WorldWideScience

Sample records for a3 facilitates lysosomal

  1. Lysosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Matte BSc, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Christian de Duve first described the lysosome in the 1950s, it has been generally presented as a membrane-bound compartment containing acid hydrolases that enables the cell to degrade molecules without being digested by autolysis. For those working on the field of lysosomal storage disorders, the lack of one such hydrolase would lead to undegraded or partially degraded substrate storage inside engorged organelles disturbing cellular function by yet poorly explored mechanisms. However, in recent years, a much more complex scenario of lysosomal function has emerged, beyond and above the cellular “digestive” system. Knowledge on how the impairment of this organelle affects cell functioning may shed light on signs and symptoms of lysosomal disorders and open new roads for therapy.

  2. Lysosome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ursula Matte BSc, PhD; Gabriela Pasqualim BSc, MSc

    2016-01-01

    Since Christian de Duve first described the lysosome in the 1950s, it has been generally presented as a membrane-bound compartment containing acid hydrolases that enables the cell to degrade molecules...

  3. The proteome of lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Bernd A; Wrocklage, Christian; Hasilik, Andrej; Saftig, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Lysosomes are organelles of eukaryotic cells that are critically involved in the degradation of macromolecules mainly delivered by endocytosis and autophagocytosis. Degradation is achieved by more than 60 hydrolases sequestered by a single phospholipid bilayer. The lysosomal membrane facilitates interaction and fusion with other compartments and harbours transport proteins catalysing the export of catabolites, thereby allowing their recycling. Lysosomal proteins have been addressed in various proteomic studies that are compared in this review regarding the source of material, the organelle/protein purification scheme, the proteomic methodology applied and the proteins identified. Distinguishing true constituents of an organelle from co-purifying contaminants is a central issue in subcellular proteomics, with additional implications for lysosomes as being the site of degradation of many cellular and extracellular proteins. Although many of the lysosomal hydrolases were identified by classical biochemical approaches, the knowledge about the protein composition of the lysosomal membrane has remained fragmentary for a long time. Using proteomics many novel lysosomal candidate proteins have been discovered and it can be expected that their functional characterisation will help to understand functions of lysosomes at a molecular level that have been characterised only phenomenologically so far and to generally deepen our understanding of this indispensable organelle.

  4. Deficiency of Neuronal p38α MAPK Attenuates Amyloid Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Mouse and Cell Models through Facilitating Lysosomal Degradation of BACE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnöder, Laura; Hao, Wenlin; Qin, Yiren; Liu, Shirong; Tomic, Inge; Liu, Xu; Fassbender, Klaus; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-29

    Amyloid β (Aβ) damages neurons and triggers microglial inflammatory activation in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. BACE1 is the primary enzyme in Aβ generation. Neuroinflammation potentially up-regulates BACE1 expression and increases Aβ production. In Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein-transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y cell models, we specifically knocked out or knocked down gene expression of mapk14, which encodes p38α MAPK, a kinase sensitive to inflammatory and oxidative stimuli. Using immunological and biochemical methods, we observed that reduction of p38α MAPK expression facilitated the lysosomal degradation of BACE1, decreased BACE1 protein and activity, and subsequently attenuated Aβ generation in the AD mouse brain. Inhibition of p38α MAPK also enhanced autophagy. Blocking autophagy by treating cells with 3-methyladenine or overexpressing dominant-negative ATG5 abolished the deficiency of the p38α MAPK-induced BACE1 protein reduction in cultured cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that p38α MAPK plays a critical role in the regulation of BACE1 degradation and Aβ generation in AD pathogenesis.

  5. GNeosomes: Highly Lysosomotropic Nanoassemblies for Lysosomal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexselblatt, Ezequiel; Esko, Jeffrey D; Tor, Yitzhak

    2015-01-01

    GNeosomes, lysosomotropic lipid vesicles decorated with guanidinoneomycin, can encapsulate and facilitate the cellular internalization and lysosomal delivery of cargo ranging from small molecules to high molecular weight proteins, in a process that is exclusively dependent on cell surface glycosaminoglycans. Their cellular uptake mechanism and co-localization with lysosomes, as well as the delivery, release, and activity of internalized cargo, are quantified. GNeosomes are proposed as a universal platform for lysosomal delivery with potential as a basic research tool and a therapeutic vehicle.

  6. Brief exposure to copper activates lysosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Karina; Coblenz, Jessica; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is essential mineral, but its toxicity necessitates existence of powerful machinery responsible for the extraction of excess Cu from the cell. Cu exposure was recently shown to induce the translocation of Cu pump ATP7B to the lysosomes followed by lysosomal exocytosis. Here we sought to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of Cu on lysosomal exocytosis. We found that brief exposure to Cu activates lysosomal exocytosis, which was measured as a release of the lysosomal digestive enzyme β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) into the extracellular medium and by the presence lysosomal protein LAMP1 at the plasma membrane. Such release depends on calcium (Ca) and on the lysosomal SNARE VAMP7. ATP7B knockdown using RNAi suppressed the basal lysosomal exocytosis, but did not affect the ability of Cu to activate it. ATP7B knockdown was associated with sustained oxidative stress. The removal of Ca from the extracellular medium suppressed the Cu-dependent component of the lysosomal exocytosis. We propose that Cu promotes lysosomal exocytosis by facilitating a Ca-dependent step of the lysosomal exocytosis.

  7. BK Channels Alleviate Lysosomal Storage Diseases by Providing Positive Feedback Regulation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhu; Toro, Ligia; Dong, Xian-Ping

    2015-05-26

    Promoting lysosomal trafficking represents a promising therapeutic approach for lysosome storage diseases. Efficient Ca(2+) mobilization from lysosomes is important for lysosomal trafficking. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes could generate a negative potential in the lumen to disturb subsequent Ca(2+) release in the absence of counter ion flux. Here we report that lysosomes express big-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels that form physical and functional coupling with the lysosomal Ca(2+) release channel, TRPML1. Ca(2+) release via TRPML1 causes BK activation, which in turn facilitates further lysosomal Ca(2+) release and membrane trafficking. Importantly, BK overexpression rescues the impaired TRPML1-mediated Ca(2+) release and abnormal lysosomal storage in cells from Niemann-Pick C1 patients. Therefore, we have identified a lysosomal K(+) channel that provides a positive feedback mechanism to facilitate TRPML1-mediated Ca(2+) release and membrane trafficking. Our findings suggest that upregulating BK may be a potential therapeutic strategy for certain lysosomal storage diseases and common neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Salinomycin co-treatment enhances tamoxifen cytotoxicity in luminal A breast tumor cells by facilitating lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ann-Katrin; Hermawan, Adam; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Ljepoja, Bojan; Knyazev, Pjotr; Bräuchle, Christoph; Ullrich, Axel; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2016-08-02

    Luminal A breast cancer is the most common breast cancer subtype which is usually treated with selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMS) like tamoxifen. Nevertheless, one third of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients initially do not respond to endocrine therapy and about 40% of luminal A breast tumors recur in five years. In this study, we investigated an alternative treatment approach by combining tamoxifen and salinomycin in luminal A breast cancer cell lines. We have found that salinomycin induces an additional cytotoxic effect by inhibiting the ligand independent activation of ERα. Thereby salinomycin increases the intracellular calcium level. This leads to a premature fusion of endosomes with lysosomes and thus to the degradation of Egfr family members. Since this process is essential for luminal A breast cancer cells to circumvent tamoxifen treatment, the combination of both drugs induces cytotoxicity in tamoxifen sensitive as well as resistant luminal A breast cancer cell lines.

  9. TRPML and lysosomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, David A; Frumkin, Ayala; Bach, Gideon

    2007-08-01

    Mucolipin 1 (MLN1), also known as TRPML1, is a member of the mucolipin family. The mucolipins are the only lysosomal proteins within the TRP superfamily. Mutations in the gene coding for TRPML1 result in a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD). This review summarizes the current knowledge related to this protein and the rest of the mucolipin family.

  10. Lysosome Biogenesis and Autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiori, Fulvio; Klumperman, Judith|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097273

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes degrade biological components acquired by endocytosis, the major cellular pathway for internalization of extracellular material, and macroautophagy. This chapter presents an overview of these two major degradative intracellular pathways, and highlights the emerging cross talks between

  11. The lysosome and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisha Zhang; Rui Sheng; Zhenghong Qin

    2009-01-01

    It has long been believed that the lysosome is an important digestive organelle. There is increasing evidence that the lysosome is also involved in pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Abnormal protein degradation and deposition induced by lysosoreal dysfunction may be the primary contributor to age-related neurodegeneration. In this review, the possible relationship between lysosome and various neurodegenerative diseases is described.

  12. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-asso......:10.1038/onc.2012.292....

  13. LYSOSOMAL DISRUPTION BY BACTERIAL TOXINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernheimer, Alan W.; Schwartz, Lois L.

    1964-01-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysosomal disruption by bacterial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:1100–1104. 1964.—Seventeen bacterial toxins were examined for capacity (i) to disrupt rabbit leukocyte lysosomes as indicated by decrease in turbidity of lysosomal suspensions, and (ii) to alter rabbit liver lysosomes as measured by release of β-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase. Staphylococcal α-toxin, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin, and streptolysins O and S affected lysosomes in both systems. Staphylococcal β-toxin, leucocidin and enterotoxin, Shiga neurotoxin, Serratia endotoxin, diphtheria toxin, tetanus neurotoxin, C. botulinum type A toxin, and C. perfringens ε-toxin were not active in either system. Staphylococcal δ-toxin, C. histolyticum collagenase, crude C. perfringens β-toxin, and crude anthrax toxin caused lysosomal damage in only one of the test systems. There is a substantial correlation between the hemolytic property of a toxin and its capacity to disrupt lysosomes, lending support to the concept that erythrocytes and lysosomes are bounded by similar membranes. PMID:5874534

  14. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-associated......-targeting anti-cancer drugs. In this review we compile our current knowledge on cancer-associated changes in lysosomal composition and discuss the consequences of these alterations to cancer progression and the possibilities they can bring to cancer therapy.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 July 2012; doi...

  15. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form...... of cell death is mainly carried out by the lysosomal cathepsin proteases and can have necrotic, apoptotic or apoptosis-like features depending on the extent of the leakage and the cellular context. This article summarizes our current knowledge on lysosomal cell death with an emphasis on the upstream...... mechanisms that lead to lysosomal membrane permeabilization....

  16. Reporter Assay for Endo/Lysosomal Escape of Toxin-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Gilabert-Oriol

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters—horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa and ricin A-chain (RTA—were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates—saporin-HRP, Alexasaporin and saporin-KQ-RTA—were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of Alexasaporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10–1000 nM.

  17. Reporter assay for endo/lysosomal escape of toxin-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Thakur, Mayank; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Bhargava, Cheenu; Wiesner, Burkhard; Eichhorst, Jenny; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander

    2014-05-22

    Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters-horseradish peroxidase (HRP), Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa) and ricin A-chain (RTA)-were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates-saporin-HRP, (Alexa)saporin and saporin-KQ-RTA-were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release) or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape) was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of (Alexa)saporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10-1000 nM.

  18. Lysosomal cell death mechanisms in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sintes, Raquel; Ledesma, María Dolores; Boya, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomes are degradative organelles essential for cell homeostasis that regulate a variety of processes, from calcium signaling and nutrient responses to autophagic degradation of intracellular components. Lysosomal cell death is mediated by the lethal effects of cathepsins, which are released into the cytoplasm following lysosomal damage. This process of lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin release is observed in several physiopathological conditions and plays a role in tissue remodeling, the immune response to intracellular pathogens and neurodegenerative diseases. Many evidences indicate that aging strongly influences lysosomal activity by altering the physical and chemical properties of these organelles, rendering them more sensitive to stress. In this review we focus on how aging alters lysosomal function and increases cell sensitivity to lysosomal membrane permeabilization and lysosomal cell death, both in physiological conditions and age-related pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomarkers in Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Bobillo Lobato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A biomarker is generally an analyte that indicates the presence and/or extent of a biological process, which is in itself usually directly linked to the clinical manifestations and outcome of a particular disease. The biomarkers in the field of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs have particular relevance where spectacular therapeutic initiatives have been achieved, most notably with the introduction of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT. There are two main types of biomarkers. The first group is comprised of those molecules whose accumulation is directly enhanced as a result of defective lysosomal function. These molecules represent the storage of the principal macro-molecular substrate(s of a specific enzyme or protein, whose function is deficient in the given disease. In the second group of biomarkers, the relationship between the lysosomal defect and the biomarker is indirect. In this group, the biomarker reflects the effects of the primary lysosomal defect on cell, tissue, or organ functions. There is no “gold standard” among biomarkers used to diagnosis and/or monitor LSDs, but there are a number that exist that can be used to reasonably assess and monitor the state of certain organs or functions. A number of biomarkers have been proposed for the analysis of the most important LSDs. In this review, we will summarize the most promising biomarkers in major LSDs and discuss why these are the most promising candidates for screening systems.

  20. A web-based collaborative framework for facilitating decision making on a 3D design developing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purevdorj Nyamsuren

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased competitive challenges are forcing companies to find better ways to bring their applications to market faster. Distributed development environments can help companies improve their time-to-market by enabling parallel activities. Although, such environments still have their limitations in real-time communication and real-time collaboration during the product development process. This paper describes a web-based collaborative framework which has been developed to support the decision making on a 3D design developing process. The paper describes 3D design file for the discussion that contains all relevant annotations on its surface and their visualization on the user interface for design changing. The framework includes a native CAD data converting module, 3D data based real-time communication module, revision control module for 3D data and some sub-modules such as data storage and data management. We also discuss some raised issues in the project and the steps underway to address them.

  1. A TRP channel in the lysosome regulates large particle phagocytosis via focal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Mohammad; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Goschka, Andrew; Li, Xinran; Cheng, Xiping; Gregg, Evan; Azar, Marlene; Zhuo, Yue; Garrity, Abigail G; Gao, Qiong; Slaugenhaupt, Susan; Pickel, Jim; Zolov, Sergey N; Weisman, Lois S; Lenk, Guy M; Titus, Steve; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel; Juan, Marugan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2013-09-16

    Phagocytosis of large extracellular particles such as apoptotic bodies requires delivery of the intracellular endosomal and lysosomal membranes to form plasmalemmal pseudopods. Here, we identified mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) as the key lysosomal Ca2+ channel regulating focal exocytosis and phagosome biogenesis. Both particle ingestion and lysosomal exocytosis are inhibited by synthetic TRPML1 blockers and are defective in macrophages isolated from TRPML1 knockout mice. Furthermore, TRPML1 overexpression and TRPML1 agonists facilitate both lysosomal exocytosis and particle uptake. Using time-lapse confocal imaging and direct patch clamping of phagosomal membranes, we found that particle binding induces lysosomal PI(3,5)P2 elevation to trigger TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca2+ release specifically at the site of uptake, rapidly delivering TRPML1-resident lysosomal membranes to nascent phagosomes via lysosomal exocytosis. Thus phagocytic ingestion of large particles activates a phosphoinositide- and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis pathway to provide membranes necessary for pseudopod extension, leading to clearance of senescent and apoptotic cells in vivo.

  2. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastall DP

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available David PW Rastall,1 Andrea Amalfitano1,2 1Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2Department of Pediatrics, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA Abstract: Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme's substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood–brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field. Keywords: human trials, clinical trials, gene therapy, lysosomal storage disease, blood-brain barrier, adeno-associated virus, lentivirus, adenovirus 

  3. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  4. Structure Dependence of Lysosomal Transit of Chitosan-Based Polyplexes for Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Marc; Lavertu, Marc; Astolfi, Mélina; Buschmann, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Chitosan-based polyplexes are known to traffic through lysosomes for a relatively long time, independent of the degree of deacetylation (DDA) and the number average molecular weight (Mn) of the polymer, even though both of these parameters have profound effects on polyplex stability and transfection efficiency. A better understanding of the lysosomal barrier is paramount to the rational design of vectors capable of overcoming obstacles to transgene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate if lysosomal transit affects chitosan-based polyplex transfection efficiency in a structure-dependent (DDA, Mn) manner. Toward this end, we analyzed the effects of intracellular trafficking modifying agents on transfection efficiency and intracellular vesicular trafficking of polyplexes with different structural properties and stabilities or nucleic acid binding affinity. The use of agents that modify endosome/lysosome acidification and transit processes by distinct mechanisms and their effect on cell viability, polyplex uptake, vesicular trafficking, and transfection efficiency revealed novel and strong chitosan structure-dependent consequences of lysosomal transit. Inhibiting lysosomal transit using chloroquine significantly increased the efficiency of unstable polyplexes, while having minimal effects for polyplexes with intermediate or high stability. In parallel, specifically inhibiting the acidification of vesicles abrogated transfection for all formulations, suggesting that vesicular acidification is essential to promote transfection, most probably by facilitating lysosomal escape. These results provide novel insights into the structure-performance relationship of chitosan-based gene delivery systems.

  5. A molecular mechanism to regulate lysosome motility for lysosome positioning and tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-04-01

    To mediate the degradation of biomacromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 cause lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca(2+)-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region (where autophagosomes accumulate) following autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca(2+) sensor that associates physically with the minus-end-directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PtdIns(3,5)P(2), a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PtdIns(3,5)P(2)-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signalling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely to be caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes thus provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning and tubulation.

  6. Up-regulation of lysosomal TRPML1 channels is essential for lysosomal adaptation to nutrient starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Lu; Lawas, Maria; Li, Xinran; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel T; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2015-03-17

    Upon nutrient starvation, autophagy digests unwanted cellular components to generate catabolites that are required for housekeeping biosynthesis processes. A complete execution of autophagy demands an enhancement in lysosome function and biogenesis to match the increase in autophagosome formation. Here, we report that mucolipin-1 (also known as TRPML1 or ML1), a Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome that regulates many aspects of lysosomal trafficking, plays a central role in this quality-control process. By using Ca(2+) imaging and whole-lysosome patch clamping, lysosomal Ca(2+) release and ML1 currents were detected within hours of nutrient starvation and were potently up-regulated. In contrast, lysosomal Na(+)-selective currents were not up-regulated. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) mimicked a starvation effect in fed cells. The starvation effect also included an increase in lysosomal proteostasis and enhanced clearance of lysosomal storage, including cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) cells. However, this effect was not observed when ML1 was pharmacologically inhibited or genetically deleted. Furthermore, overexpression of ML1 mimicked the starvation effect. Hence, lysosomal adaptation to environmental cues such as nutrient levels requires mTOR/TFEB-dependent, lysosome-to-nucleus regulation of lysosomal ML1 channels and Ca(2+) signaling.

  7. Sensitivity to lysosome-dependent cell death is directly regulated by lysosomal cholesterol content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Appelqvist

    Full Text Available Alterations in lipid homeostasis are implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. We evaluated the impact of cholesterol accumulation, induced by U18666A, quinacrine or mutations in the cholesterol transporting Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1 protein, on lysosomal stability and sensitivity to lysosome-mediated cell death. We found that neurons with lysosomal cholesterol accumulation were protected from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In addition, human fibroblasts with cholesterol-loaded lysosomes showed higher lysosomal membrane stability than controls. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol accumulation is accompanied by the storage of lipids such as sphingomyelin, glycosphingolipids and sphingosine and an up regulation of lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2, which may also influence lysosomal stability. However, in this study the use of myriocin and LAMP deficient fibroblasts excluded these factors as responsible for the rescuing effect and instead suggested that primarily lysosomal cholesterol content determineD the cellular sensitivity to toxic insults. Further strengthening this concept, depletion of cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the stability of lysosomes and cells became more prone to undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, cholesterol content regulated lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby influenced cell death sensitivity. Our data suggests that lysosomal cholesterol modulation might be used as a therapeutic strategy for conditions associated with accelerated or repressed apoptosis.

  8. Endosome-lysosomes and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, R J; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Arnold, J; Lowe, J; Landon, M

    1994-01-01

    A number of the major human and animal neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and sheep scrapie, are characterised by deposits of amyloid, arising through incomplete breakdown of membrane proteins. Although our knowledge concerning these diseases is increasing, they remain largely untreatable. Recently, attention has focussed on the mechanisms of production of different types of amyloid and the likely involvement within cells of acid compartments called endosome-lysosomes. These organelles may be 'bioreactor' sites for the unfolding and partial degradation of membrane proteins to generate the amyloid materials. These subsequently become expelled from the cell, or are released from dead cells, and accumulate as pathological entities. Common features of the disease processes give new direction to therapeutic intervention.

  9. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastall, David Pw; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme's substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood-brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field.

  10. Lysosomal enlargement and lysosomal membrane destabilisation in mussel digestive cells measured by an integrative index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izagirre, Urtzi [Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology Research Group, Department of Zoology and Cell Biology, School of Sciences and Technology, University of the Basque Country, P.O. box 644, E-48080 Bilbo (Spain); Marigomez, Ionan, E-mail: ionan.marigomez@ehu.e [Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology Research Group, Department of Zoology and Cell Biology, School of Sciences and Technology, University of the Basque Country, P.O. box 644, E-48080 Bilbo (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Lysosomal responses (enlargement and membrane destabilisation) in mussel digestive cells are well-known environmental stress biomarkers in pollution effects monitoring in marine ecosystems. Presently, in laboratory and field studies, both responses were measured separately (in terms of lysosomal volume density - Vv - and labilisation period -LP) and combined (lysosomal response index - LRI) in order to contribute to their understanding and to develop an index useful for decisions makers. LRI integrates Vv and LP, which are not necessarily dependent lysosomal responses. It is unbiased and more sensitive than Vv and LP alone and diminishes background due to confounding factors. LRI provides a simple numerical index (consensus reference = 0; critical threshold = 1) directly related to the pollution impact degree. Moreover, LRI can be represented in a way that allows the interpretation of lysosomal responses, which is useful for environmental scientists. - Lysosomal responses to pollutants measured by an integrative index.

  11. Lysosomal exoglycosidases in nasal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowska, Sylwia; Minarowska, Alina; Knaś, Małgorzata; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Kępka, Alina; Minarowski, Łukasz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Nasal polyps are smooth outgrowths assuming a shape of grapes, formed from the nasal mucosa, limiting air flow by projecting into a lumen of a nasal cavity. Up to now the surgical resection is the best method of their treatment, but etiology and pathogenesis of the nasal polyps is not yet fully established. The aim of the study was the assessment of the selected lysosomal exoglycosidases activity in the nasal polyps. In this study the activity of β-galactosidase, α-mannosidase and α-fucosidase was determined in the tissue of the nasal polyps obtained from 40 patients (10F, 30M) and control tissues derived from mucosa of lower nasal conchas obtained during mucotomy from 20 patients (10F, 10M). We observed significant lower values of GAL, FUC and tendency to decrease of MAN and GLU concentration in nasal polyps (P) in comparison to control healthy nasal mucosa (C). In nasal polyp tissue (P) no differences of GAL, MAN and FUC specific activity in comparison to control mucosa (C) were found. Our research supports bioelectrical theory of the nasal polyps pathogenesis and directs attention at research on glycoconjugates and glycosidases of the nasal mucosa extracellular matrix. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Presenilin 1 maintains lysosomal Ca2+ homeostasis by regulating vATPase-mediated lysosome acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hyun; McBrayer, Mary Kate; Wolfe, Devin M.; Haslett, Luke J.; Kumar, Asok; Sato, Yutaka; Lie, Pearl P. Y.; Mohan, Panaiyur; Coffey, Erin E.; Kompella, Uday; Mitchell, Claire H.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Presenilin-1 (PS1) deletion or Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)-linked mutations disrupt lysosomal acidification and proteolysis, which inhibits autophagy. Here, we establish that this phenotype stems from impaired glycosylation and instability of vATPase V0a1 subunit causing deficient lysosomal vATPase assembly and function. We further demonstrate that elevated lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells induces abnormal Ca2+ efflux from lysosomes mediated by TRPML1 and elevates cytosolic Ca2+. In WT cells, blocking vATPase activity or knockdown of either PS1 or the V0a1 subunit of vATPase reproduces all of these abnormalities. Normalizing lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells using acidic nanoparticles restores normal lysosomal proteolysis, autophagy, and Ca2+ homeostasis, but correcting lysosomal Ca2+ deficits alone neither re-acidifies lysosomes nor reverses proteolytic and autophagic deficits. Our results indicate that vATPase deficiency in PS1 loss of function states causes lysosomal/autophagy deficits and contributes to abnormal cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, thus linking two AD-related pathogenic processes through a common molecular mechanism. PMID:26299959

  13. Lipid storage disorders block lysosomal trafficking by inhibiting a TRP channel and lysosomal calcium release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dongbiao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Xinran; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yao, Zepeng; Dibble, Shannon; Dong, Xian-ping; Yu, Ting; Lieberman, Andrew P; Showalter, Hollis D; Xu, Haoxing

    2012-03-13

    Lysosomal lipid accumulation, defects in membrane trafficking and altered Ca(2+) homoeostasis are common features in many lysosomal storage diseases. Mucolipin transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPML1) is the principle Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome. Here we show that TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca(2+) release, measured using a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator (GCaMP3) attached directly to TRPML1 and elicited by a potent membrane-permeable synthetic agonist, is dramatically reduced in Niemann-Pick (NP) disease cells. Sphingomyelins (SMs) are plasma membrane lipids that undergo sphingomyelinase (SMase)-mediated hydrolysis in the lysosomes of normal cells, but accumulate distinctively in lysosomes of NP cells. Patch-clamp analyses revealed that TRPML1 channel activity is inhibited by SMs, but potentiated by SMases. In NP-type C cells, increasing TRPML1's expression or activity was sufficient to correct the trafficking defects and reduce lysosome storage and cholesterol accumulation. We propose that abnormal accumulation of luminal lipids causes secondary lysosome storage by blocking TRPML1- and Ca(2+)-dependent lysosomal trafficking.

  14. Amyloid-β secretion, generation, and lysosomal sequestration in response to proteasome inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agholme, Lotta; Hallbeck, Martin; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2012-01-01

    that proteasome inhibition resulted in autophagy-dependent accumulation of Aβ in lysosomes, and increased levels of intracellular and secreted Aβ. The enhanced levels of Aβ could not be explained by increased amounts of AβPP. Instead, reduced degradation of the C-terminal fragment of AβPP (C99) by the proteasome....... Furthermore, proteasome inhibition caused a reduction in cellular viability, which was reverted by inhibition of autophagy. Dysfunction of the proteasome could cause lysosomal accumulation of Aβ, as well as increased generation and secretion of Aβ, which is partly facilitated by autophagy. As a decrease...

  15. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed.

  16. Lysosomal Storage Disorders and Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Pastores

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are infrequent to rare conditions caused by mutations that lead to a disruption in the usual sequential degradation of macromolecules or their transit within the cell. Gaucher disease (GD, a lipidosis, is among the most common LSD, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 40,000 among the Caucasian, non-Jewish population. Studies have indicated an increased frequency of polyclonal and monoclonal gammopathy among patients with GD. It has been shown that two major sphingolipids that accumulate in GD, namely, β-glucosylceramide 22:0 (βGL1-22 and glucosylsphingosine (LGL1, can be recognized by a distinct subset of CD1d-restricted human and murine type II natural killer T (NKT cells. Investigations undertaken in an affected mouse model revealed βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells were present and constitutively promoted the expression of a T-follicular helper (TFH phenotype; injection of these lipids led to downstream induction of germinal center B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and the production of antilipid antibodies. Subsequent studies have found clonal immunoglobulin in 33% of sporadic human monoclonal gammopathies is also specific for the lysolipids LGL1 and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Furthermore, substrate reduction ameliorated GD-associated gammopathy in mice. It had been hypothesized that chronic antigenic stimulation by the abnormal lipid storage and associated immune dysregulation may be the underlying mechanism for the increased incidence of monoclonal and polyclonal gammopathies, as well as an increased incidence of multiple myeloma in patients with GD. Current observations support this proposition and illustrate the value of investigations into rare diseases, which as ‘experiments of nature’ may provide insights into conditions found in the general population that continue to remain incompletely understood.

  17. Hsp70 stabilizes lysosomes and reverts Niemann-Pick disease-associated lysosomal pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Thomas; Roth, Anke G; Petersen, Nikolaj H T

    2010-01-01

    inhibition of ASM, effectively revert the Hsp70-mediated stabilization of lysosomes. Notably, the reduced ASM activity in cells from patients with Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) A and B-severe lysosomal storage disorders caused by mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 gene (SMPD1) encoding for ASM...

  18. ErbB2-associated changes in the lysosomal proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylandsted, Jesper; Becker, Andrea C; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Late endosomes and lysosomes (hereafter referred to as lysosomes) play an essential role in the turnover of cellular macromolecules and organelles. Their biochemical characterization has so far depended on purification methods based on either density gradient centrifugations or magnetic...... purification of iron-loaded organelles. Owing to dramatic changes in lysosomal density and stability associated with lysosomal diseases and cancer, these methods are not optimal for the comparison of normal and pathological lysosomes. Here, we introduce an efficient method for the purification of intact...... lysosomes by magnetic immunoprecipitation with antibodies against the vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPase. Quantitative MS-based proteomics analysis of the obtained lysosomal membranes identified 60 proteins, most of which have previously been associated with the lysosomal compartment. Interestingly, the lysosomal...

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario de la Mata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs describe a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic disorders that result from the absence or loss of function of lysosomal hydrolases or transporters, resulting in the progressive accumulation of undigested material in lysosomes. The accumulation of substances affects the function of lysosomes and other organelles, resulting in secondary alterations such as impairment of autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis. LSDs frequently involve the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal dysfunction or loss results in progressive neurodegeneration and premature death. Many LSDs exhibit signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, which include mitochondrial morphological changes, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, diminished ATP production and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, reduced autophagic flux may lead to the persistence of dysfunctional mitochondria. Gaucher disease (GD, the LSD with the highest prevalence, is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene that results in defective and insufficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Decreased catalytic activity and/or instability of GCase leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph in the lysosomes of macrophage cells and visceral organs. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported to occur in numerous cellular and mouse models of GD. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge and implications of mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs.

  20. Lysosomal Ca(2+) homeostasis: role in pathogenesis of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Platt, Frances M

    2011-08-01

    Disrupted cellular Ca(2+) signaling is believed to play a role in a number of human diseases including lysosomal storage diseases (LSD). LSDs are a group of ∼50 diseases caused predominantly by mutations in lysosomal proteins that result in accumulation of macromolecules within the lysosome. We recently reported that Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is the first human disease to be associated with defective lysosomal Ca(2+) uptake and defective NAADP-mediated lysosomal Ca(2+) release. These defects in NPC cells leads to the disruption in endocytosis and subsequent lipid storage that is a feature of this disease. In contrast, Chediak-Higashi Syndrome cells have been reported to have enhanced lysosomal Ca(2+) uptake whilst the TRPML1 protein defective in mucolipidosis type IV is believed to function as a Ca(2+) channel. In this review we provide a summary of the current knowledge on the role of lysosomal Ca(2+) signaling in the pathogenesis of this group of diseases.

  1. Endo-lysosomal dysfunction in human proximal tubular epithelial cells deficient for lysosomal cystine transporter cystinosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Ivanova

    Full Text Available Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles.

  2. Lysosomal stress: a new player in perturbed lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriel, T.L.

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are involved in many different essential cellular processes, among others organelle and molecule degradation, exocytosis, cell energy metabolism, cholesterol and sphingolipid level regulation. Lysosomal stress has a strong impact on the immune system, affecting specially macrophages as the

  3. Lysosomal stress: a new player in perturbed lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriel, T.L.

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are involved in many different essential cellular processes, among others organelle and molecule degradation, exocytosis, cell energy metabolism, cholesterol and sphingolipid level regulation. Lysosomal stress has a strong impact on the immune system, affecting specially macrophages as the

  4. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Zhou; Shi-Hao Tan; Valérie Nicolas; Chantal Bauvy; Nai-Di Yang; Jianbin Zhang; Yuan Xue

    2013-01-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy.In this study,we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torinl),but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin),leads to activation of lysosomal function.Second,we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal function is associated with the suppression of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1),but not mTORC2,and the mTORC1 localization to lysosomes is not directly correlated to its regulatory role in lysosomal function.Third,we examined the involvement of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and demonstrated that TFEB activation following mTORC1 suppression is necessary but not sufficient for lysosomal activation.Finally,Atg5 or Atg7deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation,suggesting that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on antophagosome-lysosome fusion.Taken together,this study demonstrates that in the course of autophagy,lysosomal function is upregulated via a dual mechanism involving mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

  5. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Tan, Shi-Hao; Nicolas, Valérie; Bauvy, Chantal; Yang, Nai-Di; Zhang, Jianbin; Xue, Yuan; Codogno, Patrice; Shen, Han-Ming

    2013-04-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy. In this study, we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torin1), but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin), leads to activation of lysosomal function. Second, we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal function is associated with the suppression of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), but not mTORC2, and the mTORC1 localization to lysosomes is not directly correlated to its regulatory role in lysosomal function. Third, we examined the involvement of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and demonstrated that TFEB activation following mTORC1 suppression is necessary but not sufficient for lysosomal activation. Finally, Atg5 or Atg7 deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation, suggesting that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Taken together, this study demonstrates that in the course of autophagy, lysosomal function is upregulated via a dual mechanism involving mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

  6. Mucolipidosis type IV protein TRPML1-dependent lysosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Austin; Schafer, Jessica; Upchurch, Cameron; Spooner, Ellen; Huynh, Julie; Hernandez, Sebastian; McLaughlin, Brooke; Oden, Liam; Fares, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes are dynamic organelles that undergo cycles of fusion and fission with themselves and with other organelles. Following fusion with late endosomes to form hybrid organelles, lysosomes are reformed as discrete organelles. This lysosome reformation or formation is a poorly understood process that has not been systematically analyzed and that lacks known regulators. In this study, we quantitatively define the multiple steps of lysosome formation and identify the first regulator of this process.

  7. Effects of ethanol, acetaldehyde and cholesteryl esters on pancreatic lysosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J S; Apte, M V; Thomas, M. C.; Haber, P S; Pirola, R C

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that altered lysosomal function may be involved in the early stages of pancreatic injury. Chronic consumption of ethanol increases rat pancreatic lysosomal fragility. The aim of this study is to determine whether the lysosomal fragility observed after chronic ethanol consumption is mediated by ethanol per se, its oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde or cholesteryl esters (substances which accumulate in the pancreas after ethanol consumption). Pancreatic lysosomes from cho...

  8. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  9. Transport of Lysosome-Related Organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordens, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Many intracellular compartments, including (MHC class II-containing) lysosomes, melanosomes and phagosomes, move along microtubules in a bi-directional manner due to the alternating activities of the plus-end directed kinesin motor and the minus-end directed dynein-dynactin motor. However, it is lar

  10. Transport of Lysosome-Related Organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordens, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Many intracellular compartments, including (MHC class II-containing) lysosomes, melanosomes and phagosomes, move along microtubules in a bi-directional manner due to the alternating activities of the plus-end directed kinesin motor and the minus-end directed dynein-dynactin motor. However, it is

  11. Lysosomal proteolysis: effects of aging and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2003-07-01

    Age-related characteristics of the effect of insulin on the activity of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes were studied. The relationship between the insulin effect on protein degradation and insulin degradation was analyzed. The effect of insulin on the activities of lysosomal enzymes was opposite in young and old rats (inhibitory in 3-month-old and stimulatory in 24-month-old animals). The activities of proteolytic enzymes were regulated by insulin in a glucose-independent manner: similar hypoglycemic effects of insulin in animals of different ages were accompanied by opposite changes in the activities of lysosomal enzymes. The inhibition of lysosomal enzymes by insulin in 3-month-old rats is consistent with a notion on the inhibitory effect of insulin on protein degradation. An opposite insulin effect in 24-month-old rats (i.e., stimulation of proteolytic activity by insulin) may be partly associated with attenuation of the degradation of insulin, resulting in disturbances in signaling that mediates the regulatory effects of insulin on protein degradation.

  12. Using the Technology Acceptance Model to explore community dwelling older adults' perceptions of a 3D interior design application to facilitate pre-discharge home adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Arthur G; Atwal, Anita; Young, Katherine L; Day, Yasmin; Wilson, Lesley; Money, Kevin G

    2015-08-26

    In the UK occupational therapy pre-discharge home visits are routinely carried out as a means of facilitating safe transfer from the hospital to home. Whilst they are an integral part of practice, there is little evidence to demonstrate they have a positive outcome on the discharge process. Current issues for patients are around the speed of home visits and the lack of shared decision making in the process, resulting in less than 50 % of the specialist equipment installed actually being used by patients on follow-up. To improve practice there is an urgent need to examine other ways of conducting home visits to facilitate safe discharge. We believe that Computerised 3D Interior Design Applications (CIDAs) could be a means to support more efficient, effective and collaborative practice. A previous study explored practitioners perceptions of using CIDAs; however it is important to ascertain older adult's views about the usability of technology and to compare findings. This study explores the perceptions of community dwelling older adults with regards to adopting and using CIDAs as an assistive tool for the home adaptations process. Ten community dwelling older adults participated in individual interactive task-focused usability sessions with a customised CIDA, utilising the think-aloud protocol and individual semi-structured interviews. Template analysis was used to carry out both deductive and inductive analysis of the think-aloud and interview data. Initially, a deductive stance was adopted, using the three pre-determined high-level themes of the technology acceptance model (TAM): Perceived Usefulness (PU), Perceived Ease of Use (PEOU), Actual Use (AU). Inductive template analysis was then carried out on the data within these themes, from which a number of sub-thmes emerged. Regarding PU, participants believed CIDAs served as a useful visual tool and saw clear potential to facilitate shared understanding and partnership in care delivery. For PEOU, participants were

  13. TRPML: transporters of metals in lysosomes essential for cell survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyov, Kirill; Colletti, Grace A; Terwilliger, Austen; Ketchum, Kathleen; Lyons, Christopher W P; Quinn, James; Muallem, Shmuel

    2011-09-01

    Key aspects of lysosomal function are affected by the ionic content of the lysosomal lumen and, therefore, by the ion permeability in the lysosomal membrane. Such functions include regulation of lysosomal acidification, a critical process in delivery and activation of the lysosomal enzymes, release of metals from lysosomes into the cytoplasm and the Ca(2+)-dependent component of membrane fusion events in the endocytic pathway. While the basic mechanisms of lysosomal acidification have been largely defined, the lysosomal metal transport system is not well understood. TRPML1 is a lysosomal ion channel whose malfunction is implicated in the lysosomal storage disease Mucolipidosis Type IV. Recent evidence suggests that TRPML1 is involved in Fe(2+), Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) transport across the lysosomal membrane, ascribing novel physiological roles to this ion channel, and perhaps to its relatives TRPML2 and TRPML3 and illuminating poorly understood aspects of lysosomal function. Further, alterations in metal transport by the TRPMLs due to mutations or environmental factors may contribute to their role in the disease phenotype and cell death.

  14. A non-conserved miRNA regulates lysosomal function and impacts on a human lysosomal storage disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Di Malta, Chiara; Wen, Jiayu

    2014-01-01

    Sulfatases are key enzymatic regulators of sulfate homeostasis with several biological functions including degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and other macromolecules in lysosomes. In a severe lysosomal storage disorder, multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), global sulfatase activity...

  15. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency.

  16. Neuroinflammatory paradigms in lysosomal storage diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Elizabeth Bosch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs include approximately 70 distinct disorders that collectively account for 14% of all inherited metabolic diseases. LSDs are caused by mutations in various enzymes/proteins that disrupt lysosomal function, which impairs macromolecule degradation following endosome-lysosome and phagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagy, ultimately disrupting cellular homeostasis. LSDs are pathologically typified by lysosomal inclusions composed of a heterogeneous mixture of various proteins and lipids that can be found throughout the body. However, in many cases the CNS is dramatically affected, which may result from heightened neuronal vulnerability based on their post-mitotic state. Besides intrinsic neuronal defects, another emerging factor common to many LSDs is neuroinflammation, which may negatively impact neuronal survival and contribute to neurodegeneration. Microglial and astrocyte activation is a hallmark of many LSDs that affect the CNS, which often precedes and predicts regions where eventual neuron loss will occur. However, the timing, intensity, and duration of neuroinflammation may ultimately dictate the impact on CNS homeostasis. For example, a transient inflammatory response following CNS insult/injury can be neuroprotective, as glial cells attempt to remove the insult and provide trophic support to neurons. However, chronic inflammation, as seen in several LSDs, can promote neurodegeneration by creating a neurotoxic environment due to elevated levels of cytokines, chemokines, and pro-apoptotic molecules. Although neuroinflammation has been reported in several LSDs, the cellular basis and mechanisms responsible for eliciting neuroinflammatory pathways are just beginning to be defined. This review highlights the role of neuroinflammation in select LSDs and its potential contribution to neuron loss.

  17. Lysosomal-associated transmembrane protein 5 (LAPTM5 is a molecular partner of CD1e.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Angénieux

    Full Text Available The CD1e protein participates in the presentation of lipid antigens in dendritic cells. Its transmembrane precursor is transported to lysosomes where it is cleaved into an active soluble form. In the presence of bafilomycin, which inhibits vacuolar ATPase and consequently the acidification of endosomal compartments, CD1e associates with a 27 kD protein. In this work, we identified this molecular partner as LAPTM5. The latter protein and CD1e colocalize in trans-Golgi and late endosomal compartments. The quantity of LAPTM5/CD1e complexes increases when the cells are treated with bafilomycin, probably due to the protection of LAPTM5 from lysosomal proteases. Moreover, we could demonstrate that LAPTM5/CD1e association occurs under physiological conditions. Although LAPTM5 was previously shown to act as a platform recruiting ubiquitin ligases and facilitating the transport of receptors to lysosomes, we found no evidence that LATPM5 controls either CD1e ubiquitination or the generation of soluble lysosomal CD1e proteins. Notwithstanding these last observations, the interaction of LAPTM5 with CD1e and their colocalization in antigen processing compartments both suggest that LAPTM5 might influence the role of CD1e in the presentation of lipid antigens.

  18. Activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgat, P; Walczuk, U; Szajda, S; Bień, M; Zimnoch, L; Mariak, Z; Zwierz, K

    2006-12-01

    There is a lot of data suggesting that modifications of cell glycoconjugates may be important in progression of cancer. In the present work we studied activities of lysosomal exoglycosidases: beta-hexosaminidase and its isoenzymes A and B, beta-galactosidase and alpha-mannosidase, in human gliomas. Enzyme activity was determined spectrophotometrically based on the release of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenyl-derivative of appropriate sugars. The activities of the exoglycosidases tested were significantly higher in malignant glial tumors than in control tissue (normal brain tissue) and non-glial tumors. The highest activities of exoglycosidases were observed in high-grade gliomas, and a positive correlation of enzyme activities and degree of malignancy was noted. Our results suggest that lysosomal exoglycosidases may participate in the progression and dynamical development of glial tumors.

  19. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease.

  20. Biphasic regulation of lysosomal exocytosis by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sreeram; Peña, Karina A; Chu, Charleen T; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress drives cell death in a number of diseases including ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of how cells recover from oxidative stress is likely to lead to better treatments for stroke and other diseases. The recent evidence obtained in several models ties the process of lysosomal exocytosis to the clearance of protein aggregates and toxic metals. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis, under normal or pathological conditions, are only beginning to emerge. Here we provide evidence for the biphasic effect of oxidative stress on lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal exocytosis was measured using the extracellular levels of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase (ß-hex). Low levels or oxidative stress stimulated lysosomal exocytosis, but inhibited it at high levels. Deletion of the lysosomal ion channel TRPML1 eliminated the stimulatory effect of low levels of oxidative stress. The inhibitory effects of oxidative stress appear to target the component of lysosomal exocytosis that is driven by extracellular Ca(2+). We propose that while moderate oxidative stress promotes cellular repair by stimulating lysosomal exocytosis, at high levels oxidative stress has a dual pathological effect: it directly causes cell damage and impairs damage repair by inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis. Harnessing these adaptive mechanisms may point to pharmacological interventions for diseases involving oxidative proteotoxicity or metal toxicity.

  1. A potentially dynamic lysosomal role for the endogenous TRPML proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, David A; Frumkin, Ayala; Offen-Glasner, Vered; Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Bach, Gideon

    2009-10-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) constitute a diverse group of inherited diseases that result from lysosomal storage of compounds occurring in direct consequence to deficiencies of proteins implicated in proper lysosomal function. Pathology in the LSD mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), is characterized by lysosomal storage of lipids together with water-soluble materials in cells from every tissue and organ of affected patients. Mutations in the mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) protein cause MLIV and TRPML1 has also been shown to interact with two of its paralogous proteins, mucolipin 2 (TRPML2) and mucolipin 3 (TRPML3), in heterologous expression systems. Heterogeneous lysosomal storage is readily identified in electron micrographs of MLIV patient cells, suggesting that proper TRPML1 function is essential for the maintenance of lysosomal integrity. In order to investigate whether TRPML2 and TRPML3 also play a role in the maintenance of lysosomal integrity, we conducted gene-specific knockdown assays against these protein targets. Ultrastructural analysis revealed lysosomal inclusions in both TRPML2 and TRPML3 knockdown cells, suggestive of a common mechanism for these proteins, in parallel with TRPML1, in the regulation of lysosomal integrity. However, co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that physical interactions between each of the endogenous TRPML proteins are quite limited. In addition, we found that all three endogenous proteins only partially co-localize with each other in lysosomal as well as extra-lysosomal compartments. This suggests that native TRPML2 and TRPML3 might participate with native TRPML1 in a dynamic form of lysosomal regulation. Given that depletion of TRPML2/3 led to lysosomal storage typical to an LSD, we propose that depletion of these proteins might also underlie novel LSD pathologies not described hitherto.

  2. BAX channel activity mediates lysosomal disruption linked to Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bové, Jordi; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Dehay, Benjamin; Perier, Celine; Recasens, Ariadna; Bombrun, Agnes; Antonsson, Bruno; Vila, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Lysosomal disruption is increasingly regarded as a major pathogenic event in Parkinson disease (PD). A reduced number of intraneuronal lysosomes, decreased levels of lysosomal-associated proteins and accumulation of undegraded autophagosomes (AP) are observed in PD-derived samples, including fibroblasts, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and post-mortem brain tissue. Mechanistic studies in toxic and genetic rodent PD models attribute PD-related lysosomal breakdown to abnormal lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PD-linked LMP and subsequent lysosomal defects remain virtually unknown, thereby precluding their potential therapeutic targeting. Here we show that the pro-apoptotic protein BAX (BCL2-associated X protein), which permeabilizes mitochondrial membranes in PD models and is activated in PD patients, translocates and internalizes into lysosomal membranes early following treatment with the parkinsonian neurotoxin MPTP, both in vitro and in vivo, within a time-frame correlating with LMP, lysosomal disruption, and autophagosome accumulation and preceding mitochondrial permeabilization and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Supporting a direct permeabilizing effect of BAX on lysosomal membranes, recombinant BAX is able to induce LMP in purified mouse brain lysosomes and the latter can be prevented by pharmacological blockade of BAX channel activity. Furthermore, pharmacological BAX channel inhibition is able to prevent LMP, restore lysosomal levels, reverse AP accumulation, and attenuate mitochondrial permeabilization and overall nigrostriatal degeneration caused by MPTP, both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, our results reveal that PD-linked lysosomal impairment relies on BAX-induced LMP, and point to small molecules able to block BAX channel activity as potentially beneficial to attenuate both lysosomal defects and neurodegeneration occurring in PD.

  3. Glucolipotoxicity diminishes cardiomyocyte TFEB and inhibits lysosomal autophagy during obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Purvi C; Bartlett, Jordan J; Perez, Lester J; Brunt, Keith R; Legare, Jean Francois; Hassan, Ansar; Kienesberger, Petra C; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Impaired cardiac metabolism in the obese and diabetic heart leads to glucolipotoxicity and ensuing cardiomyopathy. Glucolipotoxicity causes cardiomyocyte injury by increasing energy insufficiency, impairing proteasomal-mediated protein degradation and inducing apoptosis. Proteasome-evading proteins are degraded by autophagy in the lysosome, whose metabolism and function are regulated by master regulator transcription factor EB (TFEB). Limited studies have examined the impact of glucolipotoxicity on intra-lysosomal signaling proteins and their regulators. By utilizing a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, type-1 diabetes (Akita) and ex-vivo model of glucolipotoxicity (H9C2 cells and NRCM, neonatal rat cardiomyocyte), we examined whether glucolipotoxicity negatively targets TFEB and lysosomal proteins to dysregulate autophagy and cause cardiac injury. Despite differential effects of obesity and diabetes on LC3B-II, expression of proteins facilitating autophagosomal clearance such as TFEB, LAMP-2A, Hsc70 and Hsp90 were decreased in the obese and diabetic heart. In-vivo data was recapitulated in H9C2 and NRCM cells, which exhibited impaired autophagic flux and reduced TFEB content when exposed to a glucolipotoxic milieu. Notably, overloading myocytes with a saturated fatty acid (palmitate) but not an unsaturated fatty acid (oleate) depleted cellular TFEB and suppressed autophagy, suggesting a fatty acid specific regulation of TFEB and autophagy in the cardiomyocyte. The effect of glucolipotoxicity to reduce TFEB content was also confirmed in heart tissue from patients with Class-I obesity. Therefore, during glucolipotoxicity, suppression of lysosomal autophagy was associated with reduced lysosomal content, decreased cathepsin-B activity and diminished cellular TFEB content likely rendering myocytes susceptible to cardiac injury.

  4. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okada, Masato, E-mail: okadam@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  5. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers....... This demonstrates that the cell model can be a useful tool for the design of effective lysosome-targeting drugs with minimal off-target interactions....

  6. Release and uptake of lysosomal enzymes : studied in cultured cells

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the experimental work described in this thesiswas to investigate some aspects of the release and uptake of lysosomal enzymes. The experiments involved the use of normal human and animal fibroblasts and some other cell types such as hepatocytes and hepatoma cells as sources of hydrolytic enzymes, and fibroblasts from patients with lysosomal storage diseases associated with a single lysosomal enzyme deficiency and with "1-cell" disease as recipient cells. In a number ...

  7. Factors and processes modulating phenotypes in neuronopathic lysosomal storage diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Banecki, Bogdan; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are inherited metabolic disorders caused by genetic defects causing deficiency of various lysosomal proteins, and resultant accumulation of non-degraded compounds. They are multisystemic diseases, and in most of them (>70 %) severe brain dysfunctions are evident. However, expression of various phenotypes in particular diseases is extremely variable, from non-neuronopathic to severely neurodegenerative in the deficiency of the same enzyme. Although all lysosomal stor...

  8. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  9. A lysosome-centered view of nutrient homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Vinod K; Benjamin, Shawna; O'Rourke, Eyleen J

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are highly acidic cellular organelles traditionally viewed as sacs of enzymes involved in digesting extracellular or intracellular macromolecules for the regeneration of basic building blocks, cellular housekeeping, or pathogen degradation. Bound by a single lipid bilayer, lysosomes receive their substrates by fusing with endosomes or autophagosomes, or through specialized translocation mechanisms such as chaperone-mediated autophagy or microautophagy. Lysosomes degrade their substrates using up to 60 different soluble hydrolases and release their products either to the cytosol through poorly defined exporting and efflux mechanisms or to the extracellular space by fusing with the plasma membrane. However, it is becoming evident that the role of the lysosome in nutrient homeostasis goes beyond the disposal of waste or the recycling of building blocks. The lysosome is emerging as a signaling hub that can integrate and relay external and internal nutritional information to promote cellular and organismal homeostasis, as well as a major contributor to the processing of energy-dense molecules like glycogen and triglycerides. Here we describe the current knowledge of the nutrient signaling pathways governing lysosomal function, the role of the lysosome in nutrient mobilization, and how lysosomes signal other organelles, distant tissues, and even themselves to ensure energy homeostasis in spite of fluctuations in energy intake. At the same time, we highlight the value of genomics approaches to the past and future discoveries of how the lysosome simultaneously executes and controls cellular homeostasis.

  10. Cell biology in China: Focusing on the lysosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chonglin; Wang, Xiaochen

    2017-06-01

    The view that lysosomes are merely the recycling bins of the cell has changed greatly during recent years. Lysosomes are now known to play a central role in signal transduction, cellular adaptation, plasma membrane repair, immune responses and many other fundamental cellular processes. In conjunction with the seminal discoveries made by international colleagues, many important questions regarding lysosomes are being addressed by Chinese scientists. In this review, we briefly summarize recent exciting findings in China on lysosomal signaling, biogenesis, integrity and physiological functions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Presenilin 1 Maintains Lysosomal Ca2+ Homeostasis via TRPML1 by Regulating vATPase-Mediated Lysosome Acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hyun Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Presenilin 1 (PS1 deletion or Alzheimer’s disease (AD-linked mutations disrupt lysosomal acidification and proteolysis, which inhibits autophagy. Here, we establish that this phenotype stems from impaired glycosylation and instability of vATPase V0a1 subunit, causing deficient lysosomal vATPase assembly and function. We further demonstrate that elevated lysosomal pH in Presenilin 1 knockout (PS1KO cells induces abnormal Ca2+ efflux from lysosomes mediated by TRPML1 and elevates cytosolic Ca2+. In WT cells, blocking vATPase activity or knockdown of either PS1 or the V0a1 subunit of vATPase reproduces all of these abnormalities. Normalizing lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells using acidic nanoparticles restores normal lysosomal proteolysis, autophagy, and Ca2+ homeostasis, but correcting lysosomal Ca2+ deficits alone neither re-acidifies lysosomes nor reverses proteolytic and autophagic deficits. Our results indicate that vATPase deficiency in PS1 loss-of-function states causes lysosomal/autophagy deficits and contributes to abnormal cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, thus linking two AD-related pathogenic processes through a common molecular mechanism.

  12. Presenilin 1 Maintains Lysosomal Ca(2+) Homeostasis via TRPML1 by Regulating vATPase-Mediated Lysosome Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hyun; McBrayer, Mary Kate; Wolfe, Devin M; Haslett, Luke J; Kumar, Asok; Sato, Yutaka; Lie, Pearl P Y; Mohan, Panaiyur; Coffey, Erin E; Kompella, Uday; Mitchell, Claire H; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Nixon, Ralph A

    2015-09-01

    Presenilin 1 (PS1) deletion or Alzheimer's disease (AD)-linked mutations disrupt lysosomal acidification and proteolysis, which inhibits autophagy. Here, we establish that this phenotype stems from impaired glycosylation and instability of vATPase V0a1 subunit, causing deficient lysosomal vATPase assembly and function. We further demonstrate that elevated lysosomal pH in Presenilin 1 knockout (PS1KO) cells induces abnormal Ca(2+) efflux from lysosomes mediated by TRPML1 and elevates cytosolic Ca(2+). In WT cells, blocking vATPase activity or knockdown of either PS1 or the V0a1 subunit of vATPase reproduces all of these abnormalities. Normalizing lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells using acidic nanoparticles restores normal lysosomal proteolysis, autophagy, and Ca(2+) homeostasis, but correcting lysosomal Ca(2+) deficits alone neither re-acidifies lysosomes nor reverses proteolytic and autophagic deficits. Our results indicate that vATPase deficiency in PS1 loss-of-function states causes lysosomal/autophagy deficits and contributes to abnormal cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, thus linking two AD-related pathogenic processes through a common molecular mechanism.

  13. Gaucher disease: a lysosomal neurodegenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W J; Zhang, X; Chen, W W

    2015-04-01

    Gaucher disease is a multisystemic disorder that affects men and woman in equal numbers and occurs in all ethnic groups at any age with racial variations and an estimated worldwide incidence of 1/75,000. It is caused by a genetic deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase due to mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene, and resulting in lack of glucocerebroside degradation. The subsequent accumulation of glucocerebroside in lysosomes of tissue macrophages primarily in the liver, bone marrow and spleen, causes damage in haematological, skeletal and nervous systems. The clinical manifestations show a high degree of variability with symptoms that varies according to organs involved. In many cases, these disorders do not correlate with mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene. Although several mutations have been identified as responsible for the deficient activity of glucocerebrosidase, mechanisms by which this enzymatic defect leads to Gaucher disease remain poorly understood. Recent reports indicate the implication of complex mechanisms, including enzyme deficiency, substrate accumulation, unfolded protein response, and macrophage activation. Further elucidating these mechanisms will advance understanding of Gaucher disease and related disorders.

  14. Enhanced lysosomal activity by overexpressed aminopeptidase Y in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihee; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains vacuoles corresponding to lysosomes in higher eukaryotes. Lysosomes are dynamic (not silent) organelles in which enzymes can be easily integrated or released when exposed to stressful conditions. Changes in lysosomal enzymes have been observed due to oxidative stress, resulting in an increased function of lysosomes. The protein profiles from H2O2- and NH4Cl-treated lysosomes showed different expression patterns, observed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The aminopeptidase Y protein (APE3) that conspicuously enhanced antimicrobial activity than other proteins was selected for further studies. The S. cerevisiae APE3 gene was isolated and inserted into pYES2.0 expression vector. The GFP gene was inserted downstream to the APE3 gene for confirmation of APE3 targeting to lysosomes, and S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP. The APE3 did not enter in lysosomes and formed an inclusion body at 30 °C, but it inserted to lysosomes as shown by the merger of GFP with lysosomes at 28 °C. Antimicrobial activity of the cloned S. cerevisiae increased about 5 to 10 % against eight strains, compared to normal cells, and galactose induction is increased more two folds than that of normal cells. Therefore, S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP, accumulating a large amount of APE3, resulting in increased lysosomal activity. Increase in endogenous levels of lysosomes and their activity following genetic modification can lead to its use in applications such as antimicrobial agents and apoptosis-inducing materials for cancer cells, and consequently, it may also be possible to use the organelles for improving in vitro functions.

  15. Lysosome/lipid droplet interplay in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugail, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes and lipid droplets are generally considered as intracellular compartments with divergent roles in cell metabolism, lipid droplets serving as lipid reservoirs in anabolic pathways, whereas lysosomes are specialized in the catabolism of intracellular components. During the last few years, new insights in the biology of lysosomes has challenged this view by providing evidence for the importance of lysosome recycling as a sparing mechanism to maintain cellular fitness. On the other hand the understanding of lipid droplets has evolved from an inert intracellular deposit toward the status of an intracellular organelle with dynamic roles in cellular homeostasis beyond storage. These unrelated aspects have also recently converged in the finding of unexpected lipid droplet/lysosome communication through autophagy, and the discovery of lysosome-mediated lipid droplet degradation called lipopagy. Furthermore, adipocytes which are professional cells for lipid droplet formation were also shown to be active in peptide antigen presentation a pathway requiring lysosomal activity. The potential importance of lipid droplet/lysosome interplay is discussed in the context of metabolic diseases and the setting of chronic inflammation.

  16. [The blood-brain barrier and neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urayama, Akihiko

    2013-02-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy has been a very effective treatment for several lysosomal storage diseases. However, correcting central nervous system (CNS) storage has been challenging due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which hampers the entry of circulating lysosomal enzymes into the brain. In our previous studies, we discovered that luminally expressed cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor is a universal transporter for lysosomal enzymes that contain M6P moieties on the enzyme molecule. This receptor-mediated transport of lysosomal enzymes showed developmental down-regulation that resulted in a failure of delivery of lysosomal enzymes across the BBB in the adult brain. Conceptually, if one can re-induce M6P receptor-mediated transport of lysosomal enzymes in adult BBB, this could provide a novel brain targeting approach for treating abnormal storage in the CNS, regardless of the age of subjects. We found that systemic adrenergic stimuli restored functional transport of β-glucuronidase across the adult BBB. The concept of manipulating BBB transport activity by endogenous characteristics has also been demonstrated by another group who showed effective treatment in a Pompe disease model animal in vivo. It is intriguing that lysosomal enzymes utilize multiple mechanisms for their transport across the BBB. This review explores pharmacological manipulations for the delivery of lysosomal enzymes into the CNS, and the mechanisms of their transport across the BBB, based on existing evidence from studies of β-glucuronidase, sulfamidase, acid α-glucosidase, and arylsulfatase A.

