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Sample records for a3 adenosine receptor

  1. Mast cell adenosine receptors function: a focus on the A3 adenosine receptor and inflammation

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    Noam eRudich

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells, as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b and A3 of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in mast cells, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human mast cells. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed.

  2. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

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    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Adenosine A3 receptor activation is neuroprotective against retinal neurodegeneration.

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    Galvao, Joana; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cordeiro, M Francesca; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Death of retinal neural cells, namely retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is a characteristic of several retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Although the role of adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) in neuroprotection is controversial, A3R activation has been reported to afford protection against several brain insults, with few studies in the retina. In vitro models (retinal neural and organotypic cultures) and animal models [ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) and partial optic nerve transection (pONT)] were used to study the neuroprotective properties of A3R activation against retinal neurodegeneration. The A3R selective agonist (2-Cl-IB-MECA, 1 μM) prevented apoptosis (TUNEL(+)-cells) induced by kainate and cyclothiazide (KA + CTZ) in retinal neural cultures (86.5 ± 7.4 and 37.2 ± 6.1 TUNEL(+)-cells/field, in KA + CTZ and KA + CTZ + 2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively). In retinal organotypic cultures, 2-Cl-IB-MECA attenuated NMDA-induced cell death, assessed by TUNEL (17.3 ± 2.3 and 8.3 ± 1.2 TUNEL(+)-cells/mm(2) in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) and PI incorporation (ratio DIV4/DIV2 3.3 ± 0.3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) assays. Intravitreal 2-Cl-IB-MECA administration afforded protection against I-R injury decreasing the number of TUNEL(+) cells by 72%, and increased RGC survival by 57%. Also, intravitreal administration of 2-Cl-IB-MECA inhibited apoptosis (from 449.4 ± 37.8 to 207.6 ± 48.9 annexin-V(+)-cells) and RGC loss (from 1.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 1.7 cells/mm) induced by pONT. This study demonstrates that 2-Cl-IB-MECA is neuroprotective to the retina, both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of A3R may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by RGC death, as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, and ischemic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adenosine A(3) receptor-induced CCL2 synthesis in cultured mouse astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittendorp, MC; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, K

    During neuropathological conditions, high concentrations of adenosine are released, stimulating adenosine receptors in neurons and glial cells. It has recently been shown that stimulation of adenosine receptors in glial cells induces the release of neuroprotective substances such as NGF, S-100beta,

  5. Synthesis of novel apio carbocyclic nucleoside analogues as selective a(3) adenosine receptor agonists.

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    Lee, Jeong A; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Kim, Hea Ok; Kim, Kyung Ran; Lee, Kang Man; Kim, Bum Tae; Hwang, Ki Jun; Chun, Moon Woo; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Jeong, Lak Shin

    2005-06-24

    On the basis of the biological activity of neplanocin A and apio-dideoxyadenosine (apio-ddA), novel apio-neplanocin A analogues 5a-d, combining the properties of two nucleosides, were stereoselectively synthesized. The apio moiety of the target nucleosides 5a-d was stereoselectively introduced by treating lactol 10 with 37% formaldehyde in the presence of potassium carbonate. The carbasugar moiety of neplanocin A was successively built by exposing diene 12 on a Grubbs catalyst in methylene chloride. The final nucleosides 5a-d were synthesized from the condensation of the glycosyl donor 14 with nucleic bases under the standard Mitsunobu conditions. Similarly, apio-aristeromycin 6 and (N)-apio-methanocarbaadenosine 7 were derived from the common intermediate 13 using catalytic hydrogenation and Simmons-Smith cyclopropanation as key steps. All of the final nucleosides 5a-d, 6, and 7 did not show significant inhibitory activity against S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAH) up to 100 muM, maybe due to the absence of the secondary hydroxyl group at the C3'-position, which should be oxidized by cofactor-bound NAD(+). However, apio-neplanocin A (5a) showed potent and highly selective binding affinity (K(i) = 628 +/- 69 nM) at the A(3) adenosine receptor without any binding affinity at the A(1) and A(2A) adenosine receptors. In conclusion, we have first developed novel carbocyclic nucleosides with unnatural apio-carbasugars using stereoselective hydroxymethylation and RCM reaction and also discovered a new template of human A(3) adenosine receptor agonist, which play a great role in developing new A(3) adenosine receptor agonist as well as in identifying the binding site of the receptor.

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of N6-Substituted Apioadenosines as Potential Adenosine A3 Receptor Modulators

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    Toti, Kiran S.; Moss, Steven M.; Paoletta, Silvia; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) trigger signal transduction pathways inside the cell when activated by extracellular adenosine. Selective modulation of the A3AR subtype may be beneficial in controlling diseases such as colorectal cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of β-D-apio-D-furano- and α-D-apio-L-furanoadenosines and derivatives thereof. Introduction of a 2-methoxy-5-chlorobenzyl group at N6 of β-D-apio-D-furanoadenosine afforded an A3AR antagonist (10c, Ki = 0.98 μM), while a similar modification of an α-D-apio-L-furanoadenosine gave rise to a partial agonist (11c, Ki = 3.07 μM). The structural basis for this difference was examined by docking to an A3AR model; the antagonist lacked a crucial interaction with Thr94. PMID:24931275

  7. Structural determinants of efficacy at A3 adenosine receptors: modification of the ribose moiety.

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    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jeong, Lak Shin; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Kim, Hea Ok; Choi, Won Jun; Shin, Dae Hong; Elhalem, Eleonora; Comin, Maria J; Melman, Neli; Mamedova, Liaman; Gross, Ariel S; Rodriguez, Juan B; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2004-03-01

    We have found previously that structural features of adenosine derivatives, particularly at the N6- and 2-positions of adenine, determine the intrinsic efficacy as A3 adenosine receptor (AR) agonists. Here, we have probed this phenomenon with respect to the ribose moiety using a series of ribose-modified adenosine derivatives, examining binding affinity and activation of the human A3 AR expressed in CHO cells. Both 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups in the ribose moiety contribute to A3 AR binding and activation, with 2'-OH being more essential. Thus, the 2'-fluoro substitution eliminated both binding and activation, while a 3'-fluoro substitution led to only a partial reduction of potency and efficacy at the A3 AR. A 5'-uronamide group, known to restore full efficacy in other derivatives, failed to fully overcome the diminished efficacy of 3'-fluoro derivatives. The 4'-thio substitution, which generally enhanced A3 AR potency and selectivity, resulted in 5'-CH2OH analogues (10 and 12) which were partial agonists of the A3 AR. Interestingly, the shifting of the N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenine moiety from the 1'- to 4'-position had a minor influence on A3 AR selectivity, but transformed 15 into a potent antagonist (16) (Ki = 4.3 nM). Compound 16 antagonized human A3 AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP with a K(B) value of 3.0 nM. A novel apio analogue (20) of neplanocin A, was a full A3 AR agonist. The affinities of selected, novel analogues at rat ARs were examined, revealing species differences. In summary, critical structural determinants for human A3 AR activation have been identified, which should prove useful for further understanding the mechanism of receptor activation and development of more potent and selective full agonists, partial agonists and antagonists for A3 ARs.

  8. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A3 Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding

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    Antonella Ciancetta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR subtypes, termed A1, A2A, A2B and A3, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily. The human A3AR (hA3AR subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA3AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure–activity relationships (SARs of newly emerged A3AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A3AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates.

  9. A3 Adenosine Receptors Modulate Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1a Expression in Human A375 Melanoma Cells

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    Stefania Merighi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is a key regulator of genes crucial to many aspects of cancer biology. The purine nucleoside, adenosine, accumulates within many tissues under hypoxic conditions, including that of tumors. Because the levels of both HIF-1 and adenosine are elevated within the hypoxic environment of solid tumors, we investigated whether adenosine may regulate HIF-1. Here we show that, under hypoxic conditions (< 2% 02, adenosine upregulates HIF-1α protein expression in a dose-dependent and timedependent manner, exclusively through the A3 receptor subtype. The response to adenosine was generated at the cell surface because the inhibition of A3 receptor expression, by using small interfering RNA, abolished nucleoside effects. A3 receptor stimulation in hypoxia also increases angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2 protein accumulation through the induction of HIF-1α. In particular, we found that A3 receptor stimulation activates p44/p42 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which are required for A3-induced increase of HIF-1a and Ang-2. Collectively, these results suggest a cooperation between hypoxic and adenosine signals that ultimately may lead to the increase in HIF-1-mediated effects in cancer cells.

  10. Adenosine A3 Receptor Suppresses Prostate Cancer Metastasis by Inhibiting NADPH Oxidase Activity

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    Sarvesh Jajoo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed and second most lethal malignancy in men, due mainly to a lack of effective treatment for the metastatic disease. A number of recent studies have shown that activation of the purine nucleoside receptor, adenosine A3 receptor (A3AR, attenuates proliferation of melanoma, colon, and prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we determined whether activation of the A3AR reduces the ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in vitro and metastasize in vivo. Using severe combined immunodeficient mice, we show that proliferation and metastasis of AT6.1 rat prostate cancer cells were decreased by the administration of A3AR agonist N6-(3-iodobenzyl adenosine-5′-N-methyluronamide. In vitro studies show that activation of A3AR decreased high basal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase activity present in these cells, along with the expression of Rac1 and p47phox subunits of this enzyme. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity by the dominant-negative RacN17 or short interfering (siRNA against p47phox reduced both the generation of reactive oxygen species and the invasion of these cells on Matrigel. In addition, we show that membrane association of p47phox and activation of NADPH oxidase is dependent on the activity of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. We also provide evidence that A3AR inhibits ERK1/2 activity in prostate cancer cells through inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A. We conclude that activation of the A3AR in prostate cancer cells reduces protein kinase A-mediated stimulation of ERK1/2, leading to reduced NADPH oxidase activity and cancer cell invasiveness.

  11. Hide and seek: a comparative autoradiographic in vitro investigation of the adenosine A3 receptor

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    Haeusler, D.; Fuchshuber, F.; Girschele, F.; Hacker, M.; Wadsak, W.; Mitterhauser, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Grassinger, L. [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Department of Biomedical Analytics, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Hoerleinsberger, W.J. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Cognitive Science Research Platform, Vienna (Austria); Hoeftberger, R.; Leisser, I. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Shanab, K.; Spreitzer, H. [University of Vienna, Department of Drug and Natural Product Synthesis, Vienna (Austria); Gerdenitsch, W. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Biomedicinal Research, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    Since the adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) is considered to be of high clinical importance in the diagnosis and treatment of ischaemic conditions (heart and brain), glaucoma, asthma, arthritis, cancer and inflammation, a suitable and selective A3R PET tracer such as [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY would be of high clinical value for clinicians as well as patients. A3R was discovered in the late 1990s, but there is still little known regarding its distribution in the CNS and periphery. Hence, in autoradiographic experiments the distribution of A3R in human brain and rat tissues was investigated and the specific binding of the A3R antagonist FE rate at SUPPY and MRS1523 compared. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) experiments were also performed to validate the autoradiographic findings. For autoradiographic competition experiments human post-mortem brain and rat tissues were incubated with [{sup 125}I]AB-MECA and highly selective compounds to block the other adenosine receptor subtypes. Additionally, IHC was performed with an A3 antibody. Specific A3R binding of MRS1523 and FE rate at SUPPY was found in all rat peripheral tissues examined with the highest amounts in the spleen (44.0 % and 46.4 %), lung (44.5 % and 45.0 %), heart (39.9 % and 42.9 %) and testes (27.4 % and 29.5 %, respectively). Low amounts of A3R were found in rat brain tissues (5.9 % and 5.6 %, respectively) and human brain tissues (thalamus 8.0 % and 9.1 %, putamen 7.8 % and 8.2 %, cerebellum 6.0 % and 7.8 %, hippocampus 5.7 % and 5.6 %, caudate nucleus 4.9 % and 6.4 %, cortex 4.9 % and 6.3 %, respectively). The outcome of the A3 antibody staining experiments complemented the results of the autoradiographic experiments. The presence of A3R protein was verified in central and peripheral tissues by autoradiography and IHC. The specificity and selectivity of FE rate at SUPPY was confirmed by direct comparison with MRS1523, providing further evidence that [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY may be a suitable A3 PET

  12. Triazoloquinazolines as Human A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: A QSAR Study

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    Dae-Sil Lee

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple linear regression analysis was performed on the quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR of the triazoloquinazoline adenosine antagonists for human A3receptors. The data set used for the QSAR analysis encompassed the activities of 33triazoloquinazoline derivatives and 72 physicochemical descriptors. A template moleculewas derived using the known molecular structure for one of the compounds when bound tothe human A2B receptor, in which the amide bond was in a cis-conformation. All the testcompounds were aligned to the template molecule. In order to identify a reasonable QSARequation to describe the data set, we developed a multiple linear regression program thatexamined every possible combination of descriptors. The QSAR equation derived from thisanalysis indicates that the spatial and electronic effects is greater than that of hydrophobiceffects in binding of the antagonists to the human A3 receptor. It also predicts that a largesterimol length parameter is advantageous to activity, whereas large sterimol widthparameters and fractional positive partial surface areas are nonadvatageous.

  13. Structure-Activity Analysis of Biased Agonism at the Human Adenosine A3 Receptor.

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    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Paoletta, Silvia; Nguyen, Anh T N; Gregory, Karen J; Tosh, Dilip K; Christopoulos, Arthur; Jacobson, Kenneth A; May, Lauren T

    2016-07-01

    Biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has significant implications for current drug discovery, but molecular determinants that govern ligand bias remain largely unknown. The adenosine A3 GPCR (A3AR) is a potential therapeutic target for various conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and ischemia, but for which biased agonism remains largely unexplored. We now report the generation of bias "fingerprints" for prototypical ribose containing A3AR agonists and rigidified (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with regard to their ability to mediate different signaling pathways. Relative to the reference prototypical agonist IB-MECA, (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with significant N(6) or C2 modifications, including elongated aryl-ethynyl groups, exhibited biased agonism. Significant positive correlation was observed between the C2 substituent length (in Å) and bias toward cell survival. Molecular modeling suggests that extended C2 substituents on (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleosides promote a progressive outward shift of the A3AR transmembrane domain 2, which may contribute to the subset of A3AR conformations stabilized on biased agonist binding. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  14. Enhanced neurodegeneration after a high dose of methamphetamine in adenosine A3 receptor null mutant mice.

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    Shen, H; Luo, Y; Yu, S-J; Wang, Y

    2011-10-27

    Previous reports have indicated that adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) knockout mice are more sensitive to ischemic or hypoxic brain injury. The purpose of this study was to examine if suppression of A3R expression is associated with increase in sensitivity to injury induced by a high dose of methamphetamine (Meth). Adult male A3R null mutant (-/-) mice and their controls (+/+) were injected with four doses (2 h apart) of Meth (10 mg/kg) or saline. Animals were placed in a behavioral activity chamber, equipped with food and water, for 52 h starting from one day after injections. The first 4 h were used for studying exploratory behaviors, and the next 48 h were used to measure locomotor activity. High doses of Meth equally reduced the 4-h exploratory behavior in -/- and +/+ mice. Meth suppressed locomotor activity between 4 and 52 h in both groups, with a greater reduction being found in the -/- mice. Brain tissues were collected at 3 days after the Meth or saline injections. Meth treatment reduced striatal dopamine (DA) levels in both +/+ and -/- mice with an increase in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratio being found only in -/- animals. Meth also significantly increased ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) and cleaved caspase-3 level in striatum, as well as Iba-1 and TNFα mRNA expression in nigra in -/-, compared to +/+, mice. Previous studies have shown that pharmacological suppression of vesicular monoamine transport 2 (VMAT2) by reserpine enhanced Meth toxicity by increasing cytosolic DA and inflammation. A significant reduction in striatal VMAT2 expression was found in -/- mice compared to +/+ mice, suggesting that increase in sensitivity to Meth injury in -/- mice may be related to a reduction in VMAT2 expression in these mice. In conclusion, our data suggest that A3R -/- mice are more sensitive to high doses of Meth. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Allosteric interactions across native adenosine-A3 receptor homodimers: quantification using single-cell ligand-binding kinetics

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    May, Lauren T.; Bridge, Lloyd J.; Stoddart, Leigh A.; Briddon, Stephen J.; Hill, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    A growing awareness indicates that many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exist as homodimers, but the extent of the cooperativity across the dimer interface has been largely unexplored. Here, measurement of the dissociation kinetics of a fluorescent agonist (ABA-X-BY630) from the human A1 or A3 adenosine receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells has provided evidence for highly cooperative interactions between protomers of the A3-receptor dimer in single living cells. In the absence of competiti...

  16. A3 Adenosine Receptor Allosteric Modulator Induces an Anti-Inflammatory Effect: In Vivo Studies and Molecular Mechanism of Action

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    Shira Cohen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR is overexpressed in inflammatory cells and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals with inflammatory conditions. Agonists to the A3AR are known to induce specific anti-inflammatory effects upon chronic treatment. LUF6000 is an allosteric compound known to modulate the A3AR and render the endogenous ligand adenosine to bind to the receptor with higher affinity. The advantage of allosteric modulators is their capability to target specifically areas where adenosine levels are increased such as inflammatory and tumor sites, whereas normal body cells and tissues are refractory to the allosteric modulators due to low adenosine levels. LUF6000 administration induced anti-inflammatory effect in 3 experimental animal models of rat adjuvant induced arthritis, monoiodoacetate induced osteoarthritis, and concanavalin A induced liver inflammation in mice. The molecular mechanism of action points to deregulation of signaling proteins including PI3K, IKK, IκB, Jak-2, and STAT-1, resulting in decreased levels of NF-κB, known to mediate inflammatory effects. Moreover, LUF6000 induced a slight stimulatory effect on the number of normal white blood cells and neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effect of LUF6000, mechanism of action, and the differential effects on inflammatory and normal cells position this allosteric modulator as an attractive and unique drug candidate.

  17. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

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    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural Mapping of Adenosine Receptor Mutations

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    Jespers, Willem; Schiedel, Anke C; Heitman, Laura H

    2018-01-01

    The four adenosine receptors (ARs), A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, constitute a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with exceptional foundations for structure-based ligand design. The vast amount of mutagenesis data, accumulated in the literature since the 1990s, has been recently supplemente...

  19. An adenosine A3 receptor agonist inhibits DSS-induced colitis in mice through modulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway

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    Ren, Tianhua; Tian, Ting; Feng, Xiao; Ye, Shicai; Wang, Hao; Wu, Weiyun; Qiu, Yumei; Yu, Caiyuan; He, Yanting; Zeng, Juncheng; Cen, Junwei; Zhou, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The role of the adenosine A3 receptor (A3AR) in experimental colitis is controversial. The A3AR agonist N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) has been shown to have a clinical benefit, although studies in A3AR-deficient mice suggest a pro-inflammatory role. However, there are no studies on the effect of 2-Cl-IB-MECA and the molecular mechanism of action of A3AR in murine colitis models in vivo. Is it the same as that observed in vitro? The interaction between 2-CL-IB-MECA and A3AR in a murine colitis model and the signaling pathways associated with this interaction remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for the NF-κB signaling pathway and its effect on modifying the activity of proinflammatory factors in A3AR-mediated biological processes. Our results demonstrated that A3AR activation possessed marked effects on experimental colitis through the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25762375

  20. Mast cells are directly activated by contact with cancer cells by a mechanism involving autocrine formation of adenosine and autocrine/paracrine signaling of the adenosine A3 receptor.

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    Gorzalczany, Yaara; Akiva, Eyal; Klein, Ofir; Merimsky, Ofer; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2017-07-01

    Mast cells (MCs) constitute an important part of the tumor microenvironment (TME). However, their underlying mechanisms of activation within the TME remain poorly understood. Here we show that recapitulating cell-to-cell contact interactions by exposing MCs to membranes derived from a number of cancer cell types, results in MC activation, evident by the increased phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases and Akt, in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase dependent fashion. Activation is unidirectional since MC derived membranes do not activate cancer cells. Stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation is strictly dependent on the ecto enzyme CD73 that mediates autocrine formation of adenosine, and is inhibited by knockdown of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R) as well as by an A3R antagonist or by agonist-stimulated down-regulation of the A3R. We also show that cancer cell mediated triggering upregulates expression and stimulates secretion of interleukin 8 from the activated MCs. These findings provide evidence for a novel mode of unidirectional crosstalk between MCs and cancer cells implicating direct activation by cancer cells in MC reprogramming into a pro tumorigenic profile. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Non-imaging High Throughput Approach to Chemical Library Screening at the Unmodified Adenosine-A3 Receptor in Living Cells

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    Maria Augusta Arruda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in fluorescent ligand technology have enabled the study of G protein-coupled receptors in their native environment without the need for genetic modification such as addition of N-terminal fluorescent or bioluminescent tags. Here, we have used a non-imaging plate reader (PHERAstar FS to monitor the binding of fluorescent ligands to the human adenosine-A3 receptor (A3AR; CA200645 and AV039, stably expressed in CHO-K1 cells. To verify that this method was suitable for the study of other GPCRs, assays at the human adenosine-A1 receptor, and β1 and β2 adrenoceptors (β1AR and β2AR; BODIPY-TMR-CGP-12177 were also carried out. Affinity values determined for the binding of the fluorescent ligands CA200645 and AV039 to A3AR for a range of classical adenosine receptor antagonists were consistent with A3AR pharmacology and correlated well (R2 = 0.94 with equivalent data obtained using a confocal imaging plate reader (ImageXpress Ultra. The binding of BODIPY-TMR-CGP-12177 to the β1AR was potently inhibited by low concentrations of the β1-selective antagonist CGP 20712A (pKi 9.68 but not by the β2-selective antagonist ICI 118551(pKi 7.40. Furthermore, in experiments conducted in CHO K1 cells expressing the β2AR this affinity order was reversed with ICI 118551 showing the highest affinity (pKi 8.73 and CGP20712A (pKi 5.68 the lowest affinity. To determine whether the faster data acquisition of the non-imaging plate reader (~3 min per 96-well plate was suitable for high throughput screening (HTS, we screened the LOPAC library for inhibitors of the binding of CA200645 to the A3AR. From the initial 1,263 compounds evaluated, 67 hits (defined as those that inhibited the total binding of 25 nM CA200645 by ≥40% were identified. All compounds within the library that had medium to high affinity for the A3AR (pKi ≥6 were successfully identified. We found three novel compounds in the library that displayed unexpected sub-micromolar affinity

  2. Adenosine A3 receptor stimulation reduces muscle injury following physical trauma and is associated with alterations in the MMP/TIMP response.

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    Urso, Maria L; Wang, Ruibo; Zambraski, Edward J; Liang, Bruce T

    2012-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that in response to traumatic injury in skeletal muscle, there is a dysregulation of the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs), a response hypothesized to interfere with proper skeletal muscle regeneration. Moreover, we have shown that pharmacological activation of the adenosine A(3) receptor by Cl-IBMECA in skeletal muscle can protect against ischemia-reperfusion and eccentric exercise injury. However, the mechanism by which Cl-IBMECA protects muscle tissue is poorly defined. This study evaluated the effects of Cl-IBMECA on MMP/TIMP expression in skeletal muscle and tested the hypothesis that adenosine A(3) receptor-stimulated protection of skeletal muscle following traumatic injury is associated with a blunting of MMPs involved in inflammatory processes and collagen degradation, and an increase in MMPs associated with extracellular matrix remodeling. Sixty C57BL/6J male mice were injected with Cl-IBMECA (n = 30) or a vehicle (n = 30), and Evans blue dye. Injury was induced by applying a cold steel probe (-79°C) to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle for 10 s. TA muscles from uninjured and injured legs were collected 3, 10, and 24 h postinjury for analysis of muscle injury and MMP/TIMP mRNA and protein levels. Twenty-four hours postinjury, 56.8% of the fibers were damaged in vehicle-treated mice vs. 35.4% in Cl-IBMECA-treated mice (P = 0.02). Cl-IBMECA treatment reduced membrane type 1 (MT1)-MMP, MMP-3, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 mRNA expression 2- to 20-fold compared with vehicle-treated mice (P muscle injury.

  3. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) Dendrimer Conjugates of Clickable Agonists of the A3 Adenosine Receptor and Coactivation of the P2Y14 Receptor by a Tethered Nucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosh, Dilip, K. [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Yoo, Lena S. [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Chinn, Moshe [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Barrett, Matthew O. [University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Fricks, Ingrid P. [University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Harden, T. Kendall [University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Jacobson, Kenneth A. [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health

    2010-01-01

    We previously synthesized a series of potent and selective A{sub 3} adenosine receptor (AR) agonists (North-methanocarba nucleoside 5{prime}-uronamides) containing dialkyne groups on extended adenine C2 substituents. We coupled the distal alkyne of a 2-octadiynyl nucleoside by Cu(I)-catalyzed 'click' chemistry to azide-derivatized G4 (fourth-generation) PAMAM dendrimers to form triazoles. A{sub 3}AR activation was preserved in these multivalent conjugates, which bound with apparent Ki of 0.1-0.3 nM. They were substituted with nucleoside moieties, solely or in combination with water-solubilizing carboxylic acid groups derived from hexynoic acid. A comparison with various amide-linked dendrimers showed that triazole-linked conjugates displayed selectivity and enhanced A{sub 3}AR affinity. We prepared a PAMAM dendrimer containing equiproportioned peripheral azido and amino groups for conjugation of multiple ligands. A bifunctional conjugate activated both A{sub 3} and P2Y{sub 14} receptors (via amide-linked uridine-5{prime}-diphosphoglucuronic acid), with selectivity in comparison to other ARs and P2Y receptors. This is the first example of targeting two different GPCRs with the same dendrimer conjugate, which is intended for activation of heteromeric GPCR aggregates. Synergistic effects of activating multiple GPCRs with a single dendrimer conjugate might be useful in disease treatment.

