WorldWideScience

Sample records for a53t mutant form

  1. Tauopathic changes in the striatum of A53T α-synuclein mutant mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Jonathan Wills

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tauopathic pathways lead to degenerative changes in Alzheimer's disease and there is evidence that they are also involved in the neurodegenerative pathology of Parkinson's disease [PD]. We have examined tauopathic changes in striatum of the α-synuclein (α-Syn A53T mutant mouse. Elevated levels of α-Syn were observed in striatum of the adult A53T α-Syn mice. This was accompanied by increases in hyperphosphorylated Tau [p-Tau], phosphorylated at Ser202, Ser262 and Ser396/404, which are the same toxic sites also seen in Alzheimer's disease. There was an increase in active p-GSK-3β, hyperphosphorylated at Tyr216, a major and primary kinase known to phosphorylate Tau at multiple sites. The sites of hyperphosphorylation of Tau in the A53T mutant mice were similar to those seen in post-mortem striata from PD patients, attesting to their pathophysiological relevance. Increases in p-Tau were not due to alterations on protein phosphatases in either A53T mice or in human PD, suggesting lack of involvement of these proteins in tauopathy. Extraction of striata with Triton X-100 showed large increases in oligomeric forms of α-Syn suggesting that α-Syn had formed aggregates the mutant mice. In addition, increased levels of p-GSK-3β and pSer396/404 were also found associated with aggregated α-Syn. Differential solubilization to measure protein binding to cytoskeletal proteins demonstrated that p-Tau in the A53T mutant mouse were unbound to cytoskeletal proteins, consistent with dissociation of p-Tau from the microtubules upon hyperphosphorylation. Interestingly, α-Syn remained tightly bound to the cytoskeleton, while p-GSK-3β was seen in the cytoskeleton-free fractions. Immunohistochemical studies showed that α-Syn, pSer396/404 Tau and p-GSK-3β co-localized with one another and was aggregated and accumulated into large inclusion bodies, leading to cell death of Substantia nigral neurons. Together, these data demonstrate an elevated state of

  2. Metabolic abnormalities and hypoleptinemia in α-synuclein A53T mutant mice.

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    Rothman, Sarah M; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Spencer, Richard G; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Cong, Wei-Na; Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients frequently display loss of body fat mass and increased energy expenditure, and several studies have outlined a relationship between these metabolic abnormalities and disease severity, yet energy metabolism is largely unstudied in mouse models of PD. Here we characterize metabolic and physiologic responses to a high calorie diet (HCD) in mice expressing in neurons a mutant form of human α-synuclein (A53T) that causes dominantly inherited familial forms of the disease. A53T (SNCA) and wild type (WT) littermate mice were placed on a HCD for 12 weeks and evaluated for weight gain, food intake, body fat, blood plasma leptin, hunger, glucose tolerance, and energy expenditure. Results were compared with both SNCA and WT mice on a control diet. Despite consuming similar amounts of food, WT mice gained up to 66% of their original body weight on a HCD, whereas SNCA mice gained only 17%. Further, after 12 weeks on a HCD, magnetic resonance imaging analysis revealed that WT mice had significantly greater total and visceral body fat compared with SNCA mice (p < 0.007). At the age of 24 weeks SNCA mice displayed significantly increased hunger compared with WT (p < 0.03). At the age of 36 weeks, SNCA mice displayed significant hypoleptinemia compared with WT, both on a normal diet and a HCD (p < 0.03). The HCD induced insulin insensitivity in WT, but not SNCA mice, as indicated by an oral glucose tolerance test. Finally, SNCA mice displayed greater energy expenditure compared with WT, as measured in a Comprehensive Laboratory Animal Monitoring System, after 12 weeks on a HCD. Thus, SNCA mice are resistant to HCD-induced obesity and insulin resistance and display reduced body fat, increased hunger, hypoleptinemia and increased energy expenditure. Our findings reveal a profile of metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of PD that is similar to that of human PD patients, thus providing evidence that α-synuclein pathology is sufficient to drive such

  3. Olfactory dysfunction and neurotransmitter disturbance in olfactory bulb of transgenic mice expressing human A53T mutant α-synuclein.

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    Zhang, Sufang; Xiao, Qian; Le, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a multi-system neurodegenerative disease characterized by both motor and non-motor symptoms. Hyposmia is one of the early non-motor symptoms occurring in more than 90% of Parkinson disease cases, which can precede motor symptoms even several years. Up to now, the relationship between hyposmia and Parkinson disease remains elusive. Lack of proper animal models of hyposmia restricts the investigation. In this study we assessed olfactory function in Prp-A53T-α-synuclein transgenic (αSynA53T) mice which had been reported to show age-dependent motor impairments and intracytoplasmic inclusions. We also examined cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in olfactory bulb of αSynA53T mice by immunofluorescent staining, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and western blot. We found that compared to wild type littermates, αSynA53T mice at 6 months or older displayed a deficit of odor discrimination and odor detection. No significant changes were found in olfactory memory and odor habituation. Furthermore compared to wildtype littermates, in olfactory bulb of αSynA53T mice at 10 months old we detected a marked decrease of cholinergic neurons in mitral cell layer and a decrease of acetylcholinesterase activity, while dopaminergic neurons were found increased in glomerular layer, accompanied with an increase of tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Our studies indicate that αSynA53T mice have olfactory dysfunction before motor deficits occur, and the cholinergic and dopaminergic disturbance might be responsible for the Parkinson disease-related olfactory dysfunction.

  4. Olfactory dysfunction and neurotransmitter disturbance in olfactory bulb of transgenic mice expressing human A53T mutant α-synuclein.

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    Sufang Zhang

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is a multi-system neurodegenerative disease characterized by both motor and non-motor symptoms. Hyposmia is one of the early non-motor symptoms occurring in more than 90% of Parkinson disease cases, which can precede motor symptoms even several years. Up to now, the relationship between hyposmia and Parkinson disease remains elusive. Lack of proper animal models of hyposmia restricts the investigation. In this study we assessed olfactory function in Prp-A53T-α-synuclein transgenic (αSynA53T mice which had been reported to show age-dependent motor impairments and intracytoplasmic inclusions. We also examined cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in olfactory bulb of αSynA53T mice by immunofluorescent staining, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and western blot. We found that compared to wild type littermates, αSynA53T mice at 6 months or older displayed a deficit of odor discrimination and odor detection. No significant changes were found in olfactory memory and odor habituation. Furthermore compared to wildtype littermates, in olfactory bulb of αSynA53T mice at 10 months old we detected a marked decrease of cholinergic neurons in mitral cell layer and a decrease of acetylcholinesterase activity, while dopaminergic neurons were found increased in glomerular layer, accompanied with an increase of tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Our studies indicate that αSynA53T mice have olfactory dysfunction before motor deficits occur, and the cholinergic and dopaminergic disturbance might be responsible for the Parkinson disease-related olfactory dysfunction.

  5. Site-specific perturbations of alpha-synuclein fibril structure by the Parkinson's disease associated mutations A53T and E46K.

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    Luisel R Lemkau

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is pathologically characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies (LBs in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. These intracellular inclusions are largely composed of misfolded α-synuclein (AS, a neuronal protein that is abundant in the vertebrate brain. Point mutations in AS are associated with rare, early-onset forms of PD, although aggregation of the wild-type (WT protein is observed in the more common sporadic forms of the disease. Here, we employed multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to assess A53T and E46K mutant fibrils, in comparison to our recent description of WT AS fibrils. We made de novo chemical shift assignments for the mutants, and used these chemical shifts to empirically determine secondary structures. We observe significant perturbations in secondary structure throughout the fibril core for the E46K fibril, while the A53T fibril exhibits more localized perturbations near the mutation site. Overall, these results demonstrate that the secondary structure of A53T has some small differences from the WT and the secondary structure of E46K has significant differences, which may alter the overall structural arrangement of the fibrils.

  6. Non-motor parkinsonian pathology in aging A53T α-synuclein mice is associated with progressive synucleinopathy and altered enzymatic function.

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    Farrell, Kaitlin F; Krishnamachari, Sesha; Villanueva, Ernesto; Lou, Haiyan; Alerte, Tshianda N M; Peet, Eloise; Drolet, Robert E; Perez, Ruth G

    2014-02-01

    Aging, the main risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), is associated with increased α-synuclein levels in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Excess α-synuclein spurs Lewy-like pathology and dysregulates the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). PP2A dephosphorylates many neuroproteins, including the catecholamine rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons induces PD movement problems, but before those abnormalities occur, behaviors such as olfactory loss, anxiety, and constipation often manifest. Identifying mouse models with early PD behavioral changes could provide a model in which to test emerging therapeutic compounds. To this end, we evaluated mice expressing A53T mutant human (A53T) α-synuclein for behavior and α-synuclein pathology in olfactory bulb, adrenal gland, and gut. Aging A53T mice exhibited olfactory loss and anxiety that paralleled olfactory and adrenal α-synuclein aggregation. PP2A activity was also diminished in olfactory and adrenal tissues harboring insoluble α-synuclein. Low adrenal PP2A activity co-occurred with TH hyperactivity, making this the first study to link adrenal synucleinopathy to anxiety and catecholamine dysregulation. Aggregated A53T α-synuclein recombinant protein also had impaired stimulatory effects on soluble recombinant PP2A. Collectively, the data identify an excellent model in which to screen compounds for their ability to block the spread of α-synuclein pathology associated with pre-motor stages of PD. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation is neuroprotective in the A53T α-synuclein Parkinson's disease rat model.

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    Musacchio, Thomas; Rebenstorff, Maike; Fluri, Felix; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Volkmann, Jens; Koprich, James B; Ip, Chi Wang

    2017-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a highly effective symptomatic therapy for motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). An additional, disease-modifying effect has been suspected from studies in toxin-based PD animal models, but these models do not reflect the molecular pathology and progressive nature of PD that would be required to evaluate a disease-modifying action. Defining a disease-modifying effect could radically change the way in which DBS is used in PD. We applied STN-DBS in an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 1/2-driven human mutated A53T α-synuclein (aSyn)-overexpressing PD rat model (AAV1/2-A53T-aSyn). Rats were injected unilaterally, in the substantia nigra (SN), with AAV1/2-A53T-aSyn or control vector. Three weeks later, after behavioral and nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficits had developed, rats underwent STN-DBS electrode implantation ipsilateral to the vector-injected SN. Stimulation lasted for 3 weeks. Control groups remained OFF stimulation. Animals were sacrificed at 6 weeks. Motor performance in the single pellet reaching task was impaired in the AAV1/2-A53T-aSyn-injected stim-OFF group, 6 weeks after AAV1/2-A53T-aSyn injection, compared to preoperative levels (-82%; p motor improvement was maintained when the stimulation was turned off and was accompanied by a higher number of tyrosine hydroxylase+ SN neurons (increase of ∼29%), compared to AAV1/2-A53T-aSyn stim-OFF rats (p < 0.05). Our data support the putative neuroprotective and disease-modifying effect of STN-DBS in a mechanistically relevant model of PD. Ann Neurol 2017;81:825-836. © 2017 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  8. A Swedish family with de novo alpha-synuclein A53T mutation: evidence for early cortical dysfunction

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    Puschmann, Andreas; Ross, Owen A; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2009-01-01

    A de novo alpha-synuclein A53T (p.Ala53 Th; c.209G > A) mutation has been identified in a Swedish family with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Two affected individuals had early-onset (before 31 and 40 years), severe levodopa-responsive PD with prominent dysphasia, dysarthria, and cog......A de novo alpha-synuclein A53T (p.Ala53 Th; c.209G > A) mutation has been identified in a Swedish family with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Two affected individuals had early-onset (before 31 and 40 years), severe levodopa-responsive PD with prominent dysphasia, dysarthria...

  9. Neuronal expression of familial Parkinson's disease A53T α-synuclein causes early motor impairment, reduced anxiety and potential sleep disturbances in mice.

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    Rothman, Sarah M; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Vranis, Neil; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cong, Wei-na; Cadet, Jean-Lud; Haran, Jamie; Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the human α-synuclein gene lead to early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD); however, phenotypes of α-synuclein mutant mice vary depending upon the promoter driving transgene expression. The goal of this study was to characterize behavior and neurochemical alterations in mice expressing mutant (A53T) human α-synuclein, controlled by a neuron-specific Thy-1 promoter. Our data provide important additional phenotypic and biochemical characterization of a previously generated model of PD. A53T (SNCA) and wild type (WT) littermate mice were evaluated for motor function (rotarod and stride length) and anxiety (elevated plus maze and open field) every 2 weeks. At 24 weeks mice were evaluated in a Comprehensive Lab Animal Monitoring System (CLAMS). A separate cohort of mice were euthanized at 12, 24 and 36 weeks for immunoblot analysis of α-synuclein, dopamine transporter (DAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the striatum, and hypothalamic serotonin and metabolites were measured. SNCA mice display significant motor deficits at 14-18 weeks of age compared to WT mice, which progress over time. CLAMS analysis revealed an increase in activity during the dark phase and a reduction in overall estimated sleep time for SNCA mice compared to WT consistent with clinical reports of sleep abnormalities in PD. A transient change in the levels of DAT appeared at 12 weeks in the striatum and serotonin levels were also altered in the hypothalamus at this time point. This PD model displays consistent and clinically relevant motor and sleep phenotypes. Anxiety phenotypes are consistent with other α-synuclein based PD models yet incongruous with typical clinical symptoms. Early increases in serotonin levels potentially explain reductions in anxiety behaviors and sleep.

  10. Alpha-synuclein A53T mutation is not frequent on a sample of Brazilian Parkinson’s disease patients

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    Gabriela S. Longo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD involves both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors, with focus on the mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA.Objective To analyse the polymorphism SNCA-A53T in patients with familial PD (FPD and sporadic PD (SPD.Method A total of 294 individuals were studied, regardless of sex and with mixed ethnicity. The study group with 154 patients with PD, and the control group included 140 individuals without PD. The genotyping of SNCA-A53T was performed by PCR/RFLP. Significance level was p < 0.05.Results Among all patients, 37 (24% had FPD and 117 (75.9% had SPD. The absence of SNCA-A53T mutation was observed in all individuals.Conclusion SPD is notably observed in patients. However, the SNCA-A53T mutation was absent in all individuals, which does not differ controls from patients. This fact should be confirmed in a Brazilian study case with a more numerous and older population.

  11. Behavioral characterization of A53T mice reveals early and late stage deficits related to Parkinson's disease.

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    Katrina L Paumier

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD pathology is characterized by the formation of intra-neuronal inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are comprised of alpha-synuclein (α-syn. Duplication, triplication or genetic mutations in α-syn (A53T, A30P and E46K are linked to autosomal dominant PD; thus implicating its role in the pathogenesis of PD. In both PD patients and mouse models, there is increasing evidence that neuronal dysfunction occurs before the accumulation of protein aggregates (i.e., α-syn and neurodegeneration. Characterization of the timing and nature of symptomatic dysfunction is important for understanding the impact of α-syn on disease progression. Furthermore, this knowledge is essential for identifying pathways and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. To this end, we examined various functional and morphological endpoints in the transgenic mouse model expressing the human A53T α-syn variant directed by the mouse prion promoter at specific ages relating to disease progression (2, 6 and 12 months of age. Our findings indicate A53T mice develop fine, sensorimotor, and synaptic deficits before the onset of age-related gross motor and cognitive dysfunction. Results from open field and rotarod tests show A53T mice develop age-dependent changes in locomotor activity and reduced anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, digigait analysis shows these mice develop an abnormal gait by 12 months of age. A53T mice also exhibit spatial memory deficits at 6 and 12 months, as demonstrated by Y-maze performance. In contrast to gross motor and cognitive changes, A53T mice display significant impairments in fine- and sensorimotor tasks such as grooming, nest building and acoustic startle as early as 1-2 months of age. These mice also show significant abnormalities in basal synaptic transmission, paired-pulse facilitation and long-term depression (LTD. Combined, these data indicate the A53T model exhibits early- and late-onset behavioral and synaptic

  12. Behavioral characterization of A53T mice reveals early and late stage deficits related to Parkinson's disease.

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    Paumier, Katrina L; Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J; Berger, Zdenek; Chen, Yi; Gonzales, Cathleen; Kaftan, Edward; Li, Li; Lotarski, Susan; Monaghan, Michael; Shen, Wei; Stolyar, Polina; Vasilyev, Dmytro; Zaleska, Margaret; D Hirst, Warren; Dunlop, John

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology is characterized by the formation of intra-neuronal inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are comprised of alpha-synuclein (α-syn). Duplication, triplication or genetic mutations in α-syn (A53T, A30P and E46K) are linked to autosomal dominant PD; thus implicating its role in the pathogenesis of PD. In both PD patients and mouse models, there is increasing evidence that neuronal dysfunction occurs before the accumulation of protein aggregates (i.e., α-syn) and neurodegeneration. Characterization of the timing and nature of symptomatic dysfunction is important for understanding the impact of α-syn on disease progression. Furthermore, this knowledge is essential for identifying pathways and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. To this end, we examined various functional and morphological endpoints in the transgenic mouse model expressing the human A53T α-syn variant directed by the mouse prion promoter at specific ages relating to disease progression (2, 6 and 12 months of age). Our findings indicate A53T mice develop fine, sensorimotor, and synaptic deficits before the onset of age-related gross motor and cognitive dysfunction. Results from open field and rotarod tests show A53T mice develop age-dependent changes in locomotor activity and reduced anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, digigait analysis shows these mice develop an abnormal gait by 12 months of age. A53T mice also exhibit spatial memory deficits at 6 and 12 months, as demonstrated by Y-maze performance. In contrast to gross motor and cognitive changes, A53T mice display significant impairments in fine- and sensorimotor tasks such as grooming, nest building and acoustic startle as early as 1-2 months of age. These mice also show significant abnormalities in basal synaptic transmission, paired-pulse facilitation and long-term depression (LTD). Combined, these data indicate the A53T model exhibits early- and late-onset behavioral and synaptic impairments

  13. Behavioral Characterization of A53T Mice Reveals Early and Late Stage Deficits Related to Parkinson’s Disease

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    Paumier, Katrina L.; Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J.; Berger, Zdenek; Chen, Yi; Gonzales, Cathleen; Kaftan, Edward; Li, Li; Lotarski, Susan; Monaghan, Michael; Shen, Wei; Stolyar, Polina; Vasilyev, Dmytro; Zaleska, Margaret; D. Hirst, Warren; Dunlop, John

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology is characterized by the formation of intra-neuronal inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are comprised of alpha-synuclein (α-syn). Duplication, triplication or genetic mutations in α-syn (A53T, A30P and E46K) are linked to autosomal dominant PD; thus implicating its role in the pathogenesis of PD. In both PD patients and mouse models, there is increasing evidence that neuronal dysfunction occurs before the accumulation of protein aggregates (i.e., α-syn) and neurodegeneration. Characterization of the timing and nature of symptomatic dysfunction is important for understanding the impact of α-syn on disease progression. Furthermore, this knowledge is essential for identifying pathways and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. To this end, we examined various functional and morphological endpoints in the transgenic mouse model expressing the human A53T α-syn variant directed by the mouse prion promoter at specific ages relating to disease progression (2, 6 and 12 months of age). Our findings indicate A53T mice develop fine, sensorimotor, and synaptic deficits before the onset of age-related gross motor and cognitive dysfunction. Results from open field and rotarod tests show A53T mice develop age-dependent changes in locomotor activity and reduced anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, digigait analysis shows these mice develop an abnormal gait by 12 months of age. A53T mice also exhibit spatial memory deficits at 6 and 12 months, as demonstrated by Y-maze performance. In contrast to gross motor and cognitive changes, A53T mice display significant impairments in fine- and sensorimotor tasks such as grooming, nest building and acoustic startle as early as 1–2 months of age. These mice also show significant abnormalities in basal synaptic transmission, paired-pulse facilitation and long-term depression (LTD). Combined, these data indicate the A53T model exhibits early- and late-onset behavioral and synaptic impairments

  14. FTY720/Fingolimod Reduces Synucleinopathy and Improves Gut Motility in A53T Mice: CONTRIBUTIONS OF PRO-BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (PRO-BDNF) AND MATURE BDNF.

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    Vidal-Martínez, Guadalupe; Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Gil-Tommee, Carolina; Medina, David; Garza, Nathan T; Yang, Barbara; Segura-Ulate, Ismael; Dominguez, Samantha J; Perez, Ruth G

    2016-09-23

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often have aggregated α-synuclein (aSyn) in enteric nervous system (ENS) neurons, which may be associated with the development of constipation. This occurs well before the onset of classic PD motor symptoms. We previously found that aging A53T transgenic (Tg) mice closely model PD-like ENS aSyn pathology, making them appropriate for testing potential PD therapies. Here we show that Tg mice overexpressing mutant human aSyn develop ENS pathology by 4 months. We then evaluated the responses of Tg mice and their WT littermates to the Food and Drug Administration-approved drug FTY720 (fingolimod, Gilenya) or vehicle control solution from 5 months of age. Long term oral FTY720 in Tg mice reduced ENS aSyn aggregation and constipation, enhanced gut motility, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but produced no significant change in WT littermates. A role for BDNF was directly assessed in a cohort of young A53T mice given vehicle, FTY720, the Trk-B receptor inhibitor ANA-12, or FTY720 + ANA-12 from 1 to 4 months of age. ANA-12-treated Tg mice developed more gut aSyn aggregation as well as constipation, whereas FTY720-treated Tg mice had reduced aSyn aggregation and less constipation, occurring in part by increasing both pro-BDNF and mature BDNF levels. The data from young and old Tg mice revealed FTY720-associated neuroprotection and reduced aSyn pathology, suggesting that FTY720 may also benefit PD patients and others with synucleinopathy. Another finding was a loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in gut neurons with aggregated aSyn, comparable with our prior findings in the CNS. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Methyl-Arginine Profile of Brain from Aged PINK1-KO+A53T-SNCA Mice Suggests Altered Mitochondrial Biogenesis

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    Georg Auburger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Parkinson’s disease can be triggered by an autosomal dominant overdose of alpha-Synuclein (SNCA or the autosomal recessive deficiency of PINK1. We recently showed that the combination of PINK1-knockout with overexpression of A53T-SNCA in double mutant (DM mice potentiates phenotypes and reduces survival. Now we studied brain hemispheres of DM mice at age of 18 months in a hypothesis-free approach, employing a quantitative label-free global proteomic mass spectrometry scan of posttranslational modifications focusing on methyl-arginine. The strongest effects were documented for the adhesion modulator CMAS, the mRNA decapping/deadenylation factor PATL1, and the synaptic plasticity mediator CRTC1/TORC1. In addition, an intriguing effect was observed for the splicing factor PSF/SFPQ, known to interact with the dopaminergic differentiation factor NURR1 as well as with DJ-1, the protein responsible for the autosomal recessive PARK7 variant of PD. CRTC1, PSF, and DJ-1 are modulators of PGC1alpha and of mitochondrial biogenesis. This pathway was further stressed by dysregulations of oxygen sensor EGLN3 and of nuclear TMPO. PSF and TMPO cooperate with dopaminergic differentiation factors LMX1B and NURR1. Further dysregulations concerned PRR18, TRIO, HNRNPA1, DMWD, WAVE1, ILDR2, DBNDD1, and NFM. Thus, we report selective novel endogenous stress responses in brain, which highlight early dysregulations of mitochondrial homeostasis and midbrain vulnerability.

  16. A Swedish family with de novo α-synuclein A53T mutation: Evidence for early cortical dysfunction

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    Puschmann, Andreas; Ross, Owen A.; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Lincoln, Sarah J.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Cobb, Stephanie A.; Lindquist, Suzanne G.; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Farrer, Matthew; Widner, Håkan; van Westen, Danielle; Hägerström, Douglas; Markopoulou, Katerina; Chase, Bruce A.; Nilsson, Karin; Reimer, Jan; Nilsson, Christer

    2009-01-01

    A de novo α-synuclein A53T (p.Ala53Thr; c.209G>A) mutation has been identified in a Swedish family with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Two affected individuals had early-onset (before 31 and 40 years), severe levodopa-responsive PD with prominent dysphasia, dysarthria, and cognitive decline. Longitudinal clinical follow-up, EEG, SPECT and CSF biomarker examinations suggested an underlying encephalopathy with cortical involvement. The mutated allele (c.209A) was present within a haplotype different from that shared among mutation carriers in the Italian (Contursi) and the Greek-American Family H kindreds. One unaffected family member carried the mutation haplotype without the c.209A mutation, strongly suggesting its de novo occurrence within this family. Furthermore, a novel mutation c.488G>A (p.Arg163His; R163H) in the presenilin-2 (PSEN2) gene was detected, but was not associated with disease state. PMID:19632874

  17. The different faces of the p. A53T alpha-synuclein mutation: A screening of Greek patients with parkinsonism and/or dementia.

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    Breza, Marianthi; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Potagas, Constantin; Kartanou, Chrisoula; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Paraskevas, George P; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Stefanis, Leonidas; Panas, Marios

    2017-12-09

    The p. A53T mutation in the alpha-synuclein (SNCA) gene is a rare cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Although generally rare, it is particularly common in the Greek population due to a founder effect. A53T-positive PD patients often develop dementia during disease course and may very rarely present with dementia. We screened for the p. A53T SNCA mutation a total of 347 cases of Greek origin with parkinsonism and/or dementia, collected over 15 years at the Neurogenetics Unit, Eginition Hospital, University of Athens. Cases were classified into: "pure parkinsonism", "pure dementia" and "parkinsonism plus dementia". In total, 4 p. A53T SNCA mutation carriers were identified. All had autosomal dominant family history and early onset. Screening of the "pure parkinsonism" category revealed 2 cases with typical PD. The other two mutation carriers were identified in the "parkinsonism plus dementia" category. One had a diagnosis of PD dementia and the other of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Screening of patients with "pure dementia" failed to identify any further A53T-positive cases. Our results confirm that the p. A53T SNCA mutation is relatively common in Greek patients with PD or PD plus dementia, particularly in cases with early onset and/or autosomal dominant family history. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced oligomerization of the alpha-synuclein mutant by the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and hydrogen peroxide system.

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    Kang, Jung Hoon; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2003-02-28

    The alpha-synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies that are found in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Also, two point mutations in this protein, A53T and A30P, are associated with rare familial forms of the disease. We investigated whether there are differences in the Cu,Zn-SOD and hydrogen peroxide system mediated-protein modification between the wild-type and mutant alpha-synucleins. When alpha-synuclein was incubated with both Cu,Zn-SOD and H2O2, then the amount of A53T mutant oligomerization increased relative to that of the wild-type protein. This process was inhibited by radical scavenger, spin-trapping agent, and copper chelator. These results suggest that the oligomerization of alpha-synuclein is mediated by the generation of the hydroxyl radical through the metal-catalyzed reaction. The dityrosine formation of the A53T mutant protein was enhanced relative to that of the wild-type protein. Antioxidant molecules, carnosine, and anserine effectively inhibited the wild-type and mutant proteins' oligomerization. Therefore, these compounds may be explored as potential therapeutic agents for PD patients. The present experiments, in part, may provide an explanation for the association between PD and the alpha-synuclein mutant.

  19. Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of mutant forms of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase.

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    Azzariti, A; Vacca, R A; Giannattasio, S; Merafina, R S; Marra, E; Doonan, S

    1998-07-28

    Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of the precursor form of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, the mature form lacking 9 amino acids from the N-terminus, and forms of the mature protein in which cysteine-166 had been mutated to serine or alanine were compared with those of the mature enzyme. The precursor and the cysteine mutants showed moderately impaired catalytic properties consistent with decreased ability to undergo transition from the open to the closed conformation which is an integral part of the mechanism of action of the enzyme. The deletion mutant had a kcat only 2% of that of the mature enzyme but also much reduced Km values for both substrates. In addition it showed enhanced reactivity of cysteine-166 with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate), which is characteristic of the closed form of the enzyme, with no enhancement of reactivity in the presence of substrates. This is taken to show that the deletion mutant adopts a conformation that is significantly different from that of the mature enzyme particularly in respect of the small domain. The deletion mutant was found to be more resistant to thermal inactivation over a range of temperatures than were the other forms of the enzyme consistent with its having a more tightly packed small domain.

  20. A53T Human α-Synuclein Overexpression in Transgenic Mice Induces Pervasive Mitochondria Macroautophagy Defects Preceding Dopamine Neuron Degeneration

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    Xie, Zhiguo; Turkson, Susie

    2015-01-01

    In vitro evidence suggests that the inefficient removal of damaged mitochondria by macroautophagy contributes to Parkinson's disease (PD). Using a tissue-specific gene amplification strategy, we generated a transgenic mouse line with human α-synuclein A53T overexpression specifically in dopamine (DA) neurons. Transgenic mice showed profound early-onset mitochondria abnormalities, characterized by macroautophagy marker-positive cytoplasmic inclusions containing mainly mitochondrial remnants, which preceded the degeneration of DA neurons. Genetic deletion of either parkin or PINK1 in these transgenic mice significantly worsened mitochondrial pathologies, including drastically enlarged inclusions and loss of total mitochondria contents. These data suggest that mitochondria are the main targets of α-synuclein and their defective autophagic clearance plays a significant role during pathogenesis. Moreover, endogenous PINK1 or parkin is indispensable for the proper autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria. Our data for the first time establish an essential link between mitochondria macroautophagy impairments and DA neuron degeneration in an in vivo model based on known PD genetics. The model, its well-defined pathologies, and the demonstration of a main pathogenesis pathway in the present study have set the stage and direction of emphasis for future studies. PMID:25609609

  1. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation is neuroprotective in the A53T α‐synuclein Parkinson's disease rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, Thomas; Rebenstorff, Maike; Fluri, Felix; Brotchie, Jonathan M.; Volkmann, Jens; Koprich, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a highly effective symptomatic therapy for motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). An additional, disease‐modifying effect has been suspected from studies in toxin‐based PD animal models, but these models do not reflect the molecular pathology and progressive nature of PD that would be required to evaluate a disease‐modifying action. Defining a disease‐modifying effect could radically change the way in which DBS is used in PD. Methods We applied STN‐DBS in an adeno‐associated virus (AAV) 1/2‐driven human mutated A53T α‐synuclein (aSyn)‐overexpressing PD rat model (AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn). Rats were injected unilaterally, in the substantia nigra (SN), with AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn or control vector. Three weeks later, after behavioral and nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficits had developed, rats underwent STN‐DBS electrode implantation ipsilateral to the vector‐injected SN. Stimulation lasted for 3 weeks. Control groups remained OFF stimulation. Animals were sacrificed at 6 weeks. Results Motor performance in the single pellet reaching task was impaired in the AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn–injected stim‐OFF group, 6 weeks after AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn injection, compared to preoperative levels (–82%; p AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn, stim‐ON rats after 3 weeks of active stimulation, compared to the AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn stim‐OFF rats (an increase of ∼400%; p neurons (increase of ∼29%), compared to AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn stim‐OFF rats (p < 0.05). Interpretation Our data support the putative neuroprotective and disease‐modifying effect of STN‐DBS in a mechanistically relevant model of PD. Ann Neurol 2017;81:825–836 PMID:28470693

  2. Human GLTP and mutant forms of ACD11 suppress cell death in the Arabidopsis acd11 mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; McKinney, Lea V; Pike, Helen

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis acd11 mutant exhibits runaway, programmed cell death due to the loss of a putative sphingosine transfer protein (ACD11) with homology to mammalian GLTP. We demonstrate that transgenic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of human GLTP partially suppressed the phenotype of the acd11...

  3. Construction of histidine-tagged yeast mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase for facile purification of mutant forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Brigitte; Maréchal, Amandine; Rich, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    Yeast CcO (cytochrome c oxidase) has been developed as a facile system for the production and analysis of mutants of a mitochondrial form of CcO for mechanistic studies. First, a 6H tag (His6 tag) was fused to the C-terminus of a nuclear-encoded subunit of CcO from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This allowed efficient purification of a WT (wild-type) mitochondrial CcO, 6H-WT (yeast CcO with a 6H tag on the nuclear-encoded Cox13 subunit), with a recovery yield of 45%. Its catalytic-centre activity [≈180 e·s(-1) (electrons per s)], UV-visible signatures of oxidized and reduced states and ability to form the P(M) ['peroxy' (but actually a ferryl/radical state)] and F (ferryl) intermediates confirm normal functioning of the histidine-tagged protein. Point mutations were introduced into subunit I of the 6H-WT strain. All mutants were screened for their ability to assemble CcO and grow on respiratory substrate. One such mutant [6H-E243DI (the 6H-WT strain with an additional mutation of E243D in mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunit I)] was purified and showed ~50% of the 6H-WT catalytic-centre activity, consistent with the effects of the equivalent mutation in bacterial oxidases. Mutations in both the D and the H channels affect respiratory growth and these effects are discussed in terms of their putative roles in CcO mechanism.

  4. Xenopus mutant reveals necessity of rax for specifying the eye field which otherwise forms tissue with telencephalic and diencephalic character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marilyn; Hirsch, Nicolas; Cox, Amanda; Reeder, Rollin; Carruthers, Samantha; Hall, Amanda; Stemple, Derek L.; Grainger, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The retinal anterior homeobox (rax) gene encodes a transcription factor necessary for vertebrate eye development. rax transcription is initiated at the end of gastrulation in Xenopus, and is a key part of the regulatory network specifying anterior neural plate and retina. We describe here a Xenopus tropicalis rax mutant, the first mutant analyzed in detail from a reverse genetic screen. As in other vertebrates, this nonsense mutation results in eyeless animals, and is lethal peri-metamorphosis. Tissue normally fated to form retina in these mutants instead forms tissue with characteristics of diencephalon and telencephalon. This implies that a key role of rax, in addition to defining the eye field, is in preventing alternative forebrain identities. Our data highlight that brain and retina regions are not determined by the mid-gastrula stage but are by the neural plate stage. An RNA-Seq analysis and in situ hybridization assays for early gene expression in the mutant revealed that several key eye field transcription factors (e.g. pax6, lhx2 and six6) are not dependent on rax activity through neurulation. However, these analyses identified other genes either up- or down-regulated in mutant presumptive retinal tissue. Two neural patterning genes of particular interest that appear up-regulated in the rax mutant RNA-seq analysis are hesx1 and fezf2. These genes were not previously known to be regulated by rax. The normal function of rax is to partially repress their expression by an indirect mechanism in the presumptive retina region in wildtype embryos, thus accounting for the apparent up-regulation in the rax mutant. Knock-down experiments using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against hesx1 and fezf2 show that failure to repress these two genes contributes to transformation of presumptive retinal tissue into non-retinal forebrain identities in the rax mutant. PMID:25224223

  5. AAV1/2-induced overexpression of A53T-?-synuclein in the substantia nigra results in degeneration of the nigrostriatal system with Lewy-like pathology and motor impairment: a new mouse model for Parkinson?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ip, Chi Wang; Klaus, Laura-Christin; Karikari, Akua A.; Visanji, Naomi P; Brotchie, Jonathan M.; Lang, Anthony E.; Volkmann, Jens; Koprich, James B.

    2017-01-01

    ?-Synuclein is a protein implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson?s disease (PD). AAV1/2-driven overexpression of human mutated A53T-?-synuclein in rat and monkey substantia nigra (SN) induces degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons and decreases striatal dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Given certain advantages of the mouse, especially it being amendable to genetic manipulation, translating the AAV1/2-A53T ?-synuclein model to mice would be of significant value. AAV1/2-A53T...

  6. Structure and development of somatic embryos formed in Arabidopsis thaliana pt mutant callus cultures derived from seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recklinghausen, von I.R.; Iwanowska, A.; Kieft, H.; Mordhorst, A.P.; Schel, J.H.N.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Seeds of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant primordia timing (pt) were germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid- containing liquid medium. The seedlings formed somatic embryos and nonembryogenic and embryogenic callus in vitro in a time period of approximately two to three weeks. Embryogenesis and

  7. Trapping of normal EB1 ligands in aggresomes formed by an EB1 deletion mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askham Jon M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EB1 is a microtubule tip-associated protein that interacts with the APC tumour suppressor protein and the p150glued subunit of dynactin. We previously reported that an EB1 deletion mutant that retains both of these interactions but does not directly associate with microtubules (EB1-ΔN2-GFP spontaneously formed perinuclear aggregates when expressed in COS-7 cells. Results In the present study live imaging indicated that EB1-ΔN2-GFP aggregates underwent dynamic microtubule-dependent changes in morphology and appeared to be internally cohesive. EB1-ΔN2-GFP aggregates were phase-dense structures that displayed microtubule-dependent accumulation around the centrosome, were immunoreactive for both the 20s subunit of the proteasome and ubiquitin, and induced the collapse of the vimentin cytoskeleton. Fractionation studies revealed that a proportion of EB1-ΔN2-GFP was detergent-insoluble and ubiquitylated, indicating that EB1-ΔN2-GFP aggregates are aggresomes. Immunostaining also revealed that APC and p150glued were present in EB1-ΔN2-GFP aggregates, whereas EB3 was not. Furthermore, evidence for p150glued degradation was found in the insoluble fraction of EB1-ΔN2-GFP transfected cultures. Conclusion Our data indicate that aggresomes can be internally cohesive and may not represent a simple "aggregate of aggregates" assembled around the centrosome. Our observations also indicate that a partially misfolded protein may retain the ability to interact with its normal physiological ligands, leading to their co-assembly into aggresomes. This supports the idea that the trapping and degradation of co-aggregated proteins might contribute to human pathologies characterised by aggresome formation.

  8. Allergenic Characterization of New Mutant Forms of Pru p 3 as New Immunotherapy Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gómez-Casado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, treatment of food allergy only considered the avoidance of the specific food. However, the possibility of cross-reactivity makes this practice not very effective. Immunotherapy may exhibit as a good alternative to food allergy treatment. The use of hypoallergenic molecules with reduced IgE binding capacity but with ability to stimulate the immune system is a promising tool which could be developed for immunotherapy. In this study, three mutants of Pru p 3, the principal allergen of peach, were produced based on the described mimotope and T cell epitopes, by changing the specific residues to alanine, named as Pru p 3.01, Pru p 3.02, and Pru p 3.03. Pru p 3.01 showed very similar allergenic activity as the wild type by in vitro assays. However, Pru p 3.02 and Pru p 3.03 presented reduced IgE binding with respect to the native form, by in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo assays. In addition, Pru p 3.03 had affected the IgG4 binding capacity and presented a random circular dichroism, which was reflected in the nonrecognition by specific antibodies anti-Pru p 3. Nevertheless, both Pru p 3.02 and Pru p 3.03 maintained the binding to IgG1 and their ability to activate T lymphocytes. Thus, Pru p 3.02 and Pru p 3.03 could be good candidates for potential immunotherapy in peach-allergic patients.

  9. Repressor mutant forms of the Azospirillum brasilense NtrC protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, Luciano F; Assumpção, Marcelo C; Souza, Emanuel M; Steffens, M Berenice R; Yates, M Geoffrey; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O

    2004-10-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense mutant strains FP8 and FP9, after treatment with nitrosoguanidine, showed a null Nif phenotype and were unable to use nitrate as their sole nitrogen source. Sequencing of the ntrC genes revealed single nucleotide mutations in the NtrC nucleotide-binding site. The phenotypes of these strains are discussed in relation to their genotypes.

  10. ALS-causing profilin-1-mutant forms a non-native helical structure in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Liangzhong; Kang, Jian; Song, Jianxing

    2017-11-01

    Despite having physiological functions completely different from superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), profilin 1 (PFN1) also carries mutations causing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with a striking similarity to that triggered by SOD1 mutants. Very recently, the C71G-PFN1 has been demonstrated to cause ALS by a gain of toxicity and the acceleration of motor neuron degeneration preceded the accumulation of its aggregates. Here by atomic-resolution NMR determination of conformations and dynamics of WT-PFN1 and C71G-PFN1 in aqueous buffers and in membrane mimetics DMPC/DHPC bicelle and DPC micelle, we deciphered that: 1) the thermodynamic destabilization by C71G transforms PFN1 into coexistence with the unfolded state, which is lacking of any stable tertiary/secondary structures as well as restricted ps-ns backbone motions, thus fundamentally indistinguishable from ALS-causing SOD1 mutants. 2) Most strikingly, while WT-PFN1 only weakly interacts with DMPC/DHPC bicelle without altering the native structure, C71G-PFN1 acquires abnormal capacity in strongly interacting with DMPC/DHPC bicelle and DPC micelle, energetically driven by transforming the highly disordered unfolded state into a non-native helical structure, similar to what has been previously observed on ALS-causing SOD1 mutants. Our results imply that one potential mechanism for C71G-PFN1 to initiate ALS might be the abnormal interaction with membranes as recently established for SOD1 mutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. AAV1/2-induced overexpression of A53T-α-synuclein in the substantia nigra results in degeneration of the nigrostriatal system with Lewy-like pathology and motor impairment: a new mouse model for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Chi Wang; Klaus, Laura-Christin; Karikari, Akua A; Visanji, Naomi P; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Lang, Anthony E; Volkmann, Jens; Koprich, James B

    2017-02-01

    α-Synuclein is a protein implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). AAV1/2-driven overexpression of human mutated A53T-α-synuclein in rat and monkey substantia nigra (SN) induces degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons and decreases striatal dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Given certain advantages of the mouse, especially it being amendable to genetic manipulation, translating the AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein model to mice would be of significant value. AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein or AAV1/2 empty vector (EV) at a concentration of 5.16 x 1012 gp/ml were unilaterally injected into the right SN of male adult C57BL/6 mice. Post-mortem examinations included immunohistochemistry to analyze nigral α-synuclein, Ser129 phosphorylated α-synuclein and TH expression, striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) levels by autoradiography and dopamine levels by high performance liquid chromatography. At 10 weeks, in AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein mice there was a 33% reduction in TH+ dopaminergic nigral neurons (P AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein injected mice had widespread nigral and striatal expression of vector-delivered A53T-α-synuclein. Concurrent staining with human PD SN samples using gold standard histological methodology for Lewy pathology detection by proteinase K digestion and application of specific antibody raised against human Lewy body α-synuclein (LB509) and Ser129 phosphorylated α-synuclein (81A) revealed insoluble α-synuclein aggregates in AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein mice resembling Lewy-like neurites and bodies. In the cylinder test, we observed significant paw use asymmetry in the AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein group when compared to EV controls at 5 and 9 weeks post injection (P AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein into the mouse SN leads to persistent motor deficits, neurodegeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system and development of Lewy-like pathology, thereby reflecting clinical and pathological hallmarks of human PD.

  12. NMR studies of differences in the conformations and dynamics of ligand complexes formed with mutant dihydrofolate reductases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdsall, B.; Andrews, J.; Ostler, G.; Tendler, S.J.B.; Feeney, J.; Roberts, G.C.K.; Davies, R.W.; Cheung, H.T.A. (National Institute for Medical Research, London (England))

    1989-02-07

    Two mutants of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase, Trp 21 {yields} Leu and Asp 26 {yields} Glu, have been prepared by using site-directed mutagenesis methods, and their ligand binding and structural properties have been compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 31}P NMR studies have been carried out to characterize the structural changes in the complexes of the mutant and wild-type enzymes. Replacement of the conserved Trp 21 by a Leu residue causes a decrease in activity of the enzyme and reduces the NADPH binding constant by a factor of 400. The binding of substrates and substrate analogues is only slightly affected. {sup 1}H NMR studies of the Trp 21 {yields} Leu enzyme complexes have confirmed the original resonance assignments for Trp 21. In complexes formed with methotrexate and the mutant enzyme, the results indicate some small changes in conformation occurring as much as 14 {angstrom} away from the site of substitution. For the enzyme-NADPH complexes, the chemical shifts of nuclei in the bound coenzyme indicate that the nicotinamide ring binds differently in complexes with the mutant and the wild-type enzyme. There are complexes where the wild-type enzyme has been shown to exist in solution as a mixture of conformations, and studies on the corresponding complexes with the Trp 21 {yields} Leu mutant indicate that the delicately poised equilibria can be perturbed. Some conformational adjustments are required to allow the carboxylate of Glu 26 to bind effectively to the N1 proton of inhibitors such as methotrexate and trimethoprim.

  13. Use of protease sensitivity to probe the conformations of newly synthesised mutant forms of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzariti, A; Giannattasio, S; Doonan, S; Merafina, R S; Marra, E; Quagliariello, E

    1995-10-24

    Sensitivity to digestion with pronase has been used to show that the precursor form of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, the form lacking the N-terminal presequence, that with a deletion of the first 9 residues and mutants of the mature enzyme in which residue Cys-166 is mutated to alanine or serine, all retain unfolded conformations after synthesis in a reticulocyte lysate. In the presence of lysed mitochondria the various forms of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase retained their susceptibilities to pronase in a way that mirrored the efficiencies with which they are imported into intact mitochondria. The results are interpreted as showing that the presequence of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase is not uniquely required for interaction with cytosolic factors required to maintain the newly synthesised protein in a form competent for interacting with, and being imported into, mitochondria.

  14. A Nonoligomerizing Mutant Form of Helicobacter pylori VacA Allows Structural Analysis of the p33 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivera, Christian; Campbell, Anne M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Pyburn, Tasia M; Foegeding, Nora J; Barke, Theresa L; Spiller, Benjamin W; McClain, Mark S; Ohi, Melanie D; Lacy, D Borden; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori secretes a pore-forming VacA toxin that has structural features and activities substantially different from those of other known bacterial toxins. VacA can assemble into multiple types of water-soluble flower-shaped oligomeric structures, and most VacA activities are dependent on its capacity to oligomerize. The 88-kDa secreted VacA protein can undergo limited proteolysis to yield two domains, designated p33 and p55. The p33 domain is required for membrane channel formation and intracellular toxic activities, and the p55 domain has an important role in mediating VacA binding to cells. Previous studies showed that the p55 domain has a predominantly β-helical structure, but no structural data are available for the p33 domain. We report here the purification and analysis of a nonoligomerizing mutant form of VacA secreted by H. pylori The nonoligomerizing 88-kDa mutant protein retains the capacity to enter host cells but lacks detectable toxic activity. Analysis of crystals formed by the monomeric protein reveals that the β-helical structure of the p55 domain extends into the C-terminal portion of p33. Fitting the p88 structural model into an electron microscopy map of hexamers formed by wild-type VacA (predicted to be structurally similar to VacA membrane channels) reveals that p55 and the β-helical segment of p33 localize to peripheral arms but do not occupy the central region of the hexamers. We propose that the amino-terminal portion of p33 is unstructured when VacA is in a monomeric form and that it undergoes a conformational change during oligomer assembly. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Mutant α-Synuclein Overexpression Induces Stressless Pacemaking in Vagal Motoneurons at Risk in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Simchovitz, Alon; Chiu, Wei-Hua; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Sharon, Ronit; Soreq, Hermona; Roeper, Jochen; Goldberg, Joshua A

    2017-01-04

    α-Synuclein overexpression (ASOX) drives the formation of toxic aggregates in neurons vulnerable in Parkinson's disease (PD), including dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). Just as these populations differ in when they exhibit α-synucleinopathies during PD pathogenesis, they could also differ in their physiological responses to ASOX. An ASOX-mediated hyperactivity of SN dopamine neurons, which was caused by oxidative dysfunction of Kv4.3 potassium channels, was recently identified in transgenic (A53T-SNCA) mice overexpressing mutated human α-synuclein. Noting that DMV neurons display extensive α-synucleinopathies earlier than SN dopamine neurons while exhibiting milder cell loss in PD, we aimed to define the electrophysiological properties of DMV neurons in A53T-SNCA mice. We found that DMV neurons maintain normal firing rates in response to ASOX. Moreover, Kv4.3 channels in DMV neurons exhibit no oxidative dysfunction in the A53T-SNCA mice, which could only be recapitulated in wild-type mice by glutathione dialysis. Two-photon imaging of redox-sensitive GFP corroborated the finding that mitochondrial oxidative stress was diminished in DMV neurons in the A53T-SNCA mice. This reduction in oxidative stress resulted from a transcriptional downregulation of voltage-activated (Cav) calcium channels in DMV neurons, which led to a reduction in activity-dependent calcium influx via Cav channels. Thus, ASOX induces a homeostatic remodeling with improved redox signaling in DMV neurons, which could explain the differential vulnerability of SN dopamine and DMV neurons in PD and could promote neuroprotective strategies that emulate endogenous homeostatic responses to ASOX (e.g., stressless pacemaking) in DMV neurons. Overexpression of mutant α-synuclein causes Parkinson's disease, presumably by driving neurodegeneration in vulnerable neuronal target populations. However, the extent of

  16. Molecular Dynamics Approach in the Comparison of Wild-Type and Mutant Paraoxonase-1 Apoenzyme Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khadija; Miri, Lamia; Naimi, Adil; Saile, Rachid; El Kharrim, Abderrahmane; Mikou, Afaf; Kettani, Anass

    2015-01-01

    There is some evidence linking the mammalian paraoxonase-1 (PON1) loops (L1 and L2) to an increased flexibility and reactivity of its active site with potential substrates. The aim of this work is to study the structural, dynamical, and functional effects of the most flexible regions close to the active site and to determine the impact of mutations on the protein. For both models, wild-type (PON1wild) and PON1 mutant (PON1mut) models, the L1 loop and Q/R and L/M mutations were constructed using MODELLER software. Molecular dynamics simulations of 20 ns at 300 K on fully modeled PON1wild and PON1mut apoenzyme have been done. Detailed analyses of the root-mean-square deviation and fluctuations, H-bonding pattern, and torsion angles have been performed. The PON1wild results were then compared with those obtained for the PON1mut. Our results show that the active site in the wild-type structure is characterized by two distinct movements of opened and closed conformations of the L1 and L2 loops. The alternating and repetitive movement of loops at specific times is consistent with the presence of 11 defined hydrogen bonds. In the PON1mut, these open-closed movements are therefore totally influenced and repressed by the Q/R and L/M mutations. In fact, these mutations seem to impact the PON1mut active site by directly reducing the catalytic core flexibility, while maintaining a significant mobility of the switch regions delineated by the loops surrounding the active site. The impact of the studied mutations on structure and dynamics proprieties of the protein may subsequently contribute to the loss of both flexibility and activity of the PON1 enzyme.

  17. Stepwise assembly of hyperaggregated forms of Drosophila zeste mutant protein suppresses white gene expression in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J D; Pirrotta, V

    1993-01-01

    The zeste gene is involved in two chromosome pairing-dependent phenomena: transvection and the suppression of white gene expression. Both require the ability of zeste protein to multimerize, dependent on three interlaced hydrophobic heptad repeats in the C-terminal domain. The first step is dimerization through a leucine zipper. Two other heptad repeats are then required to form higher multimers. The zeta(1) mutation, which causes the pairing-dependent suppression of white, creates a new hydr...

  18. Fragments of HdhQ150 mutant huntingtin form a soluble oligomer pool that declines with aggregate deposition upon aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Marcellin

    Full Text Available Cleavage of the full-length mutant huntingtin (mhtt protein into smaller, soluble aggregation-prone mhtt fragments appears to be a key process in the neuropathophysiology of Huntington's Disease (HD. Recent quantification studies using TR-FRET-based immunoassays showed decreasing levels of soluble mhtt correlating with an increased load of aggregated mhtt in the aging HdhQ150 mouse brain. To better characterize the nature of these changes at the level of native mhtt species, we developed a detection method that combines size exclusion chromatography (SEC and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET that allowed us to resolve and define the formation, aggregation and temporal dynamics of native soluble mhtt species and insoluble aggregates in the brain of the HdhQ150 knock-in mouse. We found that mhtt fragments and not full-length mhtt form oligomers in the brains of one month-old mice long before disease phenotypes and mhtt aggregate histopathology occur. As the HdhQ150 mice age, brain levels of soluble full-length mhtt protein remain similar. In contrast, the soluble oligomeric pool of mhtt fragments slightly increases during the first two months before it declines between 3 and 8 months of age. This decline inversely correlates with the formation of insoluble mhtt aggregates. We also found that the pool-size of soluble mhtt oligomers is similar in age-matched heterozygous and homozygous HdhQ150 mouse brains whereas insoluble aggregate formation is greatly accelerated in the homozygous mutant brain. The capacity of the soluble mhtt oligomer pool therefore seems exhausted already in the heterozygous state and likely kept constant by changes in flux and, as a consequence, increased rate of insoluble aggregate formation. We demonstrate that our novel findings in mice translate to human HD brain but not HD patient fibroblasts.

  19. Congenital cataract causing mutants of αA-crystallin/sHSP form aggregates and aggresomes degraded through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilangovan Raju

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations of human αA-crystallin cause congenital cataract by protein aggregation. How mutations of αA-crystallin cause disease pathogenesis through protein aggregation is not well understood. To better understand the cellular events leading to protein aggregation, we transfected cataract causing mutants, R12C, R21L, R21W, R49C, R54C, R116C and R116H, of human αA-crystallin in HeLa cells and examined the formation of intracellular protein aggregates and aggresomes by confocal microscopy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: YFP-tagged human αA-wild-type (αA-wt was sub-cloned and the mutants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. The αA-wt and the mutants were individually transfected or co-transfected with CFP-tagged αA-wt or αB-wild-type (αB-wt in HeLa cells. Overexpression of these mutants forms multiple small dispersed cytoplasmic aggregates as well as aggresomes. Co-expression of αB-wt with these mutants significantly inhibited protein aggregates where as co-expression with αA-wt enhanced protein aggregates which seems to be due to co-aggregation of the mutants with αA-wt. Aggresomes were validated by double immunofluorescence by co-localization of γ-tubulin, a centrosome marker protein with αA-crystallin. Furthermore, increased ubiquitination was detected in R21W, R116C and R116H as assessed by western blot analyses. Immunostaining with an ubiquitin antibody revealed that ubiquitin inclusions in the perinuclear regions were evident only in R116C transfected cells. Pulse chase assay, after cycloheximide treatment, suggested that R116C degraded faster than the wild-type control. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mutants of αA-crystallin form aggregates and aggresomes. Co-expression of αA-wt with the mutants increased aggregates and co-expression of αB-wt with the mutants significantly decreased the aggregates. The mutant, R116C protein degraded faster than wild-type control and increased ubiquitination was evident in R

  20. Emergence of nontoxic mutants as revealed by single filament analysis in bloom-forming cyanobacteria of the genus Planktothrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qin; Christiansen, Guntram; Deng, Li; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2016-02-25

    Bloom-forming cyanobacteria cause toxic algae outbreaks in lakes and reservoirs. We aimed to explore and quantify mutation events occurring within the large mcy gene cluster (55 kbp) encoding microcystin (MC) biosynthesis that inactivate MC net production. For this purpose we developed a workflow to detect mutations in situ occurring anywhere within the large mcy gene cluster as amplified from one single filament of the red-pigmented cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens. From five lakes of the Alps eight hundred Planktothrix filaments were isolated and each individual filament was analyzed for mutations affecting the mcy genes. Mutations inactivating MC synthesis were either through an insertion element ISPlr1 or the partial deletion of mcy genes. Neutral mutations not affecting MC biosynthesis occurred within two intergenic spacer regions, either through the insertion of a Holliday-junction resolvase RusA or ISPlr1. Altogether, the insertions affected a few mcy genes only and their location was correlated with regions similar to repetitive extragenic palindromic DNA sequences (REPs). Taking all of the filaments together, the mutations leading to the inactivation of MC synthesis were more rare (0.5-6.9%), when compared with the neutral mutations (7.5-20.6%). On a spatial-temporal scale the ratio of MC synthesis-inactivating vs. neutral mutations was variable, e.g., the filament abundance carrying partial deletion of mcyD (5.2-19.4%) and/or mcyHA (0-7.3%) exceeded the abundance of neutral mutations. It is concluded that insertion events occurring within the Planktothrix mcy gene cluster are predictable due to their correlation with REPs. The frequency of occurrence of the REPs within the mcy gene cluster of Planktothrix relates to the rather common mutation of mcy genes in Planktothrix. Spatial-temporal variable conditions may favor the emergence of partial mcy deletion mutants in Planktothrix, in particular a higher proportion of genotypes resulting in

  1. The Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom) Natural Genetic Variation Rg1 and the DELLA Mutant Procera Control the Competence Necessary to Form Adventitious Roots and Shoots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Despite the wide use of plant regeneration for biotechnological purposes, the signals that allow cells to become competent to assume different fates remain largely unknown. Here, it is demonstrated that the Regeneration1 (Rg1) allele, a natural genetic variation from the tomato wild relative Solanum peruvianum, increases the capacity to form both roots and shoots in vitro; and that the gibberellin constitutive mutant procera (pro) presented the opposite phenotype, reducing organogenesis on either root-inducing medium (RIM) or shoot-inducing medium (SIM). Mutants showing alterations in the formation of specific organs in vitro were the auxin low-sensitivity diageotropica (dgt), the lateral suppresser (ls), and the KNOX-overexpressing Mouse ears (Me). dgt failed to form roots on RIM, Me increased shoot formation on SIM, and the high capacity for in vitro shoot formation of ls contrasted with its recalcitrance to form axillary meristems. Interestingly, Rg1 rescued the in vitro organ formation capacity in proRg1 and dgtRg1 double mutants and the ex vitro low lateral shoot formation in pro and ls. Such epistatic interactions were also confirmed in gene expression and histological analyses conducted in the single and double mutants. Although Me phenocopied the high shoot formation of Rg1 on SIM, it failed to increase rooting on RIM and to rescue the non-branching phenotype of ls. Taken together, these results suggest REGENERATION1 and the DELLA mutant PROCERA as controlling a common competence to assume distinct cell fates, rather than the specific induction of adventitious roots or shoots, which is controlled by DIAGEOTROPICA and MOUSE EARS, respectively. PMID:22915742

  2. Null mutants of Candida albicans for cell-wall-related genes form fragile biofilms that display an almost identical extracellular matrix proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, José P; Blanes, Rosario; Casanova, Manuel; Valentín, Eulogio; Murgui, Amelia; Domínguez, Ángel

    2016-11-01

    By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry, we have characterized the polypeptide species present in extracts obtained by 60% ethanol treatment of whole mature (48 h) biofilms formed by a reference strain (CAI4-URA3) and four Candida albicans null mutants for cell-wall-related genes (ALG5, CSA1, MNN9 and PGA10) Null mutants form fragile biofilms that appeared partially split and weakly attached to the substratum contrary to those produced by the reference strain. An almost identical, electrophoretic profile consisting of about 276 spots was visualized in all extracts examined. Proteomic analysis led to the identification of 131 polypeptides, corresponding to 86 different protein species, being the rest isoforms-83 displayed negative hydropathic indexes and 82 lack signal peptide. The majority of proteins appeared at pI between 4 and 6, and molecular mass between 10 and 94 kDa. The proteins identified belonged to the following Gene Ontology categories: 21.9% unknown molecular function, 16.2% oxidoreductase activity, 13.3% hydrolase activity and 41.8% distributed between other different GO categories. Strong defects in biofilm formation appreciated in the cell-wall mutant strains could be attributed to defects in aggregation due to abnormal cell wall formation rather than to differences in the biofilm extracellular matrix composition. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of decameric and monomeric forms of C49S mutant thioredoxin-dependent AhpC from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supangat [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Kyung Hye; Furqoni, Ahmad [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kon Ho, E-mail: lkh@gsnu.ac.kr [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-01

    Decameric and monomeric forms of recombinant C49S mutant AhpC from H. pylori have been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 and 2.25 Å, respectively. Cys49Ser mutant Helicobacter pylori alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (C49S HpAhpC) was purified under reducing conditions in monomeric and decameric forms. The monomeric form was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 245.8, b = 140.7, c = 189.5 Å, β = 127°, and contained 20 molecules in the asymmetric unit. A crystal of the decameric form was obtained by the microbatch crystallization method and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. It belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 257.5, b = 417.5, c = 95.6 Å. The structure of the monomeric form of C49S HpAhpC has been solved by the molecular-replacement method.

