuticals. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.11/issuetoc. © 2016 The British

  12. A.A., constructivism, and reflecting teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevels, B

    1997-12-01

    Numerous studies and clinical anecdotes reveal a relationship between attendance at A.A. meetings and/or degree of involvement in A.A. and maintenance of sobriety. Hypotheses as to how A.A. and/or the A.A. meeting is helpful to its members have ranged from a focus on factors common to all therapy groups, to aspects of A.A. "treatment" which are behavioral in nature. Presented here is another way of understanding A.A.'s effectiveness within the frame of more recent, constructivistic approaches to family therapy. In particular, the A.A. topic meeting is compared to the reflecting team concept of Tom Anderson.

  13. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands methyllycaconitine, NS6740 and GTS-21 reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α release from microglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of, particularly the α7, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the peripheral immune system are well documented. There are also reports of anti-inflammatory actions of nicotine in the CNS, but it is unclear, whether this is due to activation or inhibition...... of nAChRs. Here we investigate the mechanisms behind α7 nAChR-mediated modulation of TNF-α release. We show that α7 nAChR agonists or positive allosteric modulators do not affect LPS-induced release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α from cultured microglia. This suggests that classical activation...... of, i.e. ion-flux through, the α7 nAChR does not reduce TNF-α release from activated microglia. Contrarily, the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine and the weak (...

  14. Controlled-release levodopa methyl ester/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles ameliorate levodopa-induced dyskinesia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Xinxin Yang1*, Ruiyuan Zheng2*, Yunpeng Cai2, Meiling Liao2, Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital (affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*Xinxin Yang and Ruiyuan Zheng contributed equally to this workBackground: Levodopa remains the most effective drug in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, long-term administration of levodopa induces motor complications, such as levodopa-induced dyskinesia. The mechanisms underlying levodopa-induced dyskinesia are not fully understood.Methods: In this study, we prepared levodopa methyl ester (LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles, which can release LDME and benserazide in a sustained manner. Dyskinesia was induced in rats by repeated administration of levodopa then treated with LDME plus benserazide or the same dose of LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles. Apomorphine-induced rotations and abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs were measured on treatment days 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20. In addition, the levels of phosphorylated dopamine- and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, and ΔfosB were determined by Western blot. Tau levels were determined by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Dynorphin levels in the striatum and cortex of rats were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Over the course of levodopa treatment, the rats developed abnormal AIMs, classified as locomotive, axial, orolingual, and forelimb dyskinesia. The degree of reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations was comparable in dyskinetic rats treated with LDME plus benserazide or LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles. The axial, limb, and orolingual (ALO AIMs of dyskinetic rats treated with LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles were 14 ± 2.5, 9 ± 2.0, and 10 ± 2.1 on treatment days 10, 15, and 20

  15. AaERF1 positively regulates the resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Artemisia annua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lu

    Full Text Available Plants are sessile organisms, and they can not move away under abiotic or biotic stresses. Thus plants have evolved a set of genes that response to adverse environment to modulate gene expression. In this study, we characterized and functionally studied an ERF transcription factor from Artemisia annua, AaERF1, which plays an important role in biotic stress responses. The AaERF1 promoter had been cloned and GUS staining results of AaERF1 promoter-GUS transgenic A. annua showed that AaERF1 is expressed ubiquitiously in all organs. Several putative cis-acting elements such as W-box, TGA-box and Py-rich element, which are involved in defense responsiveness, are present in the promoter. The expression of AaERF1 can be induced vigorously by methyl jasmonate as well as by ethephon and wounding, implying that AaERF1 may activate some of the defense genes via the jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling pathways of A. annua. The results of electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and yeast one-hybrid experiments showed that AaERF1 was able to bind to the GCC box cis-acting element in vitro and in yeast. Ectopic expression of AaERF1 could enhance the expression levels of the defense marker genes PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2 and BASIC CHITINASE (ChiB, and increase the resistance to Botrytis cinerea in the 35S::AaERF1 transgenic Arabidopsis. The down-regulated expression level of AaERF1 evidently reduced the resistance to B. cinerea in A. annua. The overall results showed that AaERF1 positively regulated the resistance to B. cinerea in A. annua.

  16. Immobilization of glucose isomerase onto radiation synthesized P(AA-co-AMPS hydrogel and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kamal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Isomerization of glucose to fructose was carried out using Glucose isomerase (GI that immobilized by entrapment into Poly(acrylic acid P(AA and Poly(acrylic acid-co-2-Acrylamido 2-methyl Propane sulfonic acid P(AA-co-AMPS polymer networks, the enzyme carriers were prepared by radiation induced copolymerization in the presence of (Methylene-bisacrylamide (MBAA as a crosslinking agent. The maximum gel fraction of pure P(AA and P(AA-co-AMPS hydrogel was found to be 95.2% and 89.6% for P(AA and P(AA-co-AMPS, respectively at a total dose of 20 kGy. Effects of immobilization conditions such as radiation dose, MBAA concentration, comonomer composition and amount of GI were investigated. The influence of reaction conditions on the activity of immobilized GI were studied, the optimum pH value of the reaction solution is 7.5 and reaction temperature is 65 °C. The immobilized GI into P(AA-co-AMPS and P(AA polymer networks retained 81% and 69%, respectively of its initial activity after recycled for 15 times while it retained 87% and 71%, respectively of its initial activity after stored at 4 °C for 48 days. The Km values of free and immobilized GI onto P(AA-co-AMPS and onto P(AA matrices were found to be 34, 29.2 and 14.5 mg/mL, respectively while the Vmax Values calculated to be 3.87, 1.6 and 0.79 mg/mL min, respectively. GI entrapped into P(AA-co-AMPS hydrogel show promising behavior that may be useful as the newly glucose isomerase reactor in biomedical applications.

  17. AAS 228: Day 2 afternoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    scientific sense) to his then-new theory of general relativity. Instead, he applied his theory for the first time to the orbit of Mercury and demonstrated that it explains existing facts. In the same way, we may add or remove credence from the multiverse theory even without newly collected measurements on directly testable predictions.Plenary Session APOGEE: The New View of the Milky Way (by Nathan Sanders)Jo Bovy (Toronto) spoke about a bevy of recent discoveries by the APOGEE team, which has collected half a million spectra of red giant stars throughout the Milky Way disk. Bovy emphasized APOGEEs unprecedented scope, covering close to half of the Milky Way disk and ranging ~10 kpc in radius, rather than the tiny neighborhood around the sun that most historical stellar surveys have probed. Overcoming the challenges of galactic extinction, the APOGEE team has made the most precise measurement of the circular rotation velocity of the MIlky Way disk, v_c = 218 +- 6 km/s, and produced remarkable results on the chemical evolution history of the Galaxy. In particular, they have shown that the star formation and chemical evolution history of the Galaxy seems to be remarkably constant throughout the disk.However, the radial migration of stars, which follows a non-circular orbit across the Milky Ways spiral structure, causes mixing that makes the distribution of stellar parameters look uneven. Bovy also emphasized the importance of open science, sharing data and code related to their work. Like all SDSS data, the APOGEE spectra have been released publicly, and all their software pipelines and stellar models have also been made public. Coming next is an APOGEE-2 survey of the Southern sky, a copy of the instrument to be installed at the DuPont telescope in Chile.Afternoon Press Conference Dark Skies, Aliens, and the Multiverse (by Chris Faesi)Tuesday afternoon brought another press conference to the AAS 228th meeting, this one taking us beyond the benign realms of planets, stars, and

  18. Food-induced changes in theophylline absorption from controlled-release formulations. Part I. Substantial increased and decreased absorption with Uniphyl tablets and Theo-Dur Sprinkle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, A; Burns, T; Wearley, L; Streicher, J; Palmer, M

    1985-07-01

    Food-induced changes in absorption from two controlled-release formulations of theophylline (Uniphyl tablets [Purdue Frederick Co.] and Theo-Dur Sprinkle [Key Pharmaceuticals, Inc.]) were studied in healthy male nonsmokers. Although the two forms exhibited a theophylline in vitro dissolution rate that was independent of changes in pH from 1 to 8, they showed substantial but opposite food-induced absorption changes. In a 12-subject, three-way, single-dose, randomized, crossover study the bioavailability of theophylline relative to immediate-release aminophylline tablets increased from 53% +/- 23% (means +/- SD) to 96% +/- 46% when Uniphyl (two 400 mg tablets) was taken under fasting and nonfasting (high fat content meal) conditions, respectively. On the other hand, in a separate six-subject, two-way, randomized, crossover study, food reduced the bioavailability of theophylline from Theo-Dur Sprinkle: Theophylline bioavailability in the nonfasting state was only 53% +/- 9% that in the fasting state.

  19. Effect of coriander seed (Coriandrum sativum L.) ethanol extract on insulin release from pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Maryam; Eidi, Akram; Saeidi, Ali; Molanaei, Saadat; Sadeghipour, Alireza; Bahar, Massih; Bahar, Kamal

    2009-03-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is grown as a spice crop all over the world. The seeds have been used to treat indigestion, diabetes, rheumatism and pain in the joints. In the present study, an ethanol extract of the seeds was investigated for effects on insulin release from the pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood samples were drawn from the retro-orbital sinus before and 1.5, 3 and 5 h after administration of the seed extract. Serum glucose levels were determined by the glucose oxidase method. To determine the insulin releasing activity, after extract treatment the animals were anaesthetized by diethyl ether, the pancreas was excised, fixed in 10% formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin for sectioning. Pancreatic sections of 5 microm were processed for examination of insulin-releasing activity using an immunocytochemistry kit. The results showed that administration of the ethanol extract (200 and 250 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significant reduction in serum glucose. Administration of streptozotocin decreased the number of beta cells with insulin secretory activity in comparison with intact rats, but treatment with the coriander seed extract (200 mg/kg) increased significantly the activity of the beta cells in comparison with the diabetic control rats. The extract decreased serum glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and increased insulin release from the beta cells of the pancreas. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. MS-377, a novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, reverses phencyclidine-induced release of dopamine and serotonin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Kato, T

    2001-09-21

    A novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), inhibits phencyclidine (1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine; PCP)-induced behaviors in animal models. In this study, we measured extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat brain after treatment with MS-377 alone, using in vivo microdialysis. We also examined the effects of MS-377 on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat medial prefrontal cortex after treatment with PCP. MS-377 itself had no significant effects on dopamine release in the striatum (10 mg/kg, p.o.) nor on dopamine or serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.). PCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) markedly increased dopamine and serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex. MS-377 (1 mg/kg, p.o.), when administered 60 min prior to PCP, significantly attenuated this effect of PCP. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of MS-377 on PCP-induced behaviors are partly mediated by inhibition of the increase in dopamine and serotonin release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex caused by PCP.

  1. Self-soothing behaviors with particular reference to oxytocin release induced by non-noxious sensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin; Handlin, Linda; Petersson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin, a hypothalamic nonapeptide, is linked to increased levels of social interaction, well-being and anti-stress effects. The effects of oxytocin that is released by sensory stimulation during different kinds of interactive behaviors are often underestimated or even forgotten. In fact, many of the positive effects caused during interaction, such a wellbeing, stress reduction and even health promotion, are indeed linked to oxytocin released in response to activation of various types of sensory nerves. Oxytocin is released in response to activation of sensory nerves during labor, breastfeeding and sexual activity. In addition oxytocin is released in response to low intensity stimulation of the skin, e.g., in response to touch, stroking, warm temperature, etc. Consequently oxytocin is not only released during interaction between mothers and infants, but also during positive interaction between adults or between humans and animals. Finally oxytocin is also released in response to suckling and food intake. Oxytocin released in the brain in response to sensory stimulation as a consequence of these types of interactive behaviors, contributes to every day wellbeing and ability to handle stress. Food intake or sex may be used or even abused to achieve oxytocin-linked wellbeing and stress relief to compensate for lack of good relationships or when the levels of anxiety are high. The present review article will summarize the role played by oxytocin released by sensory (in particular somatosensory) stimulation, during various kinds of interactive behaviors. Also the fact that the anti-stress effects of oxytocin are particularly strong when oxytocin is released in response to "low intensity" stimulation of the skin will be highlighted.

  2. Self-soothing behaviors with particular reference to oxytocin release induced by non-noxious sensory stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin eUvnäs-Moberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin, a hypothalamic nonapeptide, is linked to increased levels of social interaction, well-being and anti-stress effects. The effects of oxytocin that is released by sensory stimulation during different kinds of interactive behaviors are often underestimated or even forgotten. In fact, many of the positive effects caused during interaction, such a wellbeing, stress reduction and even health promotion, are indeed linked to oxytocin released in response to activation of various types of sensory nerves. Oxytocin is released in response to activation of sensory nerves during labor, breastfeeding and sexual activity. In addition oxytocin is released in response to low intensity stimulation of the skin, e.g. in response to touch, stroking, warm temperature etc . Consequently oxytocin is not only released during interaction between mothers and infants, but also during positive interaction between adult or between humans and animals. Finally oxytocin is also released in response to suckling and food intake. Oxytocin released in the brain in response to sensory stimulation as a consequence of these types of interactive behaviors, contributes to every day wellbeing and ability to handle stress. Food intake or sex may be used or even abused to achieve oxytocin-linked wellbeing and stress relief to compensate for lack of good relationships or when the levels of anxiety are high. The present review article will summarize the role played by oxytocin released by sensory (in particular somatosensory stimulation, during various kinds of interactive behaviors. Also the fact that the anti-stress effects of oxytocin are particularly strong when oxytocin is released in response to low intensity stimulation of the skin will be highlighted.