  17. Photoaffinity labeling of the lysosomal neuraminidase from bovine testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); U. Rose (Ursula); R. Brossmer (Reinhard); F.W. Verheijen (Frans)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract ASA-NeuAc2en, a photoreactive arylazide derivative of sialic acid, is shown to be a powerful competitive inhibitor of lysosomal neuraminidase from bovine testis (Ki ≈ 21 μM). Photoaffinity labeling and partial purification of preparations containing this lysosomal neuramin

  18. Artesunate induces cell death in human cancer cells via enhancing lysosomal function and lysosomal degradation of ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nai-Di; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Wong, Wai-Shiu Fred; Shen, Han-Ming

    2014-11-28

    Artesunate (ART) is an anti-malaria drug that has been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity, and functional lysosomes are reported to be required for ART-induced cancer cell death, whereas the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying ART-induced cell death. We first confirmed that ART induces apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Interestingly, we found that ART preferably accumulates in the lysosomes and is able to activate lysosomal function via promotion of lysosomal V-ATPase assembly. Furthermore, we found that lysosomes function upstream of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species production. Importantly, we provided evidence showing that lysosomal iron is required for the lysosomal activation and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production induced by ART. Finally, we showed that ART-induced cell death is mediated by the release of iron in the lysosomes, which results from the lysosomal degradation of ferritin, an iron storage protein. Meanwhile, overexpression of ferritin heavy chain significantly protected cells from ART-induced cell death. In addition, knockdown of nuclear receptor coactivator 4, the adaptor protein for ferritin degradation, was able to block ART-mediated ferritin degradation and rescue the ART-induced cell death. In summary, our study demonstrates that ART treatment activates lysosomal function and then promotes ferritin degradation, subsequently leading to the increase of lysosomal iron that is utilized by ART for its cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. Thus, our data reveal a new mechanistic action underlying ART-induced cell death in cancer cells.

  19. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  20. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α induces lysosomal biogenesis in brain cells: implications for lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Jana, Malabendu; Modi, Khushbu; Gonzalez, Frank J; Sims, Katherine B; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-04-17

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-enclosed organelles filled with an acidic interior and are central to the autophagic, endocytic, or phagocytic pathway. In contrast to its classical function as the waste management machinery, lysosomes are now considered to be an integral part of various cellular signaling processes. The diverse functionality of this single organelle requires a very complex and coordinated regulation of its activity with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, at its core. However, mechanisms by which TFEB is regulated are poorly understood. This study demonstrates that gemfibrozil, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, alone and in conjunction with all-trans-retinoic acid is capable of enhancing TFEB in brain cells. We also observed that PPARα, but not PPARβ and PPARγ, is involved in gemfibrozil-mediated up-regulation of TFEB. Reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the recruitment of retinoid X receptor α, PPARα, and PGC1α on the PPAR-binding site on the Tfeb promoter as well. Subsequently, the drug-mediated induction of TFEB caused an increase in lysosomal protein and the lysosomal abundance in cell. Collectively, this study reinforces the link between lysosomal biogenesis and lipid metabolism with TFEB at the crossroads. Furthermore, gemfibrozil may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders in which autophagy-lysosome pathway plays an important role.

  1. Mucolipidosis type IV: the effect of increased lysosomal pH on the abnormal lysosomal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Zeigler, Marsha; Ornoy, Asher; Bach, Gideon

    2009-06-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a neurodegenerative channelopathy that is caused by the deficiency of TRPML1 activity, a nonselective cation channel. TRPML1 is a lysosomal membrane protein, and thus, MLIV is a lysosomal storage disorder. The basic, specific function of TRPML1 has not been yet clarified. A recent report (Soyombo AA, Tjon-Kon-Sang S, Rbaibi Y, Bashllari E, Bisceglia J, Muallem S, Kiselyov K: J Biol Chem 281:7294-7301, 2006) indicated that TRPML1 functions as an outwardly proton channel whose function is the prevention of overacidification of these organelles. Thus, in MLIV the lysosomal pH is lower than normal. Furthermore, attempts by these investigators to increase slightly the lysososmal pH with either Nigericin or Chloroquine suggested corrective effect of the abnormal storage in MLIV cells. We investigated this approach using these agents with cultured fibroblasts from severely affected and milder patients. Our data indicated that there was no reduction in the total number of storage vesicles by either agent, although Nigericin resulted in a change in the nature of the storage materials, reducing the presence of lamellated substances (lipids) so that the storage vesicles contained predominantly granulated substances. On the other hand, transfection with the normal MCOLN1 cDNA (the gene coding for TRPML1) resulted in the removal of almost all the storage materials.

  2. Lysosomal trafficking of {beta}-catenin induced by the tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashwood, Wan-Mohaiza [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Carter, Orianna [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Al-Fageeh, Mohamed [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Li, Qingjie [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Dashwood, Roderick H. [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States)]. E-mail: Rod.Dashwood@oregonstate.edu

    2005-12-11

    {beta}-Catenin is a cadherin-binding protein involved in cell-cell adhesion, which also functions as a transcriptional activator when complexed in the nucleus with members of the T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) family of proteins. There is considerable interest in mechanisms that down-regulate {beta}-catenin, since this provides an avenue for the prevention of colorectal and other cancers in which {beta}-catenin is frequently over-expressed. We show here that physiologically relevant concentrations of the tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) inhibited {beta}-catenin/TCF-dependent reporter activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with wild type or mutant {beta}-catenins, and there was a corresponding decrease in {beta}-catenin protein levels in the nuclear, cytosolic and membrane-associated fractions. However, {beta}-catenin accumulated as punctate aggregates in response to EGCG treatment, including in human colon cancer cells over-expressing {beta}-catenin endogenously. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that the aggregated {beta}-catenin in HEK293 cells was extra-nuclear and co-localized with lysosomes, suggesting that EGCG activated a pathway involving lysosomal trafficking of {beta}-catenin. Lysosomal inhibitors leupeptin and transepoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanido)butane produced an increase in {beta}-catenin protein in total cell lysates, without a concomitant increase in {beta}-catenin transcriptional activity. These data provide the first evidence that EGCG facilitates the trafficking of {beta}-catenin into lysosomes, presumably as a mechanism for sequestering {beta}-catenin and circumventing further nuclear transport and activation of {beta}-catenin/TCF/LEF signaling.

  3. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  4. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Stephan T; Adiseshaiah, Pavan P; Crist, Rachael M

    2012-06-14

    The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy) pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  5. Two pore channel 2 (TPC2) inhibits autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion by alkalinizing lysosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingying; Hao, Bai-Xia; Graeff, Richard; Wong, Connie W M; Wu, Wu-Tian; Yue, Jianbo

    2013-08-16

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), one of the most potent Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers, elicits Ca(2+) release from lysosomes via the two pore channel 2 (TPC2) in many cell types. Here we found that overexpression of TPC2 in HeLa or mouse embryonic stem cells inhibited autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion, thereby resulting in the accumulation of autophagosomes. Treatment of TPC2 expressing cells with a cell permeant-NAADP agonist, NAADP-AM, further induced autophagosome accumulation. On the other hand, TPC2 knockdown or treatment of cells with Ned-19, a NAADP antagonist, markedly decreased the accumulation of autophagosomes. TPC2-induced accumulation of autophagosomes was also markedly blocked by ATG5 knockdown. Interestingly, inhibiting mTOR activity failed to increase TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. Instead, we found that overexpression of TPC2 alkalinized lysosomal pH, and lysosomal re-acidification abolished TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. In addition, TPC2 overexpression had no effect on general endosomal-lysosomal degradation but prevented the recruitment of Rab-7 to autophagosomes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPC2/NAADP/Ca(2+) signaling alkalinizes lysosomal pH to specifically inhibit the later stage of basal autophagy progression.

  6. Cationic lipids delay the transfer of plasmid DNA to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattiaux, R; Jadot, M; Laurent, N; Dubois, F; Wattiaux-De Coninck, S

    1996-10-14

    Plasmid 35S DNA, naked or associated with different cationic lipid preparations was injected to rats. Subcellular distribution of radioactivity in the liver one hour after injection, was established by centrifugation methods. Results show that at that time, 35S DNA has reached lysosomes. On the contrary, when 35S DNA was complexed with lipids, radioactivity remains located in organelles whose distribution after differential and isopycnic centrifugation, is clearly distinct from that of arylsulfatase, lysosome marker enzyme. Injection of Triton WR 1339, a specific density perturbant of lysosomes, four days before 35S DNA injection causes a density decrease of radioactivity bearing structures, apparent one hour after naked 35S DNA injection but visible only after more than five hours, when 35S DNA associated with a cationic lipid is injected. These observations show that cationic lipids delay the transfer to lysosomes, of plasmid DNA taken up by the liver.

  7. Secondary Lysosomal Changes in Liver in Preclinical Drug Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincent P. Meador; D. V. M.; Ph. D.; Diplomate ACVP

    2005-01-01

    @@ Lysosomes are intracytoplasmic membrane-bound organelles that function to degrade intracellular substances by enzymatic digestion. They occur normally in all cells, being especially prominent in phagocytic cells of the reticuloendothelial system.

  8. Endosome-lysosomes, ubiquitin and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, R J; Tipler, C; Arnold, J; Laszlo, L; Al-Khedhairy, A; Lowe, J; Landon, M

    1996-01-01

    Before the advent of ubiquitin immunochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy, there was no known intracellular molecular commonality between neurodegenerative diseases. The application of antibodies which primarily detect ubiquitin protein conjugates has shown that all of the human and animal idiopathic and transmissible chronic neurodegenerative diseases, (including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie) are related by some form of intraneuronal inclusion which contains ubiquitin protein conjugates. In addition, disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, CJD and sheep scrapie, are characterised by deposits of amyloid, arising through incomplete breakdown of membrane proteins which may be associated with cytoskeletal reorganisation. Although our knowledge about these diseases is increasing, they remain largely untreatable. Recently, attention has focused on the mechanisms of production of different types of amyloid and the likely involvement within cells of the endosome-lysosome system, organelles which are immuno-positive for ubiquitin protein conjugates. These organelles may be 'bioreactor' sites for the unfolding and partial degradation of membrane proteins to generate the amyloid materials or their precursors which subsequently become expelled from the cell, or are released from dead cells, and accumulate as pathological entities. Such common features of the disease processes give new direction to therapeutic intervention.

  9. Lysosomal enzymes and their receptors in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nadimpalli Siva; Bhamidimarri, Poorna M

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal biogenesis is an important process in eukaryotic cells to maintain cellular homeostasis. The key components that are involved in the biogenesis such as the lysosomal enzymes, their modifications and the mannose 6-phosphate receptors have been well studied and their evolutionary conservation across mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates is clearly established. Invertebrate lysosomal biogenesis pathway on the other hand is not well studied. Although, details on mannose 6-phosphate receptors and enzymes involved in lysosomal enzyme modifications were reported earlier, a clear cut pathway has not been established. Recent research on the invertebrate species involving biogenesis of lysosomal enzymes suggests a possible conserved pathway in invertebrates. This review presents certain observations based on these processes that include biochemical, immunological and functional studies. Major conclusions include conservation of MPR-dependent pathway in higher invertebrates and recent evidence suggests that MPR-independent pathway might have been more prominent among lower invertebrates. The possible components of MPR-independent pathway that may play a role in lysosomal enzyme targeting are also discussed here.

  10. Subcellular Trafficking of Mammalian Lysosomal Proteins: An Extended View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Staudt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomes clear macromolecules, maintain nutrient and cholesterol homeostasis, participate in tissue repair, and in many other cellular functions. To assume these tasks, lysosomes rely on their large arsenal of acid hydrolases, transmembrane proteins and membrane-associated proteins. It is therefore imperative that, post-synthesis, these proteins are specifically recognized as lysosomal components and are correctly sorted to this organelle through the endosomes. Lysosomal transmembrane proteins contain consensus motifs in their cytosolic regions (tyrosine- or dileucine-based that serve as sorting signals to the endosomes, whereas most lysosomal acid hydrolases acquire mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P moieties that mediate binding to two membrane receptors with endosomal sorting motifs in their cytosolic tails. These tyrosine- and dileucine-based motifs are tickets for boarding in clathrin-coated carriers that transport their cargo from the trans-Golgi network and plasma membrane to the endosomes. However, increasing evidence points to additional mechanisms participating in the biogenesis of lysosomes. In some cell types, for example, there are alternatives to the Man-6-P receptors for the transport of some acid hydrolases. In addition, several “non-consensus” sorting motifs have been identified, and atypical transport routes to endolysosomes have been brought to light. These “unconventional” or “less known” transport mechanisms are the focus of this review.

  11. Lysosomal trafficking functions of mucolipin-1 in murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Hope

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucolipidosis Type IV is currently characterized as a lysosomal storage disorder with defects that include corneal clouding, achlorhydria and psychomotor retardation. MCOLN1, the gene responsible for this disease, encodes the protein mucolipin-1 that belongs to the "Transient Receptor Potential" family of proteins and has been shown to function as a non-selective cation channel whose activity is modulated by pH. Two cell biological defects that have been described in MLIV fibroblasts are a hyperacidification of lysosomes and a delay in the exit of lipids from lysosomes. Results We show that mucolipin-1 localizes to lysosomal compartments in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages that show subcompartmental accumulations of endocytosed molecules. Using stable RNAi clones, we show that mucolipin-1 is required for the exit of lipids from these compartments, for the transport of endocytosed molecules to terminal lysosomes, and for the transport of the Major Histocompatibility Complex II to the plasma membrane. Conclusion Mucolipin-1 functions in the efficient exit of molecules, destined for various cellular organelles, from lysosomal compartments.

  12. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Sonja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3, BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103 and macrosialin (CD68. LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The abundant proteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are major constituents of the glycoconjugate coat present on the inside of the lysosomal membrane, the 'lysosomal glycocalyx'. The LAMP family is characterized by a conserved domain of 150 to 200 amino acids with two disulfide bonds. Results The crystal structure of the conserved domain of human DC-LAMP was solved. It is the first high-resolution structure of a heavily glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein. The structure represents a novel β-prism fold formed by two β-sheets bent by β-bulges and connected by a disulfide bond. Flexible loops and a hydrophobic pocket represent possible sites of molecular interaction. Computational models of the glycosylated luminal regions of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 indicate that the proteins adopt a compact conformation in close proximity to the lysosomal membrane. The models correspond to the thickness of the lysosomal glycoprotein coat of only 5 to 12 nm, according to electron microscopy. Conclusion The conserved luminal domain of lysosome-associated membrane proteins forms a previously unknown β-prism fold. Insights into the structure of the lysosomal glycoprotein coat were obtained by computational models of the LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 luminal regions.

  13. Lysosomal storage disorders: Molecular basis and laboratory testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filocamo Mirella

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are a large group of more than 50 different inherited metabolic diseases which, in the great majority of cases, result from the defective function of specific lysosomal enzymes and, in cases, of non-enzymatic lysosomal proteins or non-lysosomal proteins involved in lysosomal biogenesis. The progressive lysosomal accumulation of undegraded metabolites results in generalised cell and tissue dysfunction, and, therefore, multi-systemic pathology. Storage may begin during early embryonic development, and the clinical presentation for LSDs can vary from an early and severe phenotype to late-onset mild disease. The diagnosis of most LSDs--after accurate clinical/paraclinical evaluation, including the analysis of some urinary metabolites--is based mainly on the detection of a specific enzymatic deficiency. In these cases, molecular genetic testing (MGT can refine the enzymatic diagnosis. Once the genotype of an individual LSD patient has been ascertained, genetic counselling should include prediction of the possible phenotype and the identification of carriers in the family at risk. MGT is essential for the identification of genetic disorders resulting from non-enzymatic lysosomal protein defects and is complementary to biochemical genetic testing (BGT in complex situations, such as in cases of enzymatic pseudodeficiencies. Prenatal diagnosis is performed on the most appropriate samples, which include fresh or cultured chorionic villus sampling or cultured amniotic fluid. The choice of the test--enzymatic and/or molecular--is based on the characteristics of the defect to be investigated. For prenatal MGT, the genotype of the family index case must be known. The availability of both tests, enzymatic and molecular, enormously increases the reliability of the entire prenatal diagnostic procedure. To conclude, BGT and MGT are mostly complementary for post- and prenatal diagnosis of LSDs. Whenever genotype

  14. The Link Between Lysosomal Storage Disorders and More Common Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beck MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, it has become more and more evident that lysosomal storage disorders and common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases have clinical, neuropathological, and genetic features in common, including lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagy. Patients with Gaucher and even carriers of Gaucher disease have an increased risk to develop Parkinson disease. Likewise, individuals who are heterozygous for a mutation of a gene that causes an adult form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis are more likely to be affected by a form of frontotemporal dementia in their later life. A further example is the gene NAGLU encoding the enzyme α- N -acetylglucosaminidase, which is deficient in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Mutations of the NAGLU gene have been observed in patients affected by an axonal neuropathy. An interesting unexpected finding was the link between stuttering and genes that are essential for the function of all lysosomal enzymes. This review will present some example of the association of lysosomal storage disorders and neurodegenerative disease and discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms that are common to both conditions. The understanding of the pathophysiology of the endosomal–lysosomal–autophagic system may help to develop drugs, which might provide benefit not only for patients with rare lysosomal storage disorders but also for individuals affected by more common diseases.

  15. TRPML1: an ion channel in the lysosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuyang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing

    2014-01-01

    The first member of the mammalian mucolipin TRP channel subfamily (TRPML1) is a cation-permeable channel that is predominantly localized on the membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs) in all mammalian cell types. In response to the regulatory changes of LEL-specific phosphoinositides or other cellular cues, TRPML1 may mediate the release of Ca(2+) and heavy metal Fe(2+)/Zn(2+)ions into the cytosol from the LEL lumen, which in turn may regulate membrane trafficking events (fission and fusion), signal transduction, and ionic homeostasis in LELs. Human mutations in TRPML1 result in type IV mucolipidosis (ML-IV), a childhood neurodegenerative lysosome storage disease. At the cellular level, loss-of-function mutations of mammalian TRPML1 or its C. elegans or Drosophila homolog gene results in lysosomal trafficking defects and lysosome storage. In this chapter, we summarize recent advances in our understandings of the cell biological and channel functions of TRPML1. Studies on TRPML1's channel properties and its regulation by cellular activities may provide clues for developing new therapeutic strategies to delay neurodegeneration in ML-IV and other lysosome-related pediatric diseases.

  16. The Link Between Lysosomal Storage Disorders and More Common Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beck MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, it has become more and more evident that lysosomal storage disorders and common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases have clinical, neuropathological, and genetic features in common, including lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagy. Patients with Gaucher and even carriers of Gaucher disease have an increased risk to develop Parkinson disease. Likewise, individuals who are heterozygous for a mutation of a gene that causes an adult form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis are more likely to be affected by a form of frontotemporal dementia in their later life. A further example is the gene NAGLU encoding the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase, which is deficient in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Mutations of the NAGLU gene have been observed in patients affected by an axonal neuropathy. An interesting unexpected finding was the link between stuttering and genes that are essential for the function of all lysosomal enzymes. This review will present some example of the association of lysosomal storage disorders and neurodegenerative disease and discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms that are common to both conditions. The understanding of the pathophysiology of the endosomal–lysosomal–autophagic system may help to develop drugs, which might provide benefit not only for patients with rare lysosomal storage disorders but also for individuals affected by more common diseases.

  17. Salinomycin kills cancer stem cells by sequestering iron in lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang Thi; Hamaï, Ahmed; Hienzsch, Antje; Cañeque, Tatiana; Müller, Sebastian; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Leroy, Christine; David, Amandine; Acevedo, Verónica; Ryo, Akihide; Ginestier, Christophe; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Codogno, Patrice; Mehrpour, Maryam; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2017-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells within tumours that exhibit self-renewal properties and the capacity to seed tumours. CSCs are typically refractory to conventional treatments and have been associated to metastasis and relapse. Salinomycin operates as a selective agent against CSCs through mechanisms that remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that a synthetic derivative of salinomycin, which we named ironomycin (AM5), exhibits a more potent and selective activity against breast CSCs in vitro and in vivo, by accumulating and sequestering iron in lysosomes. In response to the ensuing cytoplasmic depletion of iron, cells triggered the degradation of ferritin in lysosomes, leading to further iron loading in this organelle. Iron-mediated production of reactive oxygen species promoted lysosomal membrane permeabilization, activating a cell death pathway consistent with ferroptosis. These findings reveal the prevalence of iron homeostasis in breast CSCs, pointing towards iron and iron-mediated processes as potential targets against these cells.

  18. Rab2 promotes autophagic and endocytic lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lőrincz, Péter; Tóth, Sarolta; Benkő, Péter; Lakatos, Zsolt; Boda, Attila; Glatz, Gábor; Zobel, Martina; Bisi, Sara; Hegedűs, Krisztina; Takáts, Szabolcs; Scita, Giorgio; Juhász, Gábor

    2017-07-03

    Rab7 promotes fusion of autophagosomes and late endosomes with lysosomes in yeast and metazoan cells, acting together with its effector, the tethering complex HOPS. Here we show that another small GTPase, Rab2, is also required for autophagosome and endosome maturation and proper lysosome function in Drosophila melanogaster We demonstrate that Rab2 binds to HOPS, and that its active, GTP-locked form associates with autolysosomes. Importantly, expression of active Rab2 promotes autolysosomal fusions unlike that of GTP-locked Rab7, suggesting that its amount is normally rate limiting. We also demonstrate that RAB2A is required for autophagosome clearance in human breast cancer cells. In conclusion, we identify Rab2 as a key factor for autophagic and endocytic cargo delivery to and degradation in lysosomes. © 2017 Lőrincz et al.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Shares the Lysosome with Gaucher's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The second most common neurodegenerative disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age dependent progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement. While many of the causes of PD remain unclear, a consistent finding in PD is the abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein that has lead to the widely held notion that PD is a synucleinopathy. In a recent Cell manuscript Mazzuli et al., provide a potential mechanistic link between Gaucher's disease, a glycolipid lysosomal storage disorder due to Glucocerebrocidase (GBA) deficiency and PD. The authors reveal a reciprocal connection between the loss of GBA activity and accumulation of α-synuclein in the lysosome establishing a bidirectional positive feed back loop with pathologic consequences. These findings should stimulate further work on role of the lysosome in PD pathogenesis and the identification of new treatment strategies for PD. PMID:21753118

  20. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Harold A

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically their roles in matrix remodeling and in regulating the immune response, and their relationship to lung diseases.

  1. PDT: loss of autophagic cytoprotection after lysosomal photodamage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Price, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is known to evoke both autophagy and apoptosis. Apoptosis is an irreversible death pathway while autophagy can serve a cytoprotective function. In this study, we examined two photosensitizing agents that target lysosomes, although they differ in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during irradiation. With both agents, the 'shoulder' on the PDT dose-response curve was substantially attenuated, consistent with loss of a cytoprotective pathway. In contrast, this 'shoulder' is commonly observed when PDT targets mitochondria or the ER. We propose that lysosomal targets may offer the possibility of promoting PDT efficacy by eliminating a potentially protective pathway.

  2. Lysosome stability during lytic infection by simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einck, K H; Norkin, L C

    1979-01-01

    By 48 h postinfection, 40--80% of SV40-infected CV-1 cells have undergone irreversible injury as indicated by trypan blue staining. Nevertheless, at this time the lysosomes of these cells appear as discrete structures after vital staining with either acridine orange or neutral red. Lysosomes, vitally stained with neutral red at 24 h postinfection, were still intact in cells stained with trypan blue at 48 h. Acid phosphatase activity is localized in discrete cytoplasmic particles at 48 h, as indicated by histochemical staining of both fixed and unfixed cells.

  3. Analyzing Lysosome-Related Organelles by Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hurbain, Ilse

    2017-04-29

    Intracellular organelles have a particular morphological signature that can only be appreciated by ultrastructural analysis at the electron microscopy level. Optical imaging and associated methodologies allow to explore organelle localization and their dynamics at the cellular level. Deciphering the biogenesis and functions of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and their dysfunctions requires their visualization and detailed characterization at high resolution by electron microscopy. Here, we provide detailed protocols for studying LROs by transmission electron microscopy. While conventional electron microscopy and its recent improvements is the method of choice to investigate organelle morphology, immunoelectron microscopy allows to localize organelle components and description of their molecular make up qualitatively and quantitatively.

  4. The endoplasmic reticulum, not the pH gradient, drives calcium refilling of lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, Abigail G; Wang, Wuyang; Collier, Crystal Md; Levey, Sara A; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-05-23

    Impaired homeostasis of lysosomal Ca(2+) causes lysosome dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), but the mechanisms by which lysosomes acquire and refill Ca(2+) are not known. We developed a physiological assay to monitor lysosomal Ca(2+) store refilling using specific activators of lysosomal Ca(2+) channels to repeatedly induce lysosomal Ca(2+) release. In contrast to the prevailing view that lysosomal acidification drives Ca(2+) into the lysosome, inhibiting the V-ATPase H(+) pump did not prevent Ca(2+) refilling. Instead, pharmacological depletion or chelation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) prevented lysosomal Ca(2+) stores from refilling. More specifically, antagonists of ER IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) rapidly and completely blocked Ca(2+) refilling of lysosomes, but not in cells lacking IP3Rs. Furthermore, reducing ER Ca(2+) or blocking IP3Rs caused a dramatic LSD-like lysosome storage phenotype. By closely apposing each other, the ER may serve as a direct and primary source of Ca(2+)for the lysosome.

  5. Methods for monitoring Ca(2+) and ion channels in the lysosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xi Zoë; Yang, Yiming; Sun, Xue; Dong, Xian-Ping

    2016-12-09

    Lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles are emerging as intracellular Ca(2+) stores and play important roles in a variety of membrane trafficking processes, including endocytosis, exocytosis, phagocytosis and autophagy. Impairment of lysosomal Ca(2+) homeostasis and membrane trafficking has been implicated in many human diseases such as lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), neurodegeneration, myopathy and cancer. Lysosomal membrane proteins, in particular ion channels, are crucial for lysosomal Ca(2+) signaling. Compared with ion channels in the plasma membrane, lysosomal ion channels and their roles in lysosomal Ca(2+) signaling are less understood, largely due to their intracellular localization and the lack of feasible functional assays directly applied to the native environment. Recent advances in biomedical methodology have made it possible to directly investigate ion channels in the lysosomal membrane. In this review, we provide a summary of the newly developed methods for monitoring lysosomal Ca(2+) and ion channels, as well as the recent discovery of lysosomal ion channels and their significances in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. These new techniques will expand our research scope and our understanding of the nature of lysosomes and lysosome-related diseases.

  6. Genomic expression analyses reveal lysosomal, innate immunity proteins, as disease correlates in murine models of a lysosomal storage disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Suhail Alam

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC disease is a rare, genetic, lysosomal disorder with progressive neurodegeneration. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology and a lack of blood-based diagnostic markers are major hurdles in the treatment and management of NPC and several additional, neurological lysosomal disorders. To identify disease severity correlates, we undertook whole genome expression profiling of sentinel organs, brain, liver, and spleen of Balb/c Npc1(-/- mice relative to Npc1(+/- at an asymptomatic stage, as well as early- and late-symptomatic stages. Unexpectedly, we found prominent up regulation of innate immunity genes with age-dependent change in their expression, in all three organs. We shortlisted a set of 12 secretory genes whose expression steadily increased with age in both brain and liver, as potential plasma correlates of neurological and/or liver disease. Ten were innate immune genes with eight ascribed to lysosomes. Several are known to be elevated in diseased organs of murine models of other lysosomal diseases including Gaucher's disease, Sandhoff disease and MPSIIIB. We validated the top candidate lysozyme, in the plasma of Npc1(-/- as well as Balb/c Npc1(nmf164 mice (bearing a point mutation closer to human disease mutants and show its reduction in response to an emerging therapeutic. We further established elevation of innate immunity in Npc1(-/- mice through multiple functional assays including inhibition of bacterial infection as well as cellular analysis and immunohistochemistry. These data revealed neutrophil elevation in the Npc1(-/- spleen and liver (where large foci were detected proximal to damaged tissue. Together our results yield a set of lysosomal, secretory innate immunity genes that have potential to be developed as pan or specific plasma markers for neurological diseases associated with lysosomal storage and where diagnosis is a major problem. Further, the accumulation of neutrophils in diseased organs

  7. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  8. The relationship between Cd-induced autophagy and lysosomal activation in WRL-68 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Su-Fang; Mao, Wei-Ping; Wang, Fang; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Shao, Luan-Luan

    2015-11-01

    This study shows that Cd induces autophagy in the human's embryonic normal liver cell line (WRL-68). The expression of LC3B-II and the mature cathepsin L were analyzed by Western blotting. The autophagosomes and lysosomes were directly visualized by electron microscopy and confocal microscopy analysis in Cd-exposed WRL-68 cells. In this study, we first found that autophagy induced the activation of lysosomal function in WRL-68 cells. The lysosomal activation was markedly decreased when the cells were co-treated with 3-MA (an inhibitor of autophagy). Secondly, we provided the evidence that the activation of lysosomal function depended on autophagosome-lysosome fusion. The colocalization of lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP2) and GFP-LC3 was significantly reduced, when they were treated with thapsigargin (an inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion). We demonstrated that deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation, which suggests that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Thirdly, we provided evidence that the activation of lysosomal function was associated with lysosomal acid. We investigated the relationship between autophagosome-lysosome fusion and pH in acidic compartments by visualizing fusion process in WRL-68 cells. This suggests that increasing pH in acidic compartments in WRL-68 cells inhibits the autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Finally, we found that the activation of lysosomal function was associated with Ca(2+) stores and the intracellular Ca(2+) channels or pumps were possibly pH-dependent.

  9. Lysosomal acid phosphatase is internalized via clathrin-coated pits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Hille, A.; Geuze, H.J.; Peters, C.; Brodsky, F.M.; Figura, K. von

    1992-01-01

    The presence of lysosomal acid phosphatase (LAP) in coated pits at the plasma membrane was investigated by immunocytochemistry in thymidine kinase negative mouse L-cells (Ltk-) and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing human LAP (Ltk-LAP and BHK-LAP cells). Double immunogold labeling showed

  10. PIG7 promotes leukemia cell chemosensitivity via lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiazhuo; Peng, Leiwen; Niu, Ting; Wu, Yu; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Fangfang; Zheng, Yuhuan; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-26

    PIG7 localizes to lysosomal membrane in leukemia cells. Our previous work has shown that transduction of pig7 into a series of leukemia cell lines did not result in either apoptosis or differentiation of most tested cell lines. Interestingly, it did significantly sensitize these cell lines to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we further investigated the mechanism underlying pig7-induced improved sensitivity of acute leukemia cells to chemotherapy. Our results demonstrated that the sensitization effect driven by exogenous pig7 was more effective in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines which had lower endogenous pig7 expression. Overexpression of pig7 did not directly activate the caspase apoptotic pathway, but decreased the lysosomal stability. The expression of pig7 resulted in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and lysosomal protease (e.g. cathepsin B, D, L) release. Moreover, we also observed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by pig7. Some autophagy markers such as LC3I/II, ATG5 and Beclin-1, and necroptosis maker MLKL were also stimulated. However, intrinsic antagonism such as serine/cysteine protease inhibitors Spi2A and Cystatin C prevented downstream effectors from triggering leukemia cells, which were only on the "verge of apoptosis". When combined with chemotherapy, LMP increased and more proteases were released. Once this process was beyond the limit of intrinsic antagonism, it induced programmed cell death cooperatively via caspase-independent and caspase-dependent pathways.

  11. The frequency of lysosomal storage diseases in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, BJHM; Wevers, RA; Kleijer, WJ; Groener, JEM; de Jong, JGN; van Weely, S; Niezen-Koning, KE; van Diggelen, OP

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the relative frequency and the birth prevalence of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) in The Netherlands based on all 963 enzymatically confirmed cases diagnosed during the period 1970-1996. The combined birth prevalence for all LSDs is 14 per 100,000 live births. Glycogenosis type

  12. Clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity in lysosomal storage diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe history of lysosomal storage diseases dates back to the end of the last century when the first clinical reports appeared of patients suffering from these genetic, metabolic disorders (Tay, 1881; Gaucher, 1882; Sachs, 1887; Fabry, 1898). About seventy years wouid pass before the term

  13. The frequency of lysosomal storage diseases in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, BJHM; Wevers, RA; Kleijer, WJ; Groener, JEM; de Jong, JGN; van Weely, S; Niezen-Koning, KE; van Diggelen, OP

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the relative frequency and the birth prevalence of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) in The Netherlands based on all 963 enzymatically confirmed cases diagnosed during the period 1970-1996. The combined birth prevalence for all LSDs is 14 per 100,000 live births. Glycogenosis type

  14. Release and uptake of lysosomal enzymes : studied in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.J. Halley (Dicky)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the experimental work described in this thesiswas to investigate some aspects of the release and uptake of lysosomal enzymes. The experiments involved the use of normal human and animal fibroblasts and some other cell types such as hepatocytes and hepatoma cells as sources

  15. Neuronopathic Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Carlos E.; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lysosomal--autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death. Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings,…

  16. Toxicity detection using lysosomal enzymes, glycoamylase and thioredoxin fused with fluorescent protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Tu; Shin, Hwa-Yoon; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2015-11-20

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the simplest and a favorite eukaryotic system that contains lysosome and thus, is a suitable organism for monitoring some toxic effects in environmental pollution. In this study, S. cerevisiae was transformed with two recombinant plasmids. Sporulation-specific glycoamylase (SGA1), which was upregulated in response to arsenic, was fused with the blue fluorescent protein (BFP) for the construction of an oxidative stress-causing chemicals sensor. Additionally, thioredoxin (TRX2), a protein overexpressed exclusively under tetracycline's influence, fused with the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to create a detector for this kind of chemical. In summary, we developed two recombinant S. cerevisiae that facilitate the detection of both kinds of toxic chemicals, specifically visualized by different color indicators.

  17. Glycolipid-dependent sorting of melanosomal from lysosomal membrane proteins by lumenal determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groux-Degroote, S.; Dijk, S.M. van; Wolthoorn, J.; Neumann, S.; Theos, A.C.; Mazière, A.M. de; Klumperman, J.; Meer, G. van; Sprong, H.

    2008-01-01

    Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles that coexist with lysosomes in mammalian pigment cells. Melanosomal and lysosomal membrane proteins share similar sorting signals in their cytoplasmic tail, raising the question how they are segregated. We show that in control melanocytes, the melanosomal

  18. Glycolipid-dependent sorting of melanosomal from lysosomal membrane proteins by lumenal determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groux-Degroote, S.; Dijk, S.M. van; Wolthoorn, J.; Neumann, S.; Theos, A.C.; Mazière, A.M. de; Klumperman, J.; Meer, G. van; Sprong, H.

    2008-01-01

    Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles that coexist with lysosomes in mammalian pigment cells. Melanosomal and lysosomal membrane proteins share similar sorting signals in their cytoplasmic tail, raising the question how they are segregated. We show that in control melanocytes, the melanosomal

  19. Fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles leads to uncontrolled exocytosis in the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonhong; Ahuja, Malini; Kim, Min Seuk; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Jha, Archana; Zeng, Mei; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D; Zerfas, Patricia M; Eckhaus, Michael A; Brailoiu, Eugen; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in TRPML1 cause the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV). The role of TRPML1 in cell function and how the mutations cause the disease are not well understood. Most studies focus on the role of TRPML1 in constitutive membrane trafficking to and from the lysosomes. However, this cannot explain impaired neuromuscular and secretory cells' functions that mediate regulated exocytosis. Here, we analyzed several forms of regulated exocytosis in a mouse model of MLIV and, opposite to expectations, we found enhanced exocytosis in secretory glands due to enlargement of secretory granules in part due to fusion with lysosomes. Preliminary exploration of synaptic vesicle size, spontaneous mEPSCs, and glutamate secretion in neurons provided further evidence for enhanced exocytosis that was rescued by re-expression of TRPML1 in neurons. These features were not observed in Niemann-Pick type C1. These findings suggest that TRPML1 may guard against pathological fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles and suggest a new approach toward developing treatment for MLIV.

  20. Acute effects of the sigma-2 receptor agonist siramesine on lysosomal and extra-lysosomal proteolytic systems in lens epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jonhede, S.; Petersen, A; Zetterberg, M.; Karlsson, J-O

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of the sigma-2 receptor agonist, siramesine, on morphology, growth, cell death, lysosomal function, and effects on extra-lysosomal proteolytic systems in human lens epithelial cells. Methods Human lens epithelial cells in culture were exposed to siramesine and examined for morphological changes using Nomarski optics or calcein. Lysosomes were evaluated using acridine orange and Magic Red (RR-cresyl violet). Nuclear morphology was...

  1. Autophagic flux promotes cisplatin resistance in human ovarian carcinoma cells through ATP-mediated lysosomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liwei; Xu, Ye; Su, Jing; Yu, Huimei; Kang, Jinsong; Li, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoning; Xie, Qi; Yu, Chunyan; Sun, Liankun; Li, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Lysosomes are involved in promoting resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying lysosomal influence of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer remain incompletely understood. We report that, compared with cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells, autophagy increases in cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells treated with cisplatin. Inhibition of early-stage autophagy enhanced cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in SKOV3/DDP cells, but autophagy inhibition at a later stage by disturbing autophagosome-lysosome fusion is more effective. Notably, SKOV3/DDP cells contained more lysosomes than cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells. Abundant lysosomes and lysosomal cathepsin D activity were required for continued autolysosomal degradation and maintenance of autophagic flux in SKOV3/DDP cells. Furthermore, SKOV3/DDP cells contain abundant lysosomal ATP required for lysosomal function, and inhibition of lysosomal ATP accumulation impaired lysosomal function and blocked autophagic flux. Therefore, our findings suggest that lysosomes at least partially contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells through their role in cisplatin-induced autophagic processes, and provide insight into the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in tumors.

  2. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved in learning and memory, of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model, the leptin receptor deficient db/db mouse. We demonstrate for the first time that diabetes leads to destabilization of lysosomes as well as alterations in the protein expression, activity, and/or trafficking of two lysosomal enzymes, hexosaminidase A and cathepsin D, in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) commonly used in the treatment of diabetes due to its ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse hyperglycemia, was ineffective in reversing the diabetes-induced changes on lysosomal enzymes. Our previous work revealed that pioglitazone does not reverse hypercholesterolemia; thus, we investigated whether cholesterol plays a role in diabetes-induced lysosomal changes. In vitro, cholesterol promoted the destabilization of lysosomes, suggesting that lysosomal-related changes associated with diabetes are due to elevated levels of cholesterol. Since lysosome dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, our results may provide a potential mechanism that links diabetes with complications of the central nervous system.

  3. Myelin lesions associated with lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Phyllis L; Kaye, Edward M; Powers, James M

    2010-09-01

    Abnormalities of myelin are common in lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders. Most display a primary loss of myelin in which the myelin sheath and/or oligodendrocytes are selectively targeted by diverse pathogenetic processes. The most severe and, hence, clinically relevant are heritable diseases predominantly of infants and children, the leukodystrophies: metachromatic, globoid cell (Krabbe disease) and adreno-leukodystrophy. Our still limited understanding of these diseases has derived from multiple sources: originally, neurological-neuropathologic-neurochemical correlative studies of the natural disease in humans or other mammals, which has been enhanced by more sophisticated and contemporary techniques of cell and molecular biology. Transgenic mouse models seem to be the most promising methodology, allowing the examination of the cellular role of lysosomes and peroxisomes for formation and maintenance of both myelin and axons, and providing initial platforms to evaluate therapies. Treatment options are woefully inadequate and in their nascent stages, but still inspire some hope for the future.

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cell models of lysosomal storage disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K. Borger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have provided new opportunities to explore the cell biology and pathophysiology of human diseases, and the lysosomal storage disorder research community has been quick to adopt this technology. Patient-derived iPSC models have been generated for a number of lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher disease, Pompe disease, Fabry disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, Niemann-Pick types A and C1, and several of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Here, we review the strategies employed for reprogramming and differentiation, as well as insights into disease etiology gleaned from the currently available models. Examples are provided to illustrate how iPSC-derived models can be employed to develop new therapeutic strategies for these disorders. We also discuss how models of these rare diseases could contribute to an enhanced understanding of more common neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, and discuss key challenges and opportunities in this area of research.

  5. Immune response hinders therapy for lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Katherine P

    2008-08-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) involves i.v. injection of alpha-l-iduronidase, which can be taken up by cells throughout the body. While a significant immune response to ERT has been shown in patients with MPS I, little is known about what effect anti-enzyme antibodies have on treatment efficacy. In this issue of the JCI, Dickson et al. demonstrate that anti-enzyme antibodies inhibit enzyme uptake and substantially limit the therapeutic efficacy of ERT in canines with MPS I (see the related article beginning on page 2868). Furthermore, the induction of immune tolerance--via oral delivery of cyclosporine A and azathioprine for two months at the time of initiation of ERT with recombinant human alpha-L-iduronidase--improved enzyme uptake in organs. Therefore, transient immunosuppression may enhance ERT for lysosomal storage diseases.

  6. Targeting Androgen Receptor by Lysosomal Degradation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    were done as described.13 Protein Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Tandem Affinity Purification of FLAG-His-EWS-Fli-1- Interacting Proteins . Forty...incubated with Ni-NTA agarose (Qiagen), FLAG-His-EWS-Fli-1 and its interacting proteins were collected by centrifugation, washed three times with TN buffer...the lysosome fraction was loaded at 100x compared to the input. ■ RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Proteomic Analysis of the EWS-Fli-1- Interacting Proteins To

  7. Vamp-7 Mediates Vesicular Transport from Endosomes to Lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Raj J.; Yang, Bin; Prekeris, Rytis; Lee, Kelly C.; Klumperman, Judith; Scheller, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    A more complete picture of the molecules that are critical for the organization of membrane compartments is beginning to emerge through the characterization of proteins in the vesicle-associated membrane protein (also called synaptobrevin) family of membrane trafficking proteins. To better understand the mechanisms of membrane trafficking within the endocytic pathway, we generated a series of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the cytoplasmic domain of vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7). The antibodies recognize a 25-kD membrane-associated protein in multiple tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals colocalization with a marker of late endosomes and lysosomes, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), but not with other membrane markers, including p115 and transferrin receptor. Treatment with nocodozole or brefeldin A does not disrupt the colocalization of VAMP-7 and LAMP-1. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis shows that VAMP-7 is most concentrated in the trans-Golgi network region of the cell as well as late endosomes and transport vesicles that do not contain the mannose-6 phosphate receptor. In streptolysin- O–permeabilized cells, antibodies against VAMP-7 inhibit the breakdown of epidermal growth factor but not the recycling of transferrin. These data are consistent with a role for VAMP-7 in the vesicular transport of proteins from the early endosome to the lysosome. PMID:10459012

  8. Doxorubicin Blocks Cardiomyocyte Autophagic Flux by Inhibiting Lysosome Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan L; Wang, Zhao V; Ding, Guanqiao; Tan, Wei; Luo, Xiang; Criollo, Alfredo; Xie, Min; Jiang, Nan; May, Herman; Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Schneider, Jay W; Gillette, Thomas G; Hill, Joseph A

    2016-04-26

    The clinical use of doxorubicin is limited by cardiotoxicity. Histopathological changes include interstitial myocardial fibrosis and the appearance of vacuolated cardiomyocytes. Whereas dysregulation of autophagy in the myocardium has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, the role of autophagy in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy remains poorly defined. Most models of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity involve intraperitoneal injection of high-dose drug, which elicits lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, and peritoneal fibrosis, all of which confound the interpretation of autophagy. Given this, we first established a model that provokes modest and progressive cardiotoxicity without constitutional symptoms, reminiscent of the effects seen in patients. We report that doxorubicin blocks cardiomyocyte autophagic flux in vivo and in cardiomyocytes in culture. This block was accompanied by robust accumulation of undegraded autolysosomes. We go on to localize the site of block as a defect in lysosome acidification. To test the functional relevance of doxorubicin-triggered autolysosome accumulation, we studied animals with diminished autophagic activity resulting from haploinsufficiency for Beclin 1. Beclin 1(+/-) mice exposed to doxorubicin were protected in terms of structural and functional changes within the myocardium. Conversely, animals overexpressing Beclin 1 manifested an amplified cardiotoxic response. Doxorubicin blocks autophagic flux in cardiomyocytes by impairing lysosome acidification and lysosomal function. Reducing autophagy initiation protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  10. Changes in the morphology and lability of lysosomal subpopulations in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Nancy; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús; Juanes, Pedro P; Pérez, Nieves; Ferreira, Laura; García-Hernández, Violeta; Mangas, Arturo; Calvo, José J; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen

    2011-02-01

    Lysosomes play an important role in acute pancreatitis (AP). Here we developed a method for the isolation of lysosome subpopulations from rat pancreas and assessed the stability of lysosomal membranes. AP was induced by four subcutaneous injections of 20 μg caerulein/kg body weight at hourly intervals. The animals were killed 9h after the first injection. Marker enzymes [N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), cathepsin B and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)] were assayed in subcellular fractions from control pancreas and in pancreatitis. Lysosomal subpopulations were separated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation and observed by electron microscopy. NAG molecular forms were determined by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. AP was associated with: (i) increases in the specific activity of lysosomal enzymes in the soluble fraction, (ii) changes in the size and alterations in the morphology of the organelles from the lysosomal subpopulations, (iii) the appearance of large vacuoles in the primary and secondary lysosome subpopulations, (iv) the increase in the amount of the NAG form associated with the pancreatic lysosomal membrane as well as its release towards the soluble fraction. Lysosome subpopulations are separated by a combination of differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugations. Primary lysosome membrane stability decreases in AP. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. MCOLN1 is a ROS sensor in lysosomes that regulates autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Cheng, Xiping; Yu, Lu; Yang, Junsheng; Calvo, Raul; Patnaik, Samarjit; Hu, Xin; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Lawas, Maria; Delling, Markus; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-06-30

    Cellular stresses trigger autophagy to remove damaged macromolecules and organelles. Lysosomes 'host' multiple stress-sensing mechanisms that trigger the coordinated biogenesis of autophagosomes and lysosomes. For example, transcription factor (TF)EB, which regulates autophagy and lysosome biogenesis, is activated following the inhibition of mTOR, a lysosome-localized nutrient sensor. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate TFEB via a lysosomal Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism independent of mTOR. Exogenous oxidants or increasing mitochondrial ROS levels directly and specifically activate lysosomal TRPML1 channels, inducing lysosomal Ca(2+) release. This activation triggers calcineurin-dependent TFEB-nuclear translocation, autophagy induction and lysosome biogenesis. When TRPML1 is genetically inactivated or pharmacologically inhibited, clearance of damaged mitochondria and removal of excess ROS are blocked. Furthermore, TRPML1's ROS sensitivity is specifically required for lysosome adaptation to mitochondrial damage. Hence, TRPML1 is a ROS sensor localized on the lysosomal membrane that orchestrates an autophagy-dependent negative-feedback programme to mitigate oxidative stress in the cell.

  12. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome–lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome–lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome–lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome–lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages. PMID:10888671

  13. Facilitering som styringsredskab

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Karen Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    #This thesis surveys facilitation as a new tool of steering within the public sector in Denmark. It is explored how facilitation is articulated and practiced among facilitators from the public, private and voluntary sector. Furthermore, the facilitator’s challenges by using facilitation are examined. The thesis is based on the presumption that facilitation is articulated by rationalities, which influence how facilitation is practiced and performed. Also, a facilitator is seen as a performer a...

  14. Lyn Delivers Bacteria to Lysosomes for Eradication through TLR2-Initiated Autophagy Related Phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, have been reported to induce autophagy; however, the role and machinery of infection-induced autophagy remain elusive. We show that the pleiotropic Src kinase Lyn mediates phagocytosis and autophagosome maturation in alveolar macrophages (AM, which facilitates eventual bacterial eradication. We report that Lyn is required for bacterial infection-induced recruitment of autophagic components to pathogen-containing phagosomes. When we blocked autophagy with 3-methyladenine (3-MA or by depleting Lyn, we observed less phagocytosis and subsequent bacterial clearance by AM. Both morphological and biological evidence demonstrated that Lyn delivered bacteria to lysosomes through xenophagy. TLR2 initiated the phagocytic process and activated Lyn following infection. Cytoskeletal trafficking proteins, such as Rab5 and Rab7, critically facilitated early phagosome formation, autophagosome maturation, and eventual autophagy-mediated bacterial degradation. These findings reveal that Lyn, TLR2 and Rab modulate autophagy related phagocytosis and augment bactericidal activity, which may offer insight into novel therapeutic strategies to control lung infection.

  15. The Ankrd13 Family of Ubiquitin-interacting Motif-bearing Proteins Regulates Valosin-containing Protein/p97 Protein-mediated Lysosomal Trafficking of Caveolin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burana, Daocharad; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Tanno, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Komada, Masayuki

    2016-03-18

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is an oligomeric protein that forms flask-shaped, lipid-rich pits, termed caveolae, on the plasma membrane. Cav-1 is targeted for lysosomal degradation in ubiquitination- and valosin-containing protein (VCP)-dependent manners. VCP, an ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities that remodels or segregates ubiquitinated protein complexes, has been proposed to disassemble Cav-1 oligomers on the endosomal membrane, facilitating the trafficking of Cav-1 to the lysosome. Genetic mutations in VCP compromise the lysosomal trafficking of Cav-1, leading to a disease called inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of bone and/or frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Here we identified the Ankrd13 family of ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM)-containing proteins as novel VCP-interacting molecules on the endosome. Ankrd13 proteins formed a ternary complex with VCP and Cav-1 and exhibited high binding affinity for ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers in an UIM-dependent manner. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that Cav-1 undergoes Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination, which serves as a lysosomal trafficking signal, and that the UIMs of Ankrd13 proteins bind preferentially to this ubiquitin chain type. The overexpression of Ankrd13 caused enlarged hollow late endosomes, which was reminiscent of the phenotype of the VCP mutations in IBMPFD. Overexpression of Ankrd13 proteins also stabilized ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers on the limiting membrane of enlarged endosomes. The interaction with Ankrd13 was abrogated in IMBPFD-associated VCP mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ankrd13 proteins cooperate with VCP to regulate the lysosomal trafficking of ubiquitinated Cav-1.

  16. Cathepsin B modulates lysosomal biogenesis and host defense against Francisella novicida infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Man, Si Ming; Malireddi, R K Subbarao; Karki, Rajendra; Lupfer, Christopher; Gurung, Prajwal; Neale, Geoffrey; Guy, Clifford S; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-09-19

    Lysosomal cathepsins regulate an exquisite range of biological functions, and their deregulation is associated with inflammatory, metabolic, and degenerative diseases in humans. In this study, we identified a key cell-intrinsic role for cathepsin B as a negative feedback regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy. Mice and macrophages lacking cathepsin B activity had increased resistance to the cytosolic bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B down-regulated mechanistic target of rapamycin activity and prevented cleavage of the lysosomal calcium channel TRPML1. These events drove transcription of lysosomal and autophagy genes via transcription factor EB, which increased lysosomal biogenesis and activation of autophagy initiation kinase ULK1 for clearance of the bacteria. Our results identified a fundamental biological function of cathepsin B in providing a checkpoint for homeostatic maintenance of lysosome populations and basic recycling functions in the cell.

  17. TFEB and TFE3: Linking Lysosomes to Cellular Adaptation to Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2016-10-06

    In recent years, our vision of lysosomes has drastically changed. Formerly considered to be mere degradative compartments, they are now recognized as key players in many cellular processes. The ability of lysosomes to respond to different stimuli revealed a complex and coordinated regulation of lysosomal gene expression. This review discusses the participation of the transcription factors TFEB and TFE3 in the regulation of lysosomal function and biogenesis, as well as the role of the lysosomal pathway in cellular adaptation to a variety of stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation, mitochondrial dysfunction, protein misfolding, and pathogen infection. We also describe how cancer cells make use of TFEB and TFE3 to promote their own survival and highlight the potential of these transcription factors as therapeutic targets for the treatment of neurological and lysosomal diseases.

  18. A TRP Channel in the Lysosome Regulates Large Particle Phagocytosis via Focal Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis of large extracellular particles such as apoptotic bodies requires delivery of the intracellular endosomal and lysosomal membranes to form plasmalemmal pseudopods. Here we identified Mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) as the key lysosomal Ca2+ channel regulating focal exocytosis and phagosome biogenesis. Both particle ingestion and lysosomal exocytosis are inhibited by synthetic TRPML1 blockers, and are defective in macrophages isolated from TRPML1 knockout mice. Furthermore, TRPML...

  19. Disruption of Lysosome Function Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Drosophila *

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han,Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-01-01

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the RasV12 cells....

  20. A new lysosomal storage disorder resembling Morquio syndrome in sibs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Laurence; Fenneteau, Odile; Ilharreborde, Brice; Capri, Yline; Gérard, Marion; Quoc, Emmanuel Bui; Passemard, Sandrine; Ghoumid, Jamal; Caillaud, Catherine; Froissart, Roseline; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Lebon, Sophie; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Mazda, Keyvan; Verloes, Alain

    2012-03-01

    We report two male sibs, born from unrelated French Caribbean parents, presenting with an unclassifiable storage disorder. Pregnancy and delivery were uneventful. Stunted growth was noted during the first year of life. Both children have short stature (below - 4SD) with short trunk, barrel chest, micromelia with rhizomelic shortening, severe kyphoscoliosis, pectus carinatum, short hands and feet with metatarsus adductus, and excessive joint laxity of the small joints. Learning difficulties with borderline intelligence quotient (IQ) were noted in one of them. They had no hepatomegaly, no splenomegaly, and no dysmorphism. Skeletal X-rays survey demonstrated generalized platyspondyly with tongue-like deformity of the anterior part of the vertebral bodies, hypoplasia of the odontoid process, generalized epiphyseal dysplasia and abnormally shaped metaphyses. The acetabular roofs had a trident aspect. Ophthalmologic and cardiac examinations were normal. Spine deformity required surgical correction in one of the patient at age 4 years. Lysosomal enzymes assays including N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase and β-galactosidase were normal, excluding mucopolysaccharidoses type IV A and IV B (Morquio syndrome), respectively. Qualitative analysis found traces of dermatan and chondroitin-sulfates in urine, but quantitative glycosaminoglycan excretion fell within normal limits. They were no vacuolated lymphocytes. Abnormal coarse inclusions were present in eosinophils. Mild Alder anomaly was observed in polymorphonuclears. Granulations were discretely metachromatic with toluidine blue. Those morphological anomalies are in favor of a lysosomal storage disease. No inclusions were found in skin fibroblasts. We hypothesize that these two boys have a distinct autosomal recessive or X-linked lysosomal storage disorder of unknown origin that shares clinical and radiological features with Morquio disease.

  1. Sub-lethal oxidative stress induces lysosome biogenesis via a lysosomal membrane permeabilization-cathepsin-caspase 3-transcription factor EB-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, San Min; Chua, Shu Xian Serene; Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Shen, Liang; Luo, Le; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2016-12-18

    Here we provide evidence to link sub-lethal oxidative stress to lysosomal biogenesis. Exposure of cells to sub-lethal concentrations of exogenously added hydrogen peroxide resulted in cytosol to nuclear translocation of the Transcription Factor EB (TFEB), the master controller of lysosome biogenesis and function. Nuclear translocation of TFEB was dependent upon the activation of a cathepsin-caspase 3 signaling pathway, downstream of a lysosomal membrane permeabilization and accompanied by a significant increase in lysosome numbers as well as induction of TFEB dependent lysosome-associated genes expression such as Ctsl, Lamp2 and its spliced variant Lamp2a, Neu1and Ctsb and Sqstm1 and Atg9b. The effects of sub-lethal oxidative stress on lysosomal gene expression and biogenesis were rescued upon gene silencing of caspase 3 and TFEB. Notably, caspase 3 activation was not associated with phenotypic hallmarks of apoptosis, evidenced by the absence of caspase 3 substrate cleavage, such as PARP, Lamin A/C or gelsolin. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time an unexpected and non-canonical role of a cathepsin-caspase 3 axis in the nuclear translocation of TFEB leading to lysosomes biogenesis under conditions of sub-lethal oxidative stress.

  2. Lysosomes serve as a platform for hepatitis A virus particle maturation and nonlytic release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seggewiß, Nicole; Paulmann, Dajana; Dotzauer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Early studies on hepatitis A virus (HAV) in cell culture demonstrated the inclusion of several viral particles in an intracellular lipid-bilayer membrane. However, the origin of these virus-associated membranes and the mechanism for the non-lytic release of HAV into bile are still unknown. Analyzing the association of this virus with cell organelles, we found that newly synthesized HAV particles accumulate in lysosomal organelles and that lysosomal enzymes are involved in the maturation cleavage of the virion. Furthermore, by inhibiting the processes of fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane, we found that the nonlytic release of HAV from infected cells occurs via lysosome-related organelles.

  3. Lipid Storage Disorders Block Lysosomal Trafficking By Inhibiting TRP Channel and Calcium Release

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal lipid accumulation, defects in membrane trafficking, and altered Ca2+ homeostasis are common features in many lysosomal storage diseases. Mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) is the principle Ca2+ channel in the lysosome. Here we show that TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca2+ release, measured using a genetically-encoded Ca2+ indicator (GCaMP3) attached directly to TRPML1 and elicited by a potent membrane-permeable synthetic agonist, is dramatically reduced in Niemann-Pick (NP) disease cells....

  4. Cathepsin inhibition-induced lysosomal dysfunction enhances pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis in high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minjeong; Lee, Jaemeun; Seo, Hye-Young; Lim, Ji Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that plays an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. We previously showed that the inhibition of autophagy causes pancreatic β-cell apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a protective mechanism for the survival of pancreatic β-cells. The current study demonstrates that treatment with inhibitors and knockdown of the lysosomal cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B and L impair autophagy, enhancing the caspase-dependent apoptosis of INS-1 cells and islets upon exposure to high concentration of glucose. Interestingly, treatment with cathepsin B and L inhibitors prevented the proteolytic processing of cathepsins B, D and L, as evidenced by gradual accumulation of the respective pro-forms. Of note, inhibition of aspartic cathepsins had no effect on autophagy and cell viability, suggesting the selective role of cathepsins B and L in the regulation of β-cell autophagy and apoptosis. Lysosomal localization of accumulated pro-cathepsins in the presence of cathepsin B and L inhibitors was verified via immunocytochemistry and lysosomal fractionation. Lysotracker staining indicated that cathepsin B and L inhibitors led to the formation of severely enlarged lysosomes in a time-dependent manner. The abnormal accumulation of pro-cathepsins following treatment with inhibitors of cathepsins B and L suppressed normal lysosomal degradation and the processing of lysosomal enzymes, leading to lysosomal dysfunction. Collectively, our findings suggest that cathepsin defects following the inhibition of cathepsin B and L result in lysosomal dysfunction and consequent cell death in pancreatic β-cells.