  4. FTIR spectroscopic study of biofilms formed by the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 and its mutant Azospirillum brasilense Sp245.1610

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugarova, Anna V.; Scheludko, Andrei V.; Dyatlova, Yulia A.; Filip'echeva, Yulia A.; Kamnev, Alexander A.

    2017-07-01

    Biofilms are spatially and metabolically structured communities of microorganisms, representing a mode of their existence which is ubiquitous in nature, with cells localised within an extracellular biopolymeric matrix, attached to each other, at an interface. For plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), the formation of biofilms is of special importance due to their primary localisation at the surface of plant root systems. In this work, FTIR spectroscopy was used, for the first time for bacteria of the genus Azospirillum, to comparatively study 6-day-mature biofilms formed on the surface of ZnSe discs by the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 and its mutant A. brasilense Sp245.1610. The mutant strain, having an Omegon Km insertion in the gene of lipid metabolism fabG1 on the plasmid AZOBR_p1, as compared to the wild-type strain Sp245 (see http://dx.doi.org/10.1134/S1022795413110112)

  5. Clearance of mutant huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, He; Li, Shihua

    2010-07-01

    Mutant huntingtin (htt) carries an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat (> 36 glutamines) in its N-terminal region, which leads htt to become misfolded and kill neuronal cells in Huntington disease (HD). The cytotoxicity of N-terminal mutant htt fragments is evident by severe neurological phenotypes of transgenic mice that express these htt fragments. Clearance of mutant htt is primarily mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasomal sysmtem (UPS) and autophagy. However, the relative efficiency of these two systems to remove toxic forms of mutant htt has not been rigorously compared. Using cellular and mouse models of HD, we found that inhibiting the UPS leads to a greater accumulation of mutant htt than inhibiting autophagy. Moreover, N-terminal mutant htt fragments, but not full-length mutant htt, accumulate in the HD mouse brains after inhibiting the UPS. These findings suggest that the UPS is more efficient than autophagy to remove N-terminal mutant htt.

  6. Centromere replication timing determines different forms of genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae checkpoint mutants during replication stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenyi; Bachant, Jeff; Collingwood, David; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2009-12-01

    Yeast replication checkpoint mutants lose viability following transient exposure to hydroxyurea, a replication-impeding drug. In an effort to understand the basis for this lethality, we discovered that different events are responsible for inviability in checkpoint-deficient cells harboring mutations in the mec1 and rad53 genes. By monitoring genomewide replication dynamics of cells exposed to hydroxyurea, we show that cells with a checkpoint deficient allele of RAD53, rad53K227A, fail to duplicate centromeres. Following removal of the drug, however, rad53K227A cells recover substantial DNA replication, including replication through centromeres. Despite this recovery, the rad53K227A mutant fails to achieve biorientation of sister centromeres during recovery from hydroxyurea, leading to secondary activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), aneuploidy, and lethal chromosome segregation errors. We demonstrate that cell lethality from this segregation defect could be partially remedied by reinforcing bipolar attachment. In contrast, cells with the mec1-1 sml1-1 mutations suffer from severely impaired replication resumption upon removal of hydroxyurea. mec1-1 sml1-1 cells can, however, duplicate at least some of their centromeres and achieve bipolar attachment, leading to abortive segregation and fragmentation of incompletely replicated chromosomes. Our results highlight the importance of replicating yeast centromeres early and reveal different mechanisms of cell death due to differences in replication fork progression.

  7. Equilibrium isotope exchange kinetics of native and site-specific mutant forms of E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedler, F.C.; Hsuanyu, Y.; Kantrowitz, E.R.

    1987-05-01

    Isotope exchange kinetics at equilibrium (EIEK) have been used to probe the kinetic and regulatory mechanisms of native aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from E. coli at pH 7.0, 30/sup 0/. Substrate saturation patterns were most consistent with a preferred order random kinetic mechanism: C-P prior to L-Asp, C-Asp released before Pi, with the Asp in equilibrium C-Asp exchange rate 5X faster than C-P in equilibrium Pi. Computer simulations allow one to fit the EIEK experimental data and to arrive at the best set of kinetic constants for a given enzyme state. These approaches have been applied to modified ATCase. Bound CTP and ATP were observed, respectively, to inhibit and activate differentially Asp in equilibrium C-Asp, but not C-P in equilibrium Pi, indicating that these modifiers alter the association-dissociation rates of L-Asp and C-Asp but not of C-P or Pi. Low levels of PALA activated both exchange rates (due to shifting the T-R equilibrium), but higher (PALA) completely blocked both exchanges. The effects of a site-specific mutation of Tyr240 Phe have been similarly probed by EIEK methods. The Phe240 mutant enzyme exhibited kinetic properties markedly different from native ATCase: the data indicate that Phe240 ATCase is much closer to an R-state enzyme than is native enzyme.

  8. Single chain variable fragment antibodies block aggregation and toxicity induced by familial ALS-linked mutant forms of SOD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadge, Ghanashyam D; Pavlovic, John D; Koduvayur, Sujatha P; Kay, Brian K; Roos, Raymond P

    2013-08-01

    Approximately 10% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases are familial (known as FALS) with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, and ~25% of FALS cases are caused by mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). There is convincing evidence that mutant SOD1 (mtSOD1) kills motor neurons (MNs) because of a gain-of-function toxicity, most likely related to aggregation of mtSOD1. A number of recent reports have suggested that antibodies can be used to treat mtSOD1-induced FALS. To follow up on the use of antibodies as potential therapeutics, we generated single chain fragments of variable region antibodies (scFvs) against SOD1, and then expressed them as 'intrabodies' within a motor neuron cell line. In the present study, we describe isolation of human scFvs that interfere with mtSOD1 in vitro aggregation and toxicity. These scFvs may have therapeutic potential in sporadic ALS, as well as FALS, given that sporadic ALS may also involve abnormalities in the SOD1 protein or activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. X-ray structure of a protease-resistant mutant form of human galectin-9 having two carbohydrate recognition domains with a metal-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Nishi, Nozomu; Wada, Kenji; Nakamura, Takanori; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Kuwabara, Naoyuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2017-09-02

    Galectin-9 (G9) is a tandem-repeat type β-galactoside-specific animal lectin having N-terminal and C-terminal carbohydrate recognition domains (N-CRD and C-CRD, respectively) joined by a linker peptide that is involved in the immune system. G9 is divalent in glycan binding, and structural information about the spatial arrangement of the two CRDs is very important for elucidating its biological functions. As G9 is protease sensitive due to the long linker, the protease-resistant mutant form of G9 (G9Null) was developed by modification of the linker peptide, while retaining its biological functions. The X-ray structure of a mutant form of G9Null with the replacement of Arg221 by Ser (G9Null_R221S) having two CRDs was determined. The structure of G9Null_R221S was compact to associate the two CRDs in the back-to-back orientation with a large interface area, including hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. A metal ion was newly found in the galectin structure, possibly contributing to the stable structure of protein. The presented X-ray structure was thought to be one of the stable structures of G9, which likely occurs in solution. This was supported by structural comparisons with other tandem-repeated galectins and the analyses of protein thermostability by CD spectra measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The capacity of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette transporters to form biofilms and comparison with the wild type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ceruso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is a food-borne pathogen responsible for human listeriosis, an invasive infection with high mortality rates. Lm has developed efficient strategies for survival under stress conditions such as starvation and wide variations in temperature, pH, and osmolarity. Therefore, Lm can survive in food under multiple stress conditions. Detailed studies to determine the mode of action of this pathogen for survival under stress conditions are important to control Lm in food. It has been shown that genes encoding for ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are induced in Lm in food, in particular under stress conditions. Previous studies showed that these genes are involved in sensitivity to nisin, acids, and salt. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of some ABC transporters in biofilm formation. Therefore, deletion mutants of ABC transporter genes (LMOf2365_1875 and LMOf2365_1877 were created in Lm F2365, and then were compared to the wild type for their capacity to form biofilms. Lm strain F2365 was chosen as reference since the genome is fully sequenced and furthermore this strain is particularly involved in food-borne outbreaks of listeriosis. Our results showed that DLMOf2365_1875 had an increased capacity to form biofilms compared to the wild type, indicating that LMOf2365_1875 negatively regulates biofilm formation. A deeper knowledge on the ability to form biofilms in these mutants may help in the development of intervention strategies to control Lm in food and in the environment.

  11. Chlorina and viridis mutants of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) allow assignment of long-wavelength chlorophyll forms to individual Lhca proteins of photosystem I in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoetzel, J; Bossmann, B; Grimme, L H

    1998-10-09

    The isolated subcomplex LHCI-730 of plant photosystem I (PSI) chlorophyll (Chl) alb binding antenna is a heterodimer of Lhca1 and Lhca4 and has a 77 K fluorescence emission peak at 730 nm (F730). Recently, three Chl spectral forms with 77 K fluorescence emission peaks at 720 nm, 730 nm and 742 nm were identified in native PSI. In an attempt to assign the two longest wavelength emission maxima to peripheral PSI antenna proteins, we performed 77 K fluorescence emission spectroscopy on intact leaves of chlorina and viridis mutants from barley which lack individual LHCI-730 proteins. This approach indicates that F732 is found only in Lhca1 and F742 only in Lhca4, when these proteins are associated with the PSI reaction centre.

  12. Mutant forms of Escherichia coli protein L25 unable to bind to 5S rRNA are incorporated efficiently into the ribosome in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikaev, A Y; Korepanov, A P; Korobeinikova, A V; Kljashtorny, V G; Piendl, W; Nikonov, S V; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2014-08-01

    5S rRNA-binding ribosomal proteins of the L25 family are an evolutional acquisition of bacteria. Earlier we showed that (i) single replacements in the RNA-binding module of the protein of this family result in destabilization or complete impossibility to form a complex with 5S rRNA in vitro; (ii) ΔL25 ribosomes of Escherichia coli are less efficient in protein synthesis in vivo than the control ribosomes. In the present work, the efficiency of incorporation of the E. coli protein L25 with mutations in the 5S rRNA-binding region into the ribosome in vivo was studied. It was found that the mutations in L25 that abolish its ability to form the complex with free 5S rRNA do not prevent its correct and efficient incorporation into the ribosome. This is supported by the fact that even the presence of a very weakly retained mutant form of the protein in the ribosome has a positive effect on the activity of the translational machinery in vivo. All this suggests the existence of an alternative incorporation pathway for this protein into the ribosome, excluding the preliminary formation of the complex with 5S rRNA. At the same time, the stable L25-5S rRNA contact is important for the retention of the protein within the ribosome, and the conservative amino acid residues of the RNA-binding module play a key role in this.

  13. Nanomolar oligomerization and selective co-aggregation of α-synuclein pathogenic mutants revealed by single-molecule fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierecki, Emma; Giles, Nichole; Bowden, Quill; Polinkovsky, Mark E.; Steinbeck, Janina; Arrioti, Nicholas; Rahman, Diya; Bhumkar, Akshay; Nicovich, Philip R.; Ross, Ian; Parton, Robert G.; Böcking, Till; Gambin, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, notably Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies, abnormal aggregates mainly composed of α-synuclein. Moreover, cases of familial Parkinson’s disease have been linked to mutations in α-synuclein. In this study, we compared the behavior of wild-type (WT) α-synuclein and five of its pathological mutants (A30P, E46K, H50Q, G51D and A53T). To this end, single-molecule fluorescence detection was coupled to cell-free protein expression to measure precisely the oligomerization of proteins without purification, denaturation or labelling steps. In these conditions, we could detect the formation of oligomeric and pre-fibrillar species at very short time scale and low micromolar concentrations. The pathogenic mutants surprisingly segregated into two classes: one group forming large aggregates and fibrils while the other tending to form mostly oligomers. Strikingly, co-expression experiments reveal that members from the different groups do not generally interact with each other, both at the fibril and monomer levels. Together, this data paints a completely different picture of α-synuclein aggregation, with two possible pathways leading to the development of fibrils. PMID:27892477

  14. ATM mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. ATM mutants. ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated). AT2BE and AT5B1 cells – fibroblast cell lines from Ataxia telangiectasia patients. Deletion mutants expressing truncated ATM protein which is inactive. Have been used in studies looking at the role of ATM in DNA damage ...

  15. Phage-encoded colanic acid-degrading enzyme permits lytic phage infection of a capsule-forming resistant mutant Escherichia coli strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Soo; Kim, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Sik; Park, Kwangseo; Ko, Kwan Soo; Myung, Heejoon

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we isolated a bacteriophage T7-resistant mutant strain of Escherichia coli (named S3) and then proceeded to characterize it. The mutant bacterial colonies appeared to be mucoid. Microarray analysis revealed that genes related to colanic acid production were upregulated in the mutant. Increases in colanic acid production by the mutant bacteria were observed when l-fucose was measured biochemically, and protective capsule formation was observed under an electron microscope. We found a point mutation in the lon gene promoter in S3, the mutant bacterium. Overproduction of colanic acid was observed in some phage-resistant mutant bacteria after infection with other bacteriophages, T4 and lambda. Colanic acid overproduction was also observed in clinical isolates of E. coli upon phage infection. The overproduction of colanic acid resulted in the inhibition of bacteriophage adsorption to the host. Biofilm formation initially decreased shortly after infection but eventually increased after 48 h of incubation due to the emergence of the mutant bacteria. Bacteriophage PBECO4 was shown to infect the colanic acid-overproducing mutant strains of E. coli. We confirmed that the gene product of open reading frame 547 (ORF547) of PBECO4 harbored colanic acid-degrading enzymatic (CAE) activity. Treatment of the T7-resistant bacteria with both T7 and PBECO4 or its purified enzyme (CAE) led to successful T7 infection. Biofilm formation decreased with the mixed infection, too. This procedure, using a phage cocktail different from those exploiting solely receptor differences, represents a novel strategy for overcoming phage resistance in mutant bacteria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Integrative proteomics, genomics, and translational immunology approaches reveal mutated forms of Proteolipid Protein 1 (PLP1) and mutant-specific immune response in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qendro, Veneta; Bugos, Grace A; Lundgren, Debbie H; Glynn, John; Han, May H; Han, David K

    2017-03-01

    In order to gain mechanistic insights into multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, we utilized a multi-dimensional approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in myelin proteins lead to immune activation and central nervous system autoimmunity in MS. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human MS brain lesions revealed seven unique mutations of PLP1; a key myelin protein that is known to be destroyed in MS. Surprisingly, in-depth genomic analysis of two MS patients at the genomic DNA and mRNA confirmed mutated PLP1 in RNA, but not in the genomic DNA. Quantification of wild type and mutant PLP RNA levels by qPCR further validated the presence of mutant PLP RNA in the MS patients. To seek evidence linking mutations in abundant myelin proteins and immune-mediated destruction of myelin, specific immune response against mutant PLP1 in MS patients was examined. Thus, we have designed paired, wild type and mutant peptide microarrays, and examined antibody response to multiple mutated PLP1 in sera from MS patients. Consistent with the idea of different patients exhibiting unique mutation profiles, we found that 13 out of 20 MS patients showed antibody responses against specific but not against all the mutant-PLP1 peptides. Interestingly, we found mutant PLP-directed antibody response against specific mutant peptides in the sera of pre-MS controls. The results from integrative proteomic, genomic, and immune analyses reveal a possible mechanism of mutation-driven pathogenesis in human MS. The study also highlights the need for integrative genomic and proteomic analyses for uncovering pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Expression of human A53T alpha-synuclein in the rat substantia nigra using a novel AAV1/2 vector produces a rapidly evolving pathology with protein aggregation, dystrophic neurite architecture and nigrostriatal degeneration with potential to model the pathology of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprich, James B; Johnston, Tom H; Reyes, M Gabriela; Sun, Xuan; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2010-10-28

    The pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD) include the presence of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) rich Lewy bodies and neurites and the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra (SN). Animal models of PD based on viral vector-mediated over-expression of α-syn have been developed and show evidence of DA toxicity to varying degrees depending on the type of virus used, its concentration, and the serotype of vector employed. To date these models have been variable, difficult to reproduce, and slow in their evolution to achieve a desired phenotype, hindering their use as a model for testing novel therapeutics. To address these issues we have taken a novel vector in this context, that can be prepared in high titer and which possesses an ability to produce neuronally-directed expression, with expression dynamics optimised to provide a rapid rise in gene product expression. Thus, in the current study, we have used a high titer chimeric AAV1/2 vector, to express human A53T α-syn, an empty vector control (EV), or green fluorescent protein (GFP), the latter to control for the possibility that high levels of protein in themselves might contribute to damage. We show that following a single 2 μl injection into the rat SN there is near complete coverage of the structure and expression of A53T α-syn or GFP appears throughout the striatum. Within 3 weeks of SN delivery of their respective vectors, aggregations of insoluble α-syn were observed in SN DA neurons. The numbers of DA neurons in the SN were significantly reduced by expression of A53T α-syn (52%), and to a lesser extent by GFP (24%), compared to EV controls (both P AAV1/2-A53T α-syn injection produced dystrophic neurites and a significant reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels (by 53%, P AAV1/2-GFP condition. In the current implementation of the model, we recapitulate the primary pathological hallmarks of PD, although a proportion of the SN damage may relate to general protein overload and

  18. Reversion by calcium of a yeast-like development to the original filamentous form, of the 10V10 5-fluorocytosine-sensitive mutant of Aspergillus niger Reversão pelo cálcio de um desenvolvimento leveduriforme para a forma filamentosa original em um mutante sensível a 5-fluorocitosina na linhagem 10V10 de Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela de Carvalho Goulart

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Some filamentous fungi present the phenomenon of dimorphism, their morphological structure alterations being capable of inducing metabolism changes. The Aspergillus niger strain 10v10, a producer of citric acid, was submitted to the mutagenic action of ultraviolet irradiation which respectively selects mutants sensitive or resistant to the antifungi agent 5 fluorocytosine (5-FC. 5-FC sensitive mutants presented a morphological alteration to a yeast-like form. The effects of pH changes, addition of salts (KH2PO4, NH4NO3, MgSO4 and MgCl2, the presence of osmotic stabilizers, as well as of calcium chloride, on morphological reversal and acid production were studied. Morphological reversal to the filamentous form was observed only in the presence of CaCl2 (500mM for the mutants strains 1 and 2, while the acid production occurred in both, yeast-like and filamentous forms.Alguns fungos filamentosos apresentam o fenômeno de dimorfismo, sendo que as alterações da estrutura morfológica podem induzir alterações metabólicas. A linhagem de Aspergillus niger 10v10, produtora de ácido cítrico foi submetida à ação mutagênica da radiação ultravioleta selecionando mutantes sensíveis ou resistentes ao antifúngico 5-fluorocitosina (5-FC. Os mutantes selecionados como sensíveis a 5-FC apresentaram uma alteração morfológica com desenvolvimento leveduriforme. Nestes mutantes foram avaliados o efeito da alteração de pH, a adição de sais (KH2PO4, NH4NO3, MgSO4e MnCl2, a presença de estabilizadores osmóticos, cloreto de cálcio, e o seu efeito sobre a reversão morfológica e a produção de ácido. A reversão morfológica para a forma filamentosa ocorreu apenas na presença de CaCl2 (500mM para as linhagens mutantes 1 e 2, enquanto que a produção de ácido ocorreu nas duas formas, leveduriforme e filamentosa.

  19. Structural and preliminary molecular dynamics studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center and its mutant form L(M196)H + H(M202)L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyashtorny, V. G.; Fufina, T. Yu.; Vasilieva, L. G.; Shuvalov, V. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.

    2014-07-01

    Pigment-protein interactions are responsible for the high efficiency of the light-energy transfer and conversion in photosynthesis. The reaction center (RC) from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is the most convenient model for studying the mechanisms of primary processes of photosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis can be used to study the effect of the protein environment of electron-transfer cofactors on the optical properties, stability, pigment composition, and functional activity of RC. The preliminary analysis of RC was performed by computer simulation of the amino acid substitutions L(M196)H + H(M202)L at the pigment-protein interface and by estimating the stability of the threedimensional structure of the mutant RC by the molecular dynamics method. The doubly mutated reaction center was overexpressed, purified, and crystallized. The three-dimensional structure of this mutant was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the molecular dynamics model.

  20. Expression of human A53T alpha-synuclein in the rat substantia nigra using a novel AAV1/2 vector produces a rapidly evolving pathology with protein aggregation, dystrophic neurite architecture and nigrostriatal degeneration with potential to model the pathology of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xuan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD include the presence of alpha-synuclein (α-syn rich Lewy bodies and neurites and the loss of dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra (SN. Animal models of PD based on viral vector-mediated over-expression of α-syn have been developed and show evidence of DA toxicity to varying degrees depending on the type of virus used, its concentration, and the serotype of vector employed. To date these models have been variable, difficult to reproduce, and slow in their evolution to achieve a desired phenotype, hindering their use as a model for testing novel therapeutics. To address these issues we have taken a novel vector in this context, that can be prepared in high titer and which possesses an ability to produce neuronally-directed expression, with expression dynamics optimised to provide a rapid rise in gene product expression. Thus, in the current study, we have used a high titer chimeric AAV1/2 vector, to express human A53T α-syn, an empty vector control (EV, or green fluorescent protein (GFP, the latter to control for the possibility that high levels of protein in themselves might contribute to damage. Results We show that following a single 2 μl injection into the rat SN there is near complete coverage of the structure and expression of A53T α-syn or GFP appears throughout the striatum. Within 3 weeks of SN delivery of their respective vectors, aggregations of insoluble α-syn were observed in SN DA neurons. The numbers of DA neurons in the SN were significantly reduced by expression of A53T α-syn (52%, and to a lesser extent by GFP (24%, compared to EV controls (both P P Conclusions In the current implementation of the model, we recapitulate the primary pathological hallmarks of PD, although a proportion of the SN damage may relate to general protein overload and may not be specific for A53T α-syn. Future studies will thus be required to optimise the dose of

  1. Glial innate immunity generated by non-aggregated alpha-synuclein in mouse: differences between wild-type and Parkinson's disease-linked mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Roodveldt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized pathologically by the presence in the brain of intracellular protein inclusions highly enriched in aggregated alpha-synuclein (α-Syn. Although it has been established that progression of the disease is accompanied by sustained activation of microglia, the underlying molecules and factors involved in these immune-triggered mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Lately, accumulating evidence has shown the presence of extracellular α-Syn both in its aggregated and monomeric forms in cerebrospinal fluid and blood plasma. However, the effect of extracellular α-Syn on cellular activation and immune mediators, as well as the impact of familial PD-linked α-Syn mutants on this stimulation, are still largely unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this work, we have compared the activation profiles of non-aggregated, extracellular wild-type and PD-linked mutant α-Syn variants on primary glial and microglial cell cultures. After stimulation of cells with α-Syn, we measured the release of Th1- and Th2- type cytokines as well as IP-10/CXCL10, RANTES/CCL5, MCP-1/CCL2 and MIP-1α/CCL3 chemokines. Contrary to what had been observed using cell lines or for the case of aggregated α-Syn, we found strong differences in the immune response generated by wild-type α-Syn and the familial PD mutants (A30P, E46K and A53T. CONCLUSIONS: These findings might contribute to explain the differences in the onset and progression of this highly debilitating disease, which could be of value in the development of rational approaches towards effective control of immune responses that are associated with PD.

  2. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  3. A substrate trapping mutant form of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase prevents amphetamine-induced stereotypies and long-term potentiation in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashev, Roman; Moura, Paula J; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Prosperetti, Chiara; Centonze, Diego; Paul, Surojit; Lombroso, Paul J

    2009-04-15

    Chronic, intermittent exposure to psychostimulant drugs results in striatal neuroadaptations leading to an increase in an array of behavioral responses on subsequent challenge days. A brain-specific striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) regulates synaptic strengthening by dephosphorylating and inactivating several key synaptic proteins. This study tests the hypothesis that a substrate-trapping form of STEP will prevent the development of amphetamine-induced stereotypies. A substrate-trapping STEP protein, TAT-STEP (C-S), was infused into the ventrolateral striatum on each of 5 consecutive exposure days and 1 hour before amphetamine injection. Animals were challenged to see whether sensitization to the stereotypy-producing effects of amphetamine developed. The same TAT-STEP (C-S) protein was used on acute striatal slices to determine the impact on long-term potentiation and depression. Infusion of TAT-STEP (C-S) blocks the increase of amphetamine-induced stereotypies when given during the 5-day period of sensitization. The TAT-STEP (C-S) has no effect if only infused on the challenge day. Treatment of acute striatal slices with TAT-STEP (C-S) blocks the induction of long-term potentiation and potentates long-term depression. A substrate trapping form of STEP blocks the induction of amphetamine-induced neuroplasticity within the ventrolateral striatum and supports the hypothesis that STEP functions as a tonic break on synaptic strengthening.

  4. A Substrate Trapping Mutant Form of the Tyrosine Phosphatase STEP Prevents Amphetamine-induced Stereotypies and Long-term Potentiation in the Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashev, Roman; Moura, Paula J.; Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Prosperetti, Chiara; Centonze, Diego; Paul, Surojit; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic, intermittent exposure to psychostimulants results in striatal neuroadaptations leading to an increase in an array of behavioral responses on subsequent challenge days. STEP, a brain-specific STriatal Enriched tyrosine Phosphatase, regulates synaptic strengthening by dephosphorylating and inactivating several key synaptic proteins. This study tests the hypothesis that a substrate-trapping form of STEP will prevent the development of amphetamine-induced stereotypies. Methods A substrate-trapping STEP protein, TAT-STEP (C-S), was infused into the ventrolateral striatum on each of five consecutive exposure days and 1 hour prior to amphetamine injection. Animals were challenged to see whether sensitization to the stereotypy-producing effects of amphetamine developed. The same TAT-STEP (C-S) protein was used on acute striatal slices to determine the impact on long-term potentiation and depression. Results Infusion of TAT-STEP (C-S) blocks the increase of amphetamine-induced stereotypies when given during the 5-day period of sensitization. TAT-STEP (C-S) has no effect if only infused on the challenge day. Treatment of acute striatal slices with TAT-STEP (C-S) blocks the induction of LTP and potentates LTD. Conclusions A substrate trapping form of STEP blocks the induction of amphetamine-induced neuroplasticity within the ventrolateral striatum, and supports the hypothesis that STEP functions as a tonic break on synaptic strengthening. PMID:19026408

  5. The mutant form of lamin A that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a biomarker of cellular aging in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle McClintock

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and early death, frequently from stroke or coronary artery disease. 90% of HGPS cases carry the LMNA G608G (GGC>GGT mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, activating a splice donor site that results in production of a dominant negative form of lamin A protein, denoted progerin. Screening 150 skin biopsies from unaffected individuals (newborn to 97 years showed that a similar splicing event occurs in vivo at a low level in the skin at all ages. While progerin mRNA remains low, the protein accumulates in the skin with age in a subset of dermal fibroblasts and in a few terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Progerin-positive fibroblasts localize near the basement membrane and in the papillary dermis of young adult skin; however, their numbers increase and their distribution reaches the deep reticular dermis in elderly skin. Our findings demonstrate that progerin expression is a biomarker of normal cellular aging and may potentially be linked to terminal differentiation and senescence in elderly individuals.

  6. Propensity of mutant SOD1 to form a destabilized monomer predicts cellular aggregation and toxicity but not in vitro aggregation propensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke McAlary

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterised by the rapid and progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem and motor cortex. The first gene linked to ALS was the gene encoding the free radical scavenging enzyme superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1 that currently has over 180, mostly missense, ALS-associated mutations identified. SOD1-associated fALS patients show remarkably broad mean survival times (< 1 year to ~17 years death post-diagnosis that are mutation dependent. A hallmark of SOD1-associated ALS is the deposition of SOD1 into large insoluble aggregates in motor neurons. This is thought to be a consequence of mutation induced structural destabilisation and/or oxidative damage leading to the misfolding and aggregation of SOD1 into a neurotoxic species. Here we aim to understand the relationship between SOD1 variant toxicity, structural stability, and aggregation propensity using a combination of cell culture and purified protein assays. Cell based assays indicated that aggregation of SOD1 variants correlate closely to cellular toxicity. However, the relationship between cellular toxicity and disease severity was less clear. We next utilised mass spectrometry to interrogate the structural consequences of metal loss and disulfide reduction on fALS-associated SOD1 variant structure. All variants showed evidence of unfolded, intermediate, and compact conformations, with SOD1G37R, SOD1G93A and SOD1V148G having the greatest abundance of intermediate and unfolded SOD1. SOD1G37R was an informative outlier as it had a high propensity to unfold and form oligomeric aggregates, but it did not aggregate to the same extent as SOD1G93A and SOD1V148G in in vitro aggregation assays. Furthermore, seeding the aggregation of DTT/EDTA-treated SOD1G37R with preformed SOD1G93A fibrils elicited minimal aggregation response, suggesting that the arginine substitution at position-37 blocks

  7. Using the MCF10A/MCF10CA1a Breast Cancer Progression Cell Line Model to Investigate the Effect of Active, Mutant Forms of EGFR in Breast Cancer Development and Treatment Using Gefitinib.

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    Darrell C Bessette

    Full Text Available Basal-like and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC share common molecular features, poor prognosis and a propensity for metastasis to the brain. Amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR occurs in ~50% of basal-like breast cancer, and mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR have been reported in up to ~ 10% of Asian TNBC patients. In non-small cell lung cancer several different mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain confer sensitivity to receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but the tumourigenic potential of EGFR mutations in breast cells and their potential for targeted therapy is unknown.Constructs containing wild type, G719S or E746-A750 deletion mutant forms of EGFR were transfected into the MCF10A breast cells and their tumorigenic derivative, MCF10CA1a. The effects of EGFR over-expression and mutation on proliferation, migration, invasion, response to gefitinib, and tumour formation in vivo was investigated. Copy number analysis and whole exome sequencing of the MCF10A and MCF10CA1a cell lines were also performed.Mutant EGFR increased MCF10A and MCF10CA1a proliferation and MCF10A gefitinib sensitivity. The EGFR-E746-A750 deletion increased MCF10CA1a cell migration and invasion, and greatly increased MCF10CA1a xenograft tumour formation and growth. Compared to MCF10A cells, MCF10CA1a cells exhibited large regions of gain on chromosomes 3 and 9, deletion on chromosome 7, and mutations in many genes implicated in cancer.Mutant EGFR enhances the oncogenic properties of MCF10A cell line, and increases sensitivity to gefitinib. Although the addition of EGFR E746-A750 renders the MCF10CA1a cells more tumourigenic in vivo it is not accompanied by increased gefitinib sensitivity, perhaps due to additional mutations, including the PIK3CA H1047R mutation, that the MCF10CA1a cell line has acquired. Screening TNBC/basal-like breast cancer for EGFR mutations may prove useful for directing therapy but, as in non

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldol...

  9. The GDF5 mutant BB-1 enhances the bone formation induced by an injectable, poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) fiber-reinforced, brushite-forming cement in a sheep defect model of lumbar osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnella, Francesca; Kunisch, Elke; Maenz, Stefan; Horbert, Victoria; Xin, Long; Mika, Joerg; Borowski, Juliane; Bischoff, Sabine; Schubert, Harald; Sachse, Andre; Illerhaus, Bernhard; Günster, Jens; Bossert, Jörg; Jandt, Klaus D; Plöger, Frank; Kinne, Raimund W; Brinkmann, Olaf; Bungartz, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    Targeted delivery of osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins (eg, GDF5) in bioresorbable calcium phosphate cement (CPC), potentially suitable for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty of osteoporotic vertebral fractures, may be required to counteract augmented local bone catabolism and to support complete bone regeneration. The biologically optimized GDF5 mutant BB-1 may represent an attractive drug candidate for this purpose. The aim of the current study was to test an injectable, poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) fiber-reinforced, brushite-forming CPC containing low-dose BB-1 in a sheep lumbar osteopenia model. This is a prospective experimental animal study. Bone defects (diameter 5 mm) were generated in aged, osteopenic female sheep and were filled with fiber-reinforced CPC alone (L4; CPC+fibers) or with CPC containing different dosages of BB-1 (L5; CPC+fibers+BB-1; 5, 100, and 500 µg BB-1; n=6 each). The results were compared with those of untouched controls (L1). Three and 9 months after the operation, structural and functional effects of the CPC (±BB-1) were analyzed ex vivo by measuring (1) bone mineral density (BMD); (2) bone structure, that is, bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) (assessed by micro-CT and histomorphometry), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), and trabecular number (Tb.N); (3) bone formation, that is, osteoid volume/bone volume (OV/BV), osteoid surface/bone surface (OS/BS), osteoid thickness, mineralizing surface/bone surface (MS/BS), mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate/bone surface; (4) bone resorption, that is, eroded surface/bone surface; and (5) compressive strength. Compared with untouched controls (L1), CPC+fibers (L4) and/or CPC+fibers+BB-1 (L5) significantly improved all parameters of bone formation, bone resorption, and bone structure. These effects were observed at 3 and 9 months, but were less pronounced for some parameters at 9 months. Compared with CPC without BB-1, additional significant effects of BB-1 were

  10. Distribution of soluble amino acids in maize endosperm mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Alejandro Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available For human nutrition the main source of vegetable proteins are cereal and legume seeds. The content of total soluble amino acids in mature endosperm of wild-type, opaque and floury maize (Zea mays L. mutants were determined by HPLC. The total absolute concentration of soluble amino acids among the mutants varied depending on the mutant. The o11 and o13 mutants exhibited the highest average content, whereas o10, fl3 and fl1 exhibited the lowest average content. In general, the mutants exhibited similar concentrations of total soluble amino acids when compared to the wild-type lines, with the clear exception of mutants o11 and fl1, with the o11 mutant exhibiting a higher concentration of total soluble amino acids when compared to its wild-type counterpart W22 and the fl1 mutant a lower concentration when compared to its wild-type counterpart Oh43. For methionine, the mutants o2 and o11 and wild-type Oh43 exhibited the highest concentrations of this amino acid. Significant differences were not observed between mutants for other amino acids such as lysine and threonine. The high lysine concentrations obtained originally for these mutants may be due to the amino acids incorporated into storage proteins, but not those present in the soluble form.

  11. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β-sheet structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa M; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; Park, Paul S-H

    2015-10-07

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate the aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. The effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  12. Morphological mutants of garlic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, A.D.; Dnyansagar, V.R. (Nagpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Botany)

    1982-01-01

    Cloves of garlic (Allium sativuum Linn.) were exposed to gamma rays with various doses and different concentrations of ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (dES) and ethylene imine (EI). In the second and third generations, 16 types of morphological mutants were recorded with varied frequencies. Of all the mutagens used, gamma rays were found to be the most effective in inducing the maximum number of mutations followed EI, EMS and dES in that order.

  13. Decreased cariogenicity of a mutant of Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoppelaar, J.D.; König, K.G.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Hoeven, J.S. van der

    A strain of Streptococcus mutans was treated with a mutagenic agent. This resulted in isolation of a mutant which, compared to the original strain, had lost the ability to form sticky deposits on hard surfaces in sucrose medium. Apart from colonial morphology, the mutant had not changed in any other

  14. Targeting mutant NRAS signaling pathways in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Ha Linh; Aplin, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a devastating form of skin cancer and its incidence is increasing faster than any other preventable cancer in the United States. The mutant NRAS subset of melanoma is more aggressive and associated with poorer outcomes compared to non-NRAS mutant melanoma. The aggressive nature and complex molecular signaling conferred by this transformation has evaded clinically effective treatment options. This review examines the major downstream effectors of NRAS relevant in melanoma and the associated advances made in targeted therapies that focus on these effector pathways. We outline the history of MEK inhibition in mutant NRAS melanoma and recent advances with newer MEK inhibitors. Since MEK inhibitors will likely be optimized when combined with other targeted therapies, we focus on recently identified targets that can be used in combination with MEK inhibitors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Torrey

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection.

  16. Therapeutic targeting of p53: all mutants are equal, but some mutants are more equal than others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, Kanaga; Lane, David P

    2017-09-26

    TP53, which encodes the tumour-suppressor protein p53, is the most frequently mutated gene across all cancer types. The presence of mutant p53 predisposes to cancer development, promotes the survival of cancer cells, and is associated with ineffective therapeutic responses and unfavourable prognoses. Despite these effects, no drug that abrogates the oncogenic functions of mutant p53 has yet been approved for the treatment of cancer. Current investigational therapeutic strategies are mostly aimed at restoring the wild-type activity of mutant p53, based on the assumption that all p53 mutants are functionally equal. Our increasing knowledge of mutant forms of p53, however, supports the antithetical hypothesis that not all p53 mutants have equivalent cellular effects; hence, a judicious approach to therapeutic targeting of mutant p53 is required. In this Review, we propose a categorization of the major classes of p53 mutants based on their functionality in tumour suppression and response to therapy. The emerging picture is that the mutations across TP53 form a 'rainbow of mutants', with varying degrees of functionality and different pathobiological consequences, necessitating the use of diverse therapeutic strategies to selectively target specific classes of mutation. The utility of this knowledge of TP53 mutations in developing selective therapeutic options, and in facilitating clinical decision-making is discussed.

  17. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation

  18. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  19. Auxin transport inhibitor induced low complexity petiolated leaves and sessile leaf-like stipules and architectures of heritable leaf and stipule mutants in Pisum sativum suggest that its simple lobed stipules and compound leaf represent ancestral forms in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Sharma, Vishakha; Khan, Moinuddin; Hindala, Mali Ram; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-04-01

    In angiosperms, leaf and stipule architectures are inherited species-specific traits. Variation in leaf and stipule sizes, and forms result from the interaction between abiotic and biotic stimuli, and gene regulatory network(s) that underlie the leaf and stipule developmental programme(s). Here, correspondence between variation in leaf and stipule architectures described for extant angiosperms and that induced mutationally and by imposition of stress in model angiosperm species, especially in Pisum sativum, was detected. Following inferences were drawn from the observations. (i) Several leaf forms in P. sativum have origin in fusion of stipule and leaf primordia. Perfoliate (and amplexicaul and connate) simple sessile leaves and sessile adnate leaves are the result of such primordial fusions. Reversal of changes in the gene regulatory network responsible for fusion products are thought to restore original stipule and leaf conditions. (ii) Compound leaf formation in several different model plants, is a result of promotion of pathways for such condition by gene regulatory networks directed by KNOx1 and LEAFY transcription factors or intercalation of the gene networks directed by them. (iii) Gene regulatory network for compound leaves in P. sativum when mutated generates highly complex compound leaves on one hand and simple leaves on other hand. These altered conditions are mutationally reversible. (vi) Simple leaves in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana despite overexpression of KNOx1 orthologues do not become compound. (v) All forms of leaves, including simple leaf, probably have origins in a gene regulatory network of the kind present in P. sativum.

  20. Onjisaponin B Derived from Radix Polygalae Enhances Autophagy and Accelerates the Degradation of Mutant α-Synuclein and Huntingtin in PC-12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Guo Wu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence indicates important protective roles being played by autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders through clearance of aggregate-prone or mutant proteins. In the current study, we aimed to identify autophagy inducers from Chinese medicinal herbs as a potential neuroprotective agent that enhances the clearance of mutant huntingtin and α-synuclein in PC-12 cells. Through intensive screening using the green fluorescent protein-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3 autophagy detection platform, we found that the ethanol extracts of Radix Polygalae (Yuan Zhi were capable of inducing autophagy. Further investigation showed that among three single components derived from Radix Polygalae—i.e., polygalacic acid, senegenin and onjisaponin B—onjisaponin B was able to induce autophagy and accelerate both the removal of mutant huntingtin and A53T α-synuclein, which are highly associated with Huntington disease and Parkinson disease, respectively. Our study further demonstrated that onjisaponin B induces autophagy via the AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, findings in the current study provide detailed insights into the protective mechanism of a novel autophagy inducer, which is valuable for further investigation as a new candidate agent for modulating neurodegenerative disorders through the reduction of toxicity and clearance of mutant proteins in the cellular level.

  1. Fibrinolytic Activity of Recombinant Mutant Streptokinase

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    Mahboobeh Mobarrez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptokinase is a bacterial protein produced by different beta hemolytic streptococci and widely used in thrombolytic treatment. The main disadvantage of using streptokinase is antibody formation which causes allergic reaction to neutralize effects of streptokinase therapy. Aim of this study was investigate of recombinant mutant streptokinase fibrinolytic activity.Materials and Methods: In this study recombinant mutant streptokinase without 42 amino acids from the C terminal region was purified by affinity S-Tag column chromatography and its fibrinolytic activity was studied.Results: The concentration of expressed and purified protein was 10 mg/ml. Its enzyme activity was assayed using zymography, radial caseinolytic activity and fibrin plate test methods and estimated quantitatively by casein digestion method compared to a commercial form.Conclusion: It was found that this product had the more volume and more enzymatic activity.

  2. Cloning, preparation and preliminary crystallographic studies of penicillin V acylase autoproteolytic processing mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, P. Manish [Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Brannigan, James A., E-mail: jab@ysbl.york.ac.uk [York Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Prabhune, Asmita; Pundle, Archana [Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Turkenburg, Johan P.; Dodson, G. Guy [York Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Suresh, C. G., E-mail: jab@ysbl.york.ac.uk [Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India)

    2005-01-01

    The production, crystallization and characterization of three inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase from B. sphaericus in their respective precursor and processed forms are reported. The space groups are different for the native enzyme and the mutants. The crystallization of three catalytically inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase (PVA) from Bacillus sphaericus in precursor and processed forms is reported. The mutant proteins crystallize in different primitive monoclinic space groups that are distinct from the crystal forms for the native enzyme. Directed mutants and clone constructs were designed to study the post-translational autoproteolytic processing of PVA. The catalytically inactive mutants will provide three-dimensional structures of precursor PVA forms, plus open a route to the study of enzyme–substrate complexes for this industrially important enzyme.

  3. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  4. Aequorin mutants with increased thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaoge; Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Ensor, Mark; Daunert, Sylvia

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescent labels can be especially useful for in vivo and live animal studies due to the negligible bioluminescence background in cells and most animals, and the non-toxicity of bioluminescent reporter systems. Significant thermal stability of bioluminescent labels is essential, however, due to the longitudinal nature and physiological temperature conditions of many bioluminescent-based studies. To improve the thermostability of the bioluminescent protein aequorin, we employed random and rational mutagenesis strategies to create two thermostable double mutants, S32T/E156V and M36I/E146K, and a particularly thermostable quadruple mutant, S32T/E156V/Q168R/L170I. The double aequorin mutants, S32T/E156V and M36I/E146K, retained 4 and 2.75 times more of their initial bioluminescence activity than wild-type aequorin during thermostability studies at 37 °C. Moreover, the quadruple aequorin mutant, S32T/E156V/Q168R/L170I, exhibited more thermostability at a variety of temperatures than either double mutant alone, producing the most thermostable aequorin mutant identified thus far.

  5. New mutants and their chromosome assignment in the fly Megaselia scalaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traut, W; Traut, G; Mertl, H G; Egelhaaf, A

    1994-01-01

    We describe six new mutants, spontaneous or EMS-induced, and a previously isolated radiation-induced mutant of Megaselia scalaris Loew (Diptera, Phoridae). Five are eye-color mutants, one affects the segmentation of the abdomen, and one disturbs the regular form and arrangement of ommatidia in the compound eye. A complementation test exposed two pairs of alleles among the five eye-color mutants, leaving three different loci that affect eye pigmentation. Two of them influence the amount of xanthommatin synthesized, and one blocks the ommochrome pathway at the kynurenine step. We established chromosome assignment of the mutants by crossbreeding them with Y chromosome-autosome translocation strains.

  6. Ribosylurea accumulates in yeast urc4 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnberg, O; Vodnala, M; Domkin, V; Hofer, A; Rasmussen, A; Andersen, G; Piskur, J

    2010-06-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces (Lachancea) kluyveri urc4 mutants, unable to grow on uracil, biotransformed (14)C(2)-uracil into two labeled compounds, as detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These two compounds could also be obtained following organic synthesis of ribosylurea. This finding demonstrates that in the URC pyrimidine degradation pathway, the opening of the uracil ring takes place when uracil is attached to the ribose moiety. Ribosylurea has not been reported in the cell metabolism before and the two observed compounds likely represent an equilibrium mixture of the pyranosyl and furanosyl forms.

  7. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    , this book offers both inspiration to teaching form and a systematic framework for pedagogical and didactical reflection on this topic. In this sense, it shapes and professionalizes design teaching, and contributes to the development of the double-professionalism, which is so essential for teachers in modern...... means that form serves both as the connective value and as the concept for reflection. In other words, form is observed as form, not anything else. The didactical challenge of teaching form as form is accentuated by students’ everyday-based pre-orientation towards function at the expense of form...... in this book that they are highly interested in both the declarative and formative dimension of making form. Methodologically, the courses described in the contributions have a strong focus on student-centered experiential activities, thereby implicitly claiming that students must learn to make form...

  8. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  9. AFM images of complexes between amylose and Aspergillus niger glucoamylase mutants, native and mutant starch binding domains: a model for the action of glucoamylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, V. M.; Gunning, A. P.; Faults, C. B.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to investigate the complexes formed between high molecular weight amylose chains and Aspergillus niger glucoamylase mutants (E400Q and W52F), wild-type A. niger starch binding domains (SBDS), and mutant SBDs (W563K and W590K) lacking either of the two starch ...

  10. Wild Accessions and Mutant Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Lotus japonicus, Lotus burttii, and Lotus filicaulis are species of Lotus genus that are utilized for molecular genetic analysis such as the construction of a linkage map and QTL analysis. Among them, a number of mutants have been isolated from two wild accessions: L. japonicus Gifu B-129 and Miy...

  11. Detection of sensitive and mutant ruminal bacteria isolates from sheep, cattle, and buffalo using 14 therapeutic antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    SALEM, Abdelfattah Zeidan Mohamed; JIMENEZ, Roberto Montes de OCA; CERRILLO-SOTO, Maria Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, sensitive and mutant colonies of some ruminal bacterial species isolated from sheep, cattle, and buffalo were detected. We counted and considered \\"mutant colonies\\" the bacterial colonies grown in the clear inhibition zone in the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test. Detected mutant colonies were higher in buffalo than in cattle and sheep. Duricef and metronidazole caused no mutations in any species. The others formed mutant colonies, where r...

  12. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  13. Cadmium-sensitive, cad1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana are phytochelatin deficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, R; Goldsbrough, P B; Andersen, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-04-01

    An allelic series of cad1, cadmium-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, was isolated. These mutants were sensitive to cadmium to different extents and were deficient in their ability to form cadmium-peptide complexes as detected by gel-filtration chromatography. Each mutant was deficient in its ability to accumulate phytochelatins (PCs) as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and the amount of PCs accumulated by each mutant correlated with its degree of sensitivity to cadmium. The mutants had wild-type levels of glutathione, the substrate for PC biosynthesis, and in vitro assays demonstrated that each of the mutants was deficient in PC synthase activity. These results demonstrate conclusively the importance of PCs for cadmium tolerance in plants.

  14. Studies on mutant breeding of Hibiscus syriacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Ki Un; Kim, Young Taik

    1997-01-01

    Hibiscus has been known as a national flower of Korea. Hibiscus has such a characteristic of self-incompatibility that all the plant exist as natural hybrids and have heterogeneous genes. Many domestic 91 varieties of Hibiscus syriacus were collected. Radiosensitivity of H. Syriacus irradiated with {gamma}-ray was investigated in plant cuttings. The plant height was reduced by 45% in 5KR irradiated group, compared to control group. The radiation dose of 5KR could be recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus cuttings. Radiosensitivity of {gamma}-ray irradiated Hibiscus seed were investigated. The germination rate, survival rate and plant height was better in the 4KR irradiation plot than control. The radiation dose of 10{approx}12KR are recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus. Promising mutant lines were selected form the varieties of Hwarang, Wolsan no. 176, Ilpyondansim, Emille, Hanol, Yongkwang, Saeyongkwang, Chungmu, Imjinhong, Arang, Hungdansim-1 and Hongdansim-2. (author). 66 refs., 16 tabs., 13 figs.

  15. MDM2 Overexpression Cooperates with Mutant CDK4 in Mammary Cell Transformation and Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carbone, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to gain a better understanding of the consequence of deregulated CDK4 activity in vivo, the authors generated knock-in transgenic mice that express a tumor-derived mutant form of CDK4 (r24c...

  16. Collaborative form(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Gunn asks us to consider beauty as collaborative forms of action generated by moving between design by means of anthropology and anthropology by means of design. Specifically, she gives focus to play-like reflexions on practices of designing energy products, systems and infrastructure. Design...... anthropology engages groups of people within collaborative, interdisciplinary, inter-organizational design processes and co-analytic activities vs. the individual anthropologist conducting studies of people. In doing anthropology by means of design as Gatt and Ingold (2013) have shown, design is considered...

  17. Genetic interactions among homologous recombination mutants in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Alberto; Andaluz, Encarnación; Gómez-Raja, Jonathan; Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Larriba, Germán

    2015-01-01

    rad52-ΔΔ and, to a lesser extent, rad51-ΔΔ deletants of Candidaalbicans displayed slow growth and aberrant filamentous morphology whereas rad59-ΔΔ mutants, both by growth rate and morphology resembled wild type. In this study, we have constructed pair-wise double deletants to analyze genetic interactions among these homologous recombination (HR) proteins that affect growth and morphology traits. When grown in liquid YPD medium, double mutant rad51-ΔΔ rad59-ΔΔ exhibited growth rates, cell and colony morphologies, and plating efficiencies that were not significantly different from those observed for rad51-ΔΔ. The same was true for rad52-ΔΔ rad59-ΔΔ compared to rad52-ΔΔ. Slow growth and decreased plating efficiency were caused, at least in part, by a decreased viability, as deduced from FUN1 staining. Flow cytometry and microscopic studies of filamentous mutant populations revealed major changes in cell ploidy, size and morphology, whereas DAPI staining identified complex nuclear rearrangements in yeast and filamentous cells. These phenotypes were not observed in the rad59-ΔΔ mutant populations. Our results show that abolishing Rad51 functions induces the appearance of a subpopulation of aberrant yeast and filamentous forms with increased cell size and ploidy. The size of this complex subpopulation was exacerbated in rad52-ΔΔ mutants. The combination of filamentous cell morphology and viability phenotypes was reflected on the colony morphology of the respective mutants. We conclude that the rad52 mutation is epistatic to rad51 for all the morphological traits analyzed. We discuss these results in the light of the several functions of these recombination genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Construction and pilot screening of a signature-tagged mutant library of Sinorhizobium fredii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yuan Chun; Wu, Li Juan; Liu, Jian Xin; Zhang, Pan; Jiao, Jian; Yan, Hui; Liu, Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2016-03-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii is well known for its ability to establish symbiosis with diverse legumes such as Glycine max (soybean, determinate nodules) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea, indeterminate nodules). In order to make screening of S. fredii genes related to symbiosis cost-effective, we constructed a large Tn5 insertion mutant library of S. fredii CCBAU45436 using the signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) technique. This STM library contains a total of 25,500 independent mutants distributed in 17 sublibraries tagged by corresponding distinct DNA bar-code sequences. After the pilot screening of 255 mutants in 15 batches, Tag85-4, Tag4-17, Tag4-11 and Tag10-13 were found to have attenuated competitiveness (0-30 % in nodule occupation) compared to the wild-type strain when inoculated on soybean. Further characterization of these mutants suggests that Tag4-11 (a pyrC mutant) and Tag10-13 (a nrdJ mutant) are defective in establishing symbiosis with soybean. The pyrC mutant induced uninfected pseudonodules while the nrdJ mutant formed significantly more nodules containing bacteroids with poor persistence ability. When these two mutants were tested on pigeon pea, host-specific symbiotic defects were found. These results demonstrated the STM library as a valuable resource for identifying S. fredii genes relevant to symbiosis.

  19. Altered desferrioxamine-mediated iron utilization is a common trait of bald mutants of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Stéphany; Traxler, Matthew F; Craig, Matthias; Maciejewska, Marta; Ongena, Marc; van Wezel, Gilles P; Kolter, Roberto; Rigali, Sébastien

    2014-08-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is an important model organism for developmental studies of filamentous GC-rich actinobacteria. The genetic characterization of mutants of S. coelicolor blocked at the vegetative mycelium stage, the so-called bald (bld) mutants that are unable to erect spore-forming aerial hyphae, has opened the way to discovering the molecular basis of development in actinomycetes. Desferrioxamine (DFO) production and import of ferrioxamines (FO; iron-complexed DFO) are key to triggering morphogenesis of S. coelicolor and we show here that growth of S. coelicolor on the reference medium for Streptomyces developmental studies is fully dependent on DFO biosynthesis. UPLC-ESI-MS analysis revealed that all bld mutants tested are affected in DFO biosynthesis, with bldA, bldJ, and ptsH mutants severely impaired in DFO production, while bldF, bldK, crr and ptsI mutants overproduce DFO. Morphogenesis of bldK and bldJ mutants was recovered by supplying exogenous iron. Transcript analysis showed that the bldJ mutant is impaired in expression of genes involved in the uptake of FO, whereas transcription of genes involved in both DFO biosynthesis and FO uptake is increased in bldK mutants. Our study allows proposing altered DFO production and/or FO uptake as a novel phenotypic marker of many S. coelicolor bld mutants, and strengthens the role of siderophores and iron acquisition in morphological development of actinomycetes.

  20. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDb (https://scabusa.org/FgMutantDb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Thomas T; Basenko, Evelina; Harb, Omar; Brown, Neil A; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Bregitzer, Phil P

    2018-02-02

    There is no comprehensive storage for generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or data associated with these mutants. Instead, researchers relied on several independent and non-integrated databases. FgMutantDb was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web that will function as a centralized source of information on F. graminearum mutants. FgMutantDb aids in the maintenance and sharing of mutants within a research community. It will serve also as a platform for disseminating prepublication results as well as negative results that often go unreported. Additionally, the highly curated information on mutants in FgMutantDb will be shared with other databases (FungiDB, Ensembl, PhytoPath, and PHI-base) through updating reports. Here we describe the creation and potential usefulness of FgMutantDb to the F. graminearum research community, and provide a tutorial on its use. This type of database could be easily emulated for other fungal species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Arabidopsis mutant bik1 exhibits strong resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis-induced kinase1 (BIK1, a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, plays an important role in resistance against pathogens and insects in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions against Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate biotrophic protist that attacks cruciferous plants and induces gall formation on roots. Here, we investigated the potential roles of receptors FLS2, BAK1 and BIK1 in the infection of P. brassicae cruciferous plants. Wild-type plants, fls2 and bak1 mutants showed typical symptom on roots, and the galls were filled with large quantities of resting spores, while bik1 mutant plants exhibited strong resistance to P. brassicae. Compared with that of the wild-type plants, the root hair and cortical infection rate of bik1 mutant were significantly reduced by about 40-50%. A considerable portion of bik1 roots failed to form typical galls. Even if some small galls were formed, they were filled with multinucleate secondary plasmodia. The bik1 plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS at infected roots than other mutants and wild-type plants. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA treatment alleviated the clubroot symptoms in wild-type plants, and the expression of the SA signaling marker gene PR1 was significantly increased in bik1. Both sid2 (salicylic acid induction-deficient 2 and npr1-1 (non-expresser of PR genes that regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR mutants showed increased susceptibility to P. brassicae compared with wild-type plants. These results suggest that the resistance of bik1 to P. brassicae is possibly mediated by SA inducible mechanisms enhance the resistance to clubroot disease.

  2. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative ...

  3. Characterization of Sugar Insensitive (sis) Mutants of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Susan I.

    2009-06-08

    Despite the fact that soluble sugar levels have been postulated to play an important role in the control of a wide variety of plant metabolic and developmental pathways, the mechanisms by which plants respond to soluble sugar levels remain poorly understood. Plant responses to soluble sugar levels are also important in bioenergy production, as plant sugar responses are believed to help regulate both carbon fixation and carbon partitioning. For example, accumulation of soluble sugars, such as sucrose and glucose, in source tissues leads to feedback inhibition of photosynthesis, thereby decreasing rates of carbon fixation. Soluble sugar levels can also affect sink strengths, affecting the rates of accumulation of carbon-based compounds into both particular molecular forms (e.g. carbohydrates versus lipids versus proteins) and particular plant organs and tissues. Mutants of Arabidopsis that are defective in the ability to respond to soluble sugar levels were isolated and used as tools to identify some of the factors involved in plant sugar response. These sugar insensitive (sis) mutants were isolated by screening mutagenized seeds for those that were able to germinate and develop relatively normal shoot systems on media containing 0.3 M glucose or 0.3 M sucrose. At these sugar concentrations, wild-type Arabidopsis germinate and produce substantial root systems, but show little to no shoot development. Twenty-eight sis mutants were isolated during the course of four independent mutant screens. Based on a preliminary characterization of all of these mutants, sis3 and sis6 were chosen for further study. Both of these mutations appear to lie in previously uncharacterized loci. Unlike many other sugar-response mutants, sis3 mutants exhibit a wild-type or near wild-type response in all phytohormone-response assays conducted to date. The sis6-1 mutation is unusual in that it appears to be due to overexpression of a gene, rather than representing a loss of function mutation

  4. Development and evaluation of drought resistant mutant germ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this project was to select cowpea plants with improved levels of drought resistance without alteration to the colour of the testa or the growth form. Seed from M2 to M5 generations (M = mutant) were used in the study. The M2 to M4 seeds were planted and evaluated in wooden boxes in the greenhouse and in the ...

  5. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The induced mutagenesis method for deriving pigment mutants of a green microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-124 and their pigment composition as well as ability to assess mutability of contaminated aquatic ecosystems were studied. In the present study, 14086 mutants (colonies) were obtained by exposure of the ...

  6. Cadmium-Sensitive Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, R; Cobbett, C S

    1992-09-01

    A screening procedure for identifying Cd-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is described. With this procedure, two Cd-sensitive mutants were isolated. These represent independent mutations in the same locus, referred to as CAD1. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed that the mutation is closely linked to the tt3 locus on chromosome 5. In addition to Cd, the mutants are also significantly more sensitive to mercuric ions and only slightly more sensitive to Cu and Zn, while being no more sensitive than the wild type to Mn, thus indicating a degree of specificity in the mechanism affected by the mutation. Undifferentiated callus tissue is also Cd sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. Both wild-type and mutant plants showed increased sensitivity to Cd in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of the cadmium-binding (gamma-glutamylcysteine)(n)-glycine peptides, suggesting that the mutant is still able to synthesize these peptides. However, the effects of a cad1 mutation and buthionine sulfoximine together on cadmium sensitivity are essentially nonadditive, indicating that they may affect different aspects of the same detoxification mechanism. Assays of Cd uptake by intact plants indicate that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester Cd.

  7. Induced High Lysine Mutants in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Hans; Køie, B.; Eggum, B. O.

    1974-01-01

    Screening of mutagenically treated materials by combined Kjeldahl nitrogen and dye-binding capacity determinations disclosed fourteen barley mutants, which have from a few to about 40 per cent more lysine in the protein and one mutant with 10 per cent less lysine in the protein than the parent...