  3. Stress-induced suppression of neuropeptide Y-induced hunger in anorexic chicks involves corticotrophin-releasing factor signalling and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Yi, J; Siegel, P B; Cline, M A; Gilbert, E R

    2017-12-01

    The Virginia lines of chickens have been selected for low (LWS) or high (HWS) juvenile body weight and have different severities of anorexia and obesity, respectively. The LWS that are exposed to stressors at hatch are refractory to neuropeptide Y (NPY)-induced food intake and the objective of the present study was to determine the underlying mechanisms. Chicks were exposed to a stressor (-20°C for 6 minutes and 22°C and delayed access to food for 24 hours) after hatching and the hypothalamic nuclei, including the lateral hypothalamus (LH), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and arcuate nucleus (ARC), were collected 5 days later. In LWS but not HWS, stress exposure up-regulated corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), CRF receptor subtypes 1 and 2 (CRFR1 and CRFR2, respectively), melanocortin receptor 4 and urocortin 3 in the PVN, as well as CRFR2 mRNA in the VMH and ARC. In LWS, stress exposure was also associated with greater NPY and NPY receptor subtype 5 mRNA in the ARC and PVN, respectively, as well as decreased agouti-related peptide mRNA in the ARC. In HWS, stress exposure was associated with increased CRFR1 and decreased cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in the ARC and PVN, respectively. Refractoriness of the food intake response to NPY in LWS may thus result from the over-riding anorexigenic tone in the PVN associated with CRF signalling. Indeed, the orexigenic effect of NPY was restored when LWS were injected with a CRF receptor antagonist, astressin, before stress exposure. The results of the present study provide insights into the molecular basis of eating disorders and suggest that CRF signalling in the PVN may exacerbate the anorexic phenotype in the presence of environmental stressors. © 2017 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  4. The Cytolytic Amphipathic ?(2,2)-Amino Acid LTX-401 Induces DAMP Release in Melanoma Cells and Causes Complete Regression of B16 Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Eike, Liv-Marie; Mauseth, Brynjar; Camilio, Ketil Andr?; Rekdal, ?ystein; Sveinbj?rnsson, Baldur

    2016-01-01

    Published version. Source at http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0148980. License CC BY 4.0. In the present study we examined the ability of the amino acid derivative LTX-401 to induce cell death in cancer cell lines, as well as the capacity to induce regression in a murine melanoma model. Mode of action studies in vitro revealed lytic cell death and release of danger-associated molecular pattern molecules, preceded by massive cytoplasmic vacuolization and compromised lysosomes in treat...

  5. The Cytolytic Amphipathic β(2,2)-Amino Acid LTX-401 Induces DAMP Release in Melanoma Cells and Causes Complete Regression of B16 Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eike, Liv-Marie; Mauseth, Brynjar; Camilio, Ketil André; Rekdal, Øystein; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we examined the ability of the amino acid derivative LTX-401 to induce cell death in cancer cell lines, as well as the capacity to induce regression in a murine melanoma model. Mode of action studies in vitro revealed lytic cell death and release of danger-associated molecular pattern molecules, preceded by massive cytoplasmic vacuolization and compromised lysosomes in treated cells. The use of a murine melanoma model demonstrated that the majority of animals treated with intratumoural injections of LTX-401 showed complete and long-lasting remission. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of LTX-401 as an immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors.

  6. Intra-peritoneal administration of interleukin-1 beta induces impaired insulin release from the perfused rat pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, L; Helqvist, S; Pociot, F

    1990-01-01

    content in pancreata from IL-1 beta pre-treated rats was higher than in pancreata from saline-treated controls. In contrast to the inhibitory effect of in vivo administration of IL-1 beta on beta-cell function glucagon secretion was stimulated. These observations suggest that circulating IL-1 beta......-1 beta glucose-stimulated as well as IL-1 beta potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin release was almost completely abolished. Furthermore, a decline in insulin release was observed at 11 mmol/l D-glucose, in contrast to an increase in insulin release in controls. The total extractable insulin...

  7. Speech-induced striatal dopamine release is left lateralized and coupled to functional striatal circuits in healthy humans: A combined PET, fMRI and DTI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Kristina; Herscovitch, Peter; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been recently made in understanding the brain mechanisms underlying speech and language control. However, the neurochemical underpinnings of normal speech production remain largely unknown. We investigated the extent of striatal endogenous dopamine release and its influences on the organization of functional striatal speech networks during production of meaningful English sentences using a combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand [11C]raclopride and functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, we used diffusion tensor tractography (DTI) to examine the extent of dopaminergic modulatory influences on striatal structural network organization. We found that, during sentence production, endogenous dopamine was released in the ventromedial portion of the dorsal striatum, in its both associative and sensorimotor functional divisions. In the associative striatum, speech-induced dopamine release established a significant relationship with neural activity and influenced the left-hemispheric lateralization of striatal functional networks. In contrast, there were no significant effects of endogenous dopamine release on the lateralization of striatal structural networks. Our data provide the first evidence for endogenous dopamine release in the dorsal striatum during normal speaking and point to the possible mechanisms behind the modulatory influences of dopamine on the organization of functional brain circuits controlling normal human speech. PMID:23277111

  8. Microparticles released from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected human macrophages contain increased levels of the type I interferon inducible proteins including ISG15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Nathan J; Chan, Brian; Chan, Edwina; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Britton, Warwick J; Saunders, Bernadette M

    2015-09-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are small membranous particles (100-1000 nm) released under normal steady-state conditions and are thought to provide a communication network between host cells. Previous studies demonstrated that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection of macrophages increased the release of MPs, and these MPs induced a proinflammatory response from uninfected macrophages in vitro and in vivo following their transfer into uninfected mice. To determine how M. tb infection modulates the protein composition of the MPs, and if this contributes to their proinflammatory properties, we compared the proteomes of MPs derived from M. tb-infected (TBinf-MP) and uninfected human THP-1 monocytic cells. MP proteins were analyzed by GeLC-MS/MS with spectral counting revealing 68 proteins with statistically significant differential abundances. The 42 proteins increased in abundance in TBinf-MPs included proteins associated with immune function (7), lysosomal/endosomal maturation (4), vesicular formation (12), nucleosome proteins (4), and antigen processing (9). Prominent among these were the type I interferon inducible proteins, ISG15, IFIT1, IFIT2, and IFIT3. Exposure of uninfected THP-1 cells to TBinf-MPs induced increased gene expression of isg15, ifit1, ifit2, and ifit3 and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. These proteins may regulate the proinflammatory potential of the MPs and provide candidate biomarkers for M. tb infection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Piracetam ameliorated oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical neurons via inhibition of oxidative stress, excitatory amino acids release and P53/Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Hu, Min; Zha, Yun-hong; Li, Zi-cheng; Zhao, Bo; Yu, Ling-ling; Yu, Min; Qian, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that piracetam inhibited the decrease in amino acid content induced by chronic hypoperfusion, ameliorated the dysfunction of learning and memory in a hypoperfusion rat model, down-regulated P53, and BAX protein, facilitated the synaptic plasticity, and may be helpful in the treatment of vascular dementia. To explore the precise mechanism, the present study further evaluated effects of piracetam on Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in rat primary cortical cells. The addition of piracetam to the cultured cells 12 h before OGD for 4 h significantly reduced neuronal damage as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and lactate dehydrogenase release experiments. Piracetam also lowered the levels of malondialdehyde, nitrogen monoxidum, and xanthine oxidase which was increased in the OGD cells, and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, which were decreased in the OGD cells. We also demonstrated that piracetam could decrease glutamate and aspartate release when cortical cells were subjected to OGD. Furthermore, Western blot study demonstrated that piracetam attenuated the increased expression of P53 and BAX protein in OGD cells. These observations demonstrated that piracetam reduced OGD-induced neuronal damage by inhibiting the oxidative stress and decreasing excitatory amino acids release and lowering P53/Bax protein expression in OGD cells.

  10. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  11. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  12. Non-invasive controlled release from gold nanoparticle integrated photo-responsive liposomes through pulse laser induced microbubble cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiyazhakan, Malathi; Yang, Yuanxiang; Liu, Yibo; Zhu, Caigang; Liu, Quan; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Tam, Kam Chiu; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-02-01

    Drug-carriers, capable of releasing the drug at the target sites upon external stimuli, are attractive for theranostic applications. In recent years, photo-responsive nanoparticles (NPs) have received considerable attention because of their potentials in providing spatial, temporal, and dosage control over the drug release. However, most of the relevant technologies are still in the process of development and are unprocurable by the clinics. Here, we demonstrated facile fabrication of these photo-responsive NPs by loading hydrophilic gold NPs within thermo-responsive liposomes. Calcein was used as a model drug to evaluate the encapsulation efficiency and the release kinetic profile upon heat/light stimulation. Furthermore, we characterized their size, morphology, phase transition temperature and stability. Finally, we demonstrated that this photo-triggered release might be due to the membrane disruption caused by microbubble cavitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroendocrine circuitry and endometriosis: progesterone derivative dampens corticotropin-releasing hormone-induced inflammation by peritoneal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariverdian, Nadja; Rücke, Mirjam; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia; Blois, Sandra M; Karpf, Eva F; Sedlmayr, Peter; Klapp, Burghard F; Kentenich, Heribert; Siedentopf, Friederike; Arck, Petra C

    2010-03-01

    Clinical symptoms of endometriosis, such as pain and infertility, can be described as persistent stressors. Such continuous exposure to stress may severely affect the equilibrium and bidirectional communication of the endocrine and immune system, hereby further aggravating the progression of endometriosis. In the present study, we aimed to tease apart mediators that are involved in the stress response as well as in the progression of endometriosis. Women undergoing diagnostic laparoscopy due to infertility were recruited (n = 69). Within this cohort, early stage of endometriosis were diagnosed in n = 30 and advanced stage of endometriosis in n = 8. Levels of progesterone in serum were determined. Frequency of progesterone receptor (PR) expression on CD56(+) and CD8(+) peritoneal lymphocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. The production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10 by peritoneal leukocytes upon stimulation with the potent stress mediator corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the progesterone derivative dydrogesterone, or both, were evaluated. Furthermore, the production of progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) by peritoneal leukocytes and the expression of PR in endometriotic tissue were investigated. Levels of progesterone in serum were decreased in women with endometriosis and inversely correlated to pain scores. Furthermore, an increased frequency of CD56(+)PR(+) and CD8(+)PR(+) peritoneal lymphocytes was present in advanced endometriosis. The TNF/IL-10 ratio, reflecting cytokine secretion by peritoneal cells, was higher in cells derived from endometriosis patients and could be further heightened by CRH stimulation, whereas stimulation with dydrogesterone abrogated the CRH-mediated inflammation. Finally, the expression of PIBF by peritoneal leukocytes was increased in endometriosis. Low levels of progesterone in the follicular phase could be responsible for the progression of endometriosis and related pain. Peripheral CRH

  14. Proteomic profiling of extracellular vesicles released from vascular smooth muscle cells during initiation of phosphate-induced mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Khalid, Sana; Smethurst, Victoria; Monier, Daisy; Mobley, James; Huet, Alexis; Conway, James F; Napierala, Dobrawa

    2018-02-22

    Elevated serum phosphate is one of the major factors contributing to vascular calcification. Studies suggested that extracellular vesicles released from vascular smooth muscle cells significantly contribute to the initiation and progression of this pathology. Recently, we have demonstrated that elevated phosphate stimulates release of extracellular vesicles from osteogenic cells at the initiation of the mineralization process. Here, we used MOVAS cell line as an in vitro model of vascular calcification to examine whether vascular smooth muscle cells respond to high phosphate levels in a similar way and increase formation of extracellular vesicles. Vesicles residing in extracellular matrix as well as vesicles released to culture medium were evaluated by nanoparticle tracking analyses. In addition, using mass spectrometry and protein profiling, protein composition of extracellular vesicles released by MOVAS cells under standard growth conditions and upon exposure to high phosphate was compared. Significant increase of the number of extracellular vesicles was detected after 72 hours of exposure of cells to high phosphate. Elevated phosphate levels also affected protein composition of extracellular vesicles released from MOVAS cells. Finally, the comparative analyses of proteins in extracellular vesicles isolated from extracellular matrix and from conditioned medium identified significant differences in protein composition in these two groups of extracellular vesicles. In conclusion, results of this study demonstrate that exposure of MOVAS cells to high phosphate levels stimulates the release of extracellular vesicles and changes their protein composition.

  15. Mexican obsidian samples analysed by PIXE and AAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenorio, D.; Jimenez-Reyes, M. [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico (Mexico); Lagarde, G.

    1997-12-31

    Proton induced X-ray emission analysis results are reported for obsidian artifacts from different sites of the State of Mexico: Teotenango, Calixtlahuaca, La Marqueza, Malinalco and Tonatico. Twenty elements were analysed by PIXE and some of them were verified by AAS. The results show that the samples came from three different sources: Teotenango and Calixtlahuaca samples from the first, La Marqueza and Malinalco samples from the second and Tonatico samples from the third. (author)

  16. A comparison of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa virulence traits in a rat model for periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Schreiner

    Full Text Available Our aim was to explore the effects of Cytolethal Distending toxin (Cdt in a well established rat model of periodontal disease where leukotoxin (LtxA was thought to have no known effect. In vitro studies, were used to assess CdtB activity using Aa Leukotoxin as a negative control. These studies showed that both CdtB and LtxA (unexpectedly exerted significant effects on CD4(+ T cells. As a result we decided to compare the effects of these two prominent Aa virulence factors on bone loss using our rat model of Aa-induced periodontitis. In this model, Aa strains, mutant in cdtB and ltxA, were compared to their parent non-mutant strains and evaluated for colonization, antibody response to Aa, bone loss and disease. We found that bone loss/disease caused by the ltxA mutant strain, in which cdtB was expressed, was significantly less (p<0.05 than that due to the wild type strain. On the other hand, the disease caused by cdtB mutant strain, in which ltxA was expressed, was not significantly different from the wild type strain. This data indicates that Aa LtxA exerts a greater effect on bone loss than Cdt in this rat model of periodontal disease and supports the utility of this model to dissect specific virulence factors as they relate to immunopathology in studies of Aa-induced disease.