  5. hLGDB: a database of human lysosomal genes and their regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozzi, Alessandro; Urbanelli, Lorena; Germain, Pierre Luc; Magini, Alessandro; Emiliani, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles present in almost all eukaryotic cells, which play a fundamental role in key aspects of cellular homeostasis such as membrane repair, autophagy, endocitosis and protein metabolism. The characterization of the genes and enzymes constituting the lysosome represents a central issue to be addressed toward a better understanding of the biology of this organelle. In humans, mutations that cause lysosomal enzyme deficiencies result in >50 different disorders and severe pathologies. So far, many experimental efforts using different methodologies have been carried out to identity lysosomal genes. The Human Lysosome Gene Database (hLGDB) is the first resource that provides a comprehensive and accessible census of the human genes belonging to the lysosomal system. This database was developed by collecting and annotating gene lists from many different sources. References to the studies that have identified each gene are provided together with cross databases gene related information. Special attention has been given to the regulation of the genes through microRNAs and the transcription factor EB. The hLGDB can be easily queried to retrieve, combine and analyze information on different lists of lysosomal genes and their regulation by microRNA (binding sites predicted by five different algorithms). The hLGDB is an open access dynamic project that will permit in the future to collapse in a unique publicly accessible resource all the available biological information about lysosome genes and their regulation. Database URL: http://lysosome.unipg.it/.

  6. Transformation-associated changes in sphingolipid metabolism sensitize cells to lysosomal cell death induced by inhibitors of acid sphingomyelinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Olsen, Ole D; Groth-Pedersen, Line

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and subsequent cell death may prove useful in cancer treatment, provided that cancer cell lysosomes can be specifically targeted. Here, we identify acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition as a selective means to destabilize cancer cell lysosomes. Lysosome......-destabilizing experimental anticancer agent siramesine inhibits ASM by interfering with the binding of ASM to its essential lysosomal cofactor, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. Like siramesine, several clinically relevant ASM inhibitors trigger cancer-specific lysosomal cell death, reduce tumor growth in vivo, and revert...

  7. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke Sonja; Krausze Joern; Büssow Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3), BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103) and macrosialin (CD68). LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The ...

  8. Klebsiella pneumoniae survives within macrophages by avoiding delivery to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Victoria; March, Catalina; Insua, Jose Luis; Aguiló, Nacho; Llobet, Enrique; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Brennan, Gerard P; Millán-Lou, Maria Isabel; Martín, Carlos; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that Klebsiella might be able to persist intracellularly within a vacuolar compartment. This study was designed to investigate the interaction between Klebsiella and macrophages. Engulfment of K. pneumoniae was dependent on host cytoskeleton, cell plasma membrane lipid rafts and the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Microscopy studies revealed that K. pneumoniae resides within a vacuolar compartment, the Klebsiella-containing vacuole (KCV), which traffics within vacuoles associated with the endocytic pathway. In contrast to UV-killed bacteria, the majority of live bacteria did not co-localize with markers of the lysosomal compartment. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae triggers a programmed cell death in macrophages displaying features of apoptosis. Our efforts to identify the mechanism(s) whereby K. pneumoniae prevents the fusion of the lysosomes to the KCV uncovered the central role of the PI3K-Akt-Rab14 axis to control the phagosome maturation. Our data revealed that the capsule is dispensable for Klebsiella intracellular survival if bacteria were not opsonized. Furthermore, the environment found by Klebsiella within the KCV triggered the down-regulation of the expression of cps. Altogether, this study proves evidence that K. pneumoniae survives killing by macrophages by manipulating phagosome maturation that may contribute to Klebsiella pathogenesis.

  9. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cátia S.; Ribeiro, Helena; Macedo, M. Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d) molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed. PMID:28245613

  10. Noxa couples lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eno, Colins O; Zhao, Guoping; Venkatanarayan, Avinashnarayan; Wang, Bing; Flores, Elsa R; Li, Chi

    2013-12-01

    The exact roles of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) in oxidative stress-triggered apoptosis are not completely understood. Here, we first studied the temporal relation between LMP and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) during the initial stage of apoptosis caused by the oxidative stress inducer H2O2. Despite its essential role in mediating apoptosis, the expression of the BH3-only Bcl-2 protein Noxa was dispensable for LMP. In contrast, MOMP was dependent on Noxa expression and occurred downstream of LMP. When lysosomal membranes were stabilized by the iron-chelating agent desferrioxamine, H2O2-induced increase in DNA damage, Noxa expression, and subsequent apoptosis were abolished by the inhibition of LMP. Importantly, LMP-induced Noxa expression increase was mediated by p53 and seems to be a unique feature of apoptosis caused by oxidative stress. Finally, exogenous iron loading recapitulated the effects of H2O2 on the expression of BH3-only Bcl-2 proteins. Overall, these data reveal a Noxa-mediated signaling pathway that couples LMP with MOMP and ultimate apoptosis during oxidative stress.

  11. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia S. Pereira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed.

  12. Frustrated phagocytosis on micro-patterned immune complexes to characterize lysosome movements in live macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud M. Labrousse

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosome mobilization is a key cellular process in phagocytes for bactericidal activities and trans-matrix migration. The molecular mechanisms that regulate lysosome mobilization are still poorly known. Lysosomes are hard to track as they move towards phagosomes throughout the cell volume. In order to anticipate cell regions where lysosomes are recruited to, human and RAW264.7 macrophages were seeded on surfaces that were micro-patterned with immune complexes (ICs as 4 µm-side squares. Distances between IC patterns were adapted to optimize cell spreading in order to constrain lysosome movements mostly in 2 dimensions. Fc receptors triggered local frustrated phagocytosis, frustrated phagosomes appeared as rings of F-actin dots around the IC patterns as early as 5 minutes after cells made contact with the substratum. Frustrated phagosomes recruited actin-associated proteins (vinculin, paxillin and gelsolin. The fusion of lysosomes with frustrated phagosomes was shown by the release of beta-hexosaminidase and the recruitment of Lamp-1 to frustrated phagosomes. Lysosomes of RAW264.7 macrophages were labeled with cathepsinD-mCherry to visualize their movements towards frustrated phagosomes. Lysosomes saltatory movements were markedly slowed down compared to cells layered on non-opsonized patterns. In addition, the linearity of the trajectories and the frequency and duration of contacts of lysosomes with frustrated phagosomes were measured.¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬ Using PP2 we showed that instant velocity, pauses and frequency of lysosome/phagosome contacts were at least in part dependent on Src tyrosine kinases. This experimental set-up is the first step towards deciphering molecular mechanisms which are involved in lysosome movements in the cytoplasm (directionality, docking and fusion using RNA interference, pharmacological inhibition or mutant expression.

  13. Characterization of storage material in cultured fibroblasts by specific lectin binding in lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I; Ekblom, P; Laurila, P; Nordling, S; Raivio, K O; Aula, P

    1980-11-01

    The lysosomal storage material in cultured fibroblasts from patients with various lysosomal storage diseases was characterized by fluorescence microscopy using lectins specific for different saccharide moieties. In normal fibroblasts and cultured amniotic fluid cells lectins specific for mannosyl and glucosyl moieties, Con A and LcA gave a bright perinuclear cytoplasmic staining corresponding to the localization of endoplasmic reticulum in the cells. All other lectins stained the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear reticular structure. In fucosidosis fibroblasts, only lectins specific for fucosyl groups LTA and UEA, distinctly stained the lysosomal inclusions. The lysosomes in mannosidosis fibroblasts did not react with Con A and LcA, both specific for mannosyl moieties of glycoconjugates, but were brightly labeled with WGA, a lectin specific for N-acetyl glucosaminyl moieties. In I-cell fibroblasts, the numerous perinuclear phase-dense granules, representing abnormal lysosomes, were labeled with every lectin used. In fibroblasts from patients with Salla disease, a newly discovered lysosomal storage disorder, the lysosomes were brightly stained only with LPA, indicating the presence of increased amounts of sialic acid residues in the lysosomal inclusions.

  14. Autophagy-lysosomal pathway is involved in lipid degradation in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skop, V; Cahová, M; Papáčková, Z; Páleníčková, E; Daňková, H; Baranowski, M; Zabielski, P; Zdychová, J; Zídková, J; Kazdová, L

    2012-01-01

    We present data supporting the hypothesis that the lysosomal-autophagy pathway is involved in the degradation of intracellular triacylglycerols in the liver. In primary hepatocytes cultivated in the absence of exogenous fatty acids (FFA), both inhibition of autophagy flux (asparagine) or lysosomal activity (chloroquine) decreased secretion of VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) and formation of FFA oxidative products while the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycine increased some of these parameters. Effect of rapamycine was completely abolished by inactivation of lysosomes. Similarly, when autophagic activity was influenced by cultivating the hepatocytes in "starving" (amino-acid poor medium) or "fed" (serum-supplemented medium) conditions, VLDL secretion and FFA oxidation mirrored the changes in autophagy being higher in starvation and lower in fed state. Autophagy inhibition as well as lysosomal inactivation depressed FFA and DAG (diacylglycerol) formation in liver slices in vitro. In vivo, intensity of lysosomal lipid degradation depends on the formation of autophagolysosomes, i.e. structures bringing the substrate for degradation and lysosomal enzymes into contact. We demonstrated that lysosomal lipase (LAL) activity in liver autophagolysosomal fraction was up-regulated in fasting and down-regulated in fed state together with the increased translocation of LAL and LAMP2 proteins from lysosomal pool to this fraction. Changes in autophagy intensity (LC3-II/LC3-I ratio) followed a similar pattern.

  15. The phytoestrogen genistein modulates lysosomal metabolism and transcription factor EB (TFEB) activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskot, Marta; Montefusco, Sandro; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Mozolewski, Paweł; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Di Bernardo, Diego; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Medina, Diego L; Ballabio, Andrea; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2014-06-13

    Genistein (5,7-dihydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) has been previously proposed as a potential drug for use in substrate reduction therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses, a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by mutations leading to inefficient degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in lysosomes. It was demonstrated that this isoflavone can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it an especially desirable potential drug for the treatment of neurological symptoms present in most lysosomal storage diseases. So far, no comprehensive genomic analyses have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect elicited by genistein. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify the genistein-modulated gene network regulating GAG biosynthesis and degradation, taking into consideration the entire lysosomal metabolism. Our analyses identified over 60 genes with known roles in lysosomal biogenesis and/or function whose expression was enhanced by genistein. Moreover, 19 genes whose products are involved in both GAG synthesis and degradation pathways were found to be remarkably differentially regulated by genistein treatment. We found a regulatory network linking genistein-mediated control of transcription factor EB (TFEB) gene expression, TFEB nuclear translocation, and activation of TFEB-dependent lysosome biogenesis to lysosomal metabolism. Our data indicate that the molecular mechanism of genistein action involves not only impairment of GAG synthesis but more importantly lysosomal enhancement via TFEB. These findings contribute to explaining the beneficial effects of genistein in lysosomal storage diseases as well as envisage new therapeutic approaches to treat these devastating diseases.

  16. Protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhro Jyoti; Stanely Mainzen Prince, Ponnian

    2012-11-01

    In the pathology of myocardial infarction, lysosomal lipid peroxidation and resulting enzyme release play an important role. We evaluated the protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with sinapic acid (12 mg/kg body weight) orally daily for 10 days and isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was injected twice at an interval of 24 h (9th and 10th day). Then, lysosomal lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes in serum, heart homogenate, lysosomal fraction and myocardial infarct size were measured. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in serum creatine kinase-MB and lysosomal lipid peroxidation. The activities of β-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, cathepsin-B and D were significantly increased in serum, heart and the activities of β-glucuronidase and cathepsin-D were significantly decreased in lysosomal fraction of myocardial infarcted rats. Pre-and-co-treatment with sinapic acid normalized all the biochemical parameters and reduced myocardial infarct size in myocardial infarcted rats. In vitro studies confirmed the free radical scavenging effects of sinapic acid. The possible mechanisms for the observed effects are attributed to sinapic acid's free radical scavenging and membrane stabilizing properties. Thus, sinapic acid has protective effects on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

  17. The Octyl Ester of Ginsenoside Rh2 Induces Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization via Bax Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Zhang, Bing; Sun, Yong; Xiong, Zeng-Xing; Peng, Han; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Hu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-04-25

    Ginsenoside Rh2 is a potential pharmacologically active metabolite of ginseng. Previously, we have reported that an octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O), has been confirmed to possess higher bioavailability and anticancer effect than Rh2 in vitro. In order to better assess the possibility that Rh2-O could be used as an anticancer compound, the underlying mechanism was investigated in this study. The present results revealed that lysosomal destabilization was involved in the early stage of cell apoptosis in HepG2 cells induced by Rh2-O. Rh2-O could induce an early lysosomal membrane permeabilization with the release of lysosomal protease cathepsins to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. The Cat B inhibitor (leu) and Cat D inhibitor (pepA) inhibited Rh2-O-induced HepG2 apoptosis as well as tBid production and Δφm depolarization, indicating that lysosomal permeabilization occurred upstream of mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, Rh2-O induced a significant increase in the protein levels of DRAM1 and Bax (p lysosomes of HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Bax partially inhibited Rh2-O-induced Cat D release from lysosomes. Thus it was concluded that Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through activation of the lysosomal-mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involving the translocation of Bax to the lysosome.

  18. Expression Pattern of Lysosomal Protective Protein/Cathepsin A: Implications for the analysis of hnman galactosialidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Rottier (Robbert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe lysosome represents a well characterized, membrane-contained intracellular digestive system. Iu this important organelle a battery of lysosomal hydro lases and accessory proteins work in concert on the step-wise conversion of macromolecular substrates into small biological building b

  19. Vps33B is required for delivery of endocytosed cargo to lysosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galmes, Romain; ten Brink, Corlinda; Oorschot, Viola; Veenendaal, Tineke; Jonker, Caspar; van der Sluijs, Peter; Klumperman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells Vps33B forms a complex with VIPAS-39 that is recruited to recycling endosomes. Here we show that when Vps33B is expressed together with Rab7-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP) it is recruited to late endosomes-lysosomes and that depletion of Vps33B impairs late

  20. Glycogenosis type II : cloning and characterization of the human lysosomal α-glucosidase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractGlycogenosis type II is a lysosomal storage disorder. Characteristic features are heart failure and generalized muscle weakness. The disease is caused by the inherited deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of lysosomal glycogen. The aim of the work

  1. Lysosomal cholesterol accumulation : driver on the road to inflammation during atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikx, T.; Walenbergh, S. M. A.; Hofker, M. H.; Shiri-Sverdlov, R.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies show an association between the accumulation of cholesterol inside lysosomes and the progression towards inflammatory disease states that are closely related to obesity. While in the past, the knowledge regarding lysosomal cholesterol accumulation was limited to its association with pla

  2. Calpains mediate epithelial-cell death during mammary gland involution: mitochondria and lysosomal destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnandis, T; Ferrer-Vicens, I; García-Trevijano, E R; Miralles, V J; García, C; Torres, L; Viña, J R; Zaragozá, R

    2012-09-01

    Our aim was to elucidate the physiological role of calpains (CAPN) in mammary gland involution. Both CAPN-1 and -2 were induced after weaning and its activity increased in isolated mitochondria and lysosomes. CAPN activation within the mitochondria could trigger the release of cytochrome c and other pro-apoptotic factors, whereas in lysosomes it might be essential for tissue remodeling by releasing cathepsins into the cytosol. Immunohistochemical analysis localized CAPNs mainly at the luminal side of alveoli. During weaning, CAPNs translocate to the lysosomes processing membrane proteins. To identify these substrates, lysosomal fractions were treated with recombinant CAPN and cleaved products were identified by 2D-DIGE. The subunit b(2) of the v-type H(+) ATPase is proteolyzed and so is the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2a (LAMP2a). Both proteins are also cleaved in vivo. Furthermore, LAMP2a cleavage was confirmed in vitro by addition of CAPNs to isolated lysosomes and several CAPN inhibitors prevented it. Finally, in vivo inhibition of CAPN1 in 72-h-weaned mice decreased LAMP2a cleavage. Indeed, calpeptin-treated mice showed a substantial delay in tissue remodeling and involution of the mammary gland. These results suggest that CAPNs are responsible for mitochondrial and lysosomal membrane permeabilization, supporting the idea that lysosomal-mediated cell death is a new hallmark of mammary gland involution.

  3. High sphingomyelin levels induce lysosomal damage and autophagy dysfunction in Niemann Pick disease type A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabandé-Rodríguez, E; Boya, P; Labrador, V; Dotti, C G; Ledesma, M D

    2014-01-01

    Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), which is caused by loss of function mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) gene, is a lysosomal storage disorder leading to neurodegeneration. Yet, lysosomal dysfunction and its consequences in the disease are poorly characterized. Here we show that undegraded molecules build up in neurons of acid sphingomyelinase knockout mice and in fibroblasts from NPA patients in which autophagolysosomes accumulate. The latter is not due to alterations in autophagy initiation or autophagosome–lysosome fusion but because of inefficient autophago–lysosomal clearance. This, in turn, can be explained by lysosomal membrane permeabilization leading to cytosolic release of Cathepsin B. High sphingomyelin (SM) levels account for these effects as they can be induced in control cells on addition of the lipid and reverted on SM-lowering strategies in ASM-deficient cells. These results unveil a relevant role for SM in autophagy modulation and characterize autophagy anomalies in NPA, opening new perspectives for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24488099

  4. Ubiquitin trafficking to the lysosome: keeping the house tidy and getting rid of unwanted guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Georgiana E; Russell, David G

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial killing by autophagic delivery to the lysosomal compartment has been shown for Mycobacteria, Streptococcus, Shigella, Legionella and Salmonella, indicating an important role for this conserved trafficking pathway for the control of intracellular bacterial pathogens.(1-5) In a recent study we found that solubilized lysosomes isolated from bone marrow-derived macrophages had potent antibacterial properties against M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis that were associated with ubiquitin and ubiquitin-derived peptides. We propose that ubiquitinated proteins are delivered to the lysosomal compartment, where degradation by lysosomal proteinases generates ubiquitin-derived peptides with antimycobacterial properties. This surprising finding provokes a number of questions regarding the nature and trafficking of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-modified proteins in mammalian cells. We discuss the possible role(s) that the multivesicular body (MVB), the late endosome and the autophagosome may play in trafficking of ubiquitinated proteins to the lysosome.

  5. The effects of hydrocortisone and glycyrrhizine on the enzyme releases of arylsulfatase and hyaluronidase from lysosomes of liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, T; Tokawa, Y; Ogasawara, T; Sato, K; Kan, M

    1978-03-15

    Hydrocortisone and glycyrrhizine act as both stabilizers and labilizers of the lysosomes of liver. The effect of both agents on the lysosomes is changeable according to the duration of their administration.

  6. Metallothionein-3 regulates lysosomal function in cultured astrocytes under both normal and oxidative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Jeong; Park, Mi-Ha; Kim, Hyun-Jae; Koh, Jae-Young

    2010-08-01

    Cellular zinc plays a key role in lysosomal change and cell death in neurons and astrocytes under oxidative stress. Here, using astrocytes lacking metallothionein-3 (MT3), a potential source of labile zinc in the brain, we studied the role of MT3 in oxidative stress responses. H(2)O(2) induced a large increase in labile zinc in wild-type (WT) astrocytes, but stimulated only a modest rise in MT3-null astrocytes. In addition, H(2)O(2)-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death were comparably attenuated in MT3-null astrocytes. Expression and glycosylation of Lamp1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 1) and Lamp2 were increased in MT3-null astrocytes, and the activities of several lysosomal enzymes were significantly reduced, indicating an effect of MT3 on lysosomal components. Consistent with lysosomal dysfunction in MT3-null cells, the level of LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3), a marker of early autophagy, was increased by oxidative stress in WT astrocytes, but not in MT3-null cells. Similar changes in Lamp1, LC3, and cathepsin-D were induced by the lysosomal inhibitors bafilomycin A1, chloroquine, and monensin, indicating that lysosomal dysfunction may lie upstream of changes observed in MT3-null astrocytes. Consistent with this idea, lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol and lipofuscin were augmented in MT3-null astrocytes. Similar to the results seen in MT3-null cells, MT3 knockdown by siRNA inhibited oxidative stress-induced increases in zinc and LMP. These results indicate that MT3 may play a key role in normal lysosomal function in cultured astrocytes.

  7. Mild MPP(+) exposure impairs autophagic degradation through a novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyara, Masatsugu; Kotake, Yaichiro; Tokunaga, Wataru; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, but its underlying cause remains unknown. Although recent studies using PD-related neurotoxin MPP(+) suggest autophagy involvement in the pathogenesis of PD, the effect of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of PD, remains largely unclear. We examined the effect of mild MPP(+) exposure (10 and 200 μM for 48 h), which induces a more slowly developing cell death, on autophagic processes and the mechanistic differences with acute MPP(+) toxicity (2.5 and 5 mM for 24 h). In SH-SY5Y cells, mild MPP(+) exposure predominantly inhibited autophagosome degradation, whereas acute MPP(+) exposure inhibited both autophagosome degradation and basal autophagy. Mild MPP(+) exposure reduced lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D activity without changing lysosomal acidity, whereas acute exposure decreased lysosomal density. Lysosome biogenesis enhancers trehalose and rapamycin partially alleviated mild MPP(+) exposure induced impaired autophagosome degradation and cell death, but did not prevent the pathogenic response to acute MPP(+) exposure, suggesting irreversible lysosomal damage. We demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation by MPP(+) exposure and mechanistic differences between mild and acute MPP(+) toxicities. Mild MPP(+) toxicity impaired autophagosome degradation through novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanisms. Sustained mild lysosomal damage may contribute to PD. We examined the effects of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of Parkinson's disease, in SH-SY5Y cells. This study demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation through a reduction in lysosomal cathepsin D activity without altering lysosomal acidity by mild MPP(+) exposure. Mechanistic differences between acute and mild MPP(+) toxicity were also observed. Sustained mild damage of lysosome may be an underlying cause

  8. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Jäättelä, Marja

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 siRNAs was preceded by lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and all identified siRNAs induced several changes in the endo-lysosomal compartment, i.e. increased lysosomal volume (KIF11, KIF20A, KIF25, MYO1G, MYH1), increased cysteine cathepsin activity (KIF20A, KIF25), altered lysosomal localization (KIF25, MYH1, TPM2), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide or cisplatin. Similarly to KIF11 siRNA, the KIF11 inhibitor monastrol induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and sensitized several cancer cell lines to siramesine. While KIF11 inhibitors are under clinical development as mitotic blockers, our data reveal a new function for KIF11 in controlling lysosomal stability and introduce six other molecular motors as putative cancer drug targets.

  9. Oxidant-induced autophagy and ferritin degradation contribute to epithelial–mesenchymal transition through lysosomal iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioutas, Apostolos; Vainikka, Linda K; Kentson, Magnus; Dam-Larsen, Sören; Wennerström, Urban; Jacobson, Petra; Persson, Hans Lennart

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 triggers epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) through autophagy, which is partly driven by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to determine whether leaking lysosomes and enhanced degradation of H-ferritin could be involved in EMT and whether it could be possible to prevent EMT by iron chelation targeting of the lysosome. Materials and methods EMT, H-ferritin, and autophagy were evaluated in TGF-β1-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells cultured in vitro using Western blotting, with the additional morphological assessment of EMT. By using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, lysosomes and ROS were assessed by acridine orange and 6-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate assays, respectively. Results TGF-β1-stimulated cells demonstrated a loss of H-ferritin, which was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and inhibitors of lysosomal degradation. TGF-β1 stimulation generated ROS and autophagosome formation and led to EMT, which was further promoted by the additional ROS-generating cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α. Lysosomes of TGF-β1-stimulated cells were sensitized to oxidants but also completely protected by lysosomal loading with dextran-bound deferoxamine (DFO). Autophagy and EMT were prevented by NAC, DFO, and inhibitors of autophagy and lysosomal degradation. Conclusion The findings of this study support the role of enhanced autophagic degradation of H-ferritin as a mechanism for increasing the vulnerability of lysosomes to iron-driven oxidant injury that triggers further autophagy during EMT. This study proposes that lysosomal leakage is a novel pathway of TGF-β1-induced EMT that may be prevented by iron-chelating drugs that target the lysosome.

  10. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-01-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain. PMID:9742219

  11. Septins as modulators of endo-lysosomal membrane traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungyeun Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins constitute a family of GTP-binding proteins, which assemble into non-polar filaments in a nucleotide-dependent manner. These filaments can be recruited to negatively charged membrane surfaces. When associated with membranes septin filaments can act as diffusion barriers, which confine subdomains of distinct biological functions. In addition, they serve scaffolding roles by recruiting cytosolic proteins and other cytoskeletal elements. Septins have been implicated in a large variety of membrane-dependent processes, including cytokinesis, signaling, cell migration, and membrane traffic, and several family members have been implicated in disease. However, surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying their biological functions. This review summarizes evidence in support of regulatory roles of septins during endo-lysosomal sorting, with a particular focus on phosphoinositides, which serve as spatial landmarks guiding septin recruitment to distinct subcellular localizations.

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Cytoplasmic Domain Affects ErbB Protein Degradation by the Lysosomal and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Glogowska

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic domains of EGF-like ligands, including EGF cytoplasmic domain (EGFcyt, have important biological functions. Using specific constructs and peptides of human EGF cytoplasmic domain, we demonstrate that EGFcyt facilitates lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation, and this coincided with growth inhibition of human thyroid and glioma carcinoma cells. EGFcyt and exon 22–23-encoded peptide (EGF22.23 enhanced procathepsin B (procathB expression and procathB-mediated lysosomal degradation of EGFR/ErbB1 as determined by inhibitors for procathB and the lysosomal ATPase inhibitor BafA1. Presence of mbEGFctF, EGFcyt, EGF22.23, and exon 23-encoded peptides suppressed the expression of the deubiqitinating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1. This coincided with hyperubiquitination of total cellular proteins and ErbB1/2 and reduced proteasome activity. Upon small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of endogenously expressed UCH-L1, a similar hyperubiquitinylation phenotype, reduced ErbB1/2 content, and attenuated growth was observed. The exon 23-encoded peptide region of EGFcyt was important for these biologic actions. Structural homology modeling of human EGFcyt showed that this molecular region formed an exposed surface loop. Peptides derived from this EGFcyt loop structure may aid in the design of novel peptide therapeutics aimed at inhibiting growth of cancer cells.

  13. Lysosomal exoglycosidases and cathepsin D in colon adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Szajda, Sławomir D; Kępka, Alina; Waszkiewicz, Magdalena; Roszkowska-Jakimiec, Wiesława; Wojewódzka-Żeleźniakowicz, Marzena; Milewska, Anna J; Dadan, Jacek; Szulc, Agata; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Ladny, Jerzy R

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the structure of membrane glycoconjugates and activity of glycosidases and proteases are important in tumor formation. The aim of the study was to compare the specific activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase (HEX), its isoenzymes A (HEX A) and B (HEX B), β-D-galactosidase (GAL), α-fucosidase (FUC), and α-mannosidase (MAN) with the activity of cathepsin D (CD) in serum, urine, and carcinoma tissue of patients with colon adenocarcinoma. The specific activity of HEX, HEX A, HEX B, GAL, FUC, MAN, and CD was assayed in serum, urine, and carcinoma tissue of 12 patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Lysosomal exoglycosidases and CD have similar specific activity in colon adenocarcinoma tissue and urine, which is higher than their activity in serum (with the exception of the highest specific activity of CD in urine). A positive correlation was observed between the specific activity of CD and that of HEX, HEX A, FUC, and MAN in the carcinoma tissue and urine as well as between CD and GAL in the urine of patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Negative correlations were observed between protein levels and the specific activity of HEX, HEX A, FUC, MAN, and CD in the carcinoma tissue and urine, and between protein levels and GAL in urine. Increased degradation and remodeling of glycoconjugates in the colon adenocarcinoma tissue is reflected by increased specific activity of exoglycosidases and CD. The results suggest a strong effect of exoglycosidase action on tissue degradation and a potential role of exoglycosidases in the initiation of proteolysis.

  14. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanocarrier Improved Cellular Transport of Lysosomal Cholesterol in Human Sterol Carrier Protein-Deficient Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Da-Eun; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Jeongmin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2), which is not found in tissues of people with Zellweger syndrome, facilitates the movement of cholesterol within cells, resulting in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient cells. This study investigated whether synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanocarrier (sHDL-NC) improves the cellular transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts. Human SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts were incubated with [(3)H-cholesterol]LDL as a source of cholesterol and sHDL-NC. The cells were fractionated by centrifugation permit tracking of [(3)H]-cholesterol from lysosome into plasma membrane. Furthermore, cellular content of cholesteryl ester as a storage form and mRNA expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor were measured to support the cholesterol transport to plasma membrane. Incubation with sHDL-NC for 8 h significantly increased uptake of [(3)H]-cholesterol to lysosome by 53% and further enhanced the transport of [(3)H]-cholesterol to plasma membrane by 32%. Treatment with sHDL-NC significantly reduced cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R). In conclusion, sHDL-NC enables increased transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane. In addition, these data were indirectly supported by decreased cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased gene expression of LDL-R. Therefore, sHDL-NC may be a useful vehicle for transporting cholesterol, which may help to prevent accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts.

  15. Antioxidant, genotoxic and lysosomal biomarkers in the freshwater bivalve (Unio pictorum) transplanted in a metal polluted river basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Patrizia; Frenzilli, Giada; Benedetti, Maura; Bernardeschi, Margherita; Falleni, Alessandra; Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Nigro, Marco

    2010-10-01

    The freshwater painter's mussel (Unio pictorum) was used as sentinel species to assess the chemical disturbance in an Italian river (the river Cecina) characterized by elevated levels of trace metals of both natural and anthropogenic origin. Organisms were transplanted for 4 weeks in different locations of the river basin and the bioaccumulation of metals was integrated with a wide battery of biomarkers consisting of oxidative, genotoxic and lysosomal responses. Such parameters included the levels of individual antioxidants (catalase, glutathione-S-transferases, glutathione reductase, Se-dependent and Se-independent glutathione peroxidases, total glutathione), the total oxyradical scavenging capacity (TOSC), metallothionein-like proteins, the assessment of DNA integrity, chromosomal damages and lysosomal membrane stability. Elevated levels of several metals were measured in sediments, but the relatively low tissue concentrations suggested a moderate bioaccumulation, possibly due to a high excretion efficiency, of U. pictorum and/or to a limited bioavailability of these elements, partly deriving from erosion of bedrocks. Among antioxidant responses, those based on glutathione metabolism and the activity of catalase were mostly affected in bivalves showing a significant accumulation of arsenic, mercury and/or nickel. In these specimens, the content of glutathione and the activities of glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidases (H2O2) were respectively 9-, 6- and 4-fold lower than in controls, while a 3-fold increase was observed for catalase. Despite some differences in the response of individual antioxidants, a significant reduction of the capability to neutralize peroxyl radicals was observed in bivalves caged in all the impacted sites of the river basin; these organisms also exhibited a significant impairment at the DNA, chromosomal and lysosomal levels. Considering the mild contamination gradient in the investigated area, the overall results suggested that

  16. COOH-terminal isoleucine of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 is optimal for its efficient targeting to dense secondary lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaki, Kenji; Suenobu, Michihisa; Mukaida, Maki; Michihara, Akihiro; Wada, Ikuo

    2010-12-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) consists of a highly glycosylated luminal domain, a single-transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic tail that possesses a lysosome-targeting signal (GYQTI(382)) at the COOH terminus. It is hypothesized that the COOH-terminal isoleucine, I(382), could be substituted with any other bulky hydrophobic amino acid residue for LAMP-1 to exclusively localize in lysosomes. In order to test this hypothesis, we compared subcellular distribution of four substitution mutants with phenylalanine, leucine, methionine and valine at the COOH-terminus (termed I382F, I382L, I382M and I382V, respectively) with that of wild-type (WT)-LAMP-1. Double-labelled immunofluorescence analyses showed that these substitution mutants were localized as significantly to late endocytic organelles as WT-LAMP-1. However, the quantitative subcellular fractionation study revealed different distribution of WT-LAMP-1 and these four COOH-terminal mutants in late endosomes and dense secondary lysosomes. WT-LAMP-1 was accumulated three to six times more in the dense lysosomal fraction than the four mutants. The level of WT-LAMP-1 in late endosomal fraction was comparable to those of I382F, I382M and I382V. Conversely, I382L in the late endosomal fraction was approximately three times more abundant than WT-LAMP-1. These findings define the presence of isoleucine residue at the COOH-terminus of LAMP-1 as critical in governing its efficient delivery to secondary lysosomes and its ratio of lysosomes to late endosomes.

  17. Combined effects of thermal stress and Cd on lysosomal biomarkers and transcription of genes encoding lysosomal enzymes and HSP70 in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izagirre, Urtzi; Errasti, Aitzpea; Bilbao, Eider; Múgica, María; Marigómez, Ionan

    2014-04-01

    In estuaries and coastal areas, intertidal organisms may be subject to thermal stress resulting from global warming, together with pollution. In the present study, the combined effects of thermal stress and exposure to Cd were investigated in the endo-lysosomal system of digestive cells in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were maintained for 24h at 18°C and 26°C seawater temperature in absence and presence of 50 μg Cd/L seawater. Cadmium accumulation in digestive gland tissue, lysosomal structural changes and membrane stability were determined. Semi-quantitative PCR was applied to reveal the changes elicited by the different experimental conditions in hexosaminidase (hex), β-glucuronidase (gusb), cathepsin L (ctsl) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene transcription levels. Thermal stress provoked lysosomal enlargement whilst Cd-exposure led to fusion of lysosomes. Both thermal stress and Cd-exposure caused lysosomal membrane destabilisation. hex, gusb and ctsl genes but not hsp70 gene were transcriptionally up-regulated as a result of thermal stress. In contrast, all the studied genes were transcriptionally down-regulated in response to Cd-exposure. Cd bioaccumulation was comparable at 18°C and 26°C seawater temperatures but interactions between thermal stress and Cd-exposure were remarkable both in lysosomal biomarkers and in gene transcription. hex, gusb and ctsl genes, reacted to elevated temperature in absence of Cd but not in Cd-exposed mussels. Therefore, thermal stress resulting from global warming might influence the use and interpretation of lysosomal biomarkers in marine pollution monitoring programmes and, vice versa, the presence of pollutants may condition the capacity of mussels to respond against thermal stress in a climate change scenario.

  18. Learning facilitating leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2016-01-01

    in teaching facilitation and the literature. These types of skills are most effectively acquired by combining conceptual lectures, classroom exercises and the facilitation of groups in a real-life context. The paper also reflects certain ‘shadow sides’ related to facilitation observed by the students...

  19. Antimicrobial Properties of Lysosomal Enzymes Immobilized on NH₂Functionalized Silica-Encapsulated Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seung Hyuck; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, So Jeong; Le, Thai-Hoang; Kim, Pil; Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-01-01

    The immobilization efficiency, antimicrobial activity and recovery of lysosomal enzymes on NH2 functionalized magnetite nanoparticles have been studied under various conditions. The immobi- lization efficiency depends upon the ratio of the amount of enzyme and magnetite and it shows an increase with magnetite concentration which is due to the presence of amine group at the magnetite surface that leads to a strong attraction. The optimized reaction time to immobilize the lysosomal enzymes on magnetite was determined by using a rolling method. The immobilization efficiency increases with reaction time and reached a plateau after 5 minutes and then remained constant for 10 minutes. However, after 30 minutes the immobilization efficiency decreased to 85%, which is due to the weaker electrostatic interactions between magnetite and detached lysosomal enzymes. The recovery and stability of immobilized lysosomal enzymes has also been studied. The antimicrobial activity was almost 100% but it decreased upon reuse and no activity was observed after its reuse for seven times. The storage stability of lysosomal enzymes as an antimicrobial agent was about 88%, which decreased to 53% after one day and all activity of immobilized lysosomal enzymes was maintained after five days. Thus, the lysosomal enzymes immobilized on magnetite nanoparticles could potentially be used as antimicrobial agents to remove bacteria.

  20. Involvement of lysosomes in the uptake of macromolecular material by bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperdoes, F R; Van Roy, J

    1982-09-01

    To investigate whether the lysosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are capable of uptake of macromolecules after internalization by the cell, we used Triton WR-1339, a non-digestible macromolecular compound, which is known to cause a marked decrease in the density of hepatic lysosomes due to massive intralysosomal storage. Intraperitoneal administration of 0.4 g/kg Triton WR-1339 to rats infected with T. brucei led to the development of a large vacuole in the trypanosomes between nucleus and kinetoplast within 22 h. Higher doses (2 g/kg) led to the disappearance of the trypanosomes from the blood and resulted in permanent cures (greater than 100 days). Lysosomes isolated from the trypanosomes of animals treated with a sub-curative dose showed a decrease in equilibrium density of 0.03 g/cm3 in sucrose gradients. These lysosomes were partly damaged as evidenced by a reduction in latency and an increase in the non-sedimentable part of lysosomal enzymes. We conclude that acid proteinase and alpha-mannosidase-containing organelles of T. brucei take up exogenous macromolecules and must therefore be considered as true lysosomes and that Triton WR-1339 acts in T. brucei as a true lysosomotropic drug. Its trypanocidal action probably results from an interference with lysosomal function.

  1. TRPML cation channels regulate the specialized lysosomal compartment of vertebrate B-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yumei; Dayalu, Rashmi; Matthews, Sharon A; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2006-12-01

    B-lymphocytes possess a specialized lysosomal compartment, the regulated transformation of which has been implicated in B-cell antigen presentation. Members of the mucolipin (TRPML) family of cation channels have been implicated in regulated vesicular transport in several tissues, but a role for TRPML function in lymphocyte vesicular transport physiology has not been previously described. To address the role of TRPML proteins in lymphocyte vesicular transport, we analyzed the lysosomal compartment in cultured B-lymphocytes engineered to lack TRPML1 or after expression of N- or C-terminal GFP fusion proteins of TRPML1 or TRPML2. Consistent with previous analyses of lymphocytes derived from human patients with mutations in TRPML1, we were not able to detect abnormalities in the lysosomes of TRPML1-deficient DT40 B-lymphocytes. However, while N-terminal GFP fusions of TRPML2 localized to normal appearing lysosomes, C-terminal GFP fusions of either TRPML1 or TRPML2 acted to antagonize endogenous TRPML function, localizing to large vesicular structures, the histological properties of which were indistinguishable from the enlarged lysosomes observed in affected tissues of TRPML1-deficient humans. Endocytosed B-cell receptors were delivered to these enlarged lysosomes, demonstrating that a TRPML-dependent process is required for normal regulation of the specialized lysosome compartment of vertebrate B-lymphocytes.

  2. Chlamydia species-dependent differences in the growth requirement for lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot P Ouellette

    Full Text Available Genome reduction is a hallmark of obligate intracellular pathogens such as Chlamydia, where adaptation to intracellular growth has resulted in the elimination of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Accordingly, chlamydiae rely heavily on the host cell for nutrients yet their specific source is unclear. Interestingly, chlamydiae grow within a pathogen-defined vacuole that is in close apposition to lysosomes. Metabolically-labeled uninfected host cell proteins were provided as an exogenous nutrient source to chlamydiae-infected cells, and uptake and subsequent labeling of chlamydiae suggested lysosomal degradation as a source of amino acids for the pathogen. Indeed, Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1, an inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+/ATPase that blocks lysosomal acidification and functions, impairs the growth of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae, and these effects are especially profound in C. pneumoniae. BafA1 induced the marked accumulation of material within the lysosomal lumen, which was due to the inhibition of proteolytic activities, and this response inhibits chlamydiae rather than changes in lysosomal acidification per se, as cathepsin inhibitors also inhibit the growth of chlamydiae. Finally, the addition of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis, compromises the ability of lysosomal inhibitors to block chlamydial growth, suggesting chlamydiae directly access free amino acids in the host cytosol as a preferred source of these nutrients. Thus, chlamydiae co-opt the functions of lysosomes to acquire essential amino acids.

  3. Eucommia ulmoides cortex, geniposide and aucubin regulate lipotoxicity through the inhibition of lysosomal BAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Mi-Rin; Lee, Hwa-Young; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the inhibition of hepatic dyslipidemia by Eucommia ulmoides extract (EUE). Using a screening assay for BAX inhibition we determined that EUE regulates BAX-induced cell death. Among various cell death stimuli tested EUE regulated palmitate-induced cell death, which involves lysosomal BAX translocation. EUE rescued palmitate-induced inhibition of lysosomal V-ATPase, α-galactosidase, α-mannosidase, and acid phosphatase, and this effect was reversed by bafilomycin, a lysosomal V-ATPase inhibitor. The active components of EUE, aucubin and geniposide, showed similar inhibition of palmitate-induced cell death to that of EUE through enhancement of lysosome activity. Consistent with these in vitro findings, EUE inhibited the dyslipidemic condition in a high-fat diet animal model by regulating the lysosomal localization of BAX. This study demonstrates that EUE regulates lipotoxicity through a novel mechanism of enhanced lysosomal activity leading to the regulation of lysosomal BAX activation and cell death. Our findings further indicate that geniposide and aucubin, active components of EUE, may be therapeutic candidates for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  4. Action of low-energy monochromatic coherent light on the stability of retinal lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitsina, Irina P.; Leus, N. F.

    1995-05-01

    The data had been obtained during the experiment in vitro by irradiation of solubilized lysosomal enzymes, retinal homogenates and native lysosomes enabled us to conclude that the laser beam ((lambda) equals 632.8 nm, power density from 0.1 to 15.0 mWt/cm2) acts on the level of membranous structures of lysosomes. During irradiation of rabbits eyes in vitro with an unfocused laser beam (power density on the cornea aur face from 0.01 to 15.0 mWt/cm2 was shown, that low-energy, ranged from 0.01 to 1.0 mWt/cm2 promotes stabilization of lysosomal membranes. Irradiation with laser beam of 8.0 mWt/cm2 and more power induces destabilization of lysosomal membranes. We have also shown that vitamins A and E effecting membranotropic on lysosomes may be corrected by low-energy radiation of helium-neon laser. It is substantiated experimentally that the stabilizing effect of vitamin E may be intensified in case of the combined action of laser radiation on lysosomes. The labilizing effect of vitamin A on membranes of organelles, as was studied, may be weakened by application of laser radiation of low intensities.

  5. Lysosomal cholesterol accumulation: driver on the road to inflammation during atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, T; Walenbergh, S M A; Hofker, M H; Shiri-Sverdlov, R

    2014-05-01

    Many studies show an association between the accumulation of cholesterol inside lysosomes and the progression towards inflammatory disease states that are closely related to obesity. While in the past, the knowledge regarding lysosomal cholesterol accumulation was limited to its association with plaque severity during atherosclerosis, recently, a growing body of evidence indicates a causal link between lysosomal cholesterol accumulation and inflammation. These findings make lysosomal cholesterol accumulation an important target for intervention in metabolic diseases that are characterized by the presence of an inflammatory response. In this review, we aim to show the importance of cholesterol trapping inside lysosomes to the development of inflammation by focusing upon cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in particular. We summarize current data supporting the hypothesis that lysosomal cholesterol accumulation plays a key role in the development of inflammation during atherosclerosis and NASH. In addition, potential mechanisms by which disturbed lysosomal function can trigger the inflammatory response, the challenges in improving cholesterol trafficking in macrophages and recent successful research directions will be discussed.

  6. Autophagic lysosome reformation dysfunction in glucocerebrosidase deficient cells: relevance to Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Joana; Gegg, Matthew E; Migdalska-Richards, Anna; Doherty, Mary K; Whitfield, Phillip D; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2016-08-15

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene mutations increase the risk of Parkinson disease (PD). While the cellular mechanisms associating GBA1 mutations and PD are unknown, loss of the glucocerebrosidase enzyme (GCase) activity, inhibition of autophagy and increased α-synuclein levels have been implicated. Here we show that autophagy lysosomal reformation (ALR) is compromised in cells lacking functional GCase. ALR is a cellular process controlled by mTOR which regenerates functional lysosomes from autolysosomes formed during macroautophagy. A decrease in phopho-S6K levels, a marker of mTOR activity, was observed in models of GCase deficiency, including primary mouse neurons and the PD patient derived fibroblasts with GBA1 mutations, suggesting that ALR is compromised. Importantly Rab7, a GTPase crucial for endosome-lysosome trafficking and ALR, accumulated in GCase deficient cells, supporting the notion that lysosomal recycling is impaired. Recombinant GCase treatment reversed ALR inhibition and lysosomal dysfunction. Moreover, ALR dysfunction was accompanied by impairment of macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy, increased levels of total and phosphorylated (S129) monomeric α-synuclein, evidence of amyloid oligomers and increased α-synuclein release. Concurrently, we found increased cholesterol and altered glucosylceramide homeostasis which could compromise ALR. We propose that GCase deficiency in PD inhibits lysosomal recycling. Consequently neurons are unable to maintain the pool of mature and functional lysosomes required for the autophagic clearance of α-synuclein, leading to the accumulation and spread of pathogenic α-synuclein species in the brain. Since GCase deficiency and lysosomal dysfunction occur with ageing and sporadic PD pathology, the decrease in lysosomal reformation may be a common feature in PD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Burkard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs. Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV. Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  8. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, Christine; Verheije, Monique H; Wicht, Oliver; van Kasteren, Sander I; van Kuppeveld, Frank J; Haagmans, Bart L; Pelkmans, Lucas; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2014-11-01

    Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs). Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV). Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  9. Combined effects of thermal stress and Cd on lysosomal biomarkers and transcription of genes encoding lysosomal enzymes and HSP70 in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izagirre, Urtzi; Errasti, Aitzpea; Bilbao, Eider; Múgica, María; Marigómez, Ionan, E-mail: ionan.marigomez@ehu.es

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Thermal stress and Cd caused lysosomal enlargement and membrane destabilisation. • hex, gusb and ctsl but not hsp70 were up-regulated at elevated temperature but down-regulated by Cd. • Thermal stress influenced lysosomal responses to Cd exposure. • The presence of Cd jeopardised responsiveness against thermal stress. - Abstract: In estuaries and coastal areas, intertidal organisms may be subject to thermal stress resulting from global warming, together with pollution. In the present study, the combined effects of thermal stress and exposure to Cd were investigated in the endo-lysosomal system of digestive cells in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were maintained for 24 h at 18 °C and 26 °C seawater temperature in absence and presence of 50 μg Cd/L seawater. Cadmium accumulation in digestive gland tissue, lysosomal structural changes and membrane stability were determined. Semi-quantitative PCR was applied to reveal the changes elicited by the different experimental conditions in hexosaminidase (hex), β-glucuronidase (gusb), cathepsin L (ctsl) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene transcription levels. Thermal stress provoked lysosomal enlargement whilst Cd-exposure led to fusion of lysosomes. Both thermal stress and Cd-exposure caused lysosomal membrane destabilisation. hex, gusb and ctsl genes but not hsp70 gene were transcriptionally up-regulated as a result of thermal stress. In contrast, all the studied genes were transcriptionally down-regulated in response to Cd-exposure. Cd bioaccumulation was comparable at 18 °C and 26 °C seawater temperatures but interactions between thermal stress and Cd-exposure were remarkable both in lysosomal biomarkers and in gene transcription. hex, gusb and ctsl genes, reacted to elevated temperature in absence of Cd but not in Cd-exposed mussels. Therefore, thermal stress resulting from global warming might influence the use and interpretation of lysosomal biomarkers in marine pollution

  10. Lysosomal glycosphingolipid catabolism by acid ceramidase: formation of glycosphingoid bases during deficiency of glycosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Appelman, Monique D; Verhoek, Marri; Strijland, Anneke; Mirzaian, Mina; Scheij, Saskia; Ouairy, Cécile M; Lahav, Daniel; Wisse, Patrick; Overkleeft, Herman S; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-03-01

    Glycosphingoid bases are elevated in inherited lysosomal storage disorders with deficient activity of glycosphingolipid catabolizing glycosidases. We investigated the molecular basis of the formation of glucosylsphingosine and globotriaosylsphingosine during deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (Gaucher disease) and α-galactosidase A (Fabry disease). Independent genetic and pharmacological evidence is presented pointing to an active role of acid ceramidase in both processes through deacylation of lysosomal glycosphingolipids. The potential pathophysiological relevance of elevated glycosphingoid bases generated through this alternative metabolism in patients suffering from lysosomal glycosidase defects is discussed.

  11. Roles of CUP-5, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of human TRPML1, in lysosome and gut granule biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Hanna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CUP-5 is a Transient Receptor Potential protein in C. elegans that is the orthologue of mammalian TRPML1. Loss of TRPML1 results in the lysosomal storage disorder Mucolipidosis type IV. Loss of CUP-5 results in embryonic lethality and the accumulation of enlarged yolk granules in developing intestinal cells. The embryonic lethality of cup-5 mutants is rescued by mutations in mrp-4, which is required for gut granule differentiation. Gut granules are intestine-specific lysosome-related organelles that accumulate birefringent material. This link between CUP-5 and gut granules led us to determine the roles of CUP-5 in lysosome and gut granule biogenesis in developing intestinal cells. Results We show that CUP-5 protein localizes to lysosomes, but not to gut granules, in developing intestinal cells. Loss of CUP-5 results in defects in endo-lysosomal transport in developing intestinal cells of C. elegans embryos. This ultimately leads to the appearance of enlarged terminal vacuoles that show defective lysosomal degradation and that have lysosomal and endosomal markers. In contrast, gut granule biogenesis is normal in the absence of CUP-5. Furthermore, loss of CUP-5 does not result in inappropriate fusion or mixing of content between lysosomes and gut granules. Conclusions Using an in vivo model of MLIV, we show that there is a defect in lysosomal transport/biogenesis that is earlier than the presumed function of TRPML1 in terminal lysosomes. Our results indicate that CUP-5 is required for the biogenesis of lysosomes but not of gut granules. Thus, cellular phenotypes in Mucolipidosis type IV are likely not due to defects in lysosome-related organelle biogenesis, but due to progressive defects in lysosomal transport that lead to severe lysosomal dysfunction.

  12. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated memb

  13. Lysosome dysfunction enhances oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through ubiquitinated protein accumulation in Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunyan; Huang, Xiaowei; Xu, Ye; Li, Hongyan; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jiateng; Kang, Jinsong; Liu, Yuhe; Sun, Liankun

    2013-01-01

    The role of lysosomal system in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cancer cells is not fully understood. Menadione is frequently used as oxidative stress model. It is indicated that menadione could induce autophagy in Hela cells. In the present study, we examined whether the lysosomal inhibitor, ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl) could prevent the autophagy flux by inhibiting the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes and enhance apoptosis induced by menadione via mitochondrial pathway. The results demonstrated generation and accumulation of reactive oxygen species and increased levels of ubiquitinated proteins and GRP78 in cells treated with both menadione and NH(4)Cl. Our data indicates that lysosomal system through autophagy plays an important role in preventing menadione-induced apoptosis in Hela cells by clearing misfolded proteins, which alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  14. Lysosomal acid lipase: At the crossroads of normal and atherogenic cholesterol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Dubland

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Unregulated cellular uptake of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the arterial intima leads to the formation of foam cells in atherosclerosis. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL plays a crucial role in both lipoprotein lipid catabolism and excess lipid accumulation as it is the primary enzyme that hydrolyzes cholesteryl esters derived from both low density lipoprotein (LDL and modified forms of LDL. Evidence suggests that as atherosclerosis progresses, accumulation of excess free cholesterol in lysosomes leads to impairment of LAL activity, resulting in accumulation of cholesteryl esters in the lysosome as well as the cytosol in foam cells. Impaired metabolism and release of cholesterol from lysosomes can lead to downstream defects in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 regulation, needed to offload excess cholesterol from plaque foam cells. This review focuses on the role LAL plays in normal cholesterol metabolism and how the associated changes in its enzymatic activity may ultimately contribute to atherosclerosis progression.

  15. Enantioselective effects of methamidophos on the coelomocytes lysosomal membrane stability of Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linhua; Lu, Xianting; Ma, Yun

    2012-12-01

    Many of organophosphorous insecticides are chiral compounds. In this study, the enantioselective effects of organophosphate insecticide methamidophos on the coelomocytes lysosomal membrane stability of earthworm Eisenia fetida were studied: (1) The enantiomers of methamidophos were absolutely separated by high-performance liquid chromatography with a commercial chiral column; (2) The neutral red retention assay was used to judge the lysosomal membrane stability. The results showed that with the concentration increasing, lysosomal membranes have been significantly destroyed by individual stereoisomers and racemate of methamidophos. The neutral red retention times were significantly descended from 76.88 to 29.78 min. Both (+)- and (-)-methamidophos showed more prone to destroy the integrity of the lysosomal membrane than the racemate. However, the different effect between stereoisomers is slight.

  16. uPARAP/endo180 directs lysosomal delivery and degradation of collagen IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Høyer-Hansen, Maria

    2004-01-01

    transmembrane glycoprotein urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP/endo180) directs collagen IV for lysosomal delivery and degradation. In wild-type fibroblasts, fluorescently labeled collagen IV was first internalized into vesicular structures with diffuse fluorescence eventually...... appearing uniformly within the wild-type cells after longer incubation times. In these cells, some collagen-containing vesicles were identified as lysosomes by staining for LAMP-1. In contrast, collagen IV remained extracellular and associated with fiber-like structures on uPARAP/endo180-deficient...... fibroblasts. Blocking lysosomal cysteine proteases with the inhibitor E64d resulted in strong accumulation of collagen IV in lysosomes in wild-type cells, but only very weak intracellular fluorescence accumulation in uPARAP/endo180-deficient fibroblasts. We conclude that uPARAP/endo180 is critical...

  17. High resolution crystal structure of human β-glucuronidase reveals structural basis of lysosome targeting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Waheed, Abdul; Grubb, Jeffery H; Klei, Herbert E; Korolev, Sergey; Sly, William S

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  18. High Resolution Crystal Structure of Human [beta]-Glucuronidase Reveals Structural Basis of Lysosome Targeting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan, Md; Waheed, Abdul; Grubb, Jeffery; Klei, Herbert; Korolev, Sergey; Sly, William

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  19. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Christensen, Karina; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte

    Targeting lysosomes is a novel approach in cancer therapy providing a possible way of killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Recent research has thus shown that lysosome targeting compounds induce cell death in a cervix cancer cell line. Tumor stem cells in glioblastomas have...... recently been suggested to possess innate resistance mechanisms against radiation and chemotherapy possibly explaining the high level of therapeutic resistance of these tumors. Since the presence and distribution of lysosomes in tumor cells and especially in tumor stem cells in astrocytomas is unknown......, the aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of LAMP-1, a membrane bound protein in lysosomes, in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumor tissue from 23 diffuse astrocytomas, 17 anaplastic astrocytomas and 72 glioblastomas. The LAMP-1 expression was scored and compared...

  20. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated

  1. Emerging therapies for neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders - from concept to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Kim M; Hopwood, John J

    2011-10-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders are inherited metabolic diseases in which a mutation in a gene encoding a lysosomal enzyme or lysosome-related protein results in the intra-cellular accumulation of substrate and reduced cell/tissue function. Few patients with neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders have access to safe and effective treatments although many therapeutic strategies have been or are presently being studied in vivo thanks to the availability of a large number of animal models. This review will describe the comparative advancement of a variety of therapeutic strategies through the 'research pipeline'. Our goal is to provide information for clinicians, researchers and patients/families alike on the leading therapeutic candidates at this point in time, and also to provide information on emerging approaches that may provide a safe and effective treatment in the future. The length of the pipeline represents the significant and sustained effort required to move a novel concept from the laboratory into the clinic.

  2. Magnesium Modulates Doxorubicin Activity through Drug Lysosomal Sequestration and Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Valentina; Luongo, Francesca; Arduini, Daniela; Wolf, Federica I

    2016-03-21

    Magnesium is directly involved in the control of cell growth and survival, but its role in cancer biology and therapy is multifaceted; in particular, it is highly controversial whether magnesium levels can affect therapy outcomes. Here we investigated whether magnesium availability can modulate cellular responses to the widely used chemotherapeutic doxorubicin. We used an in vitro model consisting of mammary epithelial HC11 cells and found that high magnesium availability was correlated with diminished sensitivity both in cells chronically adapted to high magnesium concentrations and in acutely magnesium-supplemented cells. This decrease in sensitivity resulted from reduced intracellular doxorubicin accumulation in the face of a similar drug uptake rate. We observed that high-magnesium conditions caused a decrease in intracellular drug retention by altering drug lysosomal sequestration and trafficking. In our model, magnesium supplementation correspondingly modulated expression of the TRPM7 channel, which is known to control cytoskeletal organization and dynamics and may be involved in the proposed mechanism. Our findings suggest that magnesium supplementation in hypomagnesemic cancer patients may hinder response to therapy.

  3. Less Is More: Substrate Reduction Therapy for Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francisca Coutinho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are a group of rare, life-threatening genetic disorders, usually caused by a dysfunction in one of the many enzymes responsible for intralysosomal digestion. Even though no cure is available for any LSD, a few treatment strategies do exist. Traditionally, efforts have been mainly targeting the functional loss of the enzyme, by injection of a recombinant formulation, in a process called enzyme replacement therapy (ERT, with no impact on neuropathology. This ineffectiveness, together with its high cost and lifelong dependence is amongst the main reasons why additional therapeutic approaches are being (and have to be investigated: chaperone therapy; gene enhancement; gene therapy; and, alternatively, substrate reduction therapy (SRT, whose aim is to prevent storage not by correcting the original enzymatic defect but, instead, by decreasing the levels of biosynthesis of the accumulating substrate(s. Here we review the concept of substrate reduction, highlighting the major breakthroughs in the field and discussing the future of SRT, not only as a monotherapy but also, especially, as complementary approach for LSDs.

  4. Impaired Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein 2-dependent Peroxiredoxin 6 Delivery to Lamellar Bodies Accounts for Altered Alveolar Phospholipid Content in Adaptor Protein-3-deficient pearl Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Seunghyi; Wang, Ping; Young, Lisa R; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Weng, Xialian; Meng, Ying; Neculai, Dante; Marks, Michael S; Gonzales, Linda; Beers, Michael F; Guttentag, Susan

    2016-04-15

    The Hermansky Pudlak syndromes (HPS) constitute a family of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and bleeding diathesis, often associated with lethal lung fibrosis. HPS results from mutations in genes of membrane trafficking complexes that facilitate delivery of cargo to lysosome-related organelles. Among the affected lysosome-related organelles are lamellar bodies (LB) within alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) in which surfactant components are assembled, modified, and stored. AT2 from HPS patients and mouse models of HPS exhibit enlarged LB with increased phospholipid content, but the mechanism underlying these defects is unknown. We now show that AT2 in the pearl mouse model of HPS type 2 lacking the adaptor protein 3 complex (AP-3) fails to accumulate the soluble enzyme peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in LB. This defect reflects impaired AP-3-dependent trafficking of PRDX6 to LB, because pearl mouse AT2 cells harbor a normal total PRDX6 content. AP-3-dependent targeting of PRDX6 to LB requires the transmembrane protein LIMP-2/SCARB2, a known AP-3-dependent cargo protein that functions as a carrier for lysosomal proteins in other cell types. Depletion of LB PRDX6 in AP-3- or LIMP-2/SCARB2-deficient mice correlates with phospholipid accumulation in lamellar bodies and with defective intraluminal degradation of LB disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, AP-3-dependent LB targeting is facilitated by protein/protein interaction between LIMP-2/SCARB2 and PRDX6 in vitro and in vivo Our data provide the first evidence for an AP-3-dependent cargo protein required for the maturation of LB in AT2 and suggest that the loss of PRDX6 activity contributes to the pathogenic changes in LB phospholipid homeostasis found HPS2 patients.

  5. Learning facilitating leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper explains how engineering students at a Danish university acquired the necessary skills to become emergent facilitators of organisational development. The implications of this approach are discussed and related to relevant viewpoints and findings in the literature. The methodology deplo....... By connecting the literature, the authors’ and engineering students’ reflections on facilitator skills, this paper adds value to existing academic and practical discussions on learning facilitating leadership....