  4. Activation of Adenosine A3 Receptor Alleviates TNF-α-Induced Inflammation through Inhibition of the NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Human Colonic Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the expression of adenosine A3 receptor (A3AR in human colonic epithelial cells and the effects of A3AR activation on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α- induced inflammation in order to determine its mechanism of action in human colonic epithelial cells, human colonic epithelial cells (HT-29 cells were treated with different concentrations of 2-Cl-IB-MECA prior to TNF-α stimulation, followed by analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway activation and downstream IL-8 and IL-1β production. A3AR mRNA and protein were expressed in HT-29 cells and not altered by changes in TNF-α or 2-Cl-IB-MECA. Pretreatment with 2-Cl-IB-MECA prior to stimulation with TNF-α attenuated NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation as p65 protein decreased in the nucleus of cells and increased in the cytoplasm, inhibited the degradation of IκB-α, and reduced phosphorylated-IκB-α level significantly, compared to TNF-α-only-treated groups. Furthermore, 2-Cl-IB-MECA significantly decreased TNF-α-stimulated IL-8 and IL-1β mRNA expression and secretion, compared to the TNF-α-only treated group. These results confirm that A3AR is expressed in human colonic epithelial cells and demonstrate that its activation has an anti-inflammatory effect, through the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway, which leads to inhibition of downstream IL-8 and IL-1β expression. Therefore, A3AR activation may be a potential treatment for gut inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. A3 adenosine receptor agonist prevents the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by modulating spinal glial-restricted redox-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Kali; Esposito, Emanuela; Doyle, Timothy; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Tosh, Dillip K; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Salvemini, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy accompanied by chronic neuropathic pain is the major dose-limiting toxicity of several anticancer agents including the taxane paclitaxel (Taxol). A critical mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain is the increased production of peroxynitrite in spinal cord generated in response to activation of the superoxide-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase. Peroxynitrite in turn contributes to the development of neuropathic pain by modulating several redox-dependent events in spinal cord. We recently reported that activation of the Gi/Gq-coupled A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) with selective A3AR agonists (ie, IB-MECA) blocked the development of chemotherapy induced-neuropathic pain evoked by distinct agents, including paclitaxel, without interfering with anticancer effects. The mechanism or mechanisms of action underlying these beneficial effects has yet to be explored. We now demonstrate that IB-MECA attenuates the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting the activation of spinal NADPH oxidase and two downstream redox-dependent systems. The first relies on inhibition of the redox-sensitive transcription factor (NFκB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (ERK and p38) resulting in decreased production of neuroexcitatory/proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) and increased formation of the neuroprotective/anti-inflammatory IL-10. The second involves inhibition of redox-mediated posttranslational tyrosine nitration and modification (inactivation) of glia-restricted proteins known to play key roles in regulating synaptic glutamate homeostasis: the glutamate transporter GLT-1 and glutamine synthetase. Our results unravel a mechanistic link into biomolecular signaling pathways employed by A3AR activation in neuropathic pain while providing the foundation to consider use of A3AR agonists as therapeutic agents in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2014

  6. Pyrazin-2(1H)-ones as a novel class of selective A3 adenosine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuaje, Jhonny; Carbajales, Carlos; González-Gómez, Manuel; Coelho, Alberto; Caamaño, Olga; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sotelo, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    A3AR antagonists are promising drug candidates as neuroprotective agents as well as for the treatment of inflammation or glaucoma. The most widely known A3AR antagonists are derived from polyheteroaromatic scaffolds, which usually show poor pharmacokinetic properties. Accordingly, the identification of structurally simple A3AR antagonists by the exploration of novel diversity spaces is a challenging goal. A convergent and efficient Ugi-based multicomponent approach enabled the discovery of pyrazin-2(1H)-ones as a novel class of A3AR antagonists. A combined experimental/computational strategy accelerated the establishment of the most salient features of the structure-activity and structure-selectivity relationships in this series. The optimization process provided pyrazin-2(1H)-ones with improved affinity and a plausible hypothesis regarding their binding modes was proposed.

  7. 75 FR 8981 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Treatment of Glaucoma by Administration of Adenosine A3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Glaucoma by Administration of Adenosine A3 Antagonists AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health... triazoloquinazoline derivatives, their preparation and use as adenosine receptor antagonists,'' filed January 29, 1996... one-, and triazoloquinazoline derivatives, their preparation and use as adenosine receptor antagonists...

  8. CF101, An Agonist to the A3 Adenosine Receptor, Enhances the Chemotherapeutic Effect of 5-Fluorouracil in a Colon Carcinoma Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bar-Yehuda

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available NF-κB and the upstream kinase PKB/Akt are highly expressed in chemoresistance tumor cells and may hamper the apoptotic pathway. CF101, a specific agonist to the A3 adenosine receptor, inhibits the development of colon carcinoma growth in cell cultures and xenograft murine models. Because CF101 has been shown to downregulate PKB/Akt and NF-κB protein expression level, we presumed that its combination with chemotherapy will enhance the antitumor effect of the cytotoxic drug. In this study, we utilized 3-[4,5Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and colony formation assays and a colon carcinoma xenograft model. It has been shown that a combined treatment of CF101 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU enhanced the cytotoxic effect of the latter on HCT-116 human colon carcinoma growth. Downregulation of PKB/Akt, NF-κB, and cyclin D1, and upregulation of caspase-3 protein expression level were observed in cells and tumor lesions on treatment with a combination of CF101 and 5-FU. Moreover, in mice treated with the combined therapy, myelotoxicity was prevented as was evidenced by normal white blood cell and neutrophil counts. These results show that CF101 potentiates the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU, thus preventing drug resistance. The myeloprotective effect of CF101 suggests its development as an add-on treatment to 5-FU.

  9. Adenosine receptors as drug targets — what are the challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors — either directly or indirectly — have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent — the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) — has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  10. The mouse brain adenosine A(1) receptor : functional expression and pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittendorp, MC; Kunzel, JVD; Ijzerman, AP; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, K

    2004-01-01

    The adenosinergic system is involved in many important physiological functions. Adenosine exerts its extracellular effects through four types of G-protein-coupled receptors: A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3). Adenosine acts as an important regulator of metabolic processes. In the brain adenosine mediates

  11. [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY: a suitable PET tracer for the adenosine A3 receptor? An in vivo study in rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusler, Daniela; Zeilinger, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus; Mitterhauser, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Kuntner, Claudia; Wanek, Thomas; Langer, Oliver [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Biomedical Systems, Health and Environment Department, Seibersdorf (Austria); Nics, Lukas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Savli, Markus; Lanzenberger, Rupert R. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Karagiannis, Panagiotis [King' s College London, Cutaneous Medicine and Immunotherapy, St. John' s Institute of Dermatology, Division of Genetics and Molecular Medicine King' s College London School of Medicine, Guy' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Shanab, Karem; Spreitzer, Helmut [University of Vienna, Department of Drug and Natural Product Synthesis, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-04-01

    The adenosine A{sub 3} receptor (A3R) is involved in cardiovascular, neurological and tumour-related pathologies and serves as an exceptional pharmaceutical target in the clinical setting. A3R antagonists are considered antiinflammatory, antiallergic and anticancer agents, and to have potential for the treatment of asthma, COPD, glaucoma and stroke. Hence, an appropriate A3R PET tracer would be highly beneficial for the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of these diseases. Therefore, in this preclinical in vivo study we evaluated the potential as a PET tracer of the A3R antagonist [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY. Rats were injected with [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY for baseline scans and blocking scans (A3R with MRS1523 or FE rate at SUPPY, P-gp with tariquidar; three animals each). Additionally, metabolism was studied in plasma and brain. In a preliminary experiment in a mouse xenograft model (mice injected with cells expressing the human A3R; three animals), the animals received [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY and [{sup 18}F]FDG. Dynamic PET imaging was performed (60 min in rats, 90 min in xenografted mice). In vitro stability of [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY in human and rat plasma was also evaluated. [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY showed high uptake in fat-rich regions and low uptake in the brain. Pretreatment with MRS1523 led to a decrease in [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY uptake (p = 0.03), and pretreatment with the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar led to a 1.24-fold increase in [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY uptake (p = 0.09) in rat brain. There was no significant difference in metabolites in plasma and brain in the treatment groups. However, plasma concentrations of [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY were reduced to levels similar to those in rat brain after blocking. In contrast to [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake (p = 0.12), the xenograft model showed significantly increased uptake of [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY in the tissue masses from CHO cells expressing the human A3R (p = 0.03). [{sup 18}F

  12. Adenosine A(2A) receptor dynamics studied with the novel fluorescent agonist Alexa488-APEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Frank; Klutz, Athena M; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Fredholm, Bertil B; Schulte, Gunnar

    2008-08-20

    G protein-coupled receptors, such as the adenosine A(2A) receptor, are dynamic proteins, which undergo agonist-dependent redistribution from the cell surface to intracellular membranous compartments, such as endosomes. In order to study the kinetics of adenosine A(2A) receptor redistribution in living cells, we synthesized a novel fluorescent agonist, Alexa488-APEC. Alexa488-APEC binds to adenosine A(2A) (K(i)=149+/-27 nM) as well as A(3) receptors (K(i)=240+/-160 nM) but not to adenosine A(1) receptors. Further, we characterized the dose-dependent increase in Alexa488-APEC-induced cAMP production as well as cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation, verifying the ligand's functionality at adenosine A(2A) but not A(2B) receptors. In live-cell imaging studies, Alexa488-APEC-induced adenosine A(2A) receptor internalization, which was blocked by the competitive reversible antagonist ZM 241385 and hyperosmolaric sucrose. Further, internalized adenosine A(2A) receptors co-localized with clathrin and Rab5, indicating that agonist stimulation promotes adenosine A(2A) receptor uptake through a clathrin-dependent mechanism to Rab5-positive endosomes. The basic characterization of Alexa488-APEC described here showed that it provides a useful tool for tracing adenosine A(2A) receptors in vitro.

  13. Targeting adenosine receptors in the development of cardiovascular therapeutics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptor stimulation has negative inotropic and dromotropic actions, reduces cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury and remodeling, and prevents cardiac arrhythmias. In the vasculature, adenosine modulates vascular tone, reduces infiltration of inflammatory cells and generation of foam cells,

  14. The Role of Adenosine Receptors in Psychostimulant Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Ballesteros-Yáñez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (AR are a family of G-protein coupled receptors, comprised of four members, named A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors, found widely distributed in almost all human body tissues and organs. To date, they are known to participate in a large variety of physiopathological responses, which include vasodilation, pain, and inflammation. In particular, in the central nervous system (CNS, adenosine acts as a neuromodulator, exerting different functions depending on the type of AR and consequent cellular signaling involved. In terms of molecular pathways and second messengers involved, A1 and A3 receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase (AC, through Gi/o proteins, while A2A and A2B receptors stimulate it through Gs proteins. In the CNS, A1 receptors are widely distributed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, A2A receptors are localized mainly in the striatum and olfactory bulb, while A2B and A3 receptors are found at low levels of expression. In addition, AR are able to form heteromers, both among themselves (e.g., A1/A2A, as well as with other subtypes (e.g., A2A/D2, opening a whole range of possibilities in the field of the pharmacology of AR. Nowadays, we know that adenosine, by acting on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, is known to antagonistically modulate dopaminergic neurotransmission and therefore reward systems, being A1 receptors colocalized in heteromeric complexes with D1 receptors, and A2A receptors with D2 receptors. This review documents the present state of knowledge of the contribution of AR, particularly A1 and A2A, to psychostimulants-mediated effects, including locomotor activity, discrimination, seeking and reward, and discuss their therapeutic relevance to psychostimulant addiction. Studies presented in this review reinforce the potential of A1 agonists as an effective strategy to counteract psychostimulant-induced effects. Furthermore, different experimental data support the hypothesis that A2A/D2 heterodimers are

  15. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed that the concentration of extracellular adenosine at the mucosal surface of the uroepithelium was regulated by ecto-adenosine deaminase and by equilibrative nucleoside transporters, whereas adenosine kinase and equilibrative nucleoside transporters modulated serosal levels. We further observed that enriching endogenous adenosine by blocking its routes of metabolism or direct activation of mucosal A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a selective agonist, stimulated bladder activity by lowering the threshold pressure for voiding. Finally, CCPA did not quell bladder hyperactivity in animals with acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis but instead exacerbated their irritated bladder phenotype. In conclusion, we find that adenosine levels at both surfaces of the uroepithelium are modulated by turnover, that blocking these pathways or stimulating A1 receptors directly at the luminal surface promotes bladder contractions, and that adenosine further stimulates voiding in animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. PMID:22552934

  16. Adenosine receptor ligands on cancer therapy: A review of Patent Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Carmen; Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Fresco, Paula; Goncalves, Jorge

    2017-11-07

    Adenosine is a purine, with an adenine group and a ribose sugar, formed endogenously by ATP catabolism both intracellularly and extracellularly. Among the medicinal features of adenosine and of its receptors (A1, A2A, A2B and A3), anticancer activity has been an intense field of research. The anticancer potential of adenosine receptor ligands has been brought forefront of research and evidenced in innumerous research articles and patents. The present review focuses on the patent literature from 2002 onwards (2002-2017). Patents were searched and downloaded from the open access patent data bases and available online. A significant number of patents (65) have been published on adenosine receptor ligands claiming anticancer activity, or presenting new methods of preparation or of treatment thereof from 2002-2017 (May). From these, 35 were published highlighting the promising attributes of compounds/methods to fight cancer. Most of the compounds act as adenosine A3 receptor agonists, while others act as antagonists for the other adenosine receptor subtypes. The signaling events triggered by activation of adenosine A3 receptor or by blockade of adenosine A1, A2A and A2B receptors can reverse an environment pro-cancer to an anti-cancer in the body. The promising anticancer effects mediated by adenosine receptor ligands put them in the forefront as new drug candidates. The present compilation can be worthy to medicinal chemists, pharmacologists, biochemists and other researchers focusing on the putative anticancer activity of adenosine receptor ligands. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Partial agonism of theophylline-7-riboside on adenosine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, A. P.; van der Wenden, E. M.; von Frijtag Drabbe Künzel, J. K.; Mathôt, R. A.; Danhof, M.; Borea, P. A.; Varani, K.

    1994-01-01

    Theophylline-7-riboside was evaluated as a partial agonist for rat adenosine receptors. Radioligand binding experiments were performed on both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors, using several methodologies to discriminate between agonists and antagonists. Mainly from thermodynamic data it was concluded

  18. Mechanism of A2 adenosine receptor activation. I. Blockade of A2 adenosine receptors by photoaffinity labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, M.J.; Klotz, K.N.; Schwabe, U.

    1991-04-01

    It has previously been shown that covalent incorporation of the photoreactive adenosine derivative (R)-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine ((R)-AHPIA) into the A1 adenosine receptor of intact fat cells leads to a persistent activation of this receptor, resulting in a reduction of cellular cAMP levels. In contrast, covalent incorporation of (R)-AHPIA into human platelet membranes, which contain only stimulatory A2 adenosine receptors, reduces adenylate cyclase stimulation via these receptors. This effect of (R)-AHPIA is specific for the A2 receptor and can be prevented by the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline. Binding studies indicate that up to 90% of A2 receptors can be blocked by photoincorporation of (R)-AHPIA. However, the remaining 10-20% of A2 receptors are sufficient to mediate an adenylate cyclase stimulation of up to 50% of the control value. Similarly, the activation via these 10-20% of receptors occurs with a half-life that is only 2 times longer than that in control membranes. This indicates the presence of a receptor reserve, with respect to both the extent and the rate of adenylate cyclase stimulation. These observations require a modification of the models of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling.

  19. The role of glial adenosine receptors in neural resilience and the neurobiology of mood disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calker, D; Biber, K

    2005-01-01

    Adenosine receptors were classified into A(1)- and A(2)-receptors in the laboratory of Bernd Hamprecht more than 25 years ago. Adenosine receptors are instrumental to the neurotrophic effects of glia cells. Both microglia and astrocytes release after stimulation via adenosine receptors factors that

  20. A2BR adenosine receptor modulates sweet taste in circumvallate taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kataoka

    Full Text Available In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3 on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate, but not anterior (fungiform, palate taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields.

  1. A2BR Adenosine Receptor Modulates Sweet Taste in Circumvallate Taste Buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Shultz, Nicole; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Ravid, Katya; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3) on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR) is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate), but not anterior (fungiform, palate) taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields. PMID:22253866

  2. Small-Animal PET Study of Adenosine A(1) Receptors in Rat Brain : Blocking Receptors and Raising Extracellular Adenosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Soumen; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Kwizera, Chantal; Sijbesma, Jurgen W. A.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; van Waarde, Aren

    2011-01-01

    Activation of adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) in the brain causes sedation, reduces anxiety, inhibits seizures, and promotes neuroprotection. Cerebral A(1)R can be visualized using 8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-C-11-methyl-3-propyl-xanthine (C-11-MPDX) and PET. This study aims to test whether C-11-MPDX

  3. Adenosine receptor modulation of seizure susceptibility in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szot, P.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine is considered to be a neuromodulator or cotransmitter in the periphery and CNS. This neuromodulatory action of adenosine may be observed as an anticonvulsant effect. Dose-response curves for R-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA), cycohexyladenosine (CHA), 2-chloroadenosine (2-ClAdo), N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) and S-PIA were generated against PTZ seizure thresholds in the rat. The rank order of potency for adenosine agonists to elevate PTZ seizure threshold was R-PIA > 2-ClAdo > NECA > CHA > S-PIA. R-PIA was approximately 80-fold more potent than S-PIA. This 80-fold difference in potency between the diasteriomers of PIA was consistent with an A{sub 1} adenoise receptor-mediated response. The anticonvulsant action of 2-ClAdo was reversed by pretreatment with theoplylline. Chronic administration of theophylline significantly increased the specific binding of {sup 3}H-cyclohexyladenosine in membranes of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of the rat. Chronic exposure to theophylline produced a significant increase in the densities of both the high- and low-affinity forms of A{sub 1} adenosine receptors in the cerebral cortex.

  4. Elevated adenosine signaling via adenosine A2B receptor induces normal and sickle erythrocyte sphingosine kinase 1 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; Bogdanov, Mikhail V.; Wu, Hongyu; Song, Anren; Li, Jessica; Dowhan, William; Idowu, Modupe; Juneja, Harinder S.; Molina, Jose G.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kellems, Rodney E.

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocyte possesses high sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity and is the major cell type supplying plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate, a signaling lipid regulating multiple physiological and pathological functions. Recent studies revealed that erythrocyte SphK1 activity is upregulated in sickle cell disease (SCD) and contributes to sickling and disease progression. However, how erythrocyte SphK1 activity is regulated remains unknown. Here we report that adenosine induces SphK1 activity in human and mouse sickle and normal erythrocytes in vitro. Next, using 4 adenosine receptor-deficient mice and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) is essential for adenosine-induced SphK1 activity in human and mouse normal and sickle erythrocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we provide in vivo genetic evidence that adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency leads to excess plasma adenosine and elevated erythrocyte SphK1 activity. Lowering adenosine by ADA enzyme therapy or genetic deletion of ADORA2B significantly reduced excess adenosine-induced erythrocyte SphK1 activity in ADA-deficient mice. Finally, we revealed that protein kinase A-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation functioning downstream of ADORA2B underlies adenosine-induced erythrocyte SphK1 activity. Overall, our findings reveal a novel signaling network regulating erythrocyte SphK1 and highlight innovative mechanisms regulating SphK1 activity in normal and SCD. PMID:25587035

  5. Pyrazolo Derivatives as Potent Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: An Overview on the Structure-Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Lee Cheong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades, medicinal chemistry research towards potent and selective antagonists of human adenosine receptors (namely, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 has been evolving rapidly. These antagonists are deemed therapeutically beneficial in several pathological conditions including neurological and renal disorders, cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. Up to this point, many classes of compounds have been successfully synthesized and identified as potent human adenosine receptor antagonists. In this paper, an overview of the structure-activity relationship (SAR profiles of promising nonxanthine pyrazolo derivatives is reported and discussed. We have emphasized the SAR for some representative structures such as pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo-[1,5-c]pyrimidines; pyrazolo-[3,4-c] or -[4,3-c]quinolines; pyrazolo-[4,3-d]pyrimidinones; pyrazolo-[3,4-d]pyrimidines and pyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridines. This overview not only clarifies the structural requirements deemed essential for affinity towards individual adenosine receptor subtypes, but it also sheds light on the rational design and optimization of existing structural templates to allow us to conceive new, more potent adenosine receptor antagonists.

  6. Protective effect of adenosine receptors against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkov, Boris; Varn, Matthew N.; Zemskova, Marina A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; Sridhar, Supriya; Lucas, Rudolf; Verin, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) affect 200,000 people a year in the USA. Pulmonary vascular and specifically endothelial cell (EC) barrier compromise is a hallmark of these diseases. We have recently shown that extracellular adenosine enhances human pulmonary (EC) barrier via activation of adenosine receptors (ARs) in cell cultures. On the basis of these data, we hypothesized that activation of ARs might exert barrier-protective effects in a model of ALI/ARDS in mice. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of pre- and posttreatment of adenosine and 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a nonselective stable AR agonist, on LPS-induced lung injury. Mice were given vehicle or LPS intratracheally followed by adenosine, NECA, or vehicle instilled via the internal jugular vein. Postexperiment cell counts, Evans Blue Dye albumin (EBDA) extravasation, levels of proteins, and inflammatory cytokines were analyzed. Harvested lungs were used for histology and myeloperoxidase studies. Mice challenged with LPS alone demonstrated an inflammatory response typical of ALI. Cell counts, EBDA extravasation, as well as levels of proteins and inflammatory cytokines were decreased in adenosine-treated mice. Histology displayed reduced infiltration of neutrophils. NECA had a similar effect on LPS-induced vascular barrier compromise. Importantly, posttreatment with adenosine or NECA recovers lung vascular barrier and reduces inflammation induced by LPS challenge. Furthermore, adenosine significantly attenuated protein degradation of A2A and A3 receptors induced by LPS. Collectively, our results demonstrate that activation of ARs protects and restores vascular barrier functions and reduces inflammation in LPS-induced ALI. PMID:24414256

  7. Enhanced cellular adenosine uptake limits adenosine receptor stimulation in patients with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Rongen, G.A.; Boers, G.H.J.; Blom, H.J.; Broek, P.H.H. van den; Smits, P.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endogenous adenosine has several cardioprotective effects. We postulate that in patients with hyperhomocysteinemia increased intracellular formation of S-adenosylhomocysteine decreases free intracellular adenosine. Subsequently, facilitated diffusion of extracellular adenosine into cells

  8. Adenosine receptor control of cognition in normal and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine and adenosine receptors (ARs) are increasingly recognized as important therapeutic targets for controlling cognition under normal and disease conditions for its dual roles of neuromodulation as well as of homeostatic function in the brain. This chapter first presents the unique ability of adenosine, by acting on the inhibitory A1 and facilitating A2A receptor, to integrate dopamine, glutamate, and BNDF signaling and to modulate synaptic plasticity (e.g., long-term potentiation and long-term depression) in brain regions relevant to learning and memory, providing the molecular and cellular bases for adenosine receptor (AR) control of cognition. This led to the demonstration of AR modulation of social recognition memory, working memory, reference memory, reversal learning, goal-directed behavior/habit formation, Pavlovian fear conditioning, and effort-related behavior. Furthermore, human and animal studies support that AR activity can also, through cognitive enhancement and neuroprotection, reverse cognitive impairments in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease, and schizophrenia. Lastly, epidemiological evidence indicates that regular human consumption of caffeine, the most widely used psychoactive drug and nonselective AR antagonists, is associated with the reduced cognitive decline in aging and AD patients, and with the reduced risk in developing PD. Thus, there is a convergence of the molecular studies revealing AR as molecular targets for integrating neurotransmitter signaling and controlling synaptic plasticity, with animal studies demonstrating the strong procognitive impact upon AR antagonism in normal and disease brains and with epidemiological and clinical evidences in support of caffeine and AR drugs for therapeutic modulation of cognition. Since some of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists are already in phase III clinical trials for motor benefits in PD patients with remarkable safety profiles

  9. Flow cytometry application for studies on adenosine A2A receptors expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Tomasz; Bereta, Michał; Faron-Górecka, Agata; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors belong to the heptaspanning membrane receptors family A, also known as G protein-coupled receptors. In human brain they are highly expressed in striatum, where they co-exist and co-function with adenosine A1, glutamate mGlu5 and dopamine D2 receptors. As glutaminergic neurotransmission modulators in GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons, adenosine A2A receptors are attractive targets for new, alternative therapies of neurodegenerative disorders, like Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. The aim of the research was to obtained fluorescently tagged adenosine A2A receptors. Gene encoding human adenosine A2A receptor was inserted into plasmid pEYFP-N1, bearing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP). The construct was expressed in HEK 293 cells. Fluorescence was observed by flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy. Functional ligand binding properties were investigated by saturation binding analysis of adenosine A2A receptors specific agonist [3H] CGS 21680.

  10. Structure-Based Rational Design of Adenosine Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sallander, Jessica; Sotelo, Eddy

    2017-01-01

    The family of adenosine receptors (ARs) is focus of several medicinal chemistry programs aimed to find new potent and selective drugs. Each receptor subtype has been proposed as a relevant drug target in the treatment of, e.g., cardiovascular or inflammatory diseases, asthma or Parkinson's disease. Until recently, most of these efforts have been dominated by ligand-based or empirical approaches. However, the latest advances in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) crystallography allowed for a thorough structural characterization of the A2AAR subtype, which has been crystalized with a number of agonists and antagonists. Consequently, the ligand discovery of AR ligands has been enriched with a number of structure-based approaches. These include the generation of higher-confident homology models for the remaining AR subtypes, virtual screening identification of novel chemotypes, structure-based lead-optimization programs, rationalization of selectivity profiles, or the structural characterization of novel binding sites that enable the design of novel allosteric modulators. Computational methodologies have importantly contributed to the success of these structure-based approaches, and the recent advances in the field are also analyzed in this review. We conclude that the design of adenosine receptor ligands has improved dramatically with the consideration of structure- based approaches, which is paving the way to a better understanding of the biology and pharmacological modulation of this relevant family of receptors.