  17. Nitric oxide protects the heart from ischemia-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial damage via protein kinase G mediated blockage of permeability transition and cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekabsone Aiste

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart ischemia can rapidly induce apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction via mitochondrial permeability transition-induced cytochrome c release. We tested whether nitric oxide (NO can block this damage in isolated rat heart, and, if so, by what mechanisms. Methods Hearts were perfused with 50 μM DETA/NO (NO donor, then subjected to 30 min stop-flow ischemia or ischemia/reperfusion. Isolated heart mitochondria were used to measure the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential using oxygen and tetraphenylphosphonium-selective electrodes. Mitochondrial and cytosolic cytochrome c levels were measured spectrophotometrically and by ELISA. The calcium retention capacity of isolated mitochondria was measured using the fluorescent dye Calcium Green-5N. Apoptosis and necrosis were evaluated by measuring the activity of caspase-3 in cytosolic extracts and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in perfusate, respectively. Results 30 min ischemia caused release of mitochondrial cytochrome c to the cytoplasm, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and stimulation of mitochondrial proton permeability. 3 min perfusion with 50 μM DETA/NO of hearts prior to ischemia decreased this mitochondrial damage. The DETA/NO-induced blockage of mitochondrial cytochrome c release was reversed by a protein kinase G (PKG inhibitor KT5823, or soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ or protein kinase C inhibitors (Ro 32-0432 and Ro 31-8220. Ischemia also stimulated caspase-3-like activity, and this was substantially reduced by pre-perfusion with DETA/NO. Reperfusion after 30 min of ischemia caused no further caspase activation, but was accompanied by necrosis, which was completely prevented by DETA/NO, and this protection was blocked by the PKG inhibitor. Incubation of isolated heart mitochondria with activated PKG blocked calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition and cytochrome c release. Perfusion of non

  18. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372, 8001383, 8010045

  19. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles, QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372,8001383, 8010042

  20. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. See also 8001372, 8010042, 8010045

  1. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. Werner Sax contemplates his achievement. See also 8001383, 8010042, 8010045.

  2. pH regulates pore formation of a protease activated Vip3Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunthic, Thittaya; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Kawano, Ryuji; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Yao, Min; Boonserm, Panadda

    2017-11-01

    Vip3Aa insecticidal protein is produced from Bacillus thuringiensis and exerts a broad spectrum of toxicity against lepidopteran insect species. Although Vip3Aa has been effectively used as part of integrated pest management strategies, the mechanism of the toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of pH in a range from 5.0 to 10.0 on the pore-forming activity of the trypsin activated Vip3Aa (actVip3Aa) by in vitro pore-forming assays. Based on calcein release assay, actVip3Aa could permeabilize the artificial neutral liposomes under all the pH tested, except pH10.0. The maximum membrane permeability of actVip3Aa was detected at pH8.0 and the permeability decreased and abolished when exposing to acidic and alkaline conditions, respectively. The planar lipid bilayer experiment revealed that actVip3Aa formed ion channels at pH5.0-8.0 but no current signals were detected at pH10.0, consistent with the observation from calcein release assay. The toxin formed ion channels with a diameter of 1.4nm at pH8.0 and pore size was gradually decreased when reducing the pH. This study provided a view of the molecular mechanism of Vip3Aa by which the pore-forming activity is regulated by pH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell volume regulation in hemoglobin CC and AA erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, L.R.; Orringer, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    Swelling hemoglobin CC erythrocytes stimulates a ouabain-insensitive K flux that restores original cell volume. Studies were performed with the K analog, 86 Rb. This volume regulatory pathway was characterized for its anion dependence, sensitivity to loop diuretics, and requirement for Na. The swelling-induced K flux was eliminated if intracellular chloride was replaced by nitrate and both swelling-activated K influx and efflux were partially inhibited by 1 mM furosemide or bumetanide. K influx in swollen hemoglobin CC cells was not diminished when Na in the incubation medium was replaced with choline, indicating Na independence of the swelling-induced flux. Identical experiments with hemoglobin AA cells also demonstrated a swelling-induced increase in K flux, but the magnitude and duration of this increase were considerably less than that seen with hemoglobin CC cells. The increased K flux in hemoglobin AA cells was likewise sensitive to anion replacement and to loop diuretics and did not require the presence of Na. These data indicate that a volume-activated K pathway with similar transport characteristics exists in both hemoglobin CC and AA red cells

  4. T lymphocyte recruitment by interleukin-8 (IL-8). IL-8-induced degranulation of neutrophils releases potent chemoattractants for human T lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, D D; Anver, M; Oppenheim, J J; Longo, D L; Murphy, W J

    1996-01-01

    IL-8 has been shown to be a human neutrophil and T cell chemoattractant in vitro. In an effort to assess the in vivo effects of IL-8 on human leukocyte migration, we examined the ability of rhIL-8 to induce human T cell infiltration using a human/mouse model in which SCID mice were administered human peripheral blood lymphocytes intraperitoneally, followed by subcutaneous injections of rhIL-8. rhIL-8 induced predominantly murine neutrophil accumulation by 4 h after administration while recombinant human macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (rhMIP-1beta) induced both murine monocytes and human T cell infiltration during the same time period as determined by immunohistology. Interestingly, 72 h after chemokine administration, a marked human T cell infiltrate was observed in the IL-8 injection site suggesting that rhIL-8 may be acting indirectly possibly through a murine neutrophil-derived T cell chemoattractant. This hypothesis was confirmed using granulocyte-depleted SCID mice. Moreover, human neutrophils stimulated in vitro with IL-8 were found to release granule-derived factor(s) that induce in vitro T cell and monocyte chemotaxis and chemokinesis. This T cell and monocyte chemotactic activity was detected in extracts of both azurophilic and specific granules. Together, these results demonstrate that neutrophils store and release, upon stimulation with IL-8 or other neutrophil activators, chemoattractants that mediate T cell and monocyte accumulation at sites of inflammation. PMID:8621778

  5. Impact of aphid alarm pheromone release on virus transmission efficiency: When pest control strategy could induce higher virus dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang-Jing; Bosquée, Emilie; Liu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Ju-Lian; Yong, Liu; Francis, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Aphids cause serious damages to crops not only by tacking sap but also by transmitting numerous viruses. To develop biological control, the aphid alarm pheromone, namely E-β-farnesene (EβF), has been demonstrated to be efficient to repel aphids and as attract beneficials, making it a potential tool to control aphid pests. Considering aphids also as virus vectors, changes of their behavior could also interfere with the virus acquisition and transmission process. Here, a combination of two aphid species and two potato virus models were selected to test the influence of EβF release on aphid and virus dispersion under laboratory conditions. EβF release was found to significantly decrease the population of Myzus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae around the infochemical releaser but simultaneously also increasing the dispersal of Potato Virus Y (PVY). At the opposite, no significant difference for Potato Leaf Roll Virus (PLRV) transmission efficiency was observed with similar aphid alarm pheromone releases for none of the aphid species. These results provide some support to carefully consider infochemical releasers not only for push-pull strategy and pest control but also to include viral disease in a the plant protection to aphids as they are also efficient virus vectors. Impact of aphid kinds and transmission mechanisms will be discussed according to the large variation found between persistent and non persistent potato viruses and interactions with aphids and related infochemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Yucca schidigera can promote rabbit growth, fecundity, affect the release of hormones in vivo and in vitro, induce pathological changes in liver, and reduce ovarian resistance to benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földešiová, Martina; Baláži, Andrej; Chrastinová, Ľubica; Pivko, Juraj; Kotwica, Jan; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Chrenek, Peter; Sirotkin, Alexander V

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Yucca schidigera (YS) extract on the physiological, reproductive, and endocrine indexes of New Zealand White rabbit does. Six-week-old rabbit does were fed a standard diet (control group) or a diet enriched with 5 or 20g of Y powder extract per 100-kg feed mixture for 350days. The does were artificially inseminated after induction of superovulation. Weight gain; conception and kindling rate; viability of pups and mothers; histopathological state of liver and muscle; plasma levels of progesterone (P4), oxytocin (OT), and prostaglandin F (PGF); and the release of P4, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), OT, and PGF by isolated ovarian fragments and their response to the addition of benzene were analyzed. YS extract supplementation promoted weight gain and induced histopathological changes in the liver (creased vacuolization and occurrence of fuchsinophile inclusions in hepatocytes, liver fibrosis, hyperemia, occurrence of Kupffer cells, signs of necrosis and inflammation). YS consumption was not associated with changes in muscle (occurrence of fuchsinophile inclusions and signs of atrophy, interstitial edema, and inflammation), although Y2 increased muscle vascularization. YS supplementation increased conception and kindling rates but did not affect viability of pups or adult animals. Moreover, it enhanced plasma OT and PGF levels; plasma P4 concentration was increased by low-dose YS, but decreased by high-dose YS. Cultured ovarian fragments isolated from YS-fed does released more P4 and PGF and less IGF-I than ovarian fragments of control animals. However, YS supplementation did not affect ovarian OT release. Benzene alone did not influence the release of hormones by ovaries of control does. YS supplementation induced the inhibitory effect of benzene on the release of PGF, but not on other ovarian hormones. Collectively, these results suggest that dietary supplementation of YS extract can stimulate rabbit performance (growth and

  7. Increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, sensitization, and accumbal dopamine release in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene S; Miller, Anthony D; Lester, Deranda B

    2010-01-01

    showed that M(5) receptor knockout (M (5) (-/-) ) mice are less sensitive to the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we investigate the role of M(5) receptors in the effects of amphetamine and cocaine on locomotor activity, locomotor sensitization, and dopamine release...... and locomotor sensitization were enhanced in M (5) (-/-) mice, while the effects of cocaine were similar in M (5) (-/-) and wild-type mice. RESULTS: Consistent with the behavioral results, amphetamine-, but not cocaine, -elicited dopamine release in nucleus accumbens was enhanced in M (5) (-/-) mice. DISCUSSION......: The different effects of amphetamine and cocaine in M (5) (-/-) mice may be due to the divergent pharmacological profile of the two drugs, where amphetamine, but not cocaine, is able to release intracellular stores of dopamine. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that amphetamine...

  8. Probabilistic siting analysis of nuclear power plants emphasizing atmospheric dispersion of radioactive releases and radiation-induced health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, Ilkka

    1980-01-01

    A presentation is made of probabilistic evaluation schemes for nuclear power plant siting. Effects on health attributable to ionizing radiation are reviewed, for the purpose of assessment of the numbers of the most important health effect cases in light-water reactor accidents. The atmospheric dispersion of radioactive releases from nuclear power plants is discussed, and there is presented an environmental consequence assessment model in which the radioactive releases and atmospheric dispersion of the releases are treated by the application of probabilistic methods. In the model, the environmental effects arising from exposure to radiation are expressed as cumulative probability distributions and expectation values. The probabilistic environmental consequence assessment model has been applied to nuclear power plant site evaluation, including risk-benefit and cost-benefit analyses, and the comparison of various alternative sites. (author)

  9. Lithium carbonate as a treatment for paliperidone extended-release-induced leukopenia and neutropenia in a patient with schizoaffective disorder; a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Hiroki; Kimoto, Sohei; Harada, Izumi; Naemura, Satoshi; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-05-26

    Antipsychotic drug treatment can potentially lead to adverse events such as leukopenia and neutropenia. Although these events are rare, they represent serious and life-threatening hematological side effects. We present a case study of a patient with schizoaffective disorder in a 50-year-old woman. We report a case of paliperidone extended-release (ER)-induced leukopenia and neutropenia in a female patient with schizoaffective disorder. Initiating lithium carbonate treatment and decreasing the dose of valproic acid improved the observed leukopenia and neutropenia. This treatment did not influence psychotic symptoms. The combination of paliperidone ER and valproic acid induces increased paliperidone ER plasma levels. Lithium carbonate was successfully used to treat paliperidone ER-induced leukopenia and neutropenia.