  6. Visual explorer facilitator's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Palus, Charles J

    2010-01-01

    Grounded in research and practice, the Visual Explorer™ Facilitator's Guide provides a method for supporting collaborative, creative conversations about complex issues through the power of images. The guide is available as a component in the Visual Explorer Facilitator's Letter-sized Set, Visual Explorer Facilitator's Post card-sized Set, Visual Explorer Playing Card-sized Set, and is also available as a stand-alone title for purchase to assist multiple tool users in an organization.

  7. Lysosomal Changes in Renal Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells of Male Sprague Dawley Rats Following Decalin Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    decalin-treated animal. Note large, pale, rcd-staining lysosome (-). An exfoliated epithelial cell can iu- seen in the tubular lumen containing large...photomicrograph contains an exfoliated epithelial cell (-) with enlarged, intact lysosomes. The tubule on the left half of the photomicrograph contains an...metabolism of proteins. In: Cytology , GH Bourne and JF Danielli (eds). Academ- The Kidney: Physiology and Pathophysiology, DW ic Press, NY, pp. 251-300. - ~- i :- d .L n .- 2

  8. The BH3 Mimetic Obatoclax Accumulates in Lysosomes and Causes Their Alkalinization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios A Stamelos

    Full Text Available Obatoclax belongs to a class of compounds known as BH3 mimetics which function as antagonists of Bcl-2 family apoptosis regulators. It has undergone extensive preclinical and clinical evaluation as a cancer therapeutic. Despite this, it is clear that obatoclax has additional pharmacological effects that contribute to its cytotoxic activity. It has been claimed that obatoclax, either alone or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapeutics, induces an autophagic form of cell death. In addition, obatoclax has been shown to inhibit lysosomal function, but the mechanism of this has not been elucidated. We have evaluated the mechanism of action of obatoclax in eight ovarian cancer cell lines. Consistent with its function as a BH3 mimetic, obatoclax induced apoptosis in three cell lines. However, in the remaining cell lines another form of cell death was evident because caspase activation and PARP cleavage were not observed. Obatoclax also failed to show synergy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, chemotherapeutic agents which we have previously shown to be synergistic with authentic Bcl-2 family antagonists. Obatoclax induced a profound accumulation of LC-3 but knockdown of Atg-5 or beclin had only minor effects on the activity of obatoclax in cell growth assays suggesting that the inhibition of lysosomal function rather than stimulation of autophagy may play a more prominent role in these cells. To evaluate how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function, confocal microscopy studies were conducted which demonstrated that obatoclax, which contains two basic pyrrole groups, accumulates in lysosomes. Studies using pH sensitive dyes demonstrated that obatoclax induced lysosomal alkalinization. Furthermore, obatoclax was synergistic in cell growth/survival assays with bafilomycin and chloroquine, two other drugs which cause lysosomal alkalinization. These studies explain, for the first time, how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function and suggest that

  9. Streptococcus oralis Induces Lysosomal Impairment of Macrophages via Bacterial Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus oralis, an oral commensal, belongs to the mitis group of streptococci and occasionally causes opportunistic infections, such as bacterial endocarditis and bacteremia. Recently, we found that the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is sufficient to kill human monocytes and epithelial cells, implying that streptococcal H2O2 is a cytotoxin. In the present study, we investigated whether streptococcal H2O2 impacts lysosomes, organelles of the intracellular digestive system, in relation to cell death. S. oralis infection induced the death of RAW 264 macrophages in an H2O2-dependent manner, which was exemplified by the fact that exogenous H2O2 also induced cell death. Infection with either a mutant lacking spxB, which encodes pyruvate oxidase responsible for H2O2 production, or Streptococcus mutans, which does not produce H2O2, showed less cytotoxicity. Visualization of lysosomes with LysoTracker revealed lysosome deacidification after infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2, which was corroborated by acridine orange staining. Similarly, fluorescent labeling of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 gradually disappeared during infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2 The deacidification and the following induction of cell death were inhibited by chelating iron in lysosomes. Moreover, fluorescent staining of cathepsin B indicated lysosomal destruction. However, treatment of infected cells with a specific inhibitor of cathepsin B had negligible effects on cell death; instead, it suppressed the detachment of dead cells from the culture plates. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 induces cell death with lysosomal destruction and then the released lysosomal cathepsins contribute to the detachment of the dead cells.

  10. Reduction of mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity by lysosomal cathepsins D and B in neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang Xiaosen; Liang Qiuli; Schneider Lonnie; Zhang Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Huntington's disease is caused by aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein containing more than a 36 polyQ repeat. Upregulation of macroautophagy was suggested as a neuroprotective strategy to degrade mutant huntingtin. However, macroautophagy initiation has been shown to be highly efficient in neurons whereas lysosomal activities are rate limiting. The role of the lysosomal and other proteases in Huntington is not clear. Some studies suggest that certain protease a...

  11. Action of polystyrene nanoparticles of different sizes on lysosomal function and integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Fröhlich Eleonore; Meindl Claudia; Roblegg Eva; Ebner Birgit; Absenger Markus; Pieber Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Data from environmental exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) suggest that chronic exposure may increase the incidence of lung, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Impairment of cell function by intracellular accumulation of NPs is also suspected. Many types of NPs have been detected in the endosomal-lysosomal system and, upon repeated exposure, alterations of the endosomal-lysosomal system may occur. To identify such effects we compared the effect of carboxyl polysty...

  12. Lysosomal responses to heat-shock of seasonal temperature extremes in Cd-exposed mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múgica, M; Izagirre, U; Marigómez, I

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effect of temperature extremes on lysosomal biomarkers in mussels exposed to a model toxic pollutant (Cd) at different seasons. For this purpose, temperature was elevated 10°C (from 12°C to 22°C in winter and from 18°C to 28°C in summer) for a period of 6h (heat-shock) in control and Cd-exposed mussels, and then returned back to initial one. Lysosomal membrane stability and lysosomal structural changes in digestive gland were investigated. In winter, heat-shock reduced the labilisation period (LP) of the lysosomal membrane, especially in Cd-exposed mussels, and provoked transient lysosomal enlargement. LP values recovered after the heat-shock cessation but lysosomal enlargement prevailed in both experimental groups. In summer, heat-shock induced remarkable reduction in LP and lysosomal enlargement (more markedly in Cd-exposed mussels), which recovered within 3 days. Besides, whilst heat-shock effects on LP were practically identical for Cd-exposed mussels in winter and summer, the effects were longer-lasting in summer than in winter for control mussels. Thus, lysosomal responsiveness after heat-shock was higher in summer than in winter but recovery was faster as well, and therefore the consequences of the heat shock seem to be more decisive in winter. In contrast, inter-season differences were attenuated in the presence of Cd. Consequently, mussels seem to be better prepared in summer than in winter to stand short periods of abrupt temperature change; this is, however, compromised when mussels are exposed to pollutants such as Cd.

  13. EGFRvIII escapes down-regulation due to impaired internalization and sorting to lysosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandal, Michael V; Zandi, Roza; Pedersen, Mikkel W

    2007-01-01

    . Moreover, internalized EGFRvIII is recycled rather than delivered to lysosomes. EGFRvIII binds the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl via Grb2, whereas binding via phosphorylated tyrosine residue 1045 seems to be limited. Despite c-Cbl binding, the receptor fails to become effectively ubiquitinylated. Thus, our...... results suggest that the long lifetime of EGFRvIII is caused by inefficient internalization and impaired sorting to lysosomes due to lack of effective ubiquitinylation....

  14. Observation of intracellular interactions between DNA origami and lysosomes by the fluorescence localization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Meifang; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Qiao; Tang, Yunqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ding, Baoquan; Li, Junbai

    2016-07-28

    We obtained the fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures in NIH 3T3 cells for the first time. The fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures and TIRF images of lysosomes were combined and they revealed the detailed interactions between the two structures. Quantitative analysis illustrated that the tube origami can be captured as well as degraded by lysosomes with time.

  15. Eps8 is recruited to lysosomes and subjected to chaperone-mediated autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Thilo; Younsi, Alexander; Disanza, Andrea; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Scita, Giorgio; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-07-15

    Eps8 controls actin dynamics directly through its barbed end capping and actin-bundling activity, and indirectly by regulating Rac-activation when engaged into a trimeric complex with Eps8-Abi1-Sos1. Recently, Eps8 has been associated with promotion of various solid malignancies, but neither its mechanisms of action nor its regulation in cancer cells have been elucidated. Here, we report a novel association of Eps8 with the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, which is independent from actin polymerization and specifically occurs in cancer cells. Endogenous Eps8 localized to large vesicular lysosomal structures in metastatic pancreatic cancer cell lines, such as AsPC-1 and Capan-1 that display high Eps8 levels. Additionally, ectopic expression of Eps8 increased the size of lysosomes. Structure-function analysis revealed that the region encompassing the amino acids 184-535 of Eps8 was sufficient to mediate lysosomal recruitment. Notably, this fragment harbors two KFERQ-like motifs required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Furthermore, Eps8 co-immunoprecipitated with Hsc70 and LAMP-2, which are key elements for the CMA degradative pathway. Consistently, in vitro, a significant fraction of Eps8 bound to (11.9+/-5.1%) and was incorporated into (5.3+/-6.5%) lysosomes. Additionally, Eps8 binding to lysosomes was competed by other known CMA-substrates. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that Eps8 recruitment to the lysosomal membrane was highly dynamic. Collectively, these results indicate that Eps8 in certain human cancer cells specifically localizes to lysosomes, and is directed to CMA. These results open a new field for the investigation of how Eps8 is regulated and contributes to tumor promotion in human cancers.

  16. Interaction of arylsulfatase A with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:Lysosomal enzyme-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierau, A; Dietz, F; Lange, H; Schestag, F; Parastar, A; Gieselmann, V

    1999-02-05

    The critical step in lysosomal targeting of soluble lysosomal enzymes is the recognition by an UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. The structure of the determinant common to all lysosomal enzymes for proper recognition by the phosphotransferase is not completely understood. Our current knowledge is largely based on the introduction of targeted amino acid substitutions into lysosomal enzymes and analysis of their effects on phosphotransferase recognition. We have investigated the effect of eight anti-arylsulfatase A monoclonal antibodies on the interaction of arylsulfatase A with the lysosomal enzyme phosphotransferase in vitro. We also show that a lysine-rich surface area of arylsulfatases A and B is essential for proper recognition by the phosphotransferase. Monoclonal antibodies bind to at least six different epitopes at different locations on the surface of arylsulfatase A. All antibodies bind outside the lysine-rich recognition area, but nevertheless Fab fragments of these antibodies prevent interaction of arylsulfatase A with the phosphotransferase. Our data support a model in which binding of arylsulfatase A to the phosphotransferase is not restricted to a limited surface area but involves the simultaneous recognition of large parts of arylsulfatase A.

  17. Cross-talk between TRPML1 channel, lipids and lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Norbert

    2012-03-01

    Described by the Belgian cytologist Christian De Duve in 1949,(1) lysosomes (from the Greek "digestive bodies") are ubiquitous specialized intracellular organelles that ensure the degradation/recycling of macromolecules (proteins, lipids, membranes) through the activity of specific enzymes (i.e., acid hydrolases). They receive their substrates through different internalization pathways (i.e., endocytosis, phagocytosis and autophagy) and are involved in a wide range of physiological functions from cell death and signaling to cholesterol homeostasis and plasma membrane repair.(2) In Mammals, 50 soluble lysosomal hydrolases have been described, each targeting specific substrates. They are confined in the lumen of the lysosome and require an optimum pH (i.e., pH 4.5) to work. This acidic pH compared with the slightly alkaline pH of the cytosol (i.e., ~pH 7.2) is maintained by the activity of integral lysosomal membrane proteins (LMPs, that represent the second class of lysosomal proteins), including the V-type proton (H(+))-ATPase(3) and the chloride ion channel CLC7(4) that pumps protons from the cytosol across the lysosomal membrane.

  18. TMEM175 deficiency impairs lysosomal and mitochondrial function and increases α-synuclein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinn, Sarah; Drolet, Robert E.; Cramer, Paige E.; Wong, Andus Hon-Kit; Toolan, Dawn M.; Gretzula, Cheryl A.; Voleti, Bhavya; Vassileva, Galya; Disa, Jyoti; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Stone, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder pathologically characterized by nigrostriatal dopamine neuron loss and the postmortem presence of Lewy bodies, depositions of insoluble α-synuclein, and other proteins that likely contribute to cellular toxicity and death during the disease. Genetic and biochemical studies have implicated impaired lysosomal and mitochondrial function in the pathogenesis of PD. Transmembrane protein 175 (TMEM175), the lysosomal K+ channel, is centered under a major genome-wide association studies peak for PD, making it a potential candidate risk factor for the disease. To address the possibility that variation in TMEM175 could play a role in PD pathogenesis, TMEM175 function was investigated in a neuronal model system. Studies confirmed that TMEM175 deficiency results in unstable lysosomal pH, which led to decreased lysosomal catalytic activity, decreased glucocerebrosidase activity, impaired autophagosome clearance by the lysosome, and decreased mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, TMEM175 deficiency in rat primary neurons resulted in increased susceptibility to exogenous α-synuclein fibrils. Following α-synuclein fibril treatment, neurons deficient in TMEM175 were found to have increased phosphorylated and detergent-insoluble α-synuclein deposits. Taken together, data from these studies suggest that TMEM175 plays a direct and critical role in lysosomal and mitochondrial function and PD pathogenesis and highlight this ion channel as a potential therapeutic target for treating PD. PMID:28193887

  19. Reduction of mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity by lysosomal cathepsins D and B in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouyang Xiaosen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease is caused by aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt protein containing more than a 36 polyQ repeat. Upregulation of macroautophagy was suggested as a neuroprotective strategy to degrade mutant huntingtin. However, macroautophagy initiation has been shown to be highly efficient in neurons whereas lysosomal activities are rate limiting. The role of the lysosomal and other proteases in Huntington is not clear. Some studies suggest that certain protease activities may contribute to toxicity whereas others are consistent with protection. These discrepancies may be due to a number of mechanisms including distinct effects of the specific intermediate digestion products of mutant huntingtin generated by different proteases. These observations suggested a critical need to investigate the consequence of upregulation of individual lysosomal enzyme in mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity. Results In this study, we used molecular approaches to enhance lysosomal protease activities and examined their effects on mutant huntingtin level and toxicity. We found that enhanced expression of lysosomal cathepsins D and B resulted in their increased enzymatic activities and reduced both full-length and fragmented huntingtin in transfected HEK cells. Furthermore, enhanced expression of cathepsin D or B protected against mutant huntingtin toxicity in primary neurons, and their neuroprotection is dependent on macroautophagy. Conclusions These observations demonstrate a neuroprotective effect of enhancing lysosomal cathepsins in reducing mutant huntingtin level and toxicity in transfected cells. They highlight the potential importance of neuroprotection mediated by cathepsin D or B through macroautophagy.

  20. Para-toluenesulfonamide induces tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell death through disturbing lysosomal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Liang, Chenyuan; Zhang, Zhuoyuan; Pan, Jian; Xia, Hui; Zhong, Nanshan; Li, Longjiang

    2015-11-01

    Para-toluenesulfonamide (PTS) has been implicated with anticancer effects against a variety of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of PTS on tongue squamous cell carcinoma (Tca-8113) and explored the lysosomal and mitochondrial changes after PTS treatment in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography showed that PTS selectively accumulated in Tca-8113 cells with a relatively low concentration in normal fibroblasts. Next, the effects of PTS on cell viability, invasion, and cell death were determined. PTS significantly inhibited Tca-8113 cells' viability and invasive ability with increased cancer cell death. Flow cytometric analysis and the lactate dehydrogenase release assay showed that PTS induced cancer cell death by activating apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Morphological changes, such as cellular shrinkage, nuclear condensation as well as formation of apoptotic body and secondary lysosomes, were observed, indicating that PTS might induce cell death through disturbing lysosomal stability. Lysosomal integrity assay and western blot showed that PTS increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization associated with activation of lysosomal cathepsin B. Finally, PTS was shown to inhibit ATP biosynthesis and induce the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. Therefore, our findings provide a novel insight into the use of PTS in cancer therapy.

  1. Lysosomal interaction of Akt with Phafin2: a critical step in the induction of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Matsuda-Lennikov

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the gross disposal of intracellular proteins in mammalian cells and dysfunction in this pathway has been associated with human disease. Although the serine threonine kinase Akt is suggested to play a role in this process, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Akt induces autophagy. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, Phafin2 (EAPF or PLEKHF2, a lysosomal protein with a unique structure of N-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology domain and C-terminal FYVE (Fab 1, YOTB, Vac 1, and EEA1 domain was found to interact with Akt. A sucrose gradient fractionation experiment revealed that both Akt and Phafin2 co-existed in the same lysosome enriched fraction after autophagy induction. Confocal microscopic analysis and BiFC analysis demonstrated that both Akt and Phafin2 accumulate in the lysosome after induction of autophagy. BiFC analysis using PtdIns (3P interaction defective mutant of Phafin2 demonstrated that lysosomal accumulation of the Akt-Phafin2 complex and subsequent induction of autophagy were lysosomal PtdIns (3P dependent events. Furthermore, in murine macrophages, both Akt and Phafin2 were required for digestion of fluorescent bacteria and/or LPS-induced autophagy. Taken together, these findings establish that lysosomal accumulation of Akt and Phafin2 is a critical step in the induction of autophagy via an interaction with PtdIns (3P.

  2. Activation of the transcription factor EB rescues lysosomal abnormalities in cystinotic kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rega, Laura R; Polishchuk, Elena; Montefusco, Sandro; Napolitano, Gennaro; Tozzi, Giulia; Zhang, Jinzhong; Bellomo, Francesco; Taranta, Anna; Pastore, Anna; Polishchuk, Roman; Piemonte, Fiorella; Medina, Diego L; Catz, Sergio D; Ballabio, Andrea; Emma, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by accumulation of cystine into lysosomes secondary to mutations in the cystine lysosomal transporter, cystinosin. The defect initially causes proximal tubular dysfunction (Fanconi syndrome) which in time progresses to end-stage renal disease. Cystinotic patients treated with the cystine-depleting agent, cysteamine, have improved life expectancy, delayed progression to chronic renal failure, but persistence of Fanconi syndrome. Here, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, in conditionally immortalized proximal tubular epithelial cells derived from the urine of a healthy volunteer or a cystinotic patient. Lack of cystinosin reduced TFEB expression and induced TFEB nuclear translocation. Stimulation of endogenous TFEB activity by genistein, or overexpression of exogenous TFEB lowered cystine levels within 24 hours in cystinotic cells. Overexpression of TFEB also stimulated delayed endocytic cargo processing within 24 hours. Rescue of other abnormalities of the lysosomal compartment was observed but required prolonged expression of TFEB. These abnormalities could not be corrected with cysteamine. Thus, these data show that the consequences of cystinosin deficiency are not restricted to cystine accumulation and support the role of TFEB as a therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases, in particular of cystinosis. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Novel Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis Gene MFSD8 Encodes a Putative Lysosomal Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siintola, Eija ; Topcu, Meral ; Aula, Nina ; Lohi, Hannes ; Minassian, Berge A. ; Paterson, Andrew D. ; Liu, Xiao-Qing ; Wilson, Callum ; Lahtinen, Ulla ; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa ; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina 

    2007-01-01

    The late-infantile–onset forms are the most genetically heterogeneous group among the autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorders, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The Turkish variant was initially considered to be a distinct genetic entity, with clinical presentation similar to that of other forms of late-infantile–onset NCL (LINCL), including age at onset from 2 to 7 years, epileptic seizures, psychomotor deterioration, myoclonus, loss of vision, and premature death. However, Turkish variant LINCL was recently found to be genetically heterogeneous, because mutations in two genes, CLN6 and CLN8, were identified to underlie the disease phenotype in a subset of patients. After a genomewide scan with single-nucleotide–polymorphism markers and homozygosity mapping in nine Turkish families and one Indian family, not linked to any of the known NCL loci, we mapped a novel variant LINCL locus to chromosome 4q28.1-q28.2 in five families. We identified six different mutations in the MFSD8 gene (previously denoted “MGC33302”), which encodes a novel polytopic 518–amino acid membrane protein that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of transporter proteins. MFSD8 is expressed ubiquitously, with several alternatively spliced variants. Like the majority of the previously identified NCL proteins, MFSD8 localizes mainly to the lysosomal compartment. However, the function of MFSD8 remains to be elucidated. Analysis of the genome-scan data suggests the existence of at least three more genes in the remaining five families, further corroborating the great genetic heterogeneity of LINCLs. PMID:17564970

  4. Presence of a lysosomal enzyme, arylsulfatase-A, in the prelysosome-endosome compartments of human cultured fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, B M; Yu, C Z; Chang, P L

    1989-02-01

    Although endosomes and lysosomes are associated with different subcellular functions, we present evidence that a lysosomal enzyme, arylsulfatase-A, is present in prelysosomal vesicles which constitute part of the endosomal compartment. When human cultured fibroblasts were subfractionated with Percoll gradients, arylsulfatase-A activity was enriched in three subcellular fractions: dense lysosomes, light lysosomes, and light membranous vesicles. Pulsing the cells for 1 to 10 min with the fluid-phase endocytic marker, horseradish peroxidase, showed that endosomes enriched with the marker were distributed partly in the light lysosome fraction but mainly in the light membranous fraction. By pulsing the fibroblasts for 10 min with horseradish peroxidase conjugated to colloidal gold and then staining the light membranous and light lysosomal fractions for arylsulfatase-A activity with a specific cytochemical technique, the endocytic marker was detected under the electron microscope in the same vesicles as the lysosomal enzyme. The origin of the lysosomal enzyme in this endosomal compartment was shown not to be acquired through mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated endocytosis of enzymes previously secreted from the cell. Together with our recent finding that the light membranous fraction contains prelysosomes distinct from bona fide lysosomes and was highly enriched with newly synthesized arylsulfatase-A molecules, these results demonstrate that prelysosomes also constitute part of the endosomal compartment to which intracellular lysosomal enzymes are targeted.

  5. Enhancing lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic flux by activating the transcription factor EB protects against cadmium-induced neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Huifeng; Li, Min; Tian, Li; Yang, Zhiqi; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a highly ubiquitous heavy metal, is a well-known inducer of neurotoxicity. However, the mechanism underlying cadmium-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. In this study, we found that Cd inhibits autophagosome-lysosome fusion and impairs lysosomal function by reducing the levels of lysosomal-associated membrane proteins, inhibiting lysosomal proteolysis and altering lysosomal pH, contributing to defects in autophagic clearance and subsequently leading to nerve cell death. In addition, Cd decreases transcription factor EB (TFEB) expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, Cd induces the nuclear translocation of TFEB and TFEB target-gene expression, associated with compromised lysosomal function or a compensatory effect after the impairment of the autophagic flux. Notably, restoration of the levels of lysosomal-associated membrane protein, lysosomal proteolysis, lysosomal pH and autophagic flux through Tfeb overexpression protects against Cd-induced neurotoxicity, and this protective effect is incompletely dependent on TFEB nuclear translocation. Moreover, gene transfer of the master autophagy regulator TFEB results in the clearance of toxic proteins and the correction of Cd-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. Our study is the first to demonstrate that Cd disrupts lysosomal function and autophagic flux and manipulation of TFEB signalling may be a therapeutic approach for antagonizing Cd-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:28240313

  6. TFEB activation promotes the recruitment of lysosomal glycohydrolases β-hexosaminidase and β-galactosidase to the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magini, Alessandro [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Department of Medical and Biological Sciences (DSMB), University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Polchi, Alice; Urbanelli, Lorena [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cesselli, Daniela; Beltrami, Antonio [Department of Medical and Biological Sciences (DSMB), University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Tancini, Brunella [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Emiliani, Carla, E-mail: carla.emiliani@unipg.it [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •TFEB activation promotes the increase of Hex and Gal activities. •The increase of Hex and Gal activities is related to transcriptional regulation. •TFEB promotes the recruitment of mature Hex and Gal on cell surface. -- Abstract: Lysosomes are membrane-enclosed organelles containing acid hydrolases. They mediate a variety of physiological processes, such as cellular clearance, lipid homeostasis, energy metabolism and pathogen defence. Lysosomes can secrete their content through a process called lysosome exocytosis in which lysosomes fuse with the plasma membrane realising their content into the extracellular milieu. Lysosomal exocytosis is not only responsible for the secretion of lysosomal enzymes, but it also has a crucial role in the plasma membrane repair. Recently, it has been demonstrated that lysosome response to the physiologic signals is regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB). In particular, lysosomal secretion is transcriptionally regulated by TFEB which induces both the docking and fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane. In this work we demonstrated that TFEB nuclear translocation is accompanied by an increase of mature glycohydrolases β-hexosaminidase and β-galactosidase on cell surface. This evidence contributes to elucidate an unknown TFEB biological function leading the lysosomal glycohydrolases on plasma membrane.

  7. The challenges of facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika

    and at the same time make closures in order to secure progress in the process? The analysis draws upon theoretical perspectives on deliberative democracy and facilitation. Whereas, the scholarly literature on deliberative democracy is rich in describing potential outcomes and criteria for deliberative processes...... hours transcriptions of three table deliberations; questionnaires of 91 participants, 2 focus group interviews with participants and facilitators....

  8. Training facilitators and supervisors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Louise Binow; O Connor, Maja; Krogh, Kristian;

    At the Master’s program in Medicine at Aarhus University, Denmark, we have developed a faculty development program for facilitators and supervisors in 4 progressing student modules in communication, cooperation, and leadership. 1) A course for module 1 and 3 facilitators inspired by the apprentic...

  9. Loss of AP-5 results in accumulation of aberrant endolysosomes: defining a new type of lysosomal storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Jennifer; Edgar, James R; Esteves, Typhaine; Darios, Frédéric; Madeo, Marianna; Chang, Jaerak; Roda, Ricardo H; Dürr, Alexandra; Anheim, Mathieu; Gellera, Cinzia; Li, Jun; Züchner, Stephan; Mariotti, Caterina; Stevanin, Giovanni; Blackstone, Craig; Kruer, Michael C; Robinson, Margaret S

    2015-09-01

    Adaptor proteins (AP 1-5) are heterotetrameric complexes that facilitate specialized cargo sorting in vesicular-mediated trafficking. Mutations in AP5Z1, encoding a subunit of the AP-5 complex, have been reported to cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), although their impact at the cellular level has not been assessed. Here we characterize three independent fibroblast lines derived from skin biopsies of patients harbouring nonsense mutations in AP5Z1 and presenting with spastic paraplegia accompanied by neuropathy, parkinsonism and/or cognitive impairment. In all three patient-derived lines, we show that there is complete loss of AP-5 ζ protein and a reduction in the associated AP-5 µ5 protein. Using ultrastructural analysis, we show that these patient-derived lines consistently exhibit abundant multilamellar structures that are positive for markers of endolysosomes and are filled with aberrant storage material organized as exaggerated multilamellar whorls, striated belts and 'fingerprint bodies'. This phenotype can be replicated in a HeLa cell culture model by siRNA knockdown of AP-5 ζ. The cellular phenotype bears striking resemblance to features described in a number of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Collectively, these findings reveal an emerging picture of the role of AP-5 in endosomal and lysosomal homeostasis, illuminates a potential pathomechanism that is relevant to the role of AP-5 in neurons and expands the understanding of recessive HSPs. Moreover, the resulting accumulation of storage material in endolysosomes leads us to propose that AP-5 deficiency represents a new type of LSDs.

  10. Membrane cholesterol regulates lysosome-plasma membrane fusion events and modulates Trypanosoma cruzi invasion of host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Hissa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are able to invade several types of non-phagocytic cells through a lysosomal dependent mechanism. It has been shown that, during invasion, parasites trigger host cell lysosome exocytosis, which initially occurs at the parasite-host contact site. Acid sphingomyelinase released from lysosomes then induces endocytosis and parasite internalization. Lysosomes continue to fuse with the newly formed parasitophorous vacuole until the parasite is completely enclosed by lysosomal membrane, a process indispensable for a stable infection. Previous work has shown that host membrane cholesterol is also important for the T. cruzi invasion process in both professional (macrophages and non-professional (epithelial phagocytic cells. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol-enriched microdomains participate in this process has remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present work we show that cardiomyocytes treated with MβCD, a drug able to sequester cholesterol from cell membranes, leads to a 50% reduction in invasion by T. cruzi trypomastigotes, as well as a decrease in the number of recently internalized parasites co-localizing with lysosomal markers. Cholesterol depletion from host membranes was accompanied by a decrease in the labeling of host membrane lipid rafts, as well as excessive lysosome exocytic events during the earlier stages of treatment. Precocious lysosomal exocytosis in MβCD treated cells led to a change in lysosomal distribution, with a reduction in the number of these organelles at the cell periphery, and probably compromises the intracellular pool of lysosomes necessary for T. cruzi invasion. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results, we propose that cholesterol depletion leads to unregulated exocytic events, reducing lysosome availability at the cell cortex and consequently compromise T. cruzi entry into host cells. The results also suggest that two different pools of

  11. Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase: cDNA cloning and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Leipprandt, J.R.; Traviss, C.E. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase is an exoglycosidase that cleaves the single {beta}-linked mannose residue from the non-reducing end of all N-linked glycoprotein oligosaccharides. Deficiency of this enzyme results in {beta}-mannosidosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease in goats and cattle. The human cases described have a milder, highly variable presentation. Study of the molecular pathology of this disease in ruminants and humans and development of the animal model for gene therapy studies required cloning of the gene for {beta}-mannosidase has been cloned. {beta}-Mannosidase cDNA were obtained from a bovine thyroid cDNA library by screening with mixed oligonucleotides derived from peptide sequences resulting from microsequencing of bovine {beta}-mannosidase peptides. A total of six independent positive clones were identified from 5 x 10{sup 5} plaques, covering about 80% of the C-terminal region. The missing 5{prime} region was obtained using 5{prime} RACE. The full-length construct contains 3852-bp nucleotides, encoding 879 amino acids. The initiation codon is followed by 17 amino acids containing the characteristics of a typical signal peptide sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with all peptide sequences determined by protein microsequencing. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.2 kb single transcript in various tissues from both normal and affected goats and calves. The mRNA level was decreased in affected {beta}-mannosidosis animals. The gene encoding {beta}-mannosidase was localized on human chromosome 4 by Southern analysis of rodent/human somatic cell hybrids. The mutation in bovine {beta}-mannosidosis has been identified. This is the first report of cloning of the {beta}-mannosidase gene.

  12. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Stine S; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Christensen, Karina G; Kristensen, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Targeting of lysosomes is a novel therapeutic anti-cancer strategy for killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Such strategies are urgently needed for treatment of brain tumors, especially the glioblastoma, which is the most frequent and most malignant type. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of lysosomes in astrocytic brain tumors focussing also on the therapy resistant tumor stem cells. Expression of the lysosomal marker LAMP-1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 112 formalin fixed paraffin embedded astrocytomas and compared with tumor grade and overall patient survival. Moreover, double immunofluorescence stainings were performed with LAMP-1 and the astrocytic marker GFAP and the putative stem cell marker CD133 on ten glioblastomas. Most tumors expressed the LAMP-1 protein in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells, while the blood vessels were positive in all tumors. The percentage of LAMP-1 positive tumor cells and staining intensities increased with tumor grade but variations in tumors of the same grade were also found. No association was found between LAMP-1 expression and patient overall survival in the individual tumor grades. LAMP-1/GFAP showed pronounced co-expression and LAMP-1/CD133 was co-expressed as well suggesting that tumor cells including the proposed tumor stem cells contain lysosomes. The results suggest that high amounts of lysosomes are present in glioblastomas and in the proposed tumor stem cells. Targeting of lysosomes may be a promising novel therapeutic strategy against this highly malignant neoplasm.

  13. DRAM1 regulates apoptosis through increasing protein levels and lysosomal localization of BAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, J-J; Zhang, X-D; Sun, W; Qi, L; Wu, J-C; Qin, Z-H

    2015-01-01

    DRAM1 (DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator 1) is a TP53 target gene that modulates autophagy and apoptosis. We previously found that DRAM1 increased autophagy flux by promoting lysosomal acidification and protease activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which DRAM1 regulates apoptosis are not clearly defined. Here we report a novel pathway by which DRAM1 regulates apoptosis involving BAX and lysosomes. A549 or HeLa cells were treated with the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP), or an anticancer drug, doxorubicin. Changes in the protein and mRNA levels of BAX and DRAM1 and the role of DRAM1 in BAX induction were determined. The interaction between DRAM1 and BAX and its effect on BAX degradation, BAX lysosomal localization, the release of cathepsin B and cytochrome c by BAX and the role of BAX in 3NP- or doxorubicin-induced cell death were studied. The results showed that BAX, a proapoptotic protein, was induced by DRAM1 in a transcription-independent manner. BAX was degraded by autophagy under basal conditions; however, its degradation was inhibited when DRAM1 expression was induced. There was a protein interaction between DRAM1 and BAX and this interaction prolonged the half-life of BAX. Furthermore, upregulated DRAM1 recruited BAX to lysosomes, leading to the release of lysosomal cathepsin B and cleavage of BID (BH3-interacting domain death agonist). BAX mediated the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, activation of caspase-3 and cell death partially through the lysosome-cathepsin B-tBid pathway. These results indicate that DRAM1 regulates apoptosis by inhibiting BAX degradation. In addition to mitochondria, lysosomes may also be involved in BAX-initiated apoptosis. PMID:25633293

  14. The Phosphoinositide-Gated Lysosomal Ca(2+) Channel, TRPML1, Is Required for Phagosome Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayam, Roya M; Saric, Amra; Shilliday, Ryan E; Botelho, Roberto J

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages internalize and sequester pathogens into a phagosome. Phagosomes then sequentially fuse with endosomes and lysosomes, converting into degradative phagolysosomes. Phagosome maturation is a complex process that requires regulators of the endosomal pathway including the phosphoinositide lipids. Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2 ), which respectively control early endosomes and late endolysosomes, are both required for phagosome maturation. Inhibition of PIKfyve, which synthesizes PtdIns(3,5)P2 , blocked phagosome-lysosome fusion and abated the degradative capacity of phagosomes. However, it is not known how PIKfyve and PtdIns(3,5)P2 participate in phagosome maturation. TRPML1 is a PtdIns(3,5)P2 -gated lysosomal Ca(2+) channel. Because Ca(2+) triggers membrane fusion, we postulated that TRPML1 helps mediate phagosome-lysosome fusion. Using Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis as a model, we describe our research showing that silencing of TRPML1 hindered phagosome acquisition of lysosomal markers and reduced the bactericidal properties of phagosomes. Specifically, phagosomes isolated from TRPML1-silenced cells were decorated with lysosomes that docked but did not fuse. We could rescue phagosome maturation in TRPML1-silenced and PIKfyve-inhibited cells by forcible Ca(2+) release with ionomycin. We also provide evidence that cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration increases upon phagocytosis in a manner dependent on TRPML1 and PIKfyve. Overall, we propose a model where PIKfyve and PtdIns(3,5)P2 activate TRPML1 to induce phagosome-lysosome fusion.

  15. Interactions between autophagic and endo-lysosomal markers in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, Clara L; Seco, Esther; Patton, Wayne F; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2013-05-01

    Autophagic and endo-lysosomal degradative pathways are essential for cell homeostasis. Availability of reliable tools to interrogate these pathways is critical to unveil their involvement in physiology and pathophysiology. Although several probes have been recently developed to monitor autophagic or lysosomal compartments, their specificity has not been validated through co-localization studies with well-known markers. Here, we evaluate the selectivity and interactions between one lysosomal (Lyso-ID) and one autophagosomal (Cyto-ID) probe under conditions modulating autophagy and/or endo-lysosomal function in live cells. The probe for acidic compartments Lyso-ID was fully localized inside vesicles positive for markers of late endosome-lysosomes, including Lamp1-GFP and GFP-CINCCKVL. Induction of autophagy by amino acid deprivation in bovine aortic endothelial cells caused an early and potent increase in the fluorescence of the proposed autophagy dye Cyto-ID. Cyto-ID-positive compartments extensively co-localized with the autophagosomal fluorescent reporter RFP-LC3, although the time and/or threshold for organelle detection was different for each probe. Interestingly, use of Cyto-ID in combination with Lysotracker Red or Lyso-ID allowed the observation of structures labeled with either one or both probes, the extent of co-localization increasing upon treatment with protease inhibitors. Inhibition of the endo-lysosomal pathway with chloroquine or U18666A resulted in the formation of large Cyto-ID and Lyso-ID-positive compartments. These results constitute the first assessment of the selectivity of Cyto-ID and Lyso-ID as probes for the autophagic and lysosomal pathways, respectively. Our observations show that these probes can be used in combination with protein-based markers for monitoring the interactions of both pathways in live cells.

  16. Facilitating Understandings of Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine C.; Bush, Sara

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates some learning encounters for facilitating first graders' understanding of geometry. Describes some of children's approaches using Cuisenaire rods and teacher's intervening. Presents six problems involving various combinations of Cuisenaire rods and cubes. (YP)

  17. Artesunate Activates Mitochondrial Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells via Iron-catalyzed Lysosomal Reactive Oxygen Species Production*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Stein, Henning A.; Turschner, Simon; Toegel, Ina; Mora, Rodrigo; Jennewein, Nina; Efferth, Thomas; Eils, Roland; Brady, Nathan R.

    2011-01-01

    The antimalarial agent artesunate (ART) activates programmed cell death (PCD) in cancer cells in a manner dependent on the presence of iron and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In malaria parasites, ART cytotoxicity originates from interactions with heme-derived iron within the food vacuole. The analogous digestive compartment of mammalian cells, the lysosome, similarly contains high levels of redox-active iron and in response to specific stimuli can initiate mitochondrial apoptosis. We thus investigated the role of lysosomes in ART-induced PCD and determined that in MCF-7 breast cancer cells ART activates lysosome-dependent mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. ART impacted endolysosomal and autophagosomal compartments, inhibiting autophagosome turnover and causing perinuclear clustering of autophagosomes, early and late endosomes, and lysosomes. Lysosomal iron chelation blocked all measured parameters of ART-induced PCD, whereas lysosomal iron loading enhanced death, thus identifying lysosomal iron as the lethal source of reactive oxygen species upstream of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. Moreover, lysosomal inhibitors chloroquine and bafilomycin A1 reduced ART-activated PCD, evidencing a requirement for lysosomal function during PCD signaling. ART killing did not involve activation of the BH3-only protein, Bid, yet ART enhanced TNF-mediated Bid cleavage. We additionally demonstrated the lysosomal PCD pathway in T47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Importantly, non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells resisted ART-induced PCD. Together, our data suggest that ART triggers PCD via engagement of distinct, interconnected PCD pathways, with hierarchical signaling from lysosomes to mitochondria, suggesting a potential clinical use of ART for targeting lysosomes in cancer treatment. PMID:21149439

  18. Protective effect of squalene on certain lysosomal hydrolases and free amino acids in isoprenaline-induced myocardial infarction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Surendraraj, A.; Anandan, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the preventive role of squalene on free amino acids and lysosomal alterations in experimentally induced myocardial infarction in rats. The levels of lysosomal enzymes (beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and cathepsin D......) in plasma and lysosomal fractions, hydroxyproline content and free amino acids in heart tissue were determined. Isoprenaline administration to rats resulted in decreased stability of the membranes which was reflected by significantly (p...

  19. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating...... and the intermediaries regulating the exchange, and facilitating knowledge sharing should therefore be viewed as a continuum of practices under the influence of opportunistic behaviour, obedience or organizational citizenship behaviour. Keywords: Knowledge sharing, motivation, organizational settings, situations...

  20. Evidence for lysosomal exocytosis and release of aggrecan-degrading hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Bastow

    2012-02-01

    The abundant proteoglycan, aggrecan, is resorbed from growth plate cartilage during endochondral bone ossification, yet mice with genetically-ablated aggrecan-degrading activity have no defects in bone formation. To account for this apparent anomaly, we propose that lysosomal hydrolases degrade extracellular, hyaluronan-bound aggrecan aggregates in growth plate cartilage, and that lysosomal hydrolases are released from hypertrophic chondrocytes into growth plate cartilage via Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. In this study we confirm that hypertrophic chondrocytes release hydrolases via lysosomal exocytosis in vitro and we show in vivo evidence for lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes during skeletal development. We show that lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1 is detected at the cell surface following in vitro treatment of epiphyseal chondrocytes with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Furthermore, we show that in addition to the lysosomal exocytosis markers, cathepsin D and β-hexosaminidase, ionomycin induces release of aggrecan- and hyaluronan-degrading activity from cultured epiphyseal chondrocytes. We identify VAMP-8 and VAMP7 as v-SNARE proteins with potential roles in lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes, based on their colocalisation with LAMP1 at the cell surface in secondary ossification centers in mouse tibiae. We propose that resorbing growth plate cartilage involves release of destructive hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, via lysosomal exocytosis.

  1. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta-cells from Death by Increasing Autophagic Flux and Restoring Lysosomal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zummo, Francesco P; Cullen, Kirsty S; Honkanen-Scott, Minna; Shaw, James Am; Lovat, Penny E; Arden, Catherine

    2017-02-23

    Studies in animal models of type 2 diabetes have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists prevent β-cell loss. Whether GLP-1 mediates β-cell survival via the key lysosomal-mediated process of autophagy is unknown.Here we report that treatment of INS-1E β-cells and primary islets with glucolipotoxicity (0.5mmol/l palmitate, 25mmol/l glucose) increases LC3 II, a marker of autophagy. Further analysis indicates a blockage in autophagic flux associated with lysosomal dysfunction. Accumulation of defective lysosomes leads to lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP) and release of Cathepsin D, which contributes to cell death. Our data further demonstrated defects in autophagic flux and lysosomal staining in human samples of type 2 diabetes. Co-treatment with the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 reversed the lysosomal dysfunction, relieving the impairment in autophagic flux and further stimulated autophagy. siRNA knockdown showed the restoration of autophagic flux is also essential for the protective effects of exendin-4.Collectively, our data highlights lysosomal dysfunction as a critical mediator of β-cell loss and shows that exendin-4 improves cell survival via restoration of lysosomal function and autophagic flux. Modulation of autophagy / lysosomal homeostasis may thus define a novel therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes, with the GLP-1 signalling pathway as a potential focus.

  2. LAMP-2 is required for incorporating syntaxin-17 into autophagosomes and for their fusion with lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Virginie; Peschel, Andrea; Langer, Brigitte; Gröger, Marion; Rees, Andrew; Kain, Renate

    2016-10-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process used for removing surplus and damaged proteins and organelles from the cytoplasm. The unwanted material is incorporated into autophagosomes that eventually fuse with lysosomes, leading to the degradation of their cargo. The fusion event is mediated by the interaction between the Qa-SNARE syntaxin-17 (STX17) on autophagosomes and the R-SNARE VAMP8 on lysosomes. Cells deficient in lysosome membrane-associated protein-2 (LAMP-2) have increased numbers of autophagosomes but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. By transfecting LAMP-2-deficient and LAMP-1/2--double-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with a tandem fluorescent-tagged LC3 we observed a failure of fusion between the autophagosomes and the lysosomes that could be rescued by complementation with LAMP-2A. Although we observed no change in expression and localization of VAMP8, its interacting partner STX17 was absent from autophagosomes of LAMP-2-deficient cells. Thus, LAMP-2 is essential for STX17 expression by the autophagosomes and this absence is sufficient to explain their failure to fuse with lysosomes. The results have clear implications for situations associated with a reduction of LAMP-2 expression.

  3. Induction, adaptation and recovery of lysosomal integrity in green-lipped mussel Perna viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J K H; Wu, R S S; Zheng, G J; Lam, P K S; Shin, P K S

    2008-01-01

    Biomarkers are generally applied to detect pollution in environmental monitoring. Such biological responses should accurately reflect the stress over time in a quantitative manner. As such, the initial and maximum responses induced by stress, as well as adaptation and recovery of these biomarkers, need to be fully understood or else erroneous false-negative or false-positive may be arrived. However, most of the biomarker studies only provided information on initially induced responses under different concentrations of toxicants, while biological adaptation and recovery were poorly known. In this study, the time required for induction, adaptation and recovery of lysosomal integrity in green-lipped mussel Perna viridis upon exposure to benzo[a]pyrene was investigated over a period of 62 days. Maximum induction occurred on day 6 when lysosomal integrity was significantly reduced by 51%, and no further change or adaptation was detected thereafter. When mussels were depurated in clean seawater after 18 days of exposure to benzo[a]pyrene, a gradual recovery was observed, with lysosomal integrity returning to its background level and showing a complete recovery after 20 days of depuration. Lysosomal integrity was significantly correlated with the body burden concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene and condition index of the mussels. The relatively fast induction (6 days) and recovery (20 days) without apparent adaptation suggested that lysosomal integrity in P. viridis can serve as a good biomarker in biomonitoring, as its response is not likely to generate both false-negative and false-positive results.

  4. Not nanocarbon but dispersant induced abnormality in lysosome in macrophages in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudasaka, Masako; Zhang, Minfang; Matsumura, Sachiko; Yuge, Ryota; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Irie, Hiroshi; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Iijima, Sumio

    2015-05-01

    The properties of nanocarbons change from hydrophobic to hydrophilic as a result of coating them with dispersants, typically phospholipid polyethylene glycols, for biological studies. It has been shown that the dispersants remain attached to the nanocarbons when they are injected in mice and influence the nanocarbons’ biodistribution in vivo. We show in this report that the effects of dispersants also appear at the subcellular level in vivo. Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), a type of nanocarbon, were dispersed with ceramide polyethylene glycol (CPEG) and intravenously injected in mice. Histological observations and electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis revealed that, in liver and spleen, the lysosome membranes were damaged, and the nanohorns formed a complex with hemosiderin in the lysosomes of the macrophages. It is inferred that the lysosomal membrane was damaged by sphigosine generated as a result of CPEG decomposition, which changed the intra lysosomal conditions, inducing the formation of the CPEG-CNH and hemosiderin complex. For comparison, when glucose was used instead of CPEG, neither the nanohorn-hemosiderin complex nor lysosomal membrane damage was found. Our results suggest that surface functionalization can control the behavior of nancarbons in cells in vivo and thereby improve their suitability for medical applications.

  5. Color reduction of melanin by lysosomal and peroxisomal enzymes isolated from mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Jun; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Yoon, Jihee; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-02-01

    Lysosomes and peroxisomes are organelles with many functions in all eukaryotic cells. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes (lysozyme) that degrade molecules, whereas peroxisomes contain enzymes such as catalase that convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to water and oxygen and neutralize toxicity. In contrast, melanin is known as a helpful element to protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. However, a high quantity of melanin leads to hyperpigmentation or skin cancer in human. New materials have already been discovered to inhibit tyrosinase in melanogenesis; however, melanin reduction does not suggest their preparation. In this study, we report that the color intensity because of melanin decreased by the cellular activation of lysosomes and peroxisomes. An increase in the superficial intensity of lysosome and peroxisome activities of HeLa cells was observed. In addition, a decrease in the amount of melanin has also been observed in mammalian cells without using any other chemical, showing that the process can work in vivo for treating melanin. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that the amount of melanin decreases by the lysosome and peroxisome activity after entering the cells, and functional organelles are effective in color reduction. This mechanism can be used in vivo for treating melanin.

  6. Disruption of lysosome function promotes tumor growth and metastasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han, Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-07-09

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the Ras(V12) cells. Knocking down either of the two other components of the Class C VPS complex, carnation (car) and vps16A, also renders Ras(V12) cells capable for uncontrolled growth and metastatic behavior. Finally, chemical disruption of the lysosomal function by feeding animals with antimalarial drugs, chloroquine or monensin, leads to malignant tumor growth of the Ras(V12) cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence for a causative role of lysosome dysfunction in tumor growth and invasion and indicate that members of the Class C VPS complex behave as tumor suppressors.

  7. Consistent wind Facilitates Vection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether a consistent haptic cue suggesting forward self-motion facilitated vection. We used a fan with no blades (Dyson, AM01 providing a wind of constant strength and direction (wind speed was 6.37 m/s to the subjects' faces with the visual stimuli visible through the fan. We used an optic flow of expansion or contraction created by positioning 16,000 dots at random inside a simulated cube (length 20 m, and moving the observer's viewpoint to simulate forward or backward self-motion of 16 m/s. we tested three conditions for fan operation, which were normal operation, normal operation with the fan reversed (ie, no wind, and no operation (no wind and no sound. Vection was facilitated by the wind (shorter latency, longer duration and larger magnitude values with the expansion stimuli. The fan noise did not facilitate vection. The wind neither facilitated nor inhibited vection with the contraction stimuli, perhaps because a headwind is not consistent with backward self-motion. We speculate that the consistency between multi modalities is a key factor in facilitating vection.

  8. The role of VAMP7/TI-VAMP in cell polarity and lysosomal exocytosis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mahito; Yoshimura, Shinichiro; Hirai, Rika; Goto, Ayako; Kunii, Masataka; Atik, Nur; Sato, Takashi; Sato, Ken; Harada, Reiko; Shimada, Junko; Hatabu, Toshimitsu; Yorifuji, Hiroshi; Harada, Akihiro

    2011-10-01

    VAMP7 or tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle- associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) has been proposed to regulate apical transport in polarized epithelial cells, axonal transport in neurons and lysosomal exocytosis. To investigate the function of VAMP7 in vivo, we generated VAMP7 knockout mice. Here, we show that VAMP7 knockout mice are indistinguishable from control mice and display a similar localization of apical proteins in the kidney and small intestine and a similar localization of axonal proteins in the nervous system. Neurite outgrowth of cultured mutant hippocampal neurons was reduced in mutant neurons. However, lysosomal exocytosis was not affected in mutant fibroblasts. Our results show that VAMP7 is required in neurons to extend axons to the full extent. However, VAMP7 does not seem to be required for epithelial cell polarity and lysosomal exocytosis.

  9. Elimination of paternal mitochondria through the lysosomal degradation pathway in C.elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Zhou; Haimin Li; Ding Xue

    2011-01-01

    In mammals,the inheritance of mitochondrion and its DNA (mtDNA) is strictly maternal,despite the fact that a sperm can inject up to 100 functional mitochondria into the oocyte during fertilization.The mechanisms responsible for the elimination of the paternal mitochondria remain largely unknown.We report here that this paternal mitochondrial elimination process is conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans,and that the lysosomal pathway actively participates in this process.Molecular and cell biological analyses indicate that in wild-type animals paternal mitoehondria and mtDNA are destroyed within two hours after fertilization.In animals with compromised lysosomes,paternal mitochondria persist until late embryonic stages.Therefore,the lysosomal pathway plays an important role in degrading paternal mitochondria introduced into the oocyte during fertilization.Our study indicates that C.elegans is an excellent animal model for understanding and dissecting this conserved biological process critical for animal development and reproduction.

  10. Guanidinylated neomycin mediates heparan sulfate-dependent transport of active enzymes to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, Stéphane; Wilson, Beth; Sly, William S; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2010-07-01

    Guanidinylated neomycin (GNeo) can transport bioactive, high molecular weight cargo into the interior of cells in a process that depends on cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In this report, we show that GNeo-modified quantum dots bind to cell surface heparan sulfate, undergo endocytosis and eventually reach the lysosomal compartment. An N-hydroxysuccinimide activated ester of GNeo (GNeo-NHS) was prepared and conjugated to two lysosomal enzymes, beta-D-glucuronidase (GUS) and alpha-L-iduronidase. Conjugation did not interfere with enzyme activity and enabled binding of the enzymes to heparin-Sepharose and heparan sulfate on primary human fibroblasts. Cells lacking the corresponding lysosomal enzyme took up sufficient amounts of the conjugated enzymes to restore normal turnover of glycosaminoglycans. The high capacity of proteoglycan-mediated uptake suggests that this method of delivery might be used for enzyme replacement or introduction of foreign enzymes into cells.

  11. Molecular characterization of aspartylglucosaminidase, a lysosomal hydrolase upregulated during strobilation in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujita, Natsumi; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Hiroki; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Arakawa, Kenji; Kuniyoshi, Hisato

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita, alternates between a benthic asexual polyp stage and a planktonic sexual medusa (jellyfish) stage. Transition from polyp to medusa is called strobilation. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of strobilation, we screened for genes that are upregulated during strobilation using the differential display method and we identified aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), which encodes a lysosomal hydrolase. Similar to AGAs from other species, Aurelia AGA possessed an N-terminal signal peptide and potential N-glycosylation sites. The genomic region of Aurelia AGA was approximately 9.8 kb in length and contained 12 exons and 11 introns. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that AGA expression increased during strobilation, and was then decreased in medusae. To inhibit AGA function, we administered the lysosomal acidification inhibitors, chloroquine or bafilomycin A1, to animals during strobilation. Both inhibitors disturbed medusa morphogenesis at the oral end, suggesting involvement of lysosomal hydrolases in strobilation.

  12. Involvement of the endosomal-lysosomal system correlates with regional pathology in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Gábor G; Gelpi, Ellen; Ströbel, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The endosomal-lysosomal system (ELS) has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine how experimental observations can be translated to human neuropathology and whether alterations of the ELS relate to neuropathologic changes....... Combined with stereologic techniques, we examined components of the ELS in human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brains. We immunostained for the early endosomal marker Rab5 and lysosomal enzymes cathepsin D and B. We determined neuron-specific changes in their expression and correlated......-immunoreactive lysosomes. The intraneuronal distribution of cathepsin D and B diverges between Purkinje cells and frontal cortical neurons in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brains. We demonstrated focal intra- and perineuronal colocalization of cathepsin D and PrP. Our results indicate that effects in the ELS...

  13. The inactivation of the sortilin gene leads to a partial disruption of prosaposin trafficking to the lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jibin; Racicott, Jesse [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Morales, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.morales@mcgill.ca [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2009-11-01

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles which contain enzymes and activator proteins involved in the digestion and recycling of a variety of cellular and extracellular substances. We have identified a novel sorting receptor, sortilin, which is involved in the lysosomal trafficking of the sphingolipid activator proteins, prosaposin and GM{sub 2}AP, and the soluble hydrolases cathepsin D, cathepsin H, and acid sphingomyelinase. Sortilin belongs to a growing family of receptors with homology to the yeast Vps10 protein, which acts as a lysosomal sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y. In this study we examined the effects of the sortilin gene inactivation in mice. The inactivation of this gene did not yield any noticeable lysosomal pathology. To determine the existence of an alternative receptor complementing the sorting function of sortilin, we quantified the concentration of prosaposin in the lysosomes of the nonciliated epithelial cells lining the efferent ducts. These cells were chosen because they express sortilin and have a large number of lysosomes containing prosaposin. In addition, the nonciliated cells are known to endocytose luminal prosaposin that is synthesized and secreted by Sertoli cells into the seminiferous luminal fluids. Consequently, the nonciliated cells are capable of targeting both exogenous and endogenous prosaposin to the lysosomes. Using electron microscope immunogold labeling and quantitative analysis, our results demonstrate that inactivation of the sortilin gene produces a significant decrease of prosaposin in the lysosomes. When luminal prosaposin was excluded from the efferent ducts, the level of prosaposin in lysosomes was even lower in the mutant mice. Nonetheless, a significant amount of prosaposin continues to reach the lysosomal compartment. These results strongly suggest the existence of an alternative receptor that complements the function of sortilin and explains the lack of lysosomal storage disorders in the sortilin

  14. Comparison of five peptide vectors for improved brain delivery of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckenhoff, Annika; Cramer, Sandra; Wölte, Philipp; Knieling, Simeon; Wohlenberg, Claudia; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Matzner, Ulrich

    2014-02-26

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is a treatment option for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) caused by deficiencies of soluble lysosomal enzymes. ERT depends on receptor-mediated transport of intravenously injected recombinant enzyme to lysosomes of patient cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents efficient transfer of therapeutic polypeptides from the blood to the brain parenchyma and thus hinders effective treatment of LSDs with CNS involvement. We compared the potential of five brain-targeting peptides to promote brain delivery of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A (ASA). Fusion proteins between ASA and the protein transduction domain of the human immunodeficiency virus TAT protein (Tat), an Angiopep peptide (Ang-2), and the receptor-binding domains of human apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and ApoE (two versions, ApoE-I and ApoE-II) were generated. All ASA fusion proteins were enzymatically active and targeted to lysosomes when added to cultured cells. In contrast to wild-type ASA, which is taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptors, all chimeric proteins were additionally endocytosed via mannose-6-phosphate-independent routes. For ASA-Ang-2, ASA-ApoE-I, and ASA-ApoE-II, uptake was partially due to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. Transendothelial transfer in a BBB cell culture model was elevated for ASA-ApoB, ASA-ApoE-I, and ASA-ApoE-II. Brain delivery was, however, increased only for ASA-ApoE-II. ApoE-II was also superior to wild-type ASA in reducing lysosomal storage in the CNS of ASA-knock-out mice treated by ERT. Therefore, the ApoE-derived peptide appears useful to treat metachromatic leukodystrophy and possibly other neurological disorders more efficiently.