  11. Regulation of Cardiovascular Development by Adenosine and Adenosine-Mediated Embryo Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    Few signaling molecules have the potential to influence the developing mammal as the nucleoside adenosine. Adenosine levels increase rapidly with tissue hypoxia and inflammation. Adenosine antagonists include the methlyxanthines caffeine and theophylline. The receptors that transduce adenosine action are the A1, A2a, A2b, and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). We examined how adenosine acts via A1ARs to influence embryo development.

  12. Molecular Vibration-Activity Relationship in the Agonism of Adenosine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Keun Chee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular vibration-activity relationship in the receptor-ligand interaction of adenosine receptors was investigated by structure similarity, molecular vibration, and hierarchical clustering in a dataset of 46 ligands of adenosine receptors. The resulting dendrogram was compared with those of another kind of fingerprint or descriptor. The dendrogram result produced by corralled intensity of molecular vibrational frequency outperformed four other analyses in the current study of adenosine receptor agonism and antagonism. The tree that was produced by clustering analysis of molecular vibration patterns showed its potential for the functional classification of adenosine receptor ligands.

  13. The 1976C>T polymorphism in the adenosine A2A receptor gene does not affect the vasodilator response to adenosine in humans in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Franke, B.; Broek, P. van den; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The 1976C>T polymorphism in the adenosine A2A receptor gene (ADORA2A) modulates the psychological response to administration of the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine. We quantified the vascular response to adenosine and caffeine to determine the relevance of this variant allele in the

  14. Modulation of neuroimmunity by adenosine and its receptors: Metabolism to mental illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Gabriel S.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a pleiotropic bioactive with potent neuromodulatory properties. Due to its ability to easily cross the blood-brain barrier, it can act as a signaling molecule between the periphery and the brain. It functions through four (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) cell surface G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (AR) that are expressed in some combination on nearly all cells types within the CNS. By regulating the activity of adenylyl cyclase and changing the intracellular concentration of cAMP, adenosine can alter neuronal function and neurotransmission. A variety of illnesses related to metabolic dysregulation, such as type 1 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, are associated with an elevated serum concentration of adenosine and a pathogenesis rooted in inflammation. This review describes the accepted physiologic function of adenosine in neurological disease and explores its new potential as a peripheral to central danger signal that can activate the neuroimmune system and contribute to symptoms of sickness and psychopathologies. PMID:25308443

  15. Methylthioadenosine reprograms macrophage activation through adenosine receptor stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Keyel

    Full Text Available Regulation of inflammation is necessary to balance sufficient pathogen clearance with excessive tissue damage. Central to regulating inflammation is the switch from a pro-inflammatory pathway to an anti-inflammatory pathway. Macrophages are well-positioned to initiate this switch, and as such are the target of multiple therapeutics. One such potential therapeutic is methylthioadenosine (MTA, which inhibits TNFα production following LPS stimulation. We found that MTA could block TNFα production by multiple TLR ligands. Further, it prevented surface expression of CD69 and CD86 and reduced NF-KB signaling. We then determined that the mechanism of this action by MTA is signaling through adenosine A2 receptors. A2 receptors and TLR receptors synergized to promote an anti-inflammatory phenotype, as MTA enhanced LPS tolerance. In contrast, IL-1β production and processing was not affected by MTA exposure. Taken together, these data demonstrate that MTA reprograms TLR activation pathways via adenosine receptors to promote resolution of inflammation.

  16. Adenosine through the A2A adenosine receptor increases IL-1β in the brain contributing to anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Gabriel S.; Darmody, Patrick T.; Walsh, John P.; Moon, Morgan L.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Bray, Julie K.; McCusker, Robert H.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most commonly reported psychiatric conditions, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Ailments associated with activation of the innate immune system, however, are increasingly linked to anxiety disorders. In adult male mice, we found that adenosine doubled caspase-1 activity in brain by a pathway reliant on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, protein kinase A (PKA) and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR). In addition, adenosine-dependent activation of caspase-1 increased interleukin (IL)-1β in the brain by two-fold. Peripheral administration of adenosine in wild-type (WT) mice led to a 2.3-fold increase in caspase-1 activity in the amygdala and to a 33% and 42% reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity and food intake, respectively, that were not observed in caspase-1 knockout (KO), IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) KO and A2A AR KO mice or in mice administered a caspase-1 inhibitor centrally. Finally, adenosine administration increased anxiety-like behaviors in WT mice by 28% in the open field test and by 55% in the elevated zero-maze. Caspase-1 KO mice, IL-1R1 KO mice, A2A AR KO mice and WT mice treated with the KATP channel blocker, glyburide, were resistant to adenosine-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, our results indicate that adenosine can act as an anxiogenic by activating caspase-1 and increasing IL-1β in the brain. PMID:24907587

  17. Leishmania infantum Parasites Subvert the Host Inflammatory Response through the Adenosine A2A Receptor to Promote the Establishment of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Mikhael H. F.; Sacramento, Lais A.; Gustavo F.S. Quirino; Marcela D Ferreira; Luciana Benevides; Santana, Alynne K. M.; Fernando Q Cunha; Almeida, Roque P; Silva, João S.; Vanessa Carregaro

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenously released purine nucleoside that signals through four widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Of these, A2AR is recognized as mediating major adenosine anti-inflammatory activity. During cutaneous leishmaniasis, adenosine induces immunosuppression, which promotes the establishment of infection. Herein, we demonstrated that A2AR signaling is exploited by Leishmania infantum parasites, the etiologic agent that causes Visceral Leishmaniasis...

  18. Adenosine transiently modulates stimulated dopamine release in the caudate putamen via A1 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ashley E.; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine modulates dopamine in the brain via A1 and A2A receptors, but that modulation has only been characterized on a slow time scale. Recent studies have characterized a rapid signaling mode of adenosine that suggests a possible rapid modulatory role. Here, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the extent to which transient adenosine changes modulate stimulated dopamine release (5 pulses at 60 Hz) in rat caudate putamen brain slices. Exogenous adenosine was applied and dopamine concentration monitored. Adenosine only modulated dopamine when it was applied 2 or 5 s before stimulation. Longer time intervals and bath application of 5 µM adenosine did not decrease dopamine release. Mechanical stimulation of endogenous adenosine 2s before dopamine stimulation also decreased stimulated dopamine release by 41 ± 7 %, similar to the 54 ± 6 % decrease in dopamine after exogenous adenosine application. Dopamine inhibition by transient adenosine was recovered within 10 minutes. The A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) blocked the dopamine modulation, whereas dopamine modulation was unaffected by the A2A receptor antagonist SCH 442416. Thus, transient adenosine changes can transiently modulate phasic dopamine release via A1 receptors. These data demonstrate that adenosine has a rapid, but transient, modulatory role in the brain. PMID:25219576

  19. Influence of the adenosine A1 receptor on blood pressure regulation and renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Russell D.; Thorén, Peter; Steege, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the role of adenosine A1 receptors in regulating blood pressure in conscious mice. Adenosine A1-receptor knockout (A1R-/-) mice and their wild-type (A1R+/+) littermates were placed on standardized normal-salt (NS), high-salt (HS), or salt-deficient (SD....... The elevated plasma renin concentrations found in the A1R-/- mice could also result in increased blood pressure. Our results confirm that adenosine, acting through the adenosine A1 receptor, plays an important role in regulating blood pressure, renin release, and sodium excretion....

  20. Elevated Adenosine Induces Placental DNA Hypomethylation Independent of A2B Receptor Signaling in Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aji; Wu, Hongyu; Iriyama, Takayuki; Zhang, Yujin; Sun, Kaiqi; Song, Anren; Liu, Hong; Peng, Zhangzhe; Tang, Lili; Lee, Minjung; Huang, Yun; Ni, Xin; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2017-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent pregnancy hypertensive disease with both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Emerging evidence indicates that global placental DNA hypomethylation is observed in patients with preeclampsia and is linked to altered gene expression and disease development. However, the molecular basis underlying placental epigenetic changes in preeclampsia remains unclear. Using 2 independent experimental models of preeclampsia, adenosine deaminase-deficient mice and a pathogenic autoantibody-induced mouse model of preeclampsia, we demonstrate that elevated placental adenosine not only induces hallmark features of preeclampsia but also causes placental DNA hypomethylation. The use of genetic approaches to express an adenosine deaminase minigene specifically in placentas, or adenosine deaminase enzyme replacement therapy, restored placental adenosine to normal levels, attenuated preeclampsia features, and abolished placental DNA hypomethylation in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice. Genetic deletion of CD73 (an ectonucleotidase that converts AMP to adenosine) prevented the elevation of placental adenosine in the autoantibody-induced preeclampsia mouse model and ameliorated preeclampsia features and placental DNA hypomethylation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that elevated placental adenosine-mediated DNA hypomethylation predominantly occurs in spongiotrophoblasts and labyrinthine trophoblasts and that this effect is independent of A2B adenosine receptor activation in both preeclampsia models. Extending our mouse findings to humans, we used cultured human trophoblasts to demonstrate that adenosine functions intracellularly and induces DNA hypomethylation without A2B adenosine receptor activation. Altogether, both mouse and human studies reveal novel mechanisms underlying placental DNA hypomethylation and potential therapeutic approaches for preeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. DMPD: Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17056121 Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Hasko ...G, Pacher P, Deitch EA, Vizi ES. Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Feb;113(2):264-75. Epub 2006 Sep 14. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Shapi...ng of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. PubmedID 17056121 Title Shapi

  2. Genetically Controlled Upregulation of Adenosine A(1) Receptor Expression Enhances the Survival of Primary Cortical Neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Atas, Hasan-Cem; Normann, Claus; van Calker, Dietrich; Biber, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has a key endogenous neuroprotective role in the brain, predominantly mediated by the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). This has been mainly explored using pharmacological tools and/or receptor knockout mice strains. It has long been suggested that the neuroprotective effects of A(1)R are

  3. Adenosine activates brown adipose tissue and recruits beige adipocytes via A2A receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Thorsten; Scheibler, Saskia; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2014-01-01

    therapies based on cold exposure or β-adrenergic agonists are clinically not feasible, alternative strategies must be explored. Purinergic co-transmission might be involved in sympathetic control of BAT and previous studies reported inhibitory effects of the purinergic transmitter adenosine in BAT from...... hamster or rat. However, the role of adenosine in human BAT is unknown. Here we show that adenosine activates human and murine brown adipocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. Adenosine is released in BAT during stimulation of sympathetic nerves as well as from brown adipocytes. The adenosine A2A...... receptor is the most abundant adenosine receptor in human and murine BAT. Pharmacological blockade or genetic loss of A2A receptors in mice causes a decrease in BAT-dependent thermogenesis, whereas treatment with A2A agonists significantly increases energy expenditure. Moreover, pharmacological stimulation...

  4. Adenosine receptor antagonists for cognitive dysfunction: a review of animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Reinaldo Naoto; Pamplona, Fabricio Alano; Prediger, Rui Daniel Schroder

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, adenosine receptors in the central nervous system have been implicated in the modulation of cognitive functions. Despite the general view that endogenous adenosine modulates cognition through the activation of adenosine A1 receptors, evidence is now emerging on a possible role of A2A receptors in learning and memory. The present review attempts to examine results reported in different studies using diverse animal models, to provide a comprehensive picture of the recent evidence of a relationship between adenosinergic function and memory deficits. The present data suggest that caffeine (a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist) and selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists can improve memory performance in rodents evaluated through different tasks. They might also afford protection against memory dysfunction elicited in experimental models of aging, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a putative genetic model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  5. Evidence for constitutively-active adenosine receptors at mammalian motor nerve endings

    OpenAIRE

    Searl, Timothy J; Silinsky, Eugene M

    2012-01-01

    A study was made to determine if constitutively active adenosine receptors are present at mouse motor nerve endings. In preparations blocked by low Ca2+ / high Mg2+ solution, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3,dipropylxanthine (CPX, 10–100 nM), which has been reported to be both an A1 adenosine receptor antagonist and inverse agonist, produced a dose-dependent increase in the number of acetylcholine quanta released by a nerve impulse. Adenosine deaminase, which degrades ambient adenosine into its inactive con...

  6. Discovery of Potent and Highly Selective A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Chemotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Maatougui, Abdelaziz; Azuaje, Jhonny; González-Gómez, Manuel; Miguez, Gabriel; Crespo, Abel; Carbajales, Carlos; Escalante, Luz; García-Mera, Xerardo; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sotelo, Eddy

    2016-03-10

    Three novel families of A2B adenosine receptor antagonists were identified in the context of the structural exploration of the 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one chemotype. The most appealing series contain imidazole, 1,2,4-triazole, or benzimidazole rings fused to the 2,3-positions of the parent diazinone core. The optimization process enabled identification of a highly potent (3.49 nM) A2B ligand that exhibits complete selectivity toward A1, A2A, and A3 receptors. The results of functional cAMP experiments confirmed the antagonistic behavior of representative ligands. The main SAR trends identified within the series were substantiated by a molecular modeling study based on a receptor-driven docking model constructed on the basis of the crystal structure of the human A2A receptor.

  7. Activation of A(2) adenosine receptors dilates cortical efferent arterioles in mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Skøtt, Ole; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine can induce vasodilatation and vasoconstriction of the renal afferent arteriole of the mouse. We determined here its direct effect on efferent arterioles of mouse kidneys. Using isolated-perfused cortical efferent arterioles, we measured changes in luminal diameter in response to adenosine....... Extraluminal application of adenosine and cyclohexyladenosine had no effect on the luminal diameter. When the vessels were constricted by the thromboxane mimetic U46619, application of adenosine and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine dilated the efferent arterioles in a dose-dependent manner. We also found...... that the adenosine-induced vasodilatation was inhibited by the A(2)-specific receptor blocker 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine. In the presence of this inhibitor, adenosine failed to alter the basal vessel diameter of quiescent efferent arterioles. Using primer-specific polymerase chain reaction we found...

  8. Adenosine promotes alternative macrophage activation via A2A and A2B receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csóka, Balázs; Selmeczy, Zsolt; Koscsó, Balázs; Németh, Zoltán H.; Pacher, Pál; Murray, Peter J.; Kepka-Lenhart, Diane; Morris, Sidney M.; Gause, William C.; Leibovich, S. Joseph; Haskó, György

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has been implicated in suppressing the proinflammatory responses of classically activated macrophages induced by Th1 cytokines. Alternative macrophage activation is induced by the Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13; however, the role of adenosine in governing alternative macrophage activation is unknown. We show here that adenosine treatment of IL-4- or IL-13-activated macrophages augments the expression of alternative macrophage markers arginase-1, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin-1. The stimulatory effect of adenosine required primarily A2B receptors because the nonselective adenosine receptor agonist 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) increased both arginase activity (EC50=261.8 nM) and TIMP-1 production (EC50=80.67 nM), and both pharmacologic and genetic blockade of A2B receptors prevented the effect of NECA. A2A receptors also contributed to the adenosine augmentation of IL-4-induced TIMP-1 release, as both adenosine and NECA were less efficacious in augmenting TIMP-1 release by A2A receptor-deficient than control macrophages. Of the transcription factors known to drive alternative macrophage activation, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β was required, while cAMP response element-binding protein and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 were dispensable in mediating the effect of adenosine. We propose that adenosine receptor activation suppresses inflammation and promotes tissue restitution, in part, by promoting alternative macrophage activation.—Csóka, B., Selmeczy, Z., Koscsó, B., Németh, Z. H., Pacher, P., Murray, P. J., Kepka-Lenhart, D., Morris S. M., Jr., Gause, W. C., Leibovich, S. J., Haskó, G. Adenosine promotes alternative macrophage activation via A2A and A2B receptors. PMID:21926236

  9. Adenosine Receptors As Drug Targets for Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan K. N. Alencar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a clinical condition characterized by pulmonary arterial remodeling and vasoconstriction, which promote chronic vessel obstruction and elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. Long-term right ventricular (RV overload leads to RV dysfunction and failure, which are the main determinants of life expectancy in PAH subjects. Therapeutic options for PAH remain limited, despite the introduction of prostacyclin analogs, endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, and soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulators within the last 15 years. Through addressing the pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cell dysfunctions associated with PAH, these interventions delay disease progression but do not offer a cure. Emerging approaches to improve treatment efficacy have focused on beneficial actions to both the pulmonary vasculature and myocardium, and several new targets have been investigated and validated in experimental PAH models. Herein, we review the effects of adenosine and adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 on the cardiovascular system, focusing on the A2A receptor as a pharmacological target. This receptor induces pulmonary vascular and heart protection in experimental models, specifically models of PAH. Targeting the A2A receptor could potentially serve as a novel and efficient approach for treating PAH and concomitant RV failure. A2A receptor activation induces pulmonary endothelial nitric oxide synthesis, smooth muscle cell hyperpolarization, and vasodilation, with important antiproliferative activities through the inhibition of collagen deposition and vessel wall remodeling in the pulmonary arterioles. The pleiotropic potential of A2A receptor activation is highlighted by its additional expression in the heart tissue, where it participates in the regulation of intracellular calcium handling and maintenance of heart chamber structure and function. In this way, the activation of A2A

  10. A comprehensive comparative review of adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Erin Y; Abraham, Teena; Saad, Nasser; Rapp, Jonathan H; Vastey, Fabienne L; Balmir, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Thrombosis risk necessitates dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and an adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonist, in patients who have acute coronary syndrome. Current guidelines emphasize the critical role of dual antiplatelet therapy in both medical management and invasive strategy, especially in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. With the availability of multiple ADP-receptor antagonists, it is crucial to select the most appropriate agent for each patient. The pertinent trials were identified through a MEDLINE search, in addition to a manual search from the articles retrieved. This review examines the differences between clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor in terms of their pharmacological/pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, drug interactions and safety parameters. Prasugrel and ticagrelor exhibit greater platelet inhibition and superior efficacy compared with clopidogrel, at the expense of higher bleeding risk. Prasugrel and ticagrelor should be preferred over clopidogrel in patients who are at a high risk of thrombotic events with low risk of bleeding. Additionally, these two agents may offer advantage over clopidogrel in those patients who might have risk for drug resistance due to CYP2C19 polymorphism. In selecting the ideal agent for patients, clinicians should tailor the antiplatelet regimen by considering individual risk factors and medication characteristics.

  11. Caffeine, Adenosine Receptors and Estrogen in Toxin Models of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwarzschild, Michael A; Xu, Kui

    2008-01-01

    Continued progress has been made toward each of the Specific Aims (SAs) 1 and 2 (SA 3 completed) of our research project, Caffeine, adenosine receptors and estrogen in toxin models of Parkinson's disease...

  12. No Effect of Nutritional Adenosine Receptor Antagonists on Exercise Performance in the Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    358–363, 1996. 11. Cook NC, Samman S. Flavonoids —chemistry, metabolism, cardiopro- tective effects, and dietary sources. Nutr Biochem 7: 66–76, 1996...metabolism and health effects of dietary flavonoids in man. Biomed Pharmacother 51: 305–310, 1997. R400 ADENOSINE RECEPTOR ANTAGONISM AND EXERCISE IN THE HEAT...Interactions of flavonoids with adenosine receptors. J Med Chem 39: 781–788, 1996. 35. MacRae HS, Mefferd KM. Dietary antioxidant supplementation com

  13. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Peakman, M C; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC5...

  14. Deletion of presynaptic adenosine A1 receptors impairs the recovery of synaptic transmission after hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, E; Crocker, A J; Saper, C B; Greene, R W; Scammell, T E

    2005-01-01

    Adenosine protects neurons during hypoxia by inhibiting excitatory synaptic transmission and preventing NMDA receptor activation. Using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing Cre recombinase, we have focally deleted adenosine A(1) receptors in specific hippocampal regions of adult mice. Recently, we found that deletion of A(1) receptors in the CA1 area blocks the postsynaptic responses to adenosine in CA1 pyramidal neurons, and deletion of A(1) receptors in CA3 neurons abolishes the presynaptic effects of adenosine on the Schaffer collateral input [J Neurosci 23 (2003) 5762]. In the current study, we used this technique to delete A(1) receptors focally from CA3 neurons to investigate whether presynaptic A(1) receptors protect synaptic transmission from hypoxia. We studied the effects of prolonged (1 h) hypoxia on the evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the CA1 region using in vitro slices. Focal deletion of the presynaptic A(1) receptors on the Schaffer collateral input slowed the depression of the fEPSPs in response to hypoxia and impaired the recovery of the fEPSPs after hypoxia. Delayed responses to hypoxia linearly correlated with impaired recovery. These findings provide direct evidence that the neuroprotective role of adenosine during hypoxia depends on the rapid inhibition of synaptic transmission by the activation of presynaptic A(1) receptors.

  15. John Daly Lecture: Structure-guided Drug Design for Adenosine and P2Y Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Jacobson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish structure activity relationships of extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, e.g. adenosine receptors (ARs and P2Y receptors (P2YRs, respectively. We synthesize selective agents for use as pharmacological probes and potential therapeutic agents (e.g. A3AR agonists for neuropathic pain. Detailed structural information derived from the X-ray crystallographic structures within these families enables the design of novel ligands, guides modification of known agonists and antagonists, and helps predict polypharmacology. Structures were recently reported for the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R, an anti-thrombotic target. Comparison of agonist-bound and antagonist-bound P2Y12R indicates unprecedented structural plasticity in the outer portions of the transmembrane (TM domains and the extracellular loops. Nonphosphate-containing ligands of the P2YRs, such as the selective P2Y14R antagonist PPTN, are desired for bioavailability and increased stability. Also, A2AAR structures are effectively applied to homology modeling of closely related A1AR and A3AR, which are not yet crystallized. Conformational constraint of normally flexible ribose with bicyclic analogues increased the ligand selectivity. Comparison of rigid A3AR agonist congeners allows the exploration of interaction of specific regions of the nucleoside analogues with the target and off-target GPCRs, such as biogenic amine receptors. Molecular modeling predicts plasticity of the A3AR at TM2 to accommodate highly rigidified ligands. Novel fluorescent derivatives of high affinity GPCR ligands are useful tool compounds for characterization of receptors and their oligomeric assemblies. Fluorescent probes are useful for characterization of GPCRs in living cells by flow cytometry and other methods. Thus, 3D knowledge of receptor binding and activation facilitates drug discovery.

  16. A Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Bitopic N6-Substituted Adenosine Derivatives as Biased Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurelio, Luigi; Baltos, Jo-Anne; Ford, Leigh; Nguyen, Anh T N; Jörg, Manuela; Devine, Shane M; Valant, Celine; White, Paul J; Christopoulos, Arthur; May, Lauren T; Scammells, Peter J

    2018-02-15

    Herein, we investigate the structure-activity relationships of a series of compounds derived from the bitopic N6-substituted adenosine derivative 1, a previously reported biased ligand at the A1 adenosine receptor. Modifications were made to the orthosteric adenosine pharmacophore, the linker and the allosteric 2-amino-3-benzoylthiophene pharmacophore to probe the structure-activity relationships, both in terms of the effect of these modifications on biased signalling as well as receptor subtype selectivity. Modification of the orthosteric pharmacophore at the 2- or 5'-positions resulted in a significant loss of bias away from calcium mobilization that was observed for 1. Interestingly, increasing the linker length by one additional carbon resulted in approximately 10-fold increase in bias away from calcium mobilization, while reducing the linker length by one carbon trended towards a reduction in bias. In terms of the allosteric pharmacophore, the trifluoromethylphenyl substituent on the thiophene ring appears to be crucial for the biased signaling away from calcium mobilization.

  17. The role of muscarinic receptors in the beneficial effects of adenosine against myocardial reperfusion injury in rats.

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    Lei Sun

    Full Text Available Adenosine, a catabolite of ATP, displays a wide variety of effects in the heart including regulation of cardiac response to myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, the precise mechanism of adenosine-induced cardioprotection is still elusive. Isolated Sprague-Dawley rat hearts underwent 30 min global ischemia and 120 min reperfusion using a Langendorff apparatus. Both adenosine and acetylcholine treatment recovered the post-reperfusion cardiac function associated with adenosine and muscarinic receptors activation. Simultaneous administration of adenosine and acetylcholine failed to exert any additive protective effect, suggesting a shared mechanism between the two. Our data further revealed a cross-talk between the adenosine and acetylcholine receptor signaling in reperfused rat hearts. Interestingly, the selective M(2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist methoctramine significantly attenuated the cardioprotective effect of adenosine. In addition, treatment with adenosine upregulated the expression and the maximal binding capacity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which were inhibited by the selective A(1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. These data suggested a possible functional coupling between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors behind the observed cardioprotection. Furthermore, nitric oxide was found involved in triggering the response to each of the two receptor agonist. In summary, there may be a cross-talk between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors in ischemic/reperfused myocardium with nitric oxide synthase might serve as the distal converging point. In addition, adenosine contributes to the invigorating effect of adenosine on muscarinic receptor thereby prompting to regulation of cardiac function. These findings argue for a potentially novel mechanism behind the adenosine

  18. Computational study of the molecular mechanisms of caffeine action: Caffeine complexes with adenosine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V. I.; Rodríguez, E.; Grokhlina, T. I.; Deriabina, A.; Gonzalez, E.

    To understand the molecular basis of the principal biological action of the caffeine (CAF), the molecular mechanics calculations of possible complexes between CAF and the fragments of human A1 adenosine receptor were performed. The fragments were selected after considerations of the CAF molecular structure and its possible interactions, as well as after an analysis of the extensive bibliography on the structure, biological role, site-directed mutagenesis, and the modeling of the adenosine receptors. The minimum energy configurations of these complexes were obtained using two different computer programs with different force fields. The most favorable configurations correspond to the formation of two hydrogen bonds between the CAF molecule and hydrophilic amino acid residues of the fragments of transmembrane domains of the receptor. These configurations are supposed to contribute to CAF blocking of the adenosine receptors. They will be used later for the construction of model CAF complexes with two transmembrane domains simultaneously.