  10. Measuring hypoxia induced metal release from highly contaminated estuarine sediments during a 40 day laboratory incubation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, Joanne L., E-mail: jlbanks@student.unimelb.edu.au [Department of Zoology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 Australia (Australia); Ross, D. Jeff, E-mail: Jeff.Ross@utas.edu.au [Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Nubeena Crescent, Taroona, Tasmania, 7053 Australia (Australia); Keough, Michael J., E-mail: mjkeough@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Zoology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 Australia (Australia); Eyre, Bradley D., E-mail: bradley.eyre@scu.edu.au [Centre for Coastal Biogeochemistry, School of Environmental Science and Management, Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW, 2480 Australia (Australia); Macleod, Catriona K., E-mail: Catriona.Macleod@utas.edu.au [Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Nubeena Crescent, Taroona, Tasmania, 7053 Australia (Australia)

    2012-03-15

    Nutrient inputs to estuarine and coastal waters worldwide are increasing and this in turn is increasing the prevalence of eutrophication and hypoxic and anoxic episodes in these systems. Many urbanised estuaries are also subject to high levels of anthropogenic metal contamination. Environmental O{sub 2} levels may influence whether sediments act as sinks or sources of metals. In this study we investigated the effect of an extended O{sub 2} depletion event (40 days) on fluxes of trace metals (and the metalloid As) across the sediment-water interface in sediments from a highly metal contaminated estuary in S.E. Tasmania, Australia. We collected sediments from three sites that spanned a range of contamination and measured total metal concentration in the overlying water using sealed core incubations. Manganese and iron, which are known to regulate the release of other divalent cations from sub-oxic sediments, were released from sediments at all sites as hypoxia developed. In contrast, the release of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc was comparatively low, most likely due to inherent stability of these elements within the sediments, perhaps as a result of their refractory origin, their association with fine-grained sediments or their being bound in stable sulphide complexes. Metal release was not sustained due to the powerful effect of metal-sulphide precipitation of dissolved metals back into sediments. The limited mobilisation of sediment bound metals during hypoxia is encouraging, nevertheless the results highlight particular problems for management in areas where hypoxia might occur, such as the release of metals exacerbating already high loads or resulting in localised toxicity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal contaminated sediments exposed to long-term hypoxia released Mn and Fe pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As flux increased under anoxic conditions Cd, Cu and Zn fluxes occurred only during the first week of hypoxia. Black

  11. Ceramide 1-phosphate induces macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 release: involvement in ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Lide; Ordoñez, Marta; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guané; Gangoiti, Patricia; Trueba, Miguel; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is implicated in inflammatory responses and was recently shown to promote cell migration. However, the mechanisms involved in these actions are poorly described. Using J774A.1 macrophages, we have now discovered a new biological activity of C1P: stimulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) release. This novel effect of C1P was pertussis toxin (PTX) sensitive, suggesting the intervention of Gi protein-coupled receptors. Treatment of the macrophages with C1P caused activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellularly regulated kinases (ERK), and p38 pathways. Inhibition of these kinases using selective inhibitors or specific siRNA blocked the stimulation of MCP-1 release by C1P. C1P stimulated nuclear factor-κB activity, and blockade of this transcription factor also resulted in complete inhibition of MCP-1 release. Also, C1P stimulated MCP-1 release and cell migration in human THP-1 monocytes and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. A key observation was that sequestration of MCP-1 with a neutralizing antibody or treatment with MCP-1 siRNA abolished C1P-stimulated cell migration. Also, inhibition of the pathways involved in C1P-stimulated MCP-1 release completely blocked the stimulation of cell migration by C1P. It can be concluded that C1P promotes MCP-1 release in different cell types and that this chemokine is a major mediator of C1P-stimulated cell migration. The PI3K/Akt, MEK/ERK, and p38 pathways are important downstream effectors in this action.

  12. 1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine release via suppression of NF-κB p65 phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xiaojie; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Nawa, Yuko; Miura, Naoki; Shrestha, Binita; Tancharoen, Salunya; Sameshima, Hisayo; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates macrophages by activating NF-κB, which contributes to the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6. 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose (1,5-AF), a monosaccharide formed from starch and glycogen, exhibits anti-oxidant activity and enhances insulin secretion. This study examined the effects of 1,5-AF on LPS-induced inflammatory reactions and elucidated its molecular mechanisms. Before LPS challenge, mice were pretreated with 1,5-AF (38.5 mg/kg). We found that 1,5-AF pretreatment attenuated cytokine release into the serum, including TNF-α, IL-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Furthermore, pretreatment with 1,5-AF (500 μg/ml) attenuated cytokine release, and 1,5-AF directly inhibited the nuclear translocalization of the NF-κB p65 subunit in LPS-stimulated murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. This inhibition was responsible for decreased LPS-induced phosphorylation on Ser536 of the NF-κB p65 subunit, which is a posttranslational modification involved in the non-canonical pathway. Collectively, these findings indicate that the anti-inflammatory activity of 1,5-AF occurs via inactivation of NF-κB.

  13. Dopamine uptake inhibitors but not dopamine releasers induce greater increases in motor behavior and extracellular dopamine in adolescent rats than in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Q David; Morris, Sarah E; Arrant, Andrew E; Nagel, Jacqueline M; Parylak, Sarah; Zhou, Guiying; Caster, Joseph M; Kuhn, Cynthia M

    2010-10-01

    Most life-long drug addiction begins during adolescence. Important structural and functional changes in brain occur during adolescence and developmental differences in forebrain dopamine systems could mediate a biologic vulnerability to drug addiction during adolescence. Studies investigating age differences in psychostimulant responses have yielded mixed results, possibly because of different mechanisms for increasing extracellular dopamine. Recent research from our laboratory suggests that adolescent dopamine systems may be most affected by selective dopamine uptake inhibitors. We investigated age-related behavioral responses to acute administration of several dopamine uptake inhibitors [methylphenidate, 1-{2-[bis-(4-fluorophenyl)methoxy]ethyl}-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine (GBR12909), and nomifensine] and releasing agents [amphetamine and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)] in adolescent and adult male rats. Methylphenidate and amphetamine effects on stimulated dopamine efflux were determined using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in vivo. Dopamine uptake inhibitors but not dopamine releasing agents induced more locomotion and/or stereotypy in adolescent relative to adult rats. MDMA effects were greater in adults at early time points after dosing. Methylphenidate but not amphetamine induced much greater dopamine efflux in periadolescent relative to adult rats. Periadolescent male rats are particularly sensitive to psychostimulants that are DAT inhibitors but are not internalized and do not release dopamine. Immaturity of DAT and/or DAT associated signaling systems in adolescence specifically enhances behavioral and dopaminergic responses in adolescence.

  14. Culicoides antigen extract stimulates equine blood mononuclear (BMN) cell proliferation and the release of eosinophil adherence-inducing factor(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckelvie, J; Foster, A P; Hamblin, A S; Cunningham, F M

    2001-04-01

    Intradermal injection of a Culicoides antigen extract (CAgX) induces T lymphocyte and eosinophil accumulation in the skin of horses with sweet itch. Blood mononuclear (BMN) cells from normal ponies proliferate when stimulated by mitogen (phytohaemagglutinin, PHA) or antigen (tetanus toxoid, TT) and, as shown here, release soluble factor(s) that induce eosinophil adherence. CAgX also caused concentration dependent proliferation of BMN cells from sweet itch and normal ponies [stimulation index: 29 (13) and 17 (7) for BMN cells from sweet itch and normal ponies, respectively during the active phase of disease; 4 microg protein ml(-1)CAgX; 168 h]. A heat labile factor(s) which caused eosinophil adherence was also released [sweet itch ponies: 6.0 (1.6) per cent adherence versus 1.3 (0.4) per cent; normal ponies: 6.6 (0.5) per cent adherence versus 0.9 (0.1) per cent for supernatants from CAgX (4 microg protein ml(-1); 48 hours) stimulated versus unstimulated BMN cells, respectively]. These results suggest that soluble proteins released from T lymphocytes could affect eosinophil function in the lesional skin of sweet itch horses. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  15. Synergistic effect of sunlight induced photothermal conversion and H2O2 release based on hybridized tungsten oxide gel for cancer inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Gao, Yibo; Gao, Xinghua; Wang, Hua; Tian, Jingxuan; Wang, Li; Zhou, Bingpu; Ye, Ziran; Wan, Jun; Wen, Weijia

    2016-10-01

    A highly efficient photochromic hydrogel was successfully fabricated via casting precursor, which is based on amorphous tungsten oxide and poly (ethylene oxide)-block-poly (propylene oxide)-block-poly (ethylene oxide). Under simulated solar illumination, the hydrogel has a rapid and controlled temperature increasing ratio as its coloration degree. Localized electrons in the amorphous tungsten oxide play a vital role in absorption over a broad range of wavelengths from 400 nm to 1100 nm, encompassing the entire visible light and infrared regions in the solar spectrum. More importantly, the material exhibits sustainable released H2O2 induced by localized electrons, which has a synergistic effect with the rapid surface temperature increase. The amount of H2O2 released by each film can be tuned by the light irradiation, and the film coloration can indicate the degree of oxidative stress. The ability of the H2O2-releasing gels in vitro study was investigated to induce apoptosis in melanoma tumor cells and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. The in vivo experimental results indicate that these gels have a greater healing effect than the control in the early stages of tumor formation.

  16. Dopamine Release Suppression Dependent on an Increase of Intracellular Ca2+ Contributed to Rotenone-induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Yan; Chen, Junfeng; Ye, Feng; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Zou, Zhongmin; Cao, Jia; Dong, Zhaojun

    2013-01-01

    Rotenone is an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I that produces a model of Parkinson’s disease (PD), in which neurons undergo dopamine release dysfunction and other features. In neurons, exocytosis is one of the processes associated with dopamine release and is dependent on Ca2+ dynamic changes of the cell. In the present study, we have investigated the exocytosis of dopamine and the involvement of Ca2+ in dopamine release in PC12 cells administrated with rotenone. Results demonstrated that rotenone led to an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ through Ca2+ influx by opening of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and influenced the soluble N-ethylmaleimide attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins expression (including syntaxin, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) and synaptosome-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25)); pretreatment with a blocker of L-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (nifedipine) decreased the intracellular dopamine levels and ROS formation, increased the cell viability and enhanced the neurite outgrowth and exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. These results indicated that the involvement of intracellular Ca2+ was one of the factors resulting in suppression of dopamine release suppression in PC12 cells intoxicated with rotenone, which was associated with the rotenone-induced dopamine neurotoxicity. PMID:23914057

  17. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  18. Lectin-Induced Mucus Release in the Urn Cell Complex of the Marine Invertebrate Sipunculus nudus (Linnaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicosia, S V

    1979-11-09

    The mucociliary urn cell complex of the marine coelomate Sipunculus nudus secretes mucus 4 to 5 minutes after being exposed to Lotus tetragonolobus and Ricinus communis I agglutinins. Surface binding of both lectins is confined to the secretory area of the urn cell complex and, like the release of mucus, is inhibited by the specific saccharides L-fucose and D-galactose or by incubation in L-fucosidase and D-galactosidase. Mucus secretion may therefore be initiated by the interaction of mucus-releasing stimuli with fucosyl or galactosyl residues of specific membrane receptors.

  19. Obesity augments the age-induced increase in mitochondrial capacity for H(2) O(2) release in Zucker fatty rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jeppesen, Jacob; Madsen, K

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to play a significant role in obesity and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate if changes in obesity and insulin resistance were related to similar changes in mitochondrial capacity for hydrogenperoxide release in Zu...

  20. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia G; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Viuff, Birgitte M

    2007-01-01

    -time RT-PCR. A calibrated NO-specific electrode was used to measure local NO release in specific regions of the anterior mitral leaflet from slaughter pigs and sows interchordally at the tip of the leaflet (region A), at the chordal insertion (region B), and at the center of the leaflet (region C...

  1. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Viuff, Birgitte

    2007-01-01

    -time RT-PCR. A calibrated NO-specific electrode was used to measure local NO release in specific regions of the anterior mitral leaflet from slaughter pigs and sows interchordally at the tip of the leaflet (region A), at the chordal insertion (region B), and at the center of the leaflets (region C...

  2. An alkaline follicular fluid fraction induces capacitation and limited release of oviduct epithelium-bound stallion sperm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, Bart; Gadella, Bart M; Stout, Tom A E; Nelis, Hilde; Hoogewijs, Maarten; Van Soom, Ann

    Induction of hyperactivated motility is considered essential for triggering the release of oviduct-bound mammalian spermatozoa in preparation for fertilization. In this study, oviduct-bound stallion spermatozoa were exposed for 2 h to: i) pre-ovulatory and ii) post-ovulatory oviductal fluid; iii)

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0231 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0231 ref|NP_000814.2| growth hormone releasing hormone receptor isofor...m a precursor [Homo sapiens] sp|Q02643|GHRHR_HUMAN RecName: Full=Growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor; ...Short=GHRH receptor; AltName: Full=GRF receptor; Short=GRFR; Flags: Precursor gb|AAA58619.1| growth hormone-...releasing gormone receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAC23789.1| growth hormone-releasing hormone... receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAC05924.1| seven transmembrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAS59864.1| growth hormone

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-0323 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-0323 ref|NP_000814.2| growth hormone releasing hormone receptor isofor...m a precursor [Homo sapiens] sp|Q02643|GHRHR_HUMAN RecName: Full=Growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor; ...Short=GHRH receptor; AltName: Full=GRF receptor; Short=GRFR; Flags: Precursor gb|AAA58619.1| growth hormone-...releasing gormone receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAC23789.1| growth hormone-releasing hormone... receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAC05924.1| seven transmembrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAS59864.1| growth hormone

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-0759 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-0759 ref|NP_000814.2| growth hormone releasing hormone receptor isofor...m a precursor [Homo sapiens] sp|Q02643|GHRHR_HUMAN RecName: Full=Growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor; ...Short=GHRH receptor; AltName: Full=GRF receptor; Short=GRFR; Flags: Precursor gb|AAA58619.1| growth hormone-...releasing gormone receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAC23789.1| growth hormone-releasing hormone... receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAC05924.1| seven transmembrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAS59864.1| growth hormone

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1440 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1440 ref|NP_000814.2| growth hormone releasing hormone receptor isofor...m a precursor [Homo sapiens] sp|Q02643|GHRHR_HUMAN RecName: Full=Growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor; ...Short=GHRH receptor; AltName: Full=GRF receptor; Short=GRFR; Flags: Precursor gb|AAA58619.1| growth hormone-...releasing gormone receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAC23789.1| growth hormone-releasing hormone... receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAC05924.1| seven transmembrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAS59864.1| growth hormone

  7. Limonene inhibits methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity via regulation of 5-HT neuronal function and dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jaesuk

    2014-05-15

    Methamphetamine is a psychomotor stimulant that produces hyperlocomotion in rodents. Limonene (a cyclic terpene from citrus essential oils) has been reported to induce sedative effects. In this study, we demonstrated that limonene administration significantly inhibited serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)-induced head twitch response in mice. In rats, pretreatment with limonene decreased hyperlocomotion induced by methamphetamine injection. In addition, limonene reversed the increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens of rats given methamphetamine. These results suggest that limonene may inhibit stimulant-induced behavioral changes via regulating dopamine levels and 5-HT receptor function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Proteolytic activity in cowshed dust extracts induces C5a release in murine bronchoalveolar lavage fluids which may account for its protective properties in allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehm, Matthias; Bufe, Albrecht; Peters, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Intranasal application of cowshed dust extract (CDE) during sensitisation in a murine model of experimental asthma leads to a significant alleviation of the clinical parameters of the allergic immune response. However, neither the immunological mechanisms underlying this protective effect nor all of the protective substances included in CDE have yet been described. Recently, complement factor 5a (C5a) receptor signalling has been identified to play a regulatory role in allergic airway disease. Thus we investigated whether CDE can activate the complement system to release biologically active C5a in the lung. Proteins included in CDE were identified by mass spectrometry. Complement cleaving activity of a serine protease identified in CDE was validated with the purified enzyme, and the biological activity of the released C5a was determined. C5a was applied in a murine model of allergy to prove its protective impact on allergic airway disease. CDE induced the release of C5a in murine bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL). We identified a serine protease from the midgut of tenebrio molitor larvae in CDEs which was able to induce the release of biologically active C5a in murine BAL. We applied C5a in different doses to female Balb/c mice during the sensitisation phase and during the first antigen challenge and showed that C5a has the ability to dampen important parameters of allergic airway inflammation, such as infiltration of proinflammatory cells into lung tissue or Th2 cytokine secretion by lung cells. We conclude that the C5a generating enzyme included in CDE might account for some of the allergy protective effects of CDE by generation of C5a in murine lungs.