  8. Sperm morphogenesis in wild-type and fertilization-defective mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Taking advantage of conditions that allow spermatogenesis in vitro, the timing and sequence of morphological changes leading from the primary spermatocyte to the spermatozoon is described by light and electron microscopy. Together with previous studies, this allows a detailed description of the nuclear, cytoplasmic, and membrane changes occurring during spermatozoan morphogenesis. By comparison with wild type, abnormalities in spermatogenesis leading to aberrant infertile spermatozoa are found in six fertilization-defective (fer) mutants. In fer-1 mutant males, spermatids appear normal, but during spermiogenesis membranous organelles (MO) fail to fuse with the sperm plasma membrane and a short, though motile. pseudopod is formed. In fer-2, fer-3, and fer-4 mutants, spermatids accumulate 48-nm tubules around their nuclei where the centriole and an RNA containing perinuclear halo would normally be. In all three mutants, spermatids still activate to spermatozoa with normal fusion of their MOs, but the pseudopods formed are aberrant in most fer-2 and fer-4 spermatozoa and in some fer-3 spermatozoa. In fer-5 mutant males, spermatozoa do not form. Instead, defective spermatids with crystalline inclusions and abnormal internal laminar membranes accumulate. In fer-6 mutant males, only a few spermatozoa form and these have defective pseudopods. These spermatozoa retain their fibrous bodies, a structure which normally disassembles in the spermatid. The time of appearance of developmental abnormalities in all of these mutants correlates with the temperature-sensitive periods for development of infertility. The observation that each of these mutants has a different and discreet set of morphological defects, a structure which normally disassembles in the spermatid. The time of appearance of developmental abnormalities in all of these mutants correlates with the temperature-sensitive periods for development of infertility. The observation that each of these mutants has a

  9. Los mutantes de la escuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Armando Jaramillo-Ocampo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo muestra los resultados parciales del estudio “Juegos en el recreo escolar: un escenario para la formación ciudadana”, cuya pretensión fue comprender los imaginarios sociales de juego en el recreo escolar y su relación con la convivencia social desde la proximidad del enfoque de complementariedad y el diseño de investigación emergente, planteado por Murcia y Jaramillo (2008. Se presentan los desarrollos logrados en dos categorías centrales del estudio: el patio y el cuerpo; dos categorías que mutan constantemente como entidades vivas en la escuela, hacia la configuración de sujetos que reconocen en el otro y lo otro su posibilidad. La escuela viva, donde es posible “ser en relación con”… se reduce a un espacio temporal y físico, limitado por la campana, “el recreo”. El texto muestra, desde la voz de los actores, esa vida que se da y se quita en la escuela y que se posiciona como una más de las imposiciones normalizadas para controlar. Reconoce, finalmente, una propuesta desde la posibilidad que estos dos mutantes propician para una escuela libre y dinámica.

  10. Mutant p53 as a target for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michael J; Synnott, Naoise C; Crown, John

    2017-09-01

    TP53 (p53) is the single most frequently altered gene in human cancers, with mutations being present in approximately 50% of all invasive tumours. However, in some of the most difficult-to-treat cancers such as high-grade serous ovarian cancers, triple-negative breast cancers, oesophageal cancers, small-cell lung cancers and squamous cell lung cancers, p53 is mutated in at least 80% of samples. Clearly, therefore, mutant p53 protein is an important candidate target against which new anticancer treatments could be developed. Although traditionally regarded as undruggable, several compounds such as p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis-1 (PRIMA-1), a methylated derivative and structural analogue of PRIMA-1, i.e. APR-246, 2-sulfonylpyrimidines such as PK11007, pyrazoles such as PK7088, zinc metallochaperone-1 (ZMC1), a third generation thiosemicarbazone developed by Critical Outcome Techonologies Inc. (COTI-2) as well as specific peptides have recently been reported to reactive mutant p53 protein by converting it to a form exhibiting wild-type properties. Consistent with the reactivation of mutant p53, these compounds have been shown to exhibit anticancer activity in preclinical models expressing mutant p53. To date, two of these compounds, i.e. APR-246 and COTI-2 have progressed to clinical trials. A phase I/IIa clinical trial with APR-246 reported no major adverse effect. Currently, APR-246 is undergoing a phase Ib/II trial in patients with advanced serous ovarian cancer, while COTI-2 is being evaluated in a phase I trial in patients with advanced gynaecological cancers. It remains to be shown however, whether any mutant p53 reactivating compound has efficacy for the treatment of human cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Thrombopoietin receptor activation by myeloproliferative neoplasm associated calreticulin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachoua, Ilyas; Pecquet, Christian; El-Khoury, Mira; Nivarthi, Harini; Albu, Roxana-Irina; Marty, Caroline; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Vertenoeil, Gaëlle; Ngo, Anna; Koay, Ann; Raslova, Hana; Courtoy, Pierre J; Choong, Meng Ling; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William; Kralovics, Robert; Constantinescu, Stefan N

    2016-03-10

    Mutations in the calreticulin gene (CALR) represented by deletions and insertions in exon 9 inducing a -1/+2 frameshift are associated with a significant fraction of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The mechanisms by which CALR mutants induce MPN are unknown. Here, we show by transcriptional, proliferation, biochemical, and primary cell assays that the pathogenic CALR mutants specifically activate the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR/MPL). No activation is detected with a battery of type I and II cytokine receptors, except granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor, which supported only transient and weak activation. CALR mutants induce ligand-independent activation of JAK2/STAT/phosphatydylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3-K) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways via TpoR, and autonomous growth in Ba/F3 cells. In these transformed cells, no synergy is observed between JAK2 and PI3-K inhibitors in inhibiting cytokine-independent proliferation, thus showing a major difference from JAK2V617F cells where such synergy is strong. TpoR activation was dependent on its extracellular domain and its N-glycosylation, especially at N117. The glycan binding site and the novel C-terminal tail of the mutant CALR proteins were required for TpoR activation. A soluble form of TpoR was able to prevent activation of full-length TpoR provided that it was N-glycosylated. By confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation, CALR mutants exhibit different intracellular localization from that of wild-type CALR. Finally, knocking down either MPL/TpoR or JAK2 in megakaryocytic progenitors from patients carrying CALR mutations inhibited cytokine-independent megakaryocytic colony formation. Taken together, our study provides a novel signaling paradigm, whereby a mutated chaperone constitutively activates cytokine receptor signaling. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. PHENOTYPIC ANALYSIS OF OsTPKb LOSS OF FUNCTION MUTANT RICE LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isayenkov S. V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of screen and analysis of two OsTPKb rice mutant lines were described. The phenotypes and growth rate level of homozygous mutant plants of both rice lines were estimated. The electron microscopy of aleurone layer from forming seeds was performed. The OsTPKb mutant plants demonstrate lower growth rate in comparison with wild type plants. The loss of function OsTPKb mutations invariably led to (semisterile rice plants. The functional disruption of OsTPKb channel has negative impact on plant growth and development. It might completely change the cell morphology of aleurone layer.

  13. An apoptotic cell cycle mutant in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Ingrid

    1996-01-01

    The simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be a useful organism for elucidating the mechanisms that govern cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The excellent in vivo system permits a cell cycle study using temperature sensitive mutants. In addition, it is possible to study...... processes.Programmmed cell death with apoptosis plays a major role in development and homeostatis in most, if not all, animal cells. Apoptosis is a morphologically distinct form of death, that requires the activation of a highly regulated suicide program. Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a new system...... in which apoptosis can be studied using the novel, temperature sensitive mutant, cdc77. The cdc77 cells are defective in a G1 process, and die show the characteristc signs of apoptosis: condensation of the chromatin, degradation of the inner nuclear membrane, dilation of the space between the nuclear...

  14. USE OF LIGNOCELLULOLYTIC MUTANTS OF PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS IN RUMINANT FEED FORMULATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Vijaya Chalamcherla; Singaracharya Maringanti A.; Vijaya Lakshmi Muvva; Lakshmi Narasu Mangamoori; Mallikarjuna Reddy Ramireddy

    2009-01-01

    Two lignolytic mutants (POM1 - U.V. irradiated and POM2 – X ray irradiated) of P. ostreatus wild type (POW) were developed and used in new feed formulations for ruminants. Paddy straw (10 kg) amended with coconut cake, glyricidia leaves, urea (2%), and rice bran (5%) along with mutant forms of P. ostreatus substantially increased the reducing sugars, crude protein, and In Vitro Dry Matter Digestibility (IVDMD), while reducing the lignin contents. Maximum amounts of reducing sugars (555 mg/1...

  15. Impaired exercise tolerance and skeletal muscle myopathy in sulfonylurea receptor-2 mutant mice

    OpenAIRE

    Stoller, Douglas; Pytel, Peter; Katz, Sophie; Earley, Judy U.; Collins, Keith; Metcalfe, Jamie; Lang, Roberto M.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    By sensing intracellular energy levels, ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels help regulate vascular tone, glucose metabolism, and cardioprotection. SUR2 mutant mice lack full-length KATP channels in striated and smooth muscle and display a complex phenotype of hypertension and coronary vasospasm. SUR2 mutant mice also display baseline cardioprotection and can withstand acute sympathetic stress better than normal mice. We now studied response to a form of chronic stress, namely that induced...

  16. Autosomal mutants of proton-exposed kidney cells display frequent loss of heterozygosity on nonselected chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Dan, Cristian; Gauny, Stacey; Eckelmann, Bradley; Ohlrich, Anna P; Connolly, Marissa; Lasarev, Michael; Grossi, Gianfranco; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2014-05-01

    High-energy protons found in the space environment can induce mutations and cancer, which are inextricably linked. We hypothesized that some mutants isolated from proton-exposed kidneys arose through a genome-wide incident that causes loss of heterozygosity (LOH)-generating mutations on multiple chromosomes (termed here genomic LOH). To test this hypothesis, we examined 11 pairs of nonselected chromosomes for LOH events in mutant cells isolated from the kidneys of mice exposed to 4 or 5 Gy of 1 GeV protons. The mutant kidney cells were selected for loss of expression of the chromosome 8-encoded Aprt gene. Genomic LOH events were also assessed in Aprt mutants isolated from isogenic cultured kidney epithelial cells exposed to 5 Gy of protons in vitro. Control groups were spontaneous Aprt mutants and clones isolated without selection from the proton-exposed kidneys or cultures. The in vivo results showed significant increases in genomic LOH events in the Aprt mutants from proton-exposed kidneys when compared with spontaneous Aprt mutants and when compared with nonmutant (i.e., nonselected) clones from the proton-exposed kidneys. A bias for LOH events affecting chromosome 14 was observed in the proton-induced Aprt mutants, though LOH for this chromosome did not confer increased radiation resistance. Genomic LOH events were observed in Aprt mutants isolated from proton-exposed cultured kidney cells; however the incidence was fivefold lower than in Aprt mutants isolated from exposed intact kidneys, suggesting a more permissive environment in the intact organ and/or the evolution of kidney clones prior to their isolation from the tissue. We conclude that proton exposure creates a subset of viable cells with LOH events on multiple chromosomes, that these cells form and persist in vivo, and that they can be isolated from an intact tissue by selection for a mutation on a single chromosome.

  17. Responses to novelty in staggerer mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misslin, R; Cigrang, M; Guastavino, J M

    1986-01-01

    Responses to novelty in normal C57BL/6 and staggerer mutant mice were recorded. The normal mice confronted a novel object in their familiar environment showed avoidance and burying responses while the staggerer mutant mice contacted it. When given the opportunity to move around freely in simultaneously presented novel and familiar environments, the mutant mice more quickly entered the novel areas than normal animals. these data reveal a significant decrease in the neophobic components of the neotic behaviour in the staggerer mice. However, since the mutant mice did not show a locomotor deficit, the impairment of neophobia seems not to be due to the gait abnormalities of these animals. The results support the view that the cerebellum may contribute to the organization of complex behaviours. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Robust mutant strain design by pessimistic optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Meltem; Xu, Liang; Zeng, Bo; Qian, Xiaoning

    2017-10-03

    Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) based mathematical modeling enables in silico prediction of systems behavior for genome-scale metabolic networks. Computational methods have been derived in the FBA framework to solve bi-level optimization for deriving "optimal" mutant microbial strains with targeted biochemical overproduction. The common inherent assumption of these methods is that the surviving mutants will always cooperate with the engineering objective by overproducing the maximum desired biochemicals. However, it has been shown that this optimistic assumption may not be valid in practice. We study the validity and robustness of existing bi-level methods for strain optimization under uncertainty and non-cooperative environment. More importantly, we propose new pessimistic optimization formulations: P-ROOM and P-OptKnock, aiming to derive robust mutants with the desired overproduction under two different mutant cell survival models: (1) ROOM assuming mutants have the minimum changes in reaction fluxes from wild-type flux values, and (2) the one considered by OptKnock maximizing the biomass production yield. When optimizing for desired overproduction, our pessimistic formulations derive more robust mutant strains by considering the uncertainty of the cell survival models at the inner level and the cooperation between the outer- and inner-level decision makers. For both P-ROOM and P-OptKnock, by converting multi-level formulations into single-level Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) problems based on the strong duality theorem, we can derive exact optimal solutions that are highly scalable with large networks. Our robust formulations P-ROOM and P-OptKnock are tested with a small E. coli core metabolic network and a large-scale E. coli iAF1260 network. We demonstrate that the original bi-level formulations (ROOM and OptKnock) derive mutants that may not achieve the predicted overproduction under uncertainty and non-cooperative environment. The knockouts obtained by the

  19. Characterization of MarR Superrepressor Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Alekshun, Michael N.; Levy, Stuart B.

    1999-01-01

    MarR negatively regulates expression of the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) locus in Escherichia coli. Superrepressor mutants, generated in order to study regions of MarR required for function, exhibited altered inducer recognition properties in whole cells and increased DNA binding to marO in vitro. Mutations occurred in three areas of the relatively small MarR protein (144 amino acids). It is surmised that superrepression results from increased DNA binding activities of these mutant pr...

  20. Patulin degradation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: Sensitive mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonart, P; Sumbu, Z L; Bechet, J

    1985-03-01

    The present experiments (sensitive mutants and transient inhibition of growth) are compatible with the synthesis of an inductible detoxifying substance in the wild type strain. This substance could be glutathione because glutathione detoxification scheme essentially involves properties of the SH group and it is well known that patulin reacts with sulfhy dril groups.Studies are presently being carried out with sensitive mutants to establish definitively the relation between intracellular pool of glutathone and the resistance mechanism of a yeast to patulin.

  1. Copper-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, C; Anderson, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-11-01

    A Cu-sensitive mutant, cup1-1, of Arabidopsis thaliana has a pattern of heavy-metal sensitivity different from that of the cad1 and cad2 mutants, which are deficient in phytochelatin biosynthesis. The latter are significantly sensitive to Cd and Hg and only slightly sensitive to Cu, whereas the cup1-1 mutant is significantly sensitive to Cu, slightly sensitive to Cd, and not more sensitive to Hg, compared to the wild type. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus, which has been mapped to chromosome 1. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that the cup1-1 mutant is not affected in phytochelatin biosynthesis or function. The sensitive phenotype of the cup1-1 mutant is associated with, and probably due to, increased accumulation of higher levels of Cd and Cu compared with the wild type. Consistent with this, a Cu-inducible, root-specific metallothionein gene, MT2a, is expressed in cup1-1 roots under conditions in which it is not expressed in the wild type. Undifferentiated cup1-1 callus tissue did not show the Cu-sensitive phenotype, suggesting that the mutant phenotype, in contrast to cad1 and cad2, is not expressed at the cellular level.

  2. Atrial fibrillation-linked germline GJA5/connexin40 mutants showed an increased hemichannel function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiguo Sun

    Full Text Available Mutations in GJA5 encoding the gap junction protein connexin40 (Cx40 have been linked to lone atrial fibrillation. Some of these mutants result in impaired gap junction function due to either abnormal connexin localization or impaired gap junction channels, which may play a role in promoting atrial fibrillation. However, the effects of the atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants on hemichannel function have not been studied. Here we investigated two atrial fibrillation-linked germline Cx40 mutants, V85I and L221I. These two mutants formed putative gap junction plaques at cell-cell interfaces, with similar gap junction coupling conductance as that of wild-type Cx40. Connexin deficient HeLa cells expressing either one of these two mutants displayed prominent propidium iodide-uptake distinct from cells expressing wild-type Cx40 or other atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants, I75F, L229M, and Q49X. Propidium iodide-uptake was sensitive to [Ca2+]o and the hemichannel blockers, carbenoxolone, flufenamic acid and mefloquine, but was not affected by the pannexin 1 channel blocking agent, probenecid, indicating that uptake is most likely mediated via connexin hemichannels. A gain-of-hemichannel function in these two atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants may provide a novel mechanism underlying the etiology of atrial fibrillation.

  3. Drosophila melanogaster White Mutant w1118 Undergo Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Ferreiro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Key scientific discoveries have resulted from genetic studies of Drosophila melanogaster, using a multitude of transgenic fly strains, the majority of which are constructed in a genetic background containing mutations in the white gene. Here we report that white mutant flies from w1118 strain undergo retinal degeneration. We observed also that w1118 mutants have progressive loss of climbing ability, shortened life span, as well as impaired resistance to various forms of stress. Retinal degeneration was abolished by transgenic expression of mini-white+ in the white null background w1118. We conclude that beyond the classical eye-color phenotype, mutations in Drosophila white gene could impair several biological functions affecting parameters like mobility, life span and stress tolerance. Consequently, we suggest caution and attentiveness during the interpretation of old experiments employing white mutant flies and when planning new ones, especially within the research field of neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. We also encourage that the use of w1118 strain as a wild-type control should be avoided.

  4. Pattern formation mechanisms in motility mutants of Myxococcus xanthus

    CERN Document Server

    Starruss, Joern; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Sogaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Baer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Formation of spatial patterns of cells is a recurring theme in biology and often depends on regulated cell motility. Motility of M. xanthus depends on two motility machineries: the S-engine and A-engine. Moving M. xanthus cells can organize into spreading colonies or spore-filled fruiting bodies depending on their nutritional status. To understand these two pattern formation processes and the contributions by the two motility machineries, as well as cell reversal, we analyze spatial self-organization in 3 strains: i) a mutant that moves unidirectionally without reversing by the A-motility system only, ii) a unidirectional mutant that is also equipped with the S-motility system, and iii) the wild-type that, in addition to the two motility systems, reverses its direction of movement. The mutant moving by the A-engine illustrates that collective motion in the form of large moving clusters can arise in gliding bacteria due to steric interactions of the rod-shaped cells, without the need of invoking any biochemica...

  5. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation is neuroprotective in the A53T ??synuclein Parkinson's disease rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Musacchio, Thomas; Rebenstorff, Maike; Fluri, Felix; Brotchie, Jonathan M.; Volkmann, Jens; Koprich, James B.; Ip, Chi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a highly effective symptomatic therapy for motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). An additional, disease?modifying effect has been suspected from studies in toxin?based PD animal models, but these models do not reflect the molecular pathology and progressive nature of PD that would be required to evaluate a disease?modifying action. Defining a disease?modifying effect could radically change the way in which DBS is...

  6. Modular forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.; Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modular forms are functions with an enormous amount of symmetry that play a central role in number theory, connecting it with analysis and geometry. They have played a prominent role in mathematics since the 19th century and their study continues to flourish today. Modular forms formed the

  7. Rhodopsin mutant P23H destabilizes rod photoreceptor disk membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Haeri

    Full Text Available Mutations in rhodopsin cause retinitis pigmentosa in humans and retinal degeneration in a multitude of other animals. We utilized high-resolution live imaging of the large rod photoreceptors from transgenic frogs (Xenopus to compare the properties of fluorescently tagged rhodopsin, Rho-EGFP, and Rho(P23H-EGFP. The mutant was abnormally distributed both in the inner and outer segments (OS, accumulating in the OS to a concentration of ∼0.1% compared to endogenous opsin. Rho(P23H-EGFP formed dense fluorescent foci, with concentrations of mutant protein up to ten times higher than other regions. Wild-type transgenic Rho-EGFP did not concentrate in OS foci when co-expressed in the same rod with Rho(P23H-EGFP. Outer segment regions containing fluorescent foci were refractory to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, while foci in the inner segment exhibited recovery kinetics similar to OS regions without foci and Rho-EGFP. The Rho(P23H-EGFP foci were often in older, more distal OS disks. Electron micrographs of OS revealed abnormal disk membranes, with the regular disk bilayers broken into vesiculotubular structures. Furthermore, we observed similar OS disturbances in transgenic mice expressing Rho(P23H, suggesting such structures are a general consequence of mutant expression. Together these results show that mutant opsin disrupts OS disks, destabilizing the outer segment possibly via the formation of aggregates. This may render rods susceptible to mechanical injury or compromise OS function, contributing to photoreceptor loss.

  8. Structure and functional studies of the ribonuclease binase Glu43Ala/Phe81Ala mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkevich, V A; Schulga, A A; Trofimov, A A; Dorovatovskii, P V; Goncharuk, D A; Tkach, E N; Makarov, A A; Polyakov, K M

    2013-06-01

    Ribonuclease from Bacillus intermedius (binase) is a small basic protein with antitumour activity. The three-dimensional structure of the binase mutant form Glu43Ala/Phe81Ala was determined at 1.98 Å resolution and its functional properties, such as the kinetic parameters characterizing the hydrolysis of polyinosinic acid and cytotoxicity towards Kasumi-1 cells, were investigated. In all crystal structures of binase studied previously the characteristic dimer is present, with the active site of one subunit being blocked owing to interactions within the dimer. In contrast to this, the new mutant form is not dimeric in the crystal. The catalytic efficiency of the mutant form is increased 1.7-fold and its cytotoxic properties are enhanced compared with the wild-type enzyme.

  9. Characterization of a cytochalasin D-resistant mutant of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, M; Gallegos, B; Meza, I

    1989-01-01

    Characterization of a cytochalasin D-resistant mutant of the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica capable of growing at 10 microM cytochalasin is described. The mutant cells also show resistance to 5 mM colchicine and 100 microM cytochalasin B, drugs proved deleterious for wild type trophozoites. The mutants show increased osmotic fragility and electric mobility but reduced phagocytic activity, and agglutination by Concanavalin A. On the other hand pinocytic activity remains unaltered when compared with the wild type cells. Polymerized actin, seen by staining with phalloidin, often appears polarized to one end of the trophozoites and forms few of the endocytic invaginations found in wild type amebas. An altered distribution of part of the actin could explain the differences in surface properties and motility observed in the mutant amebas.

  10. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity links wild-type but not mutant a-Synuclein to brain arachidonate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golovko, Mikhail; Rosenberger, Thad; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2006-01-01

    Because alpha-synuclein (Snca) has a role in brain lipid metabolism, we determined the impact that the loss of alpha-synuclein had on brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) metabolism in vivo using Snca-/- mice. We measured [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 incorporation and turnover kinetics in brain phospholipids using...... an established steady-state kinetic model. Liver was used as a negative control, and no changes were observed between groups. In Snca-/- brains, there was a marked reduction in 20:4n-6-CoA mass and in microsomal acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl) activity toward 20:4n-6. Microsomal Acsl activity was completely restored...... after the addition of exogenous wild-type mouse or human alpha-synuclein, but not by A30P, E46K, and A53T forms of alpha-synuclein. Acsl and acyl-CoA hydrolase expression was not different between groups. The incorporation and turnover of 20:4n-6 into brain phospholipid pools were markedly reduced...

  11. The Truncated C-terminal Fragment of Mutant ATXN3 Disrupts Mitochondria Dynamics in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Hsu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, known as Machado-Joseph disease, is an autosomal dominant disease caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine in ATXN3 gene, leading to neurodegeneration in SCA3 patients. Similar to other neurodegenerative diseases, the dysfunction of mitochondria is observed to cause neuronal death in SCA3 patients. Based on previous studies, proteolytic cleavage of mutant ATXN3 is found to produce truncated C-terminal fragments in SCA3 models. However, whether these truncated mutant fragments disturb mitochondrial functions and result in pathological death is still unclear. Here, we used neuroblastoma cell and transgenic mouse models to examine the effects of truncated mutant ATXN3 on mitochondria functions. In different models, we observed truncated mutant ATXN3 accelerated the formation of aggregates, which translocated into the nucleus to form intranuclear aggregates. In addition, truncated mutant ATXN3 caused more mitochondrial fission, and decreased the expression of mitochondrial fusion markers, including Mfn-1 and Mfn-2. Furthermore, truncated mutant ATXN3 decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species and finally increased cell death rate. In transgenic mouse models, truncated mutant ATXN3 also led to more mitochondrial dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cell death in the cerebellums. This study supports the toxic fragment hypothesis in SCA3, and also provides evidence that truncated mutant ATXN3 is severer than full-length mutant one in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Plasmodium berghei: in vivo generation and selection of karyotype mutants and non-gametocyte producer mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, C. J.; Ramesar, J.; van den Berg, F. M.; Mons, B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously reported that karyotype and gametocyte-producer mutants spontaneously arose during in vivo asexual multiplication of Plasmodium berghei. Here we studied the rate of selection of these mutants in vivo. Gametocyte production and karyotype pattern were established at regular intervals

  13. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; CLARK, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  14. Aging Kit mutant mice develop cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ye

    Full Text Available Both bone marrow (BM and myocardium contain progenitor cells expressing the c-Kit tyrosine kinase. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of c-Kit mutations on: i. myocardial c-Kit(+ cells counts and ii. the stability of left ventricular (LV contractile function and structure during aging. LV structure and contractile function were evaluated (echocardiography in two groups of Kit mutant (W/Wv and W41/W42 and in wild type (WT mice at 4 and 12 months of age and the effects of the mutations on LV mass, vascular density and the numbers of proliferating cells were also determined. In 4 month old Kit mutant and WT mice, LV ejection fractions (EF and LV fractional shortening rates (FS were comparable. At 12 months of age EF and FS were significantly decreased and LV mass was significantly increased only in W41/W42 mice. Myocardial vascular densities and c-Kit(+ cell numbers were significantly reduced in both mutant groups when compared to WT hearts. Replacement of mutant BM with WT BM at 4 months of age did not prevent these abnormalities in either mutant group although they were somewhat attenuated in the W/Wv group. Notably BM transplantation did not prevent the development of cardiomyopathy in 12 month W41/W42 mice. The data suggest that decreased numbers and functional capacities of c-Kit(+ cardiac resident progenitor cells may be the basis of the cardiomyopathy in W41/W42 mice and although defects in mutant BM progenitor cells may prove to be contributory, they are not causal.

  15. Hepatitis B surface gene 145 mutant as a minor population in hepatitis B virus carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsu Haruki

    2012-01-01

    children and adults. HBV carriers might have the a determinant mutants as a minor form.

  16. Ovarian abnormalities in the staggerer mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastavino, Jean-Marie; Boufares, Salima; Crusio, Wim E

    2005-08-24

    Disturbances in several reproductive functions of the staggerer cerebellar mutant mouse have been observed. In this study, reproductive efficiency of staggerer mice was compared to normal mice by recording the number of pups produced and the number of oocytes occurring. It was found that staggerer mothers produced smaller litters than controls and the number of oocytes produced in their ovaries was reduced by the staggerer mutation. These results indicate a pleiotropic effect on fertility of the Rora(sg) gene underlying the cerebellar abnormalities of the staggerer mutant.

  17. Ovarian Abnormalities in the Staggerer Mutant Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Guastavino

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances in several reproductive functions of the staggerer cerebellar mutant mouse have been observed. In this study, reproductive efficiency of staggerer mice was compared to normal mice by recording the number of pups produced and the number of oocytes occurring. It was found that staggerer mothers produced smaller litters than controls and the number of oocytes produced in their ovaries was reduced by the staggerer mutation. These results indicate a pleiotropic effect on fertility of the Rorasg gene underlying the cerebellar abnormalities of the staggerer mutant.

  18. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Koellikerstrasse 6, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany); Wehnert, Manfred [Institute of Human Genetics, University of Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Huebner, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.huebner@mail.uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Koellikerstrasse 6, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  19. Characterization of Brucella abortus mutant strain Δ22915, a potential vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanqing; Tian, Mingxing; Li, Peng; Liu, Jiameng; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2017-04-04

    Brucellosis, caused by Brucella spp., is an important zoonosis worldwide. Vaccination is an effective strategy for protection against Brucella infection in livestock in developing countries and in wildlife in developed countries. However, current vaccine strains including S19 and RB51 are pathogenic to humans and pregnant animals, limiting their use. In this study, we constructed the Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S2308 mutant strain Δ22915, in which the putative lytic transglycosylase gene BAB_RS22915 was deleted. The biological properties of mutant strain Δ22915 were characterized and protection of mice against virulent S2308 challenge was evaluated. The mutant strain Δ22915 showed reduced survival within RAW264.7 cells and survival in vivo in mice. In addition, the mutant strain Δ22915 failed to escape fusion with lysosomes within host cells, and caused no observable pathological damage. RNA-seq analysis indicated that four genes associated with amino acid/nucleotide transport and metabolism were significantly upregulated in mutant strain Δ22915. Furthermore, inoculation of ∆22915 at 10 5 colony forming units induced effective host immune responses and long-term protection of BALB/c mice. Therefore, mutant strain ∆22915 could be used as a novel vaccine candidate in the future to protect animals against B. abortus infection.

  20. Generation and characterisation of stable ethanol-tolerant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dragana; Fraser, Sarah; Chambers, Paul J; Rogers, Peter; Stanley, Grant A

    2010-02-01

    Saccharomyces spp. are widely used for ethanologenic fermentations, however yeast metabolic rate and viability decrease as ethanol accumulates during fermentation, compromising ethanol yield. Improving ethanol tolerance in yeast should, therefore, reduce the impact of ethanol toxicity on fermentation performance. The purpose of the current work was to generate and characterise ethanol-tolerant yeast mutants by subjecting mutagenised and non-mutagenised populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A to adaptive evolution using ethanol stress as a selection pressure. Mutants CM1 (chemically mutagenised) and SM1 (spontaneous) had increased acclimation and growth rates when cultivated in sub-lethal ethanol concentrations, and their survivability in lethal ethanol concentrations was considerably improved compared with the parent strain. The mutants utilised glucose at a higher rate than the parent in the presence of ethanol and an initial glucose concentration of 20 g l(-1). At a glucose concentration of 100 g l(-1), SM1 had the highest glucose utilisation rate in the presence or absence of ethanol. The mutants produced substantially more glycerol than the parent and, although acetate was only detectable in ethanol-stressed cultures, both mutants produced more acetate than the parent. It is suggested that the increased ethanol tolerance of the mutants is due to their elevated glycerol production rates and the potential of this to increase the ratio of oxidised and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)/NADH) in an ethanol-compromised cell, stimulating glycolytic activity.

  1. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  2. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  3. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    The result of bio-test, using the resulting pigment mutant of C. reinhardtii 124y-1 showed that mutagenic activity was observed significantly in both Tekeli River and Pavlodar Oil Refinery in Kazakhstan; the waste water of the. Pavlodar Oil Refinery had high-toxicity while the water of the Tekeli River had medium-toxicity.

  4. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 25; Issue 1. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus fumigatus initiate infection in Phaseolus mungo in the presence of phaseo-linone; levamisole gives protection. Suchandra Sett Santosh K Mishra Kazia I Siddiqui. Articles Volume 25 Issue 1 March ...

  5. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  6. Flocculation phenomenon of a mutant flocculent Saccharomyces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flocculation phenomenon of a mutant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain: Effects of metal ions, sugars, temperature, pH, protein-denaturants and ... was in the early stationary growth phase, which coincided with glucose depletion in the batch fermentation for the production of ethanol from kitchen refuse medium.

  7. Mutant PTEN in Cancer : Worse Than Nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leslie, Nick R; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressors block the development of cancer and are often lost during tumor development. Papa et al. show that partial loss of normal PTEN tumor suppressor function can be compounded by additional disruption caused by the expression of inactive mutant PTEN protein. This has significant

  8. Genetic engineering of EcoRI mutants with altered amino acid residues in the DNA binding site: physicochemical investigations give evidence for an altered monomer/dimer equilibrium for the Gln144Lys145 and Gln144Lys145Lys200 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, R; Rüter, T; Alves, J; Fliess, A; Wolfes, H; Pingoud, V; Urbanke, C; Maass, G; Pingoud, A; Düsterhöft, A

    1989-03-21

    We have genetically engineered the Arg200----Lys mutant, the Glu144Arg145----GlnLys double mutant, and the Glu144Arg145Arg200----GlnLysLys triple mutant of the EcoRI endonuclease in extension of previously published work on site-directed mutagenesis of the EcoRI endonuclease in which Glu144 had been exchanged for Gln and Arg145 for Lys [Wolfes et al. (1986) Nucleic Acids Res. 14, 9063]. All these mutants carry modifications in the DNA binding site. Mutant EcoRI proteins were purified to homogeneity and characterized by physicochemical techniques. All mutants have a very similar secondary structure composition. However, whereas the Lys200 mutant is not impaired in its capacity to form a dimer, the Gln144Lys145 and Gln144Lys145Lys200 mutants have a very much decreased propensity to form a dimer or tetramer depending on concentration as shown by gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation. This finding may explain the results of isoelectric focusing experiments which show that these two mutants have a considerably more basic pI than expected for a protein in which an acidic amino acid was replaced by a neutral one. Furthermore, while wild-type EcoRI and the Lys200 mutant are denatured in an irreversible manner upon heating to 60 degrees C, the thermal denaturation process as shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy is fully reversible with the Gln144Lys145 double mutant and the Gln144Lys145Lys200 triple mutant. All EcoRI endonuclease mutants described here have a residual enzymatic activity with wild-type specificity, since Escherichia coli cells overexpressing the mutant proteins can only survive in the presence of EcoRI methylase. The detailed analysis of the enzymatic activity and specificity of the purified mutant proteins is the subject of the accompanying paper [Alves et al. (1989) Biochemistry (following paper in this issue)].

  9. Mutant p53 exhibits trivial effects on mitochondrial functions which can be reactivated by ellipticine in lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Jianfeng; Robbins, Delira; Morris, Kerri; Sit, Amos; Liu, Yong-Yu; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2011-03-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that a fraction of the wild-type (wt) form of the tumor suppressor p53, can translocate to mitochondria due to genotoxic stress. The mitochondrial targets of wt p53 have also been studied. However, whether mutant p53, which exists in 50% of human cancers, translocates to mitochondria and affects mitochondrial functions is unclear. In this study, we used doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug, to treat five human lymphoma cell lines with wt, mutant or deficient in p53, to induce p53 activation and mitochondrial translocation. Our results demonstrated that mutant p53, like wt p53, was induced upon doxorubicin treatment. Similarly, a fraction of mutant p53 also translocated to mitochondria. However, Complex I and II activities in the mitochondria were compromised only in wt p53-bearing cells after doxorubicin treatment, but not in mutant p53-bearing cells. Similarly, doxorubicin treatment caused greater cell death only in wt p53-bearing cells, but not in mutant p53-bearing cells. When p53 deficient Ramos cells were transfected with mutant p53 (249S), the cells showed resistance to doxorubicin-induced cell death and decreases in complex activities. To reactivate mutant p53 and reverse chemoresistance, ellipticine (5,11-dimethyl-6H-pyrido[4,3-b]carbazole) was used to treat mutant p53 cells. Ellipticine enhanced p53 mitochondrial translocation, decreased Complex I activity, and sensitized p53 mutant cells to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. In summary, our studies suggest that mutations in p53 may not hinder p53's mitochondrial translocation, but impair its effects on mitochondrial functions. Therefore, restoring mutant p53 by ellipticine may sensitize these cells to chemotherapy.

  10. Characterization of antimicrobial activity against Listeria and cytotoxicity of native melittin and its mutant variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi; Singh, Atul K; Wu, Xiaoyu; Lyu, Yuan; Bhunia, Arun K; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are relatively short peptides that have the ability to penetrate the cell membrane, form pores leading to cell death. This study compares both antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of native melittin and its two mutants, namely, melittin I17K (GIGAVLKVLTTGLPALKSWIKRKRQQ) with a higher charge and lower hydrophobicity and mutant G1I (IIGAVLKVLTTGLPALISWIKRKRQQ) of higher hydrophobicity. The antimicrobial activity against different strains of Listeria was investigated by bioassay, viability studies, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay on mammalian Caco-2 cells. The minimum inhibitory concentration of native, mutant I17K, mutant G1I against Listeria monocytogenes F4244 was 0.315±0.008, 0.814±0.006 and 0.494±0.037μg/ml respectively, whereas the minimum bactericidal concentration values were 3.263±0.0034, 7.412±0.017 and 5.366±0.019μg/ml respectively. Lag time for inactivation of L. monocytogenes F4244 was observed at concentrations below 0.20 and 0.78μg/ml for native and mutant melittin I17K respectively. The antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes F4244 was in the order native>G1I>I17K. Native melittin was cytotoxic to mammalian Caco-2 cells above concentration of 2μg/ml, whereas the two mutants exhibited negligible cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 8μg/ml. Pore formation in cell wall/membrane was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of native and its mutants indicated that (i) surface native melittin and G1I exhibited higher tendency to penetrate a mimic of bacterial cell membrane and (ii) transmembrane native and I17K formed water channel in mimics of bacterial and mammalian cell membranes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective processing and metabolism of disease-causing mutant prion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarthi Ashok

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by aberrant metabolism of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C. In genetic forms of these diseases, mutations in the globular C-terminal domain are hypothesized to favor the spontaneous generation of misfolded PrP conformers (including the transmissible PrP(Sc form that trigger downstream pathways leading to neuronal death. A mechanistic understanding of these diseases therefore requires knowledge of the quality control pathways that recognize and degrade aberrant PrPs. Here, we present comparative analyses of the biosynthesis, trafficking, and metabolism of a panel of genetic disease-causing prion protein mutants in the C-terminal domain. Using quantitative imaging and biochemistry, we identify a misfolded subpopulation of each mutant PrP characterized by relative detergent insolubility, inaccessibility to the cell surface, and incomplete glycan modifications. The misfolded populations of mutant PrPs were neither recognized by ER quality control pathways nor routed to ER-associated degradation despite demonstrable misfolding in the ER. Instead, mutant PrPs trafficked to the Golgi, from where the misfolded subpopulation was selectively trafficked for degradation in acidic compartments. Surprisingly, selective re-routing was dependent not only on a mutant globular domain, but on an additional lysine-based motif in the highly conserved unstructured N-terminus. These results define a specific trafficking and degradation pathway shared by many disease-causing PrP mutants. As the acidic lysosomal environment has been implicated in facilitating the conversion of PrP(C to PrP(Sc, our identification of a mutant-selective trafficking pathway to this compartment may provide a cell biological basis for spontaneous generation of PrP(Sc in familial prion disease.

  12. Interactions between wild-type and mutant Ras genes in lung and skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, M D; Rosario, R D; Westcott, P M K; Banta, K L; Balmain, A

    2013-08-22

    Ras oncogenes (Hras, Kras and Nras) are important drivers of carcinogenesis. However, tumors with Ras mutations often show loss of the corresponding wild-type (WT) allele, suggesting that proto-oncogenic forms of Ras can function as a suppressor of carcinogenesis. In vitro studies also suggest that WT Ras proteins can suppress the tumorigenic properties of alternate mutant Ras family members, but in vivo evidence for these heterologous interactions is lacking. We have investigated the genetic interactions between different combinations of mutant and WT Ras alleles in vivo using carcinogen-induced lung and skin carcinogenesis in mice with targeted deletion of different Ras family members. The major suppressor effect of WT Kras is observed only in mutant Kras-driven lung carcinogenesis, where loss of one Kras allele led to increased tumor number and size. Deletion of one Hras allele dramatically reduced the number of skin papillomas with Hras mutations, consistent with Hras as the major target of mutation in these tumors. However, skin carcinoma numbers were very similar, suggesting that WT Hras functions as a suppressor of progression from papillomas to invasive squamous carcinomas. In the skin, the Kras proto-oncogene functions cooperatively with mutant Hras to promote papilloma development, although the effect is relatively small. In contrast, the Hras proto-oncogene attenuated the activity of mutant Kras in lung carcinogenesis. Interestingly, loss of Nras increased the number of mutant Kras-induced lung tumors, but decreased the number of mutant Hras-induced skin papillomas. These results show that the strongest suppressor effects of WT Ras are only seen in the context of mutation of the cognate Ras protein, and only relatively weak effects are detected on tumor development induced by mutations in alternative family members. The data also underscore the complex and context-dependent nature of interactions between proto-oncogenic and oncogenic forms of different

  13. Temperature-sensitive retinoid isomerase activity of RPE65 mutants associated with Leber Congenital Amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songhua; Hu, Jane; Jin, Robin J; Aiyar, Ashok; Jacobson, Samuel G; Bok, Dean; Jin, Minghao

    2015-08-01

    RPE65 is a membrane-associated retinoid isomerase involved in the visual cycle responsible for sustaining vision. Many mutations in the human RPE65 gene are associated with distinct forms of retinal degenerative diseases. The pathogenic mechanisms for most of these mutations remain poorly understood. Here, we show that three Leber congenital amaurosis -associated RPE65 mutants (R91W, Y249C and R515W) undergo rapid proteasomal degradation mediated by the 26 S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 13 (PSMD13) in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. These mutant proteins formed cytosolic inclusion bodies or high molecular weight complexes via disulfide bonds. The mutations are mapped on non-active sites but severely reduced isomerase activity of RPE65. At 30°C, however, the enzymatic function and membrane-association of the mutant RPE65s are significantly rescued possibly due to proper folding. In addition, PSMD13 displayed a drastically decreased effect on degradation of the mutant proteins in the cells grown at 30°C. These results suggest that PSMD13 plays a critical role in regulating pathogenicity of the mutations and the molecular basis for the PSMD13-mediated rapid degradation and loss of function of the mutants is misfolding of RPE65. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis of poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates) by mutant and recombinant Pseudomonas strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Gjalt W.; WONINK, E; DEKONING, G; Preusting, Hans; Witholt, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation kinetics and physical characteristics of the poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates) (PHAs) formed by several Pseudomonas strains, mutants and recombinants. Although PHA synthesis generally begins only after an essential nutrient such as N, P, S or Mg becomes limiting, we have

  15. Characterization of a Legionella micdadei mip mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, W A; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella micdadei is dependent upon its ability to infect alveolar phagocytes. To better understand the basis of intracellular infection by this organism, we examined the importance of its Mip surface protein. In Legionella pneumophila, Mip promotes infection of both human m...... Mip. Although unimpaired in its ability to grow in bacteriologic media, this Mip mutant was defective in its capacity to infect U937 cells, a human macrophage-like cell line. Most significantly, the Mip- organism displayed a 24-fold reduction in survivability immediately after its entry...... into the phagocyte. Similarly, the mutant was less able to parasitize Hartmannella amoebae. Taken together, these data argue that Mip specifically potentiates intracellular growth by L. micdadei....

  16. Family feud in chemosensitvity: p73 and mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Meredith S

    2004-03-01

    The importance of p53 in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of cancer cells is well established. p53 plays a critical role in the cellular response to DNA damage by regulating genes involved in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and genomic stability. As a result, p53 tumor status is a critical determinant of both responses to anti-cancer treatment and clinical prognosis. Interestingly, tumors expressing certain mutant forms of p53 ("gain of function") are particularly resistant to chemotherapy, even when compared to cells that lack any detectable p53. Until recently, the explanation for this enhanced chemoresistance was not clear. Recent studies have shown that the p53 homologues, p73 and p63, are also activated by chemotherapies, leading to tumor cell death. Now the discovery that mutant p53 interacts with p73, and that regulation of this interaction by a p53 polymorphism can modulate chemosensitvity provide a new model for how p53-family interactions can influence the response of tumors to anti-cancer therapies. Since p53 mutations are found in more than 50% of human tumors, strategies aimed at manipulating these interactions may prove useful in enhancing the chemotherapy response, and perhaps, overcoming chemoresistance.

  17. A new neurological rat mutant "mutilated foot".

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, J M; Scaravilli, F; Duchen, L W; Mertin, J

    1981-01-01

    A new autosomal recessive mutant rat (mutilated foot) with a neurological disorder is described. Affected animals become ataxic and the feet, generally of the hind limbs, are mutilated. Quantitative studies show a severe reduction in numbers of sensory ganglion cells and fibres, including unmyelinated fibres. The numbers of ventral root fibres, particularly those of small diameter, are also reduced. Markedly decreased numbers of spindles are found in the limb muscles. These quantitative abnor...

  18. Courtship song analysis of Drosophila muscle mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Samya; Wajda, Mathew P; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2012-01-01

    As part of the mating ritual, males of Drosophila species produce species-specific courtship songs through wing vibrations generated by the thoracic musculature. While previous studies have shown that indirect flight muscles (IFM) are neurally activated during courtship song production, the precise role of these muscles in song production has not been investigated. Fortunately, IFM mutants abound in Drosophila melanogaster and studies spanning several decades have shed light on the role of muscle proteins in IFM-powered flight. Analysis of courtship songs in these mutants offers the opportunity to uncover the role of the IFM in a behavior distinct than flight and subject to different evolutionary selection regimes. Here, we describe protocols for the recording and analysis of courtship behavior and mating song of D. melanogaster muscle transgenic and mutant strains. To record faint acoustic signal of courtship songs, an insulated mating compartment was used inside a recording device (INSECTAVOX) equipped with a modified electret microphone, a low-noise power supply, and noise filters. Songs recorded in the INSECTAVOX are digitized using Goldwave, whose several features enable extraction of critical song parameters, including carrier frequencies for pulse song and sine song. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by showing that deletion of the N-terminal region of the myosin regulatory light chain, a mutation known to decrease wing beat frequency and flight power, affects courtship song parameters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Parkin mutant in the fly is largely rescued by metal-responsive transcription factor (MTF-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, N.; Georgiev, O; Schaffner, W

    2011-01-01

    The gene for Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is mutated in some familial forms of Parkinson's disease, a severe neurodegenerative disorder. A homozygous mutant of the Drosophila ortholog of human parkin is viable but results in severe motoric impairment including an inability to fly, female and male sterility, and a decreased lifespan. Here we show that a double mutant of the genes for Parkin and the metal-responsive transcription factor MTF-1 is not viable. MTF-1, which is conserved from ins...

  20. HIV‑1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On the cover: Mutant forms of HIV-1 IN reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). The cover figure shows the IN of prototype foamy virus complexed to a novel INSTI (gold) that retains potency against resistant mutants of HIV-1 IN. Overlain are the host and viral DNA substrates (blue and green, respectively), showing substrate mimicry by the inhibitor. Cover design by Joseph Myer

  1. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mutants that fail to bind to plant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, J L; Colby, S; Matthysse, A G

    1990-01-01

    Transposon insertion mutants of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were screened to obtain mutant bacteria that failed to bind to carrot suspension culture cells. A light microscope binding assay was used. The bacterial isolates that were reduced in binding to carrot cells were all avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana leaves and on carrot root disks. The mutants did not appear to be altered in cellulose production. The composition of the medium affected the ability of the parent and mutant bacteria ...

  2. Ability of Candida albicans Mutants To Induce Staphylococcus aureus Vancomycin Resistance during Polymicrobial Biofilm Formation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriott, Melphine M.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus form vigorous polymicrobial biofilms in serum, which may serve as the source of coinfection in patients. More importantly, S. aureus is highly resistant to vancomycin during polymicrobial biofilm formation, with no decreases in bacterial viability observed with up to 1,600 μg/ml drug. In these mixed-species biofilms, S. aureus preferentially associates with C. albicans hyphae, which express a variety of unique adhesins. We tested C. albicans mutants deficient in transcriptional regulators of morphogenesis (CPH1 and EFG1) and biofilm formation (BCR1) to investigate the role of hyphae in mediating polymicrobial biofilm formation. These mutants also have reduced expression of hypha-specific adhesins. The ability to form polymicrobial biofilms correlated with the ability to form hyphae in these mutants. However, only mutants that could adhere to the abiotic surface could induce S. aureus vancomycin resistance, regardless of the presence of hyphae. In examining factors that may mediate interspecies adhesion, we found that the C. albicans ALS family of adhesins (Als1 to Als7 and Als9) was not involved, and neither was the hypha-specific adhesin Hwp1. Therefore, polymicrobial biofilm formation and subsequent antibiotic resistance is a multifactorial process that may require a unique combination of fungal and/or bacterial adhesins. PMID:20566760

  3. Targetable signaling pathway mutations are associated with malignant phenotype in IDH-mutant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shota; Curry, William T; Loebel, Franziska; Zhao, Dan; Tateishi, Kensuke; Chen, Juxiang; Klofas, Lindsay K; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ellisen, Leif W; Borger, Darrell R; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Batchelor, Tracy T; Iafrate, A John; Cahill, Daniel P; Chi, Andrew S

    2014-06-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutations occur in low-grade and high-grade gliomas. We sought to identify the genetic basis of malignant phenotype heterogeneity in IDH-mutant gliomas. We prospectively implanted tumor specimens from 20 consecutive IDH1-mutant glioma resections into mouse brains and genotyped all resection specimens using a CLIA-certified molecular panel. Gliomas with cancer driver mutations were tested for sensitivity to targeted inhibitors in vitro. Associations between genomic alterations and outcomes were analyzed in patients. By 10 months, 8 of 20 IDH1-mutant gliomas developed intracerebral xenografts. All xenografts maintained mutant IDH1 and high levels of 2-hydroxyglutarate on serial transplantation. All xenograft-producing gliomas harbored "lineage-defining" mutations in CIC (oligodendroglioma) or TP53 (astrocytoma), and 6 of 8 additionally had activating mutations in PIK3CA or amplification of PDGFRA, MET, or N-MYC. Only IDH1 and CIC/TP53 mutations were detected in non-xenograft-forming gliomas (P = 0.0007). Targeted inhibition of the additional alterations decreased proliferation in vitro. Moreover, we detected alterations in known cancer driver genes in 13.4% of IDH-mutant glioma patients, including PIK3CA, KRAS, AKT, or PTEN mutation or PDGFRA, MET, or N-MYC amplification. IDH/CIC mutant tumors were associated with PIK3CA/KRAS mutations whereas IDH/TP53 tumors correlated with PDGFRA/MET amplification. Presence of driver alterations at progression was associated with shorter subsequent progression-free survival (median 9.0 vs. 36.1 months; P = 0.0011). A subset of IDH-mutant gliomas with mutations in driver oncogenes has a more malignant phenotype in patients. Identification of these alterations may provide an opportunity for use of targeted therapies in these patients. Clin Cancer Res; 20(11); 2898-909. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. [Analysis of various types of competition in Tn5-mutants of alfalfa rhizobium bacteria (Sinorhizobium meliloti)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchuk, O P; Kurchak, O N; Sharypova, L A; Provorov, N A; Simarov, B V

    2001-11-01

    Nodulation, rhizospheral, and saprophytic types of competitiveness (NC, RC, and SC, respectively) were studied in the highly active strains CXM1-105 and CXM1-188 of the alfalfa rhizobium Sinorhizobium meliloti. The competitiveness was estimated with the use of markers of antibiotic resistance. It was found that the mutant strain T37, which was characterized by a drastically decreased NC, had higher SC and RC than the parental strain. The mutant T107 (with a moderately decreased NC) did not differ from the parental strain with respect to RC but had a higher SC. The mutant T27 (with the lowest NC) did not differ from the parental strain with respect to SC or RC. In the mutant Tb1, the NC and RC were decreased and the SC was the same as in the parental strain. In Tb7, the SC was decreased and RC was increased. In the mutant T795, all of the three types of competitiveness were decreased. The difference between the mutants studied and the parental strain with respect to NC and RC was confirmed using an indirect method (the ability to form effective symbiosis after mixed inoculation together with the an ineffective tester strain CXM1-48) and the X-Gluc staining method (using the S. meliloti RmM4gus tester strain carrying the gene of beta-glucuronidase). However, the decreased SC that the mutants exhibited when they were cultivated together with parental strains in a plant-growth substrate (vermiculite) was not observed in the case of their cocultivation in liquid media. The independent variation of different types of competitiveness indicate that rhizobia have several separate gene systems determining their survival in in planta and ex planta ecological niches.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Sexual Sporulation Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, K.; Heemst, van D.; Slakhorst, M.; Debets, A.J.M.; Heyting, C.

    2001-01-01

    For the genetic dissection of sexual sporulation in Aspergillus nidulans, we started a collection of ascosporeless mutants. After mutagenization of conidiospores with high doses of UV, we isolated 20 mutants with defects in ascospore formation. We crossed these mutants in two successive rounds with

  6. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Contreras, R; Lira-Silva, E; Jasso-Chávez, R; Hernández-González, I.L.; Maeda, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Boogerd, F.C.; Sheng, L; Wood, TK; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed

  7. Strain improvement in dye decolourising mutants of Mucor mucedo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... The amounts of protoplasts obtained in the developed mutants of M. mucedo MMM1 (U.V. irradiated mutant) and MMM2 (ethyl methyl sulfonate treated mutant) which are very effective decolourisers were. 5.23 x 106 and 5.65 x 106 protoplasts/ml respectively. Among the 385 colonies isolated after ...

  8. Characterization of a novel curled-cotyledons mutant in soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... some organelles degradation, and membranous multilamellar appear at different stages. Protein and amino acid contents in seeds of mutant are higher than those of the wild type, especially methionine and cysteine. These results suggest that the curled-cotyledons mutant is a novel cotyledon development mutant, which ...

  9. An Expanded Transposon Mutant Library Reveals that Vibrio fischeri δ-Aminolevulinate Auxotrophs Can Colonize Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Noreen L; Septer, Alecia N; Dunn, Anne K; Duckett, Drew; Stoudenmire, Julie L; Stabb, Eric V

    2017-03-01

    Libraries of defined mutants are valuable research tools but necessarily lack gene knockouts that are lethal under the conditions used in library construction. In this study, we augmented a Vibrio fischeri mutant library generated on a rich medium (LBS, which contains [per liter] 10 g of tryptone, 5 g of yeast extract, 20 g of NaCl, and 50 mM Tris [pH 7.5]) by selecting transposon insertion mutants on supplemented LBS and screening for those unable to grow on LBS. We isolated strains with insertions in alr, glr (murI), glmS, several heme biosynthesis genes, and ftsA, as well as a mutant disrupted 14 bp upstream of ftsQ Mutants with insertions in ftsA or upstream of ftsQ were recovered by addition of Mg2+ to LBS, but their cell morphology and motility were affected. The ftsA mutant was more strongly affected and formed cells or chains of cells that appeared to wind back on themselves helically. Growth of mutants with insertions in glmS, alr, or glr was recovered with N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), d-alanine, or d-glutamate, respectively. We hypothesized that NAG, d-alanine, or d-glutamate might be available to V. fischeri in the Euprymna scolopes light organ; however, none of these mutants colonized the host effectively. In contrast, hemA and hemL mutants, which are auxotrophic for δ-aminolevulinate (ALA), colonized at wild-type levels, although mutants later in the heme biosynthetic pathway were severely impaired or unable to colonize. Our findings parallel observations that legume hosts provide Bradyrhizobium symbionts with ALA, but they contrast with virulence phenotypes of hemA mutants in some pathogens. The results further inform our understanding of the symbiotic light organ environment.IMPORTANCE By supplementing a rich yeast-based medium, we were able to recover V. fischeri mutants with insertions in conditionally essential genes, and further characterization of these mutants provided new insights into this bacterium's symbiotic environment. Most notably, we

  10. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A

    1988-01-01

    In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...... sulfation, reduced affinity for fibronectin and decreased half-life on the cell surface when compared to the normal counterpart. Our conclusions based on this data are that these altered properties may, in part, account for the adhesion defect in the ricin-resistant mutant. Whether this results from...

  11. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornils, Astrid; Maurya, Ashish K; Tereshko, Lauren; Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-12-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies.

  12. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Cornils

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT. Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies.

  13. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia

    2003-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Gfp-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants in flow chambers irrigated with citrate minimal medium was characterized by the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy and comstat image analysis. Flagella and type IV pili were not necessary...... for P. aeruginosa initial attachment or biofilm formation, but the cell appendages had roles in biofilm development, as wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants formed biofilms with different structures. Dynamics and selection during biofilm formation were investigated by tagging the wild type...... and flagella/type IV mutants with Yfp and Cfp and performing time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy in mixed colour biofilms. The initial microcolony formation occurred by clonal growth, after which wild-type P. aeruginosa bacteria spread over the substratum by means of twitching motility. The wild-type...

  14. Novel polyketide metabolites from Streptomyces rimosus mutant strain R1059.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseo, Myrna A; Hunter, lain S; Waterman, Peter G

    2005-12-01

    Three novel polyketide metabolites were isolated from laboratory-scale fermentation of the Streptomyces rimosus mutant strain R1059. Structural elucidation of the compounds was based on NMR experiments. The compounds were characterized as naphthalene derivatives: (rel)-4beta,8-dihydroxy-3alpha-hydroxymethyl-4alpha-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene1-one (1), 4xi8-dihydroxy-3-hydroxymethyl-4xi-methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene-1-one (2) and (rel)-4beta,8-dihydroxy-3alpha-O-[alpha-glucopyranosyl]hydroxymethyl-4alpha-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-1-one (3). The compounds isolated appear to be derived via a shorter polyketide backbone than oxytetracycline (4), the normal end-product made by the parent of this strain. Compound 3 was the glucoside of 1 and must be formed as a post-PKS reaction by the activation of a glycosyl transferase, which has not been reported in this species before.

  15. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresno Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II, to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus, infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.

  16. Kinase Inhibitor Profiling Reveals Unexpected Opportunities to Inhibit Disease-Associated Mutant Kinases

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    Krisna C. Duong-Ly

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases, including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR, as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development.

  17. A cadmium-sensitive, glutathione-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, R; Andersen, C R; Goldsbrough, P B; Cobbett, C S

    1995-04-01

    The roots of the cadmium-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, cad1-1, become brown in the presence of cadmium. A new cadmium-sensitive mutant affected at a second locus, cad2, has been identified using this phenotype. Genetic analysis has grown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Assays of cadmium accumulation by intact plants indicated that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester cadmium. Undifferentiated callus tissue was also cadmium sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. The level of cadmium-binding complexes formed in vivo was decreased compared with the wild type and accumulation of phytochelatins was about 10% of that in the wild type. The level of glutathione, the substrate for phytochelatin biosynthesis, in tissues of the mutant was decreased to about 15 to 30% of that in the wild type. Thus, the deficiency in phytochelatin biosynthesis can be explained by a deficiency in glutathione.

  18. Goodness of fit to a mathematical model for Drosophila sleep behavior is reduced in hyposomnolent mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Diamond

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The conserved nature of sleep in Drosophila has allowed the fruit fly to emerge in the last decade as a powerful model organism in which to study sleep. Recent sleep studies in Drosophila have focused on the discovery and characterization of hyposomnolent mutants. One common feature of these animals is a change in sleep architecture: sleep bout count tends to be greater, and sleep bout length lower, in hyposomnolent mutants. I propose a mathematical model, produced by least-squares nonlinear regression to fit the form Y = aX∧b, which can explain sleep behavior in the healthy animal as well as previously-reported changes in total sleep and sleep architecture in hyposomnolent mutants. This model, fit to sleep data, yields coefficient of determination R squared, which describes goodness of fit. R squared is lower, as compared to control, in hyposomnolent mutants insomniac and fumin. My findings raise the possibility that low R squared is a feature of all hyposomnolent mutants, not just insomniac and fumin. If this were the case, R squared could emerge as a novel means by which sleep researchers might assess sleep dysfunction.

  19. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Javier; Folgueira, Cristina; Soto, Manuel; Fresno, Manuel; Requena, Jose M

    2011-07-27

    Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II), to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.