  15. Cytosolic peroxidases protect the lysosome of bloodstream African trypanosomes from iron-mediated membrane damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Hiller

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes express three virtually identical non-selenium glutathione peroxidase (Px-type enzymes which preferably detoxify lipid-derived hydroperoxides. As shown previously, bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei lacking the mitochondrial Px III display only a weak and transient proliferation defect whereas parasites that lack the cytosolic Px I and Px II undergo extremely fast lipid peroxidation and cell lysis. The phenotype can completely be rescued by supplementing the medium with the α-tocopherol derivative Trolox. The mechanism underlying the rapid cell death remained however elusive. Here we show that the lysosome is the origin of the cellular injury. Feeding the px I-II knockout parasites with Alexa Fluor-conjugated dextran or LysoTracker in the presence of Trolox yielded a discrete lysosomal staining. Yet upon withdrawal of the antioxidant, the signal became progressively spread over the whole cell body and was completely lost, respectively. T. brucei acquire iron by endocytosis of host transferrin. Supplementing the medium with iron or transferrin induced, whereas the iron chelator deferoxamine and apo-transferrin attenuated lysis of the px I-II knockout cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with MitoTracker and antibodies against the lysosomal marker protein p67 revealed that disintegration of the lysosome precedes mitochondrial damage. In vivo experiments confirmed the negligible role of the mitochondrial peroxidase: Mice infected with px III knockout cells displayed only a slightly delayed disease development compared to wild-type parasites. Our data demonstrate that in bloodstream African trypanosomes, the lysosome, not the mitochondrion, is the primary site of oxidative damage and cytosolic trypanothione/tryparedoxin-dependent peroxidases protect the lysosome from iron-induced membrane peroxidation. This process appears to be closely linked to the high endocytic rate and distinct iron acquisition mechanisms of the infective

  16. Lysosomal exoglycosidases in serum and urine of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Stypułkowska

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase (HEX, β-D-galactosidase (GAL, ι-L-fucosidase (FUC and ι-D-mannosidase (MAN modify oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates in endoplasmatic reticulum and/or Golgi apparatus and degrade them in lysosomes. In acid environment of lysosome, exoglycosidases degrade oligosaccharide chains of glycoproteins, glycolipids and glycosaminoglycans by eliminating single sugars from the edges of oligosaccharide chains. Neoplasms change biochemical processes in tissues and may significantly change the activity of many enzymes including the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidasses in serum and urine of persons with neoplasmatic diseases. The aim of the present paper was evaluation the activity of HEX, GAL, FUC and MAN in serum and urine of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Serum and urine samples were collected from 15 patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and 15 healthy persons. The activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases was determined by the method of Marciniak et al. adapted to serum and urine of patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Our results indicate significant decrease in activity of GAL (p=0.037 in serum of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, significant increase in activity of HEX (p<0.001 and FUC (p=0.027 in serum, and HEX (p=0.003 in urine, as well as significant decrease of FUC (p=0.016 and MAN (p=0.029 in urine o patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, in comparison to the control group. Increase in activity of some lysosomal enzymes in serum and urine of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients, may indicate on destruction of pancreatic tissue by pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Determination of the HEX, GAL, FUC and MAN in serum and urine may be useful in diagnostics of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  17. Lysosomal and mitochondrial permeabilization mediates zinc(II) cationic phthalocyanine phototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Julieta; García Vior, María C; Furmento, Verónica A; Blank, Viviana C; Awruch, Josefina; Roguin, Leonor P

    2013-11-01

    In order to find a novel photosensitizer to be used in photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment, we have previously showed that the cationic zinc(II) phthalocyanine named Pc13, the sulfur-linked dye 2,9(10),16(17),23(24)-tetrakis[(2-trimethylammonium) ethylsulfanyl]phthalocyaninatozinc(II) tetraiodide, exerts a selective phototoxic effect on human nasopharynx KB carcinoma cells and induces an apoptotic response characterized by an increase in the activity of caspase-3. Since the activation of an apoptotic pathway by chemotherapeutic agents contributes to the elimination of malignant cells, in this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of Pc13. We found that after light exposure, Pc13 induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are mediating the resultant cytotoxic action on KB cells. ROS led to an early permeabilization of lysosomal membranes as demonstrated by the reduction of lysosome fluorescence with acridine orange and the release of lysosomal proteases to cytosol. Treatment with antioxidants inhibited ROS generation, preserved the integrity of lysosomal membrane and increased cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Lysosome disruption was followed by mitochondrial depolarization, cytosolic release of cytochrome C and caspases activation. Although no change in the total amount of Bax was observed, the translocation of Bax from cytosol to mitochondria, the cleavage of the pro-apoptotic protein Bid, together with the decrease of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-XL and Bcl-2 indicated the involvement of Bcl-2 family proteins in the induction of the mitochondrial pathway. It was also demonstrated that cathepsin D, but not caspase-8, contributed to Bid cleavage. In conclusion, Pc13-induced cell photodamage is triggered by ROS generation and activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway through the release of lysosomal proteases. In addition, our results also indicated that Pc13 induced

  18. Rapid recycling of Ca2+ between IP3-sensitive stores and lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina I López Sanjurjo

    Full Text Available Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 evokes release of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, but the resulting Ca2+ signals are shaped by interactions with additional intracellular organelles. Bafilomycin A1, which prevents lysosomal Ca2+ uptake by inhibiting H+ pumping into lysosomes, increased the amplitude of the initial Ca2+ signals evoked by carbachol in human embryonic kidney (HEK cells. Carbachol alone and carbachol in combination with parathyroid hormone (PTH evoke Ca2+ release from distinct IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores in HEK cells stably expressing human type 1 PTH receptors. Bafilomycin A1 similarly exaggerated the Ca2+ signals evoked by carbachol or carbachol with PTH, indicating that Ca2+ released from distinct IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores is sequestered by lysosomes. The Ca2+ signals resulting from store-operated Ca2+ entry, whether evoked by thapsigargin or carbachol, were unaffected by bafilomycin A1. Using Gd3+ (1 mM to inhibit both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ extrusion, HEK cells were repetitively stimulated with carbachol to assess the effectiveness of Ca2+ recycling to the ER after IP3-evoked Ca2+ release. Blocking lysosomal Ca2+ uptake with bafilomycin A1 increased the amplitude of each carbachol-evoked Ca2+ signal without affecting the rate of Ca2+ recycling to the ER. This suggests that Ca2+ accumulated by lysosomes is rapidly returned to the ER. We conclude that lysosomes rapidly, reversibly and selectively accumulate the Ca2+ released by IP3 receptors residing within distinct Ca2+ stores, but not the Ca2+ entering cells via receptor-regulated, store-operated Ca2+ entry pathways.

  19. Characterization of Two-pore Channel 2 (TPCN2)-mediated Ca2+ Currents in Isolated Lysosomes*

    OpenAIRE

    Schieder, Michael; Rötzer, Katrin; Brüggemann, Andrea; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A.

    2010-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCNs) have been proposed to form lysosomal Ca2+ release channels that are activated by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Here, we employ a glass chip-based method to record for the first time nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate -dependent currents through a two-pore channel (TPCN2) from intact lysosomes. We show that TPCN2 is a highly selective Ca2+ channel that is regulated by intralysosomal pH. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identify an amino ...

  20. Three-layer poly(methyl methacrylate) microsystem for analysis of lysosomal enzymes for diagnostic purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Kwapiszewska, Karina; Kutter, Jörg P

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are chronic, progressive and typically have a devastating impact on the patient and the family. The diagnosis of these diseases is still a challenge, however, even for trained specialists. Accurate diagnostic methods and high-throughput tools that could be readily...... incorporated into existing screening laboratories are urgently required. We propose a new method for measuring the activity of lysosomal enzymes using a microfluidic device. The principle of the method is the fluorometric determination of a protonated form of 4-methylumbelliferone directly in the enzymatic...

  1. Effects of the lysosomal destabilizing drug siramesine on glioblastoma in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine S.; Asferg Petterson, Stine; Halle, Bo

    2017-01-01

    confirmed by immunohistochemical staining of histological sections of spheroids, spheroids in brain slice cultures and tumors in mice brains. Results: The results showed that siramesine killed standard glioma cell lines in vitro, and loss of acridine orange staining suggested a compromised lysosomal...... cell death and inhibited tumor cell migration. This could not be reproduced in the organotypic three dimensional spheroid-brain slice culture model or in the mice xenograft model. Conclusions: In conclusion the in vitro results obtained with tumor cells and spheroids suggest a potential of lysosomal...

  2. Lysosomal membrane stability of the mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis (L.), as a biomarker of tributyltin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Hussein K; Snyman, Reinette G; Fatoki, Olalekan S; Adekola, Folahan A; Ximba, Bhekumusa J; Slabber, Michelle Y

    2015-05-01

    The effect of tributyltin (TBT) on the stability of hemocytic lysosome membranes of the mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and the use thereof as a biomarker of TBT-induced stress, was investigated. Mussels were exposed to 0.1 and 1.0 µg/L tributyltin respectively for 4 weeks. Lysosomal membrane stability of hemocytes was tested weekly by means of the neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, after which the mussel samples were analyzed for TBT content. The two exposed groups exhibited significantly increased (p galloprovincialis.

  3. Effect of various lysosomes and endotoxin on vascular permeability in frogs and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csákó, G; Reichel, A; Csernyánszky, H; Reichel, U

    1975-01-01

    Blood-lymph permeability increasing effects of frog liver lysosomes, Escherichia coli 0111 endotoxin, bradykinin and serotonin were demonstrated in frogs with a method developed by the authors. These actions were expressed in a faster dye saturation in the lymph as compared to that of the controls. 2. The method is based on the determinations of concentration of Evans blue transported as protein-bound dye into the lymph. 3. Frog liver and polymorphonuclear leukocyte lysosomes had a capillary permeability increasing action tested by local skin response when injecting Evans blue intravenously in mice. 4. All these phenomena are similar to events described earlier in mammalian systems.

  4. Activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway induces UT-A1 urea transporter monoubiquitination and targets it for lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hua; Chen, Minguang; Sands, Jeff M; Chen, Guangping

    2013-12-15

    Regulation of urea transporter UT-A1 in the kidney is important for the urinary concentrating mechanism. We previously reported that activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway by forskolin (FSK) leads to UT-A1 ubiquitination, endocytosis, and degradation. In this study, we discovered that FSK-induced UT-A1 ubiquitination is monoubiquitination as judged by immunoblotting with specific ubiquitin antibodies to the different linkages of the ubiquitin chain. UT-A1 monoubiquitination induced by FSK was processed mainly on the cell plasma membrane. Monoubiquitination facilitates UT-A1 endocytosis, and internalized UT-A1 is accumulated in the early endosome. Inhibition of ubiquitination by E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme inhibitor PYR-41 significantly reduced FSK-induced UT-A1 endocytosis and degradation. Interestingly, FSK-stimulated UT-A1 degradation occurs through a lysosomal protein degradation system. We further found that the PKA phosphorylation sites of UT-A1 at Ser486 and Ser499 are required for FSK-induced UT-A1 monoubiquitination. The physiological significance was confirmed using rat kidney inner medullary collecting duct suspensions, which showed that vasopressin treatment promotes UT-A1 ubiquitination. We conclude that unlike under basal conditions in which UT-A1 is subject to polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated protein degradation, activation of UT-A1 by FSK induces UT-A1 monoubiquitination and protein lysosomal degradation.

  5. Facilitation skills for trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cilliers

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to develop the facilitation skills of trainers. Facilitation is defined form the Person-Centered approach, as providing an opportunity for the trainee to experience personal growth and learning. A facilitation skills workshop was presented to 40 trainers, focussing on enhancing selfactualisation, its intra and inter personal characteristics, and attending and responding behaviour. Measurement with the Personal Orientation Inventory and Carkhuff scales, indicate enhanced cognitive, affective and conative sensitivity and interpersonal skills. A post-interview indicates the trainers experienced empowerment in dealing with the providing of opportunities for growth amongst trainees, in all kinds of training situations. Recommendations are made to enhance facilitation development amongst trainers. Opsomming Hierdie navorsing poog om die fasiliteringsvaardighede van opieiers te ontwikkel. Fasilitering word gedefinieer vanuit die Persoonsgesentreerde benadering as die beskikbaarstelling van 'n geleentheid om persoonlike groei en leer te ervaar. 'n Fasiliteringsvaardighede werkswinkel is aangebied vir 40 opieiers, met die fokus op die stimulering van selfaktualisering, die intra en interpersoonlike kenmerke daarvan, en aandagskenk- en responderings- gedrag. Meting met die Persoonlike Orientasievraelys en die Carkhuff skale, dui op n toename in kognitiewe, affektiewe en konatiewe sensitiwiteit en interpersoonlike vaardighede. n Post-onderhoud dui op die opleier se ervaarde bemagtiging in die beskikbaarstelling van groeigeleenthede vir opleidelinge, in all tipe opleidingsituasies. Aanbevelings word gemaak om die ontwikkeling van fasiliteringsvaardighede by opleiers te verhoog.

  6. From Teaching to Facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    A shift from teaching to learning is characteristic of the introduction of Problem Based Learning (PBL) in an existing school. As a consequence the teaching staff has to be trained in skills like facilitating group work and writing cases. Most importantly a change in thinking about teaching...

  7. Facilitation of Adult Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  8. Facilitation skills for nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Cilliers

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Using the pcrson-centered approach, facilitation in this study was conceptualised as providing opportunities for personal growth in the patient, and operationalised in a skills workshop for 40 nurses from different hospitals in Gauteng. The first objective was to evaluate the workshop and the second to ascertain its effect on the participant’s experienced performance. A combined quantitative and qualitative research design was used. The quantitative measurement (Personal Orientation Inventory, Carkhuff scales indicated that the workshop stimulated self-actualisation in terms of intrapersonal awareness, and the interpersonal skills of respect, realness, concreteness, empathy, as well as in terms of attending and responding behaviour. The qualitative measurement (a semi-structured interview indicated that the participants were able to empower patients to find their own answers to difficult personal questions. The alternative hypothesis was accepted, namely that this workshop in facilitations skills significantly enhanced the intra- and interpersonal characteristics associated with self-actualisation and the facilitation of growth in patients. The findings highlighted the difference between the two roles of instructor and facilitator, and recommendations to this effect were formulated.

  9. Facilitating leadership team communication

    OpenAIRE

    Hedman, Eerika

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand and describe how to facilitate competent communication in leadership teamwork. Grounded in the premises of social constructionism and informed by such theoretical frameworks as coordinated management of meaning theory (CMM), dialogic organization development (OD), systemic-constructionist leadership, communication competence, and reflexivity, this study seeks to produce further insights into understanding leadership team communicati...

  10. The Possible "Proton Sponge " Effect of Polyethylenimine (PEI) Does Not Include Change in Lysosomal pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2013-01-01

    " hypothesis. Our measurements show that PEI does not induce change in lysosomal pH as previously suggested and quantification of PEI concentrations in lysosomes makes it uncertain that the "proton sponge " effect is the dominant mechanism of polyplex escape.Molecular Therapy (2012); doi:10.1038/mt.2012.185....

  11. Disorders of lysosomal acidification-The emerging role of v-ATPase in aging and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colacurcio, Daniel J; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-12-01

    Autophagy and endocytosis deliver unneeded cellular materials to lysosomes for degradation. Beyond processing cellular waste, lysosomes release metabolites and ions that serve signaling and nutrient sensing roles, linking the functions of the lysosome to various pathways for intracellular metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. Each of these lysosomal behaviors is influenced by the intraluminal pH of the lysosome, which is maintained in the low acidic range by a proton pump, the vacuolar ATPase (v-ATPase). New reports implicate altered v-ATPase activity and lysosomal pH dysregulation in cellular aging, longevity, and adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, including forms of Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. Genetic defects of subunits composing the v-ATPase or v-ATPase-related proteins occur in an increasingly recognized group of familial neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the expanding roles of the v-ATPase complex as a platform regulating lysosomal hydrolysis and cellular homeostasis. We discuss the unique vulnerability of neurons to persistent low level lysosomal dysfunction and review recent clinical and experimental studies that link dysfunction of the v-ATPase complex to neurodegenerative diseases across the age spectrum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron content and acid phosphatase activity in hepatic parenchymal lysosomes of patients with hemochromatosis before and after phlebotomy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleton, M.I.; de Bruijn, W.C.; van Blokland, W.T.; Marx, J.J.; Roelofs, J.M.; Rademakers, L.H.

    1988-03-01

    Lysosomal structures in liver parenchymal cells of 3 patients with iron overload and of 3 subjects without iron-storage disorders were investigated. A combination of enzyme cytochemistry--with cerium as a captive ion to demonstrate lysosomal acid phosphatase activity--and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) was used. We were able (1) to define and quantify lysosomal structures as lysosomes, siderosomes, or residual bodies, (2) to quantify the amount of iron and cerium simultaneously in these structures, and (3) to evaluate a possible relation between iron storage and enzyme activity. With histopathologically increased iron storage, the number of siderosomes had increased at the cost of lysosomes, with a corresponding increase in acid phosphatase activity in both organelles. In histopahtologically severe iron overload, however, acid phosphatase activity was low or not detectable and most of the iron was stored in residual bodies. After phlebotomy treatment, the number of siderosomes had decreased in favor of the lysosomes, approaching values obtained in control subjects, and acid phosphatase activity was present in all iron-containing structures. In this way a relationship between iron storage and enzyme activity was established. The iron content of the individual lysosomal structures per unit area had increased with histopathologically increased iron storage and had decreased after phlebotomy treatment. From this observation, it is concluded that the iron status of the patient is not only reflected by the amount of iron-containing hepatocytes but, as well, by the iron content lysosomal unit area.

  13. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Barrio, Luis C; Lerma, Milagros; de la Peña, Gema; Serna, Jorge; Pastor, Oscar; Lasunción, Miguel A; Busto, Rebeca

    2016-03-18

    First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively), have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI)-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) and coatomer subunit β (β-COP) were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes' internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality.

  14. Therapeutic effects of remediating autophagy failure in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease by enhancing lysosomal proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dun-Sheng; Stavrides, Philip; Mohan, Panaiyur S; Kaushik, Susmita; Kumar, Asok; Ohno, Masuo; Schmidt, Stephen D; Wesson, Daniel W; Bandyopadhyay, Urmi; Jiang, Ying; Pawlik, Monika; Peterhoff, Corrinne M; Yang, Austin J; Wilson, Donald A; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Westaway, David; Mathews, Paul M; Levy, Efrat; Cuervo, Ana M; Nixon, Ralph A

    2011-07-01

    The extensive autophagic-lysosomal pathology in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain has revealed a major defect: in the proteolytic clearance of autophagy substrates. Autophagy failure contributes on several levels to AD pathogenesis and has become an important therapeutic target for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. We recently observed broad therapeutic effects of stimulating autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD that exhibits defective proteolytic clearance of autophagic substrates, robust intralysosomal amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, extracellular β-amyloid deposition and cognitive deficits. By genetically deleting the lysosomal cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin B (CstB), to selectively restore depressed cathepsin activities, we substantially cleared Aβ, ubiquitinated proteins and other autophagic substrates from autolysosomes/lysosomes and rescued autophagic-lysosomal pathology, as well as reduced total Aβ40/42 levels and extracellular amyloid deposition, highlighting the underappreciated importance of the lysosomal system for Aβ clearance. Most importantly, lysosomal remediation prevented the marked learning and memory deficits in TgCRND8 mice. Our findings underscore the pathogenic significance of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in AD and demonstrate the value of reversing this dysfunction as an innovative therapeautic strategy for AD.

  15. Impact of high cholesterol in a Parkinson's disease model: Prevention of lysosomal leakage versus stimulation of α-synuclein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ida; Nath, Sangeeta; Bornefall, Per; Giraldo, Ana Maria Villamil; Öllinger, Karin

    2017-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by accumulation of intraneuronal cytoplasmic inclusions, Lewy bodies, which mainly consist of aggregated α-synuclein. Controversies exist as to whether high blood cholesterol is a risk factor for the development of the disease and whether statin treatment could have a protective effect. Using a model system of BE(2)-M17 neuroblastoma cells treated with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), we found that MPP(+)-induced cell death was accompanied by cholesterol accumulation in a lysosomal-like pattern in pre-apoptotic cells. To study the effects of lysosomal cholesterol accumulation, we increased lysosomal cholesterol through pre-treatment with U18666A and found delayed leakage of lysosomal contents into the cytosol, which reduced cell death. This suggests that increased lysosomal cholesterol is a stress response mechanism to protect lysosomal membrane integrity in response to early apoptotic stress. However, high cholesterol also stimulated the accumulation of α-synuclein. Treatment with the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin reduced MPP(+)-induced cell death by inhibiting the production of reactive oxygen species, but did not prevent lysosomal cholesterol increase nor affect α-synuclein accumulation. Our study indicates a dual role of high cholesterol in Parkinson's disease, in which it acts both as a protector against lysosomal membrane permeabilization and as a stimulator of α-synuclein accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of lysosomal enzymes released by alveolar macrophages in the pathogenesis of the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Pérez-Arellano

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolytic enzymes are the major constituents of alveolar macrophages (AM and have been shown to be involved in many aspects of the inflammatory pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of lysosomal enzymes in the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HPs. An experimental study on AM lysosomal enzymes of an HP-guinea-pig model was performed. The results obtained both in vivo and in vitro suggest that intracellular enzymatic activity decrease is, at least partly, due to release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. A positive but slight correlation was found between extracellular lysosomal activity and four parameters of lung lesion (lung index, bronchoalveolar fluid total (BALF protein concentration, BALF LDH and BALF alkaline phosphatase activities. All the above findings suggest that the AM release of lysosomal enzymes during HP is a factor involved, although possibly not the only one, in the pulmonary lesions appearing in this disease.

  17. Ubiquilin/Dsk2 promotes inclusion body formation and vacuole (lysosome)-mediated disposal of mutated huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kun-Han; Liang, Fengshan; Higgins, Ryan; Wang, Yanchang

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquilin proteins contain a ubiquitin-like domain (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated domain(s) that interact with the proteasome and ubiquitinated substrates, respectively. Previous work established the link between ubiquilin mutations and neurodegenerative diseases, but the function of ubiquilin proteins remains elusive. Here we used a misfolded huntingtin exon I containing a 103-polyglutamine expansion (Htt103QP) as a model substrate for the functional study of ubiquilin proteins. We found that yeast ubiquilin mutant (dsk2Δ) is sensitive to Htt103QP overexpression and has a defect in the formation of Htt103QP inclusion bodies. Our evidence further suggests that the UBL domain of Dsk2 is critical for inclusion body formation. Of interest, Dsk2 is dispensable for Htt103QP degradation when Htt103QP is induced for a short time before noticeable inclusion body formation. However, when the inclusion body forms after a long Htt103QP induction, Dsk2 is required for efficient Htt103QP clearance, as well as for autophagy-dependent delivery of Htt103QP into vacuoles (lysosomes). Therefore our data indicate that Dsk2 facilitates vacuole-mediated clearance of misfolded proteins by promoting inclusion body formation. Of importance, the defect of inclusion body formation in dsk2 mutants can be rescued by human ubiquilin 1 or 2, suggesting functional conservation of ubiquilin proteins.

  18. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K; Kessels, Michael M; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  19. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita-Eva Varga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs. Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  20. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita-Eva Varga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs. Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  1. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J. Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K.; Kessels, Michael M.; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice. PMID:26284655

  2. TPC1 Has Two Variant Isoforms, and Their Removal Has Different Effects on Endo-Lysosomal Functions Compared to Loss of TPC2

    OpenAIRE

    Ruas, Margarida; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Davis, Lianne C.; Al-Douri, Areej; Tynan, Patricia W.; Tunn, Ruth; Teboul, Lydia; Galione, Antony; Parrington, John

    2014-01-01

    Organelle ion homeostasis within the endo-lysosomal system is critical for physiological functions. Two-pore channels (TPCs) are cation channels that reside in endo-lysosomal organelles, and overexpression results in endo-lysosomal trafficking defects. However, the impact of a lack of TPC expression on endo-lysosomal trafficking is unknown. Here, we characterize Tpcn1 expression in two transgenic mouse lines (Tpcn1 XG716 and Tpcn1 T159) and show expression of a novel evolutionarily conserved ...

  3. Involvement of lysosomal dysfunction in autophagosome accumulation and early pathologies in adipose tissue of obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunoe, Yuhei; Sudo, Yuka; Okita, Naoyuki; Hiraoka, Hidenori; Mikami, Kentaro; Narahara, Tomohiro; Negishi, Arisa; Yoshida, Miki; Higashibata, Rikako; Watanabe, Shukoh; Kaneko, Hiroki; Natori, Daiki; Furuichi, Takuma; Yasukawa, Hiromine; Kobayashi, Masaki; Higami, Yoshikazu

    2017-04-03

    Whether obesity accelerates or suppresses autophagy in adipose tissue is still debatable. To clarify dysregulation of autophagy and its role in pathologies of obese adipose tissue, we focused on lysosomal function, protease maturation and activity, both in vivo and in vitro. First, we showed that autophagosome formation was accelerated, but autophagic clearance was impaired in obese adipose tissue. We also found protein and activity levels of CTSL (cathepsin L) were suppressed in obese adipose tissue, while the activity of CTSB (cathepsin B) was significantly enhanced. Moreover, cellular senescence and inflammasomes were activated in obese adipose tissue. In 3T3L1 adipocytes, downregulation of CTSL deteriorated autophagic clearance, upregulated expression of CTSB, promoted cellular senescence and activated inflammasomes. Upregulation of CTSB promoted additional activation of inflammasomes. Therefore, we suggest lysosomal dysfunction observed in obese adipose tissue leads to lower autophagic clearance, resulting in autophagosome accumulation. Simultaneously, lysosomal abnormalities, including deteriorated CTSL function and compensatory activation of CTSB, caused cellular senescence and inflammasome activation. Our findings strongly suggest lysosomal dysfunction is involved in early pathologies of obese adipose tissue.

  4. Structural and functional analysis of lysosomal ss-galactosidase and its relation to the protective protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Morreau (Hans)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractLysosomal B-galactosidase is the glycosidase, that cleaves B-linked galactosyl mmenes from a variety of natural and synthetic substrates. In normal tissues of various species this enzyme appears to associate with two other hydrolases, N-acetyl-o:-neuraminidase and the protective protein.

  5. AP-3 and Rabip4' coordinately regulate spatial distribution of lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Ivan

    Full Text Available The RUN and FYVE domain proteins rabip4 and rabip4' are encoded by RUFY1 and differ in a 108 amino acid N-terminal extension in rabip4'. Their identical C terminus binds rab5 and rab4, but the function of rabip4s is incompletely understood. We here found that silencing RUFY1 gene products promoted outgrowth of plasma membrane protrusions, and polarized distribution and clustering of lysosomes at their tips. An interactor screen for proteins that function together with rabip4' yielded the adaptor protein complex AP-3, of which the hinge region in the β3 subunit bound directly to the FYVE domain of rabip4'. Rabip4' colocalized with AP-3 on a tubular subdomain of early endosomes and the extent of colocalization was increased by a dominant negative rab4 mutant. Knock-down of AP-3 had an ever more dramatic effect and caused accumulation of lysosomes in protrusions at the plasma membrane. The most peripheral lysosomes were localized beyond microtubules, within the cortical actin network. Our results uncover a novel function for AP-3 and rabip4' in regulating lysosome positioning through an interorganellar pathway.

  6. Brucella suis-Impaired Specific Recognition of Phagosomes by Lysosomes due to Phagosomal Membrane Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroeni, Aroem; Jouy, Nicolas; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Porte, Françoise

    2001-01-01

    Brucella species are gram-negative, facultatively intracellular bacteria that infect humans and animals. These organisms can survive and replicate within a membrane-bound compartment in phagocytic and nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion has been proposed as a mechanism for intracellular survival in both types of cells. However, the biochemical mechanisms and microbial factors implicated in Brucella maturation are still completely unknown. We developed two different approaches in an attempt to gain further insight into these mechanisms: (i) a fluorescence microscopy analysis of general intracellular trafficking on whole cells in the presence of Brucella and (ii) a flow cytometry analysis of in vitro reconstitution assays showing the interaction between Brucella suis-containing phagosomes and lysosomes. The fluorescence microscopy results revealed that fusion properties of latex bead-containing phagosomes with lysosomes were not modified in the presence of live Brucella suis in the cells. We concluded that fusion inhibition was restricted to the pathogen phagosome and that the host cell fusion machinery was not altered by the presence of live Brucella in the cell. By in vitro reconstitution experiments, we observed a specific association between killed B. suis-containing phagosomes and lysosomes, which was dependent on exogenously supplied cytosol, energy, and temperature. This association was observed with killed bacteria but not with live bacteria. Hence, this specific recognition inhibition seemed to be restricted to the pathogen phagosomal membrane, as noted in the in vivo experiments. PMID:11119541

  7. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library...... in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 si......), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide...

  8. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutation is characterised by neuronal lysosomal storage pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, Emma L.; Mizielinska, Sarah; Edgar, James R.;

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report that mice which express FTD-causative mutant CHMP2B at physiological levels develop a novel lysosomal storage pathology characterised by large neuronal autofluorescent aggregates. The a...

  9. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutation is characterised by neuronal lysosomal storage pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, Emma L.; Mizielinska, Sarah; Edgar, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report that mice which express FTD-causative mutant CHMP2B at physiological levels develop a novel lysosomal storage pathology characterised by large neuronal autofluorescent aggregates. The a...

  10. Reference values for lysosomal enzymes activities using dried blood spots samples - a Brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Ana M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD are inherited disorders caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzymes in which early diagnosis is essential to provide timely treatment. This study reports interval values for the activity of lysosomal enzymes that are deficient in Mucopolysaccharidosis type I, Fabry, Gaucher and Pompe disease, using dried blood spots on filter paper (DBS samples in a Brazilian population. Results Reference activity values were obtained from healthy volunteers samples for alpha-galactosidase A (4.57 ± 1.37 umol/L/h, beta-glucosidase (3.06 ± 0.99 umol/L/h, alpha-glucosidase (ratio: 13.19 ± 4.26; % inhibition: 70.66 ± 7.60, alpha-iduronidase (3.45 ± 1.21 umol/L/h and beta-galactosidase (14.09 ± 4.36 umol/L/h. Conclusion Reference values of five lysosomal enzymes were determined for a Brazilian population sample. However, as our results differ from other laboratories, it highlights the importance of establishing specific reference values for each center.

  11. Genetic perspective on the role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan-Or, Ziv; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD), once considered as a prototype of a sporadic disease, is now known to be considerably affected by various genetic factors, which interact with environmental factors and the normal process of aging, leading to PD. Large studies determined that the hereditary component of PD is at least 27%, and in some populations, single genetic factors are responsible for more than 33% of PD patients. Interestingly, many of these genetic factors, such as LRRK2, GBA, SMPD1, SNCA, PARK2, PINK1, PARK7, SCARB2, and others, are involved in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). Some of these genes encode lysosomal enzymes, whereas others correspond to proteins that are involved in transport to the lysosome, mitophagy, or other autophagic-related functions. Is it possible that all these factors converge into a single pathway that causes PD? In this review, we will discuss these genetic findings and the role of the ALP in the pathogenesis of PD and will try to answer this question. We will suggest a novel hypothesis for the pathogenic mechanism of PD that involves the lysosome and the different autophagy pathways. PMID:26207393

  12. Lysosomal Enzyme Glucocerebrosidase Protects against Aβ1-42 Oligomer-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Tae-In; Yun, Seungpil; Kim, Sangjune; Park, Hyejin; Hwang, Heehong; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Ko, Han Seok

    2015-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GCase) functions as a lysosomal enzyme and its mutations are known to be related to many neurodegenerative diseases, including Gaucher’s disease (GD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). However, there is little information about the role of GCase in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we demonstrate that GCase protein levels and enzyme activity are significantly decreased in sporadic AD. Moreover, Aβ1–42 oligomer treatment results in neuronal cell death that is concomitant with decreased GCase protein levels and enzyme activity, as well as impairment in lysosomal biogenesis and acidification. Importantly, overexpression of GCase promotes the lysosomal degradation of Aβ1–42 oligomers, restores the lysosomal impairment, and protects against the toxicity in neurons treated with Aβ1–42 oligomers. Our findings indicate that a deficiency of GCase could be involved in progression of AD pathology and suggest that augmentation of GCase activity may be a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of AD. PMID:26629917

  13. Lysosomal Enzyme Glucocerebrosidase Protects against Aβ1-42 Oligomer-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulah Choi

    Full Text Available Glucocerebrosidase (GCase functions as a lysosomal enzyme and its mutations are known to be related to many neurodegenerative diseases, including Gaucher's disease (GD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB. However, there is little information about the role of GCase in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Here we demonstrate that GCase protein levels and enzyme activity are significantly decreased in sporadic AD. Moreover, Aβ1-42 oligomer treatment results in neuronal cell death that is concomitant with decreased GCase protein levels and enzyme activity, as well as impairment in lysosomal biogenesis and acidification. Importantly, overexpression of GCase promotes the lysosomal degradation of Aβ1-42 oligomers, restores the lysosomal impairment, and protects against the toxicity in neurons treated with Aβ1-42 oligomers. Our findings indicate that a deficiency of GCase could be involved in progression of AD pathology and suggest that augmentation of GCase activity may be a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of AD.

  14. Phototoxic effects of lysosome-associated genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Boulina, Maria E.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Bogdanova, Ekaterina A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2014-07-01

    KillerRed is a unique phototoxic red fluorescent protein that can be used to induce local oxidative stress by green-orange light illumination. Here we studied phototoxicity of KillerRed targeted to cytoplasmic surface of lysosomes via fusion with Rab7, a small GTPase that is known to be attached to membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes. It was found that lysosome-associated KillerRed ensures efficient light-induced cell death similar to previously reported mitochondria- and plasma membrane-localized KillerRed. Inhibitory analysis demonstrated that lysosomal cathepsins play an important role in the manifestation of KillerRed-Rab7 phototoxicity. Time-lapse monitoring of cell morphology, membrane integrity, and nuclei shape allowed us to conclude that KillerRed-Rab7-mediated cell death occurs via necrosis at high light intensity or via apoptosis at lower light intensity. Potentially, KillerRed-Rab7 can be used as an optogenetic tool to direct target cell populations to either apoptosis or necrosis.

  15. Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Is Reduced Both in Cryptogenic Cirrhosis and in Cirrhosis of Known Etiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Vespasiani-Gentilucci

    Full Text Available Liver cirrhosis is characterized by a severe acquired reduction of LAL-activity, the precise causes and consequences of which need to be further addressed. DBS-determined lysosomal enzyme activities seem to be affected by white blood cell and platelet counts, and the specificity of these tests can be reduced when applied to determined populations, such as cirrhotics.

  16. Two-photon fluorescence probes for imaging of mitochondria and lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanggui; Chan, Pui Shan; Chan, Miu Shan; Li, King Fai; Lo, Pik Kwan; Mak, Nai Ki; Cheah, Kok Wai; Wong, Man Shing

    2013-04-28

    Novel biocompatible cyanines show not only a very large two-photon cross-section of up to 5130 GM at 910 nm in aqueous medium for high-contrast and -brightness two-photon fluorescence live cell imaging but also highly selective subcellular localization properties including localization of mitochondria and lysosomes.

  17. Diagnosing lysosomal storage diseases in a Brazilian non-newborn population by tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Dotto Brand

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: High-throughput mass spectrometry methods have been developed to screen newborns for lysosomal storage disorders, allowing the implementation of newborn screening pilot studies in North America and Europe. It is currently feasible to diagnose Pompe, Fabry, Gaucher, Krabbe, and Niemann-Pick A/B diseases, as well as mucopolysaccharidosis I, by tandem mass spectrometry in dried blood spots, which offers considerable technical advantages compared with standard methodologies. We aimed to investigate whether the mass spectrometry methodology for lysosomal storage disease screening, originally developed for newborns, can also discriminate between affected patients and controls of various ages. METHODS: A total of 205 control individuals were grouped according to age and subjected to mass spectrometry quantification of lysosomal α-glucosidase, β-glucocerebrosidase, α-galactosidase, acid sphingomyelinase, galactocerebrosidase, and α−L-iduronidase activities. Additionally, 13 affected patients were analyzed. RESULTS: The median activities for each enzyme and each age group were determined. Enzyme activities were significantly lower in individuals aged older than 18 years compared with those in newborns. Affected patients presented enzymatic activities corresponding to less than 20% of the age-matched controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the mass spectrometry methodology can be used for the screening of lysosomal storage diseases in non-newborn patients. However, for some diseases, such as Fabry and mucopolysaccharidosis I, a combination of biochemical and clinical data may be necessary to achieve accurate diagnoses.

  18. Possible existence of lysosome-like organella within mitochondria and its role in mitochondrial quality control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Miyamoto

    Full Text Available The accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which has been implicated in aging, cancer, and a variety of degenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which mitochondrial quality is regulated remains unclear. Here, we show that Mieap, a novel p53-inducible protein, induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control. Mieap expression is directly regulated by p53 and is frequently lost in human cancer as result of DNA methylation. Mieap dramatically induces the accumulation of lysosomal proteins within mitochondria and mitochondrial acidic condition without destroying the mitochondrial structure (designated MALM, for Mieap-induced accumulation of lysosome-like organelles within mitochondria in response to mitochondrial damage. MALM was not related to canonical autophagy. MALM is involved in the degradation of oxidized mitochondrial proteins, leading to increased ATP synthesis and decreased reactive oxygen species generation. These results suggest that Mieap induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control by eliminating oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Cancer cells might accumulate unhealthy mitochondria due to p53 mutations and/or Mieap methylation, representing a potential cause of the Warburg effect.

  19. Autophagy-Independent Lysosomal Targeting Regulated by ULK1/2-FIP200 and ATG9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Goodwin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron is vital for many homeostatic processes, and its liberation from ferritin nanocages occurs in the lysosome. Studies indicate that ferritin and its binding partner nuclear receptor coactivator-4 (NCOA4 are targeted to lysosomes by a form of selective autophagy. By using genome-scale functional screening, we identify an alternative lysosomal transport pathway for ferritin that requires FIP200, ATG9A, VPS34, and TAX1BP1 but lacks involvement of the ATG8 lipidation machinery that constitutes classical macroautophagy. TAX1BP1 binds directly to NCOA4 and is required for lysosomal trafficking of ferritin under basal and iron-depleted conditions. Under basal conditions ULK1/2-FIP200 controls ferritin turnover, but its deletion leads to TAX1BP1-dependent activation of TBK1 that regulates redistribution of ATG9A to the Golgi enabling continued trafficking of ferritin. Cells expressing an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-associated TBK1 allele are incapable of degrading ferritin suggesting a molecular mechanism that explains the presence of iron deposits in patient brain biopsies.

  20. TDP-43 loss of function increases TFEB activity and blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qin; Wang, Hongfeng; Hao, Zongbing; Fu, Cheng; Hu, Qingsong; Gao, Feng; Ren, Haigang; Chen, Dong; Han, Junhai; Ying, Zheng; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-18

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by selective loss of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord. TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as a major component of disease pathogenesis in ALS, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and other neurodegenerative disease. Despite the fact that TDP-43 is a multi-functional protein involved in RNA processing and a large number of TDP-43 RNA targets have been discovered, the initial toxic effect and the pathogenic mechanism underlying TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration remain elusive. In this study, we found that loss of TDP-43 strongly induced a nuclear translocation of TFEB, the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, through targeting the mTORC1 key component raptor. This regulation in turn enhanced global gene expressions in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) and increased autophagosomal and lysosomal biogenesis. However, loss of TDP-43 also impaired the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes through dynactin 1 downregulation, leading to accumulation of immature autophagic vesicles and overwhelmed ALP function. Importantly, inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin treatment aggravated the neurodegenerative phenotype in a TDP-43-depleted Drosophila model, whereas activation of mTORC1 signaling by PA treatment ameliorated the neurodegenerative phenotype. Taken together, our data indicate that impaired mTORC1 signaling and influenced ALP may contribute to TDP-43-mediated neurodegeneration. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. Cancer cell injury by cytotoxins from cobra venom is mediated through lysosomal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofanov, Alexei V; Sharonov, George V; Astapova, Maria V; Rodionov, Dmitriy I; Utkin, Yuriy N; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2005-08-15

    Cytotoxins from cobra venom are known to manifest cytotoxicity in various cell types. It is widely accepted that the plasma membrane is a target of cytotoxins, but the mechanism of their action remains obscure. Using the confocal spectral imaging technique, we show for the first time that cytotoxins from cobra venom penetrate readily into living cancer cells and accumulate markedly in lysosomes. Cytotoxins CT1 and CT2 from Naja oxiana, CT3 from Naja kaouthia and CT1 from Naja haje are demonstrated to possess this property with respect to human lung adenocarcinoma A549 and promyelocytic leukaemia HL60 cells. Immobilized plasma membrane binding accompanies the internalization of CT3 from Naja kaouthia in the HL60 cells, but it is very weak for other cytotoxins. Detectable membrane binding is not a property of any of the cytotoxins tested in A549 cells. The kinetics and concentration-dependence of cytotoxin accumulation in lysosomes correlate well with their cytotoxic effects. On the basis of the results obtained, we propose that lysosomes are a primary target of the lytic action of cytotoxins. Plasma membrane permeabilization seems to be a downstream event relative to lysosome rupture. Direct damage to the plasma membrane may be a complementary mechanism, but its relative contribution to the cytotoxic action depends on the cytotoxin structure and cell type.

  2. Histopathologic correlates of radial stripes on MR images in lysosomal storage disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, J.P. van der; Pouwels, P.J.; Kamphorst, W.; Powers, J.M.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Barkhof, F.; Knaap, M.S. van der

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Radially oriented hypointense stripes in hyperintense cerebral white matter are recognized on T2-weighted images of certain lysosomal storage disorders. We compared in vivo and postmortem MR imaging with histopathologic findings in three patients with metachromatic leukodystr

  3. Transcriptional control of the autophagy-lysosome system in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Stoykova, Svetlana; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Ross, Kenneth N.; Fitamant, Julien; Boukhali, Myriam; Lengrand, Justine; Deshpande, Vikram; Selig, Martin K.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Settleman, Jeff; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Dyson, Nicholas J.; Zoncu, Roberto; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Haas, Wilhelm; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cellular stress response pathways to maintain metabolic homeostasis is emerging as a critical growth and survival mechanism in many cancers1. The pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) requires high levels of autophagy2–4, a conserved self-degradative process5. However, the regulatory circuits that activate autophagy and reprogram PDA cell metabolism are unknown. We now show that autophagy induction in PDA occurs as part of a broader transcriptional program that coordinates activation of lysosome biogenesis and function, and nutrient scavenging, mediated by the MiT/TFE family transcription factors. In PDA cells, the MiT/TFE proteins6 – MITF, TFE3 and TFEB – are decoupled from regulatory mechanisms that control their cytoplasmic retention. Increased nuclear import in turn drives the expression of a coherent network of genes that induce high levels of lysosomal catabolic function essential for PDA growth. Unbiased global metabolite profiling reveals that MiT/TFE-dependent autophagy-lysosomal activation is specifically required to maintain intracellular amino acid (AA) pools. These results identify the MiT/TFE transcription factors as master regulators of metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer and demonstrate activation of clearance pathways converging on the lysosome as a novel hallmark of aggressive malignancy. PMID:26168401

  4. WNK4 enhances the degradation of NCC through a sortilin-mediated lysosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Zhuang, Jieqiu; Gu, Dingying; Wang, Hua; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Guggino, William B; Cai, Hui

    2010-01-01

    WNK kinase is a serine/threonine kinase that plays an important role in electrolyte homeostasis. WNK4 significantly inhibits the surface expression of the sodium chloride co-transporter (NCC) by enhancing the degradation of NCC through a lysosomal pathway, but the mechanisms underlying this trafficking are unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of the lysosomal targeting receptor sortilin on NCC expression and degradation. In Cos-7 cells, we observed that the presence of WNK4 reduced the steady-state amount of NCC by approximately half. Co-transfection with truncated sortilin (a dominant negative mutant) prevented this WNK4-induced reduction in NCC. NCC immunoprecipitated with both wild-type sortilin and, to a lesser extent, truncated sortilin. Immunostaining revealed that WNK4 increased the co-localization of NCC with the lysosomal marker cathepsin D, and NCC co-localized with wild-type sortilin, truncated sortilin, and WNK4 in the perinuclear region. These findings suggest that WNK4 promotes NCC targeting to the lysosome for degradation via a mechanism involving sortilin.

  5. Drosophila Vps16A is required for trafficking to lysosomes and biogenesis of pigment granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulipparacharuvil, Suprabha; Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Ray, Sanchali; Sevrioukov, Evgueny A; Haberman, Adam S; Rohrer, Jack; Krämer, Helmut

    2005-08-15

    Mutations that disrupt trafficking to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles cause multiple diseases, including Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. The Drosophila eye is a model system for analyzing such mutations. The eye-color genes carnation and deep orange encode two subunits of the Vps-C protein complex required for endosomal trafficking and pigment-granule biogenesis. Here we demonstrate that dVps16A (CG8454) encodes another Vps-C subunit. Biochemical experiments revealed a specific interaction between the dVps16A C-terminus and the Sec1/Munc18 homolog Carnation but not its closest homolog, dVps33B. Instead, dVps33B interacted with a related protein, dVps16B (CG18112). Deep orange bound both Vps16 homologs. Like a deep orange null mutation, eye-specific RNAi-induced knockdown of dVps16A inhibited lysosomal delivery of internalized ligands and interfered with biogenesis of pigment granules. Ubiquitous knockdown of dVps16A was lethal. Together, these findings demonstrate that Drosophila Vps16A is essential for lysosomal trafficking. Furthermore, metazoans have two types of Vps-C complexes with non-redundant functions.

  6. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency--an under-recognized cause of dyslipidaemia and liver dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Željko; Guardamagna, Ornella; Nair, Devaki; Soran, Handrean; Hovingh, Kees; Bertolini, Stefano; Jones, Simon; Ćorić, Marijana; Calandra, Sebastiano; Hamilton, John; Eagleton, Terence; Ros, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D) is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by deleterious mutations in the LIPA gene. The age at onset and rate of progression vary greatly and this may relate to the nature of the underlying mutations. Patients presenting in infancy have the most rapidly progressive disease, developing signs and symptoms in the first weeks of life and rarely surviving beyond 6 months of age. Children and adults typically present with some combination of dyslipidaemia, hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases, and microvesicular hepatosteatosis on biopsy. Liver damage with progression to fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver failure occurs in a large proportion of patients. Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are common features, and cardiovascular disease may manifest as early as childhood. Given that these clinical manifestations are shared with other cardiovascular, liver and metabolic diseases, it is not surprising that LAL-D is under-recognized in clinical practice. This article provides practical guidance to lipidologists, endocrinologists, cardiologists and hepatologists on how to recognize individuals with this life-limiting disease. A diagnostic algorithm is proposed with a view to achieving definitive diagnosis using a recently developed blood test for lysosomal acid lipase. Finally, current management options are reviewed in light of the ongoing development of enzyme replacement therapy with sebelipase alfa (Synageva BioPharma Corp., Lexington, MA, USA), a recombinant human lysosomal acid lipase enzyme.

  7. Mindfulness for group facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active...... thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation....... A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice...

  8. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    and facilitate a variety of simple learning techniques at thirty one- and two-day conferences of up to 300 participants each. We present ten of these techniques and data evaluating them. We conclude that if conference organizers allocate a fraction of the total conference time to facilitated processes......The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an al-ternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum...... for learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We offer five design principles that specify how conferences may engage participants more and hence increase their learning. In the research-and-development effort reported here, our team collaborated with conference organizers in Denmark to introduce...

  9. A new role for an old drug: Ambroxol triggers lysosomal exocytosis via pH-dependent Ca²⁺ release from acidic Ca²⁺ stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fois, Giorgio; Hobi, Nina; Felder, Edward; Ziegler, Andreas; Miklavc, Pika; Walther, Paul; Radermacher, Peter; Haller, Thomas; Dietl, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Ambroxol (Ax) is a frequently prescribed drug used to facilitate mucociliary clearance, but its mode of action is yet poorly understood. Here we show by X-ray spectroscopy that Ax accumulates in lamellar bodies (LBs), the surfactant storing, secretory lysosomes of type II pneumocytes. Using lyso- and acidotropic substances in combination with fluorescence imaging we confirm that these vesicles belong to the class of acidic Ca(2+) stores. Ax lead to a significant neutralization of LB pH, followed by intracellular Ca(2+) release, and to a dose-dependent surfactant exocytosis. Ax-induced Ca(2+) release was significantly reduced and slowed down by pretreatment of the cells with bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1), an inhibitor of the vesicular H(+) ATPase. These results could be nearly reproduced with NH3/NH4(+). The findings suggest that Ax accumulates within LBs and severely affects their H(+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis. This is further supported by an Ax-induced change of nanostructural assembly of surfactant layers. We conclude that Ax profoundly affects LBs presumably by disordering lipid bilayers and by acting as a weak base. The pH change triggers - at least in part - Ca(2+) release from stores and secretion of surfactant from type II cells. This novel mechanism of Ax as a lysosomal secretagogue may also play a role for its recently discussed use for lysosomal storage and other degenerative diseases.

  10. Program Facilitates Distributed Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    KNET computer program facilitates distribution of computing between UNIX-compatible local host computer and remote host computer, which may or may not be UNIX-compatible. Capable of automatic remote log-in. User communicates interactively with remote host computer. Data output from remote host computer directed to local screen, to local file, and/or to local process. Conversely, data input from keyboard, local file, or local process directed to remote host computer. Written in ANSI standard C language.

  11. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating knowledge sharing is to ensure that the exchange is seen as equitable for the parties involved, and by viewing the problems of knowledge sharing as motivational problems situated in different organization...

  12. Campylobacter jejuni cell lysates differently target mitochondria and lysosomes on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, B; Campana, R; Luchetti, F; Arcangeletti, M; Betti, M; Cesarini, E; Ciacci, C; Vittoria, E; Galli, L; Papa, S; Baffone, W

    2014-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The synthesis of cytolethal distending toxin appears essential in the infection process. In this work we evaluated the sequence of lethal events in HeLa cells exposed to cell lysates of two distinct strains, C. jejuni ATCC 33291 and C. jejuni ISS3. C. jejuni cell lysates (CCLys) were added to HeLa cell monolayers which were analysed to detect DNA content, death features, bcl-2 and p53 status, mitochondria/lysosomes network and finally, CD54 and CD59 alterations, compared to cell lysates of C. jejuni 11168H cdtA mutant. We found mitochondria and lysosomes differently targeted by these bacterial lysates. Death, consistent with apoptosis for C. jejuni ATCC 33291 lysate, occurred in a slow way (>48 h); concomitantly HeLa cells increase their endolysosomal compartment, as a consequence of toxin internalization besides a simultaneous and partial lysosomal destabilization. C. jejuni CCLys induces death in HeLa cells mainly via a caspase-dependent mechanism although a p53 lysosomal pathway (also caspase-independent) seems to appear in addition. In C. jejuni ISS3-treated cells, the p53-mediated oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components seems to be lost, inducing the deepest lysosomal alterations. Furthermore, CD59 considerably decreases, suggesting both a degradation or internalisation pathway. CCLys-treated HeLa cells increase CD54 expression on their surface, because of the action of lysate as its double feature of toxin and bacterial peptide. In conclusion, we revealed that C. jejuni CCLys-treated HeLa cells displayed different features, depending on the particular strain.

  13. Neurologic abnormalities in mouse models of the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and mucolipidosis III γ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Idol

    Full Text Available UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β, while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ. Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments.

  14. Lysine suppresses protein degradation through autophagic-lysosomal system in C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomonori; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nedachi, Taku; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    Muscle mass is determined between protein synthesis and protein degradation. Reduction of muscle mass leads to bedridden condition and attenuation of resistance to diseases. Moreover, bedridden condition leads to additional muscle loss due to disuse muscle atrophy. In our previous study (Sato et al. 2013), we showed that administered lysine (Lys), one of essential amino acid, suppressed protein degradation in skeletal muscle. In this study, we investigated that the mechanism of the suppressive effects of Lys on skeletal muscle proteolysis in C2C12 cell line. C2C12 myotubes were incubated in the serum-free medium containing 10 mM Lys or 20 mM Lys, and myofibrillar protein degradation was determined by the rates of 3-methylhistidine (MeHis) release from the cells. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity from the phosphorylation levels of p70-ribosormal protein S6 kinase 1 and eIF4E-binding protein 1 and the autophagic-lysosomal system activity from the ratio of LC3-II/I in C2C12 myotubes stimulated by 10 mM Lys for 0-3 h were measured. The rates of MeHis release were markedly reduced by addition of Lys. The autophagic-lysosomal system activity was inhibited upon 30 min of Lys supplementation. The activity of mTOR was significantly increased upon 30 min of Lys supplementation. The suppressive effect of Lys on the proteolysis by the autophagic-lysosomal system was maintained partially when mTOR activity was inhibited by 100 nM rapamycin, suggesting that some regulator other than mTOR signaling, for example, Akt, might also suppress the autophagic-lysosomal system. From these results, we suggested that Lys suppressed the activity of the autophagic-lysosomal system in part through activation of mTOR and reduced myofibrillar protein degradation in C2C12 myotubes.

  15. UVA causes dual inactivation of cathepsin B and L underlying lysosomal dysfunction in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamore, Sarah D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-06-05

    Cutaneous exposure to chronic solar UVA-radiation is a causative factor in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Recently, we have identified the thiol-dependent cysteine-protease cathepsin B as a novel UVA-target undergoing photo-oxidative inactivation upstream of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in fibroblasts. In this study, we examined UVA effects on a wider range of cathepsins and explored the occurrence of UVA-induced cathepsin inactivation in other cultured skin cell types. In dermal fibroblasts, chronic exposure to non-cytotoxic doses of UVA caused pronounced inactivation of the lysosomal cysteine-proteases cathepsin B and L, effects not observed in primary keratinocytes and occurring only to a minor extent in primary melanocytes. In order to determine if UVA-induced lysosomal impairment requires single or dual inactivation of cathepsin B and/or L, we used a genetic approach (siRNA) to selectively downregulate enzymatic activity of these target cathepsins. Monitoring an established set of protein markers (including LAMP1, LC3-II, and p62) and cell ultrastructural changes detected by electron microscopy, we observed that only dual genetic antagonism (targeting both CTSB and CTSL expression) could mimic UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations, whereas single knockdown (targeting CTSB or CTSL only) did not display 'UVA-mimetic' effects failing to reproduce the UVA-induced phenotype. Taken together, our data demonstrate that chronic UVA inhibits both cathepsin B and L enzymatic activity and that dual inactivation of both enzymes is a causative factor underlying UVA-induced impairment of lysosomal function in dermal fibroblasts.

  16. Endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasome activation associated with lysosomal destabilization during coronary arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Li, Xiang; Boini, Krishna M; Pitzer, Ashley L; Gulbins, Erich; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2015-02-01

    Inflammasomes play a critical role in the development of vascular diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms activating the inflammasome in endothelial cells and the relevance of this inflammasome activation is far from clear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which an Nlrp3 inflammasome is activated to result in endothelial dysfunction during coronary arteritis by Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) cell wall fragments (LCWE) in a mouse model for Kawasaki disease. Endothelial dysfunction associated with increased vascular cell adhesion protein 1 (VCAM-1) expression and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion was observed during coronary arteritis in mice treated with LCWE. Accompanied with these changes, the inflammasome activation was also shown in coronary arterial endothelium, which was characterized by a marked increase in caspase-1 activity and IL-1β production. In cultured endothelial cells, LCWE induced Nlrp3 inflammasome formation, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production, which were blocked by Nlrp3 gene silencing or lysosome membrane stabilizing agents such as colchicine, dexamethasone, and ceramide. However, a potassium channel blocker glibenclamide or an oxygen free radical scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine had no effects on LCWE-induced inflammasome activation. LCWE also increased endothelial cell lysosomal membrane permeability and triggered lysosomal cathepsin B release into cytosol. Silencing cathepsin B blocked LCWE-induced Nlrp3 inflammasome formation and activation in endothelial cells. In vivo, treatment of mice with cathepsin B inhibitor also abolished LCWE-induced inflammasome activation in coronary arterial endothelium. It is concluded that LCWE enhanced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and consequent release of lysosomal cathepsin B, resulting in activation of the endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasome, which may contribute to the development of coronary arteritis.

  17. A Comparative Study on the Alterations of Endocytic Pathways in Multiple Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Jeff; Manthe, Rachel L; Solomon, Melani; Garnacho, Carmen; Muro, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Many cellular activities and pharmaceutical interventions involve endocytosis and delivery to lysosomes for processing. Hence, lysosomal processing defects can cause cell and tissue damage, as in lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) characterized by lysosomal accumulation of undegraded materials. This storage causes endocytic and trafficking alterations, which exacerbate disease and hinder treatment. However, there have been no systematic studies comparing different endocytic routes in LSDs. Here, we used genetic and pharmacological models of four LSDs (type A Niemann-Pick, type C Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Gaucher diseases) and evaluated the pinocytic and receptor-mediated activity of the clathrin-, caveolae-, and macropinocytic routes. Bulk pinocytosis was diminished in all diseases, suggesting a generic endocytic alteration linked to lysosomal storage. Fluid-phase (dextran) and ligand (transferrin) uptake via the clathrin route were lower for all LSDs. Fluid-phase and ligand (cholera toxin B) uptake via the caveolar route were both affected but less acutely in Fabry or Gaucher diseases. Epidermal growth factor-induced macropinocytosis was altered in Niemann-Pick cells but not other LSDs. Intracellular trafficking of ligands was also distorted in LSD versus wild-type cells. The extent of these endocytic alterations paralleled the level of cholesterol storage in disease cell lines. Confirming this, pharmacological induction of cholesterol storage in wild-type cells disrupted endocytosis, and model therapeutics restored uptake in proportion to their efficacy in attenuating storage. This suggests a proportional and reversible relationship between endocytosis and lipid (cholesterol) storage. By analogy, the accumulation of biological material in other diseases, or foreign material from drugs or their carriers, may cause similar deficits, warranting further investigation.

  18. N370S-GBA1 mutation causes lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, Patricia; Orgaz, Lorena; Bueno-Gil, Guillermo; Espadas, Isabel; Rodríguez-Traver, Eva; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Gutierrez, Antonia; Dávila, José C; González-Polo, Rosa A; Fuentes, José M; Mir, Pablo; Vicario, Carlos; Moratalla, Rosario

    2017-08-05

    Heterozygous mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase-1, increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the N370S-GBA1 mutation on cellular homeostasis and vulnerability in a patient-specific cellular model of PD. We isolated fibroblasts from 4 PD patients carrying the N370S/wild type GBA1 mutation and 6 controls to study the autophagy-lysosome pathway, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and Golgi apparatus structure by Western blot, immunofluorescence, LysoTracker and Filipin stainings, mRNA analysis, and electron microscopy. We evaluated cell vulnerability by apoptosis, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential with flow cytometry. The N370S mutation produced a significant reduction in β-glucocerebrosidase-1 protein and enzyme activity and β-glucocerebrosidase-1 retention within the endoplasmic reticulum, which interrupted its traffic to the lysosome. This led to endoplasmic reticulum stress activation and triggered unfolded protein response and Golgi apparatus fragmentation. Furthermore, these alterations resulted in autophagosome and p62/SQSTM1 accumulation. This impaired autophagy was a result of dysfunctional lysosomes, indicated by multilamellar body accumulation probably caused by increased cholesterol, enlarged lysosomal mass, and reduced enzyme activity. This phenotype impaired the removal of damaged mitochondria and reactive oxygen species production and enhanced cell death. Our results support a connection between the loss of β-glucocerebrosidase-1 function, cholesterol accumulation, and the disruption of cellular homeostasis in GBA1-PD. Our work reveals new insights into the cellular pathways underlying PD pathogenesis, providing evidence that GBA1-PD shares common features with lipid-storage diseases. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International

  19. Facilitative root interactions in intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Jensen, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Facilitation takes place when plants ameliorate the environment of their neighbours, and increase their growth and survival. Facilitation occurs in natural ecosystems as well as in agroecosystems. We discuss examples of facilitative root interactions in intercropped agroecosystems; including...... intensified cropping systems using chemical and mechanical inputs also show that facilitative interactions definitely can be of significance. It is concluded that a better understanding of the mechanisms behind facilitative interactions may allow us to benefit more from these phenomena in agriculture...

  20. Facilitation as a teaching strategy : experiences of facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lekalakala-Mokgele

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in nursing education involve the move from traditional teaching approaches that are teacher-centred to facilitation, a student centred approach. The studentcentred approach is based on a philosophy of teaching and learning that puts the learner on centre-stage. The aim of this study was to identify the challenges of facilitators of learning using facilitation as a teaching method and recommend strategies for their (facilitators development and support. A qualitative, explorative and contextual design was used. Four (4 universities in South Africa which utilize facilitation as a teaching/ learning process were identified and the facilitators were selected to be the sample of the study. The main question posed during in-depth group interviews was: How do you experience facilitation as a teaching/learning method?. Facilitators indicated different experiences and emotions when they first had to facilitate learning. All of them indicated that it was difficult to facilitate at the beginning as they were trained to lecture and that no format for facilitation was available. They experienced frustrations and anxieties as a result. The lack of knowledge of facilitation instilled fear in them. However they indicated that facilitation had many benefits for them and for the students. Amongst the ones mentioned were personal and professional growth. Challenges mentioned were the fear that they waste time and that they do not cover the content. It is therefore important that facilitation be included in the training of nurse educators.

  1. Recognition of arylsulfatase A and B by the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-phosphotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghootfam, Afshin; Schestag, Frank; Dierks, Thomas; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2003-08-29

    The critical step for sorting of lysosomal enzymes is the recognition by a Golgi-located phosphotransferase. The topogenic structure common to all lysosomal enzymes essential for this recognition is still not well defined, except that lysine residues seem to play a critical role. Here we have substituted surface-located lysine residues of lysosomal arylsulfatases A and B. In lysosomal arylsulfatase A only substitution of lysine residue 457 caused a reduction of phosphorylation to 33% and increased secretion of the mutant enzyme. In contrast to critical lysines in various other lysosomal enzymes, lysine 457 is not located in an unstructured loop region but in a helix. It is not strictly conserved among six homologous lysosomal sulfatases. Based on three-dimensional structure comparison, lysines 497 and 507 in arylsulfatase B are in a similar position as lysine 457 of arylsulfatase A. Also, the position of oligosaccharide side chains phosphorylated in arylsulfatase A is similar in arylsulfatase B. Despite the high degree of structural homology between these two sulfatases substitution of lysines 497 and 507 in arylsulfatase B has no effect on the sorting and phosphorylation of this sulfatase. Thus, highly homologous lysosomal arylsulfatases A and B did not develop a single conserved phosphotransferase recognition signal, demonstrating the high variability of this signal even in evolutionary closely related enzymes.