  19. Complex formation and functional interaction between adenosine A1 receptor and type-1 metabotropic glutamate receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Kamikubo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adenosine A1 receptor (A1R is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR for adenosine, a ubiquitous neuromodulator, and thus regulates neuronal excitability, as well as arousal and sensitivity to pain. In addition, we have previously described a new mode of action for A1R: in cerebellar Purkinje cells, its activation attenuates neuronal responses to glutamate, as mediated by the type-1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1. mGluR1 is also a GPCR, and elicits such responses as long-term depression of the postsynaptic response to glutamate, a cellular basis for cerebellar motor learning. Here, we explore in greater detail the interaction between A1R and mGluR1 using non-neuronal cells. Co-immunoprecipitation and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis reveal that A1R and mGluR1 form a complex. Furthermore, we found that mGluR1 activation inhibits A1R signaling, as measured by changes in intracellular cAMP. These findings demonstrate that A1R and mGluR1 have the intrinsic ability to form a heteromeric complex and mutually modulate signaling. This interaction may represent a new form of intriguing GPCR-mediated cellular responses.

  20. REDUCTION OF ADENOSINE-A1-RECEPTORS IN THE PERFORANT PATHWAY TERMINAL ZONE IN ALZHEIMER HIPPOCAMPUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAARSMA, D; SEBENS, JB; KORF, J

    1991-01-01

    The cells of origin of the perforant pathway are destroyed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In rat the adenosine A1-receptors are specifically localized on the perforant path terminals in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. In the present study the density of A1-receptors in the hippocampus of

  1. Targeting Adenosine A2A Receptors in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    1Facultad de Ciencias Químicas BUAP and 2Centro de Estudios Regionales UAY. *(ilhlimon@siu.buap.mx). Background: The A2A receptors antagonists have been...Funded by: FCQ- BUAP . Targeting Adenosine A2A Receptors in Parkinson’s Disease and Other CNS Disorders May 17 - 19, 2006 Boston

  2. Modulation of Adenosine Receptors by [60]Fullerene Hydrosoluble Derivative in SK-N-MC Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The most known fullerenes are spherical carbon compounds composed of 60 carbon atoms. C60 fullerenes have shown biochemical and biomedical properties in the last years such as as blockade of apoptosis and neuroprotection. The nucleoside adenosine has a neuroprotective role mainly due to inhibition of glutamate release, which is a neurotransmitter related to excitotoxicity and cell death. In the present work, we have determined the presence of adenosine receptors in SK-N-MC cells, a neuroepithelioma human cell line, and analyzed the effect of fullerenes in these receptors by using radioligand binding, immunoblotting, and quantitative real time PCR assays. Results demonstrated that SK-N-MC cells endogenously express adenosine receptors. Fullerene exposure of these cells did not affect cell viability measured by MTT reduction assay. However, adenosine A1 and A2A receptors were both increased in SK-N-MC cells after treatment. These results suggest for the first time the modulation of adenosine receptors after C60 fullerenes exposure. PMID:22816023

  3. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation Improves Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzino, Gabriele; Irrera, Natasha; Galfo, Federica; Oteri, Giacomo; Atteritano, Marco; Pallio, Giovanni; Mannino, Federica; D'Amore, Angelica; Pellegrino, Enrica; Aliquò, Federica; Anastasi, Giuseppe P; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Bitto, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is a secondary cause of bone loss. Bisphosphonates approved for GIO, might induce jaw osteonecrosis; thus additional therapeutics are required. Adenosine receptor agonists are positive regulators of bone remodeling, thus the efficacy of adenosine receptor stimulation for treating GIO was tested. In a preventive study GIO was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by methylprednisolone (MP) for 60 days. Animals were randomly assigned to receive polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), an adenosine A2 receptor agonist, or PDRN and DMPX (3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A 2 antagonist), or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). Another set of animals was used for a treatment study, following the 60 days of MP-induction rats were randomized to receive (for additional 60 days) PDRN, or PDRN and DMPX (an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist), or zoledronate (as control for gold standard treatment), or vehicle. Control animals were administered with vehicle for either 60 or 120 days. Femurs were analyzed after treatments for histology, imaging, and breaking strength analysis. MP treatment induced severe bone loss, the concomitant use of PDRN prevented the developing of osteoporosis. In rats treated for 120 days, PDRN restored bone architecture and bone strength; increased b-ALP, osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin and stimulated the Wnt canonical and non-canonical pathway. Zoledronate reduced bone resorption and ameliorated the histological features, without significant effects on bone formation. Our results suggest that adenosine receptor stimulation might be useful for preventing and treating GIO.

  4. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation Improves Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Pizzino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO is a secondary cause of bone loss. Bisphosphonates approved for GIO, might induce jaw osteonecrosis; thus additional therapeutics are required. Adenosine receptor agonists are positive regulators of bone remodeling, thus the efficacy of adenosine receptor stimulation for treating GIO was tested. In a preventive study GIO was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by methylprednisolone (MP for 60 days. Animals were randomly assigned to receive polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN, an adenosine A2 receptor agonist, or PDRN and DMPX (3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 antagonist, or vehicle (0.9% NaCl. Another set of animals was used for a treatment study, following the 60 days of MP-induction rats were randomized to receive (for additional 60 days PDRN, or PDRN and DMPX (an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist, or zoledronate (as control for gold standard treatment, or vehicle. Control animals were administered with vehicle for either 60 or 120 days. Femurs were analyzed after treatments for histology, imaging, and breaking strength analysis. MP treatment induced severe bone loss, the concomitant use of PDRN prevented the developing of osteoporosis. In rats treated for 120 days, PDRN restored bone architecture and bone strength; increased b-ALP, osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin and stimulated the Wnt canonical and non-canonical pathway. Zoledronate reduced bone resorption and ameliorated the histological features, without significant effects on bone formation. Our results suggest that adenosine receptor stimulation might be useful for preventing and treating GIO.

  5. Capadenoson, a clinically trialed partial adenosine A1receptor agonist, can stimulate adenosine A2Breceptor biased agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Vecchio, Elizabeth A; Harris, Matthew A; Qin, Cheng Xue; Ritchie, Rebecca H; Christopoulos, Arthur; White, Paul J; May, Lauren T

    2017-07-01

    The adenosine A 2B receptor (A 2B AR) has been identified as an important therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease, however in vitro and in vivo targeting has been limited by the paucity of pharmacological tools, particularly potent agonists. Interestingly, 2-((6-amino-3,5-dicyano-4-(4-(cyclopropylmethoxy)phenyl)-2-pyridinyl)thio)acetamide (BAY60-6583), a potent and subtype-selective A 2B AR agonist, has the same core structure as 2-amino-6-[[2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,3-thiazol-4-yl]methylsulfanyl]-4-[4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)phenyl]pyridine-3,5-dicarbonitril (capadenoson). Capadenoson, currently classified as an adenosine A 1 receptor (A 1 AR) partial agonist, has undergone two Phase IIa clinical trials, initially in patients with atrial fibrillation and subsequently in patients with stable angina. Capadenoson has also been shown to decrease cardiac remodeling in an animal model of advanced heart failure and a capadenoson derivative, neladenoson bialanate, recently entered clinical development for the treatment of chronic heart failure. The therapeutic effects of capadenoson are currently thought to be mediated through the A 1 AR. However, the ability of capadenoson to stimulate additional adenosine receptor subtypes, in particular the A 2B AR, has not been rigorously assessed. In this study, we demonstrate that capadenoson does indeed have significant A 2B AR activity in physiologically relevant cells, cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes, which endogenously express the A 2B AR. Relative to the non-selective adenosine receptor agonist NECA, capadenoson was a biased A 2B AR agonist with a preference for cAMP signal transduction over other downstream mediators in cells with recombinant and endogenous A 2B AR expression. These findings suggest the reclassification of capadenoson as a dual A 1 AR/A 2B AR agonist. Furthermore, a potential A 2B AR contribution should be an important consideration for the future clinical development of capadenoson-like therapeutics, as the A

  6. IL-4 amplifies the pro-inflammatory effect of adenosine in human mast cells by changing expression levels of adenosine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Hua

    Full Text Available Adenosine inhalation produces immediate bronchoconstriction in asthmatics but not in normal subjects. The bronchospastic effect of adenosine is largely mediated through adenosine-induced mast cell activation, the mechanism of which is poorly understood due to limitations in culturing human primary mast cells. Here, we show that human umbilical cord blood -derived mast cells incubated with the Th2 cytokine IL-4 develop increased sensitivity to adenosine. Potentiation of anti-IgE- induced and calcium ionophore/PMA-induced degranulation was augmented in mast cells cultured with IL-4, and this effect was reduced or abolished by pre-treatment with A(2BsiRNA and selective A(2B receptor antagonists, respectively. IL-4 incubation resulted in the increased expression of A(2B and reduced expression of A(2A adenosine receptors on human mast cells. These results suggest that Th2 cytokines in the asthmatic lung may alter adenosine receptor expression on airway mast cells to promote increased responsiveness to adenosine.

  7. IL-4 Amplifies the Pro-Inflammatory Effect of Adenosine in Human Mast Cells by Changing Expression Levels of Adenosine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiaoyang; Chason, Kelly D.; Patel, Janki Y.; Naselsky, Warren C.; Tilley, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine inhalation produces immediate bronchoconstriction in asthmatics but not in normal subjects. The bronchospastic effect of adenosine is largely mediated through adenosine-induced mast cell activation, the mechanism of which is poorly understood due to limitations in culturing human primary mast cells. Here, we show that human umbilical cord blood -derived mast cells incubated with the Th2 cytokine IL-4 develop increased sensitivity to adenosine. Potentiation of anti-IgE- induced and calcium ionophore/PMA-induced degranulation was augmented in mast cells cultured with IL-4, and this effect was reduced or abolished by pre-treatment with A2BsiRNA and selective A2B receptor antagonists, respectively. IL-4 incubation resulted in the increased expression of A2B and reduced expression of A2A adenosine receptors on human mast cells. These results suggest that Th2 cytokines in the asthmatic lung may alter adenosine receptor expression on airway mast cells to promote increased responsiveness to adenosine. PMID:21966389

  8. GIRK channel activation via adenosine or muscarinic receptors has similar effects on rat atrial electrophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liang, Bo; Skibsbye, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK) are important in the regulation of heart rate and atrial electrophysiology. GIRK channels are activated by G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic M2 receptors and adenosine A1 receptors. The aim of this study was to characterize...... and compare the electrophysiological effects of acetylcholine (ACh) and adenosine on GIRK channels in rat atria. Action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90), effective refractory period (ERP), and resting membrane potential (RMP) were investigated in isolated rat atria by intracellular recordings....... Both the adenosine analog N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and ACh profoundly shortened APD90 and ERP and hyperpolarized the RMP. No additive or synergistic effect of CPA and ACh coapplication was observed. To antagonize GIRK channel activation, the specific inhibitor rTertiapin Q (TTQ) was applied...

  9. Bradykinin and adenosine receptors mediate desflurane induced postconditioning in human myocardium: role of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Jean-Louis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desflurane during early reperfusion has been shown to postcondition human myocardium, in vitro. We investigated the role of adenosine and bradykinin receptors, and generation of radical oxygen species in desflurane-induced postconditioning in human myocardium. Methods We recorded isometric contraction of human right atrial trabeculae hanged in an oxygenated Tyrode's solution (34 degrees Celsius, stimulation frequency 1 Hz. After a 30-min hypoxic period, desflurane 6% was administered during the first 5 min of reoxygenation. Desflurane was administered alone or with pretreatment of N-mercaptopropionylglycine, a reactive oxygen species scavenger, 8-(p-Sulfophenyltheophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, HOE140, a selective B2 bradykinin receptor antagonist. In separate groups, adenosine and bradykinin were administered during the first minutes of reoxygenation alone or in presence of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. The force of contraction of trabeculae was recorded continuously. Developed force at the end of a 60-min reoxygenation period was compared (mean ± standard deviation between the groups by a variance analysis and post hoc test. Results Desflurane 6% (84 ± 6% of baseline enhanced the recovery of force after 60-min of reoxygenation as compared to control group (51 ± 8% of baseline, P N-mercaptopropionylglycine (54 ± 3% of baseline, 8-(p-Sulfophenyltheophylline (62 ± 9% of baseline, HOE140 (58 ± 6% of baseline abolished desflurane-induced postconditioning. Adenosine (80 ± 9% of baseline and bradykinin (83 ± 4% of baseline induced postconditioning (P vs control, N-mercaptopropionylglycine abolished the beneficial effects of adenosine and bradykinin (54 ± 8 and 58 ± 5% of baseline, respectively. Conclusions In vitro, desflurane-induced postconditioning depends on reactive oxygen species production, activation of adenosine and bradykinin B2 receptors. And, the cardioprotective effect of adenosine and bradykinin

  10. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicita Pedata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes. Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke.

  11. Indirect modulation of dopamine D2 receptors as potential pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia: I. Adenosine agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D A; Fenix, L A; Kim, D M; Raffa, R B

    1999-04-01

    To review preclinical and clinical information related to pharmacologic modulation of dopamine D2 receptors as potential novel antipsychotic therapy. Specifically, to summarize the data that suggest a modulatory action of adenosine A2A receptors on dopamine D2 receptors and, therefore, a possible rational role of adenosine A2A agonists as novel antipsychotic agents. Primary and review articles were identified by MEDLINE search (from 1966 to May 1998) and through secondary sources. All of the articles identified from the data sources were evaluated and all information deemed relevant was included in this review. For all of the older and many of the newer antipsychotic agents, there is a strong correlation between clinical antipsychotic activity and affinity for dopamine D2 receptors. Unfortunately, dopamine D2 receptors are believed to also be involved in the adverse effect profile of these agents. The indirect modulation of dopamine D2 receptors, rather than direct block, might produce antipsychotic effects without the usual adverse reactions. Several lines of evidence from animal studies suggest that the use of selective A2A agonists might represent a novel approach to the treatment of psychoses. Dopamine receptor modulation might represent a novel antipsychotic approach or adjunct therapy. The data regarding adenosine agonists (particularly selective A2A receptor agonists) are inconclusive at the present time. Direct clinical demonstration of effectiveness is required.

  12. In Vivo PET Imaging of Adenosine 2A Receptors in Neuroinflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vuorimaa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors are G-protein coupled P1 purinergic receptors that are broadly expressed in the peripheral immune system, vasculature, and the central nervous system (CNS. Within the immune system, adenosine 2A (A2A receptor-mediated signaling exerts a suppressive effect on ongoing inflammation. In healthy CNS, A2A receptors are expressed mainly within the neurons of the basal ganglia. Alterations in A2A receptor function and expression have been noted in movement disorders, and in Parkinson’s disease pharmacological A2A receptor antagonism leads to diminished motor symptoms. Although A2A receptors are expressed only at a low level in the healthy CNS outside striatum, pathological challenge or inflammation has been shown to lead to upregulation of A2A receptors in extrastriatal CNS tissue, and this has been successfully quantitated using in vivo positron emission tomography (PET imaging and A2A receptor-binding radioligands. Several radioligands for PET imaging of A2A receptors have been developed in recent years, and A2A receptor-targeting PET imaging may thus provide a potential additional tool to evaluate various aspects of neuroinflammation in vivo. This review article provides a brief overview of A2A receptors in healthy brain and in a selection of most important neurological diseases and describes the recent advances in A2A receptor-targeting PET imaging studies.

  13. Adenosine inhibits neutrophil vascular endothelial growth factor release and transendothelial migration via A2B receptor activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    The effects of adenosine on neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophils; PMN)-directed changes in vascular permeability are poorly characterized. This study investigated whether adenosine modulates activated PMN vascular endothelial growth factor (vascular permeability factor; VEGF) release and transendothelial migration. PMN activated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, 10 ng\\/mL) were incubated with adenosine and its receptor-specific analogues. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF. PMN transendothelial migration across human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers was assessed in vitro. Adhesion molecule receptor expression was assessed flow cytometrically. Adenosine and some of its receptor-specific analogues dose-dependently inhibited activated PMN VEGF release. The rank order of potency was consistent with the affinity profile of human A2B receptors. The inhibitory effect of adenosine was reversed by 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 receptor antagonist. Adenosine (100 microM) or the A2B receptor agonist 5\\'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 100 microM) significantly reduced PMN transendothelial migration. However, expression of activated PMN beta2 integrins and HUVEC ICAM-1 were not significantly altered by adenosine or NECA. Adenosine attenuates human PMN VEGF release and transendothelial migration via the A2B receptor. This provides a novel target for the modulation of PMN-directed vascular hyperpermeability in conditions such as the capillary leak syndrome.

  14. NCS-1 associates with adenosine A2A receptors and modulates receptor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma eNavarro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signalling by local changes in intracellular calcium concentration is an established function of Calmodulin which is known to interact with many GPCRs. Less is known about the functional role of the closely related neuronal EF-hand Ca2+-sensor proteins that frequently associate with calmodulin targets with different functional outcome. In the present study we aimed to investigate if a target of calmodulin – the A2A adenosine receptor, is able to associate with two other neuronal calcium binding proteins, namely NCS-1 and caldendrin. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation experiments we show the existence of A2A - NCS-1 complexes in living cells whereas caldendrin did not associate with A2A receptors under the conditions tested. Interestingly, NCS-1 binding modulated downstream A2A receptor intracellular signalling in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Taken together this study provides further evidence that neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins play an important role in modulation of GPCR signalling.

  15. Untangling dopamine-adenosine receptor-receptor assembly in experimental parkinsonism in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Fernández-Dueñas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a dopaminergic-related pathology in which functioning of the basal ganglia is altered. It has been postulated that a direct receptor-receptor interaction – i.e. of dopamine D2 receptor (D2R with adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR (forming D2R-A2AR oligomers – finely regulates this brain area. Accordingly, elucidating whether the pathology prompts changes to these complexes could provide valuable information for the design of new PD therapies. Here, we first resolved a long-standing question concerning whether D2R-A2AR assembly occurs in native tissue: by means of different complementary experimental approaches (i.e. immunoelectron microscopy, proximity ligation assay and TR-FRET, we unambiguously identified native D2R-A2AR oligomers in rat striatum. Subsequently, we determined that, under pathological conditions (i.e. in a rat PD model, D2R-A2AR interaction was impaired. Collectively, these results provide definitive evidence for alteration of native D2R-A2AR oligomers in experimental parkinsonism, thus conferring the rationale for appropriate oligomer-based PD treatments.

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) against organophosphate intoxication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bueters, T.J.H.; Groen, B.; Danhof, M.; IJzerman, A.P.; Helden, H.P.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether reduction of central acetylcholine (ACh) accumulation by adenosine receptor agonists could serve as a generic treatment against organophosphate (OP) poisoning. The OPs studied were tabun (O-ethyl-N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), sarin

  17. Attenuated renovascular constrictor responses to angiotensin II in adenosine 1 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B; Hashimoto, Seiji; Briggs, Josie

    2003-01-01

    In the present experiments we examined the renovascular constrictor effects of ANG II in the chronic and complete absence of A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) using mice with targeted deletion of the A1AR gene. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was not different between A1AR +/+ and A1AR -/- mice unde...

  18. Adenosine A2B receptor: from cell biology to human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR’s functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases.

  19. Endogenous activation of adenosine A1 receptors promotes post-ischemic electrocortical burst suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilie, A; Ciocan, D; Constantinescu, A O

    2009-01-01

    . Several lines of evidence suggest that BS reflects an impairment of neocortical connectivity. Here we tested in vivo whether synaptic depression by adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) activation contributes to BS patterns following GCI. Male Wistar rats were subjected to 1, 5 or 10 min of GCI using a "four......-min GCI the effect of DPCPX was only apparent on the initial fast decay of the BS ratio. These data suggest that endogenous adenosine release promotes BS patterns during reperfusion following transient cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, the endogenous A1R activation may be the primary underlying cause...

  20. Adenosine receptors in rat and human pancreatic ducts stimulate chloride transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Hede, Susanne; Hansen, Mette

    2007-01-01

    these could be involved in secretory processes, which involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels or Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and [Formula: see text] transporters. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis on rat pancreatic ducts and human duct cell......, it was found that 58% of PANC-1 cells responded to adenosine, whereas only 9% of CFPAC-1 cells responded. Adenosine elicited Ca(2+) signals only in a few rat and human duct cells, which did not seem to correlate with Cl(-) signals. A(2A) receptors were localized in the luminal membranes of rat pancreatic ducts...

  1. Adenosine inhibits renin release from juxtaglomerular cells via an A1 receptor-TRPC-mediated pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Capisano, M. Cecilia; Atchison, Douglas K.; Harding, Pamela; Lasley, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Renin is synthesized and released from juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. Adenosine inhibits renin release via an adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) calcium-mediated pathway. How this occurs is unknown. In cardiomyocytes, adenosine increases intracellular calcium via transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. We hypothesized that adenosine inhibits renin release via A1R activation, opening TRPC channels. However, higher concentrations of adenosine may stimulate renin release through A2R activation. Using primary cultures of isolated mouse JG cells, immunolabeling demonstrated renin and A1R in JG cells, but not A2R subtypes, although RT-PCR indicated the presence of mRNA of both A2AR and A2BR. Incubating JG cells with increasing concentrations of adenosine decreased renin release. Different concentrations of the adenosine receptor agonist N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) did not change renin. Activating A1R with 0.5 μM N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) decreased basal renin release from 0.22 ± 0.05 to 0.14 ± 0.03 μg of angiotensin I generated per milliliter of sample per hour of incubation (AngI/ml/mg prot) (P renin. Reducing extracellular calcium with EGTA increased renin release (0.35 ± 0.08 μg AngI/ml/mg prot; P renin inhibition by CHA (0.28 ± 0.06 μg AngI/ml/mg prot; P renin release by 55%, and blocked the inhibitory effect of CHA. Repeating these experiments in JG cells from A1R knockout mice using CHA or NECA demonstrated no effect on renin release. However, RT-PCR showed mRNA from TRPC isoforms 3 and 6 in isolated JG cells. Adding the TRPC blocker SKF-96365 reversed CHA-mediated inhibition of renin release. Thus A1R activation results in a calcium-dependent inhibition of renin release via TRPC-mediated calcium entry, but A2 receptors do not regulate renin release. PMID:23884142

  2. Stimulation of endothelial adenosine Al receptors enhances adhesion of neutrophils in the intact guinea pig coronary system

    OpenAIRE

    Zahler, Stefan; Becker, Bernhard F.; Raschke, P.; Gerlach, E.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim was to determine the action of pathophysiologically relevant adenosine concentrations (0.1-1 μM) on adhesion of neutrophils to coronary endothelium. Further aims were to evaluate the nature and localisation of the adenosine receptor involved. and to assess the effect of endogenous adenosine. Methods: Adhesion was studied in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts by determining the number of cells emerging in the coronary effluent after intracoronary bolus injections...

  3. Abolished tubuloglomerular feedback and increased plasma renin in adenosine A1 receptor deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, R.; Ollerstam, A.; Johansson, B.

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis that adenosine acting on adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) regulates several renal functions and mediates tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) was examined using A1R knockout mice. We anesthetized knockout, wild-type, and heterozygous mice and measured glomerular filtration rate, TGF response...... greater in the A1R knockout mice [74.2 +/- 14.3 milli-Goldblatt units (mGU)/ml] mice compared with the wild-type and A1R+/- mice (36.3 +/- 8.5 and 34.1 +/- 9.6 mGU/ml), respectively. The results demonstrate that adenosine acting on A1R is required for TGF and modulates renin release....

  4. Species difference in the G protein selectivity of the human and bovine A1-adenosine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jockers, R; Linder, M E; Hohenegger, M; Nanoff, C; Bertin, B; Strosberg, A D; Marullo, S; Freissmuth, M

    1994-12-23

    The purified bovine brain A1-adenosine receptor has previously been shown to discriminate among closely related G protein alpha-subunits. To obtain analogous information for the human receptor, the cDNA coding for the human A1-adenosine receptor was inserted into a plasmid placing the synthesis of the receptor protein under the control of the MalE promoter. Following induction by maltose, active receptor accumulated in Escherichia coli membranes. Binding of the antagonist 8-[3H]cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine to E. coli membranes (KD approximately 2 nM, Bmax approximately 0.2-0.4 pmol/mg) showed the appropriate pharmacological profile. Incubation of E. coli membranes with purified Go,i-reconstituted guanine nucleotide-sensitive high affinity binding of the agonist (-)[125I] N6-3-(iodo-4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)adenosine to the receptor (KD approximately 1 nM). In the presence of purified beta gamma-subunit, the recombinant receptor interacted equally well with the recombinant G protein alpha-subunits Gi alpha-1, Gi alpha-2, Gi alpha-3; G(o) alpha displayed a lower affinity for the receptor while Gs alpha was inactive. Parallel experiments were carried out in bovine and human brain membranes pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide to inactivate the endogenous G(o)/Gi proteins; Gi alpha-3 was most potent in reconstituting 125I-HPIA binding to bovine membranes, while Gi alpha-1, Gi alpha-2, and G(o) alpha displayed similar affinities. However, in human membranes, Gi alpha-1, Gi alpha-2, and Gi alpha-3, were equipotent and high concentrations of G(o) alpha were required to promote 125I-HPIA binding. These observations show (i) that functional human A1-adenosine receptors were synthesized in E. coli; (ii) that the pattern of G protein coupling is identical for the recombinant human A1-receptor and its counterpart in the native membrane; (iii) and that species differences between bovine and human receptor exist not only in their pharmacological profile but also in their G

  5. Selectivity is species-dependent: Characterization of standard agonists and antagonists at human, rat, and mouse adenosine receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alnouri, Mohamad Wessam; Jepards, Stephan; Casari, Alessandro; Schiedel, Anke C; Hinz, Sonja; Müller, Christa E

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) have emerged as new drug targets. The majority of data on affinity/potency and selectivity of AR ligands described in the literature has been obtained for the human species...