  9. Long-term reindeer grazing limits warming-induced increases in CO2 released by tundra heath soil: potential role of soil C quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Väisänen, Maria; Stark, Sari; Sjögersten, Sofie; Large, David; Drage, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    The current climate warming in the Arctic may increase the microbial degradation of vast pools of soil carbon (C); however, the temperature sensitivity of decomposition is often highly dependent on the quality of accumulated soil C. Grazing by reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) substantially affects the dominant vegetation and often increases graminoids in relation to dwarf shrubs in ecosystems, but the effect of this vegetation shift on the soil C quality has not been previously investigated. We analyzed the soil C quality and rate of microbially mediated CO 2 release at different temperatures in long-term laboratory incubations using soils from lightly grazed dwarf shrub-dominated and heavily grazed graminoid-dominated tundra ecosystem. The soil C quality was characterized by solid-state cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS 13 C NMR) spectroscopy, which showed a higher relative proportion of carbohydrate C under light grazing and higher relative proportion of aliphatic not-O-substituted C under heavy grazing. Initial measurements showed lower temperature sensitivity of the CO 2 release in soils under light grazing compared with soil under heavy grazing, but the overall CO 2 release rate and its temperature sensitivity increased under light grazing as the soil incubation progressed. At the end of incubation, significantly more carbohydrate C had been lost in soils under light grazing compared with heavy grazing. These findings indicate that there may be a link between the grazer-induced effects on soil C quality and the potential of soils to release CO 2 to atmosphere. We suggest that vegetation shifts induced by grazing could influence the proportion of accumulated soil C that is vulnerable to microbial degradation under warming climate. (letter)

  10. Ultraviolet B irradiation induces changes in the distribution and release of arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1987-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that derivatives of 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, the eicosanoids, play an important role in the inflammatory responses of the human skin. To better understand the metabolic fate of fatty acids in the skin, the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation (280-320 nm) on the distribution and release of /sup 14/C-labeled arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture was investigated. Ultraviolet B irradiation induced the release of all three /sup 14/C-labeled fatty acids from the phospholipids, especially from phosphatidylethanolamine, and this was accompanied by increased labeling of the nonphosphorus lipids. This finding suggests that UVB induces a significant liberation of eicosanoid precursor fatty acids from cellular phospholipids, but the liberated fatty acids are largely reincorporated into the nonphosphorus lipids. In conclusion, the present study suggests that not only arachidonic acid but also dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid might be involved in the UVB irradiation-induced inflammatory reactions of human skin.

  11. Ultraviolet B irradiation induces changes in the distribution and release of arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that derivatives of 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, the eicosanoids, play an important role in the inflammatory responses of the human skin. To better understand the metabolic fate of fatty acids in the skin, the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation (280-320 nm) on the distribution and release of 14 C-labeled arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture was investigated. Ultraviolet B irradiation induced the release of all three 14 C-labeled fatty acids from the phospholipids, especially from phosphatidylethanolamine, and this was accompanied by increased labeling of the nonphosphorus lipids. This finding suggests that UVB induces a significant liberation of eicosanoid precursor fatty acids from cellular phospholipids, but the liberated fatty acids are largely reincorporated into the nonphosphorus lipids. In conclusion, the present study suggests that not only arachidonic acid but also dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid might be involved in the UVB irradiation-induced inflammatory reactions of human skin

  12. Betulinic acid induces cytochrome c release and apoptosis in a Bax/Bak-independent, permeability transition pore dependent fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullauer, Franziska B.; Kessler, Jan H.; Medema, Jan Paul

    2009-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BetA) is a plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenoid that exerts potent anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo, but is non toxic to untransformed cells. In our previous study we observed that BetA consistently induced cell death in a broad panel of tumor cell lines. Apoptosis induced

  13. Release-Active Dilutions of Diclofenac Enhance Anti-inflammatory Effect of Diclofenac in Carrageenan-Induced Rat Paw Edema Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sakat, Sachin S.; Mani, Kamaraj; Demidchenko, Yulia O.; Gorbunov, Evgeniy A.; Tarasov, Sergey A.; Mathur, Archna; Epstein, Oleg I.

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the effect of technologically treated diclofenac (release-active dilutions of diclofenac (RAD of diclofenac)) on anti-inflammatory activity of diclofenac in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. Ninety male Wistar albino rats (6–8 weeks) divided into nine groups (n = 10) were used. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 h after subplantar injection of carrageenan (0.1 ml of a 1 % solution in normal saline). Diclofenac alone was studi...

  14. Role of p38 MAPK in the selective release of IL-8 induced by chemical allergen in naive THp-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitjans, Montserrat; Viviani, Barbara; Lucchi, Laura; Galli, Corrado L; Marinovich, Marina; Corsini, Emanuela

    2008-03-01

    At present, the assessment of the allergenic potential of chemicals is carried out using animal models. Over the last decade, several in vitro methods mainly using primary dendritic cells have been proposed to identify the potential of chemicals to induce skin sensitization to meet current animal welfare and public opinions. The major limitations of such tests are the donor-to-donor variability, the low levels in the source, and a possible shortage of human sources. The aim of the present investigation was to establish an in vitro test to identify chemical allergens using the human promyelocytic cell line THP-1 in order to avoid some of these difficulties. We investigated whether the chemokine interleukin-8 or CXCL8 (IL-8) production could provide a methodology for the detection of both respiratory and contact allergens. THP-1 cells were exposed to contact allergens (cinnamaldehyde, dinitrochlorobenzene, nickel sulfate, penicillin G, p-phenylenediamine, tetramethylthiuram disulfide), to respiratory allergens (ammonium hexachloroplatinate, diphenylmethane diisocyanate, trimellitic anhydride) and to irritants (salicylic acid, phenol, sodium lauryl sulphate). Following 48 h of incubation, the release of IL-8 was evaluated by sandwich ELISA. IL-8 production was significantly increased after stimulation with all allergens tested, with the exception of trimellitic anhydride, whereas irritants exposure failed to induce IL-8 release. The lack of IL-8 production by trimellitic anhydride can be explained by the rapid hydrolysis of this chemical in water to trimellitic acid, which is not an allergen. In contrast to IL-8 release, CD54 and CD86 expression did not provide a sensitive method failing to correctly identify approximately 30% of the tested compounds. Although CD86 appears to be a more sensitive marker than CD54 when discriminating allergens from irritants neither of these markers provided robust methodology. We also investigated if a common activation pathway in

  15. Fission fragment yields and total kinetic energy release in neutron-induced fission of235,238U,and239Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovesson, F.; Duke, D.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Manning, B.; Mayorov, D.; Mosby, S.; Schmitt, K.

    2018-03-01

    Different aspects of the nuclear fission process have been studied at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) using various instruments and experimental techniques. Properties of the fragments emitted in fission have been investigated using Frisch-grid ionization chambers, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC), and the SPIDER instrument which employs the 2v-2E method. These instruments and experimental techniques have been used to determine fission product mass yields, the energy dependent total kinetic energy (TKE) release, and anisotropy in neutron-induced fission of U-235, U-238 and Pu-239.

  16. Expanding the neuron's calcium signaling repertoire: intracellular calcium release via voltage-induced PLC and IP3R activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ryglewski

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal calcium acts as a charge carrier during information processing and as a ubiquitous intracellular messenger. Calcium signals are fundamental to numerous aspects of neuronal development and plasticity. Specific and independent regulation of these vital cellular processes is achieved by a rich bouquet of different calcium signaling mechanisms within the neuron, which either can operate independently or may act in concert. This study demonstrates the existence of a novel calcium signaling mechanism by simultaneous patch clamping and calcium imaging from acutely isolated central neurons. These neurons possess a membrane voltage sensor that, independent of calcium influx, causes G-protein activation, which subsequently leads to calcium release from intracellular stores via phospholipase C and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activation. This allows neurons to monitor activity by intracellular calcium release without relying on calcium as the input signal and opens up new insights into intracellular signaling, developmental regulation, and information processing in neuronal compartments lacking calcium channels.

  17. Investigation of drug-release polymers using nuclear reaction analysis and particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.W.; Massingham, Gary; Clough, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    The diffusion of water into the developmental drug-release polymer addition cured silicone has been investigated using 3 He ion scanning micro-beam techniques developed at the University of Surrey. Polymer samples loaded with 15% by weight of the drug chlorohexidine diacetate were immersed in a water based phosphate buffered saline solution for times of 1 hour, 1 day, 1 week and 1 month. The results showed that as the water diffused into the polymer it associated with the drug allowing its release by diffusion through the network formed by water filled pores. Future improvements to the techniques are discussed including the use of an array of CdZnTe detectors

  18. Sequential release of salidroside and paeonol from a nanosphere-hydrogel system inhibits ultraviolet B-induced melanogenesis in guinea pig skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng LH

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Li-Hua Peng,1 Shen-Yao Xu,1 Ying-Hui Shan,1 Wei Wei,1 Shuai Liu,1 Chen-Zhen Zhang,1 Jia-He Wu,1 Wen-Quan Liang,1 Jian-Qing Gao1,2 1Institute of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 2Novel Transdermal Research Center of Jiangsu Province, Changzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: Melanin is the one of most important pigments for skin color in mammals. Excessive biosynthesis of melanin induces various pigment disorders. Much effort has been made to develop regulators to minimize skin pigmentation abnormalities. However, only a few of them are used, primarily because of safety concerns and low efficiency. In this study, we aimed to construct a novel nanosphere-gel for sequential delivery of salidroside and paeonol, to investigate the synergistic effects of these drugs in anti-melanogenesis, and to decrease their potential for toxicity in high dosage. Nanospheres were prepared and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and morphological properties. The optimized nanospheres were incorporated in carbomer hydrogel with both paeonol and salidroside entrapped to form a dual drug-releasing nanosphere-gel. With this nanosphere-gel, rapid release of salidroside from the hydrogel followed by sustained release of paeonol from the nanosphere was achieved. Using a classical model of the melanogenesis response to ultraviolet exposure, it was shown that the anti-melanogenesis effects of the dual drug-releasing system, in which the doses of the individual drugs were decreased by half, was obviously enhanced when compared with the effects of the single drug preparations. Mechanistically, the burst release of salidroside from the hydrogel may enable prompt suppression of melanocyte proliferation on exposure to ultraviolet B radiation, while the paeonol released in a sustained manner can provide continuous inhibition of tyrosinase activity in melanocytes. Combined delivery of

  19. Dual effect of melatonin on gonadotropin-releasing-hormone-induced Ca(2+) signaling in neonatal rat gonadotropes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Vaněček, Jiří

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 4 (2001), s. 262-269 ISSN 0028-3835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0213; GA ČR GA309/99/0215; GA AV ČR IAA5011103; GA AV ČR IAA5011105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : melatonin * gonadotropin-release hormone * calcium Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.144, year: 2001

  20. Transcript Profiling of Paoenia ostii during Artificial Chilling Induced Dormancy Release Identifies Activation of GA Pathway and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunying; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Endo-dormant flower buds must pass through a period of chilling to reinitiate growth and subsequent flowering, which is a major obstacle to the forcing culture of tree peony in winter. Customized cDNA microarray (8×15 K element) was used to investigate gene expression profiling in tree peony ‘Feng Dan Bai’ buds during 24 d chilling treatment at 0–4°C. According to the morphological changes after the whole plants were transferred to green house, endo-dormancy was released after 18 d chilling treatment, and prolonged chilling treatment increased bud break rate. Pearson correlation hierarchical clustering of sample groups was highly consistent with the dormancy transitions revealed by morphological changes. Totally 3,174 significantly differentially-expressed genes (Pdormancy release process, of which the number of up-regulated (1,611) and that of down-regulated (1,563) was almost the same. Functional annotation of differentially-expressed genes revealed that cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, regulation of biological process and development process were well-represented. Hierarchical clustering indicated that activation of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism (Glycolysis, Citrate cycle and Pentose phosphate pathway), energy metabolism and cell growth. Based on the results of GO analysis, totally 51 probes presented in the microarray were associated with GA response and GA signaling pathway, and 22 of them were differently expressed. The expression profiles also revealed that the genes of GA biosynthesis, signaling and response involved in endo-dormancy release. We hypothesized that activation of GA pathway played a central role in the regulation of dormancy release in tree peony. PMID:23405132

  1. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Herv?r L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.; Ahmed, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including the cell membrane potential, proliferation and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We sho...