  2. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-08-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy.

  3. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Canfrán-Duque

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively, have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2 and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid, which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1 and coatomer subunit β (β-COP were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes’ internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality.

  4. Loss of β-glucocerebrosidase activity does not affect alpha-synuclein levels or lysosomal function in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermentzaki, Georgia; Dimitriou, Evangelia; Xilouri, Maria; Michelakakis, Helen; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2013-01-01

    To date, a plethora of studies have provided evidence favoring an association between Gaucher disease (GD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). GD, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, results from the diminished activity of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase), caused by mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). Alpha-synuclein (ASYN), a presynaptic protein, has been strongly implicated in PD pathogenesis. ASYN may in part be degraded by the lysosomes and may itself aberrantly impact lysosomal function. Therefore, a putative link between deficient GCase and ASYN, involving lysosomal dysfunction, has been proposed to be responsible for the risk for PD conferred by GBA mutations. In this current work, we aimed to investigate the effects of pharmacological inhibition of GCase on ASYN accumulation/aggregation, as well as on lysosomal function, in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and in primary neuronal cultures. Following profound inhibition of the enzyme activity, we did not find significant alterations in ASYN levels, or any changes in the clearance or formation of its oligomeric species. We further observed no significant impairment of the lysosomal degradation machinery. These findings suggest that additional interaction pathways together with aberrant GCase and ASYN must govern this complex relation between GD and PD.

  5. Cytosolic chloride ion is a key factor in lysosomal acidification and function of autophagy in human gastric cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogi, Shigekuni; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Inui, Toshio; Wang, Xiangdong; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify roles of cytosolic chloride ion (Cl(-) ) in regulation of lysosomal acidification [intra-lysosomal pH (pHlys )] and autophagy function in human gastric cancer cell line (MKN28). The MKN28 cells cultured under a low Cl(-) condition elevated pHlys and reduced the intra-lysosomal Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-) ]lys ) via reduction of cytosolic Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-) ]c ), showing abnormal accumulation of LC3II and p62 participating in autophagy function (dysfunction of autophagy) accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation via G0 /G1 arrest without induction of apoptosis. We also studied effects of direct modification of H(+) transport on lysosomal acidification and autophagy. Application of bafilomycin A1 (an inhibitor of V-type H(+) -ATPase) or ethyl isopropyl amiloride [EIPA; an inhibitor of Na(+) /H(+) exchanger (NHE)] elevated pHlys and decreased [Cl(-) ]lys associated with inhibition of cell proliferation via induction of G0 /G1 arrest similar to the culture under a low Cl(-) condition. However, unlike low Cl(-) condition, application of the compound, bafilomycin A1 or EIPA, induced apoptosis associated with increases in caspase 3 and 9 without large reduction in [Cl(-) ]c compared with low Cl(-) condition. These observations suggest that the lowered [Cl(-) ]c primarily causes dysfunction of autophagy without apoptosis via dysfunction of lysosome induced by disturbance of intra-lysosomal acidification. This is the first study showing that cytosolic Cl(-) is a key factor of lysosome acidification and autophagy.

  6. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Barrio, Luis C.; Lerma, Milagros; de la Peña, Gema; Serna, Jorge; Pastor, Oscar; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Busto, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively), have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI)-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) and coatomer subunit β (β-COP) were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes’ internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality. PMID:26999125

  7. Essence: Facilitating Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan

    2008-01-01

      This paper suggests ways to facilitate creativity and innovation in software development. The paper applies four perspectives – Product, Project, Process, and People –to identify an outlook for software innovation. The paper then describes a new facility–Software Innovation Research Lab (SIRL......) – and a new method concept for software innovation – Essence – based on views, modes, and team roles. Finally, the paper reports from an early experiment using SIRL and Essence and identifies further research....

  8. Characterization of the egg vesicular components in the seaweed, Fucus serratus L. (Fucales, Phaeophyta), using enzyme histochemistry and vital staining: the search for a lysosome-like body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, R D; Pitt, D; Moore, M N; Brownlee, C

    1997-03-01

    Fucus serratus eggs were examined for evidence of the existence of a lysosome-like body using enzyme histochemical and vital staining techniques. Simultaneous coupling azo-dye techniques for lysosomal acid phosphatase proved inappropriate owing to endogenous phenolic binding artefacts. The large number of alginate polysaccharide and polyphenolic egg vesicles interfered with vital staining techniques for lysosomes. Lysosomal esterase activity was detected in the abundant egg lipid bodies. The role of the egg lipid body as an equivalent lysosome-like body of higher plants, the spherosome, is discussed in relation to egg fertilization and early zygote development.

  9. Mice Doubly-deficient in lysosomal hexosaminidase a and neuraminidase 4 show epileptic crises and rapid neuronal loss

    OpenAIRE

    Seyrantepe, Volkan; Lema, Pablo; Caqueret, Aurore; Dridi, Larbi; Hadj, Samar Bel; Carpentier, Stephane; Boucher, Francine; Levade, Thierry; Carmant, Lionel; Gravel, Roy A.; Hamel, Edith; Vachon, Pascal; Di Cristo, Graziella; Michaud, Jacques L.; Morales, Carlos R.

    2010-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is a severe lysosomal disorder caused by mutations in the HexA gene coding for the a-subunit of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase A, which converts GM2 to GM3 ganglioside. Hexa-/- mice, depleted of b-hexosaminidase A, remain asymptomatic to 1 year of age, because they catabolise GM2 ganglioside via a lysosomal sialidase into glycolipid GA2, which is further processed by β-hexosaminidase B to lactosyl-ceramide, thereby bypassing the β-hexosaminidase A defect. Since this bypass is no...

  10. Effects of pH and Iminosugar Pharmacological Chaperones on Lysosomal Glycosidase Structure and Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, Raquel L.; D’aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; (Harvard-Med); (Brandeis)

    2009-06-05

    Human lysosomal enzymes acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase) and acid-{alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-Gal A) hydrolyze the sphingolipids glucosyl- and globotriaosylceramide, respectively, and mutations in these enzymes lead to the lipid metabolism disorders Gaucher and Fabry disease, respectively. We have investigated the structure and stability of GCase and {alpha}-Gal A in a neutral-pH environment reflective of the endoplasmic reticulum and an acidic-pH environment reflective of the lysosome. These details are important for the development of pharmacological chaperone therapy for Gaucher and Fabry disease, in which small molecules bind mutant enzymes in the ER to enable the mutant enzyme to meet quality control requirements for lysosomal trafficking. We report crystal structures of apo GCase at pH 4.5, at pH 5.5, and in complex with the pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) at pH 7.5. We also present thermostability analysis of GCase at pH 7.4 and 5.2 using differential scanning calorimetry. We compare our results with analogous experiments using {alpha}-Gal A and the chaperone 1-deoxygalactonijirimycin (DGJ), including the first structure of {alpha}-Gal A with DGJ. Both GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are more stable at lysosomal pH with and without their respective iminosugars bound, and notably, the stability of the GCase-IFG complex is pH sensitive. We show that the conformations of the active site loops in GCase are sensitive to ligand binding but not pH, whereas analogous galactose- or DGJ-dependent conformational changes in {alpha}-Gal A are not seen. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from {alpha}-Gal A unfolding indicate two-state, van't Hoff unfolding in the absence of the iminosugar at neutral and lysosomal pH, and non-two-state unfolding in the presence of DGJ. Taken together, these results provide insight into how GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are thermodynamically stabilized by iminosugars and suggest strategies for the development of new pharmacological

  11. Localization of acid hydrolases in protoplasts. Examination of the proposed lysosomal function of the mature vacuole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, H.C.; Wagner, G.J.; Siegelman, H.W.

    1977-06-01

    The development of techniques to isolate and purify relatively large quantities of intact vacuoles from mature tissues permits direct biochemical analysis of this ubiquitous mature plant cell organelle. Vacuoles and a fraction enriched in soluble cytoplasmic constituents were quantitatively prepared from Hippeastrum flower petal protoplasts. Vacuolar lysate and soluble cytoplasmic fractions were examined for acid hydrolase activities commonly associated with animal lysosomes, and pH optima were determined. Esterase, protease, carboxypeptidase, ..beta..-galactosidase, ..cap alpha..-glycosidase and ..beta..-glycosidase, not found in the vacuole lysate fraction, were components of the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. Acid phosphatase, RNase and DNase were present in both fractions. Vacuolar enzyme activities were also examined as a function of flower development from bud through senescent stages. The data obtained are not consistent with the concept that the mature plant cell vacuole functions as a generalized lysosome.

  12. Campylobacter jejuni survives within epithelial cells by avoiding delivery to lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert O Watson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is one of the major causes of infectious diarrhea world-wide, although relatively little is know about its mechanisms of pathogenicity. This bacterium can gain entry into intestinal epithelial cells, which is thought to be important for its ability to persistently infect and cause disease. We found that C. jejuni is able to survive within intestinal epithelial cells. However, recovery of intracellular bacteria required pre-culturing under oxygen-limiting conditions, suggesting that C. jejuni undergoes significant physiological changes within the intracellular environment. We also found that in epithelial cells the C. jejuni-containing vacuole deviates from the canonical endocytic pathway immediately after a unique caveolae-dependent entry pathway, thus avoiding delivery into lysosomes. In contrast, in macrophages, C. jejuni is delivered to lysosomes and consequently is rapidly killed. Taken together, these studies indicate that C. jejuni has evolved specific adaptations to survive within host cells.

  13. uPARAP/endo180 directs lysosomal delivery and degradation of collagen IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Høyer-Hansen, Maria

    2004-01-01

    transmembrane glycoprotein urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP/endo180) directs collagen IV for lysosomal delivery and degradation. In wild-type fibroblasts, fluorescently labeled collagen IV was first internalized into vesicular structures with diffuse fluorescence eventually......Collagen turnover is crucial for tissue homeostasis and remodeling and pathological processes such as cancer invasion, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. A major pathway appears to be internalization and degradation by fibroblasts. We now show that the endocytic...... appearing uniformly within the wild-type cells after longer incubation times. In these cells, some collagen-containing vesicles were identified as lysosomes by staining for LAMP-1. In contrast, collagen IV remained extracellular and associated with fiber-like structures on uPARAP/endo180-deficient...

  14. Preventive effect of phytic acid on lysosomal hydrolases in normal and isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindha, E; Rajasekapandiyan, M

    2015-02-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the preventive role of phytic acid on lysosomal enzymes in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in male Wistar rats. Rats subcutaneously injected with ISO (85 mg/kg) at an interval of 24 h for two days showed a significant increase in the activities of lysosomal enzymes (glucuronidase, N-acetyl glucosaminidase, galactosidase, cathepsin-B and cathepsin-D) were increased significantly in serum and the heart of ISO-induced rats, but the activities of glucuronidase and cathepsin-D were decreased significantly in the lysosomal fraction of the heart. Pretreatment with phytic acid (25 and 50 mg/kg) daily for a period of 56 d positively altered activities of lysosomal hydrolases in ISO-induced rats. Thus, phytic acid possesses a cardioprotective effect in ISO-induced MI in rats.

  15. A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Microtubule Bundle Formation and Lysosome Motility Regulation in Drosophila S2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber L. Jolly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo” occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins, but the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an automated tracking program and a naive Bayesian classifier for the multivariate motility data to analyze 15,683 gene phenotypes and find 98 proteins involved in regulating lysosome motility along microtubules and 48 involved in the formation of microtubule filled processes in S2 cells. We identify innate immunity genes, ion channels, and signaling proteins having a role in lysosome motility regulation and find an unexpected relationship between the dynein motor, Rab7a, and lysosome motility regulation.

  16. High Resolution Crystal Structure of Human [beta]-Glucuronidase Reveals Structural Basis of Lysosome Targeting: e79687

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Md Imtaiyaz Hassan; Abdul Waheed; Jeffery H Grubb; Herbert E Klei; Sergey Korolev; William S Sly

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  17. Identification of the amino acid sequence that targets peroxiredoxin 6 to lysosome-like structures of lung epithelial cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elena M. Sorokina; Sheldon I. Feinstein; Tatyana N. Milovanova; Aron B. Fisher

    2009-01-01

    ... (lung lamellar bodies and lysosomes) and cytosol. On the basis of their pH optima, we have postulated that protein subcellular localization determines the balance between the two activities of Prdx6...

  18. Endo-lysosomal TRP mucolipin-1 channels trigger global ER Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Bethan S.; Yates, Elizabeth; Grimm, Christian; Schapira, Anthony H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transient receptor potential (TRP) mucolipins (TRPMLs), encoded by the MCOLN genes, are patho-physiologically relevant endo-lysosomal ion channels crucial for membrane trafficking. Several lines of evidence suggest that TRPMLs mediate localised Ca2+ release but their role in Ca2+ signalling is not clear. Here, we show that activation of endogenous and recombinant TRPMLs with synthetic agonists evoked global Ca2+ signals in human cells. These signals were blocked by a dominant-negative TRPML1 construct and a TRPML antagonist. We further show that, despite a predominant lysosomal localisation, TRPML1 supports both Ca2+ release and Ca2+ entry. Ca2+ release required lysosomal and ER Ca2+ stores suggesting that TRPMLs, like other endo-lysosomal Ca2+ channels, are capable of ‘chatter’ with ER Ca2+ channels. Our data identify new modalities for TRPML1 action. PMID:27577094

  19. Constitutively internalized dopamine transporter is targeted to late endosomes and lysosomal degradation in heterologous cell lines and dopaminergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Madsen, Kenneth; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard;

    (leupeptin, chloroquine, or ammonium chloride) increased the amount of transporter accumulated intracellularly over time, suggesting that constitutively endocytosed transporter was targeted to lysosomal degradation. This was further supported by expression of Tac-DAT in the immortalized dopaminergic cell...

  20. Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde haptenated protein binds macrophage scavenger receptor(s) and induces lysosomal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Klassen, Lynell W; Carlson, Deborah L; Brouse, Chad F; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2004-07-01

    There is evidence that the chemical modification of proteins (haptens) with malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) and the immune response to these haptenated proteins is associated with the initiation and/or progression of alcohol liver disease. Experimentally, proteins modified with MAA induce antibody and T cell responses, which are mediated by scavenger receptor(s). Moreover, macrophages have been shown to play an important role in processing and presenting MAA-haptenated proteins in vitro. In vitro, MAA-modified proteins have been shown to induce both apoptosis and necrosis in a dose- and cell-type-dependent manner. Natural ligands modified by oxidative stress, such as oxidized LDL, similarly initiate not only antibody responses, but also cause cell death by disrupting lysosomes after binding to scavenger receptors and internalization. We therefore investigated the binding, internalization, and lysosomal integrity in a macrophage cell line to a MAA-haptenated protein. We demonstrate for the first time that MAA-haptenated proteins are preferentially bound by scavenger receptors on macrophages, which internalize the ligands and shuttle them to lysosomes. Moreover, MAA-haptenated proteins are demonstrated to be associated with a rapid dose-dependent disruption in lysosomal integrity, resulting in leakage and caspase activation. Similarly, as hen egg lysozyme (HEL)-MAA concentrations increased (>31.3 microg/ml), increased levels of apoptosis and a G1/S cell cycle checkpoint inhibition were identified. This study identifies mechanisms by which MAA-haptenated proteins are taken up by a representative antigen-presenting cell and may delineate steps by which MAA-haptenated proteins induce cell death and induce their immunogenicity to the carrier protein. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Arsenic induces apoptosis by the lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway in INS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao; Jiang, Liping; Zhong, Laifu; Geng, Chengyan; Jia, Li; Liu, Shuang; Guan, Huai; Yang, Guang; Yao, Xiaofeng; Piao, Fengyuan; Sun, Xiance

    2016-02-01

    Recently, long term arsenic exposure was considered to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. While a relation of cause-and-effect between apoptosis of pancreatic β-cells and arsenic exposure, the precise mechanisms of these events remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore arsenic-induced pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and the mechanisms of through the possible link between lysosomal and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. After exposure to 10 μM of arsenic, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was significantly increased at 12 h, while the mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced at 24 h and the lysosomal membrane integrity was disrupted at 48 h. A significant increase in protein expression for cytochrome c was also observed using Western blot analysis after exposure to arsenic for 48 h. To further demonstrate that arsenic reduced the lysosomal membrane integrity, cells pretreated with NH4 Cl and exposed to arsenic harbored a lower fluorescence increase than cells that were only exposed to arsenic. In addition, apoptosis was mesured using Hoechst 33342/PI dual staining by microscopy and annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide dual staining by flow cytometry. The results show an increased uptake of the arsenic dose and the cells changed from dark blue to light blue, karyopyknosis, nuclear chromatin condensation, side set or fracture, and a correlation was found between the number of apoptotic cells and arsenic dose. The result of present study suggest that arsenic may induce pancreatic β-cell apoptosis through activation of the lysosome-mitochondrial pathway.

  2. Factors influencing the measurement of lysosomal enzymes activity in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Persichetti

    Full Text Available Measurements of the activities of lysosomal enzymes in cerebrospinal fluid have recently been proposed as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. To define the operating procedures useful for ensuring the reliability of these measurements, we analyzed several pre-analytical factors that may influence the activity of β-glucocerebrosidase, α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase, β-galactosidase, α-fucosidase, β-hexosaminidase, cathepsin D and cathepsin E in cerebrospinal fluid. Lysosomal enzyme activities were measured by well-established fluorimetric assays in a consecutive series of patients (n = 28 with different neurological conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The precision, pre-storage and storage conditions, and freeze/thaw cycles were evaluated. All of the assays showed within- and between-run variabilities below 10%. At -20°C, only cathepsin D was stable up to 40 weeks. At -80°C, the cathepsin D, cathepsin E, and β-mannosidase activities did not change significantly up to 40 weeks, while β-glucocerebrosidase activity was stable up to 32 weeks. The β-galactosidase and α-fucosidase activities significantly increased (+54.9±38.08% after 4 weeks and +88.94±36.19% after 16 weeks, respectively. Up to four freeze/thaw cycles did not significantly affect the activities of cathepsins D and E. The β-glucocerebrosidase activity showed a slight decrease (-14.6% after two freeze/thaw cycles. The measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities in cerebrospinal fluid is reliable and reproducible if pre-analytical factors are accurately taken into consideration. Therefore, the analytical recommendations that ensue from this study may contribute to the establishment of actual values for the activities of cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal enzymes as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus affects lysosomal enzymes in rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.B. Peres

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously shown that dextran sulfate administered to diabetic rats accumulates in the liver and kidney, and this could be due to a malfunction of the lysosomal digestive pathway. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression and activities of lysosomal enzymes that act upon proteins and sulfated polysaccharides in the livers of diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin in 26 male Wistar rats (12 weeks old, while 26 age-matched controls received only vehicle. The livers were removed on either the 10th or the 30th day of the disease, weighed, and used to evaluate the activity, expression, and localization of lysosomal enzymes. A 50-60% decrease in the specific activities of cysteine proteases, especially cathepsin B, was observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. Expression (mRNA of cathepsins B and L was also decreased on the 10th, but not on the 30th day. Sulfatase decreased 30% on the 30th day, while glycosidases did not vary (or presented a transitory and slight decrease. There were no apparent changes in liver morphology, and immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of cathepsin B in hepatocyte granules. The decrease in sulfatase could be responsible for the dextran sulfate build-up in the diabetic liver, since the action of sulfatase precedes glycosidases in the digestive pathway of sulfated polysaccharides. Our findings suggest that the decreased activities of cathepsins resulted from decreased expression of their genes, and not from general lysosomal failure, because the levels of glycosidases were normal in the diabetic liver.

  4. C. elegans Major Fats Are Stored in Vesicles Distinct from Lysosome-Related Organelles

    OpenAIRE

    O’Rourke, Eyleen J.; Soukas, Alexander A.; Carr, Christopher E.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Genetic conservation allows ancient features of fat storage endocrine pathways to be explored in C. elegans. Multiple studies have used Nile red or BODIPY-labeled fatty acids to identify regulators of fat mass. When mixed with their food, E. coli bacteria, Nile red, and BODIPY-labeled fatty acids stain multiple spherical cellular structures in the C. elegans major fat storage organ, the intestine. However, here we demonstrate that, in the conditions previously reported, the lysosome-related o...

  5. The phylogeny and evolution of deoxyribonuclease II: An enzyme essential for lysosomal DNA degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Shpak, Max; Kugelman, Jeffrey R.; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2007-01-01

    Deoxyribonuclease II (DNase II) is an endonuclease with optimal activity at low pH, localized within the lysosomes of higher eukaryotes. The origin of this enzyme remains in dispute, and its phylogenetic distribution leaves many questions about its subsequent evolutionary history open. Earlier studies have documented its presence in various metazoans, as well as in Dictyostelium, Trichomonas and, anomalously, a single genus of bacteria (Burkholderia). This study makes use of searches of the g...

  6. Characterization and cloning of lgp110, a lysosomal membrane glycoprotein from mouse and rat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, B L; Green, S A; Gabel, C A; Howe, C L; Mellman, I; Helenius, A

    1990-07-15

    lgp110 is a heavily glycosylated intrinsic protein of lysosomal membranes. Initially defined by monoclonal antibodies against mouse liver lysosomes, it consists of a 45-kilodalton core polypeptide with O-linked and 17 asparagine-linked oligosaccharide side chains in mouse cells. Sialic acid residues make the mature protein extremely acidic, with an isoelectric point of between 2 and 4 in both normal tissues and most cultured cell lines. Partial sequencing of mouse lgp110 allowed oligonucleotide probes to be constructed for the screening of several mouse cDNA libraries. A partial cDNA clone for mouse lgp110 was found and used for additional library screening, generating a cDNA clone covering all of the coding sequence of mature rat lgp110 as well as genomic clones covering most of the mouse gene. These new clones bring to seven the number of lysosomal membrane proteins whose amino acid sequences can be deduced, and two distinct but highly similar groups (designated lgp-A and lgp-B) can now be defined. Sequence comparisons suggest that differences within each group reflect species variations of the same protein and that lgp-A and lgp-B probably diverged from a common ancestor prior to the evolup4f1ary divergence of birds and mammals. Individual cells and individual lysosomes possess both lgp-A and lgp-B, suggesting that these two proteins have different functions. Mouse lgp110 is encoded by at least seven exons; intron positions suggest that the two homologous ectodomains of each lgp arose through gene duplication.

  7. Lysosomal membrane stability in laboratory- and field-exposed terrestrial isopods Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolde, Natasa; Drobne, Damjana; Valant, Janez; Padovan, Ingrid; Horvat, Milena

    2006-08-01

    Two established methods for assessment of the cytotoxicity of contaminants, the lysosomal latency (LL) assay and the neutral red retention (NRR) assay, were successfully applied to in toto digestive gland tubes (hepatopancreas) of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea). In vitro exposure of isolated gland tubes to copper was used as a positive control to determine the performance of the two methods. Lysosomal latency and the NRR assay were then used on in vivo (via food) laboratory-exposed animals and on field populations. Arbitrarily selected criteria for determination of the fitness of P. scaber were set on the basis of lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) as assessed with in toto digestive gland tubes. Decreased LMS was detected in animals from all polluted sites, but cytotoxicity data were not in agreement with concentrations of pollutants. Lysosomal membrane stability in the digestive gland tubes of animals from an environment in Idrija, Slovenia that was highly polluted with mercury (260 microg/g dry wt food and 1,600 microg/g dry wt soil) was less affected than LMS in laboratory animals fed with 5 and 50 microg Hg/g dry weight for 3 d. This probably indicates tolerance of P. scaber to mercury in the mercury-polluted environment and/or lower bioavailability of environmental mercury. In animals from the vicinity of a thermal power plant with environmental mercury concentrations three to four orders of magnitude lower than those in Idrija, LMS was severely affected. In general, the LL assay was more sensitive than the NRR assay. The LMS assay conducted on digestive gland tubes of terrestrial isopods is highly recommended for integrated biomarker studies.

  8. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus affects lysosomal enzymes in rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, G.B. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Bioquímica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Juliano, M.A. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Biofísica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, J.A.K.; Michelacci, Y.M. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Bioquímica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    It has been previously shown that dextran sulfate administered to diabetic rats accumulates in the liver and kidney, and this could be due to a malfunction of the lysosomal digestive pathway. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression and activities of lysosomal enzymes that act upon proteins and sulfated polysaccharides in the livers of diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin in 26 male Wistar rats (12 weeks old), while 26 age-matched controls received only vehicle. The livers were removed on either the 10{sup th} or the 30{sup th} day of the disease, weighed, and used to evaluate the activity, expression, and localization of lysosomal enzymes. A 50-60% decrease in the specific activities of cysteine proteases, especially cathepsin B, was observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. Expression (mRNA) of cathepsins B and L was also decreased on the 10{sup th}, but not on the 30{sup th} day. Sulfatase decreased 30% on the 30{sup th} day, while glycosidases did not vary (or presented a transitory and slight decrease). There were no apparent changes in liver morphology, and immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of cathepsin B in hepatocyte granules. The decrease in sulfatase could be responsible for the dextran sulfate build-up in the diabetic liver, since the action of sulfatase precedes glycosidases in the digestive pathway of sulfated polysaccharides. Our findings suggest that the decreased activities of cathepsins resulted from decreased expression of their genes, and not from general lysosomal failure, because the levels of glycosidases were normal in the diabetic liver.

  9. Seasonality of bioaccumulation of trace organics and lysosomal integrity in green-lipped mussel Perna viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, James K H; Wu, Rudolf S S; Zheng, Gene J; Lam, Paul K S; Shin, Paul K S

    2010-02-15

    Lysosomal integrity in mussels is widely used as a biomarker in coastal environments to demonstrate exposure to trace organic pollutants. However, few studies have determined the long-term influences of seasonal variations on the bioaccumulation of trace organics and subsequently altered response of lysosomal integrity in mussels. This study aimed to test three null hypotheses that (1) bioaccumulations of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (SigmaPAH) and (2) total polychlorinated biphenyl (SigmaPCB), and (3) lysosomal integrity as indicated by Neutral Red retention time (NRRT) in haemocytes, in the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis were not seasonally dependent. The tissue concentrations of SigmaPAH and SigmaPCB and haemocytic NRRT were determined in P. viridis in a metropolitan harbour, subtropical Hong Kong during the wet and dry seasons from 2004 to 2007. Additional information on temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and total ammonia nitrogen in seawater, and sediment levels of SigmaPAH and SigmaPCB, were extracted from published data and re-analyzed. Our results accepted all null hypotheses, based on the minimal seasonal influences of seawater temperature and salinity on all studied parameters, in which no significant differences between the wet and dry seasons were detected. The seasonal effect was likely outweighed by the greatly improved water quality and pollution abatement noted inside the harbour, with a gradual shift in mussel PAHs from a pyrolytic origin to a petrogenic origin. Spatially, the site east of the harbour was relatively unpolluted. The single use of NRRT in P. viridis explained 25% of the total variation of the integrated pollution patterns in seawater, sediments and mussels. The present study suggested that the dynamic change of trace organics could be reflected by the response on lysosomal integrity in P. viridis, which was recommended as a routine screening biomarker in monitoring of harbour water quality across seasons.

  10. Protective Role of Endogenous Gangliosides for Lysosomal Pathology in a Cellular Model of Synucleinopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Jianshe; Fujita, Masayo; Nakai, Masaaki; Waragai, Masaaki; Sekigawa, Akio; Sugama, Shuei; Takenouchi, Takato; Masliah, Eliezer; Hashimoto,Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides may be involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease and related disorders, although the precise mechanisms governing this involvement remain unknown. In this study, we determined whether changes in endogenous ganglioside levels affect lysosomal pathology in a cellular model of synucleinopathy. For this purpose, dementia with Lewy body-linked P123H β-synuclein (β-syn) neuroblastoma cells transfected with α-synuclein were used as a model system because these cells were chara...

  11. Para-toluenesulfonamide induces tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell death through disturbing lysosomal stability

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhe; Liang, Chenyuan; Zhang, Zhuoyuan; Pan, Jian; Xia, Hui; Zhong, Nanshan; Li, Longjiang

    2015-01-01

    Para-toluenesulfonamide (PTS) has been implicated with anticancer effects against a variety of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of PTS on tongue squamous cell carcinoma (Tca-8113) and explored the lysosomal and mitochondrial changes after PTS treatment in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography showed that PTS selectively accumulated in Tca-8113 cells with a relatively low concentration in normal fibroblasts. Next, the effects of PTS on cell viability...

  12. Revealing the fate of cell surface human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1): The lysosomal degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Kapoor, Khyati; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Patel, Atish; Swaim, William; Ambudkar, Indu S; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Although mechanisms of P-gp drug transport are widely studied, the pathways involving its internalization are poorly understood. The present study is aimed at elucidating the pathways involved in degradation of cell surface P-gp. The fate of P-gp at the cell surface was determined by biotinylating cell surface proteins followed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Our data shows that the half-life of endogenously expressed P-gp is 26.7±1.1 h in human colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Treatment of cells with Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) a vacuolar H+ ATPase inhibitor increased the half-life of P-gp at the cell surface to 36.1±0.5 h. Interestingly, treatment with the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, MG115 or lactacystin alone did not alter the half-life of the protein. When cells were treated with both lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors (BafA1 and MG132), the half-life was further prolonged to 39-50 h. Functional assays done with rhodamine 123 or calcein-AM, fluorescent substrates of P-gp, indicated that the transport function of P-gp was not affected by either biotinylation or treatment with BafA1 or proteasomal inhibitors. Immunofluorescence studies done with the antibody against lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the P-gp-specific antibody UIC2 in permeabilized cells indicated that intracellular P-gp is primarily localized in the lysosomal compartment. Our results suggest that the lysosomal degradation system could be targeted to increase the sensitivity of P-gp- expressing cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drugs.

  13. MDMA induces cardiac contractile dysfunction through autophagy upregulation and lysosome destabilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani-ishida, Kaori; Saka, Kanju; Yamaguchi, Koji; Hayashida, Makiko; Nagai, Hisashi; Takemura, Genzou; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2014-05-01

    The underlying mechanisms of cardiotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") abuse are unclear. Autophagy exerts either adaptive or maladaptive effects on cardiac function in various pathological settings, but nothing is known on the role of autophagy in the MDMA cardiotoxicity. Here, we investigated the mechanism through which autophagy may be involved in MDMA-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with MDMA (20mg/kg) or saline. Left ventricular (LV) echocardiography and LV pressure measurement demonstrated reduction of LV systolic contractility 24h after MDMA administration. Western blot analysis showed a time-dependent increase in the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and cathepsin-D after MDMA administration. Electron microscopy showed the presence of autophagic vacuoles in cardiomyocytes. MDMA upregulated phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) at Thr172, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Thr2446, Raptor at Ser792, and Unc51-like kinase (ULK1) at Ser555, suggesting activation of autophagy through the AMPK-mTOR pathway. The effects of autophagic inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) on LC3-II levels indicated that MDMA enhanced autophagosome formation, but attenuated autophagosome clearance. MDMA also induced release of cathepsins into cytosol, and western blotting and electron microscopy showed cardiac troponin I (cTnI) degradation and myofibril damage, respectively. 3-MA, CQ, and a lysosomal inhibitor, E64c, inhibited cTnI proteolysis and improved contractile dysfunction after MDMA administration. In conclusion, MDMA causes lysosome destabilization following activation of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, through which released lysosomal proteases damage myofibrils and induce LV systolic dysfunction in rat heart.

  14. The lysosomal stability as a biomarker for the determination of pollution in aquatic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Loreto Nazar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the effects caused by five different formulae of gasoline on the stability of the lysosomes isolated from the liver of the tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus. The functional integrity of the lysosomal membranes was evaluated via the acid phosphatase activity. The results showed that there were significant changes in the stability of the lysosomes exposed to the presence of the hydrocarbons in the environment. Therefore, considering the method's simplicity, the sensitivity of the responses and its low cost the assessment of the lysosomal activity could be an important tool for the study of the effects of pollution in the aquatic environments.A procura de biomarcadores de agentes poluidores, mais simples e menos custosos, tem levado ao estudo dos lisossomos, isolados de animais componentes da biota nos ambientes contaminados, principalmente por poluentes com características lipofílicas, a exemplo dos hidrocarbonetos policíclicos e seus derivados. Este trabalho estudou os efeitos provocados por 05 diferentes formulações de gasolina sobre a estabilidade de lisossomos, isolados de fígado de tilápia (Oreochromis niloticus. A integridade funcional das membranas lisossômicas foi avaliada através da atividade da fosfatase ácida, expressa em mU/mg de proteínas totais. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que existem alterações significativas na estabilidade dos lisossomos isolados de fígado de tilápias submetidas aos efeitos de hidrocarbonetos presentes no meio ambiente. Portanto, levando em conta a simplicidade, a sensibilidade de resposta e o baixo custo, os autores recomendam a avaliação da atividade lisossômica, como uma importante ferramenta para o estudo dos efeitos da poluição dos meios aquáticos.

  15. Revealing the fate of cell surface human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1): The Lysosomal Degradation Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Kapoor, Khyati; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Patel, Atish; Swaim, William; Ambudkar, Indu S.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Although mechanisms of P-gp drug transport are widely studied, the pathways involving its internalization are poorly understood. The present study is aimed at elucidating the pathways involved in degradation of cell surface P-gp. The fate of P-gp at the cell surface was determined by biotinylating cell surface proteins followed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Our data shows that the half-life of endogenously expressed P-gp is 26.7 ± 1.1 h in human colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Treatment of cells with Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) a vacuolar H+ ATPase inhibitor increased the half-life of P-gp at the cell surface to 36.1± 0.5 h. Interestingly, treatment with the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, MG115 or lactacystin alone did not alter the half-life of the protein. When cells were treated with both lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors (BafA1 and MG132), the half-life was further prolonged to 39-50 h. Functional assays done with rhodamine 123 or calcein-AM, fluorescent substrates of P-gp, indicated that the transport function of P-gp was not affected by either biotinylation or treatment with BafA1 or proteasomal inhibitors. Immunofluorescence studies done with the antibody against lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the P-gp-specific antibody UIC2 in permeabilized cells indicated that intracellular P-gp is primarily localized in the lysosomal compartment. Our results suggest that the lysosomal degradation system could be targeted to increase the sensitivity of P-gp expressing cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26057472

  16. A genetic screen in Drosophila reveals novel cytoprotective functions of the autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Arsham

    Full Text Available The highly conserved autophagy-lysosome pathway is the primary mechanism for breakdown and recycling of macromolecular and organellar cargo in the eukaryotic cell. Autophagy has recently been implicated in protection against cancer, neurodegeneration, and infection, and interest is increasing in additional roles of autophagy in human health, disease, and aging. To search for novel cytoprotective features of this pathway, we carried out a genetic mosaic screen for mutations causing increased lysosomal and/or autophagic activity in the Drosophila melanogaster larval fat body. By combining Drosophila genetics with live-cell imaging of the fluorescent dye LysoTracker Red and fixed-cell imaging of autophagy-specific fluorescent protein markers, the screen was designed to identify essential metazoan genes whose disruption causes increased flux through the autophagy-lysosome pathway. The screen identified a large number of genes associated with the protein synthesis and ER-secretory pathways (e.g. aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, Oligosaccharyl transferase, Sec61alpha, and with mitochondrial function and dynamics (e.g. Rieske iron-sulfur protein, Dynamin-related protein 1. We also observed that increased lysosomal and autophagic activity were consistently associated with decreased cell size. Our work demonstrates that disruption of the synthesis, transport, folding, or glycosylation of ER-targeted proteins at any of multiple steps leads to autophagy induction. In addition to illuminating cytoprotective features of autophagy in response to cellular damage, this screen establishes a genetic methodology for investigating cell biological phenotypes in live cells, in the context of viable wild type organisms.

  17. Expert and novice facilitated modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Papadopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical study based on action research in which expert and novice facilitators in facilitated modelling workshops are compared. There is limited empirical research analysing the differences between expert and novice facilitators. Aiming to address this gap we study...

  18. A lysosome-targeted drug delivery system based on sorbitol backbone towards efficient cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniganda, Santhi; Sankar, Vandana; Nair, Jyothi B; Raghu, K G; Maiti, Kaustabh K

    2014-09-14

    A straightforward synthetic approach was adopted for the construction of a lysosome-targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) using sorbitol scaffold (Sor) linked to octa-guanidine and tetrapeptide GLPG, a peptide substrate of lysosomal cysteine protease, cathepsin B. The main objective was to efficiently deliver the potential anticancer drug, doxorubicin to the target sites, thereby minimizing dose-limiting toxicity. Three TDDS vectors were synthesized viz., DDS1: Sor-GLPG-Fl, DDS2: Sor-Fl (control) and DDS3: Sor-GLPGC-SMCC-Dox. Dox release from DDS3 in the presence of cathepsin B was studied by kinetics measurement based on the fluorescent property of Dox. The cytotoxicity of DDS1 was assessed and found to be non-toxic. Cellular internalization and colocalization studies of all the 3 systems were carried out by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy utilizing cathepsin B-expressing HeLa cells. DDS1 and DDS3 revealed significant localization within the lysosomes, in contrast to DDS2 (control). The doxorubicin-conjugated carrier, DDS3, demonstrated significant cytotoxic effect when compared to free Dox by MTT assay and also by flow cytometric analysis. The targeted approach with DDS3 is expected to be promising, because it is indicated to be advantageous over free Dox, which possesses dose-limiting toxicity, posing risk of injury to normal tissues.

  19. LAMP-3 (Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein 3) Promotes the Intracellular Proliferation of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Kwan-Sik; Jeon, In-Sook; Choi, Jae-Woon; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Choy, Hyun E; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Choi, Joong-Kook

    2016-07-01

    Lysosomes are cellular organelles containing diverse classes of catabolic enzymes that are implicated in diverse cellular processes including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport, and aging. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are major glycoproteins important for maintaining lysosomal integrity, pH, and catabolism. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are constitutively expressed in Salmonella-infected cells and are recruited to Salmonella-containing vacuoles (SCVs) as well as Salmonella-induced filaments (Sifs) that promote the survival and proliferation of the Salmonella. LAMP-3, also known as DC-LAMP/CD208, is a member of the LAMP family of proteins, but its role during Salmonella infection remains unclear. DNA microarray analysis identified LAMP-3 as one of the genes responding to LPS stimulation in THP-1 macrophage cells. Subsequent analyses reveal that LPS and Salmonella induced the expression of LAMP-3 at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Confocal Super resolution N-SIM imaging revealed that LAMP-3, like LAMP-2, shifts its localization from the cell surface to alongside Salmonella. Knockdown of LAMP-3 by specific siRNAs decreased the number of Salmonella recovered from the infected cells. Therefore, we conclude that LAMP-3 is induced by Salmonella infection and recruited to the Salmonella pathogen for intracellular proliferation.

  20. Hormonal and cholinergic influences on pancreatic lysosomal and digestive enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evander, A; Ihse, I; Lundquist, I

    1983-01-01

    Hormonal and cholinergic influences on lysosomal and digestive enzyme activities in pancreatic tissue were studied in normal adult rats. Hormonal stimulation by the cholecystokinin analogue, caerulein, induced a marked enhancement of the activities of cathepsin D and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in pancreatic tissue, whereas the activities of amylase and lipase tended to decrease. Acid phosphatase activity was not affected. Further, caerulein was found to induce a significant increase of cathepsin D output in bile-pancreatic juice. This output largely parallelled that of amylase. Cholinergic stimulation by the muscarinic agonist carbachol, at a dose level giving the same output of amylase as caerulein, did not affect pancreatic activities of cathepsin D and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Further, cholinergic stimulation induced an increase of amylase activity and a slight decrease of acid phosphatase activity in pancreatic tissue. Lipase activity was not affected. No apparent effect on cathepsin D output in bile-pancreatic juice was encountered after cholinergic stimulation. The activities of neither the digestive nor the lysosomal enzymes were influenced by the administration of secretin. The results suggest a possible lysosomal involvement in caerulein-induced secretion and/or inactivation of pancreatic digestive enzymes, whereas cholinergic stimulation seems to act through different mechanisms.

  1. Unfolded protein response activates glycogen synthase kinase-3 via selective lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijholt, Diana A T; Nölle, Anna; van Haastert, Elise S; Edelijn, Hessel; Toonen, Ruud F; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; Scheper, Wiep

    2013-07-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response that is activated upon disturbed homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In Alzheimer's disease, as well as in other tauopathies, the UPR is activated in neurons that contain early tau pathology. A recent genome-wide association study identified genetic variation in a UPR transducer as a risk factor for tauopathy, supporting a functional connection between UPR activation and tau pathology. Here we show that UPR activation increases the activity of the major tau kinase glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 in vitro via a selective removal of inactive GSK-3 phosphorylated at Ser(21/9). We demonstrate that this is mediated by the autophagy/lysosomal pathway. In brain tissue from patients with different tauopathies, lysosomal accumulations of pSer(21/9) GSK-3 are found in neurons with markers for UPR activation. Our data indicate that UPR activation increases the activity of GSK-3 by a novel mechanism, the lysosomal degradation of the inactive pSer(21/9) GSK-3. This may provide a functional explanation for the close association between UPR activation and early tau pathology in neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Lack of the Lysosomal Membrane Protein, GLMP, in Mice Results in Metabolic Dysregulation in Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yi Kong

    Full Text Available Ablation of glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein (GLMP, formerly known as NCU-G1 has been shown to cause chronic liver injury which progresses into liver fibrosis in mice. Both lysosomal dysfunction and chronic liver injury can cause metabolic dysregulation. Glmp gt/gt mice (formerly known as Ncu-g1gt/gt mice were studied between 3 weeks and 9 months of age. Body weight gain and feed efficiency of Glmp gt/gt mice were comparable to wild type siblings, only at the age of 9 months the Glmp gt/gt siblings had significantly reduced body weight. Reduced size of epididymal fat pads was accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly in Glmp gt/gt mice. Blood analysis revealed reduced levels of blood glucose, circulating triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids in Glmp gt/gt mice. Increased flux of glucose, increased de novo lipogenesis and lipid accumulation were detected in Glmp gt/gt primary hepatocytes, as well as elevated triacylglycerol levels in Glmp gt/gt liver homogenates, compared to hepatocytes and liver from wild type mice. Gene expression analysis showed an increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in Glmp gt/gt liver compared to wild type. Our findings are in agreement with the metabolic alterations observed in other mouse models lacking lysosomal proteins, and with alterations characteristic for advanced chronic liver injury.

  3. Lysosomal storage disease upon disruption of the neuronal chloride transport protein ClC-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poët, Mallorie; Kornak, Uwe; Schweizer, Michaela; Zdebik, Anselm A; Scheel, Olaf; Hoelter, Sabine; Wurst, Wolfgang; Schmitt, Anja; Fuhrmann, Jens C; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Mole, Sara E; Hübner, Christian A; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2006-09-12

    Mammalian CLC proteins function as Cl(-) channels or as electrogenic Cl(-)/H(+) exchangers and are present in the plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles. We now show that the ClC-6 protein is almost exclusively expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems, with a particularly high expression in dorsal root ganglia. ClC-6 colocalized with markers for late endosomes in neuronal cell bodies. The disruption of ClC-6 in mice reduced their pain sensitivity and caused moderate behavioral abnormalities. Neuronal tissues showed autofluorescence at initial axon segments. At these sites, electron microscopy revealed electron-dense storage material that caused a pathological enlargement of proximal axons. These deposits were positive for several lysosomal proteins and other marker proteins typical for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), a lysosomal storage disease. However, the lysosomal pH of Clcn6(-/-) neurons appeared normal. CLCN6 is a candidate gene for mild forms of human NCL. Analysis of 75 NCL patients identified ClC-6 amino acid exchanges in two patients but failed to prove a causative role of CLCN6 in that disease.

  4. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Urayama

    Full Text Available The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy.

  5. Anti-aging treatments slow propagation of synucleinopathy by restoring lysosomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lim, Hee-Sun; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Shim, Yhong-Hee; Vaikath, Nishant N; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Lee, He-Jin; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-10-02

    Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases that are also associated with impaired proteostasis, resulting in abnormal accumulation of protein aggregates. However, the role of aging in development and progression of disease remains elusive. Here, we used Caenorhabditis elegans models to show that aging-promoting genetic variations accelerated the rate of cell-to-cell transmission of SNCA/α-synuclein aggregates, hallmarks of Parkinson disease, and the progression of disease phenotypes, such as nerve degeneration, behavioral deficits, and reduced life span. Genetic and pharmacological anti-aging manipulations slowed the spread of aggregates and the associated phenotypes. Lysosomal degradation was significantly impaired in aging models, while anti-aging treatments reduced the impairment. Transgenic expression of hlh-30p::hlh-30, the master controller of lysosomal biogenesis, alleviated intercellular transmission of aggregates in the aging model. Our results demonstrate that the rate of aging closely correlates with the rate of aggregate propagation and that general anti-aging treatments can slow aggregate propagation and associated disease progression by restoring lysosomal function.

  6. SIRT1 regulates accumulation of oxidized LDL in HUVEC via the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanlin; Sun, Juanjuan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Shi, Luyao; Du, Wenxiu; Hu, Lifang; Liu, Chunfeng; Cao, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in the degradation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a new anti-atherosclerotic factor, can induce autophagy in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, we observed the effect of SIRT1 on the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and elucidated whether its effect is relative with the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. The results showed that treatment with either SIRT1 siRNA or SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM) increased Dil-labelled-ox-LDL (Dil-ox-LDL) accumulation in HUVECs, and the SIRT1 inducer resveratrol (RSV) decreased it. Knockdown of autophagy-related protein 5 or inhibit the lysosomal degradation by chloroquine (CQ) decreased the effect of RSV. In HUVECs with ox-LDL, expression of LC3II and LC3 puncta was decreased by treatment with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM, but increased by RSV treatment; sequestosome 1 p62 expression showed the opposite effects. Moreover, Dil-ox-LDL combined with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM showed a much smaller degree of overlap of Lamp1 or Cathepsin D with Dil-ox-LDL than in cells with Dil-ox-LDL alone, and RSV treatment resulted in a greater degree of overlap. These results suggest that SIRT1 can decrease the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and this effect is related to the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

  7. The role of lysosomes in the selective concentration of mineral elements. A microanalytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J P

    1996-05-01

    The role of the lysosome during the intracellular concentration of diverse mineral elements has been evidenced by the electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). This highly sensitive technique allows an in situ chemical analysis of any chemical element with an atomic number greater than 11, present in ultra-thin tissue sections. Therefore, it has been demonstrated by using this EPMA that 21 out of the 92 elements of the periodic table, once injected in a soluble form, were selectively concentrated within lysosomes of several types of mammalian cells. Amongst these 21 elements, 15 are concentrated and precipitated in an insoluble from in association with phosphorus whereas the other 6 are precipitated in association with sulphur. Amongst the 15 elements which precipitate with phosphorus in lysosomes, there are: 3 group IIIB elements of the periodic system, (aluminium, gallium and indium); the rare-earth elements (cerium, gadolinium, lanthanum, thulium and samarium); 2 group IVA elements (hafnium and zirconium), two actinides (uranium and thorium) and elements such as chromium and niobium. The 6 elements which precipitate with sulphur comprise the 3 group VIII elements of the classification (nickel, palladium, platinum) and the 3 group IB elements (copper, silver and gold). The mechanisms responsible for this selective concentration involve enzymatic processes and predominantly acid phosphatases for elements precipitating as phosphates and arylsulfatases for elements precipitating with sulphur.

  8. High resolution crystal structure of human β-glucuronidase reveals structural basis of lysosome targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Imtaiyaz Hassan

    Full Text Available Human β-glucuronidase (GUS cleaves β-D-glucuronic acid residues from the non-reducing termini of glycosaminoglycan and its deficiency leads to mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPSVII. Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases. The structure revealed several new details including a new glycan chain at Asn272, in addition to that previously observed at Asn173, and coordination of the glycan chain at Asn173 with Lys197 of the lysosomal targeting motif which is essential for phosphotransferase recognition. Analysis of the high resolution structure not only provided new insights into the structural basis for lysosomal targeting but showed significant differences between human GUS, which is medically important in its own right, and E. coli GUS, which can be selectively inhibited in the human gut to prevent prodrug activation and is also widely used as a reporter gene by plant biologists. Despite these differences, both human and E. coli GUS share a high structure homology in all three domains with most of the glycosyl hydrolases, suggesting that they all evolved from a common ancestral gene.

  9. Role of Myeloperoxidase Oxidants in the Modulation of Cellular Lysosomal Enzyme Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismael, Fahd O; Barrett, Tessa J; Sheipouri, Diba

    2016-01-01

    with the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the effect of HOCl, HOSCN and LDL pre-treated with these oxidants on the function of lysosomal enzymes responsible for protein catabolism and lipid hydrolysis in murine macrophage-like J774A.1 cells. In each case, the cells were exposed to HOCl...... or HOSCN or LDL pre-treated with these oxidants. Lysosomal cathepsin (B, L and D) and acid lipase activities were quantified, with cathepsin and LAMP-1 protein levels determined by Western blotting. Exposure of J774A.1 cells to HOCl or HOSCN resulted in a significant decrease in the activity of the Cys......-dependent cathepsins B and L, but not the Asp-dependent cathepsin D. Cathepsins B and L were also inhibited in macrophages exposed to HOSCN-modified, and to a lesser extent, HOCl-modified LDL. No change was seen in cathepsin D activity or the expression of the cathepsin proteins or lysosomal marker protein LAMP-1...

  10. Characterization of lysosome-destabilizing DOPE/PLGA nanoparticles designed for cytoplasmic drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Resham; Grabrucker, Andreas M; Veratti, Patrizia; Belletti, Daniela; Boeckers, Tobias M; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Forni, Flavio; Tosi, Giovanni; Ruozi, Barbara

    2014-08-25

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) offer a promising approach for therapeutic intracellular delivery of proteins, conventionally hampered by short half-lives, instability and immunogenicity. Remarkably, NPs uptake occurs via endocytic internalization leading to NPs content's release within lysosomes. To overcome lysosomal degradation and achieve NPs and/or loaded proteins release into cytosol, we propose the formulation of hybrid NPs by adding 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) as pH sensitive component in the formulation of poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) NPs. Hybrid NPs, featured by different DOPE/PLGA ratios, were characterized in terms of structure, stability and lipid organization within the polymeric matrix. Experiments on NIH cells and rat primary neuronal cultures highlighted the safety profile of hybrid NPs. Moreover, after internalization, NPs are able to transiently destabilize the integrity of lysosomes in which they are taken up, speeding their escape and favoring cytoplasmatic localization. Thus, these DOPE/PLGA-NPs configure themselves as promising carriers for intracellular protein delivery.

  11. Quantitative Differences in the Urinary Proteome of Siblings Discordant for Type 1 Diabetes Include Lysosomal Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Moo-Jin; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Thovarai, Vishal; Rolfe, Melanie A; Torralba, Manolito G; Wang, Junmin; Adkins, Joshua N; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Osborne, Whitney; Cogen, Fran R; Kaplowitz, Paul B; Metz, Thomas O; Nelson, Karen E; Madupu, Ramana; Pieper, Rembert

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) often have higher than normal blood glucose levels, causing advanced glycation end product formation and inflammation and increasing the risk of vascular complications years or decades later. To examine the urinary proteome in juveniles with T1D for signatures indicative of inflammatory consequences of hyperglycemia, we profiled the proteome of 40 T1D patients with an average of 6.3 years after disease onset and normal or elevated HbA1C levels, in comparison with a cohort of 41 healthy siblings. Using shotgun proteomics, 1036 proteins were identified, on average, per experiment, and 50 proteins showed significant abundance differences using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (FDR q-value ≤ 0.05). Thirteen lysosomal proteins were increased in abundance in the T1D versus control cohort. Fifteen proteins with functional roles in vascular permeability and adhesion were quantitatively changed, including CD166 antigen and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. α-N-Acetyl-galactosaminidase and α-fucosidase 2, two differentially abundant lysosomal enzymes, were detected in western blots with often elevated quantities in the T1D versus control cohort. Increased release of proteins derived from lysosomes and vascular epithelium into urine may result from hyperglycemia-associated inflammation in the kidney vasculature.

  12. Abeta42-induced neurodegeneration via an age-dependent autophagic-lysosomal injury in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daijun Ling

    Full Text Available The mechanism of widespread neuronal death occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD remains enigmatic even after extensive investigation during the last two decades. Amyloid beta 42 peptide (Abeta(1-42 is believed to play a causative role in the development of AD. Here we expressed human Abeta(1-42 and amyloid beta 40 (Abeta(1-40 in Drosophila neurons. Abeta(1-42 but not Abeta(1-40 causes an extensive accumulation of autophagic vesicles that become increasingly dysfunctional with age. Abeta(1-42-induced impairment of the degradative function, as well as the structural integrity, of post-lysosomal autophagic vesicles triggers a neurodegenerative cascade that can be enhanced by autophagy activation or partially rescued by autophagy inhibition. Compromise and leakage from post-lysosomal vesicles result in cytosolic acidification, additional damage to membranes and organelles, and erosive destruction of cytoplasm leading to eventual neuron death. Neuronal autophagy initially appears to play a pro-survival role that changes in an age-dependent way to a pro-death role in the context of Abeta(1-42 expression. Our in vivo observations provide a mechanistic understanding for the differential neurotoxicity of Abeta(1-42 and Abeta(1-40, and reveal an Abeta(1-42-induced death execution pathway mediated by an age-dependent autophagic-lysosomal injury.

  13. Disintegration of lysosomes mediated by GTPgammaS-treated cytosol: possible involvement of phospholipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Y; Matsuda, T; Arai, K; Ohkuma, S

    1998-04-01

    We showed previously that cytosol treated with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gammaS) disintegrated lysosomes in vitro [Sai, Y. et al. (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 198, 869-877] in time-, temperature-, and dose-dependent manners. This also requires ATP, however, the latter can be substituted with deoxy-ATP, ADP, or ATPgammaS, suggesting no requirement of ATP hydrolysis. The lysis was inhibited by several chemical modifiers, including N-ethylmaleimide, 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, and by various phospholipase inhibitors (trifluoperazine, p-bromophenacyl bromide, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, W-7, primaquine, compound 48/80, neomycin, and gentamicin), but not by ONO-RS-082, an inhibitor of phospholipase A2. The reaction was also inhibited by phospholipids (phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylcholine) and diacylglycerol. Among the phospholipase A2 hydrolysis products of phospholipids, unsaturated fatty acids (oleate, linoleate, and arachidonate) and lysophospholipid (lysophosphatidylcholine) by themselves broke lysosomes down directly, whereas saturated fatty acids (palmitate and stearate) had little effect. We found that GTPgammaS-stimulated cytosolic phospholipase A2 activity was highly sensitive to ONO-RS-082. These results suggest the participation of phospholipase(s), though not cytosolic phospholipase A2, in the GTPgammaS-dependent lysis of lysosomes.

  14. A contiguous compartment functions as endoplasmic reticulum and endosome/lysosome in Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abodeely, Marla; DuBois, Kelly N; Hehl, Adrian; Stefanic, Sasa; Sajid, Mohammed; DeSouza, Wanderley; Attias, Marcia; Engel, Juan C; Hsieh, Ivy; Fetter, Richard D; McKerrow, James H

    2009-11-01

    The dynamic evolution of organelle compartmentalization in eukaryotes and how strictly compartmentalization is maintained are matters of ongoing debate. While the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically envisioned as the site of protein cotranslational translocation, it has recently been proposed to have pluripotent functions. Using transfected reporter constructs, organelle-specific markers, and functional enzyme assays, we now show that in an early-diverging protozoan, Giardia lamblia, endocytosis and subsequent degradation of exogenous proteins occur in the ER or in an adjacent and communicating compartment. The Giardia endomembrane system is simple compared to those of typical eukaryotes. It lacks peroxisomes, a classical Golgi apparatus, and canonical lysosomes. Giardia orthologues of mammalian lysosomal proteases function within an ER-like tubulovesicular compartment, which itself can dynamically communicate with clathrin-containing vacuoles at the periphery of the cell to receive endocytosed proteins. These primitive characteristics support Giardia's proposed early branching and could serve as a model to study the compartmentalization of endocytic and lysosomal functions into organelles distinct from the ER. This system also may have functional similarity to the retrograde transport of toxins and major histocompatibility complex class I function in the ER of mammals.

  15. Investigation of endosome and lysosome biology by ultra pH-sensitive nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chensu; Zhao, Tian; Li, Yang; Huang, Gang; White, Michael A; Gao, Jinming

    2016-09-06

    Endosomes and lysosomes play a critical role in various aspects of cell physiology such as nutrient sensing, receptor recycling, protein/lipid catabolism, and cell death. In drug delivery, endosomal release of therapeutic payloads from nanocarriers is also important in achieving efficient delivery of drugs to reach their intracellular targets. Recently, we invented a library of ultra pH-sensitive (UPS) nanoprobes with exquisite fluorescence response to subtle pH changes. The UPS nanoprobes also displayed strong pH-specific buffer effect over small molecular bases with broad pH responses (e.g., chloroquine and NH4Cl). Tunable pH transitions from 7.4 to 4.0 of UPS nanoprobes cover the entire physiological pH of endocytic organelles (e.g., early and late endosomes) and lysosomes. These unique physico-chemical properties of UPS nanoprobes allowed a 'detection and perturbation' strategy for the investigation of luminal pH in cell signaling and metabolism, which introduces a nanotechnology-enabled paradigm for the biological studies of endosomes and lysosomes.

  16. Endocytic pathway rapidly delivers internalized molecules to lysosomes: an analysis of vesicle trafficking, clustering and mass transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangarkar, Chinmay; Dinh, Anh-Tuan; Mitragotri, Samir

    2012-08-20

    Lysosomes play a critical role in intracellular drug delivery. For enzyme-based therapies, they represent a potential target site whereas for nucleic acid or many protein drugs, they represent the potential degradation site. Either way, understanding the mechanisms and processes involved in routing of materials to lysosomes after cellular entry is of high interest to the field of drug delivery. Most therapeutic cargoes other than small hydrophobic molecules enter the cells through endocytosis. Endocytosed cargoes are routed to lysosomes via microtubule-based transport and are ultimately shared by various lysosomes via tethering and clustering of endocytic vesicles followed by exchange of their contents. Using a combined experimental and numerical approach, here we studied the rates of mass transfer into and among the endocytic vesicles in a model cell line, 3T3 fibroblasts. In order to understand the relationship of mass transfer with microtubular transport and vesicle clustering, we varied both properties through various pharmacological agents. At the same time, microtubular transport and vesicle clustering were modeled through diffusion-advection equations and the Smoluchowski equations, respectively. Our analysis revealed that the rate of mass transfer is optimally related to microtubular transport and clustering properties of vesicles. Further, the rate of mass transfer is highest in the innate state of the cell. Any perturbation to either microtubular transport or vesicle aggregation led to reduced mass transfer to lysosome. These results suggest that in the absence of an external intervention the endocytic pathway appears to maximize molecular delivery to lysosomes. Strategies are discussed to reduce mass transfer to lysosomes so as to extend the residence time of molecules in endosomes or late endosomes, thus potentially increasing the likelihood of their escape before disposition in the lysosomes.