  6. Excessive penile norepinephrine level underlies impaired erectile function in adenosine A1 receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Chen; Qi, Lin; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Zhang, Weiru; Wang, Wei; Blackburn, Michael; Kellems, Rodney; Xia, Yang

    2012-10-01

    Penile erection is a complex neurovascular physiological event controlled by multiple factors and signaling pathways. A considerable amount of evidence indicates that adenosine plays a significant role in cavernosal smooth muscle relaxation. However, the specific role of adenosine and its receptors in erectile physiology and pathology is not fully understood. To determine the role of the adenosine A1 receptor (ADORA1) in penile erection. Adenosine A1 receptor deficient (Adora1-/-) mice and aged-matched wild-type (WT) mice were utilized. We evaluated the in vivo erectile function by measuring the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) in response to cavernous nerve stimulation (CNS). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the norepinephrine (NE) plasma concentration in the corpus cavernosum and systemic circulation. We also evaluated the myosin light chain phosphorylation (p-MLC) in penile tissue pre- and post-CNS. The main outcome measurement of this research was the evaluation of in vivo erectile response to CNS by measuring the ICP in Adora1-/- mice and WT mice and to identify the localization and specific neuron types of ADORA1 expression by dual immunostaining and immunofluorescence co-localization. In vivo, both the ratio of CNS-induced Maximum ICP to mean arterial pressure and CNS-induced slope in Adora1-/- mice were significantly lower than WT mice. At the cellular level in penile tissue, we determined that ADORA1 was highly abundant in neuronal cells. During penile erection, Adora1-/- mice exhibited a higher level of NE plasma concentration in the penis than WT mice. And WT mice had a significantly greater reduction in p-MLC compared to Adora1-/- mice. Our results show that ADORA1 is enriched on neuron cells where it functions to control NE release. Activation of this receptor during penile erection results in reduced NE release and reduced cavernosal smooth muscle contraction, therefore facilitating penile erection. © 2012 International Society for

  7. Adenosine A2B receptor blockade slows growth of bladder and breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Li, Yuesheng; Theodorescu, Dan; Strieter, Robert M; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of high levels of adenosine in tumors activates A(2A) and A(2B) receptors on immune cells and inhibits their ability to suppress tumor growth. Deletion of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)ARs) has been reported to activate antitumor T cells, stimulate dendritic cell (DC) function, and inhibit angiogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of intermittent intratumor injection of a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, aminophylline (AMO; theophylline ethylenediamine) and, for the first time to our knowledge, a selective A(2B)AR antagonist, ATL801. AMO and ATL801 slowed the growth of MB49 bladder and 4T1 breast tumors in syngeneic mice and reduced by 85% metastasizes of breast cancer cells from mammary fat to lung. Based on experiments with A(2A)AR(-/-) or adenosine A(2B) receptor(-/-) mice, the effect of AMO injection was unexpectedly attributed to A(2B)AR and not to A(2A)AR blockade. AMO and ATL801 significantly increased tumor levels of IFN-γ and the IFN-inducible chemokine CXCL10, which is a ligand for CXCR3. This was associated with an increase in activated tumor-infiltrating CXCR3(+) T cells and a decrease in endothelial cell precursors within tumors. Tumor growth inhibition by AMO or ATL801 was eliminated in CXCR3(-/-) mice and RAG1(-/-) mice that lack mature T cells. In RAG1(-/-) mice, A(2B)AR deletion enhanced CD86 expression on CD11b(-) DCs. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that CXCR3 and A(2B)AR expression on bone marrow cells is required for the antitumor effects of AMO. The data suggest that blockade of A(2B)ARs enhances DC activation and CXCR3-dependent antitumor responses.

  8. Differential inhibition of noradrenaline release mediated by inhibitory A₁-adenosine receptors in the mesenteric vein and artery from normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Pereira, C; Sousa, J B; Vieira-Rocha, M S; Fresco, P; Gonçalves, J; Diniz, C

    2013-03-01

    Mesenteric arteries and veins are densely innervated by sympathetic nerves and are crucial in the regulation of peripheral resistance and capacitance, respectively, thus, in the control of blood pressure. Presynaptic adenosine receptors are involved in vascular tonus regulation, by modulating noradrenaline release from vascular postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings. Some studies also suggest that adenosine receptors (AR) may have a role in hypertension. We aim at investigating the role of presynaptic adenosine receptors in mesenteric vessels and establish a relationship between their effects (in mesenteric vessels) and hypertension, using the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) as a model of hypertension. Adenosine receptor-mediated modulation of noradrenaline release was investigated through the effects of selective agonists and antagonists on electrically-evoked [(3)H]-noradrenaline overflow. CPA (A1AR selective agonist: 1-100 nM) inhibited tritium overflow, but the inhibition was lower in SHR mesenteric vessels. IB-MECA (A3AR selective agonist: 1-100 nM) also inhibited tritium overflow but only in WKY mesenteric veins. CGS 21680 (A2AAR selective agonist: up to 100 nM) failed to facilitate noradrenaline release in mesenteric veins, from both strains, but induced a similar facilitation in the mesenteric arteries. NECA (non-selective AR agonist: 1, 3 and 10μM), in the presence of A1 (DPCPX, 20 nM) and A3 (MRS 1523, 1 μM) AR selective antagonists, failed to change tritium overflow. In summary, the modulatory effects mediated by presynaptic adenosine receptors were characterized, for the first time, in mesenteric vessels: a major inhibition exerted by the A1 subtype in both vessels; a slight inhibition mediated by A3 receptors in mesenteric vein; a facilitation mediated by A2A receptors only in mesenteric artery (from both strains). The less efficient prejunctional adenosine receptor mediated inhibitory effects can contribute to an increase of noradrenaline in

  9. The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M B; Fuxe, K; Werge, T

    2002-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 has shown effects similar to dopamine antagonists in behavioural assays in rats predictive for antipsychotic activity, without induction of extrapyramidal side-effects (EPS). In the present study, we examined whether this functional dopamine antagonism...... showed a functional anti-dopaminergic effect in Cebus apella monkeys without production of EPS. This further substantiates that adenosine A2A receptor agonists may have potential as antipsychotics with atypical profiles....

  10. Adenosine A

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vallon, Volker; Schroth, Jana; Satriano, Joseph; Blantz, Roland C; Thomson, Scott C; Rieg, Timo

    2009-01-01

    ...'). Here, experiments were performed in adenosine A receptor knockout mice (A R-/-), which lack an immediate TGF response, to determine whether A Rs are essential for early diabetic hyperfiltration and the salt paradox. Methods...

  11. Adenosine A2a receptors and O2 sensing in development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, via activation of adenylate kinase and the resulting exponential rise in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio, appears to be a critical factor underlying O2 sensing in many chemoreceptive tissues in mammals. The elevated AMP/ATP ratio, in turn, activates key enzymes that are involved in physiologic adjustments that tend to balance ATP supply and demand. An example is the conversion of AMP to adenosine via 5′-nucleotidase and the resulting activation of adenosine A2A receptors, which are involved in acute oxygen sensing by both carotid bodies and the brain. In fetal sheep, A2A receptors associated with carotid bodies trigger hypoxic cardiovascular chemoreflexes, while central A2A receptors mediate hypoxic inhibition of breathing and rapid eye movements. A2A receptors are also involved in hypoxic regulation of fetal endocrine systems, metabolism, and vascular tone. In developing lambs, A2A receptors play virtually no role in O2 sensing by the carotid bodies, but brain A2A receptors remain critically involved in the roll-off ventilatory response to hypoxia. In adult mammals, A2A receptors have been implicated in O2 sensing by carotid glomus cells, while central A2A receptors likely blunt hypoxic hyperventilation. In conclusion, A2A receptors are crucially involved in the transduction mechanisms of O2 sensing in fetal carotid bodies and brains. Postnatally, central A2A receptors remain key mediators of hypoxic respiratory depression, but they are less critical for O2 sensing in carotid chemoreceptors, particularly in developing lambs. PMID:21677265

  12. Discovery of LAS101057: A Potent, Selective, and Orally Efficacious A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Paul; Esteve, Cristina; González, Jacob; Fonquerna, Silvia; Aiguadé, Josep; Carranco, Inés; Doménech, Teresa; Aparici, Mònica; Miralpeix, Montserrat; Albertí, Joan; Córdoba, Mónica; Fernández, Raquel; Pont, Mercè; Godessart, Núria; Prats, Neus; Loza, María Isabel; Cadavid, María Isabel; Nueda, Arsenio; Vidal, Bernat

    2011-03-10

    The structure-activity relationships for a series of pyrazine-based A2B adenosine receptor antagonists are described. From this work, LAS101057 (17), a potent, selective, and orally efficacious A2B receptor antagonist, was identified as a clinical development candidate. LAS101057 inhibits agonist-induced IL-6 production in human fibroblasts and is active in an ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mouse model after oral administration, reducing airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, Th2 cytokine production, and OVA-specific IgE levels.

  13. Stimulation of endothelial adenosine A1 receptors enhances adhesion of neutrophils in the intact guinea pig coronary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahler, S; Becker, B F; Raschke, P; Gerlach, E

    1994-09-01

    The primary aim was to determine the action of pathophysiologically relevant adenosine concentrations (0.1-1 microM) on adhesion of neutrophils to coronary endothelium. Further aims were to evaluate the nature and localisation of the adenosine receptor involved, and to assess the effect of endogenous adenosine. Adhesion was studied in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts by determining the number of cells emerging in the coronary effluent after intracoronary bolus injections of 600,000 neutrophils prepared from guinea pig or human blood. The system was characterised by the use of the proadhesive stimulus thrombin. A 5 min infusion of adenosine (0.1-0.3 microM) or the A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 0.01 microM) significantly increased adhesion from about 20% (control) to 30%. This effect was prevented by the A1 receptor antagonist dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microM). It was not diminished by cessation of adenosine infusion 90 s prior to neutrophil injection. At a higher concentration of adenosine (1 microM), adhesion did not seem to be enhanced. However, coinfusion of the A2 receptor antagonist 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX, 0.1 microM) with 1 microM adenosine unmasked the A1 action, adhesion rising to 39%. Adenosine had a quantitatively identical effect on adhesion of human neutrophils. Total ischaemia of 15 min duration raised adhesion of subsequently applied neutrophils to 35%. This effect was completely blocked by DPCPX, as well as by ischaemic preconditioning (3 x 3 min). Preconditioning raised initial postischaemic coronary effluent adenosine from about 0.8 microM to 1.5 microM. The findings suggest a bimodal participation of adenosine in the development of postischaemic dysfunction by an endothelium dependent modulation of neutrophil adhesion. Stimulation occurs via endothelial A1 receptors at submicromolar adenosine levels, whereas cardioprotection by adenosine may in part relate to the use of pharmacologically high

  14. Excess adenosine in murine penile erectile tissues contributes to priapism via A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Tiejuan; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Zhang, Hong; Uray, Karen; Chunn, Janci L.; Xia, Ling Wei; Molina, Jose G.; Weisbrodt, Norman W.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Priapism, abnormally prolonged penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation, is associated with ischemia-mediated erectile tissue damage and subsequent erectile dysfunction. It is common among males with sickle cell disease (SCD), and SCD transgenic mice are an accepted model of the disorder. Current strategies to manage priapism suffer from a poor fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disorder. Here we report that mice lacking adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of adenosine, displayed unexpected priapic activity. ADA enzyme therapy successfully corrected the priapic activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that it was dependent on elevated adenosine levels. Further genetic and pharmacologic evidence demonstrated that A2B adenosine receptor–mediated (A2BR-mediated) cAMP and cGMP induction was required for elevated adenosine–induced prolonged penile erection. Finally, priapic activity in SCD transgenic mice was also caused by elevated adenosine levels and A2BR activation. Thus, we have shown that excessive adenosine accumulation in the penis contributes to priapism through increased A2BR signaling in both Ada–/– and SCD transgenic mice. These findings provide insight regarding the molecular basis of priapism and suggest that strategies to either reduce adenosine or block A2BR activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:18340377

  15. Adenosine elicits an eNOS-independent reduction in arterial blood pressure in conscious mice that involves adenosine A(2A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik; Jaff, Mohammad G; Høgh, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    Aims:  Adenosine plays an important role in the regulation of heart rate and vascular reactivity. However, the mechanisms underlying the acute effect of adenosine on arterial blood pressure in conscious mice are unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the effect of the nucleoside on mean...... arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in conscious mice. Methods:  Chronic indwelling catheters were placed in C57Bl/6J (WT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knock-out (eNOS(-/-) ) mice for continuous measurements of MAP and HR. Using PCR and myograph analysis involment of adenosine...... receptors was investigated in human and mouse renal blood vessels Results:  Bolus infusion of 0.5 mg/kg adenosine elicited significant transient decreases in MAP (99.3±2.3 to 70.4±4.5 mmHg) and HR (603.2±18.3 to 364.3±49.2 min(-1) ) which were inhibited by the A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM 241385. Activation...

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of N⁶-substituted apioadenosines as potential adenosine A₃ receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toti, Kiran S; Moss, Steven M; Paoletta, Silvia; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2014-08-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) trigger signal transduction pathways inside the cell when activated by extracellular adenosine. Selective modulation of the A₃AR subtype may be beneficial in controlling diseases such as colorectal cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of β-D-apio-D-furano- and α-D-apio-L-furanoadenosines and derivatives thereof. Introduction of a 2-methoxy-5-chlorobenzyl group at N(6) of β-D-apio-D-furanoadenosine afforded an A₃AR antagonist (10c, Ki=0.98 μM), while a similar modification of an α-D-apio-L-furanoadenosine gave rise to a partial agonist (11c, Ki=3.07 μM). The structural basis for this difference was examined by docking to an A₃AR model; the antagonist lacked a crucial interaction with Thr94. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Regulation of neutrophil function by adenosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Kathryn E.; Ley, Klaus; Mehrad, Borna

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenously released purine nucleoside that signals via four widely expressed G-protein coupled receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. In the setting of inflammation, the generation and release of adenosine is greatly enhanced. Neutrophils play an important role in host defense against invading pathogens and are the cellular hallmark of acute inflammation. Neutrophils both release adenosine and can respond to it via expression of all four adenosine receptor subtypes. At low concentrations, adenosine can act via the A1 and A3 adenosine receptor subtypes to promote neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. At higher concentrations, adenosine acts at the lower-affinity A2A and A2B receptors to inhibit neutrophil trafficking and effector functions such as oxidative burst, inflammatory mediator production, and granule release. Modulation of neutrophil function by adenosine is relevant in a broad array of disease models, including ischemia reperfusion injury, sepsis, and non-infectious acute lung injury. This review will summarize relevant research in order to provide a framework for understanding how adenosine directly regulates various elements of neutrophil function. PMID:22423037

  18. Adenosine A(1) Receptors in the Central Nervous System : Their Functions in Health and Disease, and Possible Elucidation by PET Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, S.; Elsinga, P. H.; Ishiwata, K.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; van Waarde, A.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator with several functions in the central nervous system (CNS), such as inhibition of neuronal activity in many signaling pathways. Most of the sedating, anxiolytic, seizure-inhibiting and protective actions of adenosine are mediated by adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) on

  19. The adenosine A2B receptor is involved in anion secretion in human pancreatic duct Capan-1 epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, M.; Inagaki, A.; Novak, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    − channels important for anion secretion, we herein performed experiments on Capan-1, a human pancreatic duct cell line, using open-circuit Ussing chamber and gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp techniques. The luminal addition of adenosine increased the negative transepithelial potential difference (Vte...... antagonist, PSB 603, inhibited the response of Isc to adenosine. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the A2A and A2B receptors colocalized with Ezrin in the luminal membranes of Capan-1 monolayers and in rat pancreatic ducts. Adenosine elicited the whole-cell Cl− currents in guinea pig duct cells...

  20. Interactions of the bovine brain A1-adenosine receptor with recombinant G protein alpha-subunits. Selectivity for rGi alpha-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissmuth, M; Schütz, W; Linder, M E

    1991-09-25

    The ability of the bovine brain A1-adenosine receptor to discriminate between different G protein subtypes was tested using G protein alpha-subunits synthesized in Escherichia coli (rG alpha-subunits). When combined with a 3-fold molar excess of beta gamma-subunit purified from bovine brain and used at high concentrations, all three subtypes of rGi alpha (rGi alpha-1, rGi alpha-2, and rGi alpha-3) and rGo alpha were capable of reconstituting guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity binding of the agonist radioligand (-)-N6-3-[125I] (iodo-4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl) adenosine ([125I]HPIA) to the purified A1-adenosine receptor (Kd approximately 1.2 nM). Titration of the A1-adenosine receptor with increasing amounts of rG alpha revealed a approximately 10-fold higher affinity for rGi alpha-3 compared with rGi alpha-1, rGi alpha-2, and rGo alpha. This selectivity was also observed in the absence of beta gamma. Other alpha-subunits (rGs alpha-s, rGs alpha-L, rGs alpha PT, and rGz alpha) did not promote [125I]HPIA binding to the purified receptor. In N-ethylmaleimide-treated bovine brain membranes, rGi alpha-3 was the only rG alpha-subunit capable of reconstituting high-affinity agonist binding. Similarly, rGi alpha-3 competed potently with rGo alpha for activation by the agonist-liganded A1-adenosine receptor, whereas a approximately 50-fold molar excess of rGo alpha was required to quench the receptor-mediated release of [alpha-32P]GDP from rGi alpha-3. Hence, in spite of the extensive homology between alpha-subunits belonging to the Gi/Go group, the A1-adenosine receptor appears to discriminate between the subtypes. This specificity is likely to govern transmembrane signaling pathways in vivo.

  1. The effect of cannabidiol on ischemia/reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias: the role of adenosine A1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonca, Ersöz; Darıcı, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychoactive phytocannabinoid with anti-inflammatory activity mediated by enhancing adenosine signaling. As the adenosine A1 receptor activation confers protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced ventricular arrhythmias, we hypothesized that CBD may have antiarrhythmic effect through the activation of adenosine A1 receptor. Cannabidiol has recently been shown to suppress ischemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias. We aimed to research the effect of CBD on the incidence and the duration of I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmias and to investigate the role of adenosine A1 receptor activation in the possible antiarrhythmic effect of CBD. Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion was induced in anesthetized male rats by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 6 minutes and by loosening the bond at the coronary artery, respectively. Cannabidiol alone was given in a dose of 50 µg/kg, 10 minutes prior to coronary artery occlusion and coadministrated with adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) in a dose of 100 µg/kg, 15 minutes prior to coronary artery occlusion to investigate whether the antiarrhythmic effect of CBD is modified by the activation of adenosine A1 receptors. The experimental groups were as follows: (1) vehicle control (n = 10), (2) CBD (n = 9), (3) DPCPX (n = 7), and (4) CBD + DPCPX group (n = 7). Cannabidiol treatment significantly decreased the incidence and the duration of ventricular tachycardia, total length of arrhythmias, and the arrhythmia scores compared to control during the reperfusion period. The DPCPX treatment alone did not affect the incidence and the duration of any type of arrhythmias. However, DPCPX aborted the antiarrhythmic effect of CBD when it was combined with it. The present results demonstrated that CBD has an antiarrhythmic effect against I/R-induced arrhythmias, and the antiarrhythmic effect of CBD may be mediated through the activation of adenosine

  2. Effects of adenosine and a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist on hemodynamic and thallium-201 and technetium-99m-sestaMIBI biodistribution and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Jadbabaie, Farid; Dione, Donald P; Meoli, David F; Purushothaman, Kailasnath; Belardinelli, Luiz; Sinusas, Albert J

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a selective A(2A) adenosine receptor agonist (regadenoson) with adenosine in clinically relevant canine models with regard to effects on hemodynamics and thallium-201 ((201)Tl) and technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-sestaMIBI biodistribution and kinetics. The clinical application of vasodilator stress for perfusion imaging requires consideration of the effects of these vasodilating agents on systemic hemodynamics, coronary flow, and radiotracer uptake and clearance kinetics. Sequential imaging and arterial blood sampling was performed on control, anesthetized closed-chest canines (n = 7) to evaluate radiotracer biodistribution and kinetics after either a bolus administration of regadenoson (2.5 microg/kg) or 4.5-min infusion of adenosine (280 microg/kg). The effects of regadenoson on coronary flow and myocardial radiotracer uptake were then evaluated in an open-chest canine model of a critical stenosis (n = 7). Results from ex vivo single-photon emission computed tomography were compared with tissue well-counting. The use of regadenoson compared favorably with adenosine in regard to the duration and magnitude of the hemodynamic effects and the effect on (201)Tl and (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI biodistribution and kinetics. The arterial blood clearance half-time was significantly faster for (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI (regadenoson: 1.4 +/- 0.03 min; adenosine: 1.5 +/- 0.08 min) than for (201)Tl (regadenoson: 2.5 +/- 0.16 min, p adenosine: 2.7 +/- 0.04 min, p regadenoson stress was significantly greater than the relative perfusion defect with (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI (0.69 +/- 0.03%, p regadenoson produced a hyperemic response comparable to a standard infusion of adenosine. The biodistribution and clearance of both (201)Tl and (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI during regadenoson were similar to adenosine vasodilation. Ex vivo perfusion images under the most ideal conditions permitted detection of a critical stenosis, although (201)Tl offered significant advantages over (99m

  3. Partial adenosine A1 receptor agonism: a potential new therapeutic strategy for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Stephen J; Sabbah, Hani N; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A; Albrecht-Küpper, Barbara E; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Dinh, Wilfried; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) represents a global public health and economic problem associated with unacceptable rates of death, hospitalization, and healthcare expenditure. Despite available therapy, HF carries a prognosis comparable to many forms of cancer with a 5-year survival rate of ~50%. The current treatment paradigm for HF with reduced ejection fraction (EF) centers on blocking maladaptive neurohormonal activation and decreasing cardiac workload with therapies that concurrently lower blood pressure and heart rate. Continued development of hemodynamically active medications for stepwise addition to existing therapies carries the risk of limited tolerability and safety. Moreover, this treatment paradigm has thus far failed for HF with preserved EF. Accordingly, development of hemodynamically neutral HF therapies targeting primary cardiac pathologies must be considered. In this context, a partial adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) agonist holds promise as a potentially hemodynamically neutral therapy for HF that could simultaneous improve cardiomyocyte energetics, calcium homeostasis, cardiac structure and function, and long-term clinical outcomes when added to background therapies. In this review, we describe the physiology and pathophysiology of HF as it relates to adenosine agonism, examine the existing body of evidence and biologic rationale for modulation of adenosine A1R activity, and review the current state of drug development of a partial A1R agonist for the treatment of HF.

  4. Cordycepin Increases Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep via Adenosine Receptors in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin (3′-deoxyadenosine is a naturally occurring adenosine analogue and one of the bioactive constituents isolated from Cordyceps militaris/Cordyceps sinensis, species of the fungal genus Cordyceps. It has traditionally been a prized Chinese folk medicine for the human well-being. Because of similarity of chemical structure of adenosine, cordycepin has been focused on the diverse effects of the central nervous systems (CNSs, like sleep regulation. Therefore, this study was undertaken to know whether cordycepin increases the natural sleep in rats, and its effect is mediated by adenosine receptors (ARs. Sleep was recorded using electroencephalogram (EEG for 4 hours after oral administration of cordycepin in rats. Sleep architecture and EEG power spectra were analyzed. Cordycepin reduced sleep-wake cycles and increased nonrapid eye movement (NREM sleep. Interestingly, cordycepin increased θ (theta waves power density during NREM sleep. In addition, the protein levels of AR subtypes (A1, A2A, and A2B were increased after the administration of cordycepin, especially in the rat hypothalamus which plays an important role in sleep regulation. Therefore, we suggest that cordycepin increases theta waves power density during NREM sleep via nonspecific AR in rats. In addition, this experiment can provide basic evidence that cordycepin may be helpful for sleep-disturbed subjects.

  5. Recovery sleep after extended wakefulness restores elevated A1 adenosine receptor availability in the human brain.

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    Elmenhorst, David; Elmenhorst, Eva-Maria; Hennecke, Eva; Kroll, Tina; Matusch, Andreas; Aeschbach, Daniel; Bauer, Andreas

    2017-04-18

    Adenosine and functional A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) availability are supposed to mediate sleep-wake regulation and cognitive performance. We hypothesized that cerebral A1AR availability after an extended wake period decreases to a well-rested state after recovery sleep. [(18)F]CPFPX positron emission tomography was used to quantify A1AR availability in 15 healthy male adults after 52 h of sleep deprivation and following 14 h of recovery sleep. Data were additionally compared with A1AR values after 8 h of baseline sleep from an earlier dataset. Polysomnography, cognitive performance, and sleepiness were monitored. Recovery from sleep deprivation was associated with a decrease in A1AR availability in several brain regions, ranging from 11% (insula) to 14% (striatum). A1AR availabilities after recovery did not differ from baseline sleep in the control group. The degree of performance impairment, sleepiness, and homeostatic sleep-pressure response to sleep deprivation correlated negatively with the decrease in A1AR availability. Sleep deprivation resulted in a higher A1AR availability in the human brain. The increase that was observed after 52 h of wakefulness was restored to control levels during a 14-h recovery sleep episode. Individuals with a large increase in A1AR availability were more resilient to sleep-loss effects than those with a subtle increase. This pattern implies that differences in endogenous adenosine and A1AR availability might be causal for individual responses to sleep loss.

  6. Synergistic Action of Presynaptic Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Adenosine Receptors in Developmental Axonal Competition at the Neuromuscular Junction.