  2. Evidence for autoinhibition of stimulation-induced noradrenaline release from vasa deferentia of the guinea-pig and rat.

    OpenAIRE

    McCulloch, M. W.; Papanicolaou, M.; Rand, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Both phenoxybenzamine and idazoxan increased the efflux of radioactivity elicited by a train of stimulation (4 pulses at 5 Hz) in vasa deferentia preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. Phenoxybenzamine increased the release of radioactivity from vasa stimulated with a single pulse, whereas idazoxan did not. The contractile response in both guinea-pig and rat vasa was biphasic: phenoxybenzamine enhanced the initial twitch component and reduced the second component in guinea-pig vasa stimulated ...

  3. (PCL/AA) hydrogel for controlled drug delivery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    PCL-g-AA) on the .... Solvent replacement method was used for porosity meas- urement. Weighed dried discs were immersed in .... Regression coefficient (r) values obtained from PCL/AA hydrogels at varying contents of AA and EGDMA are.

  4. Therapeutic hypogonadism induced by a delayed-release preparation of microcapsules of D-Trp-6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: a preliminary study in eight women with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, J R; Tanger, C; Roger, M; Grenier, J; Comaru-Schally, A M; Schally, A V

    1986-01-01

    Eight menstrually cycling women with proven endometriosis were treated with a delayed-release preparation of the superactive agonist D-Trp-6-LH-RH in biodegradable microcapsules, administered intramuscularly at intervals of 16 to 36 days for a period of 3 to 5 months. After the first injection which caused a transient stimulatory response, a sustained hypogonadal state, characterized by an estradiol (E2) level less than 50 pg/mL, was induced in all patients by day +14.7 (range 7.19). Subsequent injections caused no more stimulation, but a continuous decrease in E2 levels was observed. In all patients, E2 levels fell to zero after the second or third injection. Gonadotropins remained in the normal range throughout the course of treatment. Hot flashes and severe dyspareunia (related to vaginal dryness) were the main side effects. Resumption of normal pituitary-ovarian activity was documented in all patients after the last injection; the end of the hypogonadal state, ovulation and menses, occurred on days 41 (range 32-59), 58 (range 51-64) and 70 (range 65-76), respectively. All patients showed a clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that a long-lasting, reversible hypogonadism can be induced in cyclic women by intramuscular injections of D-Trp-6-LH-RH microcapsules at monthly intervals. This simple and convenient treatment should be useful in treating endometriosis and other conditions.

  5. The Cytolytic Amphipathic β(2,2-Amino Acid LTX-401 Induces DAMP Release in Melanoma Cells and Causes Complete Regression of B16 Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv-Marie Eike

    Full Text Available In the present study we examined the ability of the amino acid derivative LTX-401 to induce cell death in cancer cell lines, as well as the capacity to induce regression in a murine melanoma model. Mode of action studies in vitro revealed lytic cell death and release of danger-associated molecular pattern molecules, preceded by massive cytoplasmic vacuolization and compromised lysosomes in treated cells. The use of a murine melanoma model demonstrated that the majority of animals treated with intratumoural injections of LTX-401 showed complete and long-lasting remission. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of LTX-401 as an immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors.

  6. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  7. Spinal release of tumour necrosis factor activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase and mediates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, D B; Abdelmoaty, S; Sandor, K; Codeluppi, S; Fitzsimmons, B; Steinauer, J; Hua, X Y; Yaksh, T L; Svensson, C I

    2015-02-01

    Mounting evidence points to individual contributions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway to the induction and maintenance of various pain states. Here we explore the role of spinal TNF and JNK in carrageenan-induced hypersensitivity. As links between TNF and JNK have been demonstrated in vitro, we investigated if TNF regulates spinal JNK activity in vivo. TNF levels in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, spinal TNF gene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction and TNF protein expression, JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation by western blotting. The role of spinal TNF and JNK in inflammation-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was assessed by injecting the TNF inhibitor etanercept and the JNK inhibitors SP600125 and JIP-1 intrathecally (i.t.). TNF-mediated regulation of JNK activity was examined by assessing the effect of i.t. etanercept on inflammation-induced spinal JNK activity. TNF levels were increased in CSF and spinal cord following carrageenan-induced inflammation. While JNK phosphorylation followed the same temporal pattern as TNF, c-jun was only activated at later time points. Intrathecal injection of TNF and JNK inhibitors attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity. TNF stimulation induced JNK phosphorylation in cultured spinal astrocytes and blocking the spinal actions of TNF in vivo by i.t. injection of etanercept reduced inflammation-induced spinal JNK activity. Here we show that spinal JNK activity is dependent on TNF and that both TNF and the JNK signalling pathways modulate pain-like behaviour induced by peripheral inflammation. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  8. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. "Top-down" crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013)), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ∕mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization∕crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  9. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Release and Suppression of Caspases by Gamma-Tocotrienol Prevent Apoptosis and Delay Aging in Stress-Induced Premature Senescence of Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Makpol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the molecular mechanism of γ-tocotrienol (GTT in preventing cellular aging by focusing on its anti-apoptotic effect in stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs. Results obtained showed that SIPS exhibited senescent-phenotypic characteristic, increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal and promoted G0/G1 cell cycle arrest accompanied by shortening of telomere length with decreased telomerase activity. Both SIPS and senescent HDFs shared similar apoptotic changes such as increased Annexin V-FITC positive cells, increased cytochrome c release and increased activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 (P<0.05. GTT treatment resulted in a significant reduction of Annexin V-FITC positive cells, inhibited cytochrome c release and decreased activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 (P<0.05. Gene expression analysis showed that GTT treatment down regulated BAX mRNA, up-regulated BCL2A1 mRNA and decreased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 protein expression (P<0.05 in SIPS. These findings suggested that GTT inhibits apoptosis by modulating the upstream apoptosis cascade, causing the inhibition of cytochrome c release from the mitochondria with concomitant suppression of caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. In conclusion, GTT delays cellular senescence of human diploid fibroblasts through the inhibition of intrinsic mitochondria-mediated pathway which involved the regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins.

  10. LPS-induced release of IL-6 from glia modulates production of IL-1beta in a JAK2-dependent manner

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Minogue, Aedín M

    2012-06-14

    AbstractBackgroundCompelling evidence has implicated neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of a number of neurodegenerative conditions. Chronic activation of both astrocytes and microglia leads to excessive secretion of proinflammatory molecules such as TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β with potentially deleterious consequences for neuronal viability. Many signaling pathways involving the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor κB (NFκB) complex and the Janus kinases (JAKs)\\/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-1 have been implicated in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines from glia. We sought to identify signaling kinases responsible for cytokine production and to delineate the complex interactions which govern time-related responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS).MethodsWe examined the time-related changes in certain signaling events and the release of proinflammatory cytokines from LPS-stimulated co-cultures of astrocytes and microglia isolated from neonatal rats.ResultsTNFα was detected in the supernatant approximately 1 to 2 hours after LPS treatment while IL-1β and IL-6 were detected after 2 to 3 and 4 to 6 hours, respectively. Interestingly, activation of NFκB signaling preceded release of all cytokines while phosphorylation of STAT1 was evident only after 2 hours, indicating that activation of JAK\\/STAT may be important in the up-regulation of IL-6 production. Additionally, incubation of glia with TNFα induced both phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT1 and the interaction of JAK2 with the TNFα receptor (TNFR1). Co-treatment of glia with LPS and recombinant IL-6 protein attenuated the LPS-induced release of both TNFα and IL-1β while potentiating the effect of LPS on suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)3 expression and IL-10 release.ConclusionsThese data indicate that TNFα may regulate IL-6 production through activation of JAK\\/STAT signaling and that the subsequent production of IL-6 may impact on the release of

  11. IP{sub 3}-dependent intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenting; Tingare, Asmita; Ng, David Chi-Heng [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Johnson, Hong W.; Schell, Michael J. [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda (United States); Lord, Rebecca L. [Department of Biology, University of York (United Kingdom); Chawla, Sangeeta, E-mail: sangeeta.chawla@york.ac.uk [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Department of Biology, University of York (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons requires a submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool derives from intracellular ER stores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes inhibits cAMP-induced c-fos expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SRE-mediated and CRE-mediated gene expression is sensitive to IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of TORC1. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP are widely used in concert by neurons to relay signals from the synapse to the nucleus, where synaptic activity modulates gene expression required for synaptic plasticity. Neurons utilize different transcriptional regulators to integrate information encoded in the spatiotemporal dynamics and magnitude of Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals, including some that are Ca{sup 2+}-responsive, some that are cAMP-responsive and some that detect coincident Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals. Because Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP can influence each other's amplitude and spatiotemporal characteristics, we investigated how cAMP acts to regulate gene expression when increases in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} are buffered. We show here that cAMP-mobilizing stimuli are unable to induce expression of the immediate early gene c-fos in hippocampal neurons in the presence of the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} buffer BAPTA-AM. Expression of enzymes that attenuate intracellular IP{sub 3} levels also inhibited cAMP-dependent c-fos induction. Synaptic activity induces c-fos transcription through two cis regulatory DNA elements - the CRE and the SRE. We show here that in response to cAMP both CRE-mediated and SRE-mediated induction of a luciferase reporter gene is attenuated by IP{sub 3} metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 was inhibited

  12. Gastrin-releasing peptide facilitates glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus and effectively prevents vascular dementia induced cognitive and synaptic plasticity deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiajia; Yao, Yang; Wang, Ling; Yang, Chunxiao; Wang, Faqi; Guo, Jie; Wang, Zhiyun; Yang, Zhuo; Ming, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) has been proved to be an important neuromodulator in the brain and involved in a variety of neurological diseases. Whether GRP could attenuate cognition impairment induced by vascular dementia (VD) in rats, and the mechanism of synaptic plasticity and GRP's action on synaptic efficiency are still poorly understood. In this study, we first investigated the effects of GRP on glutamatergic transmission with patch-clamp recording. We found that acute application of GRP enhanced the excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 neurons via GRPR in a presynaptic mechanism. Secondly, we examined whether exogenous GRP or its analogue neuromedin B (NMB) could prevent VD-induced cognitive deficits and the mechanism of synaptic plasticity. By using Morris water maze, long-term potentiation (LTP) recording, western blot assay and immunofluorescent staining, we verified for the first time that GRP or NMB substantially improved the spatial learning and memory abilities in VD rats, restored the impaired synaptic plasticity and was able to elevate the expression of synaptic proteins, synaptophysin (SYP) and CaMKII, which play pivotal roles in synaptic plasticity. These results suggest that the facilitatory effects of GRP on glutamate release may contribute to its long-term action on synaptic efficacy which is essential in cognitive function. Our findings present a new entry point for a better understanding of physiological function of GRP and raise the possibility that GRPR agonists might ameliorate cognitive deficits associated with neurological diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Release of tensile strain on engineered human tendon tissue disturbs cell adhesions, changes matrix architecture, and induces an inflammatory phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tendon cells results in an upregulation of mechanotransduction signaling pathways, cell-matrix adhesion and collagen synthesis, but whether unloading removes these responses is unclear. We investigated the response to tension release, with regard to matrix proteins, pro...... were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads...

  14. Homocysteine aggravates ROS-induced depression of transmitter release from motor nerve terminals: potential mechanism of peripheral impairment in motor neuron diseases associated with hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellya eBukharaeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (HCY is a pro-inflammatory sulphur-containing redox active endogenous amino acid, which concentration increases in neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. A widely held view suggests that HCY could contribute to neurodegeneration via promotion of oxidative stress. However, the action of HCY on motor nerve terminals has not been investigated so far. We previously reported that oxidative stress inhibited synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction, targeting primarily the motor nerve terminals. In the current study, we investigated the effect of HCY on oxidative stress-induced impairment of transmitter release at the mouse diaphragm muscle. The mild oxidant H2O2 decreased the intensity of spontaneous quantum release from nerve terminals (measured as the frequency of miniature endplate potentials, MEPPs without changes in the amplitude of MEPPs, indicating a presynaptic effect. Pre-treatment with HCY for 2 h only slightly affected both amplitude and frequency of MEPPs but increased the inhibitory potency of H2O2 almost two fold. As HCY can activate certain subtypes of glutamate NMDA receptors we tested the role of NMDA receptors in the sensitizing action of HCY. Remarkably, the selective blocker of NMDA receptors, AP-5 completely removed the sensitizing effect of HCY on the H2O2-induced presynaptic depressant effect. Thus, at the mammalian neuromuscular junction HCY largely increases the inhibitory effect of oxidative stress on transmitter release, via NMDA receptors activation. This combined effect of HCY and local oxidative stress can specifically contribute to the damage of presynaptic terminals in neurodegenerative motoneuron diseases, including ALS.

  15. Viral Vector Mediated Over-Expression of Estrogen Receptor–α in Striatum Enhances the Estradiol-induced Motor Activity in Female Rats and Estradiol Modulated GABA Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kristin N.; von Esenwein, Silke A.; Hu, Ming; Bennett, Amy L.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Musatov, Sergei; Toran-Allerand, C. Dominique; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Young, Larry J.; Becker, Jill B.