  17. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD. PMID:27057276

  18. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  19. Azadirachtin-induced apoptosis involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L release in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Xingan; Meng, Qianqian; Wang, Peidan; Shu, Benshui; Hu, Qiongbo; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-07-01

    Azadirachtin as a kind of botanical insecticide has been widely used in pest control. We previously reported that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis of Spodoptera litura cultured cell line Sl-1, which involves in the up-regulation of P53 protein. However, the detailed mechanism of azadirachtin-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood in insect cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to address the involvement of lysosome and lysosomal protease in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. The result confirmed that azadirachtin indeed inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis. The lysosomes were divided into different types as time-dependent manner, which suggested that changes of lysosomes were necessarily physiological processes in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Interestingly, we noticed that azadirachtin could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L releasing to cytosol. Z-FF-FMK (a cathepsin L inhibitor), but not CA-074me (a cathepsin B inhibitor), could effectively hinder the apoptosis induced by azadirachtin in Sf9 cells. Meanwhile, the activity of caspase-3 could also be inactivated by the inhibition of cathepsin L enzymatic activity induced by Z-FF-FMK. Taken together, our findings suggest that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells in a lysosomal pathway, and cathepsin L plays a pro-apoptosis role in this process through releasing to cytosol and activating caspase-3.

  20. ESCRT-Dependent Cell Death in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of the Lysosomal Storage Disorder Mucolipidosis Type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Julie M; Dang, Hope; Munoz-Tucker, Isabel A; O'Ketch, Marvin; Liu, Ian T; Perno, Savannah; Bhuyan, Natasha; Crain, Allison; Borbon, Ivan; Fares, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in MCOLN1, which encodes the cation channel protein TRPML1, result in the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder Mucolipidosis type IV. Mucolipidosis type IV patients show lysosomal dysfunction in many tissues and neuronal cell death. The ortholog of TRPML1 in Caenorhabditis elegans is CUP-5; loss of CUP-5 results in lysosomal dysfunction in many tissues and death of developing intestinal cells that results in embryonic lethality. We previously showed that a null mutation in the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter MRP-4 rescues the lysosomal defect and embryonic lethality of cup-5(null) worms. Here we show that reducing levels of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-associated proteins DID-2, USP-50, and ALX-1/EGO-2, which mediate the final de-ubiquitination step of integral membrane proteins being sequestered into late endosomes, also almost fully suppresses cup-5(null) mutant lysosomal defects and embryonic lethality. Indeed, we show that MRP-4 protein is hypo-ubiquitinated in the absence of CUP-5 and that reducing levels of ESCRT-associated proteins suppresses this hypo-ubiquitination. Thus, increased ESCRT-associated de-ubiquitinating activity mediates the lysosomal defects and corresponding cell death phenotypes in the absence of CUP-5.

  1. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD.

  2. Preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on lysosomal dysfunction and myocardial infarct size in experimentally induced myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti Roy, Abhro; Stanely Mainzen Prince, P

    2013-01-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on lysosomal dysfunction and myocardial infarct size in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with p-coumaric acid (8 mg/kg body weight) daily for a period of 7 days after which isoproterenol (100mg/kg body weight) was injected subcutaneously into rats twice at an interval of 24h (8th and 9th day).The activity/levels of serum cardiac diagnostic markers, heart lysosomal lipid peroxidation products and the activities of lysosomal enzymes (β-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, cathepsin-B and cathepsin-D) were significantly (Plysosomal fraction. The pretreatment with p-coumaric acid significantly (Plysosomal lipid peroxidation products and the activities of lysosomal enzymes. In addition, p-coumaric acid greatly reduced myocardial infarct size. p-Coumaric acid pretreatment (8 mg/kg body weight) to normal rats did not show any significant effect. Thus, this study showed that p-coumaric acid prevents lysosomal dysfunction against cardiac damage induced by isoproterenol and brings back the levels of lipid peroxidation products and activities of lysosomal enzymes to near normal levels. The in vitro study also revealed the free radical scavenging activity of p-coumaric acid. Thus, the observed effects are due to p-coumaric acid's free radical scavenging and membrane stabilizing properties.

  3. Polyketide synthase (PKS) reduces fusion of Legionella pneumophila-containing vacuoles with lysosomes and contributes to bacterial competitiveness during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Olga; Pägelow, Dennis; Rasch, Janine; Döhrmann, Simon; Günther, Gabriele; Hoppe, Julia; Ünal, Can Murat; Bronietzki, Marc; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel; Steinert, Michael

    2014-11-01

    L. pneumophila-containing vacuoles (LCVs) exclude endocytic and lysosomal markers in human macrophages and protozoa. We screened a L. pneumophila mini-Tn10 transposon library for mutants, which fail to inhibit the fusion of LCVs with lysosomes by loading of the lysosomal compartment with colloidal iron dextran, mechanical lysis of infected host cells, and magnetic isolation of LCVs that have fused with lysosomes. In silico analysis of the mutated genes, D. discoideum plaque assays and infection assays in protozoa and U937 macrophage-like cells identified well established as well as novel putative L. pneumophila virulence factors. Promising candidates were further analyzed for their co-localization with lysosomes in host cells using fluorescence microscopy. This approach corroborated that the O-methyltransferase, PilY1, TPR-containing protein and polyketide synthase (PKS) of L. pneumophila interfere with lysosomal degradation. Competitive infections in protozoa and macrophages revealed that the identified PKS contributes to the biological fitness of pneumophila strains and may explain their prevalence in the epidemiology of Legionnaires' disease.

  4. Differentiation of norm and pathology during selective biochemical skreening of lysosomal storage diseases with increased excretion of oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Mytsyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligosaccharides are a class of polymeric carbohydrates, which are constituents of a glycoside portion of glycoprotein and glycolipid molecules. The lysosomal hydrolase dysfunction due to lysosomal storage disorders results in partial or complete failure of degradation of some glycoproteins and glycolipids, causing the accumulation of specific undegraded substrates in the lysosomes of cells, the formation of the great number of oligosaccharide chains and their increased excretion with urine. Our work was aimed at detailed study of the specificities of interpreting the results of thin-layer chromatography (TLC of urine oligosaccharides in healthy persons of different age groups with the purpose of further application of these data while differentiating the norm and pathology in the course of primary selective screening of lysosomal storage disorders. The results obtained demonstrated that TLC plates for the majority of healthy persons had insignificant excretion of a number of oligosaccharides (from monosaccharides to hexasaccharides with Rlac > 0.15, which can be characterized as physiological oligosacchariduria, conditioned by the metabolism specificities in lysosomes. Therefore while interpreting the urine samples of patients with the suspected lysosomal storage disorder it is diagnostically reasonable to examine the TLC plates for the presence of both oligosaccharide groups, absent in the samples of healthy persons, and all the fractions with Rlac < 0.15.

  5. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD. As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD.

  6. Program Facilitates CMMI Appraisals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Wesley

    2005-01-01

    A computer program has been written to facilitate appraisals according to the methodology of Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI). [CMMI is a government/industry standard, maintained by the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, for objectively assessing the engineering capability and maturity of an organization (especially, an organization that produces software)]. The program assists in preparation for a CMMI appraisal by providing drop-down lists suggesting required artifacts or evidence. It identifies process areas for which similar evidence is required and includes a copy feature that reduces or eliminates repetitive data entry. It generates reports to show the entire framework for reference, the appraisal artifacts to determine readiness for an appraisal, and lists of interviewees and questions to ask them during the appraisal. During an appraisal, the program provides screens for entering observations and ratings, and reviewing evidence provided thus far. Findings concerning strengths and weaknesses can be exported for use in a report or a graphical presentation. The program generates a chart showing capability level ratings of the organization. A context-sensitive Windows help system enables a novice to use the program and learn about the CMMI appraisal process.

  7. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Helen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth.

  8. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, de Sales; Cox, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth. PMID:15248894

  9. BECN1/Beclin 1 sorts cell-surface APP/amyloid β precursor protein for lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Gayathri; Zhu, Wan; Plowey, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    The regulation of plasma membrane (PM)-localized transmembrane protein/receptor trafficking has critical implications for cell signaling, metabolism and survival. In this study, we investigated the role of BECN1 (Beclin 1) in the degradative trafficking of PM-associated APP (amyloid β precursor protein), whose metabolism to amyloid-β, an essential event in Alzheimer disease, is dependent on divergent PM trafficking pathways. We report a novel interaction between PM-associated APP and BECN1 that recruits macroautophagy/endosomal regulatory proteins PIK3C3 and UVRAG. We found that BECN1 promotes surface APP internalization and sorting predominantly to endosomes and endolysosomes. BECN1 also promotes the targeting of a smaller fraction of internalized APP to LC3-positive phagophores, suggesting a role for BECN1-dependent PM macroautophagy in APP degradation. Furthermore, BECN1 facilitates lysosomal degradation of surface APP and reduces the secretion of APP metabolites (soluble ectodomains, sAPP). The association between APP and BECN1 is dependent on the evolutionarily conserved domain (ECD) of BECN1 (amino acids 267-337). Deletion of a BECN1 ECD subregion (amino acids 285-299) did not impair BECN1- PIK3C3 interaction, PtdIns3K function or macroautophagy, but was sufficient to impair the APP-BECN1 interaction and BECN1's effects on surface APP internalization and degradation, resulting in increased secretion of sAPPs. Interestingly, both the BECN1-APP association and BECN1-dependent APP endocytosis and degradative trafficking were negatively regulated by active AKT. Our results further implicate phosphorylation of the BECN1 Ser295 residue in the inhibition of APP degradation by AKT. Our studies reveal a novel function for BECN1 in the sorting of a plasma membrane protein for endolysosomal and macroautophagic degradation.

  10. Protective effects of positive lysosomal modulation in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Butler

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-related neurodegenerative pathology in which defects in proteolytic clearance of amyloid β peptide (Aβ likely contribute to the progressive nature of the disorder. Lysosomal proteases of the cathepsin family exhibit up-regulation in response to accumulating proteins including Aβ(1-42. Here, the lysosomal modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK was used to test whether proteolytic activity can be enhanced to reduce the accumulation events in AD mouse models expressing different levels of Aβ pathology. Systemic PADK injections in APP(SwInd and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice caused 3- to 8-fold increases in cathepsin B protein levels and 3- to 10-fold increases in the enzyme's activity in lysosomal fractions, while neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme remained unchanged. Biochemical analyses indicated the modulation predominantly targeted the active mature forms of cathepsin B and markedly changed Rab proteins but not LAMP1, suggesting the involvement of enhanced trafficking. The modulated lysosomal system led to reductions in both Aβ immunostaining as well as Aβ(x-42 sandwich ELISA measures in APP(SwInd mice of 10-11 months. More extensive Aβ deposition in 20-22-month APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice was also reduced by PADK. Selective ELISAs found that a corresponding production of the less pathogenic Aβ(1-38 occurs as Aβ(1-42 levels decrease in the mouse models, indicating that PADK treatment leads to Aβ truncation. Associated with Aβ clearance was the elimination of behavioral and synaptic protein deficits evident in the two transgenic models. These findings indicate that pharmacologically-controlled lysosomal modulation reduces Aβ(1-42 accumulation, possibly through intracellular truncation that also influences extracellular deposition, and in turn offsets the defects in synaptic composition and cognitive functions. The selective modulation promotes clearance at different levels of Aβ pathology and provides proof

  11. Contribution of mitochondria and lysosomes to photodynamic therapy-induced death in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Azizuddin, Kashif; Zhang, Ping; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Pediaditakis, Peter; Lemasters, John J.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2008-02-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), visible light activates a photosensitizing drug added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. Employing confocal microscopy, we previously found that the phthalocyanine Pc 4 localized primarily to mitochondrial membranes in various cancer cell lines, resulting in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by inner membrane permeabilization (mitochondrial permeability transition) with mitochondrial depolarization and swelling, which in turn led to cytochrome c release and apoptotic death. Recently, derivatives of Pc 4 with OH groups added to one of the axial ligands were synthesized. These derivatives appeared to be taken up more avidly by cells and caused more cytotoxicity than the parent compound Pc 4. Using organelle-specific fluorophores, we found that one of these derivatives, Pc 181, accumulated into lysosomes and that PDT with Pc 181 caused rapid disintegration of lysosomes. We hypothesized that chelatable iron released from lysosomes during PDT contributes to mitochondrial damage and subsequent cell death. We monitored cytosolic Fe2+ concentrations after PDT with calcein. Fe2+ binds to calcein causing quenching of calcein fluorescence. After bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase, calcein fluorescence became quenched, an effect prevented by starch desferal s-DFO, an iron chelator that enters cells by endocytosis. After Pc 181-PDT, cytosolic calcein fluorescence also decreased, indicating increased chelatable Fe2+ in the cytosol, and apoptosis occurred. s-DFO decreased Pc 181-PDT-induced apoptosis as measured by a decrease of caspase-3 activation. In isolated mitochondria preparations, Fe2+ induced mitochondrial swelling, which was prevented by Ru360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. The data support a hypothesis of oxidative injury in which Pc 181-PDT disintegrates lysosomes and releases constituents that synergistically promote

  12. Protective effects of positive lysosomal modulation in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, David; Hwang, Jeannie; Estick, Candice; Nishiyama, Akiko; Kumar, Saranya Santhosh; Baveghems, Clive; Young-Oxendine, Hollie B; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Charalambides, Ana; Bahr, Ben A

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative pathology in which defects in proteolytic clearance of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) likely contribute to the progressive nature of the disorder. Lysosomal proteases of the cathepsin family exhibit up-regulation in response to accumulating proteins including Aβ(1-42). Here, the lysosomal modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) was used to test whether proteolytic activity can be enhanced to reduce the accumulation events in AD mouse models expressing different levels of Aβ pathology. Systemic PADK injections in APP(SwInd) and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice caused 3- to 8-fold increases in cathepsin B protein levels and 3- to 10-fold increases in the enzyme's activity in lysosomal fractions, while neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme remained unchanged. Biochemical analyses indicated the modulation predominantly targeted the active mature forms of cathepsin B and markedly changed Rab proteins but not LAMP1, suggesting the involvement of enhanced trafficking. The modulated lysosomal system led to reductions in both Aβ immunostaining as well as Aβ(x-42) sandwich ELISA measures in APP(SwInd) mice of 10-11 months. More extensive Aβ deposition in 20-22-month APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice was also reduced by PADK. Selective ELISAs found that a corresponding production of the less pathogenic Aβ(1-38) occurs as Aβ(1-42) levels decrease in the mouse models, indicating that PADK treatment leads to Aβ truncation. Associated with Aβ clearance was the elimination of behavioral and synaptic protein deficits evident in the two transgenic models. These findings indicate that pharmacologically-controlled lysosomal modulation reduces Aβ(1-42) accumulation, possibly through intracellular truncation that also influences extracellular deposition, and in turn offsets the defects in synaptic composition and cognitive functions. The selective modulation promotes clearance at different levels of Aβ pathology and provides proof

  13. Inhibitory effect of mTOR activator MHY1485 on autophagy: suppression of lysosomal fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Ja Choi

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel

  14. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydoux, Emilie; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Nita, Izabela M; Balog, Sandor; Gazdhar, Amiq; Stumbles, Philip A; Petri-Fink, Alke; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC) networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS) particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm) PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the

  15. Advanced glycation end products receptor RAGE controls myocardial dysfunction and oxidative stress in high-fat fed mice by sustaining mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yichi; Wang, Lei; Delguste, Florian; Durand, Arthur; Guilbaud, Axel; Rousselin, Clementine; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Tessier, Frédéric; Boulanger, Eric; Neviere, Remi

    2017-08-19

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are recognized as major contributors of cardiovascular damage in diabetes and high fat diet (HFD) fed mice. Blockade of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) attenuates vascular oxidative stress and development of atherosclerosis. We tested whether HFD-induced myocardial dysfunction would be reversed in RAGE deficiency mice, in association with changes in oxidative stress damage, mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial fission and autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Cardiac antioxidant capacity was upregulated in RAGE(-)/(-) mice under normal diet as evidenced by increased superoxide dismutase and sirtuin mRNA expressions. Mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and Fis1 expressions were increased in RAGE(-)/(-) mice. Autophagy-related protein expressions and cathepsin-L activity were increased in RAGE(-)/(-) mice suggesting sustained autophagy-lysosomal flux. HFD induced mitochondrial respiration defects, cardiac contractile dysfunction, disrupted mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy inhibition, which were partially prevented in RAGE(-)/(-) mice. Our results suggest that cardioprotection against HFD in RAGE(-)/(-) mice include reactivation of autophagy, as inhibition of autophagic flux by chloroquine fully abrogated beneficial myocardial effects and its stimulation by rapamycin improved myocardial function in HFD wild type mice. As mitochondrial fission is necessary to mitophagy, increased fragmentation of mitochondrial network in HFD RAGE(-)/(-) mice may have facilitated removal of damaged mitochondria leading to better mitochondrial quality control. In conclusion, modulation of RAGE pathway may improve mitochondrial damage and myocardial dysfunction in HFD mice. Attenuation of cardiac oxidative stress and maintenance of healthy mitochondria population ensuring adequate energy supply may be involved in myocardial protection against HFD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Neuronal transport of acid hydrolases and peroxidase within the lysosomal system or organelles: involvement of agranular reticulum-like cisterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadwell, R D; Oliver, C; Brightman, M W

    1980-04-01

    Neurosecretory neurons of the hyperosmotically stressed hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system have been a useful model with which to demonstrate interrelationships among perikaryal lysosomes, agranular reticulum-like cisterns, endocytotic vacuoles, and the axoplasmic transport of acid hydrolases and horseradish peroxidase. Supraoptic neurons from normal mice and mice given 2% salt water to drink for 5--8 days have been studied using enzyme cytochemical techniques for peroxidase and lysosomal acid hydrolases. Peroxidase-labeling of these neurons was accomplished by intravenous injection or cerebral ventriculocisternal perfusion of the protein as previously reported (Broadwell and Brightman, '79). Compared to normal controls, supraoptic cell bodies from hyperosmotically stimulated mice contained elevated concentrations of peroxidase-labeled dense bodies demonstrated to be secondary lysosomes and acid hydrolase-positive and peroxidase-positive cisterns either attached or unattached to secondary lysosomes. These cisterns were smooth-surfaced and 400--1,000 A wide. Their morphology was similar to that of the agranular reticulum. Some of the cisterns contained both peroxidase and acid hydrolase activities. The cisterns probably represent an elongated form of lysosome and, therefore, are not elements of the agranular reticulum per se. By virtue of their direct connections with perikaryal secondary lysosomes, these cisterns may provide the route by which acid hydrolases and exogenous macromolecules can leave perikaryal secondary lysosomes for anterograde flow down the axon. Very few smooth-surfaced cisterns were involved in the retrograde transport of peroxidase within pituitary stalk axons from normal and salt-treated mice injected intravenously with peroxidase. Peroxidase undergoing retrograde transport was predominantly in endocytotic structures such as vacuoles and cup-shaped organelles, which deliver this exogenous macromolecule directly to secondary lysosomes for

  17. Lysosome-associated protein 1 (LAMP-1) and lysosome-associated protein 2 (LAMP-2) in a larger family carrier of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ester M; do Monte, Semiramis J H; do Nascimento, Fernando F; de Castro, Jose A F; Sousa, Jackeline L M; Filho, Henrique C S A L C; da Silva, Raimundo N; Labilloy, Anatália; Monte Neto, José T; da Silva, Adalberto S

    2014-02-15

    This study investigated the potential relationship between the expression levels of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) 1 and 2 and responses to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in the members of a single family with Fabry disease (FD). LAMP levels were assessed by flow cytometry in leukocytes from 17 FD patients who received an eight-month course of ERT course and 101 healthy individuals. We found that phagocytic cells from the FD patients had higher expression levels of both LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, relative to the levels in phagocytes from the healthy controls (p=0.001). Furthermore, the LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 levels in phagocytes from the FD carriers continuously decreased with ERT administration to reach levels similar to those in healthy controls. We suggest that LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 could be used as additional markers with which to assess ERT effectiveness in FD.

  18. Repetitive stimulation of autophagy-lysosome machinery by intermittent fasting preconditions the myocardium to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godar, Rebecca J; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Murphy, John T; Weinheimer, Carla J; Kovacs, Attila; Crosby, Seth D; Saftig, Paul; Diwan, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway, is potently stimulated in the myocardium by fasting and is essential for maintaining cardiac function during prolonged starvation. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent fasting protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury via transcriptional stimulation of the autophagy-lysosome machinery. Adult C57BL/6 mice subjected to 24-h periods of fasting, every other day, for 6 wk were protected from in-vivo ischemia-reperfusion injury on a fed day, with marked reduction in infarct size in both sexes as compared with nonfasted controls. This protection was lost in mice heterozygous null for Lamp2 (coding for lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2), which demonstrate impaired autophagy in response to fasting with accumulation of autophagosomes and SQSTM1, an autophagy substrate, in the heart. In lamp2 null mice, intermittent fasting provoked progressive left ventricular dilation, systolic dysfunction and hypertrophy; worsening cardiomyocyte autophagosome accumulation and lack of protection to ischemia-reperfusion injury, suggesting that intact autophagy-lysosome machinery is essential for myocardial homeostasis during intermittent fasting and consequent ischemic cardioprotection. Fasting and refeeding cycles resulted in transcriptional induction followed by downregulation of autophagy-lysosome genes in the myocardium. This was coupled with fasting-induced nuclear translocation of TFEB (transcription factor EB), a master regulator of autophagy-lysosome machinery; followed by rapid decline in nuclear TFEB levels with refeeding. Endogenous TFEB was essential for attenuation of hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death by repetitive starvation, in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, in-vitro. Taken together, these data suggest that TFEB-mediated transcriptional priming of the autophagy-lysosome machinery mediates the beneficial effects of fasting-induced autophagy in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  19. Turning the gun on cancer: Utilizing lysosomal P-glycoprotein as a new strategy to overcome multi-drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Nicole; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R; Jansson, Patric J

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer cells must constantly and rapidly adapt to changes in the tumor microenvironment, due to alterations in the availability of nutrients, such as glucose, oxygen and key transition metals (e.g., iron and copper). This nutrient flux is typically a consequence of rapid growth, poor vascularization and necrosis. It has been demonstrated that stress factors, such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation up-regulate master transcription factors, namely hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which transcriptionally regulate the multi-drug resistance (MDR), transmembrane drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Interestingly, in addition to the established role of plasma membrane Pgp in MDR, a new paradigm of intracellular resistance has emerged that is premised on the ability of lysosomal Pgp to transport cytotoxic agents into this organelle. This mechanism is enabled by the topological inversion of Pgp via endocytosis resulting in the transporter actively pumping agents into the lysosome. In this way, classical Pgp substrates, such as doxorubicin (DOX), can be actively transported into this organelle. Within the lysosome, DOX becomes protonated upon acidification of the lysosomal lumen, causing its accumulation. This mechanism efficiently traps DOX, preventing its cytotoxic interaction with nuclear DNA. This review discusses these effects and highlights a novel mechanism by which redox-active and protonatable Pgp substrates can utilize lysosomal Pgp to gain access to this compartment, resulting in catastrophic lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death. Hence, a key MDR mechanism that utilizes Pgp (the "gun") to sequester protonatable drug substrates safely within lysosomes can be "turned on" MDR cancer cells to destroy them from within.

  20. Ceria nanoparticles stabilized by organic surface coatings activate the lysosome-autophagy system and enhance autophagic clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wensi; Soo Lee, Seung; Savini, Marzia; Popp, Lauren; Colvin, Vicki L; Segatori, Laura

    2014-10-28

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are widely used in a variety of industrial applications including UV filters and catalysts. The expanding commercial scale production and use of ceria nanoparticles have inevitably increased the risk of release of nanoceria into the environment as well as the risk of human exposure. The use of nanoceria in biomedical applications is also being currently investigated because of its recently characterized antioxidative properties. In this study, we investigated the impact of ceria nanoparticles on the lysosome-autophagy system, the main catabolic pathway that is activated in mammalian cells upon internalization of exogenous material. We tested a battery of ceria nanoparticles functionalized with different types of biocompatible coatings (N-acetylglucosamine, polyethylene glycol and polyvinylpyrrolidone) expected to have minimal effect on lysosomal integrity and function. We found that ceria nanoparticles promote activation of the transcription factor EB, a master regulator of lysosomal function and autophagy, and induce upregulation of genes of the lysosome-autophagy system. We further show that the array of differently functionalized ceria nanoparticles tested in this study enhance autophagic clearance of proteolipid aggregates that accumulate as a result of inefficient function of the lysosome-autophagy system. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of ceria nanoparticles with the lysosome-autophagy system and demonstrates that ceria nanoparticles are activators of autophagy and promote clearance of autophagic cargo. These results provide insights for the use of nanoceria in biomedical applications, including drug delivery. These findings will also inform the design of engineered nanoparticles with safe and precisely controlled impact on the environment and the design of nanotherapeutics for the treatment of diseases with defective autophagic function and accumulation of lysosomal storage material.

  1. Chronic high glucose inhibits albumin reabsorption by lysosomal alkalinization in cultured porcine proximal tubular epithelial cells (LLC-PK1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Fukashi

    2006-06-01

    Lysosomal acidification is a key step of albumin reabsorption in proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs). This study was performed to examine the influence of chronic high glucose on lysosomal acidification in cultured PTECs. Porcine PTECs (LLC-PK(1) cells) were cultured in 16.7 mM (300 mg/dl) glucose (HG) alone or with 0.5 mM phlorizin for 24 weeks and subsequently for 12 weeks in 5.5 mM (100 mg/dl) glucose (NG). Chronic HG inhibited the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-albumin (A) uptake progressively, while phlorizin reversed the inhibition. NG for 12 weeks after HG normalized the uptake. The time-dependent uptake of FITC-A was inhibited by HG and bafilomycin A(1) (BafA(1)) after 15 min and by 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) and N-ethyl-N-isopropyl-amiloride (EIPA) after 3 min. Cellular ATP was depleted by HG and restored by NG. Lysosomal pH, assessed by an acidotropic fluorescent probe, was alkalinized (pH 4.5-7.8) with 5.5-27.8 mM glucose and normalized by subsequent NG. BafA(1) alkalinized lysosomes, and the concentration required to 50% change for the pH and 50% inhibition of FITC-A uptake was similar. EIPA inhibited FITC-A uptake, but did not influence lysosomal pH. DIDS inhibited FITC-A uptake, and unexpectedly lowered lysosomal pH. Real time PCR showed that HG reduced the mRNA level for vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, but did not alter those of chloride channel-5 and Na(+)-H(+)-exchanger-3. In conclusion, the chronic HG inhibits albumin reabsorption by lysosomal alkalinization in PTECs, probably due to ATP depletion and down-regulation of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

  2. Membrane cholesterol removal changes mechanical properties of cells and induces secretion of a specific pool of lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hissa

    Full Text Available In a previous study we had shown that membrane cholesterol removal induced unregulated lysosomal exocytosis events leading to the depletion of lysosomes located at cell periphery. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol triggered these exocytic events had not been uncovered. In this study we investigated the importance of cholesterol in controlling mechanical properties of cells and its connection with lysosomal exocytosis. Tether extraction with optical tweezers and defocusing microscopy were used to assess cell dynamics in mouse fibroblasts. These assays showed that bending modulus and surface tension increased when cholesterol was extracted from fibroblasts plasma membrane upon incubation with MβCD, and that the membrane-cytoskeleton relaxation time increased at the beginning of MβCD treatment and decreased at the end. We also showed for the first time that the amplitude of membrane-cytoskeleton fluctuation decreased during cholesterol sequestration, showing that these cells become stiffer. These changes in membrane dynamics involved not only rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but also de novo actin polymerization and stress fiber formation through Rho activation. We found that these mechanical changes observed after cholesterol sequestration were involved in triggering lysosomal exocytosis. Exocytosis occurred even in the absence of the lysosomal calcium sensor synaptotagmin VII, and was associated with actin polymerization induced by MβCD. Notably, exocytosis triggered by cholesterol removal led to the secretion of a unique population of lysosomes, different from the pool mobilized by actin depolymerizing drugs such as Latrunculin-A. These data support the existence of at least two different pools of lysosomes with different exocytosis dynamics, one of which is directly mobilized for plasma membrane fusion after cholesterol removal.

  3. Effects of ammonia on processing and secretion of precursor and mature lysosomal enzyme from macrophages of normal and pale ear mice: evidence for two distinct pathways

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Lysosomal enzymes have been shown to be synthesized as microsomal precursors, which are processed to mature enzymes located in lysosomes. We examined the effect of ammonium chloride on the intracellular processing and secretion of two lysosomal enzymes, beta-glucuronidase and beta-galactosidase, in mouse macrophages. This lysosomotropic drug caused extensive secretion of both precursor and mature enzyme forms within a few hours, as documented by pulse radiolabeling and molecular weight analys...

  4. Three-layer poly(methyl methacrylate) microsystem for analysis of lysosomal enzymes for diagnostic purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw, E-mail: r.kwapiszewski@gmail.com [Department of Microbioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Kwapiszewska, Karina [Department of Microbioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Kutter, Jörg P. [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Brzozka, Zbigniew [Department of Microbioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New approach for measuring the activity of lysosomal enzymes. • Determination of a protonated form of 4-MU directly in the enzymatic mixture. • Elimination of a long incubation step. • Significant reduction of the processing time and simplification of the procedure. - Abstract: Lysosomal storage diseases are chronic, progressive and typically have a devastating impact on the patient and the family. The diagnosis of these diseases is still a challenge, however, even for trained specialists. Accurate diagnostic methods and high-throughput tools that could be readily incorporated into existing screening laboratories are urgently required. We propose a new method for measuring the activity of lysosomal enzymes using a microfluidic device. The principle of the method is the fluorometric determination of a protonated form of 4-methylumbelliferone directly in the enzymatic mixture. Compared to the standard diagnostic protocols, the method eliminates the necessity to add alkaline buffer to stop the enzymatic reaction, and thus, the number of analytical steps is reduced. The system allows for on-chip short-term incubation of the enzymatic reagents, leading to a much simplified analytical procedure and a significantly shortened processing time. We measured the activity of β-galactosidase in RPMI-1788 human B lymphocytes and in isolated leukocytes from healthy adults. The method shows a good agreement with the standard diagnostic method. The agreement was confirmed by statistical analysis including construction of a Bland–Altman plot. The approach presented can be an alternative for the currently used diagnostic procedures. The method developed has a potential for the implementation into complex microfluidic devices thus becoming a powerful tool for a high-throughput and multiplex screening of newborns.

  5. Sulindac metabolites induce proteosomal and lysosomal degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangburn, Heather A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Rice, Pamela L

    2010-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases. In response to ligand, EGFR is internalized and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome/lysosome pathway. We previously reported that metabolites of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac downregulate the expression of EGFR and inhibit basal and EGF-induced EGFR signaling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. We now have evaluated the mechanisms of sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR. EGF-induced downregulation of EGFR occurs within 10 minutes and lasts for 24 hours. By contrast, downregulation of EGFR by sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone was first evident at 4 and 24 hours, respectively, with maximal downregulation at 72 hours. Pretreatment with either the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine or the proteosomal inhibitor MG132 blocked sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR. Sulindac metabolites also increased the ubiquitination of EGFR. Whereas sulindac metabolites inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR pY1068, they increased phosphorylation of EGFR pY1045, the docking site where c-Cbl binds, thereby enabling receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Immunofluorescence analysis of EGF and EGFR distribution confirmed the biochemical observations that sulindac metabolites alter EGFR localization and EGFR internalization in a manner similar to that seen with EGF treatment. Expression of ErbB family members HER2 and HER3 was also downregulated by sulindac metabolites. We conclude that downregulation of EGFR expression by sulindac metabolites is mediated via lysosomal and proteosomal degradation that may be due to drug-induced phosphorylation at pY1045 with resultant ubiquitination of EGFR. Thus, sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR seems to be mediated through mechanism(s) similar, at least in part, to those involved in EGF-induced downregulation of EGFR.

  6. The intracellular location of lysosomal enzymes in developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhard, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The author has found that developing Dictyostelium cells contain two distinct acid hydrolase-containing organelles. Vesicles from cells at different stages of development were separated using Percoll density gradients. The lower density vesicles (LDVs or lysosomes) were present in nourished and starved cells. The higher density vesicles (HDVs) arose during starvation-induced differentiation. HDVs lacked two prestalk cell-specific lysosomal enzymes which were contained in LDVs. Prespore cell-specific spore coat proteins were detected in HDVs by ELISA. ({sup 35}S)sulfate labeling revealed that HDVs contained newly made glycoproteins as well as glycoproteins found in preexisting LDVs. Pulse-chase experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine revealed that {alpha}-mannosidase from pre-existing LDVs an newly made {alpha}-mannosidase had entered HDVs. These data suggest that prespore LDVs mature to become HDVs. He has obtained evidence that HDVs are identical to prespore vesicles. Prespore vesicles are specialized secretory organelles which arise during prespore cell differentiation and which secrete their contents during terminal differentiation. As prespore vesicles secreted their contents, there was a co-incidental increase in extracellular acid hydrolase activity and a decrease in HDV-associated enzyme activity. Electron micrographs revealed that prespore cells contained two acid phosphatase-staining organelles, one of which appeared to be identical to lysosomes from nourished cells and a second which had features similar to prespore vesicles. Ricin-gold affinity electron microscopy was used to label the mucopolysaccharide component of prespore vesicles and the spore coat. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed co-localization of {alpha}-mannosidase with ricin-gold in prespore vesicles and the spore coat.

  7. Intracellular distribution of amyloid beta peptide and its relationship to the lysosomal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ is the main component of extraneuronal senile plaques typical of Alzheimer’s disease (AD brains. Although Aβ is produced by normal neurons, it is shown to accumulate in large amounts within neuronal lysosomes in AD. We have recently shown that under normal conditions the majority of Aβ is localized extralysosomally, while oxidative stress significantly increases intralysosomal Aβ content through activation of macroautophagy. It is also suggested that impaired Aβ secretion and resulting intraneuronal increase of Aβ can contribute to AD pathology. However, it is not clear how Aβ is distributed inside normal neurons, and how this distribution is effected when Aβ secretion is inhibited. Methods Using retinoic acid differentiated neuroblastoma cells and neonatal rat cortical neurons, we studied intracellular distribution of Aβ by double immunofluorescence microscopy for Aβ40 or Aβ42 and different organelle markers. In addition, we analysed the effect of tetanus toxin-induced exocytosis inhibition on the intracellular distribution of Aβ. Results Under normal conditions, Aβ was found in the small cytoplasmic granules in both neurites and perikarya. Only minor portion of Aβ was colocalized with trans-Golgi network, Golgi-derived vesicles, early and late endosomes, lysosomes, and synaptic vesicles, while the majority of Aβ granules were not colocalized with any of these structures. Furthermore, treatment of cells with tetanus toxin significantly increased the amount of intracellular Aβ in both perikarya and neurites. Finally, we found that tetanus toxin increased the levels of intralysosomal Aβ although the majority of Aβ still remained extralysosomally. Conclusion Our results indicate that most Aβ is not localized to Golgi-related structures, endosomes, lysosomes secretory vesicles or other organelles, while the suppression of Aβ secretion increases intracellular intra- and

  8. Triazoles inhibit cholesterol export from lysosomes by binding to NPC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Michael N; Lu, Feiran; Li, Xiaochun; Das, Akash; Liang, Qiren; De Brabander, Jef K; Brown, Michael S; Goldstein, Joseph L

    2017-01-03

    Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a membrane protein of lysosomes, is required for the export of cholesterol derived from receptor-mediated endocytosis of LDL. Lysosomal cholesterol export is reportedly inhibited by itraconazole, a triazole that is used as an antifungal drug [Xu et al. (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:4764-4769]. Here we show that posaconazole, another triazole, also blocks cholesterol export from lysosomes. We prepared P-X, a photoactivatable cross-linking derivative of posaconazole. P-X cross-linked to NPC1 when added to intact cells. Cross-linking was inhibited by itraconazole but not by ketoconazole, an imidazole that does not block cholesterol export. Cross-linking of P-X was also blocked by U18666A, a compound that has been shown to bind to NPC1 and inhibit cholesterol export. P-X also cross-linked to purified NPC1 that was incorporated into lipid bilayer nanodiscs. In this in vitro system, cross-linking of P-X was inhibited by itraconazole, but not by U18666A. P-X cross-linking was not prevented by deletion of the N-terminal domain of NPC1, which contains the initial binding site for cholesterol. In contrast, P-X cross-linking was reduced when NPC1 contained a point mutation (P691S) in its putative sterol-sensing domain. We hypothesize that the sterol-sensing domain has a binding site that can accommodate structurally different ligands.

  9. Influences of ammonia-nitrogen and dissolved oxygen on lysosomal integrity in green-lipped mussel Perna viridis: laboratory evaluation and field validation in Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J K H; Wu, R S S; Chan, A K Y; Yip, C K M; Shin, P K S

    2008-12-01

    Lysosomal integrity in mussels has been applied as a biomarker to detect the pollution of trace organics and metals in the natural environments. However, few studies have examined the effects of water quality on the response of lysosomal integrity, in particular total ammonia-nitrogen (TAN) and dissolved oxygen (DO). This study demonstrated that high level of TAN (2.0mg/l) and low DO (2.5mg O(2)/l) could significantly reduce the lysosomal integrity in green-lipped mussel Perna viridis, respectively by 33% and 38%, whereas the mussel lysosomal integrity decreased by 70% in the combined treatment of TAN and low DO under laboratory conditions after one week. The mussel lysosomal integrity of all treatment groups could return to the control level after a three week recovery period. In the field validation in Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong during an one-year study period, lysosomal integrity in P. viridis identified the cleanest site east to the harbour, where the lowest TAN and highest DO concentrations were found. While lysosomal integrity in mussels seemed not affected by seasonal changes, approximately 40% of the variation of this biomarker could be attributable to the changes in TAN and DO in seawater. In conclusion, the response of the mussel lysosomal integrity can be confounded by both TAN and DO prevailing in the natural environments and thus caution must be exercised in relating the observed changes in lysosomal integrity to any specific pollutant in coastal water quality monitoring studies.

  10. Adaptor Protein Complexes AP-1 and AP-3 Are Required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for Rerouting of Class I MHC Molecules to the Lysosomal Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpler, Lisa A.; Glosson, Nicole L.; Downs, Deanna; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A.; Hudson, Amy W.

    2014-01-01

    The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7) U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s) is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes. PMID:24901711

  11. Thrombin-induced lysosomal exocytosis in human platelets is dependent on secondary activation by ADP and regulated by endothelial-derived substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, Anna L; Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B; Ramström, Sofia; Lindström, Eva G; Grenegård, Magnus; Öllinger, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Exocytosis of lysosomal contents from platelets has been speculated to participate in clearance of thrombi and vessel wall remodelling. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis in platelets are, however, still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the pathways underlying platelet lysosomal secretion and elucidate how this process is controlled by platelet inhibitors. We found that high concentrations of thrombin induced partial lysosomal exocytosis as assessed by analysis of the activity of released N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG) and by identifying the fraction of platelets exposing the lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP)-1 on the cell surface by flow cytometry. Stimulation of thrombin receptors PAR1 or PAR4 with specific peptides was equally effective in inducing LAMP-1 surface expression. Notably, lysosomal exocytosis in response to thrombin was significantly reduced if the secondary activation by ADP was inhibited by the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor, while inhibition of thromboxane A2 formation by treatment with acetylsalicylic acid was of minor importance in this regard. Moreover, the NO-releasing drug S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) or the cyclic AMP-elevating eicosanoid prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) significantly suppressed lysosomal exocytosis. We conclude that platelet inhibitors that mimic functional endothelium such as PGI2 or NO efficiently counteract lysosomal exocytosis. Furthermore, we suggest that secondary release of ADP and concomitant signaling via PAR1/4- and P2Y12 receptors is important for efficient platelet lysosomal exocytosis by thrombin.

  12. The serotonin transporter undergoes constitutive internalization and is primarily sorted to late endosomes and lysosomal degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Bay, Tina; Eriksen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) plays a critical role in regulating serotonin signaling by mediating reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT levels in the membrane remain poorly understood. To study trafficking of surface resident....... Furthermore, internalized SERT co-localized with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker and not with transferrin. The sorting pattern was further confirmed by visualizing internalization of SERT using the fluorescent cocaine analogue JHC1-64, and by reversible and pulse chase biotinylation assays showing evidence...

  13. Lysosomal Fusion Dysfunction as a Unifying Hypothesis for Alzheimer's Disease Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen E. Funk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is characterized pathologically by extracellular senile plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and granulovacuolar degeneration. It has been debated whether these hallmark lesions are markers or mediators of disease progression, and numerous paradigms have been proposed to explain the appearance of each lesion individually. However, the unfaltering predictability of these lesions suggests a single pathological nidus central to disease onset and progression. One of the earliest pathologies observed in Alzheimer's disease is endocytic dysfunction. Here we review the recent literature of endocytic dysfunction with particular focus on disrupted lysosomal fusion and propose it as a unifying hypothesis for the three most-studied lesions of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Facilitated Communication in Mainstream Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington-Gurney, Jane; Crossley, Rosemary

    Facilitated communication is described as a method of training communication partners or facilitators to provide physical assistance to communication aid users, to help them overcome physical and emotional problems in using their aids. In Melbourne (Victoria, Australia), the DEAL (Dignity, Education and Language) Centre has identified 96 people…

  15. The spreading process of Ehrlichia canis in macrophages is dependent on actin cytoskeleton, calcium and iron influx and lysosomal evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, R N; Levenhagen, M A; Levenhagen, M M M D; Rieck, S E; Labruna, M B; Beletti, M E

    2014-01-31

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular microorganism and the etiologic agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. The invasion process has already been described for some bacteria in this genus, such as E. muris and E. chaffeensis, and consists of four stages: adhesion, internalisation, intracellular proliferation and intercellular spreading. However, little is known about the spreading process of E. canis. The aim of this study was to analyse the role of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium, iron and lysosomes from the host cell in the spreading of E. canis in dog macrophages in vitro. Different inhibitory drugs were used: cytochalasin D (actin polymerisation inhibitor), verapamil (calcium channel blocker) and deferoxamine (iron chelator). Our results showed a decrease in the number of bacteria in infected cells treated with all drugs when compared to controls. Lysosomes in infected cells were cytochemically labelled with acid phosphatase to allow the visualisation of phagosome-lysosome fusion and were further analysed by transmission electron microscopy. Phagosome-lysosome fusion was rarely observed in vacuoles containing viable E. canis. These data suggest that the spreading process of E. canis in vitro is dependent on cellular components analysed and lysosomal evasion.

  16. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Dong, E-mail: austhudong@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Wu, Jing, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Wang, Wan; Mu, Min; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Chen, Zhaoquan [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Xiao, Jian [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Hu, Fengyu; Yang, Yabo [Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rongbo, E-mail: lory456@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2015-05-29

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domain and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy.

  17. Effects of contaminant exposure and food restriction on hepatic autophagic lysosomal parameters in Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegseth, Marit Nøst; Gorbi, Stephania; Bocchetti, Raffaella; Camus, Lionel; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Regoli, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Lysosomal autophagic responses, such as lysosomal membrane stability, neutral lipids (NL), lipofuscin (LF), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, are valuable measures of cellular early-onset effects induced by environmental stress factors, such as contaminant exposure and fasting. In this study, these parameters were analysed and related to levels of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) in 40 Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) chicks. Chicks were experimentally exposed to HOCs through diet and went through a period of nutrient deprivation at the end of the experiment. HOC exposure and fasting were conducted separately and in combination. NL storages were depleted, and lysosomal membranes were destabilised after HOC exposure and nutrient deprivation. These responses were not related specifically to one type of stress or the extent of the treatment. No synergistic or additive effects from the combination of HOC exposure and fasting were observed. LF accumulated, and MDA levels increased as a result of fasting, but were unaffected by HOC exposure. LF accumulation was strongly associated with the percent weight change in the chicks. Large weight loss was associated with high LF levels, and slight weight gain was associated with low LF levels. Hence, food deprivation affected all the measured parameters, and HOC exposure decreased NL levels and lysosomal membrane stability in HG chick liver. Furthermore, autophagic lysosomal parameters have frequently been applied as biomarkers of cellular health status in previous studies of marine and terrestrial invertebrates, and this study suggests that these parameters may be good candidates for biomarkers of cellular health status in seabirds as well.

  18. Citreoviridin Induces Autophagy-Dependent Apoptosis through Lysosomal-Mitochondrial Axis in Human Liver HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexia; Liu, Yanan; Liu, Xiaofang; Jiang, Liping; Yang, Guang; Sun, Xiance; Geng, Chengyan; Li, Qiujuan; Yao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Min

    2015-08-06

    Citreoviridin (CIT) is a mycotoxin derived from fungal species in moldy cereals. In our previous study, we reported that CIT stimulated autophagosome formation in human liver HepG2 cells. Here, we aimed to explore the relationship of autophagy with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis in CIT-treated cells. Our data showed that CIT increased the expression of LC3-II, an autophagosome biomarker, from the early stage of treatment (6 h). After treatment with CIT for 12 h, lysosomal membrane permeabilization occurred, followed by the release of cathepsin D in HepG2 cells. Inhibition of autophagosome formation with siRNA against Atg5 attenuated CIT-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In addition, CIT induced collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential as assessed by JC-1 staining. Furthermore, caspase-3 activity assay showed that CIT induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Inhibition of autophagosome formation attenuated CIT-induced apoptosis, indicating that CIT-induced apoptosis was autophagy-dependent. Cathepsin D inhibitor, pepstatin A, relieved CIT-induced apoptosis as well, suggesting the involvement of the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in CIT-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data demonstrated that CIT induced autophagy-dependent apoptosis through the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in HepG2 cells. The study thus provides essential mechanistic insight, and suggests clues for the effective management and treatment of CIT-related diseases.

  19. GTPase of the Immune-Associated Nucleotide Protein 5 Regulates the Lysosomal Calcium Compartment in T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Daniel; Ghobadi, Farnaz; Boulay, Guylain; Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Lavoie, Christine; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes from Gimap5lyp/lyp rats carrying a recessive mutation in the GTPase of immune-associated protein 5 (Gimap5) gene undergo spontaneous apoptosis. Molecular mechanisms underlying this survival defect are not yet clear. We have shown that Gimap5lyp/lyp T lymphocytes display reduced calcium influx following T cell antigen receptor (TCR) stimulation that was associated with impaired buffering of calcium by mitochondria. Here, we investigated the subcellular localization of GIMAP5 and its influence on Ca2+ response in HEK293T cells and T lymphocytes. The more abundantly expressed GIMAP5v2 localizes to the lysosome and certain endosomal vesicles. Gimap5lyp/lyp T lymphocytes showed increased accumulation of calcium in the lysosomes as evidenced by Gly-Phe β-naphthylamide (GPN) triggered Ca2+ release. As a corollary, GPN-induced Ca2+ flux was decreased in HEK293T cells expressing GIMAP5v2. Strikingly, TCR stimulation of rat, mouse, and human T lymphocytes increased lysosomal calcium content. Overall, our findings show that lysosomes modulate cellular Ca2+ response during T cell activation and that GIMAP5 regulates the lysosomal Ca2+ compartment in T lymphocytes. PMID:28223986

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibition promotes lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic degradation of the amyloid-β precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Callum; Carzaniga, Raffaela; Gentleman, Steve M; Van Leuven, Fred; Walter, Jochen; Sastre, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been associated with altered activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) isozymes, which are proposed to contribute to both neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaque formation. However, the molecular basis by which GSK3 affects the formation of Aβ remains unknown. Our aim was to identify the underlying mechanisms of GSK3-dependent effects on the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). For this purpose, N2a cells stably expressing APP carrying the Swedish mutation were treated with specific GSK3 inhibitors or transfected with GSK3α/β short interfering RNA. We show that inhibition of GSK3 leads to decreased expression of APP by enhancing its degradation via an increase in the number of lysosomes. This induction of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway was associated with nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis. Our data indicate that GSK3 inhibition reduces Aβ through an increase of the degradation of APP and its carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF) by activation of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway. These results suggest that an increased propensity toward autophagic/lysosomal alterations in AD patients could have consequences for neuronal function.

  1. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A.; Te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M.; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions.

  2. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A.; te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M.; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions. PMID:28134274

  3. Analysis of mucolipidosis II/III GNPTAB missense mutations identifies domains of UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase involved in catalytic function and lysosomal enzyme recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yi; van Meel, Eline; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Yox, Alex; Steet, Richard; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2015-01-30

    UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase tags newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes with mannose 6-phosphate recognition markers, which are required for their targeting to the endolysosomal system. GNPTAB encodes the α and β subunits of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, and mutations in this gene cause the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and III αβ. Prior investigation of missense mutations in GNPTAB uncovered amino acids in the N-terminal region and within the DMAP domain involved in Golgi retention of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase and its ability to specifically recognize lysosomal hydrolases, respectively. Here, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of the remaining missense mutations in GNPTAB reported in mucolipidosis II and III αβ patients using cell- and zebrafish-based approaches. We show that the Stealth domain harbors the catalytic site, as some mutations in these regions greatly impaired the activity of the enzyme without affecting its Golgi localization and proteolytic processing. We also demonstrate a role for the Notch repeat 1 in lysosomal hydrolase recognition, as missense mutations in conserved cysteine residues in this domain do not affect the catalytic activity but impair mannose phosphorylation of certain lysosomal hydrolases. Rescue experiments using mRNA bearing Notch repeat 1 mutations in GNPTAB-deficient zebrafish revealed selective effects on hydrolase recognition that differ from the DMAP mutation. Finally, the mutant R587P, located in the spacer between Notch 2 and DMAP, was partially rescued by overexpression of the γ subunit, suggesting a role for this region in γ subunit binding. These studies provide new insight into the functions of the different domains of the α and β subunits.

  4. Stabilization of lysosomal membrane and cell membrane glycoprotein profile by Semecarpus anacardium linn. nut milk extract in experimental hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premalatha, B; Sachdanandam, P

    2000-08-01

    Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract administered orally at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day for 14 days exerted an in vivo stabilizing effect on lysosomal membrane and glycoprotein content in rat hepatocellular carcinoma. This was demonstrated in normal rats and in animals whose biomembranes were rendered fragile by induction of hepatocellular carcinoma with aflatoxin B(1) and subsequent treatment with Semecarpus anacardium nut extract. In this condition, the discharge of lysosomal enzymes increased significantly with a subsequent increase in glycoprotein components. The nut extract administration reversed these adverse changes to near normal in treated animals. The possible reason for this reversal is discussed. Such stabilization of biomembranes by Semecarpus anacardium nut extract may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and other cancers involving abnormal fragility of lysosomes and glycoprotein content providing the extract demonstrates safety in a full toxicity study. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Macroautophagy-generated increase of lysosomal amyloid β-protein mediates oxidant-induced apoptosis of cultured neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Lin; Terman, Alexei; Hallbeck, Martin

    2011-01-01

    and accumulation of Aβ within lysosomes, induced apoptosis in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Cells under hyperoxia showed: (1) increased numbers of autophagic vacuoles that contained amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as Aβ monomers and oligomers, (2) increased reactive oxygen species production......, and (3) enhanced apoptosis. Oxidant-induced apoptosis positively correlated with cellular Aβ production, being the highest in cells that were stably transfected with APP Swedish KM670/671NL double mutation. Inhibition of γ-secretase, prior and/or in parallel to hyperoxia, suggested that the increase...... and resulting lysosomal Aβ accumulation are essential for oxidant-induced apoptosis in cultured neuroblastoma cells and provide additional support for the interactive role of oxidative stress and the lysosomal system in AD-related neurodegeneration....

  6. The isolation of lysosomes from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells following pretreatment of mice with Triton WR-1339.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, A; Baxandall, J; Touster, O

    1969-08-01

    A method is described for obtaining highly purified lysosomes from Ehrlich ascites tumo cells grown in mice injected with Triton WR-1339. The isolated particles show a high specific activity for aryl sulfatase, representing an 80-90-fold purification over the homogenate, and a 15-18% yield of the total enzyme activity. Mitochondrial and microsomal marker enzymes are present in negligible amounts (0.2% of the activity of the homogenate). The biochemical evidence for a rather high degree of homogeneity of the fraction is supported by the electron microscopic examination of the purified lysosomes. The intracellular localizations of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase, NADH-cytochrome c reductase and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase in Ehrlich ascites cells are also reported, the first two being present in highest concentration in the combined mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction and the third in the microsomal fraction.

  7. Variations of lysosomal enzymes in different parts of rabbit Fallopian tube during ovum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, R K; Roy, S K

    1981-03-01

    Some lysosomal enzymes (viz., acid DNase, acid RNase and beta-glucuronidase) were estimated in different parts of the rabbit Fallopian tube during different hours post coitum (p. c.). At estrus, alterations of acid RNase and beta-glucuronidase were observed in different anatomical segments of the Fallopian tube but acid DNase was undetectable. When these enzymes were compared at different hours p.c., it was noticed that when the ovum reaches ampullary (A), ampullary-isthmic junction (AIJ) and isthmic (I) segments of the Fallopian tube at the respective hours 14, 24 and 70, the acid DNase activity showed increased value in these parts when compared to their preceding groups. Acid RNase also showed similar type of pattern except that it was not altered at 14 hr p. c. At 144 hr p. c. both the enzymes had no significant alteration over 70 hr value, beta-glucuronidase, however, did not show this type of pattern in all the segments till 144 hr p. c. The increased activity of acid RNase and DNase in AIJ and I segments of the tube till 70 hr p. c. suggests the increased lysosomal activity in the tubal fluid produced by secretory cells. The possible involvement of these lysomal factors in the process of fertilization and preparation of ovum prior to implantation is suggested.

  8. LINGO-1 promotes lysosomal degradation of amyloid-β protein precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Rian; Meabon, James S; Wiley, Jesse C; Hudson, Mark P; Montine, Thomas J; Bothwell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) by β-secretase and γ-secretase generate amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which are thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Much of this processing occurs in endosomes following endocytosis of AβPP from the plasma membrane. However, this pathogenic mode of processing AβPP may occur in competition with lysosomal degradation of AβPP, a common fate of membrane proteins trafficking through the endosomal system. Following up on published reports that LINGO-1 binds and promotes the amyloidogenic processing of AβPP we have examined the consequences of LINGO-1/AβPP interactions. We report that LINGO-1 and its paralogs, LINGO-2 and LINGO-3, decrease processing of AβPP in the amyloidogenic pathway by promoting lysosomal degradation of AβPP. We also report that LINGO-1 levels are reduced in AD brain, representing a possible pathogenic mechanism stimulating the generation of Aβ peptides in AD.

  9. LINGO-1 promotes lysosomal degradation of amyloid-β protein precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian de Laat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP by β-secretase and γ-secretase generate amyloid β (Aβ peptides, which are thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD. Much of this processing occurs in endosomes following endocytosis of AβPP from the plasma membrane. However, this pathogenic mode of processing AβPP may occur in competition with lysosomal degradation of AβPP, a common fate of membrane proteins trafficking through the endosomal system. Following up on published reports that LINGO-1 binds and promotes the amyloidogenic processing of AβPP we have examined the consequences of LINGO-1/AβPP interactions. We report that LINGO-1 and its paralogs, LINGO-2 and LINGO-3, decrease processing of AβPP in the amyloidogenic pathway by promoting lysosomal degradation of AβPP. We also report that LINGO-1 levels are reduced in AD brain, representing a possible pathogenic mechanism stimulating the generation of Aβ peptides in AD.

  10. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, a lysosomal storage disease, triggers a pathogenic CNS autoimmune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovich Phillip G

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, using a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS IIIB, a lysosomal storage disease with severe neurological deterioration, we showed that MPS IIIB neuropathology is accompanied by a robust neuroinflammatory response of unknown consequence. This study was to assess whether MPS IIIB lymphocytes are pathogenic. Methods Lymphocytes from MPS IIIB mice were adoptively transferred to naïve wild-type mice. The recipient animals were then evaluated for signs of disease and inflammation in the central nervous system. Results Our results show for the first time, that lymphocytes isolated from MPS IIIB mice caused a mild paralytic disease when they were injected systemically into naïve wild-type mice. This disease is characterized by mild tail and lower trunk weakness with delayed weight gain. The MPS IIIB lymphocytes also trigger neuroinflammation within the CNS of recipient mice characterized by an increase in transcripts of IL2, IL4, IL5, IL17, TNFα, IFNα and Ifi30, and intraparenchymal lymphocyte infiltration. Conclusions Our data suggest that an autoimmune response directed at CNS components contributes to MPS IIIB neuropathology independent of lysosomal storage pathology. Adoptive transfer of purified T-cells will be needed in future studies to identify specific effector T-cells in MPS IIIB neuroimmune pathogenesis.

  11. Disulfiram-induced cytotoxicity and endo-lysosomal sequestration of zinc in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Helen L; Wymant, Jennifer M; Solfa, Francesca; Hiscox, Stephen E; Taylor, Kathryn M; Westwell, Andrew D; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-02-01

    Disulfiram, a clinically used alcohol-deterrent has gained prominence as a potential anti-cancer agent due to its impact on copper-dependent processes. Few studies have investigated zinc effects on disulfiram action, despite it having high affinity for this metal. Here we studied the cytotoxic effects of disulfiram in breast cancer cells, and its relationship with both intra and extracellular zinc. MCF-7 and BT474 cancer cell lines gave a striking time-dependent biphasic cytotoxic response between 0.01 and 10 μM disulfiram. Co-incubation of disulfiram with low-level zinc removed this effect, suggesting that availability of extracellular zinc significantly influences disulfiram efficacy. Live-cell confocal microscopy using fluorescent endocytic probes and the zinc dye Fluozin-3 revealed that disulfiram selectively and rapidly increased zinc levels in endo-lysosomes. Disulfiram also caused spatial disorganization of late endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting they are novel targets for this drug. This relationship between disulfiram toxicity and ionophore activity was consolidated via synthesis of a new disulfiram analog and overall we demonstrate a novel mechanism of disulfiram-cytotoxicity with significant clinical implications for future use as a cancer therapeutic.

  12. Phase coexistence in a triolein-phosphatidylcholine system. Implications for lysosomal membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I; Duelund, Lars; Vuento, Matti; Ipsen, John Hjort

    2010-02-01

    The effects of tri- and monoglycerides on phospholipid (POPC) membranes were studied using spectroscopical methods. Triolein was found to form two types of POPC-rich membranes, both with POPC or as a three-component system with monopalmitin. These two membrane types were determined as co-existing phases based on their spontaneous and stable separation and named heavy and light phase according to their sedimentation behaviour. Marked differences were seen in the physical properties of these phases, even though only minor compositional variation was detected. The light, less polar phase was found to be less ordered and more fluid and seemed to allow significantly lower amount of water penetration into the membrane-water interface than pure POPC membrane. The heavy phase, apart from their slightly altered water penetration, resembled more a pure POPC membrane. As triglycerides are present in lysosomal membranes, the present results can be seen as an implication for polarity-based water permeability barrier possibly contributing to the integrity of lysosomes.

  13. The lysosomal potassium channel TMEM175 adopts a novel tetrameric architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Changkeun; Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Kim, Sunghoon; She, Ji; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2017-07-19

    TMEM175 is a lysosomal K+ channel that is important for maintaining the membrane potential and pH stability in lysosomes1. It contains two homologous copies of a six-transmembrane-helix (6-TM) domain, which has no sequence homology to the canonical tetrameric K+ channels and lacks the TVGYG selectivity filter motif found in these channels2, 3, 4. The prokaryotic TMEM175 channel, which is present in a subset of bacteria and archaea, contains only a single 6-TM domain and functions as a tetramer. Here, we present the crystal structure of a prokaryotic TMEM175 channel from Chamaesiphon minutus, CmTMEM175, the architecture of which represents a completely different fold from that of canonical K+ channels. All six transmembrane helices of CmTMEM175 are tightly packed within each subunit without undergoing domain swapping. The highly conserved TM1 helix acts as the pore-lining inner helix, creating an hourglass-shaped ion permeation pathway in the channel tetramer. Three layers of hydrophobic residues on the carboxy-terminal half of the TM1 helices form a bottleneck along the ion conduction pathway and serve as the selectivity filter of the channel. Mutagenesis analysis suggests that the first layer of the highly conserved isoleucine residues in the filter is primarily responsible for channel selectivity. Thus, the structure of CmTMEM175 represents a novel architecture of a tetrameric cation channel whose ion selectivity mechanism appears to be distinct from that of the classical K+ channel family.