  20. Chir99021 and Valproic acid reduce the proliferative advantage of Apc mutant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlands, Alistair J; Carroll, Thomas D; Chen, Yu; Näthke, Inke

    2018-02-15

    More than 90% of colorectal cancers carry mutations in Apc that drive tumourigenesis. A 'just-right' signalling model proposes that Apc mutations stimulate optimal, but not excessive Wnt signalling, resulting in a growth advantage of Apc mutant over wild-type cells. Reversal of this growth advantage constitutes a potential therapeutic approach. We utilised intestinal organoids to compare the growth of Apc mutant and wild-type cells. Organoids derived from Apc Min/+ mice recapitulate stages of intestinal polyposis in culture. They eventually form spherical cysts that reflect the competitive growth advantage of cells that have undergone loss of heterozygosity (LOH). We discovered that this emergence of cysts was inhibited by Chiron99021 and Valproic acid, which potentiates Wnt signalling. Chiron99021 and Valproic acid restrict the growth advantage of Apc mutant cells while stimulating that of wild-type cells, suggesting that excessive Wnt signalling reduces the relative fitness of Apc mutant cells. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated that Chiron99021-treated Apc mutant organoids were rendered susceptible to TSA-induced apoptosis, while wild-type cells were protected.

  1. Developmental defects in mutants of the PsbP domain protein 5 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnna L Roose

    Full Text Available Plants contain an extensive family of PsbP-related proteins termed PsbP-like (PPL and PsbP domain (PPD proteins, which are localized to the thylakoid lumen. The founding member of this family, PsbP, is an established component of the Photosystem II (PS II enzyme, and the PPL proteins have also been functionally linked to other photosynthetic processes. However, the functions of the remaining seven PPD proteins are unknown. To elucidate the function of the PPD5 protein (At5g11450 in Arabidopsis, we have characterized a mutant T-DNA insertion line (SALK_061118 as well as several RNAi lines designed to suppress the expression of this gene. The functions of the photosynthetic electron transfer reactions are largely unaltered in the ppd5 mutants, except for a modest though significant decrease in NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH activity. Interestingly, these mutants show striking plant developmental and morphological defects. Relative to the wild-type Col-0 plants, the ppd5 mutants exhibit both increased lateral root branching and defects associated with axillary bud formation. These defects include the formation of additional rosettes originating from axils at the base of the plant as well as aerial rosettes formed at the axils of the first few nodes of the shoot. The root-branching phenotype is chemically complemented by treatment with the synthetic strigolactone, GR24. We propose that the developmental defects observed in the ppd5 mutants are related to a deficiency in strigolactone biosynthesis.

  2. Arabinose Kinase-Deficient Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, O; Cobbett, C S

    1991-08-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is sensitive to exogenous l-arabinose has been isolated. Comparisons of growth of the wild type, mutant, and F1 and F2 progeny of crosses showed the arabinose-sensitive phenotype is semidominant and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed the mutation is linked to the eceriferum-2 locus on chromosome 4. In vivo incorporation of exogenous labeled l-arabinose into ethanol-insoluble polysaccharides was greatly reduced in the mutant with a concomitant accumulation of free labeled arabinose. Enzyme assays of crude plant extracts demonstrated a defect in arabinose kinase activity in the mutant.

  3. Using of AFLP to evaluate gamma-irradiated amaranth mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labajová Mária

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine which of several gamma-irradiated mutants of amaranth Ficha cultivar and K-433 hybrid are most genetically similar to their non-irradiated control genotypes, we performed amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP based analysis. A total of 40 selective primer combinations were used in reported analyses. First analyses of gamma-irradiated amaranth mutant lines were done used the AFLP. In the study, primers with the differentiation ability for all analysed mutant lines are reported. The very specific changes in the mutant lines´ non-coding regions based on AFLP length polymorphism were analysed. Mutant lines of the Ficha cultivar (C15, C26, C27, C82, C236 shared a genetic dissimilarity of 0,11 and their ISSR profiles are more similar to the Ficha than those of K-433 hybrid mutant lines. The K-433 mutant lines (D54, D279, D282 shared genetic dissimilarity of 0,534 but are more distinct to their control plant as a whole, as those of the Ficha mutant lines. Different AFLP fingerprints patters of the mutant lines when compared to the Ficha cultivar and K-433 hybrid AFLP profiles may be a consequence of the complex response of the intergenic space of mutant lines to the gamma-radiance. Although a genetic polymorphism was detected within accessions, the AFLP markers successfully identified all the accessions. The AFLP results are discussed by a combination of biochemical characteristics of mutant lines and their control genotypes.

  4. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsyama@restaff.chiba-u.jp

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusion of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ∼10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.

  5. Dystonia-4 (DYT4)-associated TUBB4A mutants exhibit disorganized microtubule networks and inhibit neuronal process growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Natsumi; Itakaoka, Misa; Seki, Yoich; Morimoto, Takako; Homma, Keiichi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Yamauchi, Junji

    2018-01-01

    Dystonia-1 (DYT1) is an autosomal dominant early-onset torsion form of dystonia, a neurological disease affecting movement. DYT1 is the prototypic hereditary dystonia and is caused by the mutation of the tor1a gene. The gene product has chaperone functions important for the control of protein folding and stability. Dystonia-4 (DYT4) is another autosomal dominant dystonia that is characterized by onset in the second to third decade of progressive laryngeal dysphonia. DYT4 is associated with the mutation of the tubb4a gene, although it remains to be understood how disease-associated mutation affects biochemical as well as cell biological properties of the gene product as the microtubule component (a tubulin beta subunit). Herein we demonstrate that DYT4-associated TUBB4A missense mutants (Arg2-to-Gly or Ala271-to-Thr) form disorganized tubulin networks in cells. Transfected mutants are indeed expressed in cytoplasmic regions, as observed in wild-type transfectants. However, mutant proteins do not exhibit typical radial tubulin networks. Rather, they have diminished ability to interact with tubulin alpha subunits. Processes do not form in sufficient amounts in cells of the N1E-115 neuronal cell line expressing each of these mutants as compared to parental cells. Together, DYT4-associated TUBB4A mutants themselves form aberrant tubulin networks and inhibit neuronal process growth, possibly explaining progress through the pathological states at cellular levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  7. Indy mutants: live long and prosper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart eFrankel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Indy encodes the fly homologue of a mammalian transporter of di and tricarboxylatecomponents of the Krebs cycle. Reduced expression of fly Indy or two of the C. elegansIndy homologs leads to an increase in life span. Fly and worm tissues that play key roles inintermediary metabolism are also the places where Indy genes are expressed. One of themouse homologs of Indy (mIndy is mainly expressed in the liver. It has been hypothesizedthat decreased INDY activity creates a state similar to caloric restriction (CR. Thishypothesis is supported by the physiological similarities between Indy mutant flies on highcalorie food and control flies on CR, such as increased physical activity and decreases inweight, egg production, triglyceride levels, starvation resistance, and insulin signaling. Inaddition, Indy mutant flies undergo changes in mitochondrial biogenesis also observed inCR animals. Recent findings with mIndy knockout mice support and extend the findingsfrom flies. mIndy-/- mice display an increase in hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis, lipidoxidation and decreased hepatic lipogenesis. When mIndy-/- mice are fed high calorie foodthey are protected from adiposity and insulin resistance. These findings point to INDY as apotential drug target for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  8. Allosteric Mutant IDH1 Inhibitors Reveal Mechanisms for IDH1 Mutant and Isoform Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoling; Baird, Daniel; Bowen, Kimberly; Capka, Vladimir; Chen, Jinyun; Chenail, Gregg; Cho, YoungShin; Dooley, Julia; Farsidjani, Ali; Fortin, Pascal; Kohls, Darcy; Kulathila, Raviraj; Lin, Fallon; McKay, Daniel; Rodrigues, Lindsey; Sage, David; Touré, B. Barry; van der Plas, Simon; Wright, Kirk; Xu, Ming; Yin, Hong; Levell, Julian; Pagliarini, Raymond A.

    2017-03-01

    Oncogenic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations contribute to cancer via production of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we characterize two structurally distinct mutant- and isoform-selective IDH1 inhibitors that inhibit 2-HG production. Both bind to an allosteric pocket on IDH1, yet shape it differently, highlighting the plasticity of this site. Oncogenic IDH1R132H mutation destabilizes an IDH1 “regulatory segment,” which otherwise restricts compound access to the allosteric pocket. Regulatory segment destabilization in wild-type IDH1 promotes inhibitor binding, suggesting that destabilization is critical for mutant selectivity. We also report crystal structures of oncogenic IDH2 mutant isoforms, highlighting the fact that the analogous segment of IDH2 is not similarly destabilized. This intrinsic stability of IDH2 may contribute to observed inhibitor IDH1 isoform selectivity. Moreover, discrete residues in the IDH1 allosteric pocket that differ from IDH2 may also guide IDH1 isoform selectivity. These data provide a deeper understanding of how IDH1 inhibitors achieve mutant and isoform selectivity.

  9. Kinetic partitioning during de novo septin filament assembly creates a critical G1 "window of opportunity" for mutant septin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Rachel M; Heasley, Lydia R; Odde, David J; McMurray, Michael A

    2016-09-16

    Septin proteins form highly conserved cytoskeletal filaments composed of hetero-oligomers with strict subunit stoichiometry. Mutations within one hetero-oligomerization interface (the "G" interface) bias the mutant septin toward conformations that are incompatible with filament assembly, causing disease in humans and, in budding yeast cells, temperature-sensitive defects in cytokinesis. We previously found that, when the amount of other hetero-oligomerization partners is limiting, wild-type and G interface-mutant alleles of a given yeast septin "compete" along parallel but distinct folding pathways for occupancy of a limited number of positions within septin hetero-octamers. Here, we synthesize a mathematical model that outlines the requirements for this phenomenon: if a wild-type septin traverses a folding pathway that includes a single rate-limiting folding step, the acquisition by a mutant septin of additional slow folding steps creates an initially large disparity between wild-type and mutant in the cellular concentrations of oligomerization-competent monomers. When the 2 alleles are co-expressed, this kinetic disparity results in mutant exclusion from hetero-oligomers, even when the folded mutant monomer is oligomerization-competent. To test this model experimentally, we first visualize the kinetic delay in mutant oligomerization in living cells, and then narrow or widen the "window of opportunity" for mutant septin oligomerization by altering the length of the G1 phase of the yeast cell cycle, and observe the predicted exacerbation or suppression, respectively, of mutant cellular phenotypes. These findings reveal a fundamental kinetic principle governing in vivo assembly of multiprotein complexes, independent of the ability of the subunits to associate with each other.

  10. Cell lineage of timed cohorts of Tbx6-expressing cells in wild-type and Tbx6 mutant embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Concepcion

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tbx6 is a T-box transcription factor with multiple roles in embryonic development as evidenced by dramatic effects on mesoderm cell fate determination, left/right axis determination, and somite segmentation in mutant mice. The expression of Tbx6 is restricted to the primitive streak and presomitic mesoderm, but some of the phenotypic features of mutants are not easily explained by this expression pattern. We have used genetically-inducible fate mapping to trace the fate of Tbx6-expressing cells in wild-type and mutant embryos to explain some of the puzzling features of the mutant phenotype. We created an inducible Tbx6-creERT2 transgenic mouse in which cre expression closely recapitulates endogenous Tbx6 expression both temporally and spatially. Using a lacZ-based Cre reporter and timed tamoxifen injections, we followed temporally overlapping cohorts of cells that had expressed Tbx6 and found contributions to virtually all mesodermally-derived embryonic structures as well as the extraembryonic allantois. Contribution to the endothelium of major blood vessels may account for the embryonic death of homozygous mutant embryos. In mutant embryos, Tbx6-creERT2-traced cells contributed to the abnormally segmented anterior somites and formed the characteristic ectopic neural tubes. Retention of cells in the mutant tail bud indicates a deficiency in migratory behavior of the mutant cells and the presence of Tbx6-creERT2-traced cells in the notochord, a node derivative provides a possible explanation for the heterotaxia seen in mutant embryos.

  11. A screen of Coxiella burnetii mutants reveals important roles for Dot/Icm effectors and host autophagy in vacuole biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Hayley J; Kohler, Lara J; McDonough, Justin A; Temoche-Diaz, Morayma; Crabill, Emerson; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Roy, Craig R

    2014-07-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a lysosome-derived vacuole. The molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to create a pathogen-occupied vacuole remain largely unknown. Here, we conducted a visual screen on an arrayed library of C. burnetii NMII transposon insertion mutants to identify genes required for biogenesis of a mature Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV). Mutants defective in Dot/Icm secretion system function or the PmrAB regulatory system were incapable of intracellular replication. Several mutants with intracellular growth defects were found to have insertions in genes encoding effector proteins translocated into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. These included mutants deficient in the effector proteins Cig57, CoxCC8 and Cbu1754. Mutants that had transposon insertions in genes important in central metabolism or encoding tRNA modification enzymes were identified based on the appearance filamentous bacteria intracellularly. Lastly, mutants that displayed a multi-vacuolar phenotype were identified. All of these mutants had a transposon insertion in the gene encoding the effector protein Cig2. Whereas vacuoles containing wild type C. burnetii displayed robust accumulation of the autophagosome protein LC3, the vacuoles formed by the cig2 mutant did not contain detectible amounts of LC3. Furthermore, interfering with host autophagy during infection by wild type C. burnetii resulted in a multi-vacuolar phenotype similar to that displayed by the cig2 mutant. Thus, a functional Cig2 protein is important for interactions between the CCV and host autophagosomes and this drives a process that enhances the fusogenic properties of this pathogen-occupied organelle.

  12. A screen of Coxiella burnetii mutants reveals important roles for Dot/Icm effectors and host autophagy in vacuole biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley J Newton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a lysosome-derived vacuole. The molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to create a pathogen-occupied vacuole remain largely unknown. Here, we conducted a visual screen on an arrayed library of C. burnetii NMII transposon insertion mutants to identify genes required for biogenesis of a mature Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV. Mutants defective in Dot/Icm secretion system function or the PmrAB regulatory system were incapable of intracellular replication. Several mutants with intracellular growth defects were found to have insertions in genes encoding effector proteins translocated into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. These included mutants deficient in the effector proteins Cig57, CoxCC8 and Cbu1754. Mutants that had transposon insertions in genes important in central metabolism or encoding tRNA modification enzymes were identified based on the appearance filamentous bacteria intracellularly. Lastly, mutants that displayed a multi-vacuolar phenotype were identified. All of these mutants had a transposon insertion in the gene encoding the effector protein Cig2. Whereas vacuoles containing wild type C. burnetii displayed robust accumulation of the autophagosome protein LC3, the vacuoles formed by the cig2 mutant did not contain detectible amounts of LC3. Furthermore, interfering with host autophagy during infection by wild type C. burnetii resulted in a multi-vacuolar phenotype similar to that displayed by the cig2 mutant. Thus, a functional Cig2 protein is important for interactions between the CCV and host autophagosomes and this drives a process that enhances the fusogenic properties of this pathogen-occupied organelle.

  13. A Screen of Coxiella burnetii Mutants Reveals Important Roles for Dot/Icm Effectors and Host Autophagy in Vacuole Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Hayley J.; Kohler, Lara J.; McDonough, Justin A.; Temoche-Diaz, Morayma; Crabill, Emerson; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Roy, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a lysosome-derived vacuole. The molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to create a pathogen-occupied vacuole remain largely unknown. Here, we conducted a visual screen on an arrayed library of C. burnetii NMII transposon insertion mutants to identify genes required for biogenesis of a mature Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV). Mutants defective in Dot/Icm secretion system function or the PmrAB regulatory system were incapable of intracellular replication. Several mutants with intracellular growth defects were found to have insertions in genes encoding effector proteins translocated into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. These included mutants deficient in the effector proteins Cig57, CoxCC8 and Cbu1754. Mutants that had transposon insertions in genes important in central metabolism or encoding tRNA modification enzymes were identified based on the appearance filamentous bacteria intracellularly. Lastly, mutants that displayed a multi-vacuolar phenotype were identified. All of these mutants had a transposon insertion in the gene encoding the effector protein Cig2. Whereas vacuoles containing wild type C. burnetii displayed robust accumulation of the autophagosome protein LC3, the vacuoles formed by the cig2 mutant did not contain detectible amounts of LC3. Furthermore, interfering with host autophagy during infection by wild type C. burnetii resulted in a multi-vacuolar phenotype similar to that displayed by the cig2 mutant. Thus, a functional Cig2 protein is important for interactions between the CCV and host autophagosomes and this drives a process that enhances the fusogenic properties of this pathogen-occupied organelle. PMID:25080348

  14. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Melloni N. [University of Memphis; Dunning, Jonathan P [University of Memphis; Wiley, Ronald G [Vanderbilt University and Veterans Administration, Nashville, TN; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  15. Forward genetic screen for auxin-deficient mutants by cytokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Luo, Pan; Di, Dong-Wei; Wang, Li; Wang, Ming; Lu, Cheng-Kai; Wei, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Zi; Amakorová, Petra; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ondřej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-07-06

    Identification of mutants with impairments in auxin biosynthesis and dynamics by forward genetic screening is hindered by the complexity, redundancy and necessity of the pathways involved. Furthermore, although a few auxin-deficient mutants have been recently identified by screening for altered responses to shade, ethylene, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) or cytokinin (CK), there is still a lack of robust markers for systematically isolating such mutants. We hypothesized that a potentially suitable phenotypic marker is root curling induced by CK, as observed in the auxin biosynthesis mutant CK-induced root curling 1 / tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 (ckrc1/taa1). Phenotypic observations, genetic analyses and biochemical complementation tests of Arabidopsis seedlings displaying the trait in large-scale genetic screens showed that it can facilitate isolation of mutants with perturbations in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling. However, unlike transport/signaling mutants, the curled (or wavy) root phenotypes of auxin-deficient mutants were significantly induced by CKs and could be rescued by exogenous auxins. Mutants allelic to several known auxin biosynthesis mutants were re-isolated, but several new classes of auxin-deficient mutants were also isolated. The findings show that CK-induced root curling provides an effective marker for discovering genes involved in auxin biosynthesis or homeostasis.

  16. Destabilizing protein polymorphisms in the genetic background direct phenotypic expression of mutant SOD1 toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Gidalevitz

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles.

  17. Mutant IDH1-driven cellular transformation increases RAD51-mediated homologous recombination and temozolomide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Shigeo; Mukherjee, Joydeep; See, Wendy L; Pieper, Russell O

    2014-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations occur in most lower grade glioma and not only drive gliomagenesis but are also associated with longer patient survival and improved response to temozolomide. To investigate the possible causative relationship between these events, we introduced wild-type (WT) or mutant IDH1 into immortalized, untransformed human astrocytes, then monitored transformation status and temozolomide response. Temozolomide-sensitive parental cells exhibited DNA damage (γ-H2AX foci) and a prolonged G2 cell-cycle arrest beginning three days after temozolomide (100 μmol/L, 3 hours) exposure and persisting for more than four days. The same cells transformed by expression of mutant IDH1 exhibited a comparable degree of DNA damage and cell-cycle arrest, but both events resolved significantly faster in association with increased, rather than decreased, clonogenic survival. The increases in DNA damage processing, cell-cycle progression, and clonogenicity were unique to cells transformed by mutant IDH1, and were not noted in cells transformed by WT IDH1 or an oncogenic form (V12H) of Ras. Similarly, these effects were not noted following introduction of mutant IDH1 into Ras-transformed cells or established glioma cells. They were, however, associated with increased homologous recombination (HR) and could be reversed by the genetic or pharmacologic suppression of the HR DNA repair protein RAD51. These results show that mutant IDH1 drives a unique set of transformative events that indirectly enhance HR and facilitate repair of temozolomide-induced DNA damage and temozolomide resistance. The results also suggest that inhibitors of HR may be a viable means to enhance temozolomide response in IDH1-mutant glioma. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Otx1 null mutant mice show partial segregation of sensory epithelia comparable to lamprey ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, B.; Signore, M.; Simeone, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the development of inner ear innervation in Otx1 null mutants, which lack a horizontal canal, between embryonic day 12 (E12) and postnatal day 7 (P7) with DiI and immunostaining for acetylated tubulin. Comparable to control animals, horizontal crista-like fibers were found to cross over the utricle in Otx1 null mice. In mutants these fibers extend toward an area near the endolymphatic duct, not to a horizontal crista. Most Otx1 null mutants had a small patch of sensory hair cells at this position. Measurement of the area of the utricular macula suggested it to be enlarged in Otx1 null mutants. We suggest that parts of the horizontal canal crista remain incorporated in the utricular sensory epithelium in Otx1 null mutants. Other parts of the horizontal crista appear to be variably segregated to form the isolated patch of hair cells identifiable by the unique fiber trajectory as representing the horizontal canal crista. Comparison with lamprey ear innervation reveals similarities in the pattern of innervation with the dorsal macula, a sensory patch of unknown function. SEM data confirm that all foramina are less constricted in Otx1 null mutants. We propose that Otx1 is not directly involved in sensory hair cell formation of the horizontal canal but affects the segregation of the horizontal canal crista from the utricle. It also affects constriction of the two main foramina in the ear, but not their initial formation. Otx1 is thus causally related to horizontal canal morphogenesis as well as morphogenesis of these foramina.

  19. Boc modifies the holoprosencephaly spectrum of Cdo mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2011-05-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE is caused by a failure to form the midline of the forebrain and/or midface. It is one of the most common human birth defects, but clinical expression is extremely variable. HPE is associated with mutations in the sonic hedgehog (SHH pathway. Mice lacking the Shh pathway regulator Cdo (also called Cdon display HPE with strain-dependent penetrance and expressivity, implicating silent modifier genes as one cause of the variability. However, the identities of potential HPE modifiers of this type are unknown. We report here that whereas mice lacking the Cdo paralog Boc do not have HPE, Cdo;Boc double mutants on a largely Cdo-resistant genetic background have lobar HPE with strong craniofacial anomalies and defects in Shh target gene expression in the developing forebrain. Boc is therefore a silent HPE modifier gene in mice. Furthermore, Cdo and Boc have specific, selective roles in Shh signaling in mammals, because Cdo;Boc double-mutant mice do not display the most severe HPE phenotype seen in Shh-null mice, nor do they have major defects in digit patterning or development of vertebrae, which are also Shh-dependent processes. This is in contrast to reported observations in Drosophila, where genetic removal of the Cdo and Boc orthologs Ihog and Boi results in a complete loss of response to the hedgehog ligand. Therefore, there is evolutionary divergence between mammals and insects in the requirement of the hedgehog pathway for Cdo/Ihog family members, with mammalian development involving additional factors and/or distinct mechanisms at this level of pathway regulation.

  20. Contributor Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2014-09-01

    to produce preprints or reprints and translate into languages other than English for sale or free distribution; and 4 the right to republish the work in a collection of articles in any other mechanical or electronic format. We give the rights to the corresponding author to make necessary changes as per the request of the journal, do the rest of the correspondence on our behalf and he/she will act as the guarantor for the manuscript on our behalf. All persons who have made substantial contributions to the work reported in the manuscript, but who are not contributors, are named in the Acknowledgment and have given me/us their written permission to be named. If I/we do not include an Acknowledgment that means I/we have not received substantial contributions from non-contributors and no contributor has been omitted.S NoAuthors' NamesContribution (IJCME Guidelines{1 substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; 2 drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; and 3 final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2, and 3}.SignatureDate                              Note: All the authors are required to sign independently in this form in the sequence given above. In case an author has left the institution/country and whose whereabouts are not known, the senior author may sign on his/her behalf taking the responsibility.No addition/deletion/ or any change in the sequence of the authorship will be permissible at a later stage, without valid reasons and permission of the Editor.If the authorship is contested at any stage, the article will be either returned or will not be processed for publication till the issue is solved.Maximum up to 4 authors for short communication and up to 6 authors for original article.

  1. Contributors Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    to produce preprints or reprints and translate into languages other than English for sale or free distribution; and 4 the right to republish the work in a collection of articles in any other mechanical or electronic format. We give the rights to the corresponding author to make necessary changes as per the request of the journal, do the rest of the correspondence on our behalf and he/she will act as the guarantor for the manuscript on our behalf. All persons who have made substantial contributions to the work reported in the manuscript, but who are not contributors, are named in the Acknowledgment and have given me/us their written permission to be named. If I/we do not include an Acknowledgment that means I/we have not received substantial contributions from non-contributors and no contributor has been omitted.S NoAuthors' NamesContribution (IJCME Guidelines{1 substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; 2 drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; and 3 final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2, and 3}.SignatureDate                              Note: All the authors are required to sign independently in this form in the sequence given above. In case an author has left the institution/country and whose whereabouts are not known, the senior author may sign on his/her behalf taking the responsibility.No addition/deletion/ or any change in the sequence of the authorship will be permissible at a later stage, without valid reasons and permission of the Editor.If the authorship is contested at any stage, the article will be either returned or will not be processed for publication till the issue is solved.Maximum up to 4 authors for short communication and up to 6 authors for original article.

  2. A Yersinia pestis tat mutant is attenuated in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic challenge models of infection but not as attenuated by intranasal challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher K; Chance, Taylor; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Kern, Steven J; Kijek, Todd K; Jenkins, Amy; Mou, Sherry; Moody, Krishna; Fritz, David; Robinson, Camenzind G; Bell, Todd; Worsham, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge.

  3. A Yersinia pestis tat mutant is attenuated in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic challenge models of infection but not as attenuated by intranasal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Bozue

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge.

  4. Google: a narrativa de uma marca mutante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete de Azevedo Kreutz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As marcas mutantes já fazem parte de nossa realidade, embora ainda não totalmente percebidas e/ou aceitas como tal. O presente artigo busca refletir sobre a relevância dessas novas estratégias de comunicação e branding, identificando suas principais características. Para isso, utilizamos o método de estudo de caso, o Google, ancorado nos métodos de pesquisa bibliográfica e de internet. A escolha foi intencional, posto que a organização é referência em sua categoria, mecanismo de busca, e reflete essa estratégia comunicacional contemporânea. Como resultado, as informações obtidas nos possibilitam compreender essa tendência de comportamento de marca que busca a interação com seus públicos.

  5. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  6. Analysis of mutant SOD1 electrophoretic mobility by Blue Native gel electrophoresis; evidence for soluble multimeric assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda H Brown

    Full Text Available Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 cause familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS. Disease causing mutations have diverse consequences on the activity and half-life of the protein, ranging from complete inactivity and short half-life to full activity and long-half-life. Uniformly, disease causing mutations induce the protein to misfold and aggregate and such aggregation tendencies are readily visualized by over-expression of the proteins in cultured cells. In the present study we have investigated the potential of using immunoblotting of proteins separated by Blue-Native gel electrophoresis (BNGE as a means to identify soluble multimeric forms of mutant protein. We find that over-expressed wild-type human SOD1 (hSOD1 is generally not prone to form soluble high molecular weight entities that can be separated by BNGE. For ALS mutant SOD1, we observe that for all mutants examined (A4V, G37R, G85R, G93A, and L126Z, immunoblots of BN-gels separating protein solubilized by digitonin demonstrated varied amounts of high molecular weight immunoreactive entities. These entities lacked reactivity to ubiquitin and were partially dissociated by reducing agents. With the exception of the G93A mutant, these entities were not reactive to the C4F6 conformational antibody. Collectively, these data demonstrate that BNGE can be used to assess the formation of soluble multimeric assemblies of mutant SOD1.

  7. Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0177 TITLE: Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Katerina...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0177 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...epigenomic landscape of EGFR mutant SCLCs and their corresponding pre- treatment LUADs. These are very rare specimens. Through our Yale rebiopsy program

  8. Mutant-specific gene programs in the zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Gerhard J.; Choe, Sung E; Dooley, Kimberly A.; Paffett-Lugassy, Noëlle N.; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.

    2005-01-01

    Hematopoiesis involves the production of stem cells, followed by the orchestrated differentiation of the blood lineages. Genetic screens in zebrafish have identified mutants with defects that disrupt specific stages of hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis, including the cloche, spadetail (tbx16), moonshine (tif1g), bloodless, and vlad tepes (gata1) mutants. To better characterize the blood program, gene expression profiling was carried out in these mutants and in scl-morphants (scl mo). Distinct ...

  9. Mutant p53 in Cancer: New Functions and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Patricia A.J.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Many different types of cancer show a high incidence of TP53 mutations, leading to the expression of mutant p53 proteins. There is growing evidence that these mutant p53s have both lost wild-type p53 tumor suppressor activity and gained functions that help to contribute to malignant progression. Understanding the functions of mutant p53 will help in the development of new therapeutic approaches that may be useful in a broad range of cancer types. PMID:24651012

  10. Growth and development of maize that contains mutant tubulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Wick

    2004-07-23

    Mutant maize plants containing a Mu transposon disrupting one of the five beta tubulin genes of interest were followed for several generations and hybridized with each other to produce plants containing disruptions in both copies of a single gene or disruption of more than one tubulin gene. Seedlings of some of these plants were grown under chilling conditions for a few weeks. After DOE funding ended, plants have been assessed to see whether mutant are more or less tolerant to chilling. Other mutant plants will be assessed for their male and female fertility relative to non-mutant siblings or other close relatives.

  11. Sphingolipid synthesis deficiency in a mutant of Bacteroides levii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumleve, B.; Lev, M.

    1986-05-01

    Bacteroides levii, an anaerobic bacterium, synthesizes two sphingolipids; the sphingomyelin analogue, ceramide phosphorylethanolamine (CPE), and also ceramide phosphorylglycerol (CPG). The first enzyme in the sphingolipid pathway, 3-ketodihydro-sphingosine (3KDS) synthase, has been partially purified previously. To study subsequent steps in the pathways, mutants defective in sphingolipid synthesis were derived by ethyl methanesulfonate and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Extracts of the mutant, 1075BB, show synthase activity although the cells do not synthesize CPE or CPG. The mutant differs from the wild type in that: (1) synthase activity was much diminished in the mutant, (2) sphingolipid synthesis does not occur in the mutant as evidenced by the absence of spots at sites where CPE and CPG migrate following two-dimensional thin layer chromatography, (3) incorporation of uniformly-labelled (/sup 14/C)serine carbon or (/sup 14/C)3KDS into sphingolipids was not observed in the mutant, (4) following incubation with (/sup 14/C)3KDS, radioactivity corresponding to dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and ceramide were observed in the mutant; no (/sup 14/C)DHS was detected in the wild type, and (5) enhanced incorporation of (/sup 14/C)serine carbon into two lipids not containing phosphorus was found in the mutant. The authors conclude, therefore, that this mutant, 1075BB, has a metabolic block at the terminal biosynthetic steps of sphingolipid synthesis.

  12. [Mutant alleles associated to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethanime resistance in Plasmodium falciparum of the Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia borders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arróspide, Nancy; Hijar-Guerra, Gisely; de Mora, Doménica; Diaz-Cortéz, César Eduardo; Veloz-Perez, Raúl; Gutierrez, Sonia; Cabezas-Sánchez, César

    2014-04-01

    The frequency of mutations in pfCRT and DHFR/DHPS genes of Plasmodium falciparum associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was evaluated in 83 strains from the districts of Esmeralda and Machala, located on the borders of Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia in 2002. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), conventional and its variants, was used. Mutations in the pfCRT gene were found in more than 90% of the samples from Esmeralda and Machala. For the DHFR gene, 90% of the strains were mutant samples from Esmeralda, 3 were double mutations and 1 was a triple mutation. In Machala, 25% were simple mutant forms and 75% mixed mutant forms (wild forms/mutant). In conclusion, resistance to chloroquine has been fixed in strains carrying K76T pfCRT mutation, whereas genetic imprinting for resistance to pyrimethamine is evolving, particularly in the district of Esmeralda.

  13. Altered gene regulation and synaptic morphology in Drosophila learning and memory mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhuo; Buhl, Lauren K.; Quinn, William G.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2011-01-01

    Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed two separable long-term memory pathways defined as anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and long-lasting long-term memory (LLTM). ARM is disrupted in radish (rsh) mutants, whereas LLTM requires CREB-dependent protein synthesis. Although the downstream effectors of ARM and LLTM are distinct, pathways leading to these forms of memory may share the cAMP cascade critical for associative learning. Dunce, which encodes a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, and rutabaga, which encodes an adenylyl cyclase, both disrupt short-term memory. Amnesiac encodes a pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide homolog and is required for middle-term memory. Here, we demonstrate that the Radish protein localizes to the cytoplasm and nucleus and is a PKA phosphorylation target in vitro. To characterize how these plasticity pathways may manifest at the synaptic level, we assayed synaptic connectivity and performed an expression analysis to detect altered transcriptional networks in rutabaga, dunce, amnesiac, and radish mutants. All four mutants disrupt specific aspects of synaptic connectivity at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis revealed ∼375 transcripts that are altered in these mutants, suggesting defects in multiple neuronal signaling pathways. In particular, the transcriptional target Lapsyn, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat cell adhesion protein, localizes to synapses and regulates synaptic growth. This analysis provides insights into the Radish-dependent ARM pathway and novel transcriptional targets that may contribute to memory processing in Drosophila. PMID:21422168

  14. Microtubule-mediated transport of the tumor-suppressor protein Merlin and its mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseñor, Lorena B; Barlan, Kari; Rice, Sarah E; Fehon, Richard G; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2010-04-20

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor protein Merlin is a member of the ERM family of proteins that links the cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. In humans, mutations in the NF2 gene cause neurofibromatosis type-2 (NF2), a cancer syndrome characterized by the development of tumors of the nervous system. Previous reports have suggested that the subcellular distribution of Merlin is critical to its function, and that several NF2 mutants that lack tumor-suppressor activity present improper localization. Here we used a Drosophila cell culture model to study the distribution and mechanism of intracellular transport of Merlin and its mutants. We found that Drosophila Merlin formed cytoplasmic particles that move bidirectionally along microtubules. A single NF2-causing amino acid substitution in the FERM domain dramatically inhibited Merlin particle movement. Surprisingly, the presence of this immotile Merlin mutant also inhibited trafficking of the WT protein. Analysis of the movement of WT protein using RNAi and pull-downs showed that Merlin particles are associated with and moved by microtubule motors (kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein), and that binding of motors and movement is regulated by Merlin phosphorylation. Inhibition of Merlin transport by expression of the dominant-negative mutant or depletion of kinesin-1 results in increased nuclear accumulation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. These results demonstrate the requirement of microtubule-dependent transport for Merlin function.

  15. New non detrimental DNA binding mutants of the Escherichia coli initiator protein DnaA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asklund, Marlene; Atlung, Tove

    2004-01-01

    gave rise to 30 single amino acid substitutions and, including double substitutions, more than 100 mutants functional in initiation of chromosome replication were characterized. The analysis indicated that all regions of the DNA-binding domain are involved in DNA binding, but the most important amino......The initiator protein DnaA has several unique DNA-binding features. It binds with high affinity as a monomer to the nonamer DnaA box. In the ATP form, DnaA binds cooperatively to the low-affinity ATP-DnaA boxes, and to single-stranded DNA in the 13mer region of the origin. We have carried out...... an extensive mutational analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Escherichia coli DnaA protein using mutagenic PCR. We analyzed mutants exhibiting more or less partial activity by selecting for complementation of a dnaA(Ts) mutant strain at different expression levels of the new mutant proteins. The selection...

  16. The aba mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is impaired in epoxy-carotenoid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rock, C.D.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-09-01

    The three mutant alleles of the ABA locus of Arabidopsis thaliana result in plants that are deficient in the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA). The authors have used {sup 18}O{sub 2} to label ABA in water-stressed leaves of mutant and wild-type Arabidopsis. Analysis by selected ion monitoring and tandem mass spectrometry of ({sup 18}O)ABA and its catabolites, phaseic acid and ABA-glucose ester ({beta}-D-glucopyranosyl abscisate), indicates that the aba genotypes are impaired in ABA biosynthesis and have a small ABA precursor pool of compounds that contain oxygens on the rings, presumably oxygenated carotenoids (xanthophylls). Quantitation of the carotenoids form mutant and wild-type leaves establishes that the aba alleles cause a deficiency of the epoxy-carotenoids violaxanthin and neoxanthin and an accumulation of their biosynthetic precursor, zeaxanthin. These results provide evidence that ABA is synthesized by oxidative cleavage of epoxy-carotenoids (the indirect pathway). Furthermore the carotenoid mutant they describe undergoes normal greening. Thus the aba alleles provide an opportunity to study the physiological roles of epoxy-carotenoids in photosynthesis in a higher plants.

  17. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An mre11 mutant of Coprinus cinereus has defects in meiotic chromosome pairing, condensation and synapsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerecke, E E; Zolan, M E

    2000-01-01

    The rad11 gene of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus is required for the completion of meiosis and for survival after gamma irradiation. We have cloned the rad11 gene and shown that it is a homolog of MRE11, a gene required for meiosis and DNA repair in numerous organisms. The expression of C. cinereus mre11 is induced during prophase I of meiosis and following gamma irradiation. The gene encodes a predicted polypeptide of 731 amino acids, and the mre11-1 (rad11-1) mutation is a single base pair change that results in a stop codon after amino acid 315. The mre11-1 mutant shows enhanced sensitivity to ionizing radiation, but no enhanced sensitivity to UV radiation. It shows a delay in fruitbody formation and a reduction in the number of mushrooms formed per dikaryon. The mre11-1 mutant also has several meiotic defects. Pachytene chromatin condensation is disrupted, and although some meiotic cells appear to achieve metaphase I condensation, no further meiotic progression is observed. The mre11-1 mutant also fails to undergo proper chromosome synapsis; neither axial elements nor mature synaptonemal complexes are complete. Finally, meiotic homolog pairing is reduced in the mre11-1 mutant. Thus, in C. cinereus, Mre11 is required for meiotic DNA metabolism. PMID:10757758

  19. The Mutant crispa Reveals Multiple Roles for PHANTASTICA in Pea Compound Leaf DevelopmentW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Alexander D.; Turner, Lynda; Knox, Margaret R.; Ambrose, Michael J.; Ellis, T.H. Noel; Hofer, Julie M.I.

    2005-01-01

    Pinnate compound leaves have laminae called leaflets distributed at intervals along an axis, the rachis, whereas simple leaves have a single lamina. In simple- and compound-leaved species, the PHANTASTICA (PHAN) gene is required for lamina formation. Antirrhinum majus mutants lacking a functional gene develop abaxialized, bladeless adult leaves. Transgenic downregulation of PHAN in the compound tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaf results in an abaxialized rachis without leaflets. The extent of PHAN gene expression was found to be correlated with leaf morphology in diverse compound-leaved species; pinnate leaves had a complete adaxial domain of PHAN gene expression, and peltate leaves had a diminished domain. These previous studies predict the form of a compound-leaved phan mutant to be either peltate or an abaxialized rachis. Here, we characterize crispa, a phan mutant in pea (Pisum sativum), and find that the compound leaf remains pinnate, with individual leaflets abaxialized, rather than the whole leaf. The mutant develops ectopic stipules on the petiole-rachis axis, which are associated with ectopic class 1 KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) gene expression, showing that the interaction between CRISPA and the KNOX gene PISUM SATIVUM KNOTTED2 specifies stipule boundaries. KNOX and CRISPA gene expression patterns indicate that the mechanism of pea leaf initiation is more like Arabidopsis thaliana than tomato. PMID:15749758

  20. Co-occurence of filamentation defects and impaired biofilms in Candida albicans protein kinase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidou, Nina; Morrissey, John Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Pathogenicity of Candida albicans is linked with its developmental stages, notably the capacity switch from yeast-like to hyphal growth, and to form biofilms on surfaces. To better understand the cellular processes involved in C. albicans development, a collection of 63 C. albicans protein kinase mutants was screened for biofilm formation in a microtitre plate assay. Thirty-eight mutants displayed some degree of biofilm impairment, with 20 categorised as poor biofilm formers. All the poor biofilm formers were also defective in the switch from yeast to hyphae, establishing it as a primary defect. Five genes, VPS15, IME2, PKH3, PGA43 and CEX1, encode proteins not previously reported to influence hyphal development or biofilm formation. Network analysis established that individual components of some processes, most interestingly MAP kinase pathways, are not required for biofilm formation, most likely indicating functional redundancy. Mutants were also screened for their response to bacterial supernatants and it was found that Pseudomonas aeruginosa supernatants inhibited biofilm formation in all mutants, regardless of the presence of homoserine lactones (HSLs). In contrast, Candida morphology was only affected by supernatant containing HSLs. This confirms the distinct HSL-dependent inhibition of filamentation and the HSL-independent impairment of biofilm development by P. aeruginosa. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Gravity-dependent differentiation and root coils in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and phospholipase-A-I knockdown mutant grown on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, G F E; Pietrzyk, P

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis roots on 45° tilted agar in 1-g grow in wave-like figures. In addition to waves, formation of root coils is observed in several mutants compromised in gravitropism and/or auxin transport. The knockdown mutant ppla-I-1 of patatin-related phospholipase-A-I is delayed in root gravitropism and forms increased numbers of root coils. Three known factors contribute to waving: circumnutation, gravisensing and negative thigmotropism. In microgravity, deprivation of wild type (WT) and mutant roots of gravisensing and thigmotropism and circumnutation (known to slow down in microgravity, and could potentially lead to fewer waves or increased coiling in both WT and mutant). To resolve this, mutant ppla-I-1 and WT were grown in the BIOLAB facility in the International Space Station. In 1-g, roots of both types only showed waving. In the first experiment in microgravity, the mutant after 9 days formed far more coils than in 1-g but the WT also formed several coils. After 24 days in microgravity, in both types the coils were numerous with slightly more in the mutant. In the second experiment, after 9 days in microgravity only the mutant formed coils and the WT grew arcuated roots. Cell file rotation (CFR) on the mutant root surface in microgravity decreased in comparison to WT, and thus was not important for coiling. Several additional developmental responses (hypocotyl elongation, lateral root formation, cotyledon expansion) were found to be gravity-influenced. We tentatively discuss these in the context of disturbances in auxin transport, which are known to decrease through lack of gravity. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  2. Prevacuolar compartment morphology in vps mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Jamie M; Eggleston, Matthew D; Attryde, Amanda L; Marshall, Pamela A

    2007-10-01

    Over 60 genes have been identified that affect protein sorting to the lysosome-like vacuole in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells with mutations in these vacuolar protein sorting (vps) genes fall into seven general classes based upon their vacuolar morphology. Class A mutants have a morphologically wild type vacuole, while Class B mutants have a fragmented vacuole. There is no discernable vacuolar structure in Class C mutants. Class D mutants have a slightly enlarged vacuole, but Class E mutants have a normal looking vacuole with an enlarged prevacuolar compartment (PVC), which is analogous to the mammalian late endosome. Class F mutants have a wild type appearing vacuole as well as fragmented vacuolar structures. vps mutants have also been found with a tubulo-vesicular vacuole structure. vps mutant morphology is pertinent, as mutants of the same class may work together and/or have a block in the same general step in the vacuolar protein sorting pathway. We probed PVC morphology and location microscopically in live cells of several null vps mutants using a GFP fusion protein of Nhx1p, an Na(+)/H(+) exchanger normally localized to the PVC. We show that cell strains deleted for VPS proteins that have been previously shown to work together, regardless of VPS Class, have the same PVC morphology. Cell strains lacking VPS genes that have not been implicated in the same pathway show different PVC morphologies, even if the mutant strains are in the same VPS Class. These new studies indicate that PVC morphology is another tier of classification that may more accurately identify proteins that function together in vacuolar protein sorting than the original vps mutation classes.

  3. Isolation and characterization of stable mutants of Streptomyces ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Daunorubicin and its derivative doxorubicin are antitumour anthracycline antibiotics produced by Streptomyces peucetius. In this study we report isolation of stable mutants of S. peucetius blocked in different steps of the daunorubicin biosynthesis pathway. Mutants were screened on the basis of colony colour since producer ...

  4. Differentially expressed genes in white egg 2 mutant of silkworm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These pathways were related to amino acid metabolism, sugar metabolism, and series of major physiological metabolism. Our results hopefully shed light on the further study of molecular mechanism of white egg 2 mutant. Key words: Bombyx mori, white egg 2 mutant, microarray, embryo, differentially expressed gene.

  5. Genomic diversity among Basmati rice ( Oryza sativa L) mutants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genomic diversity among Basmati rice ( Oryza sativa L) mutants obtained through 60 Co gamma radiations using AFLP markers. ... In order to obtain new varieties of rice with improved agronomic and grain characteristics, gamma radiation (60Co) has been used to generate novel mutants of the Basmati rice. In this study ...

  6. Enhanced production of glucose oxidase from UV- mutant of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... UV rays were used as mutagen in wild type strain of Aspergillus niger for enhanced production of glucose oxidase. After mutangenization and selection, mutant A. niger strains, resistant to 2-deoxy-D- glucose were obtained. The mutants showed 1.57 and 1.98 fold increase in activities of extra and intra.

  7. Comparison of lignin deposition in three ectopic lignification mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Louisa A; Dubos, Christian; Surman, Christine; Willment, Janet; Cullis, Ian F; Mansfield, Shawn D; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2005-10-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana mutants de-etiolated3 (det3), pom-pom1 (pom1) and ectopic lignification1 (eli1) all deposit lignins in cells where these polymers would not normally be found. Comparison of these mutants provides an opportunity to determine if the shared mutant phenotype arose by perturbing a common regulatory mechanism in each of the mutants. The mutants were compared using a combination of genetics, histochemistry, chemical profiling, transcript profiling using both Northern blots and microarrays, and bioinformatics. The subset of cells that ectopically lignified was shared between all three mutants, but clear differences in cell wall chemistry were evident between the mutants. Northern blot analysis of lignin biosynthetic genes over diurnal and circadian cycles revealed that transcript abundance of several key genes was clearly altered in all three mutants. Microarray analysis suggests that changes in the expression of specific members of the R2R3-MYB and Dof transcription factor families may contribute to the ectopic lignification phenotypes. This comparative analysis provides a suite of hypotheses that can be tested to examine the control of lignin biosynthesis.

  8. Molecularly targeted therapies for p53-mutant cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dekuang; Tahaney, William M; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Savage, Michelle I; Brown, Powel H

    2017-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is lost or mutated in approximately half of human cancers. Mutant p53 not only loses its anti-tumor transcriptional activity, but also often acquires oncogenic functions to promote tumor proliferation, invasion, and drug resistance. Traditional strategies have been taken to directly target p53 mutants through identifying small molecular compounds to deplete mutant p53, or to restore its tumor suppressive function. Accumulating evidence suggest that cancer cells with mutated p53 often exhibit specific functional dependencies on secondary genes or pathways to survive, providing alternative targets to indirectly treat p53-mutant cancers. Targeting these genes or pathways, critical for survival in the presence of p53 mutations, holds great promise for cancer treatment. In addition, mutant p53 often exhibits novel gain-of-functions to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we review and discuss strategies targeting mutant p53, with focus on targeting the mutant p53 protein directly, and on the progress of identifying genes and pathways required in p53-mutant cells.

  9. Unfolding intermediates of the mutant His-107-Tyr of human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mutant His-107-Tyr of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) is highly unstable and has long been linked to a misfolding disease known as carbonic anhydrase deficiency syndrome (CADS). High temperature unfolding trajectories of the mutant are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulationsand analyzed in ...

  10. Assessment of Genetic diversity in mutant cowpea lines using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FKOLADE

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... for crop improvement, hence the need to broaden the genetic base of any crop. This study was done in order to further enhance this in cowpea. While assessing diversity and phylogenetic relationship with other mutants and their parents, each unique mutant was also characterized. Randomly amplified ...

  11. Cadmium-Sensitive Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Ross; Cobbett, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    A screening procedure for identifying Cd-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is described. With this procedure, two Cd-sensitive mutants were isolated. These represent independent mutations in the same locus, referred to as CAD1. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed that the mutation is closely linked to the tt3 locus on chromosome 5. In addition to Cd, the mutants are also significantly more sensitive to mercuric ions and only slightly more sensitive to Cu and Zn, while being no more sensitive than the wild type to Mn, thus indicating a degree of specificity in the mechanism affected by the mutation. Undifferentiated callus tissue is also Cd sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. Both wild-type and mutant plants showed increased sensitivity to Cd in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of the cadmium-binding (γ-glutamylcysteine)n-glycine peptides, suggesting that the mutant is still able to synthesize these peptides. However, the effects of a cad1 mutation and buthionine sulfoximine together on cadmium sensitivity are essentially nonadditive, indicating that they may affect different aspects of the same detoxification mechanism. Assays of Cd uptake by intact plants indicate that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester Cd. Images Figure 1 Figure 7 PMID:16652930

  12. Differentially expressed genes in white egg 2 mutant of silkworm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... egg 2 (w-2) has the same phenotypes as white egg 1 and white egg 3 mutants with white egg color, but its mechanism is more complicated than white egg 1 and white egg 3 mutants based on recent report (Tatematsu et al., 2011) which suggest that the silkworm w-2 locus existed multi-allelic mutations.

  13. Characterization of human glucocerebrosidase from different mutant alleles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohashi, T.; Hong, C. M.; Weiler, S.; Tomich, J. M.; Aerts, J. M.; Tager, J. M.; Barranger, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Human cDNA was mutagenized to duplicate six naturally occurring mutations in the gene for glucocere-brosidase. The mutant genes were expressed in NIH 3T3 cells. The abnormal human enzymes were purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and characterized. The Asn370----Ser mutant protein differed from

  14. Photosynthetic characterization of a rolled leaf mutant of rice ( Oryza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new rolling leaf rice mutant was identified which showed an apparently straighter longitudinal shape normal transverse rolling characters at all developing stages. The chlorophyll contents per fresh weight of this mutant leaves were lower than those of wild-type. The electron transfer rate (ETR) and photochemical ...

  15. Unfolding intermediates of the mutant His-107-Tyr of human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srabani Taraphder

    Abstract. The mutant His-107-Tyr of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) is highly unstable and has long been linked to a misfolding disease known as carbonic anhydrase deficiency syndrome (CADS). High temperature unfolding trajectories of the mutant are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Mutants of Cre recombinase with improved accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroshenko, Nikolai; Church, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in genome engineering technologies, inserting genes into precise locations in the human genome remains an outstanding problem. It has been suggested that site-specific recombinases can be adapted towards use as transgene delivery vectors. The specificity of recombinases can be altered either with directed evolution or via fusions to modular DNA-binding domains. Unfortunately, both wildtype and altered variants often have detectable activities at off-target sites. Here we use bacterial selections to identify mutations in the dimerization surface of Cre recombinase (R32V, R32M, and 303GVSdup) that improve the accuracy of recombination. The mutants are functional in bacteria, in human cells, and in vitro (except for 303GVSdup, which we did not purify), and have improved selectivity against both model off-target sites and the entire E. coli genome. We propose that destabilizing binding cooperativity may be a general strategy for improving the accuracy of dimeric DNA-binding proteins. PMID:24056590

  17. Induction and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants by Ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Y. H.; Choi, J. D.; Park, J. Y.; Lee, J. R.; Sohn, H. S. [Gyeongbuk Institute for Bio Industry, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    This study was conducted to search the proper conditions and times for irradiating proton beam to seeds generally used for induction of mutant. Arabidopsis as model plants has good characters that is a short generation time, producing a lot of seeds, sequenced genome, developed maker. This points were the best materials for plant breeding for this study. The data of inducing mutants of Arabidopsis is used to be applicate to crops have more longer generation that is the final goals of this study. The goals of this project were to inducing and characterizing arabidopsis mutants by the proton ion beam and {gamma}-ray. As well as, the purpose of this study was securing more than 10 lines of arabidopsis mutants in this project and also to know the changed DNA structure of the mutants using the basic data for applying to the more study

  18. Arabinose Kinase-Deficient Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Olan; Cobbett, Christopher S.

    1991-01-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is sensitive to exogenous l-arabinose has been isolated. Comparisons of growth of the wild type, mutant, and F1 and F2 progeny of crosses showed the arabinose-sensitive phenotype is semidominant and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed the mutation is linked to the eceriferum-2 locus on chromosome 4. In vivo incorporation of exogenous labeled l-arabinose into ethanol-insoluble polysaccharides was greatly reduced in the mutant with a concomitant accumulation of free labeled arabinose. Enzyme assays of crude plant extracts demonstrated a defect in arabinose kinase activity in the mutant. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668327

  19. Characterization of a replication-incompetent pseudorabies virus mutant lacking the sole immediate early gene IE180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Brendan W; Engel, Esteban A; Enquist, Lynn W

    2014-11-11

    The alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) encodes a single immediate early gene called IE180. The IE180 protein is a potent transcriptional activator of viral genes involved in DNA replication and RNA transcription. A PRV mutant with both copies of IE180 deleted was constructed 20 years ago (S. Yamada and M. Shimizu, Virology 199:366-375, 1994, doi:10.1006/viro.1994.1134), but propagation of the mutant depended on complementing cell lines that expressed the toxic IE180 protein constitutively. Recently, Oyibo et al. constructed a novel set of PRV IE180 mutants and a stable cell line with inducible IE180 expression (H. Oyibo, P. Znamenskiy, H. V. Oviedo, L. W. Enquist, A. Zador, Front. Neuroanat. 8:86, 2014, doi:10.3389/fnana.2014.00086), which we characterized further here. These mutants failed to replicate new viral genomes, synthesize immediate early, early, or late viral proteins, and assemble infectious virions. The PRV IE180-null mutant did not form plaques in epithelial cell monolayers and could not spread from primary infected neurons to second-order neurons in culture. PRV IE180-null mutants lacked the property of superinfection exclusion. When PRV IE180-null mutants infected cells first, subsequent superinfecting viruses were not blocked in cell entry and formed replication compartments in epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and neurons. Cells infected with PRV IE180-null mutants survived as long as uninfected cells in culture while expressing a fluorescent reporter gene. Transcomplementation with IE180 in epithelial cells restored all mutant phenotypes to wild type. The conditional expression of PRV IE180 protein enables the propagation of replication-incompetent PRV IE180-null mutants and will facilitate construction of long-term single-cell-infecting PRV mutants for precise neural circuit tracing and high-capacity gene delivery vectors. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is widely used for neural tracing in animal models. The virus replicates and spreads between

  20. Preferência de Bemisia tabaci biótipo B em linhagens mutantes de algodoeiro Bemisia tabaci biotype B preference in mutant cotton lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco das Chagas Vidal Neto

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos de caracteres mutantes morfológicos do algodoeiro (Gossypium hirsutum L. r. latifolium Hutch.: folha okra, bráctea frego e planta vermelha, em relação à resistência à mosca-branca (Bemisia tabaci biótipo B Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae, foram avaliados em experimentos com ou sem chance de escolha. Os experimentos foram conduzidos em casa-de-vegetação, no delineamento de blocos ao acaso, em fatorial 23 + 1, com quatro repetições. O mutante com a característica planta vermelha foi menos atrativo e menos preferido para oviposição, em relação à planta verde, em ambos os ensaios, com ou sem escolha. Não houve preferência quanto à forma da folha e ao tipo de bráctea.The effects of cotton lines (Gossypium hirsutum L. r. latifolium Hutch. with mutants morphologic characteristics: okra leaf, frego bract and red plant in relation to host plant resistance to whitefly (Bemisia tabaci bioyipe B Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae, were evaluated in choice or no choice assays. The assays were carried out in the greenhouse conditions, according to a completely randomized block design, in a 23 + 1 in a factorial arrangement with four replications. The mutant with red plant characteristic was less attractive and less preferred for oviposition than the normal green plant does, in both, whit or without choice tests. It did not have preference in relation to the form of the leaf and bract type.

  1. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yuan

    Full Text Available The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  3. Resistance to thyroid hormone due to a novel thyroid hormone receptor mutant in a patient with hypothyroidism secondary to lingual thyroid and functional characterization of the mutant receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yasuyo; Yamada, Masanobu; Horiguchi, Kazuhiko; Satoh, Tetsurou; Hashimoto, Koshi; Tokuhiro, Etsuro; Onigata, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masatomo

    2010-08-01

    We describe a rare case of congenital hypothyroidism and an extremely high serum thyrotropin (TSH) level caused by a combination of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) and a lingual thyroid. As the RTH mutant, R316C, was new, the optimum dose of levothyroxine was unclear. To aid in assessment of the therapy, we characterized the mutant R316C thyroid hormone receptor (TR) and compared it with a common mutant, R316H, using in vitro studies. The patient was a newborn female having severe hypothyroidism with a free thyroxine level of 0.36 ng/dL and a serum TSH level of 177 microU/mL. A scintiscan showed ectopic lingual thyroid tissue without a normal thyroid gland. Supplementation with levothyroxine at a dose of >350 microg/day did not normalize the serum TSH level; however, the patient showed normal growth and intelligence at 14 years of age. Consistent with the results of a computer analysis, the binding of R316C to triiodothyronine (T3) was significantly decreased to 38% that of the wild type. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that like R316H, R316C did not form a homodimer, but formed a heterodimer with RXR. However, a glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assay showed reduced binding of R316C with NCoR in the absence of T3 and impaired release in the presence of T3. In addition, transient transfection experiments demonstrated that unlike R316H, R316C had severe impairment of transcriptional activity on genes both positively and negatively regulated by thyroid hormone. It also had a clear dominant negative effect on genes negatively, but not positively, regulated by thyroid hormone, including the TSH-releasing hormone and TSHbeta genes. This is the first reported case of a R316C TR mutation. The characteristics of the R316C mutant differed from those of the R316H mutant. Our findings suggest that R316C causes reduced association with and impaired release of NCoR, resulting in RTH predominantly at the pituitary level, and that slightly elevated serum

  4. A comparative study of cytokinins in caryopsis development in the maize miniature 1 seed mutant and its wild type

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report here a comparative developmental profile of cytokinins, both total quantity and diversity of various forms, in relation to cell size, cell number and endoreduplication in developing caryopses of a cell wall invertase-deficient miniature1 (mn1) seed mutant and its wild type, Mn1, genotype. ...

  5. Densified waste form and method for forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2015-08-25

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  6. Differences in growth promotion, drug response and intracellular protein trafficking of FLT3 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashkani, Baratali; Griffith, Renate; Ashman, Leonie

    2014-11-01

    Mutant forms FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3), are reported in 25% of childhood acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) and 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. In this study, drug response, growth promoting, and protein trafficking of FLT3 wild-type was compared with two active mutants (Internal Tandem Duplication (ITD)) and D835Y. FLT3 was expressed on factor-dependent cells (FDC-P1) using retroviral transduction. The inhibitory effects of CEP701, imatinib, dasatinib, PKC412 and sunitinib were studied on cell proliferation and FLT3 tyrosine phosphorylation. Total expression and proportion of intracellular and surface FLT3 was also determined. FDC-P1 cells became factor-independent after expression of human FLT3 mutants (ITD and D835Y). FDC-P1 cells expressing FLT3-ITD grow 3 to 4 times faster than those expressing FLT3-D835Y. FD-FLT3-ITD cells were three times more resistant to sunitinib than the FD-FLT3-WT cells. The Geo means for surface FLT3 expression in FD-FLT3-ITD and -D835Y were 65 and 70% less than the FD-FLT3-WT cells. About 40% of expressed FLT3 was detected as intracellular in FD-FLT3-D835Y cell compared to 4 and 4.5% in FD-FLT3-WT and -ITD cells. Retention of D835Y FLT3 mutant protein may cause altered signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of apoptotic signaling pathways leading to lower proliferation rate in FD-FLT3-D835Y than the FLT3-WT and ITD mutant., these may also also contribute, along with the preferential affinity, to the increased sensitivity of D835Y of CEP701 and PKC412. Studying these genetic variations can help determining the prognosis and designing a therapeutic plan for the patients with FLT3 mutations.