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    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria Angel; Cilleros, Victor; Tomàs, Josep Maria

    2016-01-01

    The development of the nervous system involves the initial overproduction of synapses, which promotes connectivity. Hebbian competition between axons with different activities leads to the loss of roughly half of the overproduced elements and this refines connectivity. We used quantitative immunohistochemistry to investigate, in the postnatal day 7 (P7) to P9 neuromuscular junctions, the involvement of muscarinic receptors (muscarinic acetylcholine autoreceptors and the M1, M2, and M4 subtypes) and adenosine receptors (A1 and A2A subtypes) in the control of axonal elimination after the mouse levator auris longus muscle had been exposed to selective antagonists in vivo. In a previous study we analyzed the role of each of the individual receptors. Here we investigate the additive or occlusive effects of their inhibitors and thus the existence of synergistic activity between the receptors. The main results show that the A2A, M1, M4, and A1 receptors (in this order of ability) delayed axonal elimination at P7. M4 produces some occlusion of the M1 pathway and some addition to the A1 pathway, which suggests that they cooperate. M2 receptors may modulate (by allowing a permissive action) the other receptors, mainly M4 and A1. The continued action of these receptors (now including M2 but not M4) finally promotes axonal loss at P9. All 4 receptors (M2, M1, A1, and A2A, in this order of ability) are necessary. The M4 receptor (which in itself does not affect axon loss) seems to modulate the other receptors. We found a synergistic action between the M1, A1, and A2A receptors, which show an additive effect, whereas the potent M2 effect is largely independent of the other receptors (though can be modulated by M4). At P9, there is a full mutual dependence between the A1 and A2A receptors in regulating axon loss. In summary, postnatal axonal elimination is a regulated multireceptor mechanism that involves the cooperation of several muscarinic and adenosine receptor subtypes.

  7. Caffeine May Reduce Perceived Sweet Taste in Humans, Supporting Evidence That Adenosine Receptors Modulate Taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ezen; Picket, Benjamin; Dando, Robin

    2017-09-01

    Multiple recent reports have detailed the presence of adenosine receptors in sweet sensitive taste cells of mice. These receptors are activated by endogenous adenosine in the plasma to enhance sweet signals within the taste bud, before reporting to the primary afferent. As we commonly consume caffeine, a powerful antagonist for such receptors, in our daily lives, an intriguing question we sought to answer was whether the caffeine we habitually consume in coffee can inhibit the perception of sweet taste in humans. 107 panelists were randomly assigned to 2 groups, sampling decaffeinated coffee supplemented with either 200 mg of caffeine, about the level found in a strong cup of coffee, or an equally bitter concentration of quinine. Participants subsequently performed sensory testing, with the session repeated in the alternative condition in a second session on a separate day. Panelists rated both the sweetened coffee itself and subsequent sucrose solutions as less sweet in the caffeine condition, despite the treatment having no effect on bitter, sour, salty, or umami perception. Panelists were also unable to discern whether they had consumed the caffeinated or noncaffeinated coffee, with ratings of alertness increased equally, but no significant improvement in reaction times, highlighting coffee's powerful placebo effect. This work validates earlier observations in rodents in a human population. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  8. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A₃ Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancetta, Antonella; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2017-03-11

    Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes, termed A₁, A2A, A2B and A₃, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The human A₃AR (hA₃AR) subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA₃AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of newly emerged A₃AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A₃AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates.

  9. Physical origins of remarkable thermostabilization by an octuple mutation for the adenosine A2a receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Yuta; Ogino, Takahiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Takamuku, Yuuki; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    It was experimentally showed that the thermal stability of a membrane protein, the adenosine A2a receptor, was remarkably enhanced by an octuple mutation. Here we theoretically prove that the energy decrease arising from the formation of protein intramolecular hydrogen bonds and the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding are made substantially larger by the mutation, leading to the remarkable enhancement. The solvent is formed by hydrocarbon groups constituting nonpolar chains of the lipid bilayer within a membrane. The mutation modifies geometric characteristics of the structure so that the solvent crowding can be reduced to a larger extent when the protein folds.

  10. Fluorinated Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists Inspired by Preladenant as Potential Cancer Immunotherapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengyang Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antagonism of the adenosine A2A receptor on T cells blocks the hypoxia-adenosinergic pathway to promote tumor rejection. Using an in vivo immunoassay based on the Concanavalin A mouse model, a series of A2A antagonists were studied and identified preladenant as a potent lead compound for development. Molecular modeling was employed to assist drug design and subsequent synthesis of analogs and those of tozadenant, including fluorinated polyethylene glycol PEGylated derivatives. The efficacy of the analogs was evaluated using two in vitro functional bioassays, and compound 29, a fluorinated triethylene glycol derivative of preladenant, was confirmed as a potential immunotherapeutic agent.

  11. The importance of the adenosine A(2A) receptor-dopamine D(2) receptor interaction in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, M; Zaniewska, M; Frankowska, M; Wydra, K; Fuxe, K

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction is a serious brain disorder with somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and legal implications in the developed world. Illegal (e.g., psychostimulants, opioids, cannabinoids) and legal (alcohol, nicotine) drugs of abuse create a complex behavioral pattern composed of drug intake, withdrawal, seeking and relapse. One of the hallmarks of drugs that are abused by humans is that they have different mechanisms of action to increase dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the mesolimbic circuitry of the brain and indirectly activate DA receptors. Among the DA receptors, D(2) receptors are linked to drug abuse and addiction because their function has been proven to be correlated with drug reinforcement and relapses. The recognition that D(2) receptors exist not only as homomers but also can form heteromers, such as with the adenosine (A)(2A) receptor, that are pharmacologically and functionally distinct from their constituent receptors, has significantly expanded the range of potential drug targets and provided new avenues for drug design in the search for novel drug addiction therapies. The aim of this review is to bring current focus on A(2A) receptors, their physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, and to discuss the therapeutic relevance of these receptors to drug addiction. We concentrate on the contribution of A(2A) receptors to the effects of different classes of drugs of abuse examined in preclinical behavioral experiments carried out with pharmacological and genetic tools. The consequences of chronic drug treatment on A(2A) receptor-assigned functions in preclinical studies are also presented. Finally, the neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between A(2A) receptors and drugs of abuse in the context of the heteromeric A(2A)-D(2) receptor complex is discussed. Taken together, a significant amount of experimental analyses provide evidence that targeting A(2A) receptors may offer innovative translational strategies

  12. Control of cannabinoid CB1 receptor function on glutamate axon terminals by endogenous adenosine acting at A1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Laaris, Nora; Kawamura, Masahito; Masino, Susan A; Lupica, Carl R

    2010-01-13

    Marijuana is a widely used drug that impairs memory through interaction between its psychoactive constituent, Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), and CB(1) receptors (CB1Rs) in the hippocampus. CB1Rs are located on Schaffer collateral (Sc) axon terminals in the hippocampus, where they inhibit glutamate release onto CA1 pyramidal neurons. This action is shared by adenosine A(1) receptors (A1Rs), which are also located on Sc terminals. Furthermore, A1Rs are tonically activated by endogenous adenosine (eADO), leading to suppressed glutamate release under basal conditions. Colocalization of A1Rs and CB1Rs, and their coupling to shared components of signal transduction, suggest that these receptors may interact. We examined the roles of A1Rs and eADO in regulating CB1R inhibition of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the rodent hippocampus. We found that A1R activation by basal or experimentally increased levels of eADO reduced or eliminated CB1R inhibition of glutamate release, and that blockade of A1Rs with caffeine or other antagonists reversed this effect. The CB1R-A1R interaction was observed with the agonists WIN55,212-2 and Delta(9)-THC and during endocannabinoid-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation. A1R control of CB1Rs was stronger in the C57BL/6J mouse hippocampus, in which eADO levels were higher than in Sprague Dawley rats, and the eADO modulation of CB1R effects was absent in A1R knock-out mice. Since eADO levels and A1R activation are regulated by homeostatic, metabolic, and pathological factors, these data identify a mechanism in which CB1R function can be controlled by the brain adenosine system. Additionally, our data imply that caffeine may potentiate the effects of marijuana on hippocampal function.

  13. Cerebral A{sub 1} adenosine receptors (A{sub 1}AR) in liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, Christian [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kircheis, Gerald; Haussinger, Dieter [University of Duesseldorf, Clinic for Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Holschbach, Marcus H.; Coenen, Heinz H. [Research Centre Juelich, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Juelich (Germany); Herzog, Hans; Elmenhorst, David [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); Kaiser, Hans J. [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Zilles, Karl [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); C. and O. Vogt Institute of Brain Research, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bauer, Andreas [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University of Duesseldorf, Department of Neurology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    The cerebral mechanisms underlying hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are poorly understood. Adenosine, a neuromodulator that pre- and postsynaptically modulates neuronal excitability and release of classical neurotransmitters via A{sub 1} adenosine receptors (A{sub 1}AR), is likely to be involved. The present study investigates changes of cerebral A{sub 1}AR binding in cirrhotic patients by means of positron emission tomography (PET) and [{sup 18}F]CPFPX, a novel selective A{sub 1}AR antagonist. PET was performed in cirrhotic patients (n = 10) and healthy volunteers (n = 10). Quantification of in vivo receptor density was done by Logan's non-invasive graphical analysis (pons as reference region). The outcome parameter was the apparent binding potential (aBP, proportional to B{sub max}/K{sub D}). Cortical and subcortical regions showed lower A{sub 1}AR binding in cirrhotic patients than in controls. The aBP changes reached statistical significance vs healthy controls (p < 0.05, U test with Bonferroni-Holm adjustment for multiple comparisons) in cingulate cortex (-50.0%), precentral gyrus (-40.9%), postcentral gyrus (-38.6%), insular cortex (-38.6%), thalamus (-32.9%), parietal cortex (-31.7%), frontal cortex (-28.6), lateral temporal cortex (-28.2%), orbitofrontal cortex (-27.9%), occipital cortex (-24.6), putamen (-22.7%) and mesial temporal lobe (-22.4%). Regional cerebral adenosinergic neuromodulation is heterogeneously altered in cirrhotic patients. The decrease of cerebral A{sub 1}AR binding may further aggravate neurotransmitter imbalance at the synaptic cleft in cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Different pathomechanisms may account for these alterations including decrease of A{sub 1}AR density or affinity, as well as blockade of the A{sub 1}AR by endogenous adenosine or exogenous xanthines. (orig.)

  14. Interactions of purified bovine brain A1-adenosine receptors with G-proteins. Reciprocal modulation of agonist and antagonist binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissmuth, M; Selzer, E; Schütz, W

    1991-05-01

    The bovine brain A1-adenosine receptor was purified 8000-fold by affinity chromatography on xanthine-amine-congener (XAC)-Sepharose. Addition of a 120-fold molar excess of a purified bovine brain G-protein preparation (Go,i a mixture of Go and Gi, containing predominantly Go) decreases the Bmax of the binding of the antagonist radioligand [3H]XAC to the receptor. This decrease is observed not only after insertion into phospholipid vesicles but also in detergent solution, and is reversed by GTP analogues. In the presence of Go,i, about 20 and 40% of the receptors display guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity binding of the agonist radioligand (-)-N6-3-([125I]iodo-4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)adenosine after reconstitution into lipid vesicles and in detergent solution, respectively. The ability of Go,i to enhance agonist binding and decrease antagonist binding is concentration-dependent, with a half-maximal effect occurring at approximately 10-fold molar excess of G-proteins over A1-adenosine receptors. In the presence of the receptor, the rate of guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate (GTP[35S]) binding to Go,i is accelerated. This rate is further enhanced if the receptor is activated by the agonist (-)(R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, whereas the antagonist XAC decreases the association rate of GTP[35S] to levels observed in the absence of receptor. These results show (1) that detergent removal is not a prerequisite for the observation of coupling between the A1-adenosine receptor and Go,i, and (2) that the regulatory effect of G-proteins on antagonist binding to the A1-adenosine receptor can be reconstituted by using purified components.

  15. Differential expression of a(2a), A(1)-adenosine and D(2)-dopamine receptor genes in rat peripheral arterial chemoreceptors during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauda, E B; Northington, F J; Linden, J; Rosin, D L

    2000-07-28

    The sensitivity of peripheral arterial chemoreceptors in the carotid body to hypoxia increases with postnatal maturation. Carotid sinus nerve activity is augmented by adenosine binding to A(2a)-adenosine receptors and attenuated by dopamine binding to D(2)-dopamine receptors. In this study, we used in situ hybridization histochemistry to determine the change in the levels of mRNA expression for A(2a) and A(1)-adenosine receptors and D(2)-dopamine receptors in the rat carotid body. We also investigated the cellular distribution and possible colocalization of these receptor mRNAs and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNAs during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development. By using immunohistocytochemistry, we detected A(2a)-adenosine receptor protein in the carotid body and petrosal ganglion. We found that A(2a)-adenosine receptor mRNA and protein are expressed in the carotid body in animals at 0, 3, 6 and 14 postnatal days. The level of A(2a)-adenosine receptor mRNA expression significantly decreased by 14 postnatal days (P<0.02 vs. day 0) while D(2)-dopamine receptor mRNA levels significantly increased by day 3 and remained greater than D(2)-dopamine receptor mRNA levels at day 0 (P<0.001 all ages vs. day 0). TH mRNA was colocalized in cells in the carotid body with A(2a) adenosine receptor and D(2)-dopamine receptor mRNAs. A(1)-adenosine receptor mRNA was not expressed in the carotid body at any of the ages examined. In the petrosal ganglion, A(1)-adenosine receptor mRNA was abundantly expressed in numerous cells, A(2a)-adenosine receptor mRNA was expressed in a moderate number of cells while D(2)-dopamine receptor mRNA was seen in a few cells in the rostral petrosal ganglion. In conclusion, using in situ hybridization histochemistry, we have shown that mRNA for both the excitatory, A(2a)-adenosine receptor, and the inhibitory, D(2)-dopamine receptor, is developmentally regulated in presumably type I cells in the carotid body which may contribute to the maturation of

  16. Stimulation of ANP secretion by 2-Cl-IB-MECA through A(3) receptor and CaMKII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kuichang; Bai, Guang Yi; Park, Woo Hyun; Kim, Sung Zoo; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2008-12-01

    Adenosine is a potent mediator of myocardial protection against hypertrophy via A(1) or A(3) receptors that may be partly related to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release. However, little is known about the possible involvement of the A(3) receptor on ANP release. We studied the effects of the A(3) receptor on atrial functions and its modification in hypertrophied atria. A selective A(3) receptor agonist, 2-chloro-N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl) adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (2-CI-IB-MECA), was perfused into isolated, beating rat atria with and without receptor modifiers. 2-CI-IB-MECA dose-dependently increased the ANP secretion, which was blocked by the A(3) receptor antagonist, but the increased atrial contractility and decreased cAMP levels induced by 30muM 2-CI-IB-MECA were not affected. The 100muM 2-(1-hexylnyl)-N-methyladenosine (HEMADO) and N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl) adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), A(3) receptor agonist, also stimulated the ANP secretion without positive inotropy. The potency for the stimulation of ANP secretion was 2-CI-IB-MECA>IB-MECA=HEMADO. The inhibition of the ryanodine receptor or calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) attenuated 2-CI-IB-MECA-induced ANP release, positive inotropy, and translocation of extracellular fluid. However, the inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-reuptake, phospholipase C or inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors did not affect these parameters. 2-CI-IB-MECA decreased cAMP level, which was blocked only with an inhibitor of CaMKII or adenylyl cyclase. These results suggest that 2-CI-IB-MECA increases the ANP secretion mainly via A(3) receptor activation and positive inotropy by intracellular Ca(2+) regulation via the ryanodine receptor and CaMKII.

  17. A2A adenosine receptor antagonism enhances synaptic and motor effects of cocaine via CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Tozzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocaine increases the level of endogenous dopamine (DA in the striatum by blocking the DA transporter. Endogenous DA modulates glutamatergic inputs to striatal neurons and this modulation influences motor activity. Since D2 DA and A2A-adenosine receptors (A2A-Rs have antagonistic effects on striatal neurons, drugs targeting adenosine receptors such as caffeine-like compounds, could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. In this study, we analyzed the electrophysiological effects of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists in striatal slices and the motor effects produced by this pharmacological modulation in rodents. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Concomitant administration of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists reduced glutamatergic synaptic transmission in striatal spiny neurons while these drugs failed to produce this effect when given in isolation. This inhibitory effect was dependent on the activation of D2-like receptors and the release of endocannabinoids since it was prevented by L-sulpiride and reduced by a CB1 receptor antagonist. Combined application of cocaine and A2A-R antagonists also reduced the firing frequency of striatal cholinergic interneurons suggesting that changes in cholinergic tone might contribute to this synaptic modulation. Finally, A2A-Rs antagonists, in the presence of a sub-threshold dose of cocaine, enhanced locomotion and, in line with the electrophysiological experiments, this enhanced activity required activation of D2-like and CB1 receptors. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides a possible synaptic mechanism explaining how caffeine-like compounds could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine.

  18. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hurtado-Alvarado

    Full Text Available Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261 in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1, adherens junction protein (E-cadherin, A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73, and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent

  19. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Gómez-González, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261) in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans) and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1), adherens junction protein (E-cadherin), A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73), and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent inflammation and

  20. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261) in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans) and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1), adherens junction protein (E-cadherin), A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73), and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent inflammation and

  1. Adenosine A2A receptors in ventral striatum, hypothalamus and nociceptive circuitry. Implications for drug addiction, sleep and pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, S.; Diamond, I.; Goldberg, S.R.; Yao, L.; Hourani, S.M.O.; Huang, Z.L.; Urade, Y.; Kitchen, I.

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors localized in the dorsal striatum are considered as a new target for the development of antiparkinsonian drugs. Co-administration of A2A receptor antagonists has shown a significant improvement of the effects of L-DOPA. The present review emphasizes the possible application of A2A receptor antagonists in pathological conditions other than parkinsonism, including drug addiction, sleep disorders and pain. In addition to the dorsal striatum, the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) contains a high density of A2A receptors, which presynaptically and postsynaptically regulate glutamatergic transmission in the cortical glutamatergic projections to the nucleus accumbens. It is currently believed that molecular adaptations of the cortico-accumbens glutamatergic synapses are involved in compulsive drug seeking and relapse. Here we review recent experimental evidence suggesting that A2A antagonists could become new therapeutic agents for drug addiction. Morphological and functional studies have identified lower levels of A2A receptors in brain areas other than the striatum, such as the ventrolateral preoptic area of the hypothalamus, where adenosine plays an important role in sleep regulation. Although initially believed to be mostly dependent on A1 receptors, here we review recent studies that demonstrate that the somnogenic effects of adenosine are largely mediated by hypothalamic A2A receptors. A2A receptor antagonists could therefore be considered as a possible treatment for narcolepsy and other sleep-related disorders. Finally, nociception is another adenosine-regulated neural function previously thought to mostly involve A1 receptors. Although there is some conflicting literature on the effects of agonists and antagonists, which may partly be due to the lack of selectivity of available drugs, the studies in A2A receptor knockout mice suggest that A2A receptor antagonists might have some therapeutic potential in pain states, in particular where

  2. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function.

  3. Antinociception by systemically-administered acetaminophen (paracetamol) involves spinal serotonin 5-HT7 and adenosine A1 receptors, as well as peripheral adenosine A1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jean; Reid, Allison R; Sawynok, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used analgesic, but its sites and mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. Recent studies have separately implicated spinal adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)Rs) and serotonin 5-HT(7) receptors (5-HT(7)Rs) in the antinociceptive effects of systemically administered acetaminophen. In the present study, we determined whether these two actions are linked by delivering a selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist to the spinal cord of mice and examining nociception using the formalin 2% model. In normal and A(1)R wild type mice, antinociception by systemic (i.p.) acetaminophen 300mg/kg was reduced by intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of the selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist SB269970 3μg. In mice lacking A(1)Rs, i.t. SB269970 did not reverse antinociception by systemic acetaminophen, indicating a link between spinal 5-HT(7)R and A(1)R mechanisms. We also explored potential roles of peripheral A(1)Rs in antinociception by acetaminophen administered both locally and systemically. In normal mice, intraplantar (i.pl.) acetaminophen 200μg produced antinociception in the formalin test, and this was blocked by co-administration of the selective A(1)R antagonist DPCPX 4.5μg. Acetaminophen administered into the contralateral hindpaw had no effect, indicating a local peripheral action. When acetaminophen was administered systemically, its antinociceptive effect was reversed by i.pl. DPCPX in normal mice; this was also observed in A(1)R wild type mice, but not in those lacking A(1)Rs. In summary, we demonstrate a link between spinal 5-HT(7)Rs and A(1)Rs in the spinal cord relevant to antinociception by systemic acetaminophen. Furthermore, we implicate peripheral A(1)Rs in the antinociceptive effects of locally- and systemically-administered acetaminophen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Overexpression of Adenosine A2A Receptors in Rats: Effects on Depression, Locomotion, and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Joana E.; Alves, Pedro; Canas, Paula M.; Valadas, Jorge S.; Shmidt, Tatiana; Batalha, Vânia L.; Ferreira, Diana G.; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.; Bader, Michael; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; do Couto, Frederico Simões; Lopes, Luísa V.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) are a sub-type of receptors enriched in basal ganglia, activated by the neuromodulator adenosine, which interact with dopamine D2 receptors. Although this reciprocal antagonistic interaction is well-established in motor function, the outcome in dopamine-related behaviors remains uncertain, in particular in depression and anxiety. We have demonstrated an upsurge of A2AR associated to aging and chronic stress. Furthermore, Alzheimer’s disease patients present A2AR accumulation in cortical areas together with depressive signs. We now tested the impact of overexpressing A2AR in forebrain neurons on dopamine-related behavior, namely depression. Adult male rats overexpressing human A2AR under the control of CaMKII promoter [Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR)] and aged-matched wild-types (WT) of the same strain (Sprague-Dawley) were studied. The forced swimming test (FST), sucrose preference test (SPT), and the open-field test (OFT) were performed to evaluate behavioral despair, anhedonia, locomotion, and anxiety. Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR) animals spent more time floating and less time swimming in the FST and presented a decreased sucrose preference at 48 h in the SPT. They also covered higher distances in the OFT and spent more time in the central zone than the WT. The results indicate that Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR) rats exhibit depressive-like behavior, hyperlocomotion, and altered exploratory behavior. This A2AR overexpression may explain the depressive signs found in aging, chronic stress, and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24982640

  5. Overexpression of adenosine A2A receptors in rats: effects on depression, locomotion and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana E Coelho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are a sub-type of receptors enriched in basal ganglia, activated by the neuromodulator adenosine, which interact with dopamine D2 receptors. Although this reciprocal antagonistic interaction is well established in motor function, the outcome in dopamine-related behaviors remains uncertain, in particular in depression and anxiety. We have demonstrated an upsurge of A2AR associated to aging and chronic stress. Furthermore, Alzheimer’s disease patients present A2AR accumulation in cortical areas together with depressive signs. We now tested the impact of overexpressing A2AR in forebrain neurons on dopamine related behavior, namely depression. Adult male rats overexpressing human A2AR under the control of CaMKII promoter [Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR] and aged-matched wild-types (WT of the same strain (Sprague-Dawley were studied. The forced swimming test (FST, sucrose preference test (SPT and the open-field test (OFT were performed to evaluate behavioral despair, anhedonia, locomotion and anxiety. Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR animals spent more time floating and less time swimming in the FST and presented a decreased sucrose preference at 48h in the SPT. They also covered higher distances in the OFT and spent more time in the central zone than the WT. The results indicate that Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR rats exhibit depressive-like behavior, hyperlocomotion and altered exploratory behavior. This A2AR overexpression may explain the depressive signs found in aging, chronic stress and Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Imidazo[1,2-α]pyridines possess adenosine A1 receptor affinity for the potential treatment of cognition in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefin, Roslyn; van der Walt, Mietha M; Milne, Pieter J; Terre'Blanche, Gisella

    2017-09-01

    Previous research has shown that bicyclic 6:5-fused heteroaromatic compounds with two N-atoms have variable degrees of adenosine A1 receptor antagonistic activity. Prompted by this imidazo[1,2-α]pyridine analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their adenosine A1 and A2A receptor affinity via radioligand binding studies and subjected to a GTP shift assay to determine its adenosine A1 receptor agonistic or antagonistic functionality. Imidazo[1,2-α]pyridine, the parent scaffold, was found devoid of affinity for the adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. The influence of substitution on position C2 showed no improvement for either adenosine A1 or A2A receptor affinity. The addition of an amino or a cyclohexylamino group to position C3 also showed no improvement of adenosine A1 or A2A receptor affinity. Surprisingly para-substitution on the phenyl ring at position C2 in combination with a cyclohexylamino group at position C3 led to adenosine A1 receptor affinity in the low micromolar range with compound 4d showing: (1) the highest affinity for the adenosine A1 receptor with a Ki value of 2.06µM and (2) adenosine A1 receptor antagonistic properties. This pilot study concludes that para-substituted 3-cyclohexylamino-2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-α]pyridine analogues represent an interesting scaffold to investigate further structure-activity relationships in the design of novel imidazo[1,2-α]pyridine-based adenosine A1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Insulin restores L-arginine transport requiring adenosine receptors activation in umbilical vein endothelium from late-onset preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsoso, R; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, E; Sáez, T; Bugueño, K; Ramírez, M A; Farías, M; Pardo, F; Leiva, A; Sanhueza, C; Mate, A; Vázquez, C; Sobrevia, L

    2015-03-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with impaired placental vasodilation and reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in the foetoplacental circulation. Adenosine and insulin stimulate vasodilation in endothelial cells, and this activity is mediated by adenosine receptor activation in uncomplicated pregnancies; however, this activity has yet to be examined in preeclampsia. Early onset preeclampsia is associated with severe placental vasculature alterations that lead to altered foetus growth and development, but whether late-onset preeclampsia (LOPE) alters foetoplacental vascular function is unknown. Vascular reactivity to insulin (0.1-1000 nmol/L, 5 min) and adenosine (1 mmol/L, 5 min) was measured in KCl-preconstricted human umbilical vein rings from normal and LOPE pregnancies using a wire myograph. The protein levels of human cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1), adenosine receptor subtypes, total and Ser¹¹⁷⁷- or Thr⁴⁹⁵-phosphorylated eNOS were detected via Western blot, and L-arginine transport (0-1000 μmol/L L-arginine, 3 μCi/mL L-[³H]arginine, 20 s, 37 °C) was measured in the presence or absence of insulin and adenosine receptor agonists or antagonists in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from normal and LOPE pregnancies. LOPE increased the maximal L-arginine transport capacity and hCAT-1 and eNOS expression and activity compared with normal conditions. The A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) antagonist ZM-241385 blocked these effects of LOPE. Insulin-mediated umbilical vein ring relaxation was lower in LOPE pregnancies than in normal pregnancies and was restored using the A(2A)AR antagonist. The reduced foetoplacental vascular response to insulin may result from A(2A)AR activation in LOPE pregnancies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultraslow Water-Mediated Transmembrane Interactions Regulate the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonji; Kim, Songmi; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-09-01

    Water molecules inside G-protein coupled receptor have recently been spotlighted in a series of crystal structures. To decipher the dynamics and functional roles of internal waters in GPCR activity, we studied A$_{\\text{2A}}$ adenosine receptor using $\\mu$sec-molecular dynamics simulations. Our study finds that the amount of water flux across the transmembrane (TM) domain varies depending on the receptor state, and that the water molecules of the TM channel in the active state flow three times slower than those in the inactive state. Depending on the location in solvent-protein interface as well as the receptor state, the average residence time of water in each residue varies from $\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ psec to $\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ nsec. Especially, water molecules, exhibiting ultraslow relaxation ($\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ nsec) in the active state, are found around the microswitch residues that are considered activity hotspots for GPCR function. A continuous allosteric network spanning the TM domain, arising from water-mediated contacts, is unique in the active state, underscoring the importance of slow waters in the GPCR activation.