  14. Lysosomal exoglycosidases in serum and urine of patients with colon adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajda, Slawomir Dariusz; Snarska, Jadwiga; Puchalski, Zbigniew; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of determination the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidase (HEX - E.C. 3.2.1.30), beta-D-galactosidase (GAL - E.C. 3.2.1.23), alpha-L-fucosidase (FUC - E.C. 3.2.1.51) and alpha-D-mannosidase (MAN - E.C. 3.2.1.24) in blood serum and urine in diagnostics of colon adenocarcinoma. The activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases was determined by the method of Marciniak et al. adapted to serum and urine of patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon. A significant increase in concentration of the activity of HEX, GAL and FUC was found in blood serum, as well as HEX and GAL in urine, of patients with colon adenocarcinoma, in comparison with healthy people. With the method of Marciniak et al. for determination the activity of HEX, GAL and FUC in blood serum as well as HEX and GAL in urine, the cases of colon adenocarcinoma were significantly differentiated from healthy people. The high diagnostic value, sensitivity and specificity of the method of Marciniak et al., suggests the possibility of its use for determination of the activity of HEX, FUC and GAL in blood serum as well as HEX and GAL in urine, in the diagnostics of colon adenocarcinoma.

  15. WO3/Pt nanoparticles promote light-induced lipid peroxidation and lysosomal instability within tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-02-01

    Although metal-metal oxide nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest as catalysts, they have attracted little interest in nanomedicine. This is likely due to the fact that metal oxide semiconductors generally require biologically harmful ultraviolet excitation. In contrast, this study focuses upon WO3/Pt nanoparticles, which can be excited by visible light. To optimize the nanoparticles’ catalytic performance, platinization was performed at alkaline pH. These nanoparticles destroyed organic dyes, consumed dissolved oxygen and produced hydroxyl radicals. 4T1 breast cancer cells internalized WO3/Pt nanoparticles within the membrane-bound endo-lysosomal compartment as shown by electron and fluorescence microscopy. During visible light exposure, but not in darkness, WO3/Pt nanoparticles manufacture reactive oxygen species, promote lipid peroxidation, and trigger lysosomal membrane disruption. As cells of the immune system degrade organic molecules, produce reactive oxygen species, and activate the lipid peroxidation pathway within target cells, these nanoparticles mimic the chemical attributes of immune effector cells. These biomimetic nanoparticles should become useful in managing certain cancers, especially ocular cancer.

  16. Deleterious effects of interruption followed by reintroduction of enzyme replacement therapy on a lysosomal storage disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ana Paula; Matte, Ursula; Pasqualim, Gabriela; Tavares, Angela Maria Vicente; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Martinelli, Barbara; Ribas, Graziela; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Giugliani, Roberto; Baldo, Guilherme

    2016-10-01

    Temporary interruption of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in patients with different lysosomal storage disorders may happen for different reasons (adverse reactions, issues with reimbursement, logistic difficulties, and so forth), and the impact of the interruption is still uncertain. In the present work, we studied the effects of the interruption of intravenous ERT (Laronidase, Genzyme) followed by its reintroduction in mice with the prototypical lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type I, comparing to mice receiving continuous treatment, untreated mucopolysaccharidosis type I mice, and normal mice. In the animals which treatment was temporarily interrupted, we observed clear benefits of treatment in several organs (liver, lung, heart, kidney, and testis) after reintroduction, but a worsening in the thickness of the aortic wall was detected. Furthermore, these mice had just partial improvements in behavioral tests, suggesting some deterioration in the brain function. Despite worsening is some disease aspects, urinary glycosaminoglycans levels did not increase during interruption, which indicates that this biomarker commonly used to monitor treatment in patients should not be used alone to assess treatment efficacy. The deterioration observed was not caused by the development of serum antienzyme antibodies. All together our results suggest that temporary ERT interruption leads to deterioration of function in some organs and should be avoided whenever possible.

  17. The role of autophagic and lysosomal pathways in ischemic brain injury******

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohua Gu; Nan Shi; Qian Zhang; Wei Zhang; Meizhen Zhao; Xiaojiang Sun; Yinyi Sun; Kangyong Liu; Fen Wang; Ting Zhang; Qiang Li; Liwei Shen; Ling Zhou; Liang Dong

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in neural cel death after cerebral ischemia. Our previous studies showed that rapamycin-induced autophagy decreased the rate of apoptosis, but the rate of apoptosis was creased after the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, was used. In this study, a suture-occluded method was performed to generate a rat model of brain ischemia. Under a transmission electron microscope, autophagic bodies and autophagy lysosomes were markedly accumulated in neurons at 4 hours post brain ischemic injury, with their numbers gradual y reducing over time. Western blotting demonstrated that protein levels of light chain 3-II and cathepsin B were significantly in-creased within 4 hours of ischemic injury, but these levels were not persistently upregulated over time. Confocal microscopy showed that autophagy was mainly found in neurons with positive light chain 3 signal. Injection of rapamycin via tail vein promoted the occurrence of autophagy in rat brain tissue after cerebral ischemia and elevated light chain 3 and cathepsin B expression. However, in-jection of 3-methyladenine significantly diminished light chain 3-II and cathepsin B expression. Results verified that autophagic and lysosomal activity is increased in ischemic neurons. Abnormal components in cel s can be eliminated through upregulating cel autophagy or inhibiting autophagy after ischemic brain injury, resulting in a dynamic balance of substances in cel s. Moreover, drugs that interfere with autophagy may be potential therapies for the treatment of brain injury.

  18. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal Shteyer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy.

  19. The Rhodococcus equi virulence protein VapA disrupts endolysosome function and stimulates lysosome biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofe, Adam P; Davis, Luther J; Whittingham, Jean L; Latimer-Bowman, Elizabeth C; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Pryor, Paul R

    2017-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) is an important pulmonary pathogen in foals that often leads to the death of the horse. The bacterium harbors a virulence plasmid that encodes numerous virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) including VapA that is essential for intracellular survival inside macrophages. However, little is known about the precise function of VapA. Here, we demonstrate that VapA causes perturbation to late endocytic organelles with swollen endolysosome organelles having reduced Cathepsin B activity and an accumulation of LBPA, LC3 and Rab7. The data are indicative of a loss of endolysosomal function, which leads cells to upregulate lysosome biogenesis to compensate for the loss of functional endolysosomes. Although there is a high degree of homology of the core region of VapA to other Vap proteins, only the highly conserved core region of VapA, and not VapD of VapG, gives the observed effects on endolysosomes. This is the first demonstration of how VapA works and implies that VapA aids R. equi survival by reducing the impact of lysosomes on phagocytosed bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [High cost drugs for rare diseases in Brazil: the case of lysosomal storage disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Mônica Vinhas; Krug, Bárbara Corrêa; Picon, Paulo Dornelles; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa Doederlein

    2010-11-01

    This paper approaches in a critical way aspects of Brazilian public policies for drugs, emphasizing those classified as high cost and for rare diseases. The lysosomal storage diseases was taken as an example because of their rarity and the international trend for the development of new drugs for their treatment, all at high costs. Three lysosomal storage diseases were approached: Gaucher disease, Fabry disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I. Gaucher disease has its treatment drug licensed in Brazil and guidelines for its use are established through a clinical protocol by the Ministry of Health. The others have their drug treatments registered in Brazil; however, no treatment guidelines for them have been developed by the government. The objective of the paper was to foster the discussion on the role of health technology assessment for high-cost drugs for rare diseases in Brazil, emphasizing the need for establishing health policies with legitimacy towards these diseases. Despite the difficulties in establishing a health policy for each rare disease, it is possible to create rational models to deal with this growing challenge.

  1. The lysosomal potassium channel TMEM175 adopts a novel tetrameric architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changkeun; Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Kim, Sunghoon; She, Ji; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2017-07-27

    TMEM175 is a lysosomal K(+) channel that is important for maintaining the membrane potential and pH stability in lysosomes. It contains two homologous copies of a six-transmembrane-helix (6-TM) domain, which has no sequence homology to the canonical tetrameric K(+) channels and lacks the TVGYG selectivity filter motif found in these channels. The prokaryotic TMEM175 channel, which is present in a subset of bacteria and archaea, contains only a single 6-TM domain and functions as a tetramer. Here, we present the crystal structure of a prokaryotic TMEM175 channel from Chamaesiphon minutus, CmTMEM175, the architecture of which represents a completely different fold from that of canonical K(+) channels. All six transmembrane helices of CmTMEM175 are tightly packed within each subunit without undergoing domain swapping. The highly conserved TM1 helix acts as the pore-lining inner helix, creating an hourglass-shaped ion permeation pathway in the channel tetramer. Three layers of hydrophobic residues on the carboxy-terminal half of the TM1 helices form a bottleneck along the ion conduction pathway and serve as the selectivity filter of the channel. Mutagenesis analysis suggests that the first layer of the highly conserved isoleucine residues in the filter is primarily responsible for channel selectivity. Thus, the structure of CmTMEM175 represents a novel architecture of a tetrameric cation channel whose ion selectivity mechanism appears to be distinct from that of the classical K(+) channel family.

  2. EGFRvIII escapes down-regulation due to impaired internalization and sorting to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandal, Michael V; Zandi, Roza; Pedersen, Mikkel W; Willumsen, Berthe M; van Deurs, Bo; Poulsen, Hans S

    2007-07-01

    EGFRvIII is a mutant variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) found exclusively in various cancer types. EGFRvIII lacks a large part of the extracellular domain and is unable to bind ligands; however, the receptor is constitutively phosphorylated and able to activate downstream signaling pathways. Failure to attenuate signaling by receptor down-regulation could be one of the major mechanisms by which EGFRvIII becomes oncogenic. Using a cell system expressing either EGFR or EGFRvIII with no expression of other EGFR family members and with endogenous levels of key degradation proteins, we have investigated the down-regulation of EGFRvIII and compared it to that of EGFR. We show that, in contrast to EGFR, EGFRvIII is inefficiently degraded. EGFRvIII is internalized, but the internalization rate of the mutated receptor is significantly less than that of unstimulated EGFR. Moreover, internalized EGFRvIII is recycled rather than delivered to lysosomes. EGFRvIII binds the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl via Grb2, whereas binding via phosphorylated tyrosine residue 1045 seems to be limited. Despite c-Cbl binding, the receptor fails to become effectively ubiquitinylated. Thus, our results suggest that the long lifetime of EGFRvIII is caused by inefficient internalization and impaired sorting to lysosomes due to lack of effective ubiquitinylation.

  3. Microglial migration mediated by ATP-induced ATP release from lysosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Dou; Qing-ming Luo; Shumin Duan; Hang-jun Wu; Hui-quan Li; Song Qin; Yin-er Wang; Jing Li; Hui-fang Lou; Zhong Chen; Xiao-ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Microglia are highly motile cells that act as the main form of active immune defense in the central nervous system.Attracted by factors released from damaged cells,microglia are recruited towards the damaged or infected site,where they are involved in degenerative and regenerative responses and phagocytotic clearance of cell debris.ATP release from damaged neural tissues has been suggested to mediate the rapid extension of microglial process towards the site of injury.However,the mechanisms of the long-range migration of microglia remain to be clarified.Here,we found that lysosomes in microglia contain abundant ATP and exhibit Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli.By establishing an efficient in vitro chemotaxis assay,we demonstrated that endogenously-released ATP from microglia triggered by local microinjection of ATPγS is critical for the long-range chemotaxis of microglia,a response that was significantly inhibited in microglia treated with an agent inducing iysosome osmodialysis or in cells derived from mice deficient in Rab 27a (ashen mice),a small GTPase required for the trafficking and exocytosis of secretory iysosomes.These results suggest that microglia respond to extracellular ATP by releasing ATP themselves through lysosomal exocytosis,thereby providing a positive feedback mechanism to generate a long-range extracellular signal for attracting distant microglia to migrate towards and accumulate at the site of injury.

  4. An aberrant sugar modification of BACE1 blocks its lysosomal targeting in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Kitazume, Shinobu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Saito, Takashi; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C; Nakano, Miyako; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Manya, Hiroshi; Endo, Tamao; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2015-02-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1), an essential protease for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, is a major drug target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there is a concern that inhibiting BACE1 could also affect several physiological functions. Here, we show that BACE1 is modified with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), a sugar modification highly expressed in brain, and demonstrate that AD patients have higher levels of bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1. Analysis of knockout mice lacking the biosynthetic enzyme for bisecting GlcNAc, GnT-III (Mgat3), revealed that cleavage of Aβ-precursor protein (APP) by BACE1 is reduced in these mice, resulting in a decrease in Aβ plaques and improved cognitive function. The lack of this modification directs BACE1 to late endosomes/lysosomes where it is less colocalized with APP, leading to accelerated lysosomal degradation. Notably, other BACE1 substrates, CHL1 and contactin-2, are normally cleaved in GnT-III-deficient mice, suggesting that the effect of bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1 is selective to APP. Considering that GnT-III-deficient mice remain healthy, GnT-III may be a novel and promising drug target for AD therapeutics.

  5. Learning to Facilitate (Online) Meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Peter; Bull, Susan; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    We describe an approach to teaching collaboration skills directly by building on competences for meeting facilitation. (Online) meetings provide a rich arena to practice collaboration since they can serve multiple purposes: learning, problem solving, decision making, idea generation and advancement......, etc.. We argue that facilitating meetings is a competence worth developing in students and describe the main knowledge and skill components that pertain to this competence. We then describe some implemented software tools that can be used in schools and colleges to provide opportunities for practicing...... and developing group facilitation skills....

  6. Hepatic entrapment of esterified cholesterol drives continual expansion of whole body sterol pool in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqul, Amal; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Taylor, Anna M; Repa, Joyce J; Burns, Dennis K; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-10-15

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) results from loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene that encodes lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). Hepatomegaly and deposition of esterified cholesterol (EC) in multiple organs ensue. The present studies quantitated rates of synthesis, absorption, and disposition of cholesterol, and whole body cholesterol pool size in a mouse model of CESD. In 50-day-old lal(-/-) and matching lal(+/+) mice fed a low-cholesterol diet, whole animal cholesterol content equalled 210 and 50 mg, respectively, indicating that since birth the lal(-/-) mice sequestered cholesterol at an average rate of 3.2 mg·day(-1)·animal(-1). The proportion of the body sterol pool contained in the liver of the lal(-/-) mice was 64 vs. 6.3% in their lal(+/+) controls. EC concentrations in the liver, spleen, small intestine, and lungs of the lal(-/-) mice were elevated 100-, 35-, 15-, and 6-fold, respectively. In the lal(-/-) mice, whole liver cholesterol synthesis increased 10.2-fold, resulting in a 3.2-fold greater rate of whole animal sterol synthesis compared with their lal(+/+) controls. The rate of cholesterol synthesis in the lal(-/-) mice exceeded that in the lal(+/+) controls by 3.7 mg·day(-1)·animal(-1). Fractional cholesterol absorption and fecal bile acid excretion were unchanged in the lal(-/-) mice, but their rate of neutral sterol excretion was 59% higher than in their lal(+/+) controls. Thus, in this model, the continual expansion of the body sterol pool is driven by the synthesis of excess cholesterol, primarily in the liver. Despite the severity of their disease, the median life span of the lal(-/-) mice was 355 days.

  7. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seydoux E

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Emilie Seydoux,1,2 Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser,1,3 Izabela M Nita,1 Sandor Balog,3 Amiq Gazdhar,1 Philip A Stumbles,4,5 Alke Petri-Fink,3,6 Fabian Blank,1,* Christophe von Garnier1,*1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, 2Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 3Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland; 4School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia; 5Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, WA, Australia; 6Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland*These authors contributed equally to the manuscriptIntroduction: Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods: Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results: The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity

  8. Fluence- and time-dependant lysosomal and mitochondrial damage induced by LS11 PDT characterized with light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeremy D.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2007-02-01

    Light scattering from cells originates from sub-cellular organelles. Our measurements of angularly resolved light scattering have demonstrated that at 633 nm, the dominant scattering centers within EMT6 cells are mitochondria and lysosomes. To assess their specific contributions, we have used photodynamic therapy (PDT) to induce organelle-specific perturbations within intact cells. We have developed a coated sphere scattering model for mitochondrial swelling in response to ALA- and Pc 4-PDT, and in the case of Pc 4-PDT we have used this model to map the scattering responses into clonogenic cell survival. More recently, we demonstrated the ability to measure the size, scattering contribution, and refractive index of lysosomes within cells by exploiting the localization and high extinction of the photosensitizer LS11 and an absorbing sphere scattering model. Here we report on time- and fluence-dependant scattering measurements from cells treated with LS11-PDT. LS11-PDT causes rapid lysosomal disruption, as quantified by uptake of acridine orange, and can induce downstream effects including release of mitochondrial cytochrome c preceding the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Reiners et al., Cell Death Differ. 9:934, 2002). Using scattering and these various methods of analysis, we observed that the induction of lysosomal morphology changes requires a fluence significantly higher than that reported for cell killing. At lower fluences, we observe that at 1 h after irradiation there is significant mitochondrial swelling, consistent with the onset of cytochrome c-induced cell death, while the morphology of lysosomes remains unchanged. We also expand on the ideas of lysosomal staining to demonstrate the sensitivity of scattering measurements at different wavelengths to different organelle populations.

  9. Alkaloids from the poisonous plant Ipomoea carnea: effects on intracellular lysosomal glycosidase activities in human lymphoblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Kato, Atsushi; Adachi, Isao; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Asano, Naoki

    2003-12-17

    There is natural intoxication of livestock by the ingestion of Ipomoea carnea (Convolvulaceae) in Brazil and other parts of the world. The alkaloidal glycosidase inhibitors swainsonine, 2-epi-lentiginosine, and calystegines B(1), B(2), B(3), and C(1) have been identified as constituents of this plant. Swainsonine is a potent inhibitor of rat lysosomal alpha-mannosidase, with an IC(50) value of 0.02 microM, whereas calystegines B(1), B(2), and C(1) are potent inhibitors of rat lysosomal beta-glucosidase, with IC(50) values of 2.1, 0.75, and 0.84 microM, respectively. The action of swainsonine results in a lysosomal storage disorder that closely mimics alpha-mannosidosis in humans. To determine whether the toxicity of I. carnea to livestock is due to purely swainsonine or due to a combination of effects by swainsonine and calystegines, intracellular lysosomal glycosidase activities in normal human lymphoblasts grown with inhibitors in the medium were examined. Incubation of lymphoblasts with 0.1 microM swainsonine for 3 days resulted in approximately 60% reduction of alpha-mannosidase activity. On the other hand, calystegines B(2) and C(1) showed no inhibition of beta-glucosidase up to 1 mM; instead inclusion of calystegines B(2) and C(1) at 100 microM in the culture medium increased its activity by 1.5- and 1.6-fold, respectively. Calystegines B(2) and C(1) seem to act as chemical chaperones, enhancing correct folding of the enzyme and enabling smooth trafficking to the lysosome. The lysosomal beta-glucosidase inhibitory calystegines seem to have little risk of inducing intoxication of livestock.

  10. Abnormal lysosomal trafficking and enhanced exosomal export of cisplatin in drug-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Roohangiz; Larson, Barrett J; Cheng, Timothy C; Gibson, Michael A; Otani, Shinji; Naerdemann, Wiltrud; Howell, Stephen B

    2005-10-01

    Previous work has shown that cisplatin (CDDP) becomes concentrated in lysosomes, and that acquired resistance to CDDP is associated with abnormalities of protein trafficking and secretion. The lysosomal compartment in CDDP-sensitive 2008 human ovarian carcinoma cells was compared with that in CDDP-resistant 2008/C13*5.25 subline using deconvoluting imaging and specific dyes and antibodies. The lysosomal compartment in CDDP-resistant cells was reduced to just 40% of that in the parental CDDP-sensitive cells (P<0.002). This was accompanied by a reduced expression of the lysosome-associated proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP1 and LAMP2) as determined by both microscopy and Western blot analysis. The CDDP-resistant cells released more protein as exosomes and Western blot analysis revealed that these exosomes contained substantially more LAMP1 than those released by the CDDP-sensitive cells. Following loading of the whole cell with CDDP, the exosomes released from 2008/C13*5.25 cells contained 2.6-fold more platinum than those released from sensitive cells. Enhanced exosomal export was accompanied by higher exosomal levels of the putative CDDP export transporters MRP2, ATP7A, and ATP7B. Expression profiling identified significant increases in the expression of several genes whose products function in membrane fusion and vesicle trafficking. This study shows that the lysosomal compartment of human ovarian carcinoma cells selected for stable resistance to CDDP is markedly reduced in size, and that these cells abnormally sort some lysosomal proteins and the putative CDDP transporters into an exosomal pathway that also exports CDDP.

  11. Insight into the Mechanism of Human Herpesvirus 7 U21-mediated Diversion of Class I MHC Molecules to Lysosomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosson, Nicole L.; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A.; Schneider, Christine L.; Ristow, Laura C.; Wang, Qiuhong; Hudson, Amy W.

    2010-01-01

    The U21 open reading frame from human herpesvirus-7 encodes a membrane protein that associates with and redirects class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment. The mechanism by which U21 accomplishes this trafficking excursion is unknown. Here we have examined the contribution of localization, glycosylation, domain structure, and the absence of substrate class I MHC molecules on the ability of U21 to traffic to lysosomes. Our results suggest the existence of a cellular protein necessary for U21-mediated rerouting of class I MHC molecules. PMID:20833720

  12. Early involvement of lysosome dysfunction in the degeneration of cerebral cortical neurons caused by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi; Eitan, Erez; Mattson, Mark P

    2017-03-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA occurs in neurons during acute brain injuries and in neurodegenerative disorders. Membrane lipid peroxidation contributes to neuronal dysfunction and death, in part by disrupting neuronal ion homeostasis and cellular bioenergetics. Emerging findings suggest that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehyde produced during lipid peroxidation, impairs the function of various proteins involved in neuronal homeostasis. Here we tested the hypothesis that HNE impairs the cellular system that removes damaged proteins and organelles, the autophagy-lysosome pathway in rat primary cortical neurons. We found that HNE, at a concentration that causes apoptosis over a 48-72 h period, increases protein levels of LC3 II and p62 and within 1 and 4 h of exposure, respectively; LC3 II and p62 immunoreactive puncta were observed in the cytoplasm of HNE-treated neurons at 6 h. The extent of up-regulation of p62 and LC3 II in response to HNE was not affected by co-treatment with the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1, suggesting that the effects of HNE on autophagy were secondary to lysosome inhibition. Indeed, we found that neurons exposed to HNE exhibit elevated pH levels, and decreased protein substrate hydrolysis and cathepsin B activity. Neurons exposed to HNE also exhibited the accumulation of K63-linked polyubiquitinated proteins, which are substrates targeted for lysosomal degradation. Moreover, we found that the levels of LAMP2a and constitutively active heat-shock protein 70, and numbers of LAMP2a-positive lysosomes, are decreased in neurons exposed to HNE. Our findings demonstrate that the lipid peroxidation product HNE causes early impairment of lysosomes which may contribute to the accumulation of damaged and dysfunctional proteins and organelles and consequent neuronal death. Because impaired lysosome function is increasingly recognized as an early event in the neuronal death that occurs in neurodegenerative

  13. Den gode facilitator af refleksionsarbejde

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Pia

    2009-01-01

    tværfaglig lektorgruppe fra social og sundhedssektoren.’Learning by doing’, selvevaluering og sparring følger herefter som bud på, hvordan man kan leve op til de tilsyneladende ret utopiske krav til en god facilitator. At kunne skabe det tillidsfulde refleksionsrum og at kunne stille gode...... præsenteres i det følgende afsnit, og forfatteren argumenterer for begrebet facilitator af refleksionsarbejde. Herefter udfoldes rollen som facilitator ifølge Ghay og Lillyman. De har fokus på positive praksisoplevelser og tillidsfulde relationer. Gillie Boltons teoretiske og praktiske referenceramme...... for facilitatorrollen beskrives herefter. Bolton beskriver refleksionsarbejde som en fysisk (ikke ren kognitiv), passioneret (ikke ren intellektuel) kontekstbunden kunstnerisk proces, som kræver flair, stil og intuition. I de følgende afsnit beskrives den gode facilitator af refleksionsarbejde detaljeret af en...

  14. Facilitating Value Co-Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veith, Anne; Assaf, Albert; Josiassen, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    ) introduced a new dominant logic in the marketing literature, the Service-Dominant Logic (S-D Logic), in which service, interactions, and enhanced experiences help create value, and this potential for value is what attracts consumers. Therefore organizations must be customer-centric in order to facilitate...... unique, positive experiences. As the name indicates, both organizations and consumers (should) obtain value when co-creating, which is why both parties are willing to increase their degree of involvement, e.g. spending more resources, sharing tacit knowledge, etc., because a high degree of involvement....... Through an exploratory qualitative study, 9 facilitators for B2C value co-creation were uncovered. The study was set in the creative industries. The 9 facilitators are a combination of the main facilitators found in the literature review and the ones found through the empirical research. The 9...

  15. NOX2-Mediated TFEB Activation and Vacuolization Regulate Lysosome-Associated Cell Death Induced by Gypenoside L, a Saponin Isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Jiang, Yingchun; Liao, Chenghui; Hu, Xiaopeng; Li, Yan; Zeng, Yong; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Xuli; Wu, Haiqiang; Liu, Lizhong; Wang, Yifei; He, Zhendan

    2017-08-09

    Downregulation of apoptotic signal pathway and activation of protective autophagy mainly contribute to the chemoresistance of tumor cells. Therefore, exploring efficient chemotherapeutic agents or isolating novel natural products that can trigger nonapoptotic and nonautophagic cell death such as lysosome-associated death is emergently required. We have recently extracted a saponin, gypenoside L (Gyp-L), from Gynostemma pentaphyllum and showed that Gyp-L was able to induce nonapoptotic cell death of esophageal cancer cells associated with lysosome swelling. However, contributions of vacuolization and lysosome to cell death remain unclear. Herein, we reveal a critical role for NADPH oxidase NOX2-mediated vacuolization and transcription factor EB (TFEB) activation in lysosome-associated cell death. We found that Gyp-L initially induced the abnormal enlarged and alkalized vacuoles, which were derived from lipid rafts dependent endocytosis. Besides, NOX2 was activated to promote vacuolization and mTORC1-independent TFEB-mediated lysosome biogenesis. Finally, raising lysosome pH could enhance Gyp-L induced cell death. These findings suggest a protective role of NOX2-TFEB-mediated lysosome biogenesis in cancer drug resistance and the tight interaction between lipid rafts and vacuolization. In addition, Gyp-L can be utilized as an alternative option to overcome drug-resistance though inducing lysosome associated cell death.

  16. TPC1 has two variant isoforms, and their removal has different effects on endo-lysosomal functions compared to loss of TPC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruas, Margarida; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Davis, Lianne C; Al-Douri, Areej; Tynan, Patricia W; Tunn, Ruth; Teboul, Lydia; Galione, Antony; Parrington, John

    2014-11-01

    Organelle ion homeostasis within the endo-lysosomal system is critical for physiological functions. Two-pore channels (TPCs) are cation channels that reside in endo-lysosomal organelles, and overexpression results in endo-lysosomal trafficking defects. However, the impact of a lack of TPC expression on endo-lysosomal trafficking is unknown. Here, we characterize Tpcn1 expression in two transgenic mouse lines (Tpcn1(XG716) and Tpcn1(T159)) and show expression of a novel evolutionarily conserved Tpcn1B transcript from an alternative promoter, raising important questions regarding the status of Tpcn1 expression in mice recently described to be Tpcn1 knockouts. We show that the transgenic Tpcn1(T159) line lacks expression of both Tpcn1 isoforms in all tissues analyzed. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from Tpcn1(-/-) and Tpcn2(-/-) animals, we show that a lack of Tpcn1 or Tpcn2 expression has no significant impact on resting endo-lysosomal pH or morphology. However, differential effects in endo-lysosomal function were observed upon the loss of Tpcn1 or Tpcn2 expression; thus, while Tpcn1(-/-) MEFs have impaired trafficking of cholera toxin from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus, Tpcn2(-/-) MEFs show slower kinetics of ligand-induced platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) degradation, which is dependent on trafficking to lysosomes. Our findings indicate that TPC1 and TPC2 have important but distinct roles in the endo-lysosomal pathway.

  17. Impact of Solvent pH on Direct Immobilization of Lysosome-Related Cell Organelle Extracts on TiO₂ for Melanin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seung Hyuck; Kim, Pil; Oh, Suk-Jung; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2015-05-01

    Techniques for immobilizing effective enzymes on nanoparticles for stabilization of the activity of free enzymes have been developing as a pharmaceutical field. In this study, we examined the effect of three different pH conditions of phosphate buffer, as a dissolving solvent for lysosomal enzymes, on the direct immobilization of lysosomal enzymes extracted from Hen's egg white and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Titanium(IV) oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, which are extensively used in many research fields, were used in this study. The lysosomal enzymes immobilized on TiO2 under each pH condition were evaluated to maintain the specific activity of lysosomal enzymes, so that we can determine the degree of melanin treatment in lysosomal enzymes immobilized on TiO2. We found that the immobilization efficiency and melanin treatment activity in both lysosomal enzymes extracted from Hen's egg white and S. cerevisiae were the highest in an acidic condition of phosphate buffer (pH 4). However, the immobilization efficiency and melanin treatment activity were inversely proportional to the increase in pH under alkaline conditions. In addition, enhanced immobilization efficiency was shown in TiO2 pretreated with a divalent, positively charged ion, Ca(2+), and the melanin treatment activity of immobilized lysosomal enzymes on TiO2 pretreated with Ca(2+) was also increased. Therefore, this result suggests that the immobilization efficiency and melanin treatment activity of lysosomal enzymes can be enhanced according to the pH conditions of the dissolving solvent.

  18. Control of lysosomal biogenesis and Notch-dependent tissue patterning by components of the TFEB-V-ATPase axis in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tognon, Emiliana; Kobia, Francis; Busi, Ilaria;

    2016-01-01

    16-1 expression follows differentiation of proneural regions of the disc. These regions, that will form sensory organs in the adult, appear to possess a distinctive endo-lysosomal compartment and Notch (N) localization. Modulation of Mitf activity in the disc in vivo alters endo-lysosomal function...

  19. Urothelial endocytic vesicle recycling and lysosomal degradative pathway regulated by lipid membrane composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, E J; Calderón, R O

    2013-02-01

    The urothelium, a specialized epithelium that covers the mucosa cell surface of the urinary bladder, undergoes dramatic morphological changes during the micturition cycle that involve a membrane apical traffic. This traffic was first described as a lysosomal pathway, in addition to the known endocytosis/exocytosis membrane recycling. In an attempt to understand the role of membrane lipid composition in those effects, we previously described the lipid-dependent leakage of the endocytosed vesicle content. In this work, we demonstrated clear differences in the traffic of both the fluid probe and the membrane-bound probe in urothelial umbrella cells by using spectrofluorometry and/or confocal and epifluorescence microscopy. Different membrane lipid compositions were established by using three diet formulae enriched in oleic acid, linoleic acid and a commercial formula. Between three and five animals for each dietary treatment were used for each analysis. The decreased endocytosis of both fluid and membrane-bound probes (approximately 32 and 49 % lower, respectively) in oleic acid-derived umbrella cells was concomitant with an increased recycling (approximately 4.0 and 3.7 times, respectively) and diminished sorting to the lysosome (approximately 23 and 37 %, respectively) when compared with the control umbrella cells. The higher intravesicular pH and the impairment of the lysosomal pathway of oleic acid diet-derived vesicles compared to linoleic acid diet-derived vesicles and control diet-derived vesicles correlate with our findings of a lower V-ATPase activity previously reported. We integrated the results obtained in the present and previous work to determine the sorting of endocytosed material (fluid and membrane-bound probes) into the different cell compartments. Finally, the weighted average effect of the individual alterations on the intracellular distribution was evaluated. The results shown in this work add evidences for the modulatory role of the membrane

  20. Autophagy facilitates Salmonella replication in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong B; Croxen, Matthew A; Marchiando, Amanda M; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2014-03-11

    Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. IMPORTANCE As a host defense system, autophagy is known to target a population of Salmonella for degradation and hence restricting Salmonella replication. In contrast to this concept, a recent report showed that knockdown of Rab1, a GTPase required for autophagy of Salmonella, decreases Salmonella replication in HeLa cells. Here, we have reexamined the fate of Salmonella targeted by autophagy by various cell biology-based assays. We found that the association of autophagy components with cytosolic Salmonella increases shortly after initiation of intracellular bacterial replication. Furthermore, through a live-cell imaging method, a subset of cytosolic Salmonella was found to be extensively associated with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3, and they replicated quickly. Most importantly, depletion of autophagy components significantly reduced the replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells. Hence, in contrast to previous reports, we propose

  1. Constitutive expression of a COOH-terminal leucine mutant of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 causes its exclusive localization in low density intracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaki, Kenji; Shiotsu, Keiko; Michihara, Akihiro; Ide, Norie; Wada, Ikuo

    2014-07-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) is a type I transmembrane protein with a short cytoplasmic tail that possesses a lysosome-targeting signal of GYQTI(382)-COOH. Wild-type (WT)-LAMP-1 was exclusively localized in high density lysosomes, and efficiency of LAMP-1's transport to lysosomes depends on its COOH-terminal amino acid residue. Among many different COOH-terminal amino acid substitution mutants of LAMP-1, a leucine-substituted mutant (I382L) displays the most efficient targeting to late endosomes and lysosomes [Akasaki et al. (2010) J. Biochem. 148: , 669-679]. In this study, we generated two human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 cell lines) that stably express WT-LAMP-1 and I382L, and compared their intracellular distributions. The subcellular fractionation study using Percoll density gradient centrifugation revealed that WT-LAMP-1 had preferential localization in the high density secondary lysosomes where endogenous human LAMP-1 was enriched. In contrast, a major portion of I382L was located in a low density fraction. The low density fraction also contained approximately 80% of endogenous human LAMP-1 and significant amounts of endogenous β-glucuronidase and LAMP-2, which probably represents occurrence of low density lysosomes in the I382L-expressing cells. Double immunofluorescence microscopic analyses distinguished I382L-containing intracellular vesicles from endogenous LAMP-1-containing lysosomes and early endosomes. Altogether, constitutive expression of I382L causes its aberrant intracellular localization and generation of low density lysosomes, indicating that the COOH-terminal isoleucine is critical for normal localization of LAMP-1 in the dense lysosomes.

  2. Niemann-Pick C1 Functions Independently of Niemann-Pick C2 in the Initial Stage of Retrograde Transport of Membrane-impermeable Lysosomal Cargo*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Stephen D. B.; Krise, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    The rare neurodegenerative disease Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) results from mutations in either NPC1 or NPC2, which are membrane-bound and soluble lysosomal proteins, respectively. Previous studies have shown that mutations in either protein result in biochemically indistinguishable phenotypes, most notably the hyper-accumulation of cholesterol and other cargo in lysosomes. We comparatively evaluated the kinetics of [3H]dextran release from lysosomes of wild type, NPC1, NPC2, and NPC1/NPC2 pseudo-double mutant cells and found significant differences between all cell types examined. Specifically, NPC1 or NPC2 mutant fibroblasts treated with NPC1 or NPC2 siRNA (to create NPC1/NPC2 pseudo-double mutants) secreted dextran less efficiently than did either NPC1 or NPC2 single mutant cell lines, suggesting that the two proteins may work independently of one another in the egress of membrane-impermeable lysosomal cargo. To investigate the basis for these differences, we examined the role of NPC1 and NPC2 in the retrograde fusion of lysosomes with late endosomes to create so-called hybrid organelles, which is believed to be the initial step in the egress of cargo from lysosomes. We show here that cells with mutated NPC1 have significantly reduced rates of late endosome/lysosome fusion relative to wild type cells, whereas cells with mutations in NPC2 have rates that are similar to those observed in wild type cells. Instead of being involved in hybrid organelle formation, we show that NPC2 is required for efficient membrane fission events from nascent hybrid organelles, which is thought to be required for the reformation of lysosomes and the release of lysosomal cargo-containing membrane vesicles. Collectively, these results suggest that NPC1 and NPC2 can function independently of one another in the egress of certain membrane-impermeable lysosomal cargo. PMID:20007703

  3. Niemann-Pick C1 functions independently of Niemann-Pick C2 in the initial stage of retrograde transport of membrane-impermeable lysosomal cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Stephen D B; Krise, Jeffrey P

    2010-02-12

    The rare neurodegenerative disease Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) results from mutations in either NPC1 or NPC2, which are membrane-bound and soluble lysosomal proteins, respectively. Previous studies have shown that mutations in either protein result in biochemically indistinguishable phenotypes, most notably the hyper-accumulation of cholesterol and other cargo in lysosomes. We comparatively evaluated the kinetics of [(3)H]dextran release from lysosomes of wild type, NPC1, NPC2, and NPC1/NPC2 pseudo-double mutant cells and found significant differences between all cell types examined. Specifically, NPC1 or NPC2 mutant fibroblasts treated with NPC1 or NPC2 siRNA (to create NPC1/NPC2 pseudo-double mutants) secreted dextran less efficiently than did either NPC1 or NPC2 single mutant cell lines, suggesting that the two proteins may work independently of one another in the egress of membrane-impermeable lysosomal cargo. To investigate the basis for these differences, we examined the role of NPC1 and NPC2 in the retrograde fusion of lysosomes with late endosomes to create so-called hybrid organelles, which is believed to be the initial step in the egress of cargo from lysosomes. We show here that cells with mutated NPC1 have significantly reduced rates of late endosome/lysosome fusion relative to wild type cells, whereas cells with mutations in NPC2 have rates that are similar to those observed in wild type cells. Instead of being involved in hybrid organelle formation, we show that NPC2 is required for efficient membrane fission events from nascent hybrid organelles, which is thought to be required for the reformation of lysosomes and the release of lysosomal cargo-containing membrane vesicles. Collectively, these results suggest that NPC1 and NPC2 can function independently of one another in the egress of certain membrane-impermeable lysosomal cargo.

  4. Concanavalin A/IFN-gamma triggers autophagy-related necrotic hepatocyte death through IRGM1-mediated lysosomal membrane disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Chang

    Full Text Available Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, a potent Th1 cytokine with multiple biological functions, can induce autophagy to enhance the clearance of the invading microorganism or cause cell death. We have reported that Concanavalin A (Con A can cause autophagic cell death in hepatocytes and induce both T cell-dependent and -independent acute hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, respectively. Although IFN-γ is known to enhance liver injury in Con A-induced hepatitis, its role in autophagy-related hepatocyte death is not clear. In this study we report that IFN-γ can enhance Con A-induced autophagic flux and cell death in hepatoma cell lines. A necrotic cell death with increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP is observed in Con A-treated hepatoma cells in the presence of IFN-γ. Cathepsin B and L were released from lysosomes to cause cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ induces immunity related GTPase family M member 1(IRGM1 translocation to lysosomes and prolongs its activity in Con A-treated hepatoma cells. Knockdown of IRGM1 inhibits the IFN-γ/Con A-induced LMP change and cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ(-/- mice are resistant to Con A-induced autophagy-associated necrotic hepatocyte death. We conclude that IFN-γ enhances Con A-induced autophagic flux and causes an IRGM1-dependent lysosome-mediated necrotic cell death in hepatocytes.

  5. Lysosomal localization of TRPML3 depends on TRPML2 and the mucolipidosis-associated protein TRPML1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hofmann, Thomas; Montell, Craig

    2006-06-23

    Mucolipidosis type IV is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurodegeneration, achlorhydria, and visual impairments such as corneal opacity and strabismus. The disease arises due to mutations in a group 2 transient receptor potential (TRP)-related cation channel, TRPML1. Mammals encode two additional TRPML proteins named TRPML2 and TRPML3. Information regarding the propensity of these proteins to multimerize, their subcellular distribution and mechanisms that regulate their trafficking are limited. Here we demonstrate that TRPMLs interact to form homo- and heteromultimers. Moreover, the presence of either TRPML1 or TRPML2 specifically influences the spatial distribution of TRPML3. TRPML1 and TRPML2 homomultimers are lysosomal proteins, whereas TRPML3 homomultimers are in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, TRPML3 localizes to lysosomes when coexpressed with either TRPML1 or TRPML2 and is comparably mislocalized when lysosomal targeting of TRPML1 and TRPML2 is disrupted. Conversely, TRPML3 does not cause retention of TRPML1 or TRPML2 in the endoplasmic reticulum. These data demonstrate that there is a hierarchy controlling the subcellular distributions of the TRPMLs such that TRPML1 and TRPML2 dictate the localization of TRPML3 and not vice versa.

  6. Assembly of BODIPY-carbazole dyes with liposomes to fabricate fluorescent nanoparticles for lysosomal bioimaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hai-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Tai; Wang, Shu; Xing, Guo-Wen

    2017-01-31

    Two BODIPY-carbazole dye based fluorescent probes BCA and BCAS were designed, synthesized and encapsulated by liposomes to obtain fluorescent nanoparticles BCA-FNP and BCAS-FNP. The fluorescence imaging showed that BCA-FNP was membrane-permeable and capable of localizing lysosomes in living cells.

  7. Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extract, aucubin, and geniposide enhance lysosomal activity to regulate ER stress and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Eucommia ulmoides Oliver is a natural product widely used as a dietary supplement and medicinal plant. Here, we examined the potential regulatory effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extracts (EUE on hepatic dyslipidemia and its related mechanisms by in vitro and in vivo studies. EUE and its two active constituents, aucubin and geniposide, inhibited palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, reducing hepatic lipid accumulation through secretion of apolipoprotein B and associated triglycerides and cholesterol in human HepG2 hepatocytes. To determine how EUE diminishes the ER stress response, lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation activities were analyzed. Although proteasomal activity was not affected, lysosomal enzyme activities including V-ATPase were significantly increased by EUE as well as aucubin and geniposide in HepG2 cells. Treatment with the V-ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin, reversed the inhibition of ER stress, secretion of apolipoprotein B, and hepatic lipid accumulation induced by EUE or its component, aucubin or geniposide. In addition, EUE was determined to regulate hepatic dyslipidemia by enhancing lysosomal activity and to regulate ER stress in rats fed a high-fat diet. Together, these results suggest that EUE and its active components enhance lysosomal activity, resulting in decreased ER stress and hepatic dyslipidemia.

  8. Partial restoration of mutant enzyme homeostasis in three distinct lysosomal storage disease cell lines by altering calcium homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Wei Mu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A lysosomal storage disease (LSD results from deficient lysosomal enzyme activity, thus the substrate of the mutant enzyme accumulates in the lysosome, leading to pathology. In many but not all LSDs, the clinically most important mutations compromise the cellular folding of the enzyme, subjecting it to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation instead of proper folding and lysosomal trafficking. A small molecule that restores partial mutant enzyme folding, trafficking, and activity would be highly desirable, particularly if one molecule could ameliorate multiple distinct LSDs by virtue of its mechanism of action. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels, using either diltiazem or verapamil-both US Food and Drug Administration-approved hypertension drugs-partially restores N370S and L444P glucocerebrosidase homeostasis in Gaucher patient-derived fibroblasts; the latter mutation is associated with refractory neuropathic disease. Diltiazem structure-activity studies suggest that it is its Ca2+ channel blocker activity that enhances the capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum to fold misfolding-prone proteins, likely by modest up-regulation of a subset of molecular chaperones, including BiP and Hsp40. Importantly, diltiazem and verapamil also partially restore mutant enzyme homeostasis in two other distinct LSDs involving enzymes essential for glycoprotein and heparan sulfate degradation, namely alpha-mannosidosis and type IIIA mucopolysaccharidosis, respectively. Manipulation of calcium homeostasis may represent a general strategy to restore protein homeostasis in multiple LSDs. However, further efforts are required to demonstrate clinical utility and safety.

  9. The autophagy/lysosome pathway is impaired in SCA7 patients and SCA7 knock-in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, Sandro; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Marinello, Martina; Marais, Thibaut; Muriel, Marie-Paule; Beaumatin, Florian; Charbonnier-Beaupel, Fanny; Tahiri, Khadija; Seilhean, Danielle; El Hachimi, Khalid; Ruberg, Merle; Stevanin, Giovanni; Barkats, Martine; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Priault, Muriel; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Sittler, Annie

    2014-01-01

    There is still no treatment for polyglutamine disorders, but clearance of mutant proteins might represent a potential therapeutic strategy. Autophagy, the major pathway for organelle and protein turnover, has been implicated in these diseases. To determine whether the autophagy/lysosome system

  10. Actin-binding protein coronin 1A controls osteoclastic bone resorption by regulating lysosomal secretion of cathepsin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Saori; Noma, Naruto; Toyomoto, Masayasu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Takeiri, Masatoshi; Fuji, Hiroaki; Takemoto, Kenji; Iwaisako, Keiko; Fujita, Tomoko; Takeda, Norihiko; Kawatani, Makoto; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Asagiri, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix proteins via the secretion of lysosomal enzymes. However, the precise mechanisms by which lysosomal components are transported and fused to the bone-apposed plasma membrane, termed ruffled border membrane, remain elusive. Here, we identified coronin 1A as a negative regulator of exocytotic release of cathepsin K, one of the most important bone-degrading enzymes in osteoclasts. The modulation of coronin 1A expression did not alter osteoclast differentiation and extracellular acidification, but strongly affected the secretion of cathepsin K and osteoclast bone-resorption activity, suggesting the coronin 1A-mediated regulation of lysosomal trafficking and protease exocytosis. Further analyses suggested that coronin 1A prevented the lipidation-mediated sorting of the autophagy-related protein LC3 to the ruffled border and attenuated lysosome–plasma membrane fusion. In this process, the interactions between coronin 1A and actin were crucial. Collectively, our findings indicate that coronin 1A is a pivotal component that regulates lysosomal fusion and the secretion pathway in osteoclast-lineage cells and may provide a novel therapeutic target for bone diseases. PMID:28300073

  11. Sorting of ligand-activated epidermal growth factor receptor to lysosomes requires its actin-binding domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, W; Kerstens, S; Fritzsche, I; den Hartigh, JC; Oud, R; van der Heyden, MAG; Henegouwen, PMPVE

    2004-01-01

    Ligand-induced down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) comprises activation of two sequential transport steps. The first involves endocytic uptake by clathrin-coated vesicles, the second transfer of endocytosed EGFR from endosomes to lysosomes. Here we demonstrate that the sec

  12. Discovery of Small Molecules That Induce Lysosomal Cell Death in Cancer Cell Lines Using an Image-Based Screening Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliero, Romina J; D'Astolfo, Diego S; Lelieveld, Daphne; Pratiwi, Riyona D; Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja; Martin, Nathaniel I; Klumperman, Judith; Egan, David A

    2016-01-01

    The lysosomal cell death (LCD) pathway is a caspase 3-independent cell death pathway that has been suggested as a possible target for cancer therapy, making the development of sensitive and specific high-throughput (HT) assays to identify LCD inducers highly desirable. In this study, we report a two

  13. Nuclear morphology and lysosomal stability of molluskan hemocytes as possible biomarkers of arsenic toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Sudipta [Post Graduate Department of Zoology, Parasitology and Medical Entomology Laboratory, Darjeeling Government College, Darjeeling (India); Ray, Sajal [Department of Zoology, Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory, University of Calcutta, Kolkata (India)

    2009-10-15

    The frequency of nuclear aberrations and neutral red retention time of hemocytes in the mollusk Lamellidens marginalis were recorded under exposure to sublethal concentrations of sodium arsenite in order to examine the sensitivity and effectiveness of these inexpensive assays for screening the toxicity of As{sup 3+}in a freshwater ecosystem. A dose and time dependent increase in the density of micronucleated and binucleated hemocytes and gill cells was indicative of the pronounced genotoxic effect of arsenic on this animal. The disruption of intrahemocyte homeostasis imposed by this natural toxicant was evident from a dose and time dependent reduction in the lysosomal stability of the hemocytes of the animal. The tested parameters are indicative of arsenic toxicity in L. marginalis in the freshwater systems of the arsenic affected geographical areas of West Bengal, India. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. The Underexploited Role of Non-Coding RNAs in Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Matheus Trovão; Pereira, Vanessa Gonçalves; do Nascimento, Cinthia Castro; D’Almeida, Vânia

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a functional class of RNA involved in the regulation of several cellular processes which may modulate disease onset, progression, and prognosis. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are a group of rare disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding specific hydrolases or non-enzymatic proteins, characterized by a wide spectrum of manifestations. The alteration of ncRNA levels is well established in several human diseases such as cancer and auto-immune disorders; however, there is a lack of information focused on the role of ncRNA in rare diseases. Recent reports related to changes in ncRNA expression and its consequences on LSD physiopathology show us the importance to keep advancing in this field. This article will summarize recent findings and provide key points for further studies on LSD and ncRNA association. PMID:27708618

  15. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Christensen, Karina; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte

    , the aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of LAMP-1, a membrane bound protein in lysosomes, in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumor tissue from 23 diffuse astrocytomas, 17 anaplastic astrocytomas and 72 glioblastomas. The LAMP-1 expression was scored and compared...... with both tumor grade and patient survival. Moreover double immunofluorescence stainings with LAMP-1 and the stem cell marker CD133 as well as the macrophage marker CD68 were performed. The results showed that LAMP-1 was expressed in the vast majority of tumors being present in the cytoplasm of single tumor...... cells, cell clusters and in blood vessel endothelial cells. The LAMP-1 expression in glioblastomas was significantly higher than in diffuse and anaplastic astrocytomas (pLAMP-1 and patient overall survival was found. Double immunofluorescence staining...

  16. [Lysosomal proteinasen and peptidasen in serum of children with inflammatory diseases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, W; Huth, E; Herrmann, H

    1976-08-01

    In the serum of 43 children the activities of proteinases and peptidases by mean of 41 substrates have been determined in order to get knowledge of overall activities and differentiation of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes. Proteinases, cathepsins A, B, C and D, aminopeptidases, carboxypeptidases, dipeptidases, tripeptidases and aminoacidarylamidases have been checked. The enzyme pattern of the serum of a collective of 15 healthy children or those without serious clinical signs is demonstrated, also the alterations and differentiations in the serum of children with leucemia, pneumonia, inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract, other inflammatory diseases and common diseases. Leucyl-glycyl-glycyltripeptidase, glycyl-glycyl-glycyltripeptidase, a proteosterase, carboxypeptidase A, a neutrale proteinase and basic proteinase (cathepsin B) and cathepsin C are increased. A distinct elevation has been found only in children with leucemia and pneumonia.

  17. C. elegans major fats are stored in vesicles distinct from lysosome-related organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Eyleen J; Soukas, Alexander A; Carr, Christopher E; Ruvkun, Gary

    2009-11-01

    Genetic conservation allows ancient features of fat storage endocrine pathways to be explored in C. elegans. Multiple studies have used Nile red or BODIPY-labeled fatty acids to identify regulators of fat mass. When mixed with their food, E. coli bacteria, Nile red, and BODIPY-labeled fatty acids stain multiple spherical cellular structures in the C. elegans major fat storage organ, the intestine. However, here we demonstrate that, in the conditions previously reported, the lysosome-related organelles stained by Nile red and BODIPY-labeled fatty acids are not the C. elegans major fat storage compartment. We show that the major fat stores are contained in a distinct cellular compartment that is not stained by Nile red. Using biochemical assays, we validate oil red O staining as a method to assess major fat stores in C. elegans, allowing for efficient and accurate genetic and functional genomic screens for genes that control fat accumulation at the organismal level.

  18. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine S; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Christensen, Karina G

    2013-01-01

    astrocytomas and compared with tumor grade and overall patient survival. Moreover, double immunofluorescence stainings were performed with LAMP-1 and the astrocytic marker GFAP and the putative stem cell marker CD133 on ten glioblastomas. Most tumors expressed the LAMP-1 protein in the cytoplasm of the tumor...... cells, while the blood vessels were positive in all tumors. The percentage of LAMP-1 positive tumor cells and staining intensities increased with tumor grade but variations in tumors of the same grade were also found. No association was found between LAMP-1 expression and patient overall survival......Targeting of lysosomes is a novel therapeutic anti-cancer strategy for killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Such strategies are urgently needed for treatment of brain tumors, especially the glioblastoma, which is the most frequent and most malignant type. The aim of the present...

  19. The clinical spectrum and pathophysiology of skeletal complications in lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Lorne A; Hollak, Carla E M

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders affect multiple organs including the skeleton. Disorders with prominent skeletal symptoms are type 1 and 3 Gaucher disease, the mucopolysaccharidoses, the glycoproteinoses and pycnodysostosis. Clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic radiographical evidence of bone pathology to overt bone crises (Gaucher), short stature with typical imaging features known as dysostosis multiplex (MPS), with spine and joint deformities (mucopolysaccharidoses, mucolipidosis), or osteopetrosis with pathological fractures (pynodysostosis). The pathophysiology of skeletal disease is only partially understood and involves direct substrate storage, inflammation and other complex alterations of cartilage and bone metabolism. Current treatments are enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, effects of these interventions on skeletal disease manifestations are less well established and outcomes are highly dependent on disease burden at treatment initiation. It is now clear that adjunctive treatments that target skeletal disease are needed and should be part of future research agenda.

  20. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  1. The Underexploited Role of Non-Coding RNAs in Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Matheus Trovão; Pereira, Vanessa Gonçalves; do Nascimento, Cinthia Castro; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a functional class of RNA involved in the regulation of several cellular processes which may modulate disease onset, progression, and prognosis. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are a group of rare disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding specific hydrolases or non-enzymatic proteins, characterized by a wide spectrum of manifestations. The alteration of ncRNA levels is well established in several human diseases such as cancer and auto-immune disorders; however, there is a lack of information focused on the role of ncRNA in rare diseases. Recent reports related to changes in ncRNA expression and its consequences on LSD physiopathology show us the importance to keep advancing in this field. This article will summarize recent findings and provide key points for further studies on LSD and ncRNA association.

  2. Structure and function of lysosomal phospholipase A2 and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhova, Alisa; Hinkovska-Galcheva, Vania; Kelly, Robert; Abe, Akira; Shayman, James A.; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) belong to a structurally uncharacterized family of key lipid-metabolizing enzymes responsible for lung surfactant catabolism and for reverse cholesterol transport, respectively. Whereas LPLA2 is predicted to underlie the development of drug-induced phospholipidosis, somatic mutations in LCAT cause fish eye disease and familial LCAT deficiency. Here we describe several high-resolution crystal structures of human LPLA2 and a low-resolution structure of LCAT that confirms its close structural relationship to LPLA2. Insertions in the α/β hydrolase core of LPLA2 form domains that are responsible for membrane interaction and binding the acyl chains and head groups of phospholipid substrates. The LCAT structure suggests the molecular basis underlying human disease for most of the known LCAT missense mutations, and paves the way for rational development of new therapeutics to treat LCAT deficiency, atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome.

  3. A role for the deep orange and carnation eye color genes in lysosomal delivery in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevrioukov, E A; He, J P; Moghrabi, N; Sunio, A; Krämer, H

    1999-10-01

    Deep orange and carnation are two of the classic eye color genes in Drosophila. Here, we demonstrate that Deep orange is part of a protein complex that localizes to endosomal compartments. A second component of this complex is Carnation, a homolog of Sec1p-like regulators of membrane fusion. Because complete loss of deep orange function is lethal, the role of this complex in intracellular trafficking was analyzed in deep orange mutant clones. Retinal cells devoid of deep orange function completely lacked pigmentation and exhibited exaggerated multivesicular structures. Furthermore, a defect in endocytic trafficking was visualized in developing photoreceptor cells. These results provide direct evidence that eye color mutations of the granule group also disrupt vesicular trafficking to lysosomes.

  4. Matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus blocks autophagosome fusion with lysosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gannagé, Monique; Dormann, Dorothee; Albrecht, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an important human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality every year and threatening the human population with epidemics and pandemics. Therefore, it is important to understand the biology of this virus to develop strategies to control its pathogenicity. Here, we...... demonstrate that influenza A virus inhibits macroautophagy, a cellular process known to be manipulated by diverse pathogens. Influenza A virus infection causes accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking their fusion with lysosomes, and one viral protein, matrix protein 2, is necessary and sufficient...... for this inhibition of autophagosome degradation. Macroautophagy inhibition by matrix protein 2 compromises survival of influenza virus-infected cells but does not influence viral replication. We propose that influenza A virus, which also encodes proapoptotic proteins, is able to determine the death of its host cell...

  5. Facilitation as a Governance Strategy: Unravelling Governments’ Facilitation Frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Grotenbreg (Sanne); M.W. van Buuren (Arwin)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGovernments increasingly choose facilitation as a strategy to entice others to produce public goods and services, including in relation to the realisation of sustainable energy innovations. An important instrument to implement this governance strategy is discursive framing. To learn how

  6. Facilitation as a governance strategy: Unravelling governments' facilitation frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenbreg, S. (Sanne); M.W. van Buuren (Arwin)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGovernments increasingly choose facilitation as a strategy to entice others to produce public goods and services, including in relation to the realisation of sustainable energy innovations. An important instrument to implement this governance strategy is discursive framing. To learn how

  7. Debra, a protein mediating lysosomal degradation, is required for long-term memory in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Benjamin; Lampin-Saint-Amaux, Aurélie; Comas, Daniel; Preat, Thomas; Goguel, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    A central goal of neuroscience is to understand how neural circuits encode memory and guide behavior changes. Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying memory are conserved from flies to mammals, and Drosophila has been used extensively to study memory processes. To identify new genes involved in long-term memory, we screened Drosophila enhancer-trap P(Gal4) lines showing Gal4 expression in the mushroom bodies, a specialized brain structure involved in olfactory memory. This screening led to the isolation of a memory mutant that carries a P-element insertion in the debra locus. debra encodes a protein involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway as a mediator of protein degradation by the lysosome. To study debra's role in memory, we achieved debra overexpression, as well as debra silencing mediated by RNA interference. Experiments conducted with a conditional driver that allowed us to specifically restrict transgene expression in the adult mushroom bodies led to a long-term memory defect. Several conclusions can be drawn from these results: i) debra levels must be precisely regulated to support normal long-term memory, ii) the role of debra in this process is physiological rather than developmental, and iii) debra is specifically required for long-term memory, as it is dispensable for earlier memory phases. Drosophila long-term memory is the only long-lasting memory phase whose formation requires de novo protein synthesis, a process underlying synaptic plasticity. It has been shown in several organisms that regulation of proteins at synapses occurs not only at translation level of but also via protein degradation, acting in remodeling synapses. Our work gives further support to a role of protein degradation in long-term memory, and suggests that the lysosome plays a role in this process.

  8. Singlet oxygen mediated apoptosis by anthrone involving lysosomes and mitochondria at ambient UV exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujtaba, Syed Faiz [Photobiology Division, (CSIR)-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); College of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pt. B.D.S University of Health Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana (India); Dwivedi, Ashish; Yadav, Neera [Photobiology Division, (CSIR)-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ray, R.S., E-mail: ratanray.2011@rediffmail.com [Photobiology Division, (CSIR)-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Singh, Gajendra [College of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pt. B.D.S University of Health Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana (India)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Photomodi