  7. The impact of nisin on sensitive and resistant mutants of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B; Cotter, P D; Hill, C; Ross, R P

    2011-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes ΔgadD1 and ΔlisK mutants display enhanced and reduced sensitivity, respectively, to the food preservative nisin in laboratory media. However, the behaviour of these strains in a nisin-containing food has not been assessed. Here we use cottage cheese as a model food to address this issue. Antibiotic-resistant forms of the wild-type and mutant strains were employed to investigate the behaviour of multiple strains in a single food sample, thereby eliminating the problem of intersample variation. Using this approach, it was established that percentage survival of the ΔlisK mutant was greater than the parent strain in the absence of nisin and that this relative difference became even more dramatic in cottage cheese supplemented with nisin. The numbers of the ΔgadD1 mutant decreased more rapidly than the parent in cottage cheese without nisin, but surprisingly this trend was reversed in nisin-supplemented cheese. Upon the addition of 10 mmol l(-1) monosodium glutamate, a substrate for the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) system, the wild-type LO28 strain regained its relative advantage over ΔgadD1. Care needs to be taken when predicting the behaviour of mutants of L. monocytogenes with altered resistance to nisin in food as experiments in laboratory media are not always a good indicator of how the strains will behave in such food environments. This study further emphasizes the importance of utilizing food matrices to confirm observations made using laboratory media. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  9. Large-scale RNA interference screening in mammalian cells identifies novel regulators of mutant huntingtin aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases including Huntington's disease (HD, mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼ 12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms.

  10. Progranulin is neurotrophic in vivo and protects against a mutant TDP-43 induced axonopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela S Laird

    Full Text Available Mislocalization, aberrant processing and aggregation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 is found in the neurons affected by two related diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD. These TDP-43 abnormalities are seen when TDP-43 is mutated, such as in familial ALS, but also in FTLD, caused by null mutations in the progranulin gene. They are also found in many patients with sporadic ALS and FTLD, conditions in which only wild type TDP-43 is present. The common pathological hallmarks and symptomatic cross over between the two diseases suggest that TDP-43 and progranulin may be mechanistically linked. In this study we aimed to address this link by establishing whether overexpression of mutant TDP-43 or knock-down of progranulin in zebrafish embryos results in motor neuron phenotypes and whether human progranulin is neuroprotective against such phenotypes. Mutant TDP-43 (A315T mutation induced a motor axonopathy characterized by short axonal outgrowth and aberrant branching, similar, but more severe, than that induced by mutant SOD1. Knockdown of the two zebrafish progranulin genes, grna and grnb, produced a substantial decrease in axonal length, with knockdown of grna alone producing a greater decrease in axonal length than grnb. Progranulin overexpression rescued the axonopathy induced by progranulin knockdown. Interestingly, progranulin also rescued the mutant TDP-43 induced axonopathy, whilst it failed to affect the mutant SOD1-induced phenotype. TDP-43 was found to be nuclear in all conditions described. The findings described here demonstrate that progranulin is neuroprotective in vivo and may have therapeutic potential for at least some forms of motor neuron degeneration.

  11. Quenching in Arabidopsis thaliana Mutants Lacking Monomeric Antenna Proteins of Photosystem II*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavina, Yuliya; de Bianchi, Silvia; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    2011-01-01

    The minor light-harvesting complexes CP24, CP26, and CP29 have been proposed to play a key role in the zeaxanthin (Zx)-dependent high light-induced regulation (NPQ) of excitation energy in higher plants. To characterize the detailed roles of these minor complexes in NPQ and to determine their specific quenching effects we have studied the ultrafast fluorescence kinetics in knockout (ko) mutants koCP26, koCP29, and the double mutant koCP24/CP26. The data provide detailed insight into the quenching processes and the reorganization of the Photosystem (PS) II supercomplex under quenching conditions. All genotypes showed two NPQ quenching sites. Quenching site Q1 is formed by a light-induced functional detachment of parts of the PSII supercomplex and a pronounced quenching of the detached antenna parts. The antenna remaining bound to the PSII core was also quenched substantially in all genotypes under NPQ conditions (quenching site Q2) as compared with the dark-adapted state. The latter quenching was about equally strong in koCP26 and the koCP24/CP26 mutants as in the WT. Q2 quenching was substantially reduced, however, in koCP29 mutants suggesting a key role for CP29 in the total NPQ. The observed quenching effects in the knockout mutants are complicated by the fact that other minor antenna complexes do compensate in part for the lack of the CP24 and/or CP29 complexes. Their lack also causes some LHCII dissociation already in the dark. PMID:21844190

  12. Growth, seed development and genetic analysis in wild type and Def mutant of Pisum sativum L

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The def mutant pea (Pisum sativum L) showed non-abscission of seeds from the funicule. Here we present data on seed development and growth pattern and their relationship in predicting this particular trait in wild type and mutant lines as well as the inheritance pattern of the def allele in F2 and F3 populations. Findings Pod length and seed fresh weight increase with fruit maturity and this may affect the abscission event in pea seeds. However, the seed position in either the distal and proximal ends of the pod did not show any difference. The growth factors of seed fresh weight (FW), width of funicles (WFN), seed width (SW) and seed height (SH) were highly correlated and their relationships were determined in both wild type and def mutant peas. The coefficient of determination R2 values for the relationship between WFN and FW, SW and SH and their various interactions were higher for the def dwarf type. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that variation of WFN was associated with SH and SW. Pearson's chi square analysis revealed that the inheritance and segregation of the Def locus in 3:1 ratio was significant in two F2 populations. Structural analysis of the F3 population was used to confirm the inheritance status of the Def locus in F2 heterozygote plants. Conclusions This study investigated the inheritance of the presence or absence of the Def allele, controlling the presence of an abscission zone (AZ) or an abscission-less zone (ALZ) forming in wild type and mutant lines respectively. The single major gene (Def) controlling this phenotype was monogenic and def mutants were characterized and controlled by the homozygous recessive def allele that showed no palisade layers in the hilum region of the seed coat. PMID:22078070

  13. Growth, seed development and genetic analysis in wild type and Def mutant of Pisum sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayeh Kwadwo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The def mutant pea (Pisum sativum L showed non-abscission of seeds from the funicule. Here we present data on seed development and growth pattern and their relationship in predicting this particular trait in wild type and mutant lines as well as the inheritance pattern of the def allele in F2 and F3 populations. Findings Pod length and seed fresh weight increase with fruit maturity and this may affect the abscission event in pea seeds. However, the seed position in either the distal and proximal ends of the pod did not show any difference. The growth factors of seed fresh weight (FW, width of funicles (WFN, seed width (SW and seed height (SH were highly correlated and their relationships were determined in both wild type and def mutant peas. The coefficient of determination R2 values for the relationship between WFN and FW, SW and SH and their various interactions were higher for the def dwarf type. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that variation of WFN was associated with SH and SW. Pearson's chi square analysis revealed that the inheritance and segregation of the Def locus in 3:1 ratio was significant in two F2 populations. Structural analysis of the F3 population was used to confirm the inheritance status of the Def locus in F2 heterozygote plants. Conclusions This study investigated the inheritance of the presence or absence of the Def allele, controlling the presence of an abscission zone (AZ or an abscission-less zone (ALZ forming in wild type and mutant lines respectively. The single major gene (Def controlling this phenotype was monogenic and def mutants were characterized and controlled by the homozygous recessive def allele that showed no palisade layers in the hilum region of the seed coat.

  14. Tumor suppressor PTEN affects tau phosphorylation: deficiency in the phosphatase activity of PTEN increases aggregation of an FTDP-17 mutant Tau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xue

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant hyperphosphorylation of tau protein has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Although a number of protein kinases have been shown to phosphorylate tau in vitro and in vivo, the molecular mechanisms by which tau phosphorylation is regulated pathophysiologically are largely unknown. Recently, a growing body of evidence suggests a link between tau phosphorylation and PI3K signaling. In this study, phosphorylation, aggregation and binding to the microtubule of a mutant frontal temporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17 tau in the presence of tumor suppressor PTEN, a major regulatory component in PI3K signaling, were investigated. Results Phosphorylation of the human mutant FTDP-17 tau, T40RW, was evaluated using different phospho-tau specific antibodies in the presence of human wild-type or phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN. Among the evaluated phosphorylation sites, the levels of Ser214 and Thr212 phospho-tau proteins were significantly decreased in the presence of wild-type PTEN, and significantly increased when the phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN was ectopically expressed. Fractionation of the mutant tau transfected cells revealed a significantly increased level of soluble tau in cytosol when wild-type PTEN was expressed, and an elevated level of SDS-soluble tau aggregates in the presence of the mutant PTEN. In addition, the filter/trap assays detected more SDS-insoluble mutant tau aggregates in the cells overexpressing the mutant PTEN compared to those in the cells overexpressing wild-type PTEN and control DNA. This notion was confirmed by the immunocytochemical experiment which demonstrated that the overexpression of the phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN caused the mutant tau to form aggregates in the COS-7 cells. Conclusion Tumor suppressor PTEN can alleviate the phosporylation of the mutant FTDP-17 tau at specific sites, and the phosphatase activity

  15. PedonnanceofE3rly MatUring MutantS Derived from ''SuPa'~ Rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sig"ificant di.ffere-"~s between the mutants and their'parent for 'ail the maraders testeiiexcept 1 (j()(J grains weight and ~ipe weight The mutants .... reported in earlier rice improvement programmes

  16. Biofilm formation ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acrAB mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kisluk, Guy; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies offer contradictory findings about the role of multidrug efflux pumps in bacterial biofilm development. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the AcrAB efflux pump in biofilm formation by investigating the ability of AcrB and AcrAB null mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce biofilms. Three models were used to compare the ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and its mutants to form biofilms: formation of biofilm on polystyrene surfaces; production of biofilm (mat model) on the air/liquid interface; and expression of curli and cellulose on Congo red-supplemented agar plates. All three investigated genotypes formed biofilms with similar characteristics. However, upon exposure to chloramphenicol, formation of biofilms on solid surfaces as well as the production of curli were either reduced or were delayed more significantly in both mutants, whilst there was no visible effect on pellicle formation. It can be concluded that when no selective pressure is applied, S. Typhimurium is able to produce biofilms even when the AcrAB efflux pumps are inactivated, implying that the use of efflux pump inhibitors to prevent biofilm formation is not a general solution and that combined treatments might be more efficient. Other factors that affect the ability to produce biofilms depending on efflux pump activity are yet to be identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Mapping pathological phenotypes in Reelin mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina eMichetti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD are neurodevelopmental disorders with multifactorial origin characterized by social communication and behavioural perseveration deficits. Several studies showed an association between the reelin gene mutation and increased risk of ASD and a reduced reelin expression in some brain regions of ASD subjects, suggesting a role for reelin deficiency in ASD etiology. Reelin is a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing important roles during development of the central nervous system. To deeply investigate the role of reelin dysfunction as vulnerability factor in ASD, we investigated the behavioural, neurochemical and brain morphological features of reeler male mice. We recently reported a genotype-dependent deviation in ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development in reeler pups. We now report that adult male heterozygous reeler mice did not show social behaviour and communication deficits during male-female social interactions. Wildtype and heterozygous mice also showed a typical light/dark locomotor activity profile, with a peak during the central interval of the dark phase. However, when faced with a mild stressful stimulus (a saline injection only heterozygous mice showed an over response to stress. At the end of the behavioural studies, we conducted high performance liquid chromatography and magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to investigate whether reelin mutation influences brain monoamine and metabolites levels in regions involved in ASD. Low levels of dopamine in cortex and high levels of glutamate and taurine in hippocampus were detected in heterozygous mice, in line with clinical data collected on ASD children. Altogether, our data detected subtle but relevant neurochemical abnormalities in reeler mice supporting this mutant line, particularly male subjects, as a valid experimental model to estimate the contribution played by reelin deficiency in the global ASD

  18. Selenite-stress selected mutant strains of probiotic bacteria for Se source production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Kovács, Szilvia; Pócsi, István; Prokisch, József

    2015-04-01

    Selenium deficiency is a major health problem worldwide for about 1 billion people. Bacterial cells usually possess low tolerance to selenite stress and also low ability to reduce high concentrations of toxic selenite. Here, high tolerance to selenite and selenium bioaccumulation capability were developed in mutated clones of probiotic and starter bacteria including Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis by food-level strain development process and clone selection. All mutant clones possessed increased glutathione concentration and glutathione reductase activity. The selenite treatment increased further these values in L. casei mutant strain pointing at a different selenite reduction pathway and/or stress response in this organism. Considerable conversion of selenite to cell bound selenium forms with a concomitant high biomass production was detected in E. faecium and B. animalis ssp. lactis cultures. Possible application of these strains as food and feed supplements is under investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. The ataxic Cacna1a-mutant mouse rolling nagoya: an overview of neuromorphological and electrophysiological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, Jaap J; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Kaja, Simon

    2009-09-01

    Homozygous rolling Nagoya natural mutant mice display a severe ataxic gait and frequently roll over to their side or back. The causative mutation resides in the Cacna1a gene, encoding the pore-forming alpha(1) subunit of Ca(v)2.1 type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. These channels are crucially involved in neuronal Ca(2+) signaling and in neurotransmitter release at many central synapses and, in the periphery, at the neuromuscular junction. We here review the behavioral, histological, biochemical, and neurophysiological studies on this mouse mutant and discuss its usefulness as a model of human neurological diseases associated with Ca(v)2.1 dysfunction.

  20. The parkin Mutant Phenotype in the Fly Is Largely Rescued by Metal-Responsive Transcription Factor (MTF-1) ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Nidhi; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The gene for Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is mutated in some familial forms of Parkinson's disease, a severe neurodegenerative disorder. A homozygous mutant of the Drosophila ortholog of human parkin is viable but results in severe motoric impairment including an inability to fly, female and male sterility, and a decreased life span. We show here that a double mutant of the genes for Parkin and the metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) is not viable. MTF-1, which is conserved fro...

  1. Transcriptome analysis of integument differentially expressed genes in the pigment mutant (quail) during molting of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hongyi; Liu, Chun; Cheng, Tingcai; Li, Qiongyan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    In the silkworm Bombyx mori, pigment mutants with diverse body colors have been maintained throughout domestication for about 5000 years. The silkworm larval body color is formed through the mutual interaction of melanin, ommochromes, pteridines and uric acid. These pigments/compounds are synthesized by the cooperative action of various genes and enzymes. Previous reports showed that melanin, ommochrome and pteridine are increased in silkworm quail (q) mutants. To understand the pigment increase and alterations in pigment synthesis in q mutant, transcriptome profiles of the silkworm integument were investigated at 16 h after head capsule slippage in the fourth molt in q mutants and wild-type (Dazao). Compared to the wild-type, 1161 genes were differentially expressed in the q mutant. Of these modulated genes, 62.4% (725 genes) were upregulated and 37.6% (436 genes) were downregulated in the q mutant. The molecular function of differently expressed genes was analyzed by Blast2GO. The results showed that upregulated genes were mainly involved in protein binding, small molecule binding, transferase activity, nucleic acid binding, specific DNA-binding transcription factor activity and chromatin binding, while exclusively down-expressed genes functioned in oxidoreductase activity, cofactor binding, tetrapyrrole binding, peroxidase activity and pigment binding. We focused on genes related to melanin, pteridine and ommochrome biosynthesis; transport of uric acid; and juvenile hormone metabolism because of their importance in integument coloration during molting. This study identified differently expressed genes implicated in silkworm integument formation and pigmentation using silkworm q mutant. The results estimated the number and types of genes that drive new integument formation.

  2. Oncogene mutations, copy number gains and mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI frequently occur together in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Soh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activating mutations in one allele of an oncogene (heterozygous mutations are widely believed to be sufficient for tumorigenesis. However, mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI has been observed in tumors and cell lines harboring mutations of oncogenes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined 1 mutational status, 2 copy number gains (CNGs and 3 relative ratio between mutant and wild type alleles of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and EGFR genes by direct sequencing and quantitative PCR assay in over 400 human tumors, cell lines, and xenografts of lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. Examination of a public database indicated that homozygous mutations of five oncogenes were frequent (20% in 833 cell lines of 12 tumor types. Our data indicated two major forms of MASI: 1 MASI with CNG, either complete or partial; and 2 MASI without CNG (uniparental disomy; UPD, due to complete loss of wild type allele. MASI was a frequent event in mutant EGFR (75% and was due mainly to CNGs, while MASI, also frequent in mutant KRAS (58%, was mainly due to UPD. Mutant: wild type allelic ratios at the genomic level were precisely maintained after transcription. KRAS mutations or CNGs were significantly associated with increased ras GTPase activity, as measured by ELISA, and the two molecular changes were synergistic. Of 237 lung adenocarcinoma tumors, the small number with both KRAS mutation and CNG were associated with shortened survival. CONCLUSIONS: MASI is frequently present in mutant EGFR and KRAS tumor cells, and is associated with increased mutant allele transcription and gene activity. The frequent finding of mutations, CNGs and MASI occurring together in tumor cells indicates that these three genetic alterations, acting together, may have a greater role in the development or maintenance of the malignant phenotype than any individual alteration.

  3. Mutant Resources for the Functional Analysis of the Rice Genome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nili Wang Tuan Long Wen Yao Lizhong Xiong Qifa Zhang Changyin Wu

    2013-01-01

    .... In order to systematically assign functions to all predicted genes in the rice genome, a large number of rice mutant lines, including those created by T-DNA insertion, Ds/dSpm tagging, Tos17 tagging...

  4. Hole poking and motor coordination in lurcher mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, R; Joyal, C C; Guastavino, J M; Botez, M I

    1993-07-01

    Lurcher mutant mice, a cerebellar mutant displaying ataxia and equilibrium deficits, had fewer hole pokes in a 16-hole matrix than normal mice. Lurcher mutants also took longer to reach a platform from a grid and to begin to climb a grid from the floor. However, the lurchers climbed as high as normal mice on the grid and their exploratory patterns of the holeboard were similar in many respects to normal mice, such as the ratio of center to peripheral hole exploration. In a wooden beam test, although lurchers did not differ from normal mice in terms of the amount of time spent on the beam or in the distance travelled, the mutants were found more often in unstable positions.

  5. Enhanced Cellulase Production by a Mutant of Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, J C; Shewale, J G; Deshpande, M V

    1979-10-01

    A mutant of Sclerotium rolfsii CPC 142 that secretes about two times more filter paper-degrading activity in NM-2 growth medium in submerged cultures than the parent strain was obtained by ultraviolet mutagenesis of crushed sclerotia. The production of endo-beta-glucanase in the mutant was affected to a lesser extent. With the parent strain, the addition of 3% rice bran to NM-2 medium was essential for optimal formation of cellulase, including filter paper-degrading activity. However, with the mutant the addition of rice bran to NM-2 medium increased the formation of endo-beta-glucanase but not filter paper-degrading or cellobiase activity. An altered control mechanism for the production of filter paper-degrading enzymes is suggested. The genome(s) controlling the cellulase complex of enzymes in the UV-8 mutant is not under coordinate control.

  6. Enhanced Cellulase Production by a Mutant of Sclerotium rolfsii†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, J. C.; Shewale, J. G.; Deshpande, M. V.

    1979-01-01

    A mutant of Sclerotium rolfsii CPC 142 that secretes about two times more filter paper-degrading activity in NM-2 growth medium in submerged cultures than the parent strain was obtained by ultraviolet mutagenesis of crushed sclerotia. The production of endo-β-glucanase in the mutant was affected to a lesser extent. With the parent strain, the addition of 3% rice bran to NM-2 medium was essential for optimal formation of cellulase, including filter paper-degrading activity. However, with the mutant the addition of rice bran to NM-2 medium increased the formation of endo-β-glucanase but not filter paper-degrading or cellobiase activity. An altered control mechanism for the production of filter paper-degrading enzymes is suggested. The genome(s) controlling the cellulase complex of enzymes in the UV-8 mutant is not under coordinate control. Images PMID:16345449

  7. Globulin gene expression in embryos of maize viviparous mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, A.R.; Wallace, M.S.; Paiva, R. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Expression of genes encoding the major Zea mays embryo globulins was examined in the maize precocious germination viviparous (vp) mutants. Comparison of globulin protein profiles of precociously germinating mutant embryos with those of normally germinating mature embryos revealed substantial differences with respect to the proteins encoded by the Glb1 gene. Analysis of Glb1 transcript levels in vp/vp embryos suggests that these mutants do not fully switch from a program of embryo maturation to one of germination. These preliminary studies indicate that the vp mutants provide an excellent system for the study of embryo maturation in maize. We also provide evidence for the positive regulation of Glb1 expression by the plant growth regulator abscisic acid.

  8. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    , stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib....... Kinetic analysis of the mutant PRib-PP synthetase revealed an apparent Km for ATP and ribose 5-phosphate of 1.0 mM and 240 μM respectively, compared to 60 μM and 45 μM respectively for the wild-type enzyme. ADP, which inhibits the wild-type enzyme at a concentration of 0.5 mM ribose 5-phosphate...

  9. Characterization of Pasteurella multocida mutants of low virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M D; Glisson, J R; Wooley, R E; Brown, J

    1990-01-01

    Ten temperature-sensitive mutants of the Clemson University (CU) vaccine strain of Pasteurella multocida have been developed and were characterized by phenotypic attributes such as carbohydrate fermentation, antibiotic resistance, and membrane protein profiles. Some mutants were found to have lost the ability to utilize some substrates, notably xylose and gluconate, whereas others were able to ferment additional carbohydrates such as arabinose and rhamnose. CU was found to be resistant to sulfisoxazole, of intermediate resistance to bacitracin, and sensitive to rifampin; the sensitivity to these three antibiotics varied among the mutant strains, but 60% were resistant to rifampin. Membrane protein profiles demonstrated some changes in major bands, and there was variation in 50% of the mutants in proteins in the 31 kilodalton range. All strains were assayed for the presence of several virulence factors, and many were found to produce siderophore and to exhibit some degree of complement resistance.

  10. Selection of mutants of capsicum annuum induced by gamma ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. I.; Lee, Y. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, E. K. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    For induction and selection of mutations of Capsicum annuum L., dry seeds of pure lines No.1 and No.2 were irradiated with gamma ray of 150Gy, 200Gy and 250Gy. Various mutants were selected such as showing early maturity, short plant height, long fruit and chlorophyll mutations. Mutation frequency of No.1 line was 3.4% in the dose of 150Gy, while the frequency of No.2 line was 2.7% in the dose of 250Gy. For selection of resistant mutant to amino acid analog, the optimum concentration of 5-methyltryptophan (5-MT) and S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine were 25 ppm and 30 ppm, respectively. Four resistant mutant lines to 5-MT were selected among 400 mutant lines.

  11. Kharon1 null mutants of Leishmania mexicana are avirulent in mice and exhibit a cytokinesis defect within macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoa D Tran

    Full Text Available In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis.

  12. Expression of hepcidin is down-regulated in TfR2 mutant mice manifesting a phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Fleming, Robert E; Gui, Dorina; Moon, Seo Y; Saitoh, Takayuki; O'Kelly, James; Umehara, Yutaka; Wano, Yuji; Said, Jonathan W; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2005-01-01

    Transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) is a membrane glycoprotein that mediates cellular iron uptake from holotransferrin. Homozygous mutations of this gene cause one form of hereditary hemochromatosis in humans. We recently reported that homozygous TfR2(Y245X) mutant mice, which correspond to the TfR2(Y250X) mutation in humans, showed a phenotype similar to hereditary hemochromatosis. In this study, we further analyzed the phenotype as well as iron-related gene expression in these mice by comparing the TfR2-mutant and wild-type siblings. Northern blot analyses showed that the levels of expression of hepcidin mRNA in the liver were generally lower, whereas those of duodenal DMT1, the main transporter for uptake of dietary iron, were higher in the TfR2-mutant mice as compared to the wild-type siblings. Expression of hepcidin mRNA in the TfR2 mutant mice remained low even after intraperitoneal iron loading. In isolated hepatocytes from both wild-type and TfR2 mutant mice, interleukin-6 and lipopolysaccharide each induced expression of hepcidin mRNA. These results suggest that up-regulation of hepcidin expression by inflammatory stimuli is independent of TfR2 and that TfR2 is upstream of hepcidin in the regulatory pathway of body iron homeostasis.

  13. Uv- and Gamma-Radiation Sensitive Mutants of Arabidopsis Thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, C Z; Yen, C. N.; Cronin, K; Mitchell, D.; Britt, A B

    1997-01-01

    Arabidopsis seedlings repair UV-induced DNA damage via light-dependent and -independent pathways. The mechanism of the ``dark repair'' pathway is still unknown. To determine the number of genes required for dark repair and to investigate the substrate-specificity of this process we isolated mutants with enhanced sensitivity to UV radiation in the absence of photoreactivating light. Seven independently derived UV sensitive mutants were isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population. These fell in...

  14. [The behavioral development of the mutant "staggerer" mouse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastavino, J M

    1978-01-01

    The behavioural study, in particular rearing environmental conditions, of the mutant mouse staggerer has shown that such animals may live more than 90 days. (he behavioural diagnosis of this mutation has been possible from the second week of life, using specific tests. A typical "bat posture" permits one to recognize the mutant from the normal Mouse. Locomotory and feeding behaviours also present late and various qualitatige particularities.

  15. Structure prediction of subtilisin BPN' mutants using molecular dynamics methods

    OpenAIRE

    Heiner, Andreas P.; Berendsen, Herman J.C.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe the achievements and pitfalls encountered in doing structure predictions of protein mutants using molecular dynamics simulation techniques in which properties of atoms are slowly changed as a function of time. Basically the method consists of a thermodynamic integration (slow growth) calculation used for free energy determination, but aimed at structure prediction; this allows for a fast determination of the mutant structure. We compared the calculated structure of t...

  16. Fate of peptides in peptidase mutants of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, E.R S; Mierau, I; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N; Venema, G; Kok, J.

    The utilization of exogenous peptides was studied in mutants of Lactococcus lactis in which combinations of the peptidase genes pepN, pepC, pepO, pepX and pepT were deleted, Multiple mutants lacking PepN, PepC, PepT plus PepX could not grow on peptides such as Leu-Gly-Gly, Gly-Phe-Leu, Leu-Gly-Pro,

  17. Ozone-Sensitive Arabidopsis Mutants with Deficiencies in Photorespiratory Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Shoko; Bathula, Srinivas; Kubo, Akihiro; Tamaoki, Masanori; Aono, Mitsuko; Sano, Tomoharu; Tobe, Kazuo; Timm, Stefan; Bauwe, Hermann; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Saji, Hikaru

    2017-05-01

    An ozone-sensitive mutant was isolated from T-DNA-tagged lines of Arabidopsis thaliana. The T-DNA was inserted at a locus on chromosome 3, where two genes encoding glycolate oxidases, GOX1 and GOX2, peroxisomal enzymes involved in photorespiration, reside contiguously. The amounts of the mutant's foliar transcripts for these genes were reduced, and glycolate oxidase activity was approximately 60% of that of the wild-type plants. No difference in growth and appearance was observed between the mutant and the wild-type plants under normal conditions with ambient air under a light intensity of 100 µmol photons m-2 s-1. However, signs of severe damage, such as chlorosis and ion leakage from the tissue, rapidly appeared in mutant leaves in response to ozone treatment at a concentration of 0.2 µl l-1 under a higher light intensity of 350 µmol photons m-2 s-1 that caused no such symptoms in the wild-type plant. The mutant also exhibited sensitivity to sulfur dioxide and long-term high-intensity light. Arabidopsis mutants with deficiencies in other photorespiratory enzymes such as glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase and hydroxypyruvate reductase also exhibited ozone sensitivities. Therefore, photorespiration appears to be involved in protection against photooxidative stress caused by ozone and other abiotic factors under high-intensity light. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Reducing ppGpp level rescues an extreme growth defect caused by mutant EF-Tu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Bergman

    Full Text Available Transcription and translation of mRNA's are coordinated processes in bacteria. We have previously shown that a mutant form of EF-Tu (Gln125Arg in Salmonella Typhimurium with a reduced affinity for aa-tRNA, causes ribosome pausing, resulting in an increased rate of RNase E-mediated mRNA cleavage, causing extremely slow growth, even on rich medium. The slow growth phenotype is reversed by mutations that reduce RNase E activity. Here we asked whether the slow growth phenotype could be reversed by overexpression of a wild-type gene. We identified spoT (encoding ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase as a gene that partially reversed the slow growth rate when overexpressed. We found that the slow-growing mutant had an abnormally high basal level of ppGpp that was reduced when spoT was overexpressed. Inactivating relA (encoding the ribosome-associated ppGpp synthetase also reduced ppGpp levels and significantly increased growth rate. Because RelA responds specifically to deacylated tRNA in the ribosomal A-site this suggested that the tuf mutant had an increased level of deacylated tRNA relative to the wild-type. To test this hypothesis we measured the relative acylation levels of 4 families of tRNAs and found that proline isoacceptors were acylated at a lower level in the mutant strain relative to the wild-type. In addition, the level of the proS tRNA synthetase mRNA was significantly lower in the mutant strain. We suggest that an increased level of deacylated tRNA in the mutant strain stimulates RelA-mediated ppGpp production, causing changes in transcription pattern that are inappropriate for rich media conditions, and contributing to slow growth rate. Reducing ppGpp levels, by altering the activity of either SpoT or RelA, removes one cause of the slow growth and reveals the interconnectedness of intracellular regulatory mechanisms.

  19. klf2ash317 Mutant Zebrafish Do Not Recapitulate Morpholino-Induced Vascular and Haematopoietic Phenotypes.

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    Peter Novodvorsky

    Full Text Available The zinc-finger transcription factor Krϋppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 transduces blood flow into molecular signals responsible for a wide range of responses within the vasculature. KLF2 maintains a healthy, quiescent endothelial phenotype. Previous studies report a range of phenotypes following morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-induced klf2a knockdown in zebrafish. Targeted genome editing is an increasingly applied method for functional assessment of candidate genes. We therefore generated a stable klf2a mutant zebrafish and characterised its cardiovascular and haematopoietic development.Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN we generated a klf2a mutant (klf2ash317 with a 14bp deletion leading to a premature stop codon in exon 2. Western blotting confirmed loss of wild type Klf2a protein and the presence of a truncated protein in klf2ash317 mutants. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutants exhibit no defects in vascular patterning, survive to adulthood and are fertile, without displaying previously described morphant phenotypes such as high-output cardiac failure, reduced haematopoetic stem cell (HSC development or impaired formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutation did not reduce angiogenesis in zebrafish with homozygous mutations in von Hippel Lindau (vhl, a form of angiogenesis that is dependent on blood flow. We examined expression of three klf family members in wildtype and klf2ash317 zebrafish. We detected vascular expression of klf2b (but not klf4a or biklf/klf4b/klf17 in wildtypes but found no differences in expression that might account for the lack of phenotype in klf2ash317 mutants. klf2b morpholino knockdown did not affect heart rate or impair formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch in either wildtypes or klf2ash317 mutants.The klf2ash317 mutation produces a truncated Klf2a protein but, unlike morpholino induced klf2a knockdown, does not affect cardiovascular development.

  20. Genetics of peripheral vestibular dysfunction: lessons from mutant mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sherri M; Jones, Timothy A

    2014-03-01

    A considerable amount of research has been published about genetic hearing impairment. Fifty to sixty percent of hearing loss is thought to have a genetic cause. Genes may also play a significant role in acquired hearing loss due to aging, noise exposure, or ototoxic medications. Between 1995 and 2012, over 100 causative genes have been identified for syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of hereditary hearing loss. Mouse models have been extremely valuable in facilitating the discovery of hearing loss genes and in understanding inner ear pathology due to genetic mutations or elucidating fundamental mechanisms of inner ear development. Whereas much is being learned about hereditary hearing loss and the genetics of cochlear disorders, relatively little is known about the role genes may play in peripheral vestibular impairment. Here we review the literature with regard to genetics of vestibular dysfunction and discuss what we have learned from studies using mutant mouse models and direct measures of peripheral vestibular neural function. Several genes are considered that when mutated lead to varying degrees of inner ear vestibular dysfunction due to deficits in otoconia, stereocilia, hair cells, or neurons. Behavior often does not reveal the inner ear deficit. Many of the examples presented are also known to cause human disorders. Knowledge regarding the roles of particular genes in the operation of the vestibular sensory apparatus is growing, and it is clear that gene products co-expressed in the cochlea and vestibule may play different roles in the respective end organs. The discovery of new genes mediating critical inner ear vestibular function carries the promise of new strategies in diagnosing, treating, and managing patients as well as predicting the course and level of morbidity in human vestibular disease. American Academy of Audiology.

  1. Neurologic function during developmental and adult stages in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquelin, C; Strazielle, C; Lalonde, R

    2012-01-01

    Homozygous Dab1(scm) mouse mutants with cell ectopias in cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, and neocortex were compared to non-ataxic controls on the SHIRPA primary screening battery on postnatal days 8, 15, and 22, as well as in the adult period. Dab1(scm) mutants were distinguished from non-ataxic controls as early as postnatal day 8 based on body tremor, gait anomalies, and body weight. On postnatal day 15, motor coordination deficits were evident on horizontal bar and inclined or vertical grid tests in association with a weaker grip strength. Likewise, mutants were distinguished from controls on drop righting and hindpaw clasping tests. Further differences were detected on postnatal day 22 in the form of fewer visual placing, touch escape, trunk curl, freezing, and vocalization responses, as well as squares traversed in the open-field. Evaluation at the adult age demonstrated similar impairments, indicative of permanent motor alterations. Neuronal metabolic activity was estimated by cytochrome oxidase histochemistry on cerebellar sections. Cerebellar cortical layers and efferent deep nuclei of Dab1(scm) mice appeared hypometabolic relative to non-ataxic mice despite normal metabolism in both regular and ectopic Purkinje cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A collection of yeast mutants selectively resistant to ionophores acting on mitochondrial inner membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrezselyova, Silvia; Lalakova, Jana; Abelovska, Lenka; Klobucnikova, Vlasta; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2008-03-01

    Valinomycin and nigericin are potassium ionophores acting selectively on the mitochondrial inner membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Kovac, L., Bohmerova, E., Butko, P., 1982a. Ionophores and intact cells. I. Valinomycin and nigericin act preferentially on mitochondria and not on the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 721, 341-348]. However, the molecular mechanism of their action is not understood. Here we show that their selective effect on mitochondrial membranes is not caused by the pleiotropic drug resistance system. To identify the molecular components mediating the action of ionophores we isolated several mutants specifically resistant to valinomycin and/or nigericin. In contrast to the parental strain, these mutants do not form respiratory-deficient cells in the presence of ionophores. Moreover, all mutants harbor extensively fragmented mitochondria and these morphological defects can be alleviated by the ionophores. Interestingly, we observed that these mitochondrial defects may be accompanied by changes in vacuolar dynamics. Our results demonstrate that the classical genetic approach can provide a starting point for the analysis of components involved in the action of ionophores on mitochondria-related processes in eukaryotic cell.

  3. A dominant-negative mutant inhibits multiple prion variants through a common mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Pei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Prions adopt alternative, self-replicating protein conformations and thereby determine novel phenotypes that are often irreversible. Nevertheless, dominant-negative prion mutants can revert phenotypes associated with some conformations. These observations suggest that, while intervention is possible, distinct inhibitors must be developed to overcome the conformational plasticity of prions. To understand the basis of this specificity, we determined the impact of the G58D mutant of the Sup35 prion on three of its conformational variants, which form amyloids in S. cerevisiae. G58D had been previously proposed to have unique effects on these variants, but our studies suggest a common mechanism. All variants, including those reported to be resistant, are inhibited by G58D but at distinct doses. G58D lowers the kinetic stability of the associated amyloid, enhancing its fragmentation by molecular chaperones, promoting Sup35 resolubilization, and leading to amyloid clearance particularly in daughter cells. Reducing the availability or activity of the chaperone Hsp104, even transiently, reverses curing. Thus, the specificity of inhibition is determined by the sensitivity of variants to the mutant dosage rather than mode of action, challenging the view that a unique inhibitor must be developed to combat each variant.

  4. Twister mutant mice are defective for otogelin, a component specific to inner ear acellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmler, Marie Christine; Zwaenepoel, Ingrid; Verpy, Elisabeth; Guillaud, Laurent; Elbaz, Colette; Petit, Christine; Panthier, Jean Jacques

    2000-11-01

    Deafness is a common sensory defect in human. Our understanding of the molecular bases of this pathology comes from the study of a few genes that have been identified in human and/or in mice. Indeed, deaf mouse mutants are good models for studying and identifying genes involved in human hereditary hearing loss. Among these mouse mutants, twister was initially reported to have abnormal behavior and thereafter to be deaf. The recessive twister (twt) mutation has been mapped on mouse Chromosome (Chr) 7, homologous to the long arm of human Chr 15 (15q11). Otog, the gene encoding otogelin, a glycoprotein specific to all the acellular membranes of the inner ear, is also localized to mouse Chr 7, but in a region more proximal to the twister mutation, homologous to the short arm of human Chr 11 (11p15) carrying the two deafness loci, DFNB18 and USH1C. Mutant mice resulting from the knock-out of Otog, the Otog(tm1Prs) mice, present deafness and severe imbalance. Although twt had been mapped distally to Otog, these data prompted us to test whether twt could be due to a mutation in the Otog locus. Here, we demonstrate by genetic analysis that twt is actually allelic to Otog(tm1Prs). We further extend the phenotypical analysis of twister mice, documenting the association of a severe vestibular phenotype and moderate to severe form of deafness. Molecular analysis of the Otog gene revealed the absence of detectable expression of Otog in the twister mutant. The molecular and phenotypical description of the twt mouse mutation, Otog(twt), reported herein, highlights the importance of the acellular membranes in the inner ear mechanotransduction process.

  5. Metabolic Perturbations in a Bacillus subtilis clpP Mutant during Glucose Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schultz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteolysis is essential for all living organisms to maintain the protein homeostasis and to adapt to changing environmental conditions. ClpP is the main protease in Bacillus subtilis, and forms complexes with different Clp ATPases. These complexes play crucial roles during heat stress, but also in sporulation or cell morphology. Especially enzymes of cell wall-, amino acid-, and nucleic acid biosynthesis are known substrates of the protease ClpP during glucose starvation. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of a clpP mutation on the metabolism in different growth phases and to search for putative new ClpP substrates. Therefore, B. subtilis 168 cells and an isogenic ∆clpP mutant were cultivated in a chemical defined medium, and the metabolome was analyzed by a combination of 1H-NMR, HPLC-MS, and GC-MS. Additionally, the cell morphology was investigated by electron microscopy. The clpP mutant showed higher levels of most glycolytic metabolites, the intermediates of the citric acid cycle, amino acids, and peptidoglycan precursors when compared to the wild-type. A strong secretion of overflow metabolites could be detected in the exo-metabolome of the clpP mutant. Furthermore, a massive increase was observed for the teichoic acid metabolite CDP-glycerol in combination with a swelling of the cell wall. Our results show a recognizable correlation between the metabolome and the corresponding proteome data of B. subtilis clpP mutant. Moreover, our results suggest an influence of ClpP on Tag proteins that are responsible for teichoic acids biosynthesis.

  6. Citric acid production by selected mutants of Aspergillus niger from cane molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram-Ul, Haq; Ali, Sikander; Qadeer, M A; Iqbal, Javed

    2004-06-01

    The present investigation deals with citric acid production by some selected mutant strains of Aspergillus niger from cane molasses in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks. For this purpose, a conidial suspension of A. niger GCB-75, which produced 31.1 g/l citric acid from 15% (w/v) molasses sugar, was subjected to UV-induced mutagenesis. Among the 3 variants, GCM-45 was found to be a better producer of citric acid (50.0 +/- 2a) and it was further improved by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl, N-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG). Out of 3,2-deoxy-D-glucose resistant variants, GCMC-7 was selected as the best mutant, which produced 96.1 +/- 1.5 g/l citric acid 168 h after fermentation of potassium ferrocyanide and H2SO4 pre-treated blackstrap molasses in Vogel's medium. On the basis of kinetic parameters such as volumetric substrate uptake rate (Qs), and specific substrate uptake rate (qs), the volumetric productivity, theoretical yield and specific product formation rate, it was observed that the mutants were faster growing organisms and produced more citric acid. The mutant GCMC-7 has greater commercial potential than the parental strain with regard to citrate synthase activity. The addition of 2.0 x 10(-5) M MgSO4 x 5H2O into the fermentation medium reduced the Fe2+ ion concentration by counter-acting its deleterious effect on mycelial growth. The magnesium ions also induced a loose-pelleted form of growth (0.6 mm, diameter), reduced the biomass concentration (12.5 g/l) and increased the volumetric productivity of citric acid monohydrate (113.6 +/- 5 g/l). Copyright 2003 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  8. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bueno

    Full Text Available Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the

  9. In vitro exploration of latent prothrombin mutants conveying antithrombin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shogo; Murata-Kawakami, Moe; Takagi, Yuki; Suzuki, Sachiko; Katsumi, Akira; Takagi, Akira; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2017-09-20

    Antithrombin resistance (ATR) prothrombinemia is an inherited thrombophilic disorder caused by missense mutations in prothrombin gene (F2) at Arg596 of the sodium-binding region. Previously, prothrombin mutants Yukuhashi (Arg596Leu), Belgrade (Arg596Gln), and Padua 2 (Arg596Trp) were reported as ATR-prothrombins possessing a risk of familial venous thrombosis. To identify additional F2 mutations causing the ATR-phenotype, we investigated the coagulant properties of recombinant prothrombins mutated at amino acid residues within the sodium-binding region by single nucleotide substitutions (Thr540, Arg541, Glu592, and Lys599). We constructed expression vectors of prothrombin mutants, established stably transfected HEK293 cells, and isolated the recombinant prothrombin proteins. We evaluated procoagulant activity and ATR-phenotypes of those mutants in reconstituted plasma by mixing with prothrombin deficient plasma. The secreted quantity of all prothrombin mutants was the same as that of the wild-type prothrombin. Procoagulant activity of each mutant varied from 1.7% to 79.5% in a one-stage clotting assay and from 2.0% to 104.5% in a two-stage chromogenic assay. Most prothrombin mutants tested presented with a severe ATR-phenotype. To estimate the thrombosis risk of these mutations, we determined the residual clotting activity (RCA) after 30min inactivation with antithrombin. RCA scores, normalized to the wild-type, revealed that prothrombin mutants Lys599Arg (5.35) and Glu592Gln (4.71) had high scores, which were comparable with prothrombins Yukuhashi (4.36) and Belgrade (5.19). Mutation of prothrombin at the sodium-binding site caused ATR-phenotypes. Of those tested, Lys599Arg and Glu592Gln may possess a thrombosis risk as large as the known pathogenic prothrombins Yukuhashi and Belgrade. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. NRAS-mutant melanoma: current challenges and future prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz-Couselo E

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Eva Muñoz-Couselo,1,2 Ester Zamora Adelantado,1,2 Carolina Ortiz,1,2 Jesús Soberino García,3 José Perez-Garcia31Medical Oncology Department, Vall d’Hebron Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; 2Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO, Barcelona, Spain; 3Baselga Institute of Oncology, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Melanoma is one of the most common cutaneous cancers worldwide. Activating mutations in RAS oncogenes are found in a third of all human cancers and NRAS mutations are found in 15%–20% of melanomas. The NRAS-mutant subset of melanoma is more aggressive and associated with poorer outcomes, compared to non-NRAS-mutant melanoma. Although immune checkpoint inhibitors and targeted therapies for BRAF-mutant melanoma are transforming the treatment of metastatic melanoma, the ideal treatment for NRAS-mutant melanoma remains unknown. Despite promising preclinical data, current therapies for NRAS-mutant melanoma remain limited, showing a modest increase in progression-free survival but without any benefit in overall survival. Combining MEK inhibitors with agents inhibiting cell cycling and the PI3K–AKT pathway appears to provide additional benefit; in particular, a strategy of MEK inhibition and CDK4/6 inhibition is likely to be a viable treatment option in the future. Patients whose tumors had NRAS mutations had better response to immunotherapy and better outcomes than patients whose tumors had other genetic subtypes, suggesting that immune therapies – especially immune checkpoint inhibitors – may be particularly effective as treatment options for NRAS-mutant melanoma. Improved understanding of NRAS-mutant melanoma will be essential to develop new treatment strategies for this subset of patients with melanoma.Keywords: metastatic melanoma, NRAS mutation, MEK inhibitor, immunotherapy, trametinib, binimetinib

  11. Defective glycinergic synaptic transmission in zebrafish motility mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Hirata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs.

  12. Altered protein dynamics of disease-associated lamin A mutants

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    Worman Howard J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent interest in the function of the nuclear lamina has been provoked by the discovery of lamin A/C mutations in the laminopathy diseases. However, it is not understood why mutations in lamin A give such a range of tissue-specific phenotypes. Part of the problem in rationalising genotype-phenotype correlations in the laminopathies is our lack of understanding of the function of normal and mutant lamin A. To investigate this we have used photobleaching in human cells to analyse the dynamics of wild-type and mutant lamin A protein at the nuclear periphery. Results We have found that a large proportion of wild-type lamin A at the nuclear periphery is immobile, but that there is some slow movement of lamin A within the nuclear lamina. The mobility of an R482W mutant lamin A was indistinguishable from wild-type, but increased mobility of L85R and L530P mutant proteins within the nuclear lamina was found. However, the N195K mutant shows the most enhanced protein mobility, both within the nucleoplasm and within the lamina. Conclusion The slow kinetics of lamin A movement is compatible with its incorporation into a stable polymer that only exchanges subunits very slowly. All of the myopathy-associated lamin A mutants that we have studied show increased protein movement compared with wild-type. In contrast, the dynamic behaviour of the lipodystrophy-associated lamin A mutant was indistinguishable from wild-type. This supports the hypothesis that the underlying defect in lamin A function is quite distinct in the laminopathies that affect striated muscle, compared to the diseases that affect adipose tissue. Our data are consistent with an alteration in the stability of the lamin A molecules within the higher-order polymer at the nuclear lamina in myopathies.

  13. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant CYP153A6 enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-01-29

    Cytochrome P450 CYP153A6 from Myobacterium sp. strain HXN1500 was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small-chain alkanes regioselectively. Mutant CYP153A6-BMO1 selectively hydroxylates butane and pentane at the terminal carbon to form 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively, at rates greater than wild-type CYP153A6 enzymes. This biocatalyst is highly active for small-chain alkane substrates and the regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  14. Kinetic partitioning during de novo septin filament assembly creates a critical G1 “window of opportunity” for mutant septin function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Rachel M.; Heasley, Lydia R.; Odde, David J.; McMurray, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Septin proteins form highly conserved cytoskeletal filaments composed of hetero-oligomers with strict subunit stoichiometry. Mutations within one hetero-oligomerization interface (the “G” interface) bias the mutant septin toward conformations that are incompatible with filament assembly, causing disease in humans and, in budding yeast cells, temperature-sensitive defects in cytokinesis. We previously found that, when the amount of other hetero-oligomerization partners is limiting, wild-type and G interface-mutant alleles of a given yeast septin “compete” along parallel but distinct folding pathways for occupancy of a limited number of positions within septin hetero-octamers. Here, we synthesize a mathematical model that outlines the requirements for this phenomenon: if a wild-type septin traverses a folding pathway that includes a single rate-limiting folding step, the acquisition by a mutant septin of additional slow folding steps creates an initially large disparity between wild-type and mutant in the cellular concentrations of oligomerization-competent monomers. When the 2 alleles are co-expressed, this kinetic disparity results in mutant exclusion from hetero-oligomers, even when the folded mutant monomer is oligomerization-competent. To test this model experimentally, we first visualize the kinetic delay in mutant oligomerization in living cells, and then narrow or widen the “window of opportunity” for mutant septin oligomerization by altering the length of the G1 phase of the yeast cell cycle, and observe the predicted exacerbation or suppression, respectively, of mutant cellular phenotypes. These findings reveal a fundamental kinetic principle governing in vivo assembly of multiprotein complexes, independent of the ability of the subunits to associate with each other. PMID:27398993

  15. Functional Characterization of Human ProNGF and NGF Mutants: Identification of NGF P61SR100E as a "Painless" Lead Investigational Candidate for Therapeutic Applications.

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    Francesca Malerba

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF holds a great therapeutic promise for Alzheimer's disease, diabetic neuropathies, ophthalmic diseases, dermatological ulcers. However, the necessity for systemic delivery has hampered the clinical applications of NGF due to its potent pro-nociceptive action. A "painless" human NGF (hNGF R100E mutant has been engineered. It has equal neurotrophic potency to hNGF but a lower nociceptive activity. We previously described and characterized the neurotrophic and nociceptive properties also of the hNGF P61S and P61SR100E mutants, selectively detectable against wild type hNGF. However, the reduced pain-sensitizing potency of the "painless" hNGF mutants has not been quantified.Aiming at the therapeutic application of the "painless" hNGF mutants, we report on the comparative functional characterization of the precursor and mature forms of the mutants hNGF R100E and hNGF P61SR100E as therapeutic candidates, also in comparison to wild type hNGF and to hNGF P61S. The mutants were assessed by a number of biochemical, biophysical methods and assayed by cellular assays. Moreover, a highly sensitive ELISA for the detection of the P61S-tagged mutants in biological samples has been developed. Finally, we explored the pro-nociceptive effects elicited by hNGF mutants in vivo, demonstrating an expanded therapeutic window with a ten-fold increase in potency.This structure-activity relationship study has led to validate the concept of developing painless NGF as a therapeutic, targeting the NGF receptor system and supporting the choice of hNGF P61S R100E as the best candidate to advance in clinical development. Moreover, this study contributes to the identification of the molecular determinants modulating the properties of the hNGF "painless" mutants.

  16. Functional Characterization of Human ProNGF and NGF Mutants: Identification of NGF P61SR100E as a "Painless" Lead Investigational Candidate for Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Francesca; Paoletti, Francesca; Bruni Ercole, Bruno; Materazzi, Serena; Nassini, Romina; Coppi, Elisabetta; Patacchini, Riccardo; Capsoni, Simona; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) holds a great therapeutic promise for Alzheimer's disease, diabetic neuropathies, ophthalmic diseases, dermatological ulcers. However, the necessity for systemic delivery has hampered the clinical applications of NGF due to its potent pro-nociceptive action. A "painless" human NGF (hNGF R100E) mutant has been engineered. It has equal neurotrophic potency to hNGF but a lower nociceptive activity. We previously described and characterized the neurotrophic and nociceptive properties also of the hNGF P61S and P61SR100E mutants, selectively detectable against wild type hNGF. However, the reduced pain-sensitizing potency of the "painless" hNGF mutants has not been quantified. Aiming at the therapeutic application of the "painless" hNGF mutants, we report on the comparative functional characterization of the precursor and mature forms of the mutants hNGF R100E and hNGF P61SR100E as therapeutic candidates, also in comparison to wild type hNGF and to hNGF P61S. The mutants were assessed by a number of biochemical, biophysical methods and assayed by cellular assays. Moreover, a highly sensitive ELISA for the detection of the P61S-tagged mutants in biological samples has been developed. Finally, we explored the pro-nociceptive effects elicited by hNGF mutants in vivo, demonstrating an expanded therapeutic window with a ten-fold increase in potency. This structure-activity relationship study has led to validate the concept of developing painless NGF as a therapeutic, targeting the NGF receptor system and supporting the choice of hNGF P61S R100E as the best candidate to advance in clinical development. Moreover, this study contributes to the identification of the molecular determinants modulating the properties of the hNGF "painless" mutants.

  17. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

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    Reetu Sharma

    Full Text Available Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  18. Developmental Biology: We Are All Walking Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    What is Developmental Biology? Developmental Biology is a discipline that evolved from the collective fields of embryology, morphology, and anatomy, which firmly established that structure underpins function. In its simplest terms, Developmental Biology has come to describe how a single cell becomes a completely formed organism. However, this definition of Developmental Biology is too narrow. Developmental Biology describes the properties of individual cells; their organization into tissues, organs, and organisms; their homeostasis, regeneration, aging, and ultimately death. Developmental Biology provides a context for cellular reprogramming, stem cell biology, regeneration, tissue engineering, evolutionary development and ecology, and involves the reiterated use of the same cellular mechanisms and signaling pathways throughout the lifespan of an organism. Using neural crest cells as an example, this review explores the contribution of Developmental Biology to our understanding of development, evolution, and disease. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. On good ETOL forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven

    1978-01-01

    This paper continues the study of ETOL forms and good EOL forms done by Maurer, Salomaa and Wood. It is proven that binary very complete ETOL forms exist, good synchronized ETOL forms exist and that no propagating or synchronized ETOL form can be very complete.......This paper continues the study of ETOL forms and good EOL forms done by Maurer, Salomaa and Wood. It is proven that binary very complete ETOL forms exist, good synchronized ETOL forms exist and that no propagating or synchronized ETOL form can be very complete....

  20. PIK3CA mutant tumors depend on oxoglutarate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Nina; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Aguirre, Andrew J.; Kory, Nora; Pacold, Michael E.; Singh, Shambhavi; Moody, Susan E.; DeAngelo, Joseph D.; Spardy, Nicole A.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Weir, Barbara A.; Cowley, Glenn S.; Root, David E.; Asara, John M.; Vazquez, Francisca; Widlund, Hans R.; Sabatini, David M.; Hahn, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Oncogenic PIK3CA mutations are found in a significant fraction of human cancers, but therapeutic inhibition of PI3K has only shown limited success in clinical trials. To understand how mutant PIK3CA contributes to cancer cell proliferation, we used genome scale loss-of-function screening in a large number of genomically annotated cancer cell lines. As expected, we found that PIK3CA mutant cancer cells require PIK3CA but also require the expression of the TCA cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH). To understand the relationship between oncogenic PIK3CA and OGDH function, we interrogated metabolic requirements and found an increased reliance on glucose metabolism to sustain PIK3CA mutant cell proliferation. Functional metabolic studies revealed that OGDH suppression increased levels of the metabolite 2-oxoglutarate (2OG). We found that this increase in 2OG levels, either by OGDH suppression or exogenous 2OG treatment, resulted in aspartate depletion that was specifically manifested as auxotrophy within PIK3CA mutant cells. Reduced levels of aspartate deregulated the malate–aspartate shuttle, which is important for cytoplasmic NAD+ regeneration that sustains rapid glucose breakdown through glycolysis. Consequently, because PIK3CA mutant cells exhibit a profound reliance on glucose metabolism, malate–aspartate shuttle deregulation leads to a specific proliferative block due to the inability to maintain NAD+/NADH homeostasis. Together these observations define a precise metabolic vulnerability imposed by a recurrently mutated oncogene. PMID:28396387

  1. Characterization of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-associated NMNAT1 Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Margolin, Zachary; Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2015-07-10

    Leber congenital amaurosis 9 (LCA9) is an autosomal recessive retinal degeneration condition caused by mutations in the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1. This condition leads to early blindness but no other consistent deficits have been reported in patients with NMNAT1 mutations despite its central role in metabolism and ubiquitous expression. To study how these mutations affect NMNAT1 function and ultimately lead to the retinal degeneration phenotype, we performed detailed analysis of LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants, including the expression, nuclear localization, enzymatic activity, secondary structure, oligomerization, and promotion of axonal and cellular integrity in response to injury. In many assays, most mutants produced results similar to wild type NMNAT1. Indeed, NAD(+) synthetic activity is unlikely to be a primary mechanism underlying retinal degeneration as most LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants had normal enzymatic activity. In contrast, the secondary structure of many NMNAT1 mutants was relatively less stable as they lost enzymatic activity after heat shock, whereas wild type NMNAT1 retains significant activity after this stress. These results suggest that LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants are more vulnerable to stressful conditions that lead to protein unfolding, a potential contributor to the retinal degeneration observed in this syndrome. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Development of Bacillus subtilis mutants to produce tryptophan in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerre, Karin; Cantor, Mette D; Nørgaard, Jan V; Poulsen, Hanne D; Blaabjerg, Karoline; Canibe, Nuria; Jensen, Bent B; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Nielsen, Bea; Derkx, Patrick M F

    2017-02-01

    To generate tryptophan-overproducing Bacillus subtilis strains for in situ use in pigs, to reduce the feed cost for farmers and nitrogen pollution. A novel concept has been investigated-to generate B. subtilis strains able to produce tryptophan (Trp) in situ in pigs. Mutagenesis by UV was combined with selection on Trp and purine analogues in an iterative process. Two mutants from different wild types were obtained, mutant 1 (M1) produced 1 mg Trp/l and mutant 2 (M2) 14 mg Trp/l. Genome sequence analysis revealed that M1 had three single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) and M2 had two SNPs compared to the wild type strains. In both mutants SNPs were found in genes regulating tryptophan synthesis. Reverse transcription PCR confirmed up-regulation of the tryptophan synthesis genes in both mutants, the expression was up to 3 times higher in M2 than in M1. Tryptophan-excreting B. subtilis strains were obtained with UV-mutagenesis and analogue selection and can be used in animal feed applications.

  3. Analysis of AtCry1 and Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Derek; Purvis, Adam; Ahmad, Margaret; Link, Justin J.; Engle, Dorothy

    Cryptochrome is an incredibly versatile protein that influences numerous biological processes such as plant growth, bird migration, and sleep cycles. Due to the versatility of this protein, understanding the mechanism would allow for advances in numerous fields such as crop growth, animal behavior, and sleep disorders. It is known that cryptochrome requires blue light to function, but the exact processes in the regulation of biological activity are still not fully understood. It is believed that the c-terminal domain of the protein undergoes a conformational change when exposed to blue light which allows for biological function. Three different non-functioning mutants were tested during this study to gain insight on the mechanism of cryptochrome. Absorbance spectra showed a difference between two of the mutants and the wild type with one mutant showing little difference. Immunoprecipitation experiments were also conducted to identify the different c-terminal responses of the mutants. By studying non functioning mutants of this protein, the mechanism of the protein can be further characterized. This two-month research experience in Paris allowed us to experience international and interdisciplinary collaborations in science and immerse in a different culture. The Borcer Fund for Student Research, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH, and John Hauck Foundation.

  4. Normal aging modulates the neurotoxicity of mutant huntingtin.

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    Elsa Diguet

    Full Text Available Aging likely plays a role in neurodegenerative disorders. In Huntington's disease (HD, a disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the protein huntingtin (Htt, the role of aging is unclear. For a given tract length, the probability of disease onset increases with age. There are mainly two hypotheses that could explain adult onset in HD: Either mutant Htt progressively produces cumulative defects over time or "normal" aging renders neurons more vulnerable to mutant Htt toxicity. In the present study, we directly explored whether aging affected the toxicity of mutant Htt in vivo. We studied the impact of aging on the effects produced by overexpression of an N-terminal fragment of mutant Htt, of wild-type Htt or of a beta-Galactosidase (beta-Gal reporter gene in the rat striatum. Stereotaxic injections of lentiviral vectors were performed simultaneously in young (3 week and old (15 month rats. Histological evaluation at different time points after infection demonstrated that the expression of mutant Htt led to pathological changes that were more severe in old rats, including an increase in the number of small Htt-containing aggregates in the neuropil, a greater loss of DARPP-32 immunoreactivity and striatal neurons as assessed by unbiased stereological counts.The present results support the hypothesis that "normal" aging is involved in HD pathogenesis, and suggest that age-related cellular defects might constitute potential therapeutic targets for HD.