  9. High salt diet exacerbates vascular contraction in the absence of adenosine A₂A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Isha; Zeldin, Darryl C; Ledent, Catherine; Mustafa, Jamal S; Falck, John R; Nayeem, Mohammed A

    2014-05-01

    High salt (4% NaCl, HS) diet modulates adenosine-induced vascular response through adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)AR). Evidence suggests that A(2A)AR stimulates cyp450-epoxygenases, leading to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) generation. The aim of this study was to understand the vascular reactivity to HS and underlying signaling mechanism in the presence or absence of A(2A)AR. Therefore, we hypothesized that HS enhances adenosine-induced relaxation through EETs in A(2A)AR⁺/⁺, but exaggerates contraction in A(2A)AR⁻/⁻. Organ bath and Western blot experiments were conducted in HS and normal salt (NS, 0.18% NaCl)-fed A(2A)AR⁺/⁺ and A(2A)AR⁻/⁻ mice aorta. HS produced concentration-dependent relaxation to non-selective adenosine analog, NECA in A(2A)AR⁺/⁺, whereas contraction was observed in A(2A)AR⁻/⁻ mice and this was attenuated by A₁AR antagonist (DPCPX). CGS 21680 (selective A(2A)AR agonist) enhanced relaxation in HS-A(2A)AR⁺/⁺ versus NS-A(2A)AR⁺/⁺, which was blocked by EETs antagonist (14,15-EEZE). Compared with NS, HS significantly upregulated the expression of vasodilators A(2A)AR and cyp2c29, whereas vasoconstrictors A₁AR and cyp4a in A(2A)AR⁺/⁺ were downregulated. In A(2A)AR⁻/⁻ mice, however, HS significantly downregulated the expression of cyp2c29, whereas A₁AR and cyp4a were upregulated compared with A(2A)AR⁺/⁺ mice. Hence, our data suggest that in A(2A)AR⁺/⁺, HS enhances A(2A)AR-induced relaxation through increased cyp-expoxygenases-derived EETs and decreased A₁AR levels, whereas in A(2A)AR⁻/⁻, HS exaggerates contraction through decreased cyp-epoxygenases and increased A₁AR levels.

  10. Chronic sleep restriction induces long-lasting changes in adenosine and noradrenaline receptor density in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Elmenhorst, David; Weisshaupt, Angela; Wedekind, Franziska; Kroll, Tina; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E; Bauer, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Although chronic sleep restriction frequently produces long-lasting behavioural and physiological impairments in humans, the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here we used a rat model of chronic sleep restriction to investigate the role of brain adenosine and noradrenaline systems, known to regulate sleep and wakefulness, respectively. The density of adenosine A1 and A2a receptors and β-adrenergic receptors before, during and following 5 days of sleep restriction was assessed with autoradiography. Rats (n = 48) were sleep-deprived for 18 h day(-1) for 5 consecutive days (SR1-SR5), followed by 3 unrestricted recovery sleep days (R1-R3). Brains were collected at the beginning of the light period, which was immediately after the end of sleep deprivation on sleep restriction days. Chronic sleep restriction increased adenosine A1 receptor density significantly in nine of the 13 brain areas analysed with elevations also observed on R3 (+18 to +32%). In contrast, chronic sleep restriction reduced adenosine A2a receptor density significantly in one of the three brain areas analysed (olfactory tubercle which declined 26-31% from SR1 to R1). A decrease in β-adrenergic receptors density was seen in substantia innominata and ventral pallidum which remained reduced on R3, but no changes were found in the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction can induce long-term changes in the brain adenosine and noradrenaline receptors, which may underlie the long-lasting neurocognitive impairments observed in chronic sleep restriction. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. Chronic sleep restriction induces long-lasting changes in adenosine and noradrenaline receptor density in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEISSHAUPT, ANGELA; WEDEKIND, FRANZISKA; KROLL, TINA; MCCARLEY, ROBERT W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Although chronic sleep restriction frequently produces long-lasting behavioural and physiological impairments in humans, the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here we used a rat model of chronic sleep restriction to investigate the role of brain adenosine and noradrenaline systems, known to regulate sleep and wakefulness, respectively. The density of adenosine A1 and A2a receptors and β-adrenergic receptors before, during and following 5 days of sleep restriction was assessed with autoradiography. Rats (n = 48) were sleep-deprived for 18 h day–1 for 5 consecutive days (SR1–SR5), followed by 3 unrestricted recovery sleep days (R1–R3). Brains were collected at the beginning of the light period, which was immediately after the end of sleep deprivation on sleep restriction days. Chronic sleep restriction increased adenosine A1 receptor density significantly in nine of the 13 brain areas analysed with elevations also observed on R3 (+18 to +32%). In contrast, chronic sleep restriction reduced adenosine A2a receptor density significantly in one of the three brain areas analysed (olfactory tubercle which declined 26–31% from SR1 to R1). A decrease in b-adrenergic receptors density was seen in substantia innominata and ventral pallidum which remained reduced on R3, but no changes were found in the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction can induce long-term changes in the brain adenosine and noradrenaline receptors, which may underlie the long-lasting neurocognitive impairments observed in chronic sleep restriction. PMID:25900125

  12. Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentine, N.; Laar, F.A. van de; Driel, M.L. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent complication of type 2 diabetes with an estimated 65% of people with type 2 diabetes dying from a cause related to atherosclerosis. Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists like clopidogrel, ticlopidine, prasugrel and ticagrelor

  13. Adenosine 2A receptor agonism: A single intrathecal administration attenuates motor paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalopathy in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loram, L.C.; Strand, K.A.; Taylor, F.R.; Sloane, E.; van Dam, A.M.; Rieger, J.; Maier, S.F.; Watkins, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    A single intrathecal dose of adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR) agonist was previously reported to produce a multi-week reversal of allodynia in two different models of neuropathic pain in addition to downregulating glial activation markers in the spinal cord. We aimed to determine whether a

  14. Synthesis and Properties of a New Water-Soluble Prodrug of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonist MSX-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa E. Müller

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The compound L-valine-3-{8-[(E-2-[3-methoxyphenylethenyl]-7-methyl-1-propargylxanthine-3-yl}propyl ester hydrochloride (MSX-4 was synthesized as an aminoacid ester prodrug of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-2. It was found to bestable in artificial gastric acid, but readily cleaved by pig liver esterase.

  15. Common genetic polymorphisms of adenosine A2A receptor do not influence response to regadenoson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlacher, Mark; Mastouri, Ronald; Philips, Santosh; Skaar, Todd C; Kreutz, Rolf P

    2017-04-01

    Hemodynamic response to regadenoson varies greatly, and underlying mechanisms for variability are poorly understood. We hypothesized that five common variants of adenosine A2A receptor (ADORA2A) are associated with altered response to regadenoson. Consecutive subjects (n = 357) undergoing resting regadenoson nuclear stress imaging were enrolled. Genotyping was performed using Taqman-based assays for rs5751862, rs2298383, rs3761422, rs2267076 and rs5751876. There was no significant difference in heart rate or blood pressure between different genotypes following regadenoson administration. There was also no significant difference in myocardial ischemia detected by nuclear perfusion imaging as defined by summed difference score, or in self-reported side effects among the genotypes tested. The common A2A variants studied are not associated with variability in hemodynamic response to regadenoson or variability in detection of ischemia with nuclear perfusion stress imaging.

  16. Adenosine A2B receptor blockade slows growth of bladder and breast tumors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Li, Yuesheng; Theodorescu, Dan; Strieter, Robert M.; Linden, Joel

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation of high levels of adenosine in tumors activates A2A and A2B receptors on immune cells and inhibits their ability to suppress tumor growth. Deletion of A2AARs has been reported to activate anti-tumor T cells, stimulates DC function and inhibits angiogenesis. Here we evaluated the effects of intermittent intratumor injection of a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, aminophylline (AMO, theophylline ethylenediamine) and, for the first time, a selective A2BAR antagonist, ATL801. AMO and ATL801 slowed the growth of MB49 bladder and 4T1 breast tumors in syngeneic mice, and reduced by 85% metastasizes of breast cancer cells from mammary fat to lung. Based on experiments with A2AAR−/− or A2BAR−/− mice, the effect of AMO injection was unexpectedly attributed to A2BAR and not to A2AAR blockade. AMO and ATL801 significantly increased tumor levels of IFNγ and the interferon-inducible chemokine CXCL10, which is a ligand for CXCR3. This was associated with an increase in activated tumor-infiltrating CXCR3+ T cells and a decrease in endothelial cell precursors within tumors. Tumor growth inhibition by AMO or ATL801 was eliminated in CXCR3−/− mice and in RAG1−/− mice that lack mature T cells. In RAG1−/− mice A2BAR deletion enhanced CD86 expression on CD11b- DCs. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that CXCR3 and A2BAR expression on bone marrow cells are required for the anti-tumor effects of AMO. The data suggest that blockade of A2BARs enhances DC activation and CXCR3-dependent anti-tumor responses. PMID:22116822

  17. Indirect basal ganglia pathway mediation of repetitive behavior: attenuation by adenosine receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Yoko; Vaziri, Sasha; Lewis, Mark H

    2010-06-26

    Repetitive behaviors are diagnostic for autism and common in related neurodevelopmental disorders. Despite their clinical importance, underlying mechanisms associated with the expression of these behaviors remain poorly understood. Our lab has previously shown that the rates of spontaneous stereotypy in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were negatively correlated with enkephalin content, a marker of striatopallidal but not striatonigral neurons. To investigate further the role of the indirect basal ganglia pathway, we examined neuronal activation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) using cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry in high- and low-stereotypy mice. CO activity in STN was significantly lower in high-stereotypy mice and negatively correlated with the frequency of stereotypy. In addition, exposure to environmental enrichment, which attenuated stereotypy, normalized the activity of STN. Co-administration of the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist CGS21680 and the A(1) receptor agonist CPA attenuated stereotypy dose-dependently. The significant reduction associated with the lowest dose of the drug combination tested was due to its effects on mice with lower baseline levels of stereotypy. Higher doses of the drug combination were required to show robust behavioral effects, and presumably requisite activation of the indirect pathway, in high-stereotypy mice. These findings support that decreased indirect pathway activity is linked to the expression of high levels of stereotypy in deer mice and that striatal A(1) and A(2A) receptors may provide promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of repetitive behaviors in neurodevelopmental disorders.

  18. Inhibition of A2A Adenosine Receptor Signaling in Cancer Cells Proliferation by the Novel Antagonist TP455

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Gessi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Several evidences indicate that the ubiquitous nucleoside adenosine, acting through A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptor (AR subtypes, plays crucial roles in tumor development. Adenosine has contrasting effects on cell proliferation depending on the engagement of different receptor subtypes in various tumors. The involvement of A2AARs in human A375 melanoma, as well as in human A549 lung and rat MRMT1 breast carcinoma proliferation has been evaluated in view of the availability of a novel A2AAR antagonist, with high affinity and selectivity, named as 2-(2-furanyl-N5-(2-methoxybenzyl[1,3]thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine-5,7-diammine (TP455. Specifically, the signaling pathways triggered in the cancer cells of different origin and the antagonist effect of TP455 were investigated. The A2AAR protein expression was evaluated through receptor binding assays. Furthermore, the effect of A2AAR activation on cell proliferation at 24, 48 and 72 hours was studied. The selective A2AAR agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethylphenethylamino-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS21680, concentration-dependently induced cell proliferation in A375, A549, and MRMT1 cancer cells and the effect was potently antagonized by the A2AAR antagonist TP455, as well as by the reference A2AAR blocker 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethylphenol (ZM241385. As for the signaling pathway recruited in this response we demonstrated that, by using the specific inhibitors of signal transduction pathways, the effect of A2AAR stimulation was induced through phospholipase C (PLC and protein kinase C-delta (PKC-δ. In addition, we evaluated, through the AlphaScreen SureFire phospho(p protein assay, the kinases enrolled by A2AAR to stimulate cell proliferation and we found the involvement of protein kinase B (AKT, extracellular regulated kinases (ERK1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs. Indeed, we demonstrated that the CGS21680 stimulatory effect on kinases was

  19. Striatal pre- and postsynaptic profile of adenosine A(2A receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal adenosine A(2A receptors (A(2ARs are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D(2 receptors (D(2Rs. A(2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A(1 receptors (A(1Rs. It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A(2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A(2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A(2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A(2AR-D(2R and A(1R-A(2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A(2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A(2AR when co-expressed with D(2R than with A(1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A(2AR co-expressed with D(2R than co-expressed with A(1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile

  20. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004. The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A(2) receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A(2) receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A(2B) subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A(2B) receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease.

  1. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004: The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-01-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A2 receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A2 receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A2B subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A2B receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A2B receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease. PMID:15980878

  2. Increased Signaling via Adenosine A(1) Receptors, Sleep Deprivation, Imipramine, and Ketamine Inhibit Depressive-like Behavior via Induction of Homer1a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Clement, Hans-Willi; Schwarz, Martin K.; Iasevoli, Felice; Tosh, Dilip K.; Idzko, Marco; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Normann, Claus; Biber, Knut; van Calker, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is among the most commonly diagnosed disabling mental diseases. Several non-pharmacological treatments of depression upregulate adenosine concentration and/or adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) in the brain. To test whether enhanced A(1)R signaling mediates antidepressant

  3. Identification of Two New Cholesterol Interaction Sites on the A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouviere, Eric; Arnarez, Clément; Yang, Lewen; Lyman, Edward

    2017-12-05

    By mole, cholesterol is the most abundant component of animal cell plasma membranes. Many membrane proteins have been shown to be functionally dependent on cholesterol, several of which have also been shown to bind cholesterol at well-defined locations on their membrane-facing surface. In this work, a combination of coarse-grained "Martini" and all-atom simulations are used to identify two, to our knowledge, new cholesterol-binding sites on the A2A adenosine receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor that is a target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. One of the sites is also observed to bind cholesterol in several recent, high-resolution crystal structures of the protein, and in the simulations, interacts with cholesterol only when bound to the inverse agonist ZM241385. Cataloguing cholesterol-binding sites is a vital step in the effort to understand cholesterol-dependent function of membrane proteins. Given that cholesterol content in plasma membranes varies with cell type and on administration of widely prescribed pharmaceuticals, such as statins, understanding cholesterol-dependent function is an important step toward exploiting membrane compositional variation for therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Platelet adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists: ticlopidine to ticagrelor—a long continuing journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Upendra; Mansoor, Aijaz H.

    2012-01-01

    Platelet aggregation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis. Platelet adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists (ticlopidine, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor) are a major advance in the treatment of atherothrombotic diseases, especially acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Ticlopidine was the first thienopyridine introduced into clinical practice, but its potentially serious haematological side-effects limited its use and it was quickly eclipsed by clopidogrel. Clinical trials established aspirin plus clopidogrel as the standard dual anti-platelet therapy in patients with ACS and patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting. Clopidogrel was found to have pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic limitations. Prasugrel is the next approved thienopyridine that has shown superior efficacy in ACS patients undergoing PCI in comparison to clopidogrel, although at the cost of a higher bleeding risk. Ticagrelor is the latest non-thienopyridine ADP receptor blocker that is potent, effective, reversible, and relatively safer as compared to clopidogrel. Both prasugrel and ticagrelor are more potent than clopidogrel. The data so far suggests that ticagrelor has a wider applicability in usage in patients with ACS as compared to prasugrel. Prasugrel however seems to be better tolerated. Search is on for newer more potent but safer anti-platelet agents. PMID:22572427

  5. Platelet adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists: ticlopidine to ticagrelor-a long continuing journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Upendra; Mansoor, Aijaz H

    2012-01-01

    Platelet aggregation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis. Platelet adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists (ticlopidine, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor) are a major advance in the treatment of atherothrombotic diseases, especially acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Ticlopidine was the first thienopyridine introduced into clinical practice, but its potentially serious haematological side-effects limited its use and it was quickly eclipsed by clopidogrel. Clinical trials established aspirin plus clopidogrel as the standard dual anti-platelet therapy in patients with ACS and patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting. Clopidogrel was found to have pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic limitations. Prasugrel is the next approved thienopyridine that has shown superior efficacy in ACS patients undergoing PCI in comparison to clopidogrel, although at the cost of a higher bleeding risk. Ticagrelor is the latest non-thienopyridine ADP receptor blocker that is potent, effective, reversible, and relatively safer as compared to clopidogrel. Both prasugrel and ticagrelor are more potent than clopidogrel. The data so far suggests that ticagrelor has a wider applicability in usage in patients with ACS as compared to prasugrel. Prasugrel however seems to be better tolerated. Search is on for newer more potent but safer anti-platelet agents. Copyright © 2012 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  7. Leishmania infantum Parasites Subvert the Host Inflammatory Response through the Adenosine A2A Receptor to Promote the Establishment of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mikhael H F; Sacramento, Lais A; Quirino, Gustavo F S; Ferreira, Marcela D; Benevides, Luciana; Santana, Alynne K M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Almeida, Roque P; Silva, João S; Carregaro, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenously released purine nucleoside that signals through four widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Of these, A2AR is recognized as mediating major adenosine anti-inflammatory activity. During cutaneous leishmaniasis, adenosine induces immunosuppression, which promotes the establishment of infection. Herein, we demonstrated that A2AR signaling is exploited by Leishmania infantum parasites, the etiologic agent that causes Visceral Leishmaniasis, to successfully colonize the vertebrate host. A2AR gene-deleted mice exhibited a well-developed cellular reaction with a strong Th1 immune response in the parasitized organs. An intense infiltration of activated neutrophils into the disease-target organs was observed in A2AR(-/-) mice. These cells were characterized by high expression of CXCR2 and CD69 on their cell surfaces and increased cxcl1 expression. Interestingly, this phenotype was mediated by IFN-γ on the basis that a neutralizing antibody specific to this cytokine prevented neutrophilic influx into parasitized organs. In evaluating the immunosuppressive effects, we identified a decreased number of CD4(+) FOXP3(+) T cells and reduced il10 expression in A2AR(-/-) infected mice. During ex vivo cell culture, A2AR(-/-) splenocytes produced smaller amounts of IL-10. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the A2AR signaling pathway is detrimental to development of Th1-type adaptive immunity and that this pathway could be associated with the regulatory process. In particular, it promotes parasite surveillance.

  8. Safety of regadenoson, an adenosine A2A receptor agonist for myocardial perfusion imaging, in mild asthma and moderate asthma patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaker, Brian R; O'Connor, B; Hansel, Trevor T; Barnes, Peter J; Meng, Lixen; Mathur, Vandana S; Lieu, Hsiao D

    2008-01-01

    Patients with reactive airways are at risk for adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, mediated via A(2B) and/or A(3) adenosine receptors. To examine the effects of regadenoson, a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, on airway resistance, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial in asthmatic patients with a positive adenosine monophosphate challenge test. The mean ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) at each tested time point relative to the baseline FEV(1) was significantly higher after treatment with regadenoson compared with placebo from 10 to 60 minutes after treatment. One patient had a substantial but asymptomatic FEV(1) reduction (-36.2%) after regadenoson that reversed spontaneously. The most common adverse events with regadenoson were tachycardia (66%), dizziness (53%), headache (45%), and dyspnea (34%). The mean heart rate significantly increased with regadenoson (maximum of +10.4 beats/min) versus placebo. In this pilot safety study of 48 patients with mild or moderate asthma who had bronchial reactivity to adenosine monophosphate, regadenoson was safe and well tolerated.

  9. Characterization of the binding of a novel nonxanthine adenosine antagonist radioligand, ( sup 3 H)CGS 15943, to multiple affinity states of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, M.F.; Williams, M.; Do, U.H.; Sills, M.A. (CIBA-GEIGY Corp., Summit, NJ (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The triazoloquinazoline CGS 15943 is the first reported nonxanthine adenosine antagonist that has high affinity for brain adenosine receptors. In the present study, the binding of (3H) CGS 15943 to recognition sites in rat cortical membranes was characterized. Saturation experiments revealed that (3H)CGS 15943 labeled a single class of recognition sites with high affinity and limited capacity. Competition studies revealed that the binding of (3H)CGS 15943 was consistent with the labeling of brain adenosine A1 receptors. Adenosine agonists inhibited 1 nM (3H)CGS 15943 binding with the following order of activity N6-cyclopentyladenosine (IC50 = 15 nM) greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than (R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than 5'-N6-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine greater than (S)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than CGS 21680 greater than CV 1808 (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). The potency order for adenosine antagonists was CGS 15943 (IC50 = 5 nM) greater than 8-phenyltheophylline greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-amino-2-chloro)phenylxanthine greater than 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine greater than theophylline = caffeine (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). Antagonist inhibition curves were steep and best described by a one-site binding model. In contrast, adenosine A1 agonist competition curves were shallow, as indicated by Hill coefficients less than unity. Computer analysis revealed that these inhibition curves were best described by a two-site binding model. Agonist competition curves generated in the presence of 1 mM GTP resulted in a rightward shift and steepening of the inhibition-concentration curves, whereas antagonist binding was not altered in the presence of GTP. The complex binding interactions found with adenosine agonists indicate that (3H)CGS 15943 labels both high and low affinity components of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex.

  10. Synthesis, biological and modeling studies of 1,3-di-n-propyl-2,4-dioxo-6-methyl-8-(substituted) 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro [1,2,4]-triazolo [3,4-f]-purines as adenosine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorin, G; Bolcato, C; Cacciari, B; Kachler, S; Klotz, K-N; Montopoli, C; Moro, S; Spalluto, G

    2005-08-01

    A new series of potential adenosine receptor antagonists with a [1,2,4]-triazolo-[3,4-f]-purine structure bearing at the 1 and 3 position n-propyl groups have been synthesized, and their affinities at the four human adenosine receptor subtypes (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) have been evaluated. In this case the presence of n-propyl groups seems to induce potency at the A(2A) and A(3) adenosine receptor subtypes as opposed to our previously reported series bearing methyl substituents at the 1 and 3 positions. In particular the non-acylated derivative 17 showed affinity at these two receptor subtypes in the micromolar range. Indeed, preliminary molecular modeling investigations according to the experimental binding data indicate a modest steric and electrostatic antagonist-receptor complementarity.

  11. Recombinant ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73 has long lasting antinociceptive effects that are dependent on adenosine A1 receptor activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zylka Mark J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, also known as CD73 hydrolyzes extracellular adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP to adenosine in nociceptive circuits. Since adenosine has antinociceptive effects in rodents and humans, we hypothesized that NT5E, an enzyme that generates adenosine, might also have antinociceptive effects in vivo. Results To test this hypothesis, we purified a soluble version of mouse NT5E (mNT5E using the baculovirus expression system. Recombinant mNT5E hydrolyzed AMP in biochemical assays and was inhibited by α,β-methylene-adenosine 5'-diphosphate (α,β-me-ADP; IC50 = 0.43 μM, a selective inhibitor of NT5E. mNT5E exhibited a dose-dependent thermal antinociceptive effect that lasted for two days when injected intrathecally in wild-type mice. In addition, mNT5E had thermal antihyperalgesic and mechanical antiallodynic effects that lasted for two days in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA model of inflammatory pain and the spared nerve injury (SNI model of neuropathic pain. In contrast, mNT5E had no antinociceptive effects when injected intrathecally into adenosine A1 receptor (A1R, Adora1 knockout mice. Conclusion Our data indicate that the long lasting antinociceptive effects of mNT5E are due to hydrolysis of AMP followed by activation of A1R. Moreover, our data suggest recombinant NT5E could be used to treat chronic pain and to study many other physiological processes that are regulated by NT5E.