    2009-01-01

    Classical estrogen receptor signaling mechanisms involve estradiol binding to intracellular nuclear receptors (estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and estrogen receptor-β (ERβ)) to promote changes in protein expression. Estradiol can also exert effects within seconds to minutes, however, a timescale incongruent with genomic signaling. In the brain, estradiol rapidly potentiates stimulated dopamine release in the striatum of female rats and enhances spontaneous rotational behavior. Furthermore, estradiol rapidly attenuates the K+- evoked increase of GABA in dialysate. We hypothesize that these rapid effects of estradiol in the striatum are mediated by ERα located on the membrane of medium spiny GABAergic neurons. This experiment examined whether over-expression of ERα in the striatum would enhance the effect of estradiol on rotational behavior and the K+- evoked increase in GABA in dialysate. Ovariectomized female rats were tested for rotational behavior or underwent microdialysis experiments after unilateral intrastriatal injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing the human ERα cDNA (AAV.ERα) into the striatum; controls received either the same vector into areas outside the striatum or an AAV containing the human alkaline phosphatase gene into the striatum (AAV.ALP). Animals that received AAV.ERα in the striatum exhibited significantly greater estradiol-induced contralateral rotations compared to controls and exhibited behavioral sensitization of contralateral rotations induced by a low dose of amphetamine. ERα over-expression also enhanced the inhibitory effect of estradiol on K+- evoked GABA release suggesting that disinhibition of dopamine release from terminals in the striatum resulted in the enhanced rotational behavior. PMID:19211896

  16. Viral vector-mediated overexpression of estrogen receptor-alpha in striatum enhances the estradiol-induced motor activity in female rats and estradiol-modulated GABA release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kristin N; von Esenwein, Silke A; Hu, Ming; Bennett, Amy L; Kennedy, Robert T; Musatov, Sergei; Toran-Allerand, C Dominique; Kaplitt, Michael G; Young, Larry J; Becker, Jill B

    2009-02-11

    Classical estrogen receptor-signaling mechanisms involve estradiol binding to intracellular nuclear receptors [estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta)] to promote changes in protein expression. Estradiol can also exert effects within seconds to minutes, however, a timescale incongruent with genomic signaling. In the brain, estradiol rapidly potentiates stimulated dopamine release in the striatum of female rats and enhances spontaneous rotational behavior. Furthermore, estradiol rapidly attenuates the K(+)-evoked increase of GABA in dialysate. We hypothesize that these rapid effects of estradiol in the striatum are mediated by ERalpha located on the membrane of medium spiny GABAergic neurons. This experiment examined whether overexpression of ERalpha in the striatum would enhance the effect of estradiol on rotational behavior and the K(+)-evoked increase in GABA in dialysate. Ovariectomized female rats were tested for rotational behavior or underwent microdialysis experiments after unilateral intrastriatal injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing the human ERalpha cDNA (AAV.ERalpha) into the striatum; controls received either the same vector into areas outside the striatum or an AAV containing the human alkaline phosphatase gene into the striatum (AAV.ALP). Animals that received AAV.ERalpha in the striatum exhibited significantly greater estradiol-induced contralateral rotations compared with controls and exhibited behavioral sensitization of contralateral rotations induced by a low-dose of amphetamine. ERalpha overexpression also enhanced the inhibitory effect of estradiol on K(+)-evoked GABA release suggesting that disinhibition of dopamine release from terminals in the striatum resulted in the enhanced rotational behavior.

  17. Release of soluble and vesicular purine nucleoside phosphorylase from rat astrocytes and microglia induced by pro-inflammatory stimulation with extracellular ATP via P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Altamira, Luis Emiliano; Polazzi, Elisabetta; Giuliani, Patricia; Beraudi, Alina; Massenzio, Francesca; Mengoni, Ilaria; Poli, Alessandro; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Ciccarelli, Renata; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Virgili, Marco; Monti, Barbara; Caciagli, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), a crucial enzyme in purine metabolism which converts ribonucleosides into purine bases, has mainly been found inside glial cells. Since we recently demonstrated that PNP is released from rat C6 glioma cells, we then wondered whether this occurs in normal brain cells. Using rat primary cultures of microglia, astrocytes and cerebellar granule neurons, we found that in basal condition all these cells constitutively released a metabolically active PNP with Km values very similar to those measured in C6 glioma cells. However, the enzyme expression/release was greater in microglia or astrocytes that in neurons. Moreover, we exposed primary brain cell cultures to pro-inflammatory agents such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or ATP alone or in combination. LPS alone caused an increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion mainly from microglia and no modification in the PNP release, even from neurons in which it enhanced cell death. In contrast, ATP administered alone to glial cells at high micromolar concentrations significantly stimulated the release of PNP within 1 h, an effect not modified by LPS presence, whereas IL-1β secretion was stimulated by ATP only in cells primed for 2 h with LPS. In both cases ATP effect was mediated by P2X 7 receptor (P2X 7 R), since it was mimicked by cell exposure to Bz-ATP, an agonist of P2X 7 R, and blocked by cell pre-treatment with the P2X 7 R antagonist A438079. Interestingly, ATP-induced PNP release from glial cells partly occurred through the secretion of lysosomal vesicles in the extracellular medium. Thus, during inflammatory cerebral events PNP secretion promoted by extracellular ATP accumulation might concur to control extracellular purine signals. Further studies could elucidate whether, in these conditions, a consensual activity of enzymes downstream of PNP in the purine metabolic cascade avoids accumulation of extracellular purine bases that might concur to brain injury by unusual formation

  18. First circulating beam in the AA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    On 3 July 1980, two years after project authorization, beam circulated for the first time in the AA. It was a 3.56 GeV/c proton test beam. We see an expecting crowd, minutes before the happy event. The persons are too numerous to name them all, but the 3 most prominent ones are at the centre (left to right): Roy Billinge (Joint AA Project Leader, with his hand on the control box), Eifionydd Jones (white shirt), Simon van der Meer (spiritus rector and Joint AA Project Leader). The first antiprotons were injected, made to circulate and cooled soon after, on 14 July 1980.

  19. Remote-controlled eradication of astrogliosis in spinal cord injury via electromagnetically-induced dexamethasone release from "smart" nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wen; Borgens, Richard Ben

    2015-08-10

    We describe a system to deliver drugs to selected tissues continuously, if required, for weeks. Drugs can be released remotely inside the small animals using pre-implanted, novel vertically aligned electromagnetically-sensitive polypyrrole nanowires (PpyNWs). Approximately 1-2mm(2) dexamethasone (DEX) doped PpyNWs was lifted on a single drop of sterile water by surface tension, and deposited onto a spinal cord lesion in glial fibrillary acidic protein-luc transgenic mice (GFAP-luc mice). Overexpression of GFAP is an indicator of astrogliosis/neuroinflammation in CNS injury. The corticosteroid DEX, a powerful ameliorator of inflammation, was released from the polymer by external application of an electromagnetic field for 2h/day for a week. The GFAP signal, revealed by bioluminescent imaging in the living animal, was significantly reduced in treated animals. At 1week, GFAP was at the edge of detection, and in some experimental animals, completely eradicated. We conclude that the administration of drugs can be controlled locally and non-invasively, opening the door to many other known therapies, such as the cases that dexamethasone cannot be safely applied systemically in large concentrations. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 expression and release from astrocytes are mediated by MAPK and NF-κB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuagkhaopong, Suttinee; Ospondpant, Dusadee; Kasemsuk, Thitima; Sibmooh, Nathawut; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Power, Christopher; Vivithanaporn, Pornpun

    2017-05-01

    Chronic exposure to cadmium has been linked to brain cancers, learning disabilities and memory deficits. Previous studies of cadmium toxicity in the central nervous system report cadmium induces oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes. In the peripheral system, cadmium promotes interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 production and release. Elevation of IL-6 expression is linked to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and astrogliosis. IL-8 plays a role in angiogenesis of gliomas and neurodegenerative diseases. Herein, the effects of non-toxic concentrations of cadmium on the production of IL-6 and IL-8 and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. U-87 MG human astrocytoma cells and primary human astrocytes were exposed to cadmium chloride. At 24h post-exposure to 1 and 10μM, levels of intracellular cadmium in U-87 MG cells were 11.89±3.59 and 53.08±7.59μg/g wet weight, respectively. These concentrations had minimal effects on cell morphology and viability. IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels and secretion increased in dose- and time-dependent manners post cadmium exposure. Acute exposure to cadmium increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and p65 NF-κB. Pretreatment with U0126-an inhibitor of MEK1 and MEK2 kinases-SB203580-a p38 MAPK inhibitor-and SC-514-an IKKβ inhibitor-suppressed cadmium-induced IL-8 expression and release. Upregulation of cadmium-induced IL-6 was inhibited by U0126 and SC-514, but not SB203580. On the other hand, SP600125-a JNK inhibitor-and celecoxib-a selective COX-2 inhibitor-had no effect on production of both cytokines. In conclusion, non-toxic concentrations of cadmium can stimulate IL-6 and IL-8 release through MAPK phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Suppressing IL-6 and IL-8 production could be novel approaches to prevent cadmium-induced angiogenesis in gliomas and inflammation in the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro exposure to xenoestrogens induces growth hormone transcription and release via estrogen receptor-dependent pathways in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Vu Hoang; Nguyen, Thi Hoa; Lee, Geun-Shik; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2009-08-01

    In this study, we employed an in vitro model to examine the effects of endocrine disruptors (EDs) in the regulation of growth hormone (GH) gene, an important hormone in growth, development and body composition. The rat pituitary cells, GH3, were treated with alkyl-phenols (APs), i.e., 4-tert-octyl-phenol (OP), p-nonyl-phenol (NP) or bisphenol A (BPA) for 24h in a dose-dependent manner (10(-5), 10(-6) and 10(-7)M) and in a time-dependent fashion (1, 3, 6, 12 and 24h) at a high concentration (10(-5)M). An anti-estrogen, ICI 182,780, was used to examine the potential involvement of estrogen receptor (ER) in the induction of GH by EDs through an ER-mediated pathway. Treatment with OP, NP and BPA induced a significant increase in GH gene expression at high and medium doses at 24h. ED-exposure induced a marked increase in GH gene transcription as early as 6h and peaked at 12h. Co-treatment with ICI 182,780 significantly attenuated ED-induced GH expression in GH3 cells. Interestingly, the level of in vitro GH release was significantly increased at 24h in response to OP, NP or BPA, whereas co-treatment with ICI 182,780 significantly reversed ED-induced GH secretion, indicating that ER may take part in both GH gene transcription and its release in these cells. In addition, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), protein kinases B (Akt) or G protein in response to OP, NP or BPA at 24h was observed in this study. Exposure to these APs resulted in a rapid and significant activation of ERK phosphorylation, reflecting that EDs-induced response may involve both genomic and non-genomic pathways in these cells. Taken together, these results may provide new insight into the mode of ED-induced action in GH gene regulation as well as the biological pathway underlying these molecular events.

  2. Long-term biases in geomagnetic K and aa indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is made of the geomagnetic-activity aa index and its source K-index data from groups of ground-based observatories in Britain, and Australia, 1868.0-2009.0, solar cycles 11-23. The K data show persistent biases, especially for high (low) K-activity levels at British (Australian) observatories. From examination of multiple subsets of the K data we infer that the biases are not predominantly the result of changes in observatory location, localized induced magnetotelluric currents, changes in magnetometer technology, or the modernization of K-value estimation methods. Instead, the biases appear to be artifacts of the latitude-dependent scaling used to assign K values to particular local levels of geomagnetic activity. The biases are not effectively removed by weighting factors used to estimate aa. We show that long-term averages of the aa index, such as annual averages, are dominated by medium-level geomagnetic activity levels having K values of 3 and 4. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  3. The heme oxygenase-1 inducer THI-56 negatively regulates iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells and CLP-induced septic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jung; Jang, Hwa Jin; Tsoyi, Konstantin; Kim, Young Min; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear DNA binding protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been suggested to act as a late mediator of septic shock. The effect of ((S)-6,7-dihydroxy-1-(4-hydroxynaphthylmethyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, also known as THI-56, in an experimental model of sepsis was investigated. THI-56 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties in response to LPS in RAW 264.7 cells. In particular, THI-56 significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of HMGB1 in activated macrophages. THI-56 activated NE-F2-regulated factor 2 (Nrf-2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The specific knockdown of the HO-1 gene by HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of THI-56 on iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Importantly, THI-56 administration protected animals from death induced by either a lethal dose of LPS or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Furthermore, the ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine, and HMGB1 levels in the blood were significantly increased in CLP-induced septic mice, and the administration of THI-56 reduced these levels in a concentration-dependent and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX)-sensitive manner. In addition, the administration of THI-56 significantly ameliorated not only lung damage but also macrophage infiltration in the livers of CLP-induced septic mice, and these effects were also abrogated in the presence of ZnPPIX. Thus, we conclude that THI-56 significantly attenuates the proinflammatory response induced by LPS and reduces organ damage in a CLP-induced sepsis model through the upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1.

  4. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  5. Release of lipoxygenase products and monoterpenes by tomato plants as an indicator of Botrytis cinerea-induced stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.M.C.; Miebach, M.; Kleist, E.; Henten, van E.J.; Wildt, J.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from tomato induced by the fungus Botrytis cinerea were studied in plants inoculated by spraying with suspensions containing B. cinerea spores. VOC emissions were analysed using on-line gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, with a time

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Releasing 2-Mercaptoacrylic Acid-Based Derivative Possesses Cytoprotective Activity in a Small Intestine of Rats with Medication-Induced Enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Sklyarova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal injury is known to be one of the most commonly appearing pathologies, resulting in the use of medications such as: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, antitumor drugs and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors. The principal objective of this study is to evaluate the action of a novel mercaptoacrylic acid derivative able to release H2S on parameters of NO-synthase system and oxidative stress. Inducing enteropathy, three types of medications were used: indomethacin, an NSAID (35 mg/kg; methotrexate, an antitumor drug (10 mg/kg; and enalapril, an ACE inhibitor (2 mg/kg/day. 2-[(4-chlorophenyl-carbamoyl-methyl]-3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl-acrylic acid (2C3DHTA was introduced based on the background of medication-induced enteropathy (10 mg/kg/day. The survey showed that malondialdehyde (MDA concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, and NO-synthases (NOS were determined in the small intestinal mucosa. The increase in inducible NO-synthase (iNOS activity was due to indomethacin and methotrexate administration. Constitutive NO-synthase (cNOS activity was decreased by an ACE-inhibitor. The cytoprotective effect was demonstrated by 2C3DHTA, which returned iNOS activity to its control level and increased cNOS activity. The enterotoxic action of studied medication was accompanied by the development of oxidative stress manifested, activity of MPO was increased. MPO activity and manifestations of oxidative stress were decreased by 2C3DHTA. Effects of 2C3DHTA can be explained by the action of H2S, released from this compound in the gastrointestinal (GI system.