  5. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selmer, Maria, E-mail: maria.selmer@icm.uu.se [Uppsala University, Box 596, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V., E-mail: maria.selmer@icm.uu.se [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Uppsala University, Box 596, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  6. Purkinje Cell Compartmentation in the Cerebellum of the Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase 2 Mutant Mouse (Nax - Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Karen; Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Mannan, Ashraf; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Marzban, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The Acp2 gene encodes the beta subunit of lysosomal acid phosphatase, which is an isoenzyme that hydrolyzes orthophosphoric monoesters. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in Acp2 results in severe cerebellar defects. These include a reduced size, abnormal lobulation, and an apparent anterior cerebellar disorder with an absent or hypoplastic vermis. Based on differential gene expression in the cerebellum, the mouse cerebellar cortex can normally be compartmentalized anteroposteriorly into four transverse zones and mediolaterally into parasagittal stripes. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed using various Purkinje cell compartmentation markers to examine their expression patterns in the Acp2 mutant. Despite the abnormal lobulation and anterior cerebellar defects, zebrin II and PLCβ4 showed similar expression patterns in the nax mutant and wild type cerebellum. However, fewer stripes were found in the anterior zone of the nax mutant, which could be due to a lack of Purkinje cells or altered expression of the stripe markers. HSP25 expression was uniform in the central zone of the nax mutant cerebellum at around postnatal day (P) 18–19, suggesting that HSP25 immunonegative Purkinje cells are absent or delayed in stripe pattern expression compared to the wild type. HSP25 expression became heterogeneous around P22–23, with twice the number of parasagittal stripes in the nax mutant compared to the wild type. Aside from reduced size and cortical disorganization, both the posterior zone and nodular zone in the nax mutant appeared less abnormal than the rest of the cerebellum. From these results, it is evident that the anterior zone of the nax mutant cerebellum is the most severely affected, and this extends beyond the primary fissure into the rostral central zone/vermis. This suggests that ACP2 has critical roles in the development of the anterior cerebellum and it may regulate anterior and central zone compartmentation. PMID:24722417

  7. Comparison Study on Colonization of hilA Mutant and Parent Strains of Salmonella enteritidis in Vertically Infected Broiler Chickens

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    MohammadSadegh Madadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella actively stimulates its own uptake into the epithelial cells by inducing cytoskeleton rearrangements and membrane ruffling triggered by some proteins secreted by Salmonella into the cytosol of the epithelial cells via a type III secretion system (TTSS encoded bygenes of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1. hilA is a transcriptional activator encoded on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1 genes.Methods: To assess the importance of hilA in a simulation modeling of vertical infection and shedding of S. enteritidis in broiler chickens a long-term experiment was designed. Two groups of 200 fertile eggs were inoculated with 20 colony forming units (CFU of hilA mutant of S. enteritidis or its parent strain just prior to incubation. Thirty five birds of each group were housed in separate rooms. On days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 of age, cloacal swabs from live birds as well as samples from internal organs (intestinal tract, liver and spleen were evaluated by bacteriological or molecular methods.Results: In most of sampling days colonization and invasion of parent strain S. enteritidis in intestine (especially ceaca and internal organs of chickens were higher with compared to its hilA mutant but this mutant strain could still colonize in intestinal tract and even invade liver or spleen.Conclusion: Colonization of hilA mutant of S. enteritidis indicated that hilA gene is only one part of the modulators in Salmonella invasion mechanism. The ability of hilA mutant to multiply and persist in host internal organs including ceaca may promise further research for potential of hilA mutant to prevent the initial colonization of the intestinal tract by a virulent S. enteritidis strain

  8. Generation and Characterization of dickkopf3 Mutant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barco Barrantes, Ivan; Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana; Obregon, Maria-Jesus; Martinez de Mena, Raquel; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Franz, Tobias J.; Kalaydjiev, Svetoslav; Klempt, Martina; Hölter, Sabine; Rathkolb, Birgit; Reinhard, Claudia; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella; Bernal, Juan; Busch, Dirk H.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Wolf, Eckhard; Schulz, Holger; Shtrom, Svetlana; Greiner, Erich; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Westphal, Heiner; Niehrs, Christof

    2006-01-01

    dickkopf (dkk) genes encode a small family of secreted Wnt antagonists, except for dkk3, which is divergent and whose function is poorly understood. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of dkk3 mutant mice. dkk3-deficient mice are viable and fertile. Phenotypic analysis shows no major alterations in organ morphology, physiology, and most clinical chemistry parameters. Since Dkk3 was proposed to function as thyroid hormone binding protein, we have analyzed deiodinase activities, as well as thyroid hormone levels. Mutant mice are euthyroid, and the data do not support a relationship of dkk3 with thyroid hormone metabolism. Altered phenotypes in dkk3 mutant mice were observed in the frequency of NK cells, immunoglobulin M, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels, as well as lung ventilation. Furthermore, dkk3-deficient mice display hyperactivity. PMID:16508007

  9. Some enzyme activities of acetate mutants of Yarrowia lypolytica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robak, M.; Wojtatowicz, M.; Rymowicz, W. [Akademia Rolnicza, Wroclaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Activity at the following enzymes: CS (oxaloacetate-lyase citrate), AH (citrate (isocitrate) hydrolyase), ICDH (threo-Ds-isocitrate: NADP oxidoreductase) and ICL (threo-Ds-isocitrate glyoxyglate-lyase) was measured at subsequent stages of citrate fermentation on glucose by wild type strain `Y, lipolytica A-101` and 2 acetate defective mutants, in order to recognize metabolic disorders in those mutants, which resulted in markedly improved homogeneity of citric acid production. Mutants did not show significant changes in activity of TCA cycle enzymes and ICL. Thus suggests that the control of citric:isocitric acid ratio is more difficult and it can also depend on transportation systems of both acids. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  10. The swimming activity of the staggerer mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, G; Guastavino, J M; Gheusi, G

    1986-09-01

    Four experiments investigated the swimming behaviour of staggerer mutant mice. The results partially confirmed previous reports that a mouse's swimming is unaffected by the staggerer mutation. In terms of speed and distance there are indeed no measurable differences between normal and staggerer mice, when first placed in the water. The stagger's resistance was however shown to be much lower than a normal's and the genetic difference was also associated with different styles of swimming. Furthermore, whereas the normal mouse's swimming behaviour evolves with increased time in the water, the staggerer's remains constant. The differences are interpreted on the basis of abnormal novelty reactions by the staggerer mutants. Thus, swimming appears to be a better tool for investigating the higher-level cognitive functions of this mutant than terrestrial locomotion. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Sensorimotor learning in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2011-04-15

    Homozygous Dab1(scm) mouse mutants with cell ectopias in cerebellar cortex and neocortex were compared with non-ataxic controls on two tests of motor coordination: rotorod and grid climbing. Even at the minimal speed of 4 rpm and unlike controls, none of the Dab1(scm) mutants reached criterion on the constant speed rotorod. In contrast, Dab1(scm) mutants improved their performances on the vertical grid over the course of the same number of trials. Thus, despite massive cerebellar degeneration, sensorimotor learning for equilibrium is still possible, indicating the potential usefulness of the grid-climbing test in determining residual functions in mice with massive cerebellar damage. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Insights into the molecular basis of L-form formation and survival in Escherichia coli.

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    William A Glover

    Full Text Available L-forms have been shown to occur among many species of bacteria and are suspected to be involved in persistent infections. Since their discovery in 1935, numerous studies characterizing L-form morphology, growth, and pathogenic potential have been conducted. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and survival of L-forms remain unknown. Using unstable L-form colonies of Escherichia coli as a model, we performed genome-wide transcriptome analysis and screened a deletion mutant library to study the molecular mechanisms involved in formation and survival of L-forms. Microarray analysis of L-form versus classical colonies revealed many up-regulated genes of unknown function as well as multiple over-expressed stress pathways shared in common with persister cells and biofilms. Mutant screens identified three groups of mutants which displayed varying degrees of defects in L-form colony formation. Group 1 mutants, which showed the strongest defect in L-form colony formation, belonged to pathways involved in cell envelope stress, DNA repair, iron homeostasis, outer membrane biogenesis, and drug efflux/ABC transporters. Four (Group 1 mutants, rcsB, a positive response regulator of colanic acid capsule synthesis, ruvA, a recombinational junction binding protein, fur, a ferric uptake regulator and smpA a small membrane lipoprotein were selected for complementation. Complementation of the mutants using a high-copy overexpression vector failed, while utilization of a low-copy inducible vector successfully restored L-form formation. This work represents the first systematic genetic evaluation of genes and pathways involved in the formation and survival of unstable L-form bacteria. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying L-form formation and survival and have implications for understanding the emergence of antibiotic resistance, bacterial persistence and latent infections and designing novel drugs and

  13. Biochemical Analysis of Two Single Mutants that Give Rise to a Polymorphic G6PD A-Double Mutant

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    Edson Jiovany Ramírez-Nava

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD is a key regulatory enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular energy and redox balance. Mutations in the gene encoding G6PD cause the most common enzymopathy that drives hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. To gain insights into the effects of mutations in G6PD enzyme efficiency, we have investigated the biochemical, kinetic, and structural changes of three clinical G6PD variants, the single mutations G6PD A+ (Asn126AspD and G6PD Nefza (Leu323Pro, and the double mutant G6PD A− (Asn126Asp + Leu323Pro. The mutants showed lower residual activity (≤50% of WT G6PD and displayed important kinetic changes. Although all Class III mutants were located in different regions of the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme and were not close to the active site, these mutants had a deleterious effect over catalytic activity and structural stability. The results indicated that the G6PD Nefza mutation was mainly responsible for the functional and structural alterations observed in the double mutant G6PD A−. Moreover, our study suggests that the G6PD Nefza and G6PD A− mutations affect enzyme functions in a similar fashion to those reported for Class I mutations.

  14. Existence of the rdl mutant alleles among the anopheles malaria vector in Indonesia

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    Asih Puji BS

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor-chloride channel complex is known to be the target site of dieldrin, a cyclodiene insecticide. GABA-receptors, with a naturally occurring amino acid substitution, A302S/G in the putative ion-channel lining region, confer resistance to cyclodiene insecticides that includes aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin and endosulphan. Methods A total of 154 mosquito samples from 10 provinces of malaria-endemic areas across Indonesia (Aceh, North Sumatra, Bangka Belitung, Lampung, Central Java, East Nusa Tenggara, West Nusa Tenggara, West Sulawesi, Molucca and North Molucca were obtained and identified by species, using morphological characteristic. The DNA was individually extracted using chelex-ion exchanger and the DNA obtained was used for analyses using sequencing method. Results Molecular analysis indicated 11% of the total 154 Anopheles samples examined, carried Rdl mutant alleles. All of the alleles were found in homozygous form. Rdl 302S allele was observed in Anopheles vagus (from Central Java, Lampung, and West Nusa Tenggara, Anopheles aconitus (from Central Java, Anopheles barbirostris (from Central Java and Lampung, Anopheles sundaicus (from North Sumatra and Lampung, Anopheles nigerrimus (from North Sumatra, whereas the 302 G allele was only found in Anopheles farauti from Molucca. Conclusion The existence of the Rdl mutant allele indicates that, either insecticide pressure on the Anopheles population in these areas might still be ongoing (though not directly associated with the malaria control programme or that the mutant form of the Rdl allele is relatively stable in the absence of insecticide. Nonetheless, the finding suggests that integrated pest management is warranted in malaria-endemic areas where insecticides are widely used for other purposes.

  15. Existence of the rdl mutant alleles among the anopheles malaria vector in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-chloride channel complex is known to be the target site of dieldrin, a cyclodiene insecticide. GABA-receptors, with a naturally occurring amino acid substitution, A302S/G in the putative ion-channel lining region, confer resistance to cyclodiene insecticides that includes aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin and endosulphan. Methods A total of 154 mosquito samples from 10 provinces of malaria-endemic areas across Indonesia (Aceh, North Sumatra, Bangka Belitung, Lampung, Central Java, East Nusa Tenggara, West Nusa Tenggara, West Sulawesi, Molucca and North Molucca) were obtained and identified by species, using morphological characteristic. The DNA was individually extracted using chelex-ion exchanger and the DNA obtained was used for analyses using sequencing method. Results Molecular analysis indicated 11% of the total 154 Anopheles samples examined, carried Rdl mutant alleles. All of the alleles were found in homozygous form. Rdl 302S allele was observed in Anopheles vagus (from Central Java, Lampung, and West Nusa Tenggara), Anopheles aconitus (from Central Java), Anopheles barbirostris (from Central Java and Lampung), Anopheles sundaicus (from North Sumatra and Lampung), Anopheles nigerrimus (from North Sumatra), whereas the 302 G allele was only found in Anopheles farauti from Molucca. Conclusion The existence of the Rdl mutant allele indicates that, either insecticide pressure on the Anopheles population in these areas might still be ongoing (though not directly associated with the malaria control programme) or that the mutant form of the Rdl allele is relatively stable in the absence of insecticide. Nonetheless, the finding suggests that integrated pest management is warranted in malaria-endemic areas where insecticides are widely used for other purposes. PMID:22364613

  16. Secretion and activation of the Serratia marcescens hemolysin by structurally defined ShlB mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Avijit; Könninger, Ulrich; Selvam, Arun; Braun, Volkmar

    2014-05-01

    The ShlA hemolysin of Serratia marcescens is secreted across the outer membrane by the ShlB protein; ShlB belongs to the two-partner secretion system (type Vb), a subfamily of the Omp85 outer membrane protein assembly and secretion superfamily. During secretion, ShlA is converted from an inactive non-hemolytic form into an active hemolytic form. The structure of ShlB is predicted to consist of the N-terminal α-helix H1, followed by the two polypeptide-transport-associated domains POTRA P1 and P2, and the β-barrel of 16 β-strands. H1 is inserted into the pore of the β-barrel in the outer membrane; P1 and P2 are located in the periplasm. To obtain insights into the secretion and activation of ShlA by ShlB, we isolated ShlB mutants impaired in secretion and/or activation. The triple H1 P1 P2 mutant did not secrete ShlA. The P1 and P2 deletion derivatives secreted reduced amounts of ShlA, of which P1 showed some hemolysis, whereas P2 was inactive. Deletion of loop 6 (L6), which is conserved among exporters of the Omp85 family, compromised activation but retained low secretion. Secretion-negative mutants generated by random mutagenesis were located in loop 6. The inactive secreted ShlA derivatives were complemented in vitro to active ShlA by an N-terminal ShlA fragment (ShlA242) secreted by ShlB. Deletion of H1 did not impair secretion of hemolytic ShlA. The study defines domains of ShlB which are important for ShlA secretion and activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of the novel mutant A78T-HERG from a long QT syndrome type 2 patient: Instability of the mutant protein and stabilization by heat shock factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takehito; Hisatome, Ichiro; Yoshimura, Shouichi; Mahati, Endang; Notsu, Tomomi; Li, Peili; Iitsuka, Kazuhiko; Kato, Masaru; Ogura, Kazuyoshi; Miake, Junichiro; Aiba, Takeshi; Shimizu, Wataru; Kurata, Yasutaka; Sakata, Shinji; Nakasone, Naoe; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Nakai, Akira; Higaki, Katsumi; Kawata, Yasushi; Shirayoshi, Yasuaki; Yoshida, Akio; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) encodes the α-subunit of rapidly activating delayed-rectifier potassium channels. Mutations in this gene cause long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2). In most cases, mutations reduce the stability of the channel protein, which can be restored by heat shock (HS). We identified the novel mutant A78T-HERG in a patient with LQT2. The purpose of the current study was to characterize this mutant protein and test whether HS and heat shock factors (HSFs) could stabilize the mutant protein. A78T-HERG and wild-type HERG (WT-HERG) were expressed in HEK293 cells and analyzed by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and whole-cell patch clamping. When expressed in HEK293 cells, WT-HERG gave rise to immature and mature forms of the protein at 135 and 155 kDa, respectively. A78T-HERG gave rise only to the immature form, which was heavily ubiquitinated. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 increased the expression of immature A78T-HERG and increased both the immature and mature forms of WT-HERG. WT-HERG, but not A78T-HERG, was expressed on the plasma membrane. In whole-cell patch clamping experiments, depolarizing pulses evoked E4031-sensitive HERG channel currents in cells transfected with WT-HERG, but not in cells transfected with A78T-HERG. The A78V mutant, but not A78G mutant, remained in the immature form similarly to A78T. Maturation of the A78T-HERG protein was facilitated by HS, expression of HSF-1, or exposure to geranyl geranyl acetone. A78T-HERG was characterized by protein instability and reduced expression on the plasma membrane. The stability of the mutant was partially restored by HSF-1, indicating that HSF-1 is a target for the treatment for LQT2 caused by the A78T mutation in HERG.

  18. Modular Forms and Weierstrass Mock Modular Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Clemm

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Alfes, Griffin, Ono, and Rolen have shown that the harmonic Maass forms arising from Weierstrass ζ-functions associated to modular elliptic curves “encode” the vanishing and nonvanishing for central values and derivatives of twisted Hasse-Weil L-functions for elliptic curves. Previously, Martin and Ono proved that there are exactly five weight 2 newforms with complex multiplication that are eta-quotients. In this paper, we construct a canonical harmonic Maass form for these five curves with complex multiplication. The holomorphic part of this harmonic Maass form arises from the Weierstrass ζ-function and is referred to as the Weierstrass mock modular form. We prove that the Weierstrass mock modular form for these five curves is itself an eta-quotient or a twist of one. Using this construction, we also obtain p-adic formulas for the corresponding weight 2 newform using Atkin’s U-operator.

  19. RFLP mapping of the barley homeotic mutant lax-a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, D A; Pratchett, N; Allen, R L; Hantke, S S

    1996-07-01

    The lax-a homeotic mutant of barley has flowers in which lodicules are replaced by stamens (giving five stamens per flower). RFLP mapping of an F2 population from a Bonus lax-a (1) x H. spontaneum cross showed that the mutation was on the short arm of chromosome 7(5H), closely linked to the centromere. An additional F2 population was used to show that the lax-a mutation gave the five-stamen phenotype in all flowers of 6-rowed spikes and that hoods were elevated and reduced in size in lax-a/Hooded double-mutant plants.

  20. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  1. Forward and reverse genetics: The LORE1 retrotransposon insertion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukai, Eigo; Malolepszy, Anna; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous Lotus retrotransposon 1 (LORE1) transposes in the germ line of Lotus japonicus plants that carry an active element. This feature of LORE1 has been exploited for generation of a large non-transgenic insertion mutant population, where insertions have been annotated using next......-generation sequencing approaches. The LORE1 mutant lines are freely available and can be ordered online. Endogenous retrotransposons are also active in many other plant species. Based on the methods developed for LORE1 mutagenesis, it should be simple to establish similar systems in other species, once an appropriate...

  2. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  3. Clear Plaque Mutants of Lactococcal Phage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Kilstrup, Mogens; Vogensen, Finn K.

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for obtaining turbid plaques of the lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 and its derivative TP901-BC1034. We have further used the method to isolate clear plaque mutants of this phage. Analysis of 8 such mutants that were unable to lysogenize the host included whole genome...... protein involved in the DNA binding. The conclusion is that cI is the only gene involved in clear plaque formation i.e. the CI protein is the determining factor for the lysogenic pathway and its maintenance in the lactococcal phage TP901-1....

  4. A male sterile pepper (C. annuum L.) mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskaloff, S

    1968-08-01

    1. After treatment of dry seeds of red pepperCapsicum annuum L. with X-rays a male-sterile mutant was discovered in the M2. 2. The male-sterile mutant segregates in a ratio of 3.28:1 (χ(2)=3.148, probability 0.07). 3. After an alternative cultivation of male-sterile plants and of a variety with good combining ability relatively good fruit-setting and seed production was obtained. 4. Grafting of male-sterile scions to normal stocks does not affect the male-sterile phenotype.

  5. Lack of enzyme activity in GBA2 mutants associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia/cerebellar ataxia (SPG46).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Saki; Reichbauer, Jennifer; Schüle, Rebecca; Mochel, Fanny; Synofzik, Matthis; van der Spoel, Aarnoud C

    2015-09-11

    Glucosylceramide is a membrane glycolipid made up of the sphingolipid ceramide and glucose, and has a wide intracellular distribution. Glucosylceramide is degraded to ceramide and glucose by distinct, non-homologous enzymes, including glucocerebrosidase (GBA), localized in the endolysosomal pathway, and β-glucosidase 2 (GBA2), which is associated with the plasma membrane and/or the endoplasmic reticulum. It is well established that mutations in the GBA gene result in endolysosomal glucosylceramide accumulation, which triggers Gaucher disease. In contrast, the biological significance of GBA2 is less well understood. GBA2-deficient mice present with male infertility, but humans carrying mutations in the GBA2 gene are affected with a combination of cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, as well as with thin corpus callosum and cognitive impairment (SPastic Gait locus #46, SPG46). To improve our understanding of the biochemical consequences of the GBA2 mutations, we have evaluated five nonsense and five missense GBA2 mutants for their enzyme activity. In transfected cells, the mutant forms of GBA2 were present in widely different amounts, ranging from overabundant to very minor, compared to the wild type enzyme. Nevertheless, none of the GBA2 mutant cDNAs raised the enzyme activity in transfected cells, in contrast to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that SPG46 patients have a severe deficit in GBA2 activity, because the GBA2 mutants are intrinsically inactive and/or reduced in amount. This assessment of the expression levels and enzyme activities of mutant forms of GBA2 offers a first insight in the biochemical basis of the complex pathologies seen in SPG46. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rhomboids of Mycobacteria: characterization using an aarA mutant of Providencia stuartii and gene deletion in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateete, David Patrick; Katabazi, Fred Ashaba; Okeng, Alfred; Okee, Moses; Musinguzi, Conrad; Asiimwe, Benon Byamugisha; Kyobe, Samuel; Asiimwe, Jeniffer; Boom, W Henry; Joloba, Moses Lutaakome

    2012-01-01

    Rhomboids are ubiquitous proteins with unknown roles in mycobacteria. However, bioinformatics suggested putative roles in DNA replication pathways and metabolite transport. Here, mycobacterial rhomboid-encoding genes were characterized; first, using the Providencia stuartii null-rhomboid mutant and then deleted from Mycobacterium smegmatis for additional insight in mycobacteria. Using in silico analysis we identified in M. tuberculosis genome the genes encoding two putative rhomboid proteins; Rv0110 (referred to as "rhomboid protease 1") and Rv1337 ("rhomboid protease 2"). Genes encoding orthologs of these proteins are widely represented in all mycobacterial species. When transformed into P. stuartii null-rhomboid mutant (ΔaarA), genes encoding mycobacterial orthologs of "rhomboid protease 2" fully restored AarA activity (AarA is the rhomboid protein of P. stuartii). However, most genes encoding mycobacterial "rhomboid protease 1" orthologs did not. Furthermore, upon gene deletion in M. smegmatis, the ΔMSMEG_4904 single mutant (which lost the gene encoding MSMEG_4904, orthologous to Rv1337, "rhomboid protease 2") formed the least biofilms and was also more susceptible to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin, antimicrobials that inhibit DNA gyrase. However, the ΔMSMEG_5036 single mutant (which lost the gene encoding MSMEG_5036, orthologous to Rv0110, "rhomboid protease 1") was not as susceptible. Surprisingly, the double rhomboid mutant ΔMSMEG_4904-ΔMSMEG_5036 (which lost genes encoding both homologs) was also not as susceptible suggesting compensatory effects following deletion of both rhomboid-encoding genes. Indeed, transforming the double mutant with a plasmid encoding MSMEG_5036 produced phenotypes of the ΔMSMEG_4904 single mutant (i.e. susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin). Mycobacterial rhomboid-encoding genes exhibit differences in complementing aarA whereby it's only genes encoding "rhomboid protease 2" orthologs that fully restore AarA activity

  7. Wild type beta-2 microglobulin and DE loop mutants display a common fibrillar architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Natalello

    Full Text Available Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m is the protein responsible for a pathologic condition known as dialysis related amyloidosis. In recent years an important role has been assigned to the peptide loop linking strands D and E (DE loop in determining β2m stability and amyloid propensity. Several mutants of the DE loop have been studied, showing a good correlation between DE loop geometrical strain, protein stability and aggregation propensity. However, it remains unclear whether the aggregates formed by wild type (wt β2m and by the DE loop variants are of the same kind, or whether the mutations open new aggregation pathways. In order to address this question, fibrillar samples of wt and mutated β2m variants have been analysed by means of atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The data here reported indicate that the DE loop mutants form aggregates with morphology and structural organisation very similar to the wt protein. Therefore, the main effect of β2m DE loop mutations is proposed to stem from the different stabilities of the native fold. Considerations on the structural role of the DE loop in the free monomeric β2m and as part of the Major Histocompatibility Complex are also presented.

  8. Hsp90 prevents interaction between CHIP and HERG proteins to facilitate maturation of wild-type and mutant HERG proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Chisato; Li, Peili; Kurata, Yasutaka; Hoshikawa, Yoshiko; Morikawa, Kumi; Maharani, Nani; Higaki, Katsumi; Sasano, Tetsuro; Notsu, Tomomi; Ishido, Yuko; Miake, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Shirayoshi, Yasuaki; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Nakai, Akira; Murata, Shigeo; Yoshida, Akio; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Hiraoka, Masayasu; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2013-12-01

    We examined the role of Hsp90 in expression and maturation of wild-type (WT) and mutant ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) proteins by using Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin (GA) and radicicol, and Hsp90 overexpression. The proteins were expressed in HEK293 cells or collected from HL-1 mouse cardiomyocytes, and analysed by western blotting, immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. GA and radicicol suppressed maturation of HERG-FLAG proteins and increased their immature forms. Co-expression of Hsp90 counteracted the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors and suppressed ubiquitination of HERG proteins. Overexpressed Hsp90 also inhibited the binding of endogenous C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) to HERG-FLAG proteins. Hsp90-induced increase of functional HERG proteins was verified by their increased expression on the cell surface and enhanced HERG channel currents. CHIP overexpression decreased both mature and immature forms of HERG-FLAG proteins in cells treated with GA. Hsp90 facilitated maturation of endogenous ERG proteins, whereas CHIP decreased both forms of ERG proteins in HL-1 cells. Mutant HERG proteins harbouring disease-causing missense mutations were mainly in the immature form and had a higher binding capacity to CHIP than the WT; Hsp90 overexpression suppressed this association. Overexpressed Hsp90 increased the mature form of HERG(1122fs/147) proteins, reduced its ubiquitinated form, increased its immunoreactivity in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the plasma membrane, and increased the mutant-mediated membrane current. CHIP overexpression decreased the immature form of HERG(1122fs/147) proteins. Enhancement of HERG protein expression through Hsp90 inhibition of CHIP binding might be a novel therapeutic strategy for long QT syndrome 2 caused by trafficking abnormalities of HERG proteins.

  9. The Activity of Nodules of the Supernodulating Mutant Mtsunn Is not Limited by Photosynthesis under Optimal Growth Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants. PMID:24727372

  10. Screening of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Mutants for Attenuation in a Bovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise A Lamont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination remains a major tool for prevention and progression of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteritis of ruminants worldwide. Currently there is only one licensed vaccine within the United States and two vaccines licensed internationally against Johne’s disease. All licensed vaccines reduce fecal shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP and delay disease progression. However, there are no available vaccines that prevent disease onset. A joint effort by the Johne’s Disease Integrated Program (JDIP, a USDA-funded consortium, and USDA- APHIS/VS sought to identify transposon insertion mutant strains as vaccine candidates in part of a three phase study. The focus of the Phase I study was to evaluate MAP mutant attenuation in a well-defined in vitro bovine monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM model. Attenuation was determined by colony forming unit (CFUs counts and slope estimates. Based on CFU counts alone, the MDM model did not identify any mutant that significantly differed from the wild-type control, MAP K-10. Slope estimates using mixed models approach identified six mutants as being attenuated. These were enrolled in protection studies involving murine and baby goat vaccination-challenge models. MDM based approach identified trends in attenuation but this did not correlate with protection in a natural host model. These results suggest the need for alternative strategies for Johne’s disease vaccine candidate screening and evaluation.

  11. The Activity of Nodules of the Supernodulating Mutant Mtsunn Is not Limited by Photosynthesis under Optimal Growth Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A. Cabeza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules, was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants.

  12. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Stefanie M; Thomas, Holly R; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J; Lees, Jacqueline A; Yost, H Joseph; Parant, John M

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. The parkin mutant phenotype in the fly is largely rescued by metal-responsive transcription factor (MTF-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Nidhi; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2011-05-01

    The gene for Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is mutated in some familial forms of Parkinson's disease, a severe neurodegenerative disorder. A homozygous mutant of the Drosophila ortholog of human parkin is viable but results in severe motoric impairment including an inability to fly, female and male sterility, and a decreased life span. We show here that a double mutant of the genes for Parkin and the metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) is not viable. MTF-1, which is conserved from insects to mammals, is a key regulator of heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification and plays additional roles in other stress conditions, notably oxidative stress. In contrast to the synthetic lethality of the double mutant, elevated expression of MTF-1 dramatically ameliorates the parkin mutant phenotype, as evidenced by a prolonged life span, motoric improvement including short flight episodes, and female fertility. At the cellular level, muscle and mitochondrial structures are substantially improved. A beneficial effect is also seen with a transgene encoding human MTF-1. We propose that Parkin and MTF-1 provide complementary functions in metal homeostasis, oxidative stress and other cellular stress responses. Our findings also raise the possibility that MTF-1 gene polymorphisms in humans could affect the severity of Parkinson's disease.

  14. The parkin Mutant Phenotype in the Fly Is Largely Rescued by Metal-Responsive Transcription Factor (MTF-1) ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Nidhi; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The gene for Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is mutated in some familial forms of Parkinson's disease, a severe neurodegenerative disorder. A homozygous mutant of the Drosophila ortholog of human parkin is viable but results in severe motoric impairment including an inability to fly, female and male sterility, and a decreased life span. We show here that a double mutant of the genes for Parkin and the metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) is not viable. MTF-1, which is conserved from insects to mammals, is a key regulator of heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification and plays additional roles in other stress conditions, notably oxidative stress. In contrast to the synthetic lethality of the double mutant, elevated expression of MTF-1 dramatically ameliorates the parkin mutant phenotype, as evidenced by a prolonged life span, motoric improvement including short flight episodes, and female fertility. At the cellular level, muscle and mitochondrial structures are substantially improved. A beneficial effect is also seen with a transgene encoding human MTF-1. We propose that Parkin and MTF-1 provide complementary functions in metal homeostasis, oxidative stress and other cellular stress responses. Our findings also raise the possibility that MTF-1 gene polymorphisms in humans could affect the severity of Parkinson's disease. PMID:21383066

  15. Superoxide-Dismutase Deficient Mutants in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): Genetic Control, Differential Expressions of Isozymes, and Sensitivity to Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2013-01-01

    Two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) mutants, sodPv 1 and sodPv 2, exhibiting foliar superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of only 25% and 40% of their mother control (MC) cv. VL 63 were isolated in EMS-mutagenized (0.15%, 8 h) M2 progeny. Native-PAGE analysis revealed occurrence of Mn SOD, Fe SOD, Cu/Zn SOD I and Cu/Zn SOD II isozymes in MC, while Fe SOD, and Mn SOD were not formed in sodPv 1 and sodPv 2 leaves, respectively. In-gel activity of individual isozymes differed significantly among the parents. SOD deficiency is inherited as recessive mutations, controlled by two different nonallelic loci. Gene expressions using qRT PCR confirmed higher expressions of Cu/Zn SOD transcripts in both mutants and the absence of Fe SOD in sodPv 1 and Mn SOD in sodPv 2. In 50 μM arsenic, Cu/Zn SODs genes were further upregulated but other isoforms downregulated in the two mutants, maintaining SOD activity in its control level. In an F2 double mutants of sodPv 1 × sodPv 2, no Fe SOD, and Mn SOD expressions were detectable, while both Cu/Zn SODs are down-regulated and arsenic-induced leaf necrosis appeared. In contrast to both mutants, ROS-imaging study revealed overaccumulation of both superoxides and H2O2 in leaves of double mutant. PMID:24078924

  16. Characterization of vegetative inflorescence (mc-vin) mutant provides new insight into the role of MACROCALYX in regulating inflorescence development of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Quinet, Muriel; Fernández-Lozano, Antonia; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-04

    Inflorescence development is a key factor of plant productivity, as it determines flower number. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflorescence architecture is critical for reproductive success and crop yield. In this study, a new mutant, vegetative inflorescence (mc-vin), was isolated from the screening of a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) T-DNA mutant collection. The mc-vin mutant developed inflorescences that reverted to vegetative growth after forming two to three flowers, indicating that the mutated gene is essential for the maintenance of inflorescence meristem identity. The T-DNA was inserted into the promoter region of the MACROCALYX (MC) gene; this result together with complementation test and expression analyses proved that mc-vin is a new knock-out allele of MC. Double combinations between mc-vin and jointless (j) and single flower truss (sft) inflorescence mutants showed that MC has pleiotropic effects on the reproductive phase, and that it interacts with SFT and J to control floral transition and inflorescence fate in tomato. In addition, MC expression was mis-regulated in j and sft mutants whereas J and SFT were significantly up-regulated in the mc-vin mutant. Together, these results provide new evidences about MC function as part of the genetic network regulating the development of tomato inflorescence meristem.

  17. Mutant connexin 50 (S276F) inhibits channel and hemichannel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mutant and wild-type Cx50 were expressed in equal levels and could efficiently localize to the plasma membrane without transportation and assembly ... Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Donghu Road 169#, Wuhan, Hubei 430071, People's Republic of China; Hubei Cancer ...

  18. Evaluation of high yielding mutants of Hordeumvulgare cultivar Izgrev

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dyulgerova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Seeds of Hordeum vulgare L. cultivar Izgrev were treated with different concentrations of sodium azide to induce genetic variability for the selection of genotypes with improved traits. After passing through different stages of selection, 18 promising mutants were selected for further studies. Eighteen mutants and their parent and national standard cultivar Veslets were evaluated in Complete Block Design with four replications. The research was conducted in 2013 – 2014 and 2014 – 2015 growing seasons in the experimental field of the Institute of Agriculture Karnobat, Southeastern Bulgaria. The characters studied included days to heading, plant height, lodging, peduncle length, spike length, awn length, spikelet number per spike, grain number per spike, grain weight per spike, 1000 grains weight and grain yield. Wide variation among mutant lines was observed for different traits. Mutant lines M4/16 and M 3/14 produced significantly greater grain yield than the parent and standard cultivar. Positive changes in lodging tolerance, grain number per spike, grain weight per spike, 1000 grains weightwere also observed. This study showed positive effects in the use of mutation in inducing improvement for grain yield and some yield related traits.

  19. Locating a modifier gene of Ovum mutant through crosses between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Volume 95 Issue 2 June 2016 pp 297-302 ... mouse; DDK syndrome; ovum mutant; modifier gene; quantitative trait loci ... Previously, some research groups reported that the embryonic mortality deviated from the semilethal rate in backcrosses between heterozygous (Om/+) females and males of other ...

  20. Characterization of a novel curled-cotyledons mutant in soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARL

    mutant, the embryo sac becomes smaller and bulbous, and ultrastructure of developing cotyledons exhibits ... has higher protein and oil content, and has altered seed ultrastructure. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the features of soybean curled-cotyledons ..... mitochondria of soybean seedling cotyledons.

  1. Enhanced longevity in tau mutant Syrian hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oklejewicz, Malgorzata; Daan, Serge

    The single-gene mutation tau in the Syrian hamster shortens the circadian period by about 20% in the homozygous mutant and simultaneously increases the mass-specific metabolic rate by about 20%. Both effects might be expected to lead to a change in longevity. To test such expectations, the life span

  2. Molecular analysis of sex chromosome-linked mutants in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... In B. mori, polyploid individuals with different sex chromo- some constitutions can be ... RNA was extracted from the ovary, testis, and fat body of a fifth-instar larva, and from the an- tennae of 10 moths. The primer set .... For example, the body of sk. (stick, 4–25.8) mutant larvae is firm to the touch, while that.

  3. Characterization of resistant tomato mutants to bacterial canker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-19

    Apr 19, 2012 ... A small scale ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) mutation was used to obtain resistant mutant plants to bacterial canker disease caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate 2 (Cmm2). Susceptible EBR3 tomato line (200) seeds were mutagenised with the chemical EMS. Of the ...

  4. Growth properties of Cellulomonas flavigena mutants affected in cellulose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguin, P; Eisen, H

    1978-01-01

    The role of cellobiose metabolism in cellulose utilization by Cellulomonas flavigena was investigated by studying mutants unable to grow on cellobiose or cellulose. The results show that the ability to utilize cellulose is strictly dependent on the ability to utilize cellobiose. PMID:415038

  5. Fusion genetic analysis of jasmonate-signalling mutants in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Bøgh; Raventos, D.; Mundy, John Williams

    2002-01-01

    Jasmonates induce plant-defence responses and act to regulate defence-related genes including positive feedback of the lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2) gene involved in jasmonate synthesis. To identify jasmonate-signalling mutants, we used a fusion genetic strategy in which the firefly luciferase (FLUC...

  6. Molecular analysis of mutants of the Neurospora adenylosuccinate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-07

    Aug 7, 2012 ... Abstract. The ad-8 gene of Neurospora crassa, in addition to being used for the study of purine biology, has been extensively studied as a model for gene structure, mutagenesis and intralocus recombination. Because of this there is an extensive collection of well- characterized N. crassa ad-8 mutants in the ...

  7. Performance of early maturing mutants derived from 'supa' rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Days to 50% flowering and 1000 grain weight exerted negative direct effect on yield. Changes in grain quality were also observed emphasizing the importance of conducting cooking and taste panel tests. Keywords: Early maturity, grain guality, rice mutants, Oryza saliva, path coefficient. Tanzania J. Agri. Sc. (2001) Vol 4, ...

  8. Isolation and partial characterization of carotenoid mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... Three major pigments isolated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were characterized by their absorption maxima, partition ratios in light ... High performance liquid chromatography was used to compare pigments of the wild-type with those of the mutants.

  9. Dynamics of Mutant Cells in Hierarchical Organized Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Benjamin; Dingli, David; Lenaerts, Tom; Pacheco, Jorge M.; Traulsen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Most tissues in multicellular organisms are maintained by continuous cell renewal processes. However, high turnover of many cells implies a large number of error-prone cell divisions. Hierarchical organized tissue structures with stem cell driven cell differentiation provide one way to prevent the accumulation of mutations, because only few stem cells are long lived. We investigate the deterministic dynamics of cells in such a hierarchical multi compartment model, where each compartment represents a certain stage of cell differentiation. The dynamics of the interacting system is described by ordinary differential equations coupled across compartments. We present analytical solutions for these equations, calculate the corresponding extinction times and compare our results to individual based stochastic simulations. Our general compartment structure can be applied to different tissues, as for example hematopoiesis, the epidermis, or colonic crypts. The solutions provide a description of the average time development of stem cell and non stem cell driven mutants and can be used to illustrate general and specific features of the dynamics of mutant cells in such hierarchically structured populations. We illustrate one possible application of this approach by discussing the origin and dynamics of PIG-A mutant clones that are found in the bloodstream of virtually every healthy adult human. From this it is apparent, that not only the occurrence of a mutant but also the compartment of origin is of importance. PMID:22144884

  10. Characterization of mutant cowpea [ Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phylogenetic relationship and polymorphism was detected in 10 cowpea lines comprising of leaf, flower and stem mutants, their putative parents and an exotic accession using 10 random ... Genetic distance ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 based on AFLP markers, while it ranged between 0.13 and 0.44 for RAPD markers. Cluster ...

  11. Clustering common bean mutants based on heterotic groupings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to cluster bean mutants from a bean mutation breeding programme, based on heterotic groupings. This was achieved by genotyping 16 bean genotypes, using 21 Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) bean markers. From the results, three different clusters A, B and C, were obtained suggesting ...

  12. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavahan, William A; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B; Gillespie, Shawn M; Venteicher, Andrew S; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Suvà, Mario L; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-01-07

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas. Mutant IDH protein produces a new onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5'-methylcytosine hydroxylases. TET enzymes catalyse a key step in the removal of DNA methylation. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), although the functional importance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that human IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hypermethylation at cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to interact aberrantly with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with a demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and downregulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wild-type gliomaspheres upregulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression.

  13. IGFBP2 expression predicts IDH-mutant glioma patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin Eric; Cohen, Adam L; Colman, Howard; Jensen, Randy L; Fults, Daniel W; Couldwell, William T

    2017-01-03

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 genes occur in ~80% of lower-grade (WHO grade II and grade III) gliomas. Mutant IDH produces (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate, which induces DNA hypermethylation and presumably drives tumorigenesis. Interestingly, IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in glioma patients, but the underlying mechanism for the difference in survival remains unclear. Through comparative analyses of 286 cases of IDH-wildtype and IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma from a TCGA data set, we report that IDH-mutant gliomas have increased expression of tumor-suppressor genes (NF1, PTEN, and PIK3R1) and decreased expression of oncogenes(AKT2, ARAF, ERBB2, FGFR3, and PDGFRB) and glioma progression genes (FOXM1, IGFBP2, and WWTR1) compared with IDH-wildtype gliomas. Furthermore, each of these genes is prognostic in overall gliomas; however, within the IDH-mutant group, none remains prognostic except IGFBP2 (encodinginsulin-like growth factor binding protein 2). Through validation in an independent cohort, we show that patients with low IGFBP2 expressiondisplay a clear advantage in overall and disease-free survival, whereas those with high IGFBP2 expressionhave worse median survival than IDH-wildtype patients. These observations hold true across different histological and molecular subtypes of lower-grade glioma. We propose therefore that an unexpected biological consequence of IDH mutations in glioma is to ameliorate patient survival by promoting tumor-suppressor signaling while inhibiting that of oncogenes, particularly IGFBP2.

  14. Isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli mutants lacking inducible cyanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloton, M; Karst, F

    1987-03-01

    To determine the physiological role of cyanate aminohydrolase (cyanase, EC 3.5.5.3) in bacteria, mutants of Escherichia coli K12 devoid of this inducible activity were isolated and their properties investigated. Five independent mutations were localized next to lac; three of them lay between lacY and codA. Thus cyanase activity could depend on the integrity of one gene or set of clustered genes; we propose for this locus the symbol cnt. Growth of the mutant stains was more sensitive to cyanate than growth of wild-type strains. This difference was noticeable in synthetic medium in the presence of low concentrations of cyanate (less than or equal to 1 mM). Higher concentrations inhibited growth of both wild-type and mutant strains. Urea in aqueous solutions dissociates slowly into ammonium cyanate. Accordingly wild-type strains were able to grow on a synthetic medium containing 0.5 M-urea whereas mutants lacking cyanase were not. We conclude that cyanase could play a role in destroying exogenous cyanate originating from the dissociation of carbamoyl compounds such as urea; alternatively cyanate might constitute a convenient nitrogen source for bacteria able to synthesize cyanase in an inducible way.

  15. Development and evaluation of drought resistant mutant germ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    terms of relative water content, free proline concentration and yield. The yield ... are suitable for boiling and canning. .... definition the permanent wilting point is the soil water content at which plants do not recover turgor overnight, but will recover if water is applied. Selected mutant and control plants were planted in pots in a.

  16. Complementation of sweet corn mutants: a method for grouping ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    accumulate sugars at the expense of starch and have low total carbohydrate at the mature kernel stage (Boyer and. Shannon 1984). At 18–21 days after pollination (harvest stage of sweet corn), these mutants have four to eight times higher total sugar than the normal corn (Holder et al. 1974). Due to comparative high sugar ...

  17. Characterization of resistant tomato mutants to bacterial canker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small scale ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) mutation was used to obtain resistant mutant plants to bacterial canker disease caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate 2 (Cmm2). Susceptible EBR3 tomato line (200) seeds were mutagenised with the chemical EMS. Of the constructed M2 population, ...

  18. A dwarf wheat mutant is associated with increased drought ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    'Green revolution' genes encode mutant gibberellin response modulators. Nature 400 (6741):. 256-61. Zhang et al. 1057. Peng J, Carol P, Richards DE, King KE, Cowling RJ, Murphy GP,. Harberd NP (1997). The Arabidopsis GAI gene defines a signaling pathway that negatively regulates gibberellin responses Genes Dev.

  19. Let-7 Sensitizes KRAS Mutant Tumor Cells to Chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Dai

    Full Text Available KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis and drug resistance. Let-7 is a family of tumor suppressor microRNAs that are frequently suppressed in solid tumors, where KRAS mutations are highly prevalent. In this study, we investigated the potential use of let-7 as a chemosensitizer. We found that let-7b repletion selectively sensitized KRAS mutant tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel and gemcitabine. Transfection of let-7b mimic downregulated the expression of mutant but not wild-type KRAS. Combination of let-7b mimic with paclitaxel or gemcitabine diminished MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling concurrently, triggered the onset of apoptosis, and reverted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in KRAS mutant tumor cells. In addition, let-7b repletion downregulated the expression of β-tubulin III and ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2, two proteins known to mediate tumor resistance to paclitaxel and gemcitabine, respectively. Let-7 may represent a new class of chemosensitizer for the treatment of KRAS mutant tumors.

  20. Modelling the evolution and spread of HIV immune escape mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Helen R; Frater, John; Duda, Anna; Roberts, Mick G; Phillips, Rodney E; McLean, Angela R

    2010-11-18

    During infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), immune pressure from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) selects for viral mutants that confer escape from CTL recognition. These escape variants can be transmitted between individuals where, depending upon their cost to viral fitness and the CTL responses made by the recipient, they may revert. The rates of within-host evolution and their concordant impact upon the rate of spread of escape mutants at the population level are uncertain. Here we present a mathematical model of within-host evolution of escape mutants, transmission of these variants between hosts and subsequent reversion in new hosts. The model is an extension of the well-known SI model of disease transmission and includes three further parameters that describe host immunogenetic heterogeneity and rates of within host viral evolution. We use the model to explain why some escape mutants appear to have stable prevalence whilst others are spreading through the population. Further, we use it to compare diverse datasets on CTL escape, highlighting where different sources agree or disagree on within-host evolutionary rates. The several dozen CTL epitopes we survey from HIV-1 gag, RT and nef reveal a relatively sedate rate of evolution with average rates of escape measured in years and reversion in decades. For many epitopes in HIV, occasional rapid within-host evolution is not reflected in fast evolution at the population level.

  1. Enhanced sporulation and toxin production by a mutant derivative of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fatima

    based medium. Maximum spore and crystal proteins were produced at 40°C with corn steep liquor as nitrogen source and hydrol as a carbon source. The best mutant MUV7 supported .... containing 10 L of culture medium as described earlier (Ghribi et al.,. 2004). ..... Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITV strain (Ortiz-Muniz et al.,.

  2. nitrosoguanidine-induced cadmium resistant mutants of Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of S. cerevisiae (Inouhe et al 1989) were used for under- standing the molecular genetics of cadmium toxicity and ... The pH of the medium was adjusted to 6⋅4 before autoclaving. Cadmium-resistant mutants after isolation ..... Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Biochem. Biophys. Acta 993 51–55. Kimura M, Otaki N and Imano M ...

  3. Development of a mutant strain of Bacillus subtilis showing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through fermentation experiments, it was confirmed that the mutant strain, TH-49, was not capable of using acetoin accumulated in broth as its energy sources for growth after glucose was consumed. This phenomenon was inconsistent with that the majorities of bacteria accumulate acetoin as stored energy sources and ...

  4. Transcriptional Analysis of serk1 and serk3 coreceptor mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esse, van Wilma; Hove, ten Colette A.; Guzzonato, Francesco; Esse, van Peter; Boekschoten, Mark; Ridder, Lars; Vervoort, Jacques; Vries, de Sacco C.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are ligand-binding coreceptors that are able to combine with different ligandperceiving receptors such as BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) and FLAGELLIN-SENSITIVE2. Phenotypical analysis of serk single mutants is not straightforward because

  5. Screening of allyl alcohol resistant mutant of Rhizopus oryzae and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethanol is a main by-product in the fermentation broth of Rhizopus oryzae during the production of high-optical purity L-lactic acid. By screening the lower activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) mutant, thus decreasing the flux of pyruvic acid to ethanol may be a virtual method for increasing the conversion rate of glucose ...

  6. Abnormal grooming activity in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazielle, C; Lefevre, A; Jacquelin, C; Lalonde, R

    2012-07-15

    Dab1(scm) mutant mice, characterized by cell ectopias and degeneration in cerebellum, hippocampus, and neocortex, were compared to non-ataxic controls for different facets of grooming caused by brief water immersions, as well as some non-grooming behaviors. Dab1(scm) mutants were strongly affected in their quantitative functional parameters, exhibiting higher starting latencies before grooming relative to non-ataxic littermates of the A/A strain, fewer grooming bouts, and grooming components of shorter duration, with an unequal regional distribution targeting almost totally the rostral part (head washing and forelimb licking) of the animal. Only bouts of a single grooming element were preserved. The cephalocaudal order of grooming elements appeared less disorganized, mutant and control mice initiating the grooming with head washing and forelimb licking prior to licking posterior parts. However, mutants differed from controls in that all their bouts were incomplete but uninterrupted, although intergroup difference for percentage of the incorrect transitions was not significant. In contrast to grooming, Dab1(scm) mice ambulated for a longer time. During walking episodes, they exhibited more body scratching than controls, possibly to compensate for the lack of licking different body parts. In conjunction with studies with other ataxic mice, these results indicate that the cerebellar cortex affects grooming activity and is consequently involved in executing various components, but not in its sequential organization, which requires other brain regions such as cerebral cortices or basal ganglia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A dwarf wheat mutant is associated with increased drought ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... was significantly higher than Jingdong 6. Most of the s-dwarf seedlings survived in recovering experiement after water loss. The stalk of s-dwarf seedling also showed reduced gravitropism. This is the first report about a new dwarf wheat mutant associated with increased drought resistance and altered stalk gravitropism.

  8. Ultradian rhythm unmasked in the Pdf clock mutant of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-20

    Jul 20, 2014 ... from the mutation. As a result, Pdf01 mutant flies locomote with precise rhythmicity generated by one ultradian oscilla- tor. In future studies, we would like to dissect this system using genetic tools available in Drosophila, for example by silencing a particular set of Pdf-positive neurons. Circadian rhythms are ...

  9. Dynamics of mutant cells in hierarchical organized tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Werner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Most tissues in multicellular organisms are maintained by continuous cell renewal processes. However, high turnover of many cells implies a large number of error-prone cell divisions. Hierarchical organized tissue structures with stem cell driven cell differentiation provide one way to prevent the accumulation of mutations, because only few stem cells are long lived. We investigate the deterministic dynamics of cells in such a hierarchical multi compartment model, where each compartment represents a certain stage of cell differentiation. The dynamics of the interacting system is described by ordinary differential equations coupled across compartments. We present analytical solutions for these equations, calculate the corresponding extinction times and compare our results to individual based stochastic simulations. Our general compartment structure can be applied to different tissues, as for example hematopoiesis, the epidermis, or colonic crypts. The solutions provide a description of the average time development of stem cell and non stem cell driven mutants and can be used to illustrate general and specific features of the dynamics of mutant cells in such hierarchically structured populations. We illustrate one possible application of this approach by discussing the origin and dynamics of PIG-A mutant clones that are found in the bloodstream of virtually every healthy adult human. From this it is apparent, that not only the occurrence of a mutant but also the compartment of origin is of importance.

  10. Siim Nestor soovitab : Mutant Disco. Azymuth. Klubis Hollywood / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2003-01-01

    Mutant Disco klubis Prive 4. juulil. Brasiilia jazz-trio Azmuth klubis BonBon 5. juulil. Pidustuste sarja Hip Hop Cafe sünnipäeva tähistamisest klubis Hollywood 4. juulil, üritusest Ibiza Night 5. juulil

  11. Photophysics and optical switching in green fluorescent protein mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, T.M.H.; Lock, A.J.; Subramaniam, V.; Jovin, T.M.; Völker, S.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate by using low-temperature high-resolution spectroscopy that red-shifted mutants of green fluorescent protein are photo- interconverted among three conformations and are, therefore, not photostable 'one-color' systems as previously believed. From our experiments we have further derived

  12. Genetic characterization of glossy-leafed mutant broccoli lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossy mutants of Brassica oleracea L. have reduced or altered epicuticular wax on the surface of their leaves as compared to wild-type plants, conveying a shiny green appearance. Mutations conferring glossiness are common and have been found in most B. oleracea crop varieties, including cauliflower...

  13. Structure of the G60A mutant of Ras: Implications for the Dominant Negative Effect.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford,B.; Skowronek, K.; Boykevisch, S.; Bar-Sagi, D.; Nassar, N.

    2005-01-01

    Substituting alanine for glycine at position 60 in v-H-Ras generated a dominant negative mutant that completely abolished the ability of v-H-Ras to transform NIH 3T3 cells and to induce germinal vesicle breakdown in Xenopus oocytes. The crystal structure of the GppNp-bound form of RasG60A unexpectedly shows that the switch regions adopt an open conformation reminiscent of the structure of the nucleotide-free form of Ras in complex with Sos. Critical residues that normally stabilize the guanine nucleotide and the Mg{sup 2+} ion have moved considerably. Sos binds to RasG60A but is unable to catalyze nucleotide exchange. Our data suggest that the dominant negative effect observed for RasG60A{center_dot}GTP could result from the sequestering of Sos in a non-productive Ras-GTP-guanine nucleotide exchange factor ternary complex.

  14. Insight into the structure and the mechanism of the slow proton transfer in the GFP double mutant T203V/S205A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineman-Fisher, Vered; Simkovitch, Ron; Shomer, Shay; Gepshtein, Rinat; Huppert, Dan; Saif, Mari; Kallio, Karen; Remington, S James; Miller, Yifat

    2014-06-21

    Mutations near the fluorescing chromophore of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) have direct effects on the absorption and emission spectra. Some mutants have significant band shifts and most of the mutants exhibit a loss of fluorescence intensity. In this study we continue our investigation of the factors controlling the excited state proton transfer (PT) process of GFP, in particular to study the effects of modifications to the key side chain Ser205 in wt-GFP, proposed to participate in the proton wire. To this aim we combined mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, steady-state spectroscopy, time-resolved emission spectroscopy and all-atom explicit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the double mutant T203V/S205A. Our results show that while in the previously described GFP double mutant T203V/S205V the PT process does not occur, in the T203V/S205A mutant the PT process does occur, but with a 350 times slower rate than in wild-type GFP (wt-GFP). Furthermore, the kinetic isotope effect in the GFP double mutant T203V/S205A is twice smaller than in the wt-GFP and in the GFP single mutant S205V, which forms a novel PT pathway. On the other hand, the crystal structure of GFP T203V/S205A does not reveal a viable proton transfer pathway. To explain PT in GFP T203V/S205A, we argue on the basis of the MD simulations for an alternative, novel proton-wire pathway which involves the phenol group of the chromophore and water molecules infrequently entering from the bulk. This alternative pathway may explain the dramatically slow PT in the GFP double mutant T203V/S205A compared to wt-GFP.

  15. Manufacturing processes 4 forming

    CERN Document Server

    Klocke, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    This book provides essential information on metal forming, utilizing a practical distinction between bulk and sheet metal forming. In the field of bulk forming, it examines processes of cold, warm and hot bulk forming, as well as rolling and a new addition, the process of thixoforming. As for the field of sheet metal working, on the one hand it deals with sheet metal forming processes (deep drawing, flange forming, stretch drawing, metal spinning and bending). In terms of special processes, the chapters on internal high-pressure forming and high rate forming have been revised and refined. On the other, the book elucidates and presents the state of the art in sheet metal separation processes (shearing and fineblanking). Furthermore, joining by forming has been added to the new edition as a new chapter describing mechanical methods for joining sheet metals. The new chapter “Basic Principles” addresses both sheet metal and bulk forming, in addition to metal physics, plastomechanics and computational basics; ...

  16. Metabolic reprogramming in mutant IDH1 glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Izquierdo-Garcia

    Full Text Available Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH 1 have been reported in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas. IDH1 is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate while mutant IDH1 catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate into 2-hydroxyglutarate. These mutations are associated with the accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate within the tumor and are believed to be one of the earliest events in the development of low-grade gliomas. The goal of this work was to determine whether the IDH1 mutation leads to additional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS-detectable changes in the cellular metabolome.Two genetically engineered cell models were investigated, a U87-based model and an E6/E7/hTERT immortalized normal human astrocyte (NHA-based model. For both models, wild-type IDH1 cells were generated by transduction with a lentiviral vector coding for the wild-type IDH1 gene while mutant IDH1 cells were generated by transduction with a lentiviral vector coding for the R132H IDH1 mutant gene. Metabolites were extracted from the cells using the dual-phase extraction method and analyzed by 1H-MRS. Principal Component Analysis was used to analyze the MRS data.Principal Component Analysis clearly discriminated between wild-type and mutant IDH1 cells. Analysis of the loading plots revealed significant metabolic changes associated with the IDH1 mutation. Specifically, a significant drop in the concentration of glutamate, lactate and phosphocholine as well as the expected elevation in 2-hydroxyglutarate were observed in mutant IDH1 cells when compared to their wild-type counterparts.The IDH1 mutation leads to several, potentially translatable MRS-detectable metabolic changes beyond the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate.

  17. Elevation of Urinary 2-Hydroxyglutarate in IDH-Mutant Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Amir T; Nahed, Brian V; Wander, Seth A; Iafrate, A John; Borger, Darrell R; Hu, Ranliang; Thabet, Ashraf; Cahill, Daniel P; Perry, Ashley M; Joseph, Christelle P; Muzikansky, Alona; Chi, Andrew S

    2016-02-01

    Recurrent mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 genes, which are frequent in gliomas, result in marked accumulation of the metabolic by-product 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) within tumors. In other malignancies, such as acute myeloid leukemia, presence of IDH mutation is associated with elevated 2-HG levels in serum or urine compartments. Circulating 2-HG in patients with glial malignancies has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we analyzed 2-HG levels in the serum and urine of a large set of patients with IDH-mutant and IDH-wild-type glioma, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a subset of this cohort. We found that 2-HG was elevated in the urine of patients with IDH-mutant versus IDH-wild-type glioma, although no significant differences in 2-HG levels were observed in the serum or the small set of CSF samples obtained. Among patients with IDH-mutant glioma, 2-HG levels did not differ based on the histopathologic grade, genetic subtype (TP53 mutant or 1p/19q codeleted), presence of a canonical (IDH1 R132H) or noncanonical (any other IDH variant) mutation, or treatment type. Our finding suggests that urinary 2-HG is increased among patients with IDH-mutant gliomas, and may represent a future surrogate, noninvasive biomarker to aid in diagnosis, prognosis, and management. Patients with glioma who harbor mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase genes showed selective elevation of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate in the urine. Similar elevations were not identified in the serum or cerebrospinal fluid. 2-Hydroxyglutarate may serve as a useful, noninvasive biomarker to stratify patients newly diagnosed with glioma with regard to prognosis and management. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Induction of cell death and gain-of-function properties of connexin26 mutants predict severity of skin disorders and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Eric R; Shao, Qing; Kelly, John J; Chin, Katrina; Alaga, Anton; Laird, Dale W

    2017-06-09

    Connexin26 (Cx26) is a gap junction protein that oligomerizes in the cell to form hexameric transmembrane channels called connexons. Cell surface connexons dock between adjacent cells to allow for gap junctional intercellular communication. Numerous autosomal dominant mutations in the Cx26-encoding GJB2 gene lead to many skin disorders and sensorineural hearing loss. Although some insights have been gained into the pathogenesis of these diseases, it is not fully understood how distinct GJB2 mutations result in hearing loss alone or in skin pathologies with comorbid hearing loss. Here we investigated five autosomal dominant Cx26 mutants (N14K, D50N, N54K, M163V, and S183F) linked to various syndromic or nonsyndromic diseases to uncover the molecular mechanisms underpinning these disease links. We demonstrated that when gap junction-deficient HeLa cells expressed the N14K and D50N mutants, they undergo cell death. The N54K mutant was retained primarily within intracellular compartments and displayed dominant or transdominant properties on wild-type Cx26 and coexpressed Cx30 and Cx43. The S183F mutant formed some gap junction plaques but was largely retained within the cell and exhibited only a mild transdominant reduction in gap junction communication when co-expressed with Cx30. The M163V mutant, which causes only hearing loss, exhibited impaired gap junction function and showed no transdominant interactions. These findings suggest that Cx26 mutants that promote cell death or exert transdominant effects on other connexins in keratinocytes will lead to skin diseases and hearing loss, whereas mutants having reduced channel function but exhibiting no aberrant effects on coexpressed connexins cause only hearing loss. Moreover, cell death-inducing GJB2 mutations lead to more severe syndromic disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mutant libraries reveals loci-dependent transcription biases and strategies to novel mutant discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants and it has been implicated as a cause of Crohn’s disease in humans. The generation of comprehensive random mutant banks by transposon mutagenesis is a fundamental wide genomic technology utilized...

  20. Vestigial mutants of Drosophila melanogaster live better in the presence of aminopterin: increased level of dihydrofolate reductase in a mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, J; Bazin, C; Le Menn, A

    1989-09-01

    Vestigial (vg) mutants of Drosophila melanogaster are characterized by atrophied wings. In this paper we show that: (1) aminopterin an inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR), an inhibitor of thymidylate synthetase induce nicks in the wings of wild-type flies and phenocopies of the vg mutant phenotype when vg/+ and vgB/+ flies are reared on these substances (vgB is a deficiency of the vg locus). Only thymidine and thymidylate can rescue the flies from the effect of aminopterin. We propose that the vg phenotype is due to a decrease in the dTMP pool in the wings. (2) Mutant vg strains yield more offspring on medium containing aminopterin than on normal medium. The resistance of vg larvae to the inhibitor seems specific to the gene. This is the first case of aminopterin resistance in living eucaryotes. In contrast sensitivity of the vg larvae to FUdR is observed. (3) An increase in the activity and amount of DHFR is observed in mutant strains as compared with the wild-type flies. Our data suggest that the vg+ gene is a regulatory gene acting on the DHFR gene or a structural gene involved in the same metabolic pathway.

  1. Efficient transduction of LEDGF/p75 mutant cells by complementary gain-of-function HIV-1 integrase mutant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the specificity of retroviral DNA integration could improve the safety of gene therapy vectors, and fusions of heterologous chromatin binding modules to the integrase (IN–binding domain from the lentiviral integration host cofactor lens epithelium–derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75 are a promising retargeting strategy. We previously proposed the utility of IN mutant lentiviral vectors that are selectively activated by complementary LEDGF/p75 variants, and our initial modifications in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 IN and LEDGF/p75 supported about 13% of wild-type vector transduction activity. Here we describe the selection and characterization of the K42E gain-of-function mutation in IN, which greatly improves the efficiency of this system. Both K42E and initial reverse-charge mutations in IN negatively affected reverse transcription and integration, yet when combined together boosted viral transduction efficiency to ∼75% of the wild-type vector in a manner dependent on a complementary LEDGF/p75 variant. Although the K42E mutation conferred functional gains to IN mutant viral reverse transcription and integration, only the integration boost depended on the engineered LEDGF/p75 mutant. We conclude that the specificity of lentiviral retargeting strategies based on heterologous LEDGF/p75 fusion proteins will benefit from our optimized system that utilizes the unique complementation properties of reverse-charge IN mutant viral and LEDGF/p75 host proteins.

  2. Genetic Analysis of Mps3 SUN Domain Mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals an Interaction with the SUN-Like Protein Slp1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederichs, Jennifer M.; Gardner, Jennifer M.; Smoyer, Christine J.; Whetstine, Christine R.; Gogol, Madelaine; Slaughter, Brian D.; Jaspersen, Sue L.

    2012-01-01

    In virtually all eukaryotic cells, protein bridges formed by the conserved inner nuclear membrane SUN (for Sad1-UNC-84) domain-containing proteins and their outer nuclear membrane binding partners span the nuclear envelope (NE) to connect the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. These linkages are important for chromosome movements within the nucleus during meiotic prophase and are essential for nuclear migration and centrosome attachment to the NE. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MPS3 encodes the sole SUN protein. Deletion of MPS3 or the conserved SUN domain is lethal in three different genetic backgrounds. Mutations in the SUN domain result in defects in duplication of the spindle pole body, the yeast centrosome-equivalent organelle. A genome-wide screen for mutants that exhibited synthetic fitness defects in combination with mps3 SUN domain mutants yielded a large number of hits in components of the spindle apparatus and the spindle checkpoint. Mutants in lipid metabolic processes and membrane organization also exacerbated the growth defects of mps3 SUN domain mutants, pointing to a role for Mps3 in nuclear membrane organization. Deletion of SLP1 or YER140W/EMP65 (for ER membrane protein of 65 kDa) aggravated growth of mps3 SUN domain mutants. Slp1 and Emp65 form an ER-membrane associated protein complex that is not required directly for spindle pole body duplication or spindle assembly. Rather, Slp1 is involved in Mps3 localization to the NE. PMID:23275891

  3. Peripherin-2 and Rom-1 have opposing effects on rod outer segment targeting of retinitis pigmentosa-linked peripherin-2 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Sybille; Riedmayr, Lisa M; Nguyen, O N Phuong; Gießl, Andreas; Liebscher, Toni; Butz, Elisabeth S; Schön, Christian; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Becirovic, Elvir

    2017-05-24

    Mutations in the photoreceptor outer segment (OS) specific peripherin-2 lead to autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). By contrast, mutations in the peripherin-2 homolog Rom-1 cause digenic RP in combination with certain heterozygous mutations in peripherin-2. The mechanisms underlying the differential role of peripherin-2 and Rom-1 in RP pathophysiology remained elusive so far. Here, focusing on two adRP-linked peripherin-2 mutants, P210L and C214S, we analyzed the binding characteristics, protein assembly, and rod OS targeting of wild type (perWT), mutant peripherin-2 (perMT), or Rom-1 complexes, which can be formed in patients heterozygous for peripherin-2 mutations. Both mutants are misfolded and lead to decreased binding to perWT and Rom-1. Furthermore, both mutants are preferentially forming non-covalent perMT-perMT, perWT-perMT, and Rom-1-perMT dimers. However, only perWT-perMT, but not perMT-perMT or Rom-1-perMT complexes could be targeted to murine rod OS. Our study provides first evidence that non-covalent perWT-perMT dimers can be targeted to rod OS. Finally, our study unravels unexpected opposing roles of perWT and Rom-1 in rod OS targeting of adRP-linked peripherin-2 mutants and suggests a new treatment strategy for the affected individuals.

  4. Mutant bacteriophage with non-catalytic endosialidase binds to both bacterial and eukaryotic polysialic acid and can be used as probe for its detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, J; Pelkonen, S; Kalimo, H; Finne, J

    2001-10-01

    There is a molecular mimicry between the polysialic acid polysaccharide of bacterial pathogens causing sepsis and meningitis, and the carbohydrate units of the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM. We investigated whether bacteriophage mutants with catalytically disabled endosialidase, which bind but do not cleave polysialic acid, could recognise and bind to bacterial and eukaryotic polysialic acid. In nitrocellulose dot blot assay the mutant bacteriophages, but not the wild-type phages, remained specifically bound to polysialic acid-containing bacteria including Escherichia coli K1 and K92, group B meningococci, Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica A2, and Moraxella nonliquefaciens. A minimum binding requirement was determined to be 10 sialyl residues in the polysialic acid chain. In Western blots the mutant phages specifically bound to the embryonic polysialylated form of NCAM, but not to the adult less sialylated form of the molecule. The mutant phages together with secondary anti-phage antibodies were subsequently successfully used in fluorescence microscopy of cultured cells and light microscopy of paraffin-embedded tissue sections as a probe for the eukaryotic polysialic acid. Thus, mutant bacteriophages of meningitis causing bacteria bind to and detect the molecularly mimicked polysialic acid of the neural cell adhesion molecule in host tissues.

  5. Maass Forms and Quantum Modular Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolen, Larry

    This thesis describes several new results in the theory of harmonic Maass forms and related objects. Maass forms have recently led to a flood of applications throughout number theory and combinatorics in recent years, especially following their development by the work of Bruinier and Funke the modern understanding Ramanujan's mock theta functions due to Zwegers. The first of three main theorems discussed in this thesis concerns the integrality properties of singular moduli. These are well-known to be algebraic integers, and they play a beautiful role in complex multiplication and explicit class field theory for imaginary quadratic fields. One can also study "singular moduli" for special non-holomorphic functions, which are algebraic but are not necessarily algebraic integers. Here we will explain the phenomenon of integrality properties and provide a sharp bound on denominators of symmetric functions in singular moduli. The second main theme of the thesis concerns Zagier's recent definition of a quantum modular form. Since their definition in 2010 by Zagier, quantum modular forms have been connected to numerous different topics such as strongly unimodal sequences, ranks, cranks, and asymptotics for mock theta functions. Motivated by Zagier's example of the quantum modularity of Kontsevich's "strange" function F(q), we revisit work of Andrews, Jimenez-Urroz, and Ono to construct a natural vector-valued quantum modular form whose components. The final chapter of this thesis is devoted to a study of asymptotics of mock theta functions near roots of unity. In his famous deathbed letter, Ramanujan introduced the notion of a mock theta function, and he offered some alleged examples. The theory of mock theta functions has been brought to fruition using the framework of harmonic Maass forms, thanks to Zwegers. Despite this understanding, little attention has been given to Ramanujan's original definition. Here we prove that Ramanujan's examples do indeed satisfy his

  6. α-Synuclein Mutation Inhibits Endocytosis at Mammalian Central Nerve Terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Sheng, Jiansong; Zhang, Zhen; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Sun, Lixin; Sgobio, Carmelo; Lin, Xian; Peng, Shiyong; Jin, Yinghui; Gan, Lin; Cai, Huaibin; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-04-20

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) missense and multiplication mutations have been suggested to cause neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies. Before causing the progressive neuronal loss, α-syn mutations impair exocytosis, which may contribute to eventual neurodegeneration. To understand how α-syn mutations impair exocytosis, we developed a mouse model that selectively expressed PD-related human α-syn A53T (h-α-synA53T) mutation at the calyx of Held terminals, where release mechanisms can be dissected with a patch-clamping technique. With capacitance measurement of endocytosis, we reported that h-α-synA53T, either expressed transgenically or dialyzed in the short term in calyces, inhibited two of the most common forms of endocytosis, the slow and rapid vesicle endocytosis at mammalian central synapses. The expression of h-α-synA53Tin calyces also inhibited vesicle replenishment to the readily releasable pool. These findings may help to understand how α-syn mutations impair neurotransmission before neurodegeneration. α-Synuclein (α-syn) missense or multiplication mutations may cause neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The initial impact of α-syn mutations before neuronal loss is impairment of exocytosis, which may contribute to eventual neurodegeneration. The mechanism underlying impairment of exocytosis is poorly understood. Here we report that an α-syn mutant, the human α-syn A53T, inhibited two of the most commonly observed forms of endocytosis, slow and rapid endocytosis, at a mammalian central synapse. We also found that α-syn A53T inhibited vesicle replenishment to the readily releasable pool. These results may contribute to accounting for the widely observed early synaptic impairment caused by α-syn mutations in the progression toward neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/364408-07$15.00/0.

  7. Cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of F877L mutant androgen receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Daniel J.; Van Hook, Kathryn; King, Carly J.; Schwartzman, Jacob; Lisac, Robert; Urrutia, Joshua; Sehrawat, Archana; Woodward, Josha; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gulati, Roman; Thomas, George V.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Gleave, Martin; Korkola, James E.; Gao, Lina; Heiser, Laura M.; Alumkal, Joshi J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed and second-most lethal cancer among men in the United States. The vast majority of prostate cancer deaths are due to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) – the lethal form of the disease that has progressed despite therapies that interfere with activation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling. One emergent resistance mechanism to medical castration is synthesis of intratumoral androgens that activate the AR. This insight led to the development of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. However, resistance to enzalutamide invariably develops, and disease progression is nearly universal. One mechanism of resistance to enzalutamide is an F877L mutation in the AR ligand-binding domain that can convert enzalutamide to an agonist of AR activity. However, mechanisms that contribute to the agonist switch had not been fully clarified, and there were no therapies to block AR F877L. Using cell line models of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we determined that cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of mutant F877L AR. Further, enzalutamide treatment of AR F877L-expressing cell lines recapitulated the effects of androgen activation of F877L AR or wild-type AR. Because the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ-1 was previously shown to block androgen activation of wild-type AR, we tested JQ-1 in AR F877L-expressing CRPC models. We determined that JQ-1 suppressed androgen or enzalutamide activation of mutant F877L AR and suppressed growth of mutant F877L AR CRPC tumors in vivo, demonstrating a new strategy to treat tumors harboring this mutation. PMID:27276681

  8. Wnt activation by wild type and mutant myocilin in cultured human trabecular meshwork cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Shen

    Full Text Available Myocilin is a gene linked to the most prevalent form of glaucoma, a major blinding disease. The trabecular meshwork (TM, a specialized eye tissue, is believed to be involved, at least in part, in the development of glaucoma. The Pro³⁷⁰ to Leu (P370L mutation of myocilin is associated with severe glaucoma phenotypes and Gln³⁶⁸ stop (Q368X is the most common myocilin mutation reported. Myocilin, upon overexpression, has been shown to induce phenotypes that include a loss of actin stress fibers, an increase in the cAMP level and protein kinase A (PKA activity, as well as a reduction in the RhoA activity. We examined herein whether Wnt signaling pathway is involved in the myocilin phenotypes and whether P370L and Q368X mutants also display biological effects similar to those of the wild type myocilin.Wild type myocilin, when transfected into cultured human TM cells, induced a loss of actin stress fibers as judged by phalloidin staining. Such a loss was averted by treatment of secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling. Consistent with the notion that Wnt pathway mediates the myocilin phenotype, Wnt activation was demonstrated by TOP/FOP-Flash reporter assays. Treatment of human TM cells of a Wnt activator, SB216763, as well as transfection of myocilin P370L and Q368X mutants all resulted in actin stress fiber loss, PKA activation and RhoA inactivation. The PKA elevation was obviated by the sFRP1 treatment, indicating that Wnt signaling was upstream that of PKA.The present study demonstrated that following forced expression of wild type myocilin, Wnt was activated, triggering in turn other myocilin-related alterations. P370L and Q368X mutations induced similar phenotypes, suggesting one possible mechanism how the mutants may lead to TM cell damage and pathology.

  9. The Origin of Mutants Under Selection: How Natural Selection Mimics Mutagenesis (Adaptive Mutation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Roth, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Selection detects mutants but does not cause mutations. Contrary to this dictum, Cairns and Foster plated a leaky lac mutant of Escherichia coli on lactose medium and saw revertant (Lac+) colonies accumulate with time above a nongrowing lawn. This result suggested that bacteria might mutagenize their own genome when growth is blocked. However, this conclusion is suspect in the light of recent evidence that revertant colonies are initiated by preexisting cells with multiple copies the conjugative F′lac plasmid, which carries the lac mutation. Some plated cells have multiple copies of the simple F′lac plasmid. This provides sufficient LacZ activity to support plasmid replication but not cell division. In nongrowing cells, repeated plasmid replication increases the likelihood of a reversion event. Reversion to lac+ triggers exponential cell growth leading to a stable Lac+ revertant colony. In 10% of these plated cells, the high-copy plasmid includes an internal tandem lac duplication, which provides even more LacZ activity—sufficient to support slow growth and formation of an unstable Lac+ colony. Cells with multiple copies of the F′lac plasmid have an increased mutation rate, because the plasmid encodes the error-prone (mutagenic) DNA polymerase, DinB. Without DinB, unstable and stable Lac+ revertant types form in equal numbers and both types arise with no mutagenesis. Amplification and selection are central to behavior of the Cairns–Foster system, whereas mutagenesis is a system-specific side effect or artifact caused by coamplification of dinB with lac. Study of this system has revealed several broadly applicable principles. In all populations, gene duplications are frequent stable genetic polymorphisms, common near-neutral mutant alleles can gain a positive phenotype when amplified under selection, and natural selection can operate without cell division when variability is generated by overreplication of local genome subregions. PMID:26134316

  10. Structure of the Dominant Negative S17N Mutant of Ras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassar, N.; Singh, K; Garcia-Diaz, M

    2010-01-01

    The use of the dominant negative mutant of Ras has been crucial in elucidating the cellular signaling of Ras in response to the activation of various membrane-bound receptors. Although several point mutants of Ras exhibit a dominant negative effect, the asparagine to serine mutation at position 17 (S17N) remains the most popular and the most effective at inhibiting the activation of endogenous Ras. It is now widely accepted that the dominant negative effect is due to the ability of the mutant to sequester upstream activators and its inability to activate downstream effectors. Here, we present the crystal structure of RasS17N in the GDP-bound form. In the three molecules that populate the asymmetric unit, the Mg{sup 2+} ion that normally coordinates the {beta}-phosphate is absent because of steric hindrance from the Asn17 side chain. Instead, a Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinating the {alpha}-phosphate. Also absent from one molecule is electron density for Phe28, a conserved residue that normally stabilizes the nucleotide's guanine base. Except for Phe28, the nucleotide makes conserved interactions with Ras. Combined, the inability of Phe28 to stabilize the guanine base and the absence of a Mg{sup 2+} ion to neutralize the negative charges on the phosphates explain the weaker affinity of GDP for Ras. Our data suggest that the absence of the Mg{sup 2+} should also dramatically affect GTP binding to Ras and the proper positioning of Thr35 necessary for the activation of switch 1 and the binding to downstream effectors, a prerequisite for the triggering of signaling pathways.

  11. Selective production of deacetylated mannosylerythritol lipid, MEL-D, by acetyltransferase disruption mutant of Pseudozyma hubeiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Masaaki; Makino, Motoki

    2017-08-25

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are produced by several smut fungi of the Ustilaginaceae family; they are promising microbial biosurfactants and have excellent surface-active and self-assembling properties. Pseudozyma hubeiensis is a candidate for abundant MEL production and produces large amounts of 4-O-[(4'-mono-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-β-d-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-C). An acetyltransferase disruption mutant of P. hubeiensis, SY62-MM36, was obtained to selectively produce deacetylated 4-O-[(2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-β-d-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-D), and the structures of the products were determined. Lower mobility of major spots of the mutant on silica gel thin-layer chromatography verified its more hydrophilic nature than that of wild-type MEL-A, B, and C. Structural analyses confirmed the product to be MEL-D, which comprises acyl chains of caproic acid (C6:0), capric acid (C10:0), and lauric acid (C12:0). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the surface tension (γCMC) of the MEL-D were 2.0 × 10(-5) M and 29.7 mN/m, respectively. SY62-MM36 also produced a minor product that was estimated as triacylated MEL-D. The triacylated MEL-D had a CMC of 3.5 × 10(-5) M and a γCMC of 29.6 mN/m. In water, MEL-D formed a lamella liquid crystal phase over a broad range of concentrations. By fed-batch cultivation, the mutant produced 91.6 ± 6.3 g/L of MEL-D for 7 days. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Alopecia in a viable phospholipase C delta 1 and phospholipase C delta 3 double mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Runkel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inositol 1,4,5trisphosphate (IP(3 and diacylglycerol (DAG are important intracellular signalling molecules in various tissues. They are generated by the phospholipase C family of enzymes, of which phospholipase C delta (PLCD forms one class. Studies with functional inactivation of Plcd isozyme encoding genes in mice have revealed that loss of both Plcd1 and Plcd3 causes early embryonic death. Inactivation of Plcd1 alone causes loss of hair (alopecia, whereas inactivation of Plcd3 alone has no apparent phenotypic effect. To investigate a possible synergy of Plcd1 and Plcd3 in postnatal mice, novel mutations of these genes compatible with life after birth need to be found. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterise a novel mouse mutant with a spontaneously arisen mutation in Plcd3 (Plcd3(mNab that resulted from the insertion of an intracisternal A particle (IAP into intron 2 of the Plcd3 gene. This mutation leads to the predominant expression of a truncated PLCD3 protein lacking the N-terminal PH domain. C3H mice that carry one or two mutant Plcd3(mNab alleles are phenotypically normal. However, the presence of one Plcd3(mNab allele exacerbates the alopecia caused by the loss of functional Plcd1 in Del(9olt1Pas mutant mice with respect to the number of hair follicles affected and the body region involved. Mice double homozygous for both the Del(9olt1Pas and the Plcd3(mNab mutations survive for several weeks and exhibit total alopecia associated with fragile hair shafts showing altered expression of some structural genes and shortened phases of proliferation in hair follicle matrix cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Plcd3(mNab mutation is a novel hypomorphic mutation of Plcd3. Our investigations suggest that Plcd1 and Plcd3 have synergistic effects on the murine hair follicle in specific regions of the body surface.

  13. Enhancement of yellow pigment production by intraspecific protoplast fusion of Monascus spp. yellow mutant (ade(-)) and white mutant (prototroph).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinsupa, Worawan; Phansiri, Salak; Thongpradis, Panida; Yongsmith, Busaba; Pothiratana, Chetsada

    2016-01-10

    To breed industrially useful strains of a slow-growing, yellow pigment producing strain of Monascus sp., protoplasts of Monascus purpureus yellow mutant (ade(-)) and rapid-growing M. purpureus white mutant (prototroph) were fused and fusants were selected on minimal medium (MM). Preliminary conventional protoplast fusion of the two strains was performed and the result showed that only white colonies were detected on MM. It was not able to differentiate the fusants from the white parental prototroph. To solve this problem, the white parental prototroph was thus pretreated with 20mM iodoacetamide (IOA) for cytoplasm inactivation and subsequently taken into protoplast fusion with slow-growing Monascus yellow mutant. Under this development technique, only the fusants, with viable cytoplasm from Monascus yellow mutant (ade(-)), could thus grow on MM, whereas neither IOA pretreated white parental prototroph nor yellow auxotroph (ade(-)) could survive. Fifty-three fusants isolated from yellow colonies obtained through this developed technique were subsequently inoculated on complete medium (MY agar). Fifteen distinguished yellow colonies from their parental yellow mutant were then selected for biochemical, morphological and fermentative properties in cassava starch and soybean flour (SS) broth. Finally, three most stable fusants (F7, F10 and F43) were then selected and compared in rice solid culture. Enhancement of yellow pigment production over the parental yellow auxotroph was found in F7 and F10, while enhanced glucoamylase activity was found in F43. The formation of fusants was further confirmed by monacolin K content, which was intermediate between the two parents (monacolin K-producing yellow auxotroph and non-monacolin K producing white prototroph). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutants of GABA transaminase (POP2 suppress the severe phenotype of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ssadh mutants in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ludewig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gamma-aminubutyrate (GABA shunt bypasses two steps of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and is present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, the pathway is composed of the calcium/calmodulin-regulated cytosolic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, the mitochondrial enzymes GABA transaminase (GABA-T; POP2 and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH. We have previously shown that compromising the function of the GABA-shunt, by disrupting the SSADH gene of Arabidopsis, causes enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs and cell death in response to light and heat stress. However, to date, genetic investigations of the relationships between enzymes of the GABA shunt have not been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the role of succinic semialdehyde (SSA, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB and GABA in the accumulation of ROIs, we combined two genetic approaches to suppress the severe phenotype of ssadh mutants. Analysis of double pop2 ssadh mutants revealed that pop2 is epistatic to ssadh. Moreover, we isolated EMS-generated mutants suppressing the phenotype of ssadh revealing two new pop2 alleles. By measuring thermoluminescence at high temperature, the peroxide contents of ssadh and pop2 mutants were evaluated, showing that only ssadh plants accumulate peroxides. In addition, pop2 ssadh seedlings are more sensitive to exogenous SSA or GHB relative to wild type, because GHB and/or SSA accumulate in these plants. SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the lack of supply of succinate and NADH to the TCA cycle is not responsible for the oxidative stress and growth retardations of ssadh mutants. Rather, we suggest that the accumulation of SSA, GHB, or both, produced downstream of the GABA-T transamination step, is toxic to the plants, resulting in high ROI levels and impaired development.

  15. Overproduction of delta-endotoxins by sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis mutants obtained by nitrous acid mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Zouari, Nabil; Messaddeq, Nadia; Schultz, Patrick; Jaoua, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Asporogenic and oligosporogenic Bacillus thuringiensis mutants having the ability to overproduce insecticidal crystal protein were generated by using nitrous acid (50 mg/ml), as chemical mutagenic agent. Insecticidal crystal proteins produced by asporogenic mutants remained encapsulated within the cells. Delta-endotoxin production by most of mutants was improved compared to the corresponding wild strains BNS3 and a mutant M26. The overproduction by asporogenic and oligosporogenic mutants was attributed to defect in genes involved in sporulation and to random mutations affecting cell metabolism at different pathways and delta-endotoxin synthesis. Sporeless bioinsecticides could be developed based on stable and environmentally safe Bacillus thuringiensis mutants.

  16. Application of a fluorescence-based continuous-flow bioassay to screen for diversity of cytochrome P450 BM3 mutant libraries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinen, J.; Ferman, S; Vottero, E.R.; Vermeulen, N.; Commandeur, J.N.M.

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescence-based continuous-flow enzyme affinity detection (EAD) setup was used to screen cytochrome P450 BM3 mutants on-line for diversity. The flow-injection screening assay is based on the BM3-mediated O-dealkylation of alkoxyresorufins forming the highly fluorescent product resorufin, and

  17. Dominant negative phenotype of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab, Cry11Aa and Cry4Ba mutants suggest hetero-oligomer formation among different Cry toxins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona, D.; Rodriguez-Almazan, C.; Munoz-Garay, C.; Portugal, L.; Perez, C.; Maagd, de R.A.; Bakker, P.; Soberon, M.; Bravo, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are used worldwide in the control of different insect pests important in agriculture or in human health. The Cry proteins are pore-forming toxins that affect the midgut cell of target insects. It was shown that non-toxic Cry1Ab helix a-4 mutants had a

  18. Expression of wild-type and mutant medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) cDNA in eucaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T G; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    1992-01-01

    carrying this mutation has an impaired ability to form correct tetramers, leading to instability and subsequent degradation of the enzyme. This finding is discussed in relation to the results from expression of human MCAD in Escherichia coli, where preliminary results show that production of mutant MCAD...

  19. Comparative Analysis of Light-Harvesting Antennae and State Transition in chlorina and cpSRP Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    State transitions in photosynthesis provide for the dynamic allocation of a mobile fraction of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to photosystem II (PSII) in state I and to photosystem I (PSI) in state II. In the state I-to-state II transition, LHCII is phosphorylated by STN7 and associates with PSI to favor absorption cross-section of PSI. Here, we used Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with defects in chlorophyll (Chl) b biosynthesis or in the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) machinery to study the flexible formation of PS-LHC supercomplexes. Intriguingly, we found that impaired Chl b biosynthesis in chlorina1-2 (ch1-2) led to preferentially stabilized LHCI rather than LHCII, while the contents of both LHCI and LHCII were equally depressed in the cpSRP43-deficient mutant (chaos). In view of recent findings on the modified state transitions in LHCI-deficient mutants (Benson et al., 2015), the ch1-2 and chaos mutants were used to assess the influence of varying LHCI/LHCII antenna size on state transitions. Under state II conditions, LHCII-PSI supercomplexes were not formed in both ch1-2 and chaos plants. LHCII phosphorylation was drastically reduced in ch1-2, and the inactivation of STN7 correlates with the lack of state transitions. In contrast, phosphorylated LHCII in chaos was observed to be exclusively associated with PSII complexes, indicating a lack of mobile LHCII in chaos Thus, the comparative analysis of ch1-2 and chaos mutants provides new evidence for the flexible organization of LHCs and enhances our understanding of the reversible allocation of LHCII to the two photosystems. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant air1 implicates SOS3 in the regulation of anthocyanins under salt stress

    KAUST Repository

    Van Oosten, Michael James

    2013-08-08

    The accumulation of anthocyanins in plants exposed to salt stress has been largely documented. However, the functional link and regulatory components underlying the biosynthesis of these molecules during exposure to stress are largely unknown. In a screen of second site suppressors of the salt overly sensitive3-1 (sos3-1) mutant, we isolated the anthocyanin-impaired-response-1 (air1) mutant. air1 is unable to accumulate anthocyanins under salt stress, a key phenotype of sos3-1 under high NaCl levels (120 mM). The air1 mutant showed a defect in anthocyanin production in response to salt stress but not to other stresses such as high light, low phosphorous, high temperature or drought stress. This specificity indicated that air1 mutation did not affect anthocyanin biosynthesis but rather its regulation in response to salt stress. Analysis of this mutant revealed a T-DNA insertion at the first exon of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding for a basic region-leucine zipper transcription factor. air1 mutants displayed higher survival rates compared to wild-type in oxidative stress conditions, and presented an altered expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes such as F3H, F3′H and LDOX in salt stress conditions. The results presented here indicate that AIR1 is involved in the regulation of various steps of the flavonoid and anthocyanin accumulation pathways and is itself regulated by the salt-stress response signalling machinery. The discovery and characterization of AIR1 opens avenues to dissect the connections between abiotic stress and accumulation of antioxidants in the form of flavonoids and anthocyanins. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Two Cellulose Morphology Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 Producing Cellulose with Lower Crystallinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  2. Analysis of Candida albicans mutants defective in the Cdk8 module of mediator reveal links between metabolism and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allia K Lindsay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans biofilm formation is a key virulence trait that involves hyphal growth and adhesin expression. Pyocyanin (PYO, a phenazine secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibits both C. albicans biofilm formation and development of wrinkled colonies. Using a genetic screen, we identified two mutants, ssn3Δ/Δ and ssn8Δ/Δ, which continued to wrinkle in the presence of PYO. Ssn8 is a cyclin-like protein and Ssn3 is similar to cyclin-dependent kinases; both proteins are part of the heterotetrameric Cdk8 module that forms a complex with the transcriptional co-regulator, Mediator. Ssn3 kinase activity was also required for PYO sensitivity as a kinase dead mutant maintained a wrinkled colony morphology in the presence of PYO. Furthermore, similar phenotypes were observed in mutants lacking the other two components of the Cdk8 module-Srb8 and Srb9. Through metabolomics analyses and biochemical assays, we showed that a compromised Cdk8 module led to increases in glucose consumption, glycolysis-related transcripts, oxidative metabolism and ATP levels even in the presence of PYO. In the mutant, inhibition of respiration to levels comparable to the PYO-treated wild type inhibited wrinkled colony development. Several lines of evidence suggest that PYO does not act through Cdk8. Lastly, the ssn3 mutant was a hyperbiofilm former, and maintained higher biofilm formation in the presence of PYO than the wild type. Together these data provide novel insights into the role of the Cdk8 module of Mediator in regulation of C. albicans physiology and the links between respiratory activity and both wrinkled colony and biofilm development.

  3. DAF-16 and Δ9 desaturase genes promote cold tolerance in long-lived Caenorhabditis elegans age-1 mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona R Savory

    Full Text Available In Caenorhabditis elegans, mutants of the conserved insulin/IGF-1 signalling (IIS pathway are long-lived and stress resistant due to the altered expression of DAF-16 target genes such as those involved in cellular defence and metabolism. The three Δ(9 desaturase genes, fat-5, fat-6 and fat-7, are included amongst these DAF-16 targets, and it is well established that Δ(9 desaturase enzymes play an important role in survival at low temperatures. However, no assessment of cold tolerance has previously been reported for IIS mutants. We demonstrate that long-lived age-1(hx546 mutants are remarkably resilient to low temperature stress relative to wild type worms, and that this is dependent upon daf-16. We also show that cold tolerance following direct transfer to low temperatures is increased in wild type worms during the facultative, daf-16 dependent, dauer stage. Although the cold tolerant phenotype of age-1(hx546 mutants is predominantly due to the Δ(9 desaturase genes, additional transcriptional targets of DAF-16 are also involved. Surprisingly, survival of wild type adults following a rapid temperature decline is not dependent upon functional daf-16, and cellular distributions of a DAF-16::GFP fusion protein indicate that DAF-16 is not activated during low temperature stress. This suggests that cold-induced physiological defences are not specifically regulated by the IIS pathway and DAF-16, but expression of DAF-16 target genes in IIS mutants and dauers is sufficient to promote cross tolerance to low temperatures in addition to other forms of stress.

  4. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govinda Rizal

    Full Text Available Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium's efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33 with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT. The back-cross (BC1F1 progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used

  5. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  6. Form postponement: a reconceptualization

    OpenAIRE

    FABRIZIO SALVADOR

    2004-01-01

    Form postponement has been widely acknowledged as one of the main avenues to mitigate the adverse effects of product proliferation or customization on operational performance. As it often happens with long debated concepts, the proposed definitions of form postponement sometimes display substantial differences. This paper aims at moving a step forward towards a more precise definition of form postponement in the domain of tangible products. A first result on this way is that form postponement...

  7. Functional importance of stripping in NFκB signaling revealed by a stripping-impaired IκBα mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Holly E; Wismer, Kevin; Vargas, Jesse D; Suryawanshi, Gajendra W; Kern, Nadja; Kroon, Gerard; Dyson, H Jane; Hoffmann, Alexander; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-21

    Stress-response transcription factors such as NFκB turn on hundreds of genes and must have a mechanism for rapid cessation of transcriptional activation. We recently showed that the inhibitor of NFκB signaling, IκBα, dramatically accelerates the dissociation of NFκB from transcription sites, a process we have called "stripping." To test the role of the IκBα C-terminal PEST (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine residues) sequence in NFκB stripping, a mutant IκBα was generated in which five acidic PEST residues were mutated to their neutral analogs. This IκBα(5xPEST) mutant was impaired in stripping NFκB from DNA and formed a more stable intermediate ternary complex than that formed from IκBα(WT) because DNA dissociated more slowly. NMR and amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry showed that the IκBα(5xPEST) appears to be "caught in the act of stripping" because it is not yet completely in the folded and NFκB-bound state. When the mutant was introduced into cells, the rate of postinduction IκBα-mediated export of NFκB from the nucleus decreased markedly.

  8. A diacidic motif determines unconventional secretion of wild-type and ALS-linked mutant SOD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Garcia, David; Brouwers, Nathalie; Duran, Juan M; Mora, Gabriel; Curwin, Amy J; Malhotra, Vivek

    2017-08-09

    The nutrient starvation-specific unconventional secretion of Acb1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires ESCRT-I, -II, and -III and Grh1. In this study, we report that another signal sequence lacking cytoplasmic protein, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), and its mutant form linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is also secreted by yeast upon nutrient starvation in a Grh1- and ESCRT-I-, -II-, and -III-dependent process. Our analyses reveal that a conserved diacidic motif (Asp-Glu) in these proteins is necessary for their export. Importantly, secretion of wild-type human SOD1 and the ALS-linked mutant in human cells also require the diacidic residues. Altogether, these findings reveal information encoded within the cytoplasmic proteins required for their unconventional secretion and provide a means to unravel the significance of the cytoplasmic versus the secreted form of mutant SOD1 in the pathology of ALS. We also propose how cells, based on a signal-induced change in cytoplasmic physiology, select a small pool of a subset of cytoplasmic proteins for unconventional secretion. © 2017 Cruz-Garcia et al.

  9. Unified form language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alnæs, Martin S.; Logg, Anders; Ølgaard, Kristian Breum

    2014-01-01

    We present the Unied Form Language (UFL), which is a domain-specic language for representing weak formulations of partial dierential equations with a view to numerical approximation. Features of UFL include support for variational forms and functionals, automatic dierentiation of forms and expres...... libraries to generate concrete low-level implementations. Some application examples are presented and libraries that support UFL are highlighted....

  10. Modular forms on Schiermonnikoog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modular forms are functions with an enormous amount of symmetry that play a central role in number theory, connecting it with analysis and geometry. They have played a prominent role in mathematics since the 19th century and their study continues to flourish today. Modular forms formed the

  11. Mesonic Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederic D. R. Bonnet; Robert G. Edwards; George T. Fleming; Randal Lewis; David Richards

    2003-07-22

    We have started a program to compute the electromagnetic form factors of mesons. We discuss the techniques used to compute the pion form factor and present preliminary results computed with domain wall valence fermions on MILC asqtad lattices, as well as Wilson fermions on quenched lattices. These methods can easily be extended to rho-to-gamma-pi transition form factors.

  12. Ultradian rhythm unmasked in the Pdf clock mutant of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yuuichi; Tanimura, Teiichi

    2014-09-01

    A diverse range of organisms shows physiological and behavioural rhythms with various periods. Extensive studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms with an approximately 24 h period in both Drosophila and mammals, while less attention has been paid to ultradian rhythms with shorter periods. We used a video-tracking method to monitor the movement of single flies, and clear ultradian rhythms were detected in the locomotor behaviour of wild type and clock mutant flies kept under constant dark conditions. In particular, the Pigment-dispersing factor mutant (Pdf 01) demonstrated a precise and robust ultradian rhythmicity, which was not temperature compensated. Our results suggest that Drosophila has an endogenous ultradian oscillator that is masked by circadian rhythmic behaviours.

  13. Dynamic void distribution in myoglobin and five mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yingying; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Sanchez, Isaac C.

    2014-02-01

    Globular proteins contain cavities/voids that play specific roles in controlling protein function. Elongated cavities provide migration channels for the transport of ions and small molecules to the active center of a protein or enzyme. Using Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics on fully atomistic protein/water models, a new computational methodology is introduced that takes into account the protein's dynamic structure and maps all the cavities in and on the surface. To demonstrate its utility, the methodology is applied to study cavity structure in myoglobin and five of its mutants. Computed cavity and channel size distributions reveal significant differences relative to the wild type myoglobin. Computer visualization of the channels leading to the heme center indicates restricted ligand access for the mutants consistent with the existing interpretations. The new methodology provides a quantitative measure of cavity structure and distributions and can become a valuable tool for the structural characterization of proteins.

  14. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.

    2015-04-06

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with ‘invisible’ phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basis of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall.

  15. Butyric acid tolerance of rice mutant M4 families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Marini Kopp

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydromorphic soils have a low drainage capacity and are used mainly for the cultivation of irrigated rice.This condition favors the development of anaerobic microorganisms that produce phytotoxic substances. The objective of thisstudy was to evaluate the response of rice mutants to the phytotoxicity caused by butyric acid under anaerobic conditions. Theexperiment consisted of four treatments arranged in a randomized block design. Plants of 40 families were grown in ahydroponic system and the measured variables were root length and length of aerial part (LAP, number of roots (NR androot dry matter (RDM and aerial part dry matter (DMAP. The analysis of variance was performed, the relative performancecalculated and linear regressions were fitted. Only the treatment effect for NR and effect of interaction for LAP were notsignificant. Root length was most affected by the acid and the regressions expressed positive as well as negative effects for acidtolerance in the mutant families.

  16. Kinetic and structural evidences on human prolidase pathological mutants suggest strategies for enzyme functional rescue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Besio

    Full Text Available Prolidase is the only human enzyme responsible for the digestion of iminodipeptides containing proline or hydroxyproline at their C-terminal end, being a key player in extracellular matrix remodeling. Prolidase deficiency (PD is an intractable loss of function disease, characterized by mutations in the prolidase gene. The exact causes of activity impairment in mutant prolidase are still unknown. We generated three recombinant prolidase forms, hRecProl-231delY, hRecProl-E412K and hRecProl-G448R, reproducing three mutations identified in homozygous PD patients. The enzymes showed very low catalytic efficiency, thermal instability and changes in protein conformation. No variation of Mn(II cofactor affinity was detected for hRecProl-E412K; a compromised ability to bind the cofactor was found in hRecProl-231delY and Mn(II was totally absent in hRecProl-G448R. Furthermore, local structure perturbations for all three mutants were predicted by in silico analysis. Our biochemical investigation of the three causative alleles identified in perturbed folding/instability, and in consequent partial prolidase degradation, the main reasons for enzyme inactivity. Based on the above considerations we were able to rescue part of the prolidase activity in patients' fibroblasts through the induction of Heath Shock Proteins expression, hinting at new promising avenues for PD treatment.

  17. Biosynthetic potential of sesquiterpene synthases: product profiles of Egyptian Henbane premnaspirodiene synthase and related mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Vickery, Christopher R; Xu, Yi; Louie, Gordon V; O'Maille, Paul E; Bowman, Marianne; Nartey, Charisse M; Burkart, Michael D; Noel, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    The plant terpene synthase (TPS) family is responsible for the biosynthesis of a variety of terpenoid natural products possessing diverse biological functions. TPSs catalyze the ionization and, most commonly, rearrangement and cyclization of prenyl diphosphate substrates, forming linear and cyclic hydrocarbons. Moreover, a single TPS often produces several minor products in addition to a dominant product. We characterized the catalytic profiles of Hyoscyamus muticus premnaspirodiene synthase (HPS) and compared it with the profile of a closely related TPS, Nicotiana tabacum 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (TEAS). The profiles of two previously studied HPS and TEAS mutants, each containing nine interconverting mutations, dubbed HPS-M9 and TEAS-M9, were also characterized. All four TPSs were compared under varying temperature and pH conditions. In addition, we solved the X-ray crystal structures of TEAS and a TEAS quadruple mutant complexed with substrate and products to gain insight into the enzymatic features modulating product formation. These informative structures, along with product profiles, provide new insight into plant TPS catalytic promiscuity.

  18. Autosomal dominant cutis laxa with severe lung disease: synthesis and matrix deposition of mutant tropoelastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Zsolt; Gao, Jimin; Pope, F Michael; Davis, Elaine C

    2005-06-01

    Cutis laxa (CL) is a heterogeneous group of genetic and acquired disorders with at least two autosomal dominant forms caused by mutations in the elastin and fibulin-5 genes, respectively. To define the molecular basis of CL in patients negative for point mutations in the elastin gene, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation experiments were used to study the synthesis of elastin in dermal fibroblasts. In addition to the normal 68 kDa tropoelastin (TE) protein, an abnormal, 120 kDa polypeptide was detected in the proband and her affected daughter in a CL family characterized by hernias and unusually severe and early-onset pulmonary disease including bronchiectasis and pulmonary emphysema. Mutational and gene expression studies established that affected individuals in this family carried a partial tandem duplication in the elastin locus. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the mutant TE was partially secreted and partially retained intracellularly. A polyclonal antibody raised against a unique peptide in the mutant TE molecule showed both intracellular and matrix staining. We conclude that elastin mutations can cause CL associated with a severe pulmonary phenotype. Synthesis of abnormal TE may interfere with elastic fiber function through a dominant-negative or a gain of function mechanism.

  19. In Vitro Root Development in Arabidopsis Thaliana Wild-Type and scr Mutants under Clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E. L.; Sarnatska, V. V.; Talalaiev, A. S.; Ovcharenko, Y. V.

    2008-06-01

    A task of our experiments was to study in vitro rhizogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and scr mutants under slow horizontal clinorotation as a convenient model to clear up a question, whether root morphogenesis de novo will occur normally in simulated microgravity. Two methods for obtaining A. thaliana roots in vitro were used: 1) from the primary callus of leaf origin and 2) directly from leaf explants. Light and electron microscopy and RT-PCR were used for an analysis of the experimental materials. Graviperceptive cells differentiated in roots formed de novo from callus and leaf explants of wild type and scr mutants but did not function under clinorotation. Tissue and cell type patterning in a root proper as well as gene expression in all variants in the control and under clinorotation were similar that gives new evidence on normal morphogenesis in altered gravity. We proposed such model for performing the experiments on board the ISS to study morphogenesis in vitro, including differentiation of graviperceptive cells.

  20. Molecular dynamics characterization of five pathogenic factor X mutants associated with decreased catalytic activity

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Azeim, Safwat

    2014-11-11

    Factor X (FX) is one of the major players in the blood coagulation cascade. Upon activation to FXa, it converts prothrombin to thrombin, which in turn converts fibrinogen into fibrin (blood clots). FXa deficiency causes hemostasis defects, such as intracranial bleeding, hemathrosis, and gastrointestinal blood loss. Herein, we have analyzed a pool of pathogenic mutations, located in the FXa catalytic domain and directly associated with defects in enzyme catalytic activity. Using chymotrypsinogen numbering, they correspond to D102N, T135M, V160A, G184S, and G197D. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for 1.68 μs on the wild-type and mutated forms of FXa. Overall, our analysis shows that four of the five mutants considered, D102N, T135M, V160A, and G184S, have rigidities higher than those of the wild type, in terms of both overall protein motion and, specifically, subpocket S4 flexibility, while S1 is rather insensitive to the mutation. This acquired rigidity can clearly impact the substrate recognition of the mutants.

  1. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2014-12-01

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function. We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.

  2. Use of an otolith-deficient mutant in studies of fish behavior under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, K.; Mizuno, R.; Eguchi, H.

    In Medaka (Oryzias latipes ), fish of a mutant strain (ha strain) had a malfunction in otolith-vestibular system. The phenotype is expressed when the fish have this recessive gene h a) in a homozygous fashion, and the gene is autosomal. Their( difference from the normal fish was first recognizable in their embryonic stages, with abnormally larger ear vesicles and absence of otoliths called Lapillus inside the vesicles. The time-course study was carried out for the subsequent development of their otoliths. X ray phot ographs of the fish revealed that some adult fish of ha- strain still lack a pair of Lapillus, which mainly serve in sensing the direction of gravity, while others have formed the otoliths partially or completely. Changing the light direction within each day, the ha mutant fish were reared from hatching to young fish. The fish treated showed less dependence on gravity even at the age of 50 days or more. Parabolic flight experiments were carried out to observe the fish behavior under microgravity for ha strain.

  3. Copper(II) and the pathological H50Q α-synuclein mutant: Environment meets genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Piqué, Anna; Rossetti, Giulia; Ventura, Salvador; Carloni, Paolo; Fernández, Claudio O; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2017-01-01

    Copper is one of the metals described to bind the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (aSyn), and to promote its aggregation. Although histidine at position 50 in the aSyn sequence is one of the most studied copper-anchoring sites, its precise role in copper binding and aSyn aggregation is still unclear. Previous studies suggested that this residue does not significantly affect copper-mediated aSyn aggregation. However, our findings showed that the aggregation of the pathological H50Q aSyn mutant is enhanced by copper hints otherwise. Despite the inexistence of a model for aSyn H50Q-copper complexation, we discuss possible mechanisms by which this metal contributes to the misfolding and self-assembly of this particular aSyn mutant. Considering the genetic association of the H50Q mutation with familial forms of Parkinson disease, and the fact that copper homeostasis is deregulated in this disorder, understanding the interplay between both factors will shed light into the molecular and cellular mechanisms triggering the development and spreading of the aSyn pathology.

  4. Copper(II) and the pathological H50Q α-synuclein mutant: Environment meets genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Piqué, Anna; Rossetti, Giulia; Ventura, Salvador; Carloni, Paolo; Fernández, Claudio O.; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Copper is one of the metals described to bind the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (aSyn), and to promote its aggregation. Although histidine at position 50 in the aSyn sequence is one of the most studied copper-anchoring sites, its precise role in copper binding and aSyn aggregation is still unclear. Previous studies suggested that this residue does not significantly affect copper-mediated aSyn aggregation. However, our findings showed that the aggregation of the pathological H50Q aSyn mutant is enhanced by copper hints otherwise. Despite the inexistence of a model for aSyn H50Q-copper complexation, we discuss possible mechanisms by which this metal contributes to the misfolding and self-assembly of this particular aSyn mutant. Considering the genetic association of the H50Q mutation with familial forms of Parkinson disease, and the fact that copper homeostasis is deregulated in this disorder, understanding the interplay between both factors will shed light into the molecular and cellular mechanisms triggering the development and spreading of the aSyn pathology. PMID:28289488

  5. Cellular responses during morphological transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA knockout mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingsheng Hou

    Full Text Available FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7 and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ revealed a total of 33 differentially expressed 2-DE gel spots, with 22 of these spots confidently separated to allow protein identification. Analysis of these spots by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and MASCOT database searching identified 48 proteins (≥10% emPAI in each spot. The functional characteristics of these proteins included carbon metabolism (beta-ketothiolase and citrate synthase, nitrogen metabolism (Glutamine synthetase and nitric oxide synthase, stress tolerance (superoxide dismutase, Alkyl hydroperoxidase and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit and morphological transformation (transducer coupling protein. The observed differences between Sp7 wild-type and flcA- strains enhance our understanding of the morphological transformation process and help to explain previous phenotypical observations. This work is a step forward in connecting the Azospirillum phenome and genome.

  6. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase in opaque and floury maize mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varisi, V.A.; Medici, L.O.; Meer, van der I.M.; Lea, P.J.; Azevedo, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) was isolated and studied in four high-lysine maize mutants (Oh43o1, Oh43o2, Oh43fl1 and Oh43fl2). The activity of DHDPS was analyzed at 16, 20, and 24 DAP and characterized in the presence of the amino acids, lysine, S-(2-aminoethyl)-l-cysteine

  7. Lactate dehydrogenase A silencing in IDH mutant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnelong, Charles; Chaumeil, Myriam M; Blough, Michael D; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Stechishin, Owen D; Chan, Jennifer A; Pieper, Russell O; Ronen, Sabrina M; Weiss, Samuel; Luchman, H Artee; Cairncross, J Gregory

    2014-05-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 gene (IDH1/2) were initially thought to enhance cancer cell survival and proliferation by promoting the Warburg effect. However, recent experimental data have shown that production of 2-hydroxyglutarate by IDH mutant cells promotes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α degradation and, by doing so, may have unexpected metabolic effects. We used human glioma tissues and derived brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) to study the expression of HIF1α target genes in IDH mutant ((mt)) and IDH wild-type ((wt)) tumors. Focusing thereafter on the major glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), we used standard molecular methods and pyrosequencing-based DNA methylation analysis to identify mechanisms by which LDHA expression was regulated in human gliomas. We found that HIF1α-responsive genes, including many essential for glycolysis (SLC2A1, PDK1, LDHA, SLC16A3), were underexpressed in IDH(mt) gliomas and/or derived BTSCs. We then demonstrated that LDHA was silenced in IDH(mt) derived BTSCs, including those that did not retain the mutant IDH1 allele (mIDH(wt)), matched BTSC xenografts, and parental glioma tissues. Silencing of LDHA was associated with increased methylation of the LDHA promoter, as was ectopic expression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes. Furthermore, in a search of The Cancer Genome Atlas, we found low expression and high methylation of LDHA in IDH(mt) glioblastomas. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of downregulation of LDHA in cancer. Although unexpected findings, silencing of LDHA and downregulation of several other glycolysis essential genes raise the intriguing possibility that IDH(mt) gliomas have limited glycolytic capacity, which may contribute to their slow growth and better prognosis.

  8. Wheat ABA-insensitive mutants result in reduced grain dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elizabeth C.; Nelson, Sven K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation of wheat mutants in the hard red spring Scarlet resulting in reduced sensitivity to the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination. ABA induces seed dormancy during embryo maturation and inhibits the germination of mature seeds. Wheat sensitivity to ABA gradually decreases with dry after-ripening. Scarlet grain normally fails to germinate when fully dormant, shows ABA sensitive germination when partially after-ripened, and becomes ABA insensitive when after-ripened for 8–12 months. Scarlet ABA-insensitive (ScABI) mutants were isolated based on the ability to germinate on 5 µM ABA after only 3 weeks of after-ripening, a condition under which Scarlet would fail to germinate. Six independent seed-specific mutants were recovered. ScABI 1, ScABI2, ScABI3 and ScABI4 are able to germinate more efficiently than Scarlet at up to 25 µM ABA. The two strongest ABA insensitive lines, ScABI3 and ScABI4, both proved to be partly dominant suggesting that they result from gain-of-function mutations. The ScABI1, ScABI2, ScABI3, ScABI4, and ScABI5 mutants after-ripen more rapidly than Scarlet. Thus, ABA insensi-tivity is associated with decreased grain dormancy in Scarlet wheat. This suggests that ABA sensitivity is an important factor controlling grain dormancy in wheat, a trait that impacts seedling emergence and pre-harvest sprouting resistance. PMID:25431501

  9. Xylitol production by a Pichia stipitis D-xylulokinase mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Su Jin; Jose Cruz; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2005-01-01

    Xylitol production by Pichia stipitis FPL-YS30, a xyl3-Ä1 mutant that metabolizes xylose using an alternative metabolic pathway, was investigated under aerobic and oxygen-limited culture conditions. Under both culture conditions, FPL-YS30 (xyl3-Ä1) produced a negligible amount of ethanol and converted xylose mainly into xylitol with comparable yields (0.30 and 0.27 g...

  10. Mutant botrocetin-2 inhibits von Willebrand factor-induced platelet agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T; Hori, A; Hamako, J; Matsushita, F; Ozeki, Y; Sakurai, Y; Hayakawa, M; Matsumoto, M; Fujimura, Y

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Botrocetin-2 (Bot2) binds to von Willebrand factor (VWF) and induces platelet agglutination. We identified Bot2 residues that are required for binding to VWF and glycoprotein (GP) Ib. We produced a mutant Bot2 that binds to VWF but inhibits platelet agglutination. Mutant Bot2 could be used as a potential anti-thrombotic reagent to block VWF-GPIb interaction. Background Botrocetin-2 (Bot2) is a botrocetin-like protein composed of α and β subunits that have been cloned from the snake Bothrops jararaca. Bot2 binds specifically to von Willebrand factor (VWF), and the complex induces glycoprotein (GP) Ib-dependent platelet agglutination. Objectives To exploit Bot2's VWF-binding capacity in order to attempt to create a mutant Bot2 that binds to VWF but inhibits platelet agglutination. Methods and Results Several point mutations were introduced into Bot2 cDNA, and the recombinant protein (recombinant Bot2 [rBot2]) was purified on an anti-botrocetin column. The mutant rBot2 with either Ala at Asp70 in the β subunit (Aspβ70Ala), or Argβ115Ala and Lysβ117Ala, showed reduced platelet agglutination-inducing activity. rBot2 with Aspβ70Ala showed little binding activity towards immobilized VWF on an ELISA plate, whereas rBot2 with Argβ115Ala/Lysβ117Ala showed reduced binding activity towards GPIb (glycocalicin) after forming a complex with VWF. rBot2 point-mutated to oppositely charged Glu at both Argβ115 and Lysβ117 showed normal binding activity towards VWF but no platelet-agglutinating activity. Furthermore, this doubly mutated protein inhibited ristocetin-induced or high shear stress-induced platelet aggregation, and restrained thrombus formation under flow conditions. Conclusions Asp70 in the β subunit of botrocetin is important for VWF binding, and Arg115 and Lys117 in the β subunit are essential for interaction with GPIb. Doubly mutated rBot2, with Argβ115Glu and Lysβ117Glu, repels GPIb and might have potential as an antithrombotic reagent that

  11. Grb2 is regulated by foxd3 and has roles in preventing accumulation and aggregation of mutant huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shounak Baksi

    Full Text Available Growth factor receptor protein binding protein 2 (Grb2 is known to be associated with intracellular growth and proliferation related signaling cascades. Huntingtin (Htt, a ubiquitously expressed protein, when mutated, forms toxic intracellular aggregates - the hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD. We observed an elevated expression of Grb2 in neuronal cells in animal and cell models of HD. Grb2 overexpression was predominantly regulated by the transcription factor Forkhead Box D3 (Foxd3. Exogenous expression of Grb2 also reduced aggregation of mutant Htt in Neuro2A cells. Grb2 is also known to interact with Htt, depending on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activation. Grb2- mutant Htt interaction in the contrary, took place in vesicular structures, independent of EGFR activation that eventually merged with autophagosomes and activated the autophagy machinery helping in autophagosome and lysosome fusion. Grb2, with its emerging dual role, holds promise for a survival mechanism for HD.

  12. Towards a Systems Approach in the Genetic Analysis of Archaea: Accelerating Mutant Construction and Phenotypic Analysis in Haloferax volcanii

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    Ian K. Blaby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the availability of a genome sequence and increasingly sophisticated genetic tools, Haloferax volcanii is becoming a model for both Archaea and halophiles. In order for H. volcanii to reach a status equivalent to Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a gene knockout collection needs to be constructed in order to identify the archaeal essential gene set and enable systematic phenotype screens. A streamlined gene-deletion protocol adapted for potential automation was implemented and used to generate 22 H. volcanii deletion strains and identify several potentially essential genes. These gene deletion mutants, generated in this and previous studies, were then analyzed in a high-throughput fashion to measure growth rates in different media and temperature conditions. We conclude that these high-throughput methods are suitable for a rapid investigation of an H. volcanii mutant library and suggest that they should form the basis of a larger genome-wide experiment.

  13. A Yeast Toxic Mutant of HET-s(218-289) Prion Displays Alternative Intermediates of Amyloidogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Géan, Julie; Immel, Françoise; Cullin, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Amyloids are thought to be involved in various types of neurodegenerative disorders. Several kinds of intermediates, differing in morphology, size, and toxicity, have been identified in the multistep amyloidogenesis process. However, the mechanisms explaining amyloid toxicity remain unclear. We previously generated a toxic mutant of the nontoxic HET-s(218-289) amyloid in yeast. Here we report that toxic and nontoxic amyloids differ not only in their structures but also in their assembling process. We used multiple and complementary methods to investigate the intermediates formed by these two amyloids. With the methods used, no intermediates were observed for the nontoxic amyloid; however, under the same experimental conditions, the toxic mutant displayed visible oligomeric and fibrillar intermediates. PMID:20713008

  14. Studies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mutants Indicate Pyoverdine as the Central Factor in Inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Gabriele; Nazik, Hasan; Penner, John; Shah, Hemi; Ansari, Shajia Rahman; Clemons, Karl V; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Dietl, Anna-Maria; Visca, Paolo; Haas, Hubertus; Déziel, Eric; Stevens, David A

    2018-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus fumigatus are common opportunistic bacterial and fungal pathogens, respectively. They often coexist in airways of immunocompromised patients and individuals with cystic fibrosis, where they form biofilms and cause acute and chronic illnesses. Hence, the interactions between them have long been of interest and it is known that P. aeruginosa can inhibit A. fumigatusin vitro We have approached the definition of the inhibitory P. aeruginosa molecules by studying 24 P. aeruginosa mutants with various virulence genes deleted for the ability to inhibit A. fumigatus biofilms. The ability of P. aeruginosa cells or their extracellular products produced during planktonic or biofilm growth to affect A. fumigatus biofilm metabolism or planktonic A. fumigatus growth was studied in agar and liquid assays using conidia or hyphae. Four mutants, the pvdD pchE, pvdD, lasR rhlR, and lasR mutants, were shown to be defective in various assays. This suggested the P. aeruginosa siderophore pyoverdine as the key inhibitory molecule, although additional quorum sensing-regulated factors likely contribute to the deficiency of the latter two mutants. Studies of pure pyoverdine substantiated these conclusions and included the restoration of inhibition by the pyoverdine deletion mutants. A correlation between the concentration of pyoverdine produced and antifungal activity was also observed in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates derived from lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. The key inhibitory mechanism of pyoverdine was chelation of iron and denial of iron to A. fumigatusIMPORTANCE Interactions between human pathogens found in the same body locale are of vast interest. These interactions could result in exacerbation or amelioration of diseases. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa affects the growth of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Both pathogens form biofilms that are resistant to therapeutic drugs and host immunity. P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus

  15. Temperature Sensitivity of Neural Tube Defects in Zoep Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Phyo; Swartz, Morgan R; Kindt, Lexy M; Kangas, Ashley M; Liang, Jennifer Ostrom

    2015-12-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) occur when the flat neural plate epithelium fails to fold into the neural tube, the precursor to the brain and spinal cord. Squint (Sqt/Ndr1), a Nodal ligand, and One-eyed pinhead (Oep), a component of the Nodal receptor, are required for anterior neural tube closure in zebrafish. The NTD in sqt and Zoep mutants are incompletely penetrant. The penetrance of several defects in sqt mutants increases upon heat or cold shock. In this project, undergraduate students tested whether temperature influences the Zoep open neural tube phenotype. Single pairs of adults were spawned at 28.5°C, the normal temperature for zebrafish, and one half of the resulting embryos were moved to 34°C at different developmental time points. Analysis of variance indicated temperature and clutch/genetic background significantly contributed to the penetrance of the open neural tube phenotype. Heat shock affected the embryos only at or before the midblastula stage. Many factors, including temperature changes in the mother, nutrition, and genetic background, contribute to NTD in humans. Thus, sqt and Zoep mutants may serve as valuable models for studying the interactions between genetics and the environment during neurulation.