  7. Bacteria-induced release of white cell--and platelet-derived vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Poor prognosis after resection of primary colorectal cancer may be related to the combination of perioperative blood transfusion and subsequent development of infectious complications. White blood cell--and platelet-derived cancer growth substances, including vascular...... endothelial growth factor (VEGF), may be involved in this process. Therefore, we studied the in vitro release of VEGF from white blood cells and platelets stimulated by bacterial antigens and supernatants from stored red cell components. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight units of whole blood (WB) and eight units...... of buffy-coat-depleted red cell (SAGM) blood were donated by healthy blood donors. Subsequently, half of every unit was leucocyte depleted by filtration, and all 32 half-units were stored under standard conditions for 35 days. Just after storage, and on days 7, 21 and 35 during storage, aliquots...

  8. The thioacetate-ω(γ-lactam carboxamide) HDAC inhibitor ST7612AA1 as HIV-1 latency reactivation agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Roger; Grau, Judith; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Ballana, Ester; Giannini, Giuseppe; Esté, José A

    2015-11-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unable to cure HIV infection. The ability of HIV to establish a subset of latent infected CD4(+) T cells, which remain undetectable to the immune system, becomes a major roadblock to achieve viral eradication. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to potently induce the reactivation of latent HIV. Here, we show that a new thiol-based HDACi, the thioacetate-ω(γ-lactam carboxamide) derivative ST7612AA1, is a potent inducer of HIV reactivation. We evaluated HIV reactivation activity of ST7612AA1 compared to panobinostat (PNB), romidepsin (RMD) and vorinostat (VOR) in cell culture models of HIV-1 latency, in latently infected primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes and in PBMCs from HIV(+) patients. ST7612AA1 potently induced HIV-1 reactivation at submicromolar concentrations with comparable potency to panobinostat or superior to vorinostat. The presence of known antiretrovirals did not affect ST7612AA1-induced reactivation and their activity was not affected by ST7612AA1. Cell proliferation and cell activation were not affected by ST7612AA1, or any other HDACi used. In conclusion, our results indicate that ST7612AA1 is a potent activator of latent HIV and that reactivation activity of ST7612AA1 is exerted without activation or proliferation of CD4(+) T cells. ST7612AA1 is a suitable candidate for further studies of HIV reactivation strategies and potential new therapies to eradicate the viral reservoirs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic horn of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    In the 1960s, the invention of this "current sheet lens" has helped to greatly improve the flux of neutrino beams. It was used again at the AA, collecting antiprotons from the production target at angles too large to fit into the acceptance of the AA. It was machined from aluminium to a thickness of 1.4 mm and pulsed at 400 kA for 15 microseconds (half-sine).

  10. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Michelle; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; McNeill, Fiona E.; Seymour, Colin B.; Rainbow, Andrew J.; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal. METHODS: The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells...

  11. LCG/AA build infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Hodgkins, Alex Liam; Hegner, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    The Software Process & Infrastructure (SPI) project provides a build infrastructure for regular integration testing and release of the LCG Applications Area software stack. In the past, regular builds have been provided using a system which has been constantly growing to include more features like server-client communication, long-term build history and a summary web interface using present-day web technologies. However, the ad-hoc style of software development resulted in a setup that is hard to monitor, inflexible and difficult to expand. The new version of the infrastructure is based on the Django Python framework, which allows for a structured and modular design, facilitating later additions. Transparency in the workflows and ease of monitoring has been one of the priorities in the design. Formerly missing functionality like on-demand builds or release triggering will support the transition to a more agile development process.

  12. LCG/AA build infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkins, Alex Liam; Diez, Victor; Hegner, Benedikt

    2012-12-01

    The Software Process & Infrastructure (SPI) project provides a build infrastructure for regular integration testing and release of the LCG Applications Area software stack. In the past, regular builds have been provided using a system which has been constantly growing to include more features like server-client communication, long-term build history and a summary web interface using present-day web technologies. However, the ad-hoc style of software development resulted in a setup that is hard to monitor, inflexible and difficult to expand. The new version of the infrastructure is based on the Django Python framework, which allows for a structured and modular design, facilitating later additions. Transparency in the workflows and ease of monitoring has been one of the priorities in the design. Formerly missing functionality like on-demand builds or release triggering will support the transition to a more agile development process.

  13. Release of lipoxygenase products and monoterpenes by tomato plants as an indicator of Botrytis cinerea-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, R M C; Miebach, M; Kleist, E; van Henten, E J; Wildt, J

    2009-11-01

    Changes in emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from tomato induced by the fungus Botrytis cinerea were studied in plants inoculated by spraying with suspensions containing B. cinerea spores. VOC emissions were analysed using on-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, with a time resolution of about 1 h, for up to 2 days after spraying. Four phases were delimited according to the starting point and the applied day/night rhythm of the experiments. These phases were used to demonstrate changes in VOC flux caused by B. cinerea infestation. Tomato plants inoculated with B. cinerea emitted a different number and amount of VOCs after inoculation compared to control plants that had been sprayed with a suspension without B. cinerea spores. The changes in emissions were dependent on time after inoculation as well as on the severity of infection. The predominant VOCs emitted after inoculation were volatile products from the lipoxygenase pathway (LOX products). The increased emission of LOX products proved to be a strong indicator of a stress response, indicating that VOC emissions can be used to detect plant stress at an early stage. Besides emission of LOX products, there were also increases in monoterpene emissions. However, neither increased emission of LOX products nor of monoterpenes is specific for B. cinerea attack. The emission of LOX products is also induced by other stresses, and increased emission of monoterpenes seems to be the result of mechanical damage induced by secondary stress impacts on leaves.

  14. Indian red scorpion venom-induced augmentation of cardio-respiratory reflexes and pulmonary edema involve the release of histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Abhaya; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2011-02-01

    Pulmonary edema is a consistent feature of Mesobuthus tamulus (MBT) envenomation. Kinins, prostaglandins and other inflammatory mediators are implicated in it. Since, histamine also increases capillary permeability, this study was undertaken to evaluate whether MBT venom utilizes histamine to produce pulmonary edema and augmentation of cardio-respiratory reflexes evoked by phenylbiguanide (PBG). Blood pressure, respiratory excursions and ECG were recorded in urethane anaesthetized adult rats. Injection of PBG (10 μg/kg) produced apnoea, hypotension and bradycardia and the responses were augmented after exposure to venom (100 μg/kg). There was increased pulmonary water content in these animals. Pretreatment with pheniramine maleate (H₁ antagonist, 3 mg/kg) blocked both venom-induced augmentation of PBG response and pulmonary edema. In another series, compound 48/80 (mast cell depletor) was treated for 4 days then the PBG responses were elicited as before. At the end of the experiments, mast cells were counted from the peritoneal fluid. The venom-induced pulmonary edema and the augmentation of PBG reflex were not observed in compound 48/80 treated animals. Further, mast cells in the peritoneal fluid were absent in this group as compared to vehicle treated group (29 ± 7.9 cells/mm³). These observations indicate that venom-induced pulmonary edema and augmentation of PBG reflexe are mediated through mast cells by involving H₁ receptors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bak compensated for Bax in p53-null cells to release cytochrome c for the initiation of mitochondrial signaling during Withanolide D-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Mondal

    Full Text Available The goal of cancer chemotherapy to induce multi-directional apoptosis as targeting a single pathway is unable to decrease all the downstream effect arises from crosstalk. Present study reports that Withanolide D (WithaD, a steroidal lactone isolated from Withania somnifera, induced cellular apoptosis in which mitochondria and p53 were intricately involved. In MOLT-3 and HCT116p53+/+ cells, WithaD induced crosstalk between intrinsic and extrinsic signaling through Bid, whereas in K562 and HCT116p53-/- cells, only intrinsic pathway was activated where Bid remain unaltered. WithaD showed pronounced activation of p53 in cancer cells. Moreover, lowered apoptogenic effect of HCT116p53-/- over HCT116p53+/+ established a strong correlation between WithaD-mediated apoptosis and p53. WithaD induced Bax and Bak upregulation in HCT116p53+/+, whereas increase only Bak expression in HCT116p53-/- cells, which was coordinated with augmented p53 expression. p53 inhibition substantially reduced Bax level and failed to inhibit Bak upregulation in HCT116p53+/+ cells confirming p53-dependent Bax and p53-independent Bak activation. Additionally, in HCT116p53+/+ cells, combined loss of Bax and Bak (HCT116Bax-Bak- reduced WithaD-induced apoptosis and completely blocked cytochrome c release whereas single loss of Bax or Bak (HCT116Bax-Bak+/HCT116Bax+Bak- was only marginally effective after WithaD treatment. In HCT116p53-/- cells, though Bax translocation to mitochondria was abrogated, Bak oligomerization helped the cells to release cytochrome c even before the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. WithaD also showed in vitro growth-inhibitory activity against an array of p53 wild type and null cancer cells and K562 xenograft in vivo. Taken together, WithaD elicited apoptosis in malignant cells through Bax/Bak dependent pathway in p53-wild type cells, whereas Bak compensated against loss of Bax in p53-null cells.

  16. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  17. Nerve growth factor inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) and bipolar cells by inducing glial cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Tarcyane Barata; Pannicke, Thomas; Vogler, Stefanie; Berk, Benjamin-Andreas; Grosche, Antje; Wiedemann, Peter; Seeger, Johannes; Reichenbach, Andreas; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Bringmann, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Osmotic swelling of neurons and glial cells contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. We show that nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibits the swelling of glial (Müller) and bipolar cells in rat retinal slices induced by barium-containing hypoosmotic solution. NGF also reduced Müller and bipolar cell swelling in the post-ischemic retina. On the other hand, NGF prevented the swelling of freshly isolated Müller cells, but not of isolated bipolar cells, suggesting that NGF induces a release of factors from Müller cells that inhibit bipolar cell swelling in retinal slices. The inhibitory effect of NGF on Müller cell swelling was mediated by activation of TrkA (the receptor tyrosine kinase A), but not p75(NTR) , and was prevented by blockers of metabotropic glutamate, P2Y1 , adenosine A1 , and fibroblast growth factor receptors. Basic fibroblast growth factor fully inhibited the swelling of freshly isolated Müller cells, but only partially the swelling of isolated bipolar cells. In addition, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and transforming growth factor-β1, but not epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, reduced the swelling of bipolar cells. Both Müller and bipolar cells displayed TrkA immunoreactivity, while Müller cells were also immunostained for p75(NTR) and NGF. The data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of NGF in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic glial and bipolar cell swelling. Cytotoxic cell swelling contributes to retinal neurodegeneration. Nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibits the osmotic swelling of glial cells by acting at TrkA, release of bFGF, and opening of K(+) and Cl(-) channels. The NGF-induced glial release of cytokines like bFGF inhibits the osmotic swelling of bipolar cells, suggesting that the neuroprotective effect of NGF is in part mediated by prevention of cytotoxic cell swelling. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Nrf2 protects the lung against inflammation induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles: A positive regulator role of Nrf2 on cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Lastres-Becker, Isabel; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Ji, Zhaoxia; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Marquina, Brenda; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Espada, Sandra; Cuadrado, Antonio; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2015-07-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans and they are an important nanomaterial widely used in pharmaceutical and paint industries. Inhalation is one of the most important routes of exposure in occupational settings. Several experimental models have shown that oxidative stress and inflammation are key mediators of cell damage. In this regard, Nrf2 modulates cytoprotection against oxidative stress and inflammation, however, its role in inflammation induced by TiO2 NPs exposure has been less investigated. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of Nrf2 in the cytokines produced after 4 weeks of TiO2 NPs exposure (5 mg/kg/2 days/week) using wild-type and Nrf2 knockout C57bl6 mice. Results showed that Nrf2 protects against inflammation and oxidative damage induced by TiO2 NPs exposure, however, Nrf2 is a positive mediator in the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and TGF-β in bronchial epithelium and alveolar space after 4 weeks of exposure. These results suggest that Nrf2 has a central role in up-regulation of cytokines released during inflammation induced by TiO2 NPs and those cytokines are needed to cope with histological alterations in lung tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Kaempferol alleviates LPS-induced neuroinflammation and BBB dysfunction in mice via inhibiting HMGB1 release and down-regulating TLR4/MyD88 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao; Yang, Ying-Lin; Yang, Huan; Wang, Yue-Hua; Du, Guan-Hua

    2018-03-01

    Kaempferol is a natural flavonoid with many biological activities including anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation. Nevertheless, its anti-neuroinflammation role and the relevant mechanism remain unclear. The present study was to investigate effects of kaempferol against LPS-induced neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier dysfunction as well as the mechanism in mice. BALB/c mice were treated with LPS 5mg/kg to induce inflammation after pre-treatment with kaempferol 25, 50, or 100mg/kg for 7days. The results showed that kaempferol reduced the production of various pro-inf