  16. Genes and Alcohol Consumption: Studies with Mutant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Jody; Arends, Michael A.; Harris, R. Adron; Blednov, Yuri A.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the effects of global null mutant and overexpressing transgenic mouse lines on voluntary self-administration of alcohol. We examine approximately 200 publications pertaining to the effects of 155 mouse genes on alcohol consumption in different drinking models. The targeted genes vary in function and include neurotransmitter, ion channel, neuroimmune, and neuropeptide signaling systems. The alcohol self-administration models include operant conditioning, two- and four-bottle choice continuous and intermittent access, drinking in the dark limited access, chronic intermittent ethanol, and scheduled high alcohol consumption tests. Comparisons of different drinking models using the same mutant mice are potentially the most informative, and we will highlight those examples. More mutants have been tested for continuous two-bottle choice consumption than any other test; of the 137 mouse genes examined using this model, 97 (72%) altered drinking in at least one sex. Overall, the effects of genetic manipulations on alcohol drinking often depend on the sex of the mice, alcohol concentration and time of access, genetic background, as well as the drinking test. PMID:27055617

  17. Characterization of tryptophan synthase alpha subunit mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanski, E R; Barczak, A J; Last, R L

    1996-12-13

    Three mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase were isolated by selection for resistance to 5-methylanthranilate or 5-fluoroindole, toxic analogs of tryptophan pathway intermediates. Plants homozygous for trp3-1 and trp3-2 are light-conditional tryptophan auxotrophs, while trp3-100 is a more leaky mutant. Genetic complementation crosses demonstrated that the three mutations are allelic to each other, and define a new complementation group. All three mutants have decreased steady-state levels of tryptophan synthase alpha protein, and the trp3-100 polypeptide exhibits altered electrophoretic mobility. All three mutations were shown to be in the TSA1 (tryptophan synthase alpha subunit) structural gene by several criteria. Firstly, the trp3-1 mutation is linked to TSA1 on the bottom of chromosome 3. Secondly, the trp3-1 mutation was complemented when transformed with the wild-type TSA1 gene. Finally, DNA sequence analysis of the TSA1 gene revealed a single transition mutation in each trp3 mutant.

  18. Allele-selective suppression of mutant genes in polyglutamine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Rung; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are heritable dominant neurological disorders, caused by abnormal CAG tri-nucleotide expansion in the coding sequence of affected genes. Extension of CAG repeats results in the production of aberrant gene products that are deleterious to neurons, such as transcripts with a CAG stem-loop secondary structure, and proteins containing a long stretch of polyQ residues. Thus, determining methods for the prevention or elimination of these mutant gene products from neuronal cells and translating this knowledge to clinical application are currently important goals in the fields of neurology and neurogenetics. Recently, several studies have revealed intriguing findings related to the allele-selective regulation of CAG-expanded genes, and have proposed novel designs to selectively diminish the mutant polyQ proteins. In this review, we focus on the genes, genetically engineered proteins, and oligonucleotides that show potential to modulate the expression of mutant genes. We also discuss their respective molecular functions at the levels of transcription, translation, and post-translation.

  19. Coloboma hyperactive mutant exhibits delayed neurobehavioral developmental milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyser, C J; Wilson, M C; Gold, L H

    1995-11-21

    The coloboma mutation (Cm) is a neutron-irradiation induced gene deletion located on the distal portion of mouse chromosome 2. This deletion region includes a gene encoding the synaptic vesicle docking fusion protein, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). The resulting mutation is semi-dominant with heterozygote mice exhibiting a triad of phenotypic abnormalities that comprise profound spontaneous hyperactivity, head bobbing and a prominent eye dysmorphology. Because the expression pattern of two SNAP-25 isoforms begins to change during the first postnatal week, neurobehavioral developmental milestones were examined in order to determine if the expression of the coloboma behavioral phenotype could be detected during this period of postnatal development. The early classification of coloboma mutant offspring may help to further describe the penetrance of this mutation as well as the contribution of developmental changes to the adult behavioral phenotype. The coloboma mutation resulted in delays in some tests of complex motor skills including righting reflex and bar holding. In addition, coloboma mutants were characterized by body weight differences (first appearance day 7) and hyperreactivity to touch (day 11) and head bobbing (day 14). These data demonstrate disruptions in the time course of attaining developmental milestones in coloboma mutants and provide further evidence supporting the hypotheses that alterations in Snap gene expression are associated with functional behavioral consequences in developing offspring.

  20. Molecular Imaging Of Metabolic Reprogramming In Mutant IDH Cells

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    Pavithra eViswanath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG. In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an oncometabolite, inhibits key α-KG- dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprogramming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprogramming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprogramming of mutant IDH cells and how this reprogramming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  1. Molecular Imaging of Metabolic Reprograming in Mutant IDH Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Chaumeil, Myriam M; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an "oncometabolite," inhibits key α-KG-dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprograming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprograming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review, we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprograming of mutant IDH cells, and how this reprograming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells, and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  2. Functional Analysis of Jasmonates in Rice through Mutant Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Dhakarey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonic acid, one of the major plant hormones, is, unlike other hormones, a lipid-derived compound that is synthesized from the fatty acid linolenic acid. It has been studied intensively in many plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana, in which most of the enzymes participating in its biosynthesis were characterized. In the past 15 years, mutants and transgenic plants affected in the jasmonate pathway became available in rice and facilitate studies on the functions of this hormone in an important crop. Those functions are partially conserved compared to other plant species, and include roles in fertility, response to mechanical wounding and defense against herbivores. However, new and surprising functions have also been uncovered by mutant approaches, such as a close link between light perception and the jasmonate pathway. This was not only useful to show a phenomenon that is unique to rice but also helped to establish this role in plant species where such links are less obvious. This review aims to provide an overview of currently available rice mutants and transgenic plants in the jasmonate pathway and highlights some selected roles of jasmonate in this species, such as photomorphogenesis, and abiotic and biotic stress.

  3. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genes and Alcohol Consumption: Studies with Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, J; Arends, M A; Harris, R A; Blednov, Y A

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the effects of global null mutant and overexpressing transgenic mouse lines on voluntary self-administration of alcohol. We examine approximately 200 publications pertaining to the effects of 155 mouse genes on alcohol consumption in different drinking models. The targeted genes vary in function and include neurotransmitter, ion channel, neuroimmune, and neuropeptide signaling systems. The alcohol self-administration models include operant conditioning, two- and four-bottle choice continuous and intermittent access, drinking in the dark limited access, chronic intermittent ethanol, and scheduled high alcohol consumption tests. Comparisons of different drinking models using the same mutant mice are potentially the most informative, and we will highlight those examples. More mutants have been tested for continuous two-bottle choice consumption than any other test; of the 137 mouse genes examined using this model, 97 (72%) altered drinking in at least one sex. Overall, the effects of genetic manipulations on alcohol drinking often depend on the sex of the mice, alcohol concentration and time of access, genetic background, as well as the drinking test. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Virulence of Burkholderia mallei quorum-sensing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Kinman, Loren; Han, Tony; Bunt, Richard; Greenberg, E Peter

    2013-05-01

    Many Proteobacteria use acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum-sensing (QS) to activate specific sets of genes as a function of cell density. QS often controls the virulence of pathogenic species, and in fact a previous study indicated that QS was important for Burkholderia mallei mouse lung infections. To gain in-depth information on the role of QS in B. mallei virulence, we constructed and characterized a mutant of B. mallei strain GB8 that was unable to make acyl-homoserine lactones. The QS mutant showed virulence equal to that of its wild-type parent in an aerosol mouse infection model, and growth in macrophages was indistinguishable from that of the parent strain. Furthermore, we assessed the role of QS in B. mallei ATCC 23344 by constructing and characterizing a mutant strain producing AiiA, a lactonase enzyme that degrades acyl-homoserine lactones. Although acyl-homoserine lactone levels in cultures of this strain are very low, it showed full virulence. Contrary to the previous report, we conclude that QS is not required for acute B. mallei infections of mice. QS may be involved in some stage of chronic infections in the natural host of horses, or the QS genes may be remnants of the QS network in B. pseudomallei from which this host-adapted pathogen evolved.

  6. Histological Characterization of the Dicer1 Mutant Zebrafish Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DICER1, a multidomain RNase III endoribonuclease, plays a critical role in microRNA (miRNA and RNA-interference (RNAi functional pathways. Loss of Dicer1 affects different developmental processes. Dicer1 is essential for retinal development and maintenance. DICER1 was recently shown to have another function of silencing the toxicity of Alu RNAs in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration. In this study, we characterized a Dicer1 mutant fish line, which carries a nonsense mutation (W1457Ter induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis. Zebrafish DICER1 protein is highly conserved in the evolution. Zebrafish Dicer1 is expressed at the earliest stages of zebrafish development and persists into late developmental stages; it is widely expressed in adult tissues. Homozygous Dicer1 mutant fish (DICER1W1457Ter/W1457Ter have an arrest in early growth with significantly smaller eyes and are dead at 14–18 dpf. Heterozygous Dicer1 mutant fish have similar retinal structure to that of control fish; the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells are normal with no sign of degeneration at the age of 20 months.

  7. Recombination Phenotypes of Escherichia coli greA Mutants

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    Poteete Anthony R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elongation factor GreA binds to RNA polymerase and modulates transcriptional pausing. Some recent research suggests that the primary role of GreA may not be to regulate gene expression, but rather, to promote the progression of replication forks which collide with RNA polymerase, and which might otherwise collapse. Replication fork collapse is known to generate dsDNA breaks, which can be recombinogenic. It follows that GreA malfunction could have consequences affecting homologous recombination. Results Escherichia coli mutants bearing substitutions of the active site acidic residues of the transcription elongation factor GreA, D41N and E44K, were isolated as suppressors of growth inhibition by a toxic variant of the bacteriophage lambda Red-beta recombination protein. These mutants, as well as a D41A greA mutant and a greA deletion, were tested for proficiency in recombination events. The mutations were found to increase the efficiency of RecA-RecBCD-mediated and RecA-Red-mediated recombination, which are replication-independent, and to decrease the efficiency of replication-dependent Red-mediated recombination. Conclusion These observations provide new evidence for a role of GreA in resolving conflicts between replication and transcription.

  8. Biochemical characterization of a fructokinase mutant of Rhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiol, A; Arias, A; Cerveñansky, C; Gaggero, C; Martínez-Drets, G

    1980-10-01

    A double mutant strain (UR3) of Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 was isolated from a phosphoglucose isomerase mutant (UR1) on the basis of its resistance to fructose inhibition when grown on fructose-rich medium. UR3 lacked both phosphoglucose isomerase and fructokinase activity. A mutant strain (UR4) lacking only the fructokinase activity was derived from UR3; it grew on the same carbon sources as the parent strain, but not on fructose, mannitol, or sorbitol. A spontaneous revertant (UR5) of normal growth phenotype contained fructokinase activity. A fructose transport system was found in L5-30, UR4, and UR5 grown in arabinose-fructose minimal medium. No fructose uptake activity was detected when L5-30 and UR5 were grown on arabinose minimal medium, but this activity was present in strain UR4. Free fructose was concentrated intracellularly by UR4 > 200-fold above the external level. A partial transformation of fructose into mannitol and sorbitol was detected by enzymatic analysis of the uptake products. Polyol dehydrogenase activity was detected in UR4 grown in arabinose-fructose minimal medium. The induction pattern of polyol dehydrogenase activities in this strain might be due to slight intracellular fructose accumulation.

  9. Transformations of membrane-bound organelles in sec 14 mutants of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambourg, A; Clermont, Y; Nicaud, J M; Gaillardin, C; Kepes, F

    1996-07-01

    In early descriptions of ultrastructural alterations of secretory (sec) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mutants, sec7 and sec14, were shown to produce cell structures, the so-called Berkeley bodies thought at first to correspond to Golgi structures. In sec7 mutants grown at restrictive temperature, secretion granules soon dis-appeared, whereas networks of Golgi tubules increased in size and transformed into stacks of seven to eight flattened elements. At these time intervals, structures resembling Berkeley bodies appeared to be extensions of the endoplasmic reticulum (Rambourg et al., 1993). It is the purpose of the present study to examine by electron microscopy S. cerevisiae sec14 mutants and to compare the modifications along their secretory pathway with those occurring in a homologous mutant of Yarrowia lipolytica. S. cerevisiae sec 14 mutant cells coming from exponentially growing cultures were examined either at 24 degrees C or after shifting at 37 degrees C for 0, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. Y. lipolytica mutant cells were first cultured in YNB in 5000 medium and then transferred for 0, 6, 8, 12, 20, and 24 hr, in a phosphate-buffered YPD medium, which allows wild cells to differentiate from yeast to mycelian form. In both cases, cells were fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde, treated for 15 min in 1% sodium metaperiodate, post-fixed in reduced osmium, and embedded in Epon. To visualize the three-dimensional configuration of cell organelles, stereopairs were prepared from section stained with lead citrate and tilted at +/- 15 degrees from the 0 degree position of the goniometric stage of the electron microscope. In S. cerevisiae mutant cells shifted for 2 min at the restrictive temperature, faintly stained networks of thin anastomosed tubules were located at close proximity and often continuous with faintly stained ER cisternae. More intensely stained tubular networks with nodular dilations having the size of secretion granules

  10. Mutant p53: a novel target for the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnott, N C; Murray, A; McGowan, P M; Kiely, M; Kiely, P A; O'Donovan, N; O'Connor, D P; Gallagher, W M; Crown, J; Duffy, M J

    2017-01-01

    The identification and validation of a targeted therapy for patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is currently one of the most urgent needs in breast cancer therapeutics. One of the key reasons for the failure to develop a new therapy for this subgroup of breast cancer patients has been the difficulty in identifying a highly prevalent, targetable molecular alteration in these tumors. Recently however, the p53 gene was found to be mutated in approximately 80% of basal/TNBC, raising the possibility that targeting the mutant p53 protein product might be a new approach for the treatment of this form of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of PRIMA-1 and PRIMA-1MET (APR-246), two compounds which were previously reported to reactivate mutant p53 and convert it to a form with wild-type (WT) properties. Using a panel of 18 breast cancer cell lines and 2 immortalized breast cell lines, inhibition of proliferation by PRIMA-1 and PRIMA-1MET was found to be cell-line dependent, but independent of cell line molecular subtype. Although response was independent of molecular subtype, p53 mutated cell lines were significantly more sensitive to PRIMA-1MET than p53 WT cells (p = 0.029). Furthermore, response (measured as IC50 value) correlated significantly with p53 protein level as measured by ELISA (p = 0.0089, r=-0.57, n = 19). In addition to inhibiting cell proliferation, PRIMA-1MET induced apoptosis and inhibited migration in a p53 mutant-dependent manner. Based on our data, we conclude that targeting mutant p53 with PRIMA-1MET is a potential new approach for treating p53-mutated breast cancer, including the subgroup with triple-negative (TN) disease. © 2016 UICC.

  11. Inhibition of Rhizobium etli Polysaccharide Mutants by Phaseolus vulgaris Root Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenschenk, Linda; Diebold, Ronald; Perez-Lesher, Jeanett; Peterson, Andrew C.; Kent Peters, N.; Noel, K. Dale

    1994-01-01

    Crude bean root extracts of Phaseolus vulgaris were tested for inhibition of the growth of several polysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium etli biovar phaseoli CE3. Mutants deficient only in exopolysaccharide and some mutants deficient only in the O-antigen of the lipopolysaccharide were no more sensitive than the wild-type strain to the extracts, whereas mutants defective in both lipopolysaccharide and exopolysaccharide were much more sensitive. The inhibitory activity was found at much higher l...

  12. Bacterial adherence to eucaryotic cells: isolation of lymphocyte-binding mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, E P; Teodorescu, M

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for obtaining bacterial mutants that bind to eucaryotic cells is described. This procedure takes advantage of the ability of the mutants to obtain a required nutrient from the eucaryotic cells. We used this procedure to isolate mutants of Escherichia coli that bind to mouse lymphocytes. We show that the mutants identify some immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes and some non-immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes. PMID:6995342

  13. Bacterial adherence to eucaryotic cells: isolation of lymphocyte-binding mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, E P; Teodorescu, M

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for obtaining bacterial mutants that bind to eucaryotic cells is described. This procedure takes advantage of the ability of the mutants to obtain a required nutrient from the eucaryotic cells. We used this procedure to isolate mutants of Escherichia coli that bind to mouse lymphocytes. We show that the mutants identify some immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes and some non-immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes.

  14. Selection of 5-fluorocytosine-resistant mutants from an Aspergillus niger citric acid-producing strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conte Ana Paula de F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutants of Aspergillus niger N402, induced by UV mutagenesis, were selected and tested for resistance or sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine. Some mutants showed increased citric acid production, which did not correlate with the intracellular amount of protein or ammonium ion. The resistance to 5-fluorocytosine proved to be a rational approach for isolation of new mutants with improved production of citric acid. The best mutant (FR13 accumulated double the amount of citric acid produced by the parental strain.

  15. The role of the lysyl binding site of tissue-type plasminogen activator in the interaction with a forming fibrin clot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.H.F.; Weening-Verhoeff, E.J.D.; Verheijen, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    To describe the role of the lysyl binding site in the interaction of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA, FGK1K2P) with a forming fibrin clot, we performed binding experiments with domain deletion mutants GK1K2P, K2P, and the corresponding point mutants lacking the lysyl binding site in the

  16. Gγ1 + Gγ2 ≠ Gβ: Heterotrimeric G Protein Gγ-Deficient Mutants Do Not Recapitulate All Phenotypes of Gβ-Deficient Mutants1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusov, Yuri; Zhang, Wei; Assmann, Sarah M.; Botella, José Ramón

    2008-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are signaling molecules ubiquitous among all eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome contains one Gα (GPA1), one Gβ (AGB1), and two Gγ subunit (AGG1 and AGG2) genes. The Gβ requirement of a functional Gγ subunit for active signaling predicts that a mutant lacking both AGG1 and AGG2 proteins should phenotypically resemble mutants lacking AGB1 in all respects. We previously reported that Gβ- and Gγ-deficient mutants coincide during plant pathogen interaction, lateral root development, gravitropic response, and some aspects of seed germination. Here, we report a number of phenotypic discrepancies between Gβ- and Gγ-deficient mutants, including the double mutant lacking both Gγ subunits. While Gβ-deficient mutants are hypersensitive to abscisic acid inhibition of seed germination and are hyposensitive to abscisic acid inhibition of stomatal opening and guard cell inward K+ currents, none of the available Gγ-deficient mutants shows any deviation from the wild type in these responses, nor do they show the hypocotyl elongation and hook development defects that are characteristic of Gβ-deficient mutants. In addition, striking discrepancies were observed in the aerial organs of Gβ- versus Gγ-deficient mutants. In fact, none of the distinctive traits observed in Gβ-deficient mutants (such as reduced size of cotyledons, leaves, flowers, and siliques) is present in any of the Gγ single and double mutants. Despite the considerable amount of phenotypic overlap between Gβ- and Gγ-deficient mutants, confirming the tight relationship between Gβ and Gγ subunits in plants, considering the significant differences reported here, we hypothesize the existence of new and as yet unknown elements in the heterotrimeric G protein signaling complex. PMID:18441222

  17. Inverse polymerase chain reaction for rapid gene isolation in Arabidopsis thaliana insertion mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderhaeghen, R.; Scheres, B.J.G.; Montagu, M. van; Lijsebetten, M. van

    1992-01-01

    Recently, many mutants have been isolated in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana by the insertion of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA into the plant genome. Instead of applying Southern analysis on these insertion mutants and to avoid the construction of mutant- derived genomic libraries,

  18. Blue ghosts: a new method for isolating amber mutants defective in essential genes of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Brickman, E R; Beckwith, J

    1981-01-01

    We describe a technique which permits an easy screening for amber mutants defective in essential genes of Escherichia coli. Using this approach, we have isolated three amber mutants defective in the rho gene. An extension of the technique allows the detection of ochre mutants and transposon inser...

  19. Heterotropic and homotropic cooperativity by a drug-metabolising mutant of cytochrome P450 BM3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt-Lussenburg, B.M.A.; Damsten, M.C.; Maasdijk, D.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Commandeur, J.N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we described a triple mutant of the bacterial cytochrome P450 BM3 as the first mutant with affinity for drug-like compounds. In this paper, we show that this mutant, but not wild-type BM3, is able to metabolise testosterone and several drug-like molecules such as amodiaquine,

  20. Identification of a novel Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus mutant that exhibits abnormal polyhedron formation and virion occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Slavicek; Melissa J. Mercer; Dana Pohlman; Mary Ellen Kelly; David S. Bischoff

    1998-01-01

    In previous studies on the formation of Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) few polyhedra (FP) mutants, several polyhedron formation mutants (PFM) were identified that appeared to be unique. These viral mutants are being characterized to investigate the processes of polyhedron formation and virion occlusion. Ld

  1. Differential analysis in Proteome of Space Induced Rice and Soybean Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Lu, B.; Gu, D.; Han, S.; Gao, Y.; Sun, Y.

    To investigate the change trends of proteome induced in space environment we chose 3 Rice mutants 2 Soybean mutants and the seeds which were selected as high yields high tillering rice blast resistance soybean insect pest resistance and wider leaf shape individually after abroad Recoverable Satellite JB-1 for 15 days in 1996 and their corresponding controls Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis 2-D with Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining and PDQuest TM software analysis found that In 6 rice samples 329 pm 35 protein spots were detected in controls whereas 298 pm 37 protein spots detected in mutants representing a 9 decrease 69 pm 27 protein spots were lost in mutants while 37 pm 14 protein spots appeared additionally showing 11 protein spots were lost in mutants 58 protein spots were significantly regulated in mutants with 16 pm 7 up- and 42 pm 18 down-regulated which occupied 5 and 14 of the total average mutants spots separately In 3 soybean leaf samples 263 pm 12 protein spots were detected in controls whereas 255 pm 20 protein spots detected in mutants representing a 3 decrease 49 pm 10 protein spots were lost in mutants while 36 pm 16 protein spots appeared additionally showing 5 protein spots lost in mutants 51 protein spots were significantly regulated in mutants with 25 pm 7 up- and 26 pm 15 down-regulated which occupied 9 8 and 10 2 of the total average mutants spots separately In 3 soybean seed samples 208 pm 41 protein spots were

  2. Isolation, characterization, and expression analyses of tryptophan aminotransferase genes in a maize dek18 mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dek18 mutant of maize has decreased auxin content in kernels. Molecular and functional characterization of this mutant line offers the possibility to better understand auxin biology in maize seed development. Seeds of the dek18 mutants are smaller compared to wild type seeds and the vegetative d...

  3. Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme requires oligomerization for activity of processed forms in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Wu, J; Faucheu, C; Lalanne, J L; Diu, A; Livingston, D J; Su, M S

    1995-05-01

    Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) is composed of 10' (p10) and 20 kDa (p20) subunits, which are derived from a common 45 kDa precursor. Recent crystallographic studies have shown that ICE exists as a tetramer (p20/p10)2 in the crystal lattice. We provide evidence that the p10 and p20 subunits of ICE associate as oligomers in transfected COS cells. Using intragenic complementation, we show that the activity of a p10/p10 interface mutant defective in autoprocessing can be restored by co-expression with active site ICE mutants. Different active site mutants can also complement each other by oligomerization to form active ICE. These studies indicate that ICE precursor polypeptides may associate in different quaternary structures and that oligomerization is required for autoprocessing. Furthermore, integenic complementation of active site mutants of ICE and an ICE homolog restores autoprocessing activity, suggesting that hetero-oligomerization occurs between ICE homologs.

  4. Forms of Life, Forms of Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio Donatelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article explores aspects of the notion of forms of life in the Wittgensteinian tradition especially following Iris Murdoch’s lead. On the one hand, the notion signals the hardness and inexhaustible character of reality, as the background needed in order to make sense of our lives in various ways. On the other, the hardness of reality is the object of a moral work of apprehension and deepening to the point at which its distinctive character dissolves into the family of connections we have gained for ourselves. The two movements of thought are connected and necessary.

  5. Micro metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Micro Metal Forming, i. e. forming of parts and features with dimensions below 1 mm, is a young area of research in the wide field of metal forming technologies, expanding the limits for applying metal forming towards micro technology. The essential challenges arise from the reduced geometrical size and the increased lot size. In order to enable potential users to apply micro metal forming in production, information about the following topics are given: tribological behavior: friction between tool and work piece as well as tool wear mechanical behavior: strength and formability of the work piece material, durability of the work pieces size effects: basic description of effects occurring due to the fact, that the quantitative relation between different features changes with decreasing size process windows and limits for forming processes tool making methods numerical modeling of processes and process chains quality assurance and metrology All topics are discussed with respect to the questions relevant to micro...

  6. Grain product of 34 soya mutant lines;Rendimiento de grano de 34 lineas mutantes de soya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmeron E, J.; Mastache L, A. A.; Valencia E, F.; Diaz V, G. E. [Colegio Superior Agropecuario del Estado de Guerrero, Vicente Guerrero No. 81, Col. Centro, 40000 Iguala, Guerrero (Mexico); Cervantes S, T. [Instituto de Recursos Geneticos y Productividad, Colegio de Posgraduados, Carretera Mexico-Texcoco Km. 36.5, Montecillo, 56230 Texcoco, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); De la Cruz T, E.; Garcia A, J. M.; Falcon B, T.; Gatica T, M. A. [ININ, Departamento de Biologia, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    This work was development with the objective of obtaining information of the agronomic behavior of 34 soya mutant lines (R{sub 4}M{sub 18}) for human consumption and this way to select the 2 better lines. The genetic materials were obtained starting from the variety ISAAEG-B M2 by means of the application of recurrent radiation with Co{sup 60} gammas, to a dose of 350 Gray for the first two generations and both later to 200 Gray and selection during 17 cycles, being obtained the 34 better lines mutants with agronomic characteristic wanted and good flavor. The obtained results were that the mutant lines L{sub 25} and L{sub 32} produced the major quantity in branches/plant number with 7.5 and 7.25, pods/plant number with 171.25 and 167, grains/plant number with 350.89 and 333.07 and grain product (ton/ha) to 15% of humidity 5.15 and 4.68 ton/ha, respectively. (Author)

  7. Targeting the Prion-like Aggregation of Mutant p53 to Combat Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jerson L; Cino, Elio A; Soares, Iaci N; Ferreira, Vitor F; A P de Oliveira, Guilherme

    2018-01-16

    Prion-like behavior of several amyloidogenic proteins has been demonstrated in recent years. Despite having functional roles in some cases, irregular aggregation can have devastating consequences. The most commonly known amyloid diseases are Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs). The pathophysiology of prion-like diseases involves the structural transformation of wild-type (wt) proteins to transmissible forms that can convert healthy proteins, generating aggregates. The mutant form of tumor suppressor protein, p53, has recently been shown to exhibit prion-like properties. Within the context of p53 aggregation and the search for ways to avert it, this review emphasizes discoveries, approaches, and research from our laboratory and others. Although its standard functions are strongly connected to tumor suppression, p53 mutants and aggregates are involved in cancer progression. p53 aggregates are heterogeneous assemblies composed of amorphous aggregates, oligomers, and amyloid-like fibrils. Evidence of these structures in tumor tissues, the in vitro capability for p53 mutants to coaggregate with wt protein, and the detection of cell-to-cell transmission indicate that cancer has the basic characteristics of prion and prion-like diseases. Various approaches aim to restore p53 functions in cancer. Methods include the use of small-molecule and peptide stabilizers of mutant p53, zinc administration, gene therapy, alkylating and DNA intercalators, and blockage of p53-MDM2 interaction. A primary challenge in developing small-molecule inhibitors of p53 aggregation is the large number of p53 mutations. Another issue is the inability to recover p53 function by dissociating mature fibrils. Consequently, efforts have emerged to target the intermediate species of the aggregation reaction. Φ-value analysis has been used to characterize the kinetics of the early phases of p53 aggregation. Our experiments using high hydrostatic pressure (HHP

  8. Wild-type H- and N-Ras promote mutant K-Ras driven tumorigenesis by modulating the DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabocka, Elda; Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Jones, Mathew JK; Lubkov, Veronica; Yemanaberhan, Eyoel; Taylor, Laura; Jeng, Hao Hsuan; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in KRAS are prevalent in human cancers and universally predictive of resistance to anti-cancer therapeutics. Although it is widely accepted that acquisition of an activating mutation endows RAS genes with functional autonomy, recent studies suggest that the wild-type forms of Ras may contribute to mutant Ras-driven tumorigenesis. Here we show that downregulation of wild-type H-Ras or N-Ras in mutant K-Ras cancer cells leads to hyperactivation of the Erk/p90RSK and PI3K/Akt pathways, and consequently, the phosphorylation of Chk1 at an inhibitory site, Ser 280. The resulting inhibition of ATR/Chk1 signaling abrogates the activation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint and confers specific sensitization of mutant K-Ras cancer cells to DNA damage chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24525237

  9. Gravitation and quadratic forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, Sudarshan; Brink, Lars; Majumdar, Sucheta; Mali, Mahendra; Shah, Nabha

    2017-03-01

    The light-cone Hamiltonians describing both pure ( N = 0) Yang-Mills and N = 4 super Yang-Mills may be expressed as quadratic forms. Here, we show that this feature extends to theories of gravity. We demonstrate how the Hamiltonians of both pure gravity and N = 8 supergravity, in four dimensions, may be written as quadratic forms. We examine the effect of residual reparametrizations on the Hamiltonian and the resulting quadratic form.

  10. Gravitation and quadratic forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananth, Sudarshan [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research,Pune 411008 (India); Brink, Lars [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology,S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Institute of Advanced Studies and Department of Physics & Applied Physics,Nanyang Technological University,Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Majumdar, Sucheta [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research,Pune 411008 (India); Mali, Mahendra [School of Physics, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research,Thiruvananthapuram, Trivandrum 695016 (India); Shah, Nabha [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research,Pune 411008 (India)

    2017-03-31

    The light-cone Hamiltonians describing both pure (N=0) Yang-Mills and N=4 super Yang-Mills may be expressed as quadratic forms. Here, we show that this feature extends to theories of gravity. We demonstrate how the Hamiltonians of both pure gravity and N=8 supergravity, in four dimensions, may be written as quadratic forms. We examine the effect of residual reparametrizations on the Hamiltonian and the resulting quadratic form.

  11. Electronic Capitalization Asset Form -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — National Automated Capitalization Authorization Form used by ATO Engineering Services, Logistics, Accounting for the purpose of identifying and capturing FAA project...

  12. Cooperative Station History Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Various forms, photographs and correspondence documenting the history of Cooperative station instrumentation, location changes, inspections, and...

  13. Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.-K.; Chang, H.-H.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, K.-S.

    2000-02-01

    To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes.

  14. Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y-K. E-mail: yklee@nanum.kaeri.re.kr; Chang, H-H.; Kim, J-S.; Kim, J.K.; Lee, K-S

    2000-02-01

    To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes. (author)

  15. Nodulation of Soybean by a Transposon-Mutant of Rhizobium fredii USDA257 Is Subject to Competitive Nodulation Blocking by Other Rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balatti, P A; Pueppke, S G

    1990-11-01

    Rhizobium fredii USDA257 fails to nodulate the improved soybean [Glycine max (L.)Merr.] cultivar McCall in plastic growth pouches. Mutant 257DH4, which was derived from USDA257 by transposon mutagenesis, forms nitrogen fixing nodules under these conditions. If USDA257 is present in inocula containing the mutant, most infections are arrested prior to organization of the nodule meristem, and nodule number is reduced by 95%. The improved cultivars Essex, Harosoy, Hodgson 78, and Viçoja, as well as a supernodulating mutant of Williams, respond like McCall to inoculation with such mixtures of bacteria. Nodulation blocking on McCall can be elicited by rhizobia other than USDA257, provided that they meet two criteria: Blocking strains must themselves be able to induce cortical cells of McCall to divide, and such divisions must proceed to the stage of nodule meristem formation. Nodulation by the mutant remains sensitive to a challenge inoculation with USDA257 for only the first 6 to 12 hours after inoculation. Nodulation blocking involving mutant 257DH4 thus appears to be a rapid, generalized process.

  16. Bacillus subtilis mutants with knockouts of the genes encoding ribonucleases RNase Y and RNase J1 are viable, with major defects in cell morphology, sporulation, and competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figaro, Sabine; Durand, Sylvain; Gilet, Laetitia; Cayet, Nadège; Sachse, Martin; Condon, Ciarán

    2013-05-01

    The genes encoding the ribonucleases RNase J1 and RNase Y have long been considered essential for Bacillus subtilis cell viability, even before there was concrete knowledge of their function as two of the most important enzymes for RNA turnover in this organism. Here we show that this characterization is incorrect and that ΔrnjA and Δrny mutants are both viable. As expected, both strains grow relatively slowly, with doubling times in the hour range in rich medium. Knockout mutants have major defects in their sporulation and competence development programs. Both mutants are hypersensitive to a wide range of antibiotics and have dramatic alterations to their cell morphologies, suggestive of cell envelope defects. Indeed, RNase Y mutants are significantly smaller in diameter than wild-type strains and have a very disordered peptidoglycan layer. Strains lacking RNase J1 form long filaments in tight spirals, reminiscent of mutants of the actin-like proteins (Mre) involved in cell shape determination. Finally, we combined the rnjA and rny mutations with mutations in other components of the degradation machinery and show that many of these strains are also viable. The implications for the two known RNA degradation pathways of B. subtilis are discussed.

  17. Rational design of a live attenuated dengue vaccine: 2'-o-methyltransferase mutants are highly attenuated and immunogenic in mice and macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Züst

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and infects at least 100 million people every year. Progressive urbanization in Asia and South-Central America and the geographic expansion of Aedes mosquito habitats have accelerated the global spread of dengue, resulting in a continuously increasing number of cases. A cost-effective, safe vaccine conferring protection with ideally a single injection could stop dengue transmission. Current vaccine candidates require several booster injections or do not provide protection against all four serotypes. Here we demonstrate that dengue virus mutants lacking 2'-O-methyltransferase activity are highly sensitive to type I IFN inhibition. The mutant viruses are attenuated in mice and rhesus monkeys and elicit a strong adaptive immune response. Monkeys immunized with a single dose of 2'-O-methyltransferase mutant virus showed 100% sero-conversion even when a dose as low as 1,000 plaque forming units was administrated. Animals were fully protected against a homologous challenge. Furthermore, mosquitoes feeding on blood containing the mutant virus were not infected, whereas those feeding on blood containing wild-type virus were infected and thus able to transmit it. These results show the potential of 2'-O-methyltransferase mutant virus as a safe, rationally designed dengue vaccine that restrains itself due to the increased susceptibility to the host's innate immune response.

  18. Generation of mariner-based transposon insertion mutant library of Bacillus sphaericus 2297 and investigation of genes involved in sporulation and mosquito-larvicidal crystal protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiming; Hu, Xiaomin; Ge, Yong; Zheng, Dasheng; Yuan, Zhiming

    2012-05-01

    Bacillus sphaericus has been used with great success in mosquito control programs worldwide. Under conditions of nutrient limitation, it undergoes sporulation via a series of well defined morphological stages. However, only a small number of genes involved in sporulation have been identified. To identify genes associated with sporulation, and to understand the relationship between sporulation and crystal protein synthesis, a random mariner-based transposon insertion mutant library of B. sphaericus strain 2297 was constructed and seven sporulation-defective mutants were selected. Sequencing of the DNA flanking of the transposon insertion identified several genes involved in sporulation. The morphologies of mutants were determined by electron microscopy and synthesis of crystal proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Four mutants blocked at early stages of sporulation failed to produce crystal proteins and had lower larvicidal activity. However, the other three mutants were blocked at later stages and were able to form crystal proteins, and the larvicidal activity was similar to wild type. These results indicated that crystal protein synthesis in B. sphaericus is dependent on sporulation initiation. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of auxotrophic mutants of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus by non-homologous end joining-mediated integrative transformation with genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarimizu, Tohru; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Junpei; Tokuda, Shuya; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Lorreungsil, Sasithorn; Sutthikhumpha, Surasit; Pukahuta, Charida; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Limtong, Savitree; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-12-01

    The isolation and application of auxotrophic mutants for gene manipulations, such as genetic transformation, mating selection and tetrad analysis, form the basis of yeast genetics. For the development of these genetic methods in the thermotolerant fermentative yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, we isolated a series of auxotrophic mutants with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism. To identify the mutated genes, linear DNA fragments of nutrient biosynthetic pathway genes were amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA and used to directly transform the K. marxianus auxotrophic mutants by random integration into chromosomes through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The appearance of transformant colonies indicated that the specific S. cerevisiae gene complemented the K. marxianus mutant. Using this interspecific complementation approach with linear PCR-amplified DNA, we identified auxotrophic mutations of ADE2, ADE5,7, ADE6, HIS2, HIS3, HIS4, HIS5, HIS6, HIS7, LYS1, LYS2, LYS4, LYS9, LEU1, LEU2, MET2, MET6, MET17, TRP3, TRP4 and TRP5 without the labour-intensive requirement of plasmid construction. Mating, sporulation and tetrad analysis techniques for K. marxianus were also established. With the identified auxotrophic mutant strains and S. cerevisiae genes as selective markers, NHEJ-mediated integrative transformation with PCR-amplified DNA is an attractive system for facilitating genetic analyses in the yeast K. marxianus. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The global translation profile in a ribosomal protein mutant resembles that of an eIF3 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruneh, Bayu Sisay; Kim, Byung-Hoon; Gallie, Daniel R; Roy, Bijoyita; von Arnim, Albrecht G

    2013-12-30

    Genome-wide assays performed in Arabidopsis and other organisms have revealed that the translation status of mRNAs responds dramatically to different environmental stresses and genetic lesions in the translation apparatus. To identify additional features of the global landscape of translational control, we used microarray analysis of polysomal as well as non-polysomal mRNAs to examine the defects in translation in a poly(A) binding protein mutant, pab2 pab8, as well as in a mutant of a large ribosomal subunit protein, rpl24b/shortvalve1. The mutation of RPL24B stimulated the ribosome occupancy of mRNAs for nuclear encoded ribosomal proteins. Detailed analysis yielded new insights into the translational regulon containing the ribosomal protein mRNAs. First, the ribosome occupancy defects in the rpl24b mutant partially overlapped with those in a previously analyzed initiation factor mutant, eif3h. Second, a group of mRNAs with incomplete coding sequences appeared to be uncoupled from the regulon, since their dependence on RPL24B differed from regular mRNAs. Third, different sister paralogs of the ribosomal proteins differed in their translation state in the wild-type. Some sister paralogs also differed in their response to the rpl24b mutation. In contrast to rpl24b, the pab2 pab8 mutant revealed few gene specific translational defects, but a group of seed storage protein mRNAs were stimulated in their ribosome occupancy. In the course of this work, while optimizing the statistical analysis of ribosome occupancy data, we collected 12 biological replicates of translation states from wild-type seedlings. We defined 20% of mRNAs as having a high variance in their translation state. Many of these mRNAs were functionally associated with responses to the environment, suggesting that subtle variation in the environmental conditions is sensed by plants and transduced to affect the translational efficiency of hundreds of mRNAs. These data represent the first genome

  1. Characterization of Drosophila Saposin-related mutants as a model for lysosomal sphingolipid storage diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Sellin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipidoses are inherited diseases belonging to the class of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs, which are characterized by the accumulation of indigestible material in the lysosome caused by specific defects in the lysosomal degradation machinery. While some LSDs can be efficiently treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT, this is not possible if the nervous system is affected due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier. Sphingolipidoses in particular often present as severe, untreatable forms of LSDs with massive sphingolipid and membrane accumulation in lysosomes, neurodegeneration and very short life expectancy. The digestion of intralumenal membranes within lysosomes is facilitated by lysosomal sphingolipid activator proteins (saposins, which are cleaved from a prosaposin precursor. Prosaposin mutations cause some of the severest forms of sphingolipidoses, and are associated with perinatal lethality in mice, hampering studies on disease progression. We identify the Drosophila prosaposin orthologue Saposin-related (Sap-r as a key regulator of lysosomal lipid homeostasis in the fly. Its mutation leads to a typical spingolipidosis phenotype with an enlarged endolysosomal compartment and sphingolipid accumulation as shown by mass spectrometry and thin layer chromatography. Sap-r mutants show reduced viability with ∼50% survival to adulthood, allowing us to study progressive neurodegeneration and analyze their lipid profile in young and aged flies. Additionally, we observe a defect in sterol homeostasis with local sterol depletion at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, we find that autophagy is increased, resulting in the accumulation of mitochondria in lysosomes, concomitant with increased oxidative stress. Together, we establish Drosophila Sap-r mutants as a lysosomal storage disease model suitable for studying the age-dependent progression of lysosomal dysfunction associated with lipid accumulation and the resulting pathological

  2. Suppression of a thermosensitive zipA cell division mutant by altering amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Daniel Vega; Margolin, William

    2017-10-23

    ZipA is essential for cell division in Escherichia coli, acting early in the process to anchor polymers of FtsZ to the cytoplasmic membrane. Along with FtsA, FtsZ and ZipA form a proto-ring at midcell that recruits additional proteins to eventually build the division septum. Cells carrying the thermosensitive zipA1 allele divide fairly normally at 30°C in rich medium but cease dividing at temperatures above 34°C, forming long filaments. In a search for suppressors of zipA1, we found that deletions of specific genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis could partially cell rescue growth and division at 34°C or 37°C, but not at 42°C. Notably, although a diverse group of amino acid biosynthetic gene deletions could partially rescue growth of zipA1 cells at 34°C, only deletions of genes related to the biosynthesis of threonine, glycine, serine and methionine could rescue at 37°C. Adding exogenous pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP), a cofactor for many of the enzymes affected by this study, partially suppressed zipA1 thermosensitivity. For many of the deletions, PLP had an additive rescuing effect on zipA1 Moreover, added PLP partially suppressed the thermosensitivity of ftsQ and ftsK mutants, weakly suppressed an ftsI mutant, but failed to suppress ftsA or ftsZ thermosensitive mutants. Along with the ability of a deletion of metC to partially suppress ftsK, our results suggest that perturbations of amino acid metabolic pathways, particularly those that redirect the flow of carbon away from synthesis of threonine, glycine, or methionine, are able to partially rescue some cell division defects.IMPORTANCE Cell division of bacteria such as Escherichia coli is essential for their successful colonization. It is becoming increasingly clear that nutritional status and central metabolism can affect bacterial size and shape; for example, a metabolic enzyme (OpgH) can moonlight as a regulator of FtsZ, an essential cell division protein. Here, we demonstrate a link between amino

  3. Isotropy of quadratic forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. Suresh University Of Hyderabad Hyderabad

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... Polynomials f (X1,··· ,Xn) − −− polynomial. V. Suresh University Of Hyderabad Hyderabad. Isotropy of quadratic forms ..... Historically, the study of quadratic forms was part of number theory; Minkowski, Siegel, Hasse, Eichler, Kneser and .... For example Z/pZ, p a prime number. V. Suresh University Of ...

  4. Mastering HTML5 forms

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial will show you how to create stylish forms, not only visually appealing, but interactive and customized, in order to gather valuable user inputs and information.Enhance your skills in building responsive and dynamic web forms using HTML5, CSS3, and related technologies. All you need is a basic understanding of HTML and PHP.

  5. PowerForms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Møller, Anders; Ricky, Mikkel

    2000-01-01

    All uses of HTML forms may benefit from validation of the specified input field values. Simple validation matches individual values against specified formats, while more advanced validation may involve interdependencies of form fields. There is currently no standard for specifying or implementing...

  6. Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) cross-reacting material in mutants of Drosophila melanogaster deficient in XDH activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browder, L W; Tucker, L; Wilkes, J

    1982-02-01

    Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate xanthine dehydrogenase cross-reacting material (XDH-CRM) in strains containing the cin and cin mutant genes, which are deficient in XDH enzymatic activity. CRM levels were determined as percentages of CRM in the Oregon-R wild-type strain. The mutant strains contain 72 and 76% of Oregon-R CRM, respectively. CRM levels in strains containing the XDH-deficient mutant genes lxd and mal are 93 and 105%, respectively. The high levels of CRM in these four mutant strains indicate that the primary effects of the mutant genes are on the function of XDH protein rather than its accumulation.

  7. Identification of An Arsenic Tolerant Double Mutant With a Thiol-Mediated Component And Increased Arsenic Tolerance in PhyA Mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, D.Y.; Lee, D.; Harris, H.; Raab, A.; Feldmann, J.; Meharg, A.; Kumabe, B.; Komives, E.A.; Schroeder, J.I.; /SLAC, SSRL /Sydney U. /Aberdeen U. /UC, San Diego

    2007-04-06

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  8. Resveratrol Antagonizes Antimicrobial Lethality and Stimulates Recovery of Bacterial Mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanli Liu

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical are thought to contribute to the rapid bactericidal activity of diverse antimicrobial agents. The possibility has been raised that consumption of antioxidants in food may interfere with the lethal action of antimicrobials. Whether nutritional supplements containing antioxidant activity are also likely to interfere with antimicrobial lethality is unknown. To examine this possibility, resveratrol, a popular antioxidant dietary supplement, was added to cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that were then treated with antimicrobial and assayed for bacterial survival and the recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Resveratrol, at concentrations likely to be present during human consumption, caused a 2- to 3-fold reduction in killing during a 2-hr treatment with moxifloxacin or kanamycin. At higher, but still subinhibitory concentrations, resveratrol reduced antimicrobial lethality by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Resveratrol also reduced the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS characteristic of treatment with quinolone (oxolinic acid. These data support the general idea that the lethal activity of some antimicrobials involves ROS. Surprisingly, subinhibitory concentrations of resveratrol promoted (2- to 6-fold the recovery of rifampicin-resistant mutants arising from the action of ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, or daptomycin. This result is consistent with resveratrol reducing ROS to sublethal levels that are still mutagenic, while the absence of resveratrol allows ROS levels to high enough to kill mutagenized cells. Suppression of antimicrobial lethality and promotion of mutant recovery by resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant may contribute to the emergence of resistance to several antimicrobials, especially if new derivatives and/or formulations of resveratrol markedly increase bioavailability.

  9. Analysis of Escherichia coli mutants with a linear respiratory chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Steinsiek

    Full Text Available The respiratory chain of E. coli is branched to allow the cells' flexibility to deal with changing environmental conditions. It consists of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases NADH dehydrogenase I and II, as well as of three terminal oxidases. They differ with respect to energetic efficiency (proton translocation and their affinity to the different quinone/quinol species and oxygen. In order to analyze the advantages of the branched electron transport chain over a linear one and to assess how usage of the different terminal oxidases determines growth behavior at varying oxygen concentrations, a set of isogenic mutant strains was created, which lack NADH dehydrogenase I as well as two of the terminal oxidases, resulting in strains with a linear respiratory chain. These strains were analyzed in glucose-limited chemostat experiments with defined oxygen supply, adjusting aerobic, anaerobic and different microaerobic conditions. In contrast to the wild-type strain MG1655, the mutant strains produced acetate even under aerobic conditions. Strain TBE032, lacking NADH dehydrogenase I and expressing cytochrome bd-II as sole terminal oxidase, showed the highest acetate formation rate under aerobic conditions. This supports the idea that cytochrome bd-II terminal oxidase is not able to catalyze the efficient oxidation of the quinol pool at higher oxygen conditions, but is functioning mainly under limiting oxygen conditions. Phosphorylation of ArcA, the regulator of the two-component system ArcBA, besides Fnr the main transcription factor for the response towards different oxygen concentrations, was studied. Its phosphorylation pattern was changed in the mutant strains. Dephosphorylation and therefore inactivation of ArcA started at lower aerobiosis levels than in the wild-type strain. Notably, not only the micro- and aerobic metabolism was affected by the mutations, but also the anaerobic metabolism, where the respiratory chain should not be important.

  10. The antiandrogenic effect of finasteride against a mutant androgen receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Zhang, Haitao; Ip, Clement

    2011-01-01

    Finasteride is known to inhibit Type 2 5α-reductase and thus block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The structural similarity of finasteride to DHT raises the possibility that finasteride may also interfere with the function of the androgen receptor (AR). Experiments were carried out to evaluate the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride in LNCaP, C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Finasteride decreased DHT binding to AR, and DHT-stimulated AR activity and cell growth in LNCaP and C4-2 cells, but not in VCaP cells. LNCaP and C4-2 (derived from castration-resistant LNCaP) cells express the T877A mutant AR, while VCaP cells express the wild-type AR. When PC-3 cells, which are AR-null, were transfected with either the wild-type or the T877A mutant AR, only the mutant AR-expressing cells were sensitive to finasteride inhibition of DHT binding. Peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx1) is a novel endogenous facilitator of AR binding to DHT. In Prx1-rich LNCaP cells, the combination of Prx1 knockdown and finasteride was found to produce a greater inhibitory effect on AR activity and cell growth than either treatment alone. The observation suggests that cells with a low expression of Prx1 are likely to be more responsive to the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride. Additional studies showed that the efficacy of finasteride was comparable to that of bicalutamide (a widely used non-steroidal antiandrogen). The implication of the above findings is discussed in the context of developing strategies to improve the outcome of androgen deprivation therapy. PMID:21386657

  11. A sialidase mutant displaying trans-sialidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Gastón; Ratier, Laura; Amaya, María Fernanda; Nguyen, Tong; Alzari, Pedro M; Frasch, Alberto Carlos C

    2005-01-28

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, expresses a modified sialidase, the trans-sialidase, which transfers sialic acid from host glycoconjugates to beta-galactose present in parasite mucins. Another American trypanosome, Trypanosoma rangeli, expresses a homologous protein that has sialidase activity but is devoid of transglycosidase activity. Based on the recently determined structures of T.rangeli sialidase (TrSA) and T.cruzi trans-sialidase (TcTS), we have now constructed mutants of TrSA with the aim of studying the relevant residues in transfer activity. Five mutations, Met96-Val, Ala98-Pro, Ser120-Tyr, Gly249-Tyr and Gln284-Pro, were enough to obtain a sialidase mutant (TrSA(5mut)) with trans-sialidase activity; and a sixth mutation increased the activity to about 10% that of wild-type TcTS. The crystal structure of TrSA(5mut) revealed the formation of a trans-sialidase-like binding site for the acceptor galactose, primarily defined by the phenol group of Tyr120 and the indole ring of Trp313, which adopts a new conformation, similar to that in TcTS, induced by the Gln284-Pro mutation. The transition state analogue 2,3-didehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA), which inhibits sialidases but is a poor inhibitor of trans-sialidase, was used to probe the active site conformation of mutant enzymes. The results show that the presence of a sugar acceptor binding-site, the fine-tuning of protein-substrate interactions and the flexibility of crucial active site residues are all important to achieve transglycosidase activity from the TrSA sialidase scaffold.

  12. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  13. Mutant prevention concentrations of daptomycin for Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinel, Clara; Jaussaud, Clara; Auzou, Michel; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Cattoir, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    Owing to the emergence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, treatment of enterococcal infections has become challenging. Although spontaneous in vitro resistance frequencies are low, the emergence of resistance is increasingly reported during daptomycin therapy. The mutant selection window (MSW), comprised between the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the mutant prevention concentration (MPC), corresponds to the concentration range within which resistant mutants may be selected. Since no data are available for enterococci, the aim of this study was to determine MPCs and MSWs for 12 representative E. faecium clinical isolates. MICs and MPCs were determined by broth microdilution and agar dilution methods, respectively. A basic MSW-derived pharmacodynamic analysis was also performed using mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) values obtained with dosages from 4 to 12 mg/kg. MICs and MPCs of daptomycin ranged from 0.5 to 4 mg/L and from 2 to 32 mg/L, respectively, with no correlation between them. The wideness of MSWs ranged from 2× to 32× MIC. Mean plasma Cmax values of daptomycin were calculated from 55 to 174.5 mg/L when using a dosage from 4 to 12 mg/kg. All Cmax values were above the MPCs whatever the dosage. Taking into account the protein binding of daptomycin (ca. 90%), the unbound fraction Cmax was just within the MSW in 67-92% of strains at recommended dosages (4-6 mg/kg) and was above the MPC for the majority of strains only with the highest dosage (12 mg/kg). This study shows that free daptomycin Cmax values usually fell into MSWs when using lower dosages (<10 mg/kg). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. clustering common bean mutants based on heterotic groupings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    diversité génétique entre les haricots mutants, ces groupes (A, B et C) peuvent être considérés comme des groupements hétérotiques. Selon le trait phénotypique considéré, le croisement de deux des génotypes appartenant à des groupes différents peut générer de la vigueur hybride. Par ailleurs, pour créer une variabilité ...

  15. Using PATIMDB to create bacterial transposon insertion mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Jonathan M; Wei, Tao; Liberati, Nicole; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Villanueva, Jacinto; Wu, Gang; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2009-04-01

    PATIMDB is a software package for facilitating the generation of transposon mutant insertion libraries. The software has two main functions: process tracking and automated sequence analysis. The process tracking function specifically includes recording the status and fates of multiwell plates and samples in various stages of library construction. Automated sequence analysis refers specifically to the pipeline of sequence analysis starting with ABI files from a sequencing facility and ending with insertion location identifications. The protocols in this unit describe installation and use of PATIMDB software.

  16. Environmental features determining successful rearing in the mutant mouse staggerer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastavino, J M

    1984-02-01

    The mutant mouse staggerer is unable to rear her pups to weaning unless special precautions are taken. The following environmental conditions were found to contribute to compensate for the maternal behavioral deficits of the staggerer: (1) the foster pups used in a constraining box to stimulate the lactating staggerer mother are 4 days old. (2) The mother is enforced to stay in close physical contact with these pups for at least 12 hours immediately after delivery. (3) The staggerer pups are transferred to a normal lactating mother to suckle her for the first 12 hours of life.

  17. p21-ras effector domain mutants constructed by "cassette" mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, J C; Vass, W C; Willumsen, B M

    1988-01-01

    A series of mutations encoding single-amino-acid substitutions within the v-rasH effector domain were constructed, and the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells was studied. The mutations, which spanned codons 32 to 40, were made by a "cassette" mutagenesis...... technique that involved replacing this portion of the v-rasH effector domain with a linker carrying two BspMI sites in opposite orientations. Since BspMI cleaves outside its recognition sequence, BspMI digestion of the plasmid completely removed the linker, creating a double-stranded gap whose missing ras...

  18. General regulatory patterns of plant mineral nutrient depletion as revealed by serat quadruple mutants disturbed in cysteine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mutsumi; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Saito, Kazuki; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2010-03-01

    Sulfate is an essential macronutrient for plants. Plants have developed strategies to cope with sulfate deficiency, and other nutrient ion limitations. However, the regulation of these adaptive responses and the coordinating signals that underlie them are still poorly characterized. O-acetylserine (OAS) is a marker metabolite of sulfate starvation and has been speculated to have a signaling function. OAS is synthesized by the enzyme serine acetyltransferase (SERAT), which is encoded by five distinct genes in Arabidopsis. We investigated quadruple knockout mutants of SERAT that retained only one functional isoform. These mutants displayed symptoms of sulfate starvation. Furthermore, some of them displayed phenotypes typical of prolonged sulfate starvation, in particular, developmental programs associated with senescence or stress responses. Thus, we compared metabolite and transcriptome data from these mutants with N-, P-, K-, and S-depleted plants. This revealed many similarities with general nutrient-depletion-induced senescence (NuDIS), indicating the recruitment of existing regulatory programs for nutrient-starvation responses. Several candidate genes that could be involved in these processes were identified, including transcription factors and other regulatory proteins, as well as the functional categories of their target genes. These results outline components of the regulatory network controlling plant development under sulfate stress, forming a basis for further investigations to elucidate the complete network. In turn, this will advance our broader understanding of plant responses to a range of other nutrient stresses.

  19. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Collagen Type IV Mutant Mouse Models of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Identify Mechanisms for Stroke Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanne, Marion; Jorgensen, Jeff; Gould, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Collagen type IV alpha 1 (COL4A1) and alpha 2 (COL4A2) form heterotrimers critical for vascular basement membrane stability and function. Patients with COL4A1 or COL4A2 mutations suffer from diverse cerebrovascular diseases including cerebral microbleeds, porencephaly and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown and there is a lack of effective treatment. Methods and Results Using Col4a1 and Col4a2 mutant mouse models, we investigated the genetic complexity and cellular mechanisms underlying the disease. We found that Col4a1 mutations cause abnormal vascular development, which triggers small vessel disease, recurrent hemorrhagic strokes and age-related macro-angiopathy. We showed that allelic heterogeneity, genetic context and environmental factors, such as acute exercise or anticoagulant medication, modulated disease severity and contributed to phenotypic heterogeneity. We found that intracellular accumulation of mutant collagen in vascular endothelial cells and pericytes was a key triggering factor of ICH. Finally, we showed that treatment of mutant mice with a FDA-approved chemical chaperone resulted in a decreased collagen intracellular accumulation and a significant reduction of ICH severity. Conclusions Our data are the first to show therapeutic prevention in vivo of ICH due to Col4a1 mutation, and imply that a mechanism-based therapy promoting protein folding might also prevent ICH in patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations. PMID:25753534

  20. Identification of a mutant locus that bypasses the BsgA protease requirement for social development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, John K; Hager, Elizabeth; Gill, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    The BsgA protease is required for the earliest morphological changes observed in Myxococcus xanthus development. We hypothesize that the BsgA protease is required to cleave an inhibitor of the developmental program, and isolation of genetic bypass suppressors of a bsgA mutant was used to identify signaling components controlling development downstream of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was created by transposon mutagenesis of a bsgA mutant followed by screening for strains that could develop despite the absence of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was able to aggregate, form fruiting bodies, and partially restored the production of viable spores in comparison to the parental bsgA mutant. The bsgA Tn5Ω955 strain partially restored developmental expression to a subset of genes normally induced during development, and expressed one developmentally induced fusion at higher amounts during vegetative growth in comparison to wild-type cells. The transposon in strain M955 was localized to a Ribonuclease D homolog that appears to exist in an operon with a downstream aminopeptidase-encoding gene. The identification of a third distinct bypass suppressor of the BsgA protease suggests that the BsgA protease may regulate a potentially complex pathway during the initiation of the M. xanthus developmental program. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.