  12. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Quiroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  13. ATP induced vasodilatation and purinergic receptors in the human leg: roles of nitric oxide, prostaglandins and adenosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Gonzalez-Alonso, Jose; Bune, Laurids

    2009-01-01

    Plasma adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is thought to contribute to the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow. Intravascular ATP infusion can induce profound limb muscle vasodilatation, but the purinergic receptors and downstream signals involved in this response remain unclear. This study...... investigated: 1) the role of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandins and adenosine as mediators of ATP induced limb vasodilation and 2) the expression and distribution of purinergic P2 receptors in human skeletal muscle. Systemic and leg hemodynamics were measured before and during 5-7 min of femoral intra.......05) and was associated with a parallel lowering in leg vascular conductance and cardiac output and a compensatory increase in leg O2 extraction. Infusion of theophylline did not alter the ATP induced leg hyperemia or systemic variables. Real time PCR analysis of the mRNA content from the vastus lateralus muscle of 8...

  14. Early Cessation of Adenosine Diphosphate Receptor Inhibitors Among Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients Treated With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Ju, Christine; Anstrom, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    treated with percutaneous coronary intervention discharged alive on ADPri therapy from 233 United States TRANSLATE-ACS study (Treatment With Adenosine Diphosphate Receptor Inhibitors: Longitudinal Assessment of Treatment Patterns and Events After Acute Coronary Syndrome) participating hospitals......BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend the use of adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor (ADPri) therapy for 1 year postacute myocardial infarction; yet, early cessation of therapy occurs frequently in clinical practice. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined 11 858 acute myocardial infarction patients...... ADPri cessation included physician-recommended discontinuation (54%), as well as patient self-discontinuation, because of cost (19%), medication side effects (9%), and procedural interruption (10%). Using a time-dependent covariate model, early cessation of ADPri therapy was associated with increased...

  15. Adenosine and dialysis hypotension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, CMF

    In this issue, Imai et al. report the results of a double-blind placebo-controlled study on the effect of an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, FK352, on the incidence of dialysis hypotension in hypotension-prone patients. This Commentary discusses the use of selective adenosine A1 receptor

  16. Effects of caffeine on behavioral and inflammatory changes elicited by copper in zebrafish larvae: Role of adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fernanda Fernandes; Leite, Carlos Eduardo; Kist, Luiza Wilges; de Oliveira, Giovanna Medeiros; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Campos, Maria Martha; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of caffeine in the behavioral and inflammatory alterations caused by copper in zebrafish larvae, attempting to correlate these changes with the modulation of adenosine receptors. To perform a survival curve, 7dpf larvae were exposed to 10μM CuSO 4 , combined to different concentrations of caffeine (100μM, 500μM and 1mM) for up to 24h. The treatment with copper showed lower survival rates only when combined with 500μM and 1mM of caffeine. We selected 4 and 24h as treatment time-points. The behavior evaluation was done by analyzing the traveled distance, the number of entries in the center, and the length of permanence in the center and the periphery of the well. The exposure to 10μM CuSO 4 plus 500μM caffeine at 4 and 24h changed the behavioral parameters. To study the inflammatory effects of caffeine, we assessed the PGE 2 levels by using UHPLC-MS/MS, and TNF, COX-2, IL-6 and IL-10 gene expression by RT-qPCR. The expression of adenosine receptors was also evaluated with RT-qPCR. When combined to copper, caffeine altered inflammatory markers depending on the time of exposure. Adenosine receptors expression was significantly increased, especially after 4h exposure to copper and caffeine together or separately. Our results demonstrated that caffeine enhances the inflammation induced by copper by decreasing animal survival, altering inflammatory markers and promoting behavioral changes in zebrafish larvae. We also conclude that alterations in adenosine receptors are related to those effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adenosine A2B receptor-mediated leukemia inhibitory factor release from astrocytes protects cortical neurons against excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moidunny Shamsudheen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF have been widely reported. In the central nervous system (CNS, astrocytes are the major source for LIF, expression of which is enhanced following disturbances leading to neuronal damage. How astrocytic LIF expression is regulated, however, has remained an unanswered question. Since neuronal stress is associated with production of extracellular adenosine, we investigated whether LIF expression in astrocytes was mediated through adenosine receptor signaling. Methods Mouse cortical neuronal and astrocyte cultures from wild-type and adenosine A2B receptor knock-out animals, as well as adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists and various enzymatic inhibitors, were used to study LIF expression and release in astrocytes. When needed, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test was used for statistical analysis. Results We show here that glutamate-stressed cortical neurons induce LIF expression through activation of adenosine A2B receptor subtype in cultured astrocytes and require signaling of protein kinase C (PKC, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs: p38 and ERK1/2, and the nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB. Moreover, LIF concentration in the supernatant in response to 5′-N-ethylcarboxamide (NECA stimulation was directly correlated to de novo protein synthesis, suggesting that LIF release did not occur through a regulated release pathway. Immunocytochemistry experiments show that LIF-containing vesicles co-localize with clathrin and Rab11, but not with pHogrin, Chromogranin (CgA and CgB, suggesting that LIF might be secreted through recycling endosomes. We further show that pre-treatment with supernatants from NECA-treated astrocytes increased survival of cultured cortical neurons against glutamate, which was absent when the supernatants were pre-treated with an anti-LIF neutralizing antibody. Conclusions

  18. Creatine, similarly to ketamine, affords antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test via adenosine A₁ and A2A receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Pazini, Francis L; Rosa, Julia M; Ramos-Hryb, Ana B; Oliveira, Ágatha; Kaster, Manuella P; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-06-01

    The benefits of creatine supplementation have been reported in a broad range of central nervous systems diseases, including depression. A previous study from our group demonstrated that creatine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test (TST), a predictive model of antidepressant activity. Since depression is associated with a dysfunction of the adenosinergic system, we investigated the involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of creatine in the TST. The anti-immobility effect of creatine (1 mg/kg, po) or ketamine (a fast-acting antidepressant, 1 mg/kg, ip) in the TST was prevented by pretreatment of mice with caffeine (3 mg/kg, ip, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) (2 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist), and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-{2-furyl}{1,2,4}triazolo-{2,3-a}{1,3,5}triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)-phenol (ZM241385) (1 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist). In addition, the combined administration of subeffective doses of creatine and adenosine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, nonselective adenosine receptor agonist) or inosine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, nucleoside formed by the breakdown of adenosine) reduced immobility time in the TST. Moreover, the administration of subeffective doses of creatine or ketamine combined with N-6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) (0.05 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist), N-6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) (0.1 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist), or dipyridamole (0.1 μg/mouse, icv, adenosine transporter inhibitor) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the TST. These results indicate that creatine, similarly to ketamine, exhibits antidepressant-like effect in the TST probably mediated by the activation of both adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, further reinforcing the potential of targeting the purinergic system to the management of mood disorders.

  19. Adenosine A2a receptor induces GDNF expression by the Stat3 signal in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Rong-Hu; Xiong, Ji; Liu, Ying

    2012-11-14

    Adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) is believed to play a role in a number of physiological responses and pathological conditions. Our group has shown previously that A2aR-activated astrocytes occurred following oxygen-glucose deprivation. However, the relationship between A2aR and neurotrophins is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of A2aR on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) expression in rat brain astrocyte-2 (RBA-2) cells by quantitative PCR and western blot. We established a stable A2aR-overexpressing cell line and found that A2aR induced GDNF expression both at mRNA and protein levels. A2aR-selective antagonist Sch58261 decreased GDNF expression in a dose-dependent manner with increased activation of Stat3. The Stat3 inhibitor reversed the effect of Sch58261 on GDNF expression. Therefore, these data indicate that A2aR induces GDNF expression by the Stat3 pathway, which provides a new insight into the function of A2aR in cerebral ischemia and neuroprotection.

  20. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackwell, Timothy S; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R

    2012-06-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A(2B)R) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A(2B)R or treatment with the A(2B)R antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A(2B)R attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A(2B)R activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A(2B)R antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.

  1. Inosine Released from Dying or Dead Cells Stimulates Cell Proliferation via Adenosine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Chaurio, Ricardo A; Maueröder, Christian; Derer, Anja; Rauh, Manfred; Kost, Andriy; Liu, Yi; Mo, Xianming; Hueber, Axel; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Herrmann, Martin; Zhao, Yi; Muñoz, Luis E

    2017-01-01

    Many antitumor therapies induce apoptotic cell death in order to cause tumor regression. Paradoxically, apoptotic cells are also known to promote wound healing, cell proliferation, and tumor cell repopulation in multicellular organisms. We aimed to characterize the nature of the regenerative signals concentrated in the micromilieu of dead and dying cells. Cultures of viable melanoma B16F10 cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in the presence of dead and dying cells, their supernatants (SNs), or purified agonists and antagonists were used to evaluate the stimulation of proliferation. Viable cell quantification was performed by either flow cytometry of harvested cells or by crystal violet staining of adherent cells. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of cell SNs were deployed to identify the nature of growth-promoting factors. Coimplantation of living cells in the presence of SNs collected from dead and dying cells and specific agonists was used to evaluate tumor growth in vivo. The stimulation of proliferation of few surviving cells by bystander dead cells was confirmed for melanoma cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary FLS. We found that small soluble molecules present in the protein-free fraction of SNs of dead and dying cells were responsible for the promotion of proliferation. The nucleoside inosine released by dead and dying cells acting via adenosine receptors was identified as putative inducer of proliferation of surviving tumor cells after irradiation and heat treatment. Inosine released by dead and dying cells mediates tumor cell proliferation via purinergic receptors. Therapeutic strategies surmounting this pathway may help to reduce the rate of recurrence after radio- and chemotherapy.

  2. Inosine Released from Dying or Dead Cells Stimulates Cell Proliferation via Adenosine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMany antitumor therapies induce apoptotic cell death in order to cause tumor regression. Paradoxically, apoptotic cells are also known to promote wound healing, cell proliferation, and tumor cell repopulation in multicellular organisms. We aimed to characterize the nature of the regenerative signals concentrated in the micromilieu of dead and dying cells.MethodsCultures of viable melanoma B16F10 cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS in the presence of dead and dying cells, their supernatants (SNs, or purified agonists and antagonists were used to evaluate the stimulation of proliferation. Viable cell quantification was performed by either flow cytometry of harvested cells or by crystal violet staining of adherent cells. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of cell SNs were deployed to identify the nature of growth-promoting factors. Coimplantation of living cells in the presence of SNs collected from dead and dying cells and specific agonists was used to evaluate tumor growth in vivo.ResultsThe stimulation of proliferation of few surviving cells by bystander dead cells was confirmed for melanoma cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary FLS. We found that small soluble molecules present in the protein-free fraction of SNs of dead and dying cells were responsible for the promotion of proliferation. The nucleoside inosine released by dead and dying cells acting via adenosine receptors was identified as putative inducer of proliferation of surviving tumor cells after irradiation and heat treatment.ConclusionInosine released by dead and dying cells mediates tumor cell proliferation via purinergic receptors. Therapeutic strategies surmounting this pathway may help to reduce the rate of recurrence after radio- and chemotherapy.

  3. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation by Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Tissue Repair and Symptomology in Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Squadrito, Francesco; Squadrito, Giovanni; Pallio, Socrate; Anastasi, Giuseppe P; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Macrì, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the adenosine receptor pathway has been demonstrated to be effective in improving tissue remodeling and blunting the inflammatory response. Active colitis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction resulting in extensive tissue damage. Symptomatic improvement requires both control of the inflammatory process and repair and remodeling of damaged tissues. We investigated the ability of an A2A receptor agonist, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), to restore tissue structural integrity in two experimental colitis models using male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first model, colitis was induced with a single intra-colonic instillation of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS), 25 mg diluted in 0.8 ml 50% ethanol. After 6 h, animals were randomized to receive either PDRN (8 mg/kg/i.p.), or PDRN + the A2A antagonist [3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX); 10 mg/kg/i.p.], or vehicle (0.8 ml saline solution) daily. In the second model, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) was dissolved in drinking water at a concentration of 8%. Control animals received standard drinking water. After 24 h animals were randomized to receive PDRN or PDRN+DMPX as described above. Rats were sacrificed 7 days after receiving DNBS or 5 days after DSS. In both experimental models of colitis, PDRN ameliorated the clinical symptoms and weight loss associated with disease as well as promoted the histological repair of damaged tissues. Moreover, PDRN reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde. All these effects were abolished by the concomitant administration of the A2A antagonist DMPX. Our study suggests that PDRN may represent a promising treatment for improving tissue repair during inflammatory bowel diseases.

  4. ADENOSINE RECEPTOR STIMULATION BY POLYDEOXYRIBONUCLEOTIDE IMPROVES TISSUE REPAIR AND SYMPTOMOLOGY IN EXPERIMENTAL COLITIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pallio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the adenosine receptor pathway has been demonstrated to be effective in improving tissue remodelling and blunting the inflammatory response. Active colitis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction resulting in extensive tissue damage. Symptomatic improvement requires both control of the inflammatory process and repair and remodelling of damaged tissues. We investigated the ability of an A2A receptor agonist, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN, to restore tissue structural integrity in two experimental colitis models using male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first model, colitis was induced with a single intra-colonic instillation of dinitro-benzene-sulfonic acid (DNBS, 25mg diluted in 0.8ml 50% ethanol. After 6 hrs, animals were randomized to receive either PDRN (8mg/kg/i.p., or PDRN + the A2A antagonist (DMPX; 10mg/kg/i.p., or vehicle (0.8 ml saline solution daily. In the second model, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS was dissolved in drinking water at a concentration of 8%. Control animals received standard drinking water. After 24 hrs animals were randomized to receive PDRN or PDRN+DMPX as described above. Rats were sacrificed 7 days after receiving DNBS or 5 days after DSS. In both experimental models of colitis, PDRN ameliorated the clinical symptoms and weight loss associated with disease as well as promoted the histological repair of damaged tissues. Moreover, PDRN reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxydase activity, and malondialdheyde. All these effects were abolished by the concomitant administration of the A2a antagonist DMPX. Our study suggests that PDRN may represent a promising treatment for improving tissue repair during inflammatory bowel diseases.

  5. Regulation of hippocampal cannabinoid CB1 receptor actions by adenosine A1 receptors and chronic caffeine administration: implications for the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Vasco C; Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Pratt, Judith A; Brett, Ros R; Sebastião, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB(1) receptor-mediated modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons is important for the integrity of hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Although adenosine A(1) receptors have a central role in fine-tuning excitatory transmission in the hippocampus, A(1) receptors localized in GABAergic cells do not directly influence GABA release. CB(1) and A(1) receptors are the main targets for the effects of two of the most heavily consumed psychoactive substances worldwide: Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, a CB(1) receptor agonist) and caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist). We first tested the hypothesis that an A(1)-CB(1) interaction influences GABA and glutamate release in the hippocampus. We found that A(1) receptor activation attenuated the CB(1)-mediated inhibition of GABA and glutamate release and this interaction was manifested at the level of G-protein activation. Using in vivo and in vitro approaches, we then investigated the functional implications of the adenosine-cannabinoid interplay that may arise following chronic caffeine consumption. Chronic administration of caffeine in mice (intraperitoneally, 3 mg/kg/day, for 15 days, >12 h before trials) led to an A(1)-mediated enhancement of the CB(1)-dependent acute disruptive effects of THC on a short-term spatial memory task, despite inducing a reduction in cortical and hippocampal CB(1) receptor number and an attenuation of CB(1) coupling with G protein. A(1) receptor levels were increased following chronic caffeine administration. This study shows that A(1) receptors exert a negative modulatory effect on CB(1)-mediated inhibition of GABA and glutamate release, and provides the first evidence of chronic caffeine-induced alterations on the cannabinoid system in the cortex and hippocampus, with functional implications in spatial memory.

  6. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette member A3 gene mutation in children from one family from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Gawahir Mohamed Ahmed; Al Otaibi, Wadha Hilal; Al-Mobaireek, Khalid Fahad Abdullah; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in ABCA3, which is adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette member A3, a member of protein transporter family for phospholipids into the lamellar bodies during synthesis of surfactant, can cause lung disease related to surfactant dysfunction with autosomal recessive pattern. We reported three cases from same family with ABCA3 mutation, their gene, clinical course, and outcomes mentioning that one patient had successful lung transplantation, one started the process of the lung transplantation while the third one died during infancy. We concluded that the patients with ABCA3 gene mutations are increasing in numbers may be due to the availability of the genetic testing and high index of suspicion among physicians. Lung transplantation is the definitive treatment, but availability is limited in our region.

  7. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette member A3 gene mutation in children from one family from Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawahir Mohamed Ahmed Mukhtar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in ABCA3, which is adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette member A3, a member of protein transporter family for phospholipids into the lamellar bodies during synthesis of surfactant, can cause lung disease related to surfactant dysfunction with autosomal recessive pattern. We reported three cases from same family with ABCA3 mutation, their gene, clinical course, and outcomes mentioning that one patient had successful lung transplantation, one started the process of the lung transplantation while the third one died during infancy. We concluded that the patients with ABCA3 gene mutations are increasing in numbers may be due to the availability of the genetic testing and high index of suspicion among physicians. Lung transplantation is the definitive treatment, but availability is limited in our region.

  8. Predicting Subtype Selectivity for Adenosine Receptor Ligands with Three-Dimensional Biologically Relevant Spectrum (BRS-3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Song-Bing; Ben Hu; Kuang, Zheng-Kun; Wang, Dong; Kong, De-Xin

    2016-11-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are potential therapeutic targets for Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, pain, stroke and cancers. Prediction of subtype selectivity is therefore important from both therapeutic and mechanistic perspectives. In this paper, we introduced a shape similarity profile as molecular descriptor, namely three-dimensional biologically relevant spectrum (BRS-3D), for AR selectivity prediction. Pairwise regression and discrimination models were built with the support vector machine methods. The average determination coefficient (r2) of the regression models was 0.664 (for test sets). The 2B-3 (A2B vs A3) model performed best with q2 = 0.769 for training sets (10-fold cross-validation), and r2 = 0.766, RMSE = 0.828 for test sets. The models’ robustness and stability were validated with 100 times resampling and 500 times Y-randomization. We compared the performance of BRS-3D with 3D descriptors calculated by MOE. BRS-3D performed as good as, or better than, MOE 3D descriptors. The performances of the discrimination models were also encouraging, with average accuracy (ACC) 0.912 and MCC 0.792 (test set). The 2A-3 (A2A vs A3) selectivity discrimination model (ACC = 0.882 and MCC = 0.715 for test set) outperformed an earlier reported one (ACC = 0.784). These results demonstrated that, through multiple conformation encoding, BRS-3D can be used as an effective molecular descriptor for AR subtype selectivity prediction.

  9. Interactions of purified bovine brain A1-adenosine receptors with G-proteins. Reciprocal modulation of agonist and antagonist binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Freissmuth, M.; Selzer, E.; Schütz, W.

    1991-01-01

    The bovine brain A1-adenosine receptor was purified 8000-fold by affinity chromatography on xanthine-amine-congener (XAC)-Sepharose. Addition of a 120-fold molar excess of a purified bovine brain G-protein preparation (Go,i a mixture of Go and Gi, containing predominantly Go) decreases the Bmax of the binding of the antagonist radioligand [3H]XAC to the receptor. This decrease is observed not only after insertion into phospholipid vesicles but also in detergent solution, and is reversed by GT...

  10. Isolation and characterization of coronary endothelial and smooth muscle cells from A1 adenosine receptor-knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Bunyen; Ansari, Habib R.; Oldenburg, Peter J.; Schnermann, J.; Mustafa, S. Jamal

    2005-01-01

    Mice have been used widely in in vivo and in vitro cardiovascular research. The availability of knockout mice provides further clues to the physiological significance of specific receptor subtypes. Adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR)-knockout (A1KO) mice and their wild-type (A1WT) controls were employed in this investigation. The heart and aortic arch were carefully removed and retroinfused with enzyme solution (1 mg/ml collagenase type I, 0.5 mg/ml soybean trypsin inhibitor, 3% BSA, and 2% antibiot...

  11. ATP Release Guides Neutrophil Chemotaxis via P2Y2 and A3 Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu Chen; Ross Corriden; Yoshiaki Inoue; Linda Yip; Naoyuki Hashiguchi; Annelies Zinkernagel; Victor Nizet; Paul A. Insel; Wolfgang G. Junger

    2006-01-01

    .... We find that human neutrophils release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from the leading edge of the cell surface to amplify chemotactic signals and direct cell orientation by feedback through P2Y2 nucleotide receptors...

  12. Astrocytic Lrp4 (Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 4) Contributes to Ischemia-Induced Brain Injury by Regulating ATP Release and Adenosine-A2AR (Adenosine A2A Receptor) Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin-Chun; Hu, Jin-Xia; Li, Lei; Li, Qiang; Tang, Fu-Lei; Lin, Sen; Sun, Dong; Sun, Xiang-Dong; Cui, Gui-Yun; Mei, Lin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Lrp4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, where it regulates glutamatergic neurotransmission by suppressing ATP release. Here, we investigated Lrp4's function in ischemia/stroke-induced brain injury response, which includes glutamate-induced neuronal death and reactive astrogliosis. The brain-specific Lrp4 conditional knockout mice (Lrp4 GFAP-Cre ), astrocytic-specific Lrp4 conditional knockout mice (Lrp4 GFAP-creER ), and their control mice (Lrp4 f/f ) were subjected to photothrombotic ischemia and the transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. After ischemia/stroke, mice or their brain samples were subjected to behavior tests, brain histology, immunofluorescence staining, Western blot, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, primary astrocytes and neurons were cocultured with or without oxygen and glucose deprivation and in the presence or absence of the antagonist for adenosine-A 2A R (adenosine A2A receptor) or ATP-P2X7R (P2X purinoceptor 7) signaling. Gliotransmitters, such as glutamate, d-serine, ATP, and adenosine, in the condition medium of cultured astrocytes were also measured. Lrp4, largely expressed in astrocytes, was increased in response to ischemia/stroke. Both Lrp4 GFAP-Cre and Lrp4 GFAP-creER mice showed less brain injury, including reduced neuronal death, and impaired reactive astrogliosis. Mechanistically, Lrp4 conditional knockout in astrocytes increased ATP release and the production of ATP derivative, adenosine, which were further elevated by oxygen and glucose deprivation. Pharmacological inhibition of ATP-P 2 X 7 R or adenosine-A 2A R signaling diminished Lrp4 GFAP-creER 's protective effect. The astrocytic Lrp4 plays an important role in ischemic brain injury response. Lrp4 deficiency in astrocytes seems to be protective in response to ischemic brain injury, likely because of the increased ATP release and adenosine-A 2A R signaling. © 2017 American Heart

  13. Adenosine Receptors as a Biological Pathway for the Anti-Inflammatory and Beneficial Effects of Low Frequency Low Energy Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Varani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies explored the biological effects of low frequency low energy pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs on human body reporting different functional changes. Much research activity has focused on the mechanisms of interaction between PEMFs and membrane receptors such as the involvement of adenosine receptors (ARs. In particular, PEMF exposure mediates a significant upregulation of A2A and A3ARs expressed in various cells or tissues involving a reduction in most of the proinflammatory cytokines. Of particular interest is the observation that PEMFs, acting as modulators of adenosine, are able to increase the functionality of the endogenous agonist. By reviewing the scientific literature on joint cells, a double role for PEMFs could be hypothesized in vitro by stimulating cell proliferation, colonization of the scaffold, and production of tissue matrix. Another effect could be obtained in vivo after surgical implantation of the construct by favoring the anabolic activities of the implanted cells and surrounding tissues and protecting the construct from the catabolic effects of the inflammatory status. Moreover, a protective involvement of PEMFs on hypoxia damage in neuron-like cells and an anti-inflammatory effect in microglial cells have suggested the hypothesis of a positive impact of this noninvasive biophysical stimulus.

  14. Methodical Challenges and a Possible Resolution in the Assessment of Receptor Reserve for Adenosine, an Agonist with Short Half-Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Zsuga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The term receptor reserve, first introduced and used in the traditional receptor theory, is an integrative measure of response-inducing ability of the interaction between an agonist and a receptor system (consisting of a receptor and its downstream signaling. The underlying phenomenon, i.e., stimulation of a submaximal fraction of receptors can apparently elicit the maximal effect (in certain cases, provides an opportunity to assess the receptor reserve. However, determining receptor reserve is challenging for agonists with short half-lives, such as adenosine. Although adenosine metabolism can be inhibited several ways (in order to prevent the rapid elimination of adenosine administered to construct concentration–effect (E/c curves for the determination, the consequent accumulation of endogenous adenosine biases the results. To address this problem, we previously proposed a method, by means of which this bias can be mathematically corrected (utilizing a traditional receptor theory-independent approach. In the present investigation, we have offered in silico validation of this method by simulating E/c curves with the use of the operational model of agonism and then by evaluating them using our method. We have found that our method is suitable to reliably assess the receptor reserve for adenosine in our recently published experimental setting, suggesting that it may be capable for a qualitative determination of receptor reserve for rapidly eliminating agonists in general. In addition, we have disclosed a possible interference between FSCPX (8-cyclopentyl-N3-[3-(4-(fluorosulfonylbenzoyloxypropyl]-N1-propylxanthine, an irreversible A1 adenosine receptor antagonist, and NBTI (S-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl-6-thioinosine, a nucleoside transport inhibitor, i.e., FSCPX may blunt the effect of NBTI.

  15. Methodical Challenges and a Possible Resolution in the Assessment of Receptor Reserve for Adenosine, an Agonist with Short Half-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsuga, Judit; Erdei, Tamas; Szabó, Katalin; Lampe, Nora; Papp, Csaba; Pinter, Akos; Szentmiklosi, Andras Jozsef; Juhasz, Bela; Szilvássy, Zoltán; Gesztelyi, Rudolf

    2017-05-19

    The term receptor reserve, first introduced and used in the traditional receptor theory, is an integrative measure of response-inducing ability of the interaction between an agonist and a receptor system (consisting of a receptor and its downstream signaling). The underlying phenomenon, i.e., stimulation of a submaximal fraction of receptors can apparently elicit the maximal effect (in certain cases), provides an opportunity to assess the receptor reserve. However, determining receptor reserve is challenging for agonists with short half-lives, such as adenosine. Although adenosine metabolism can be inhibited several ways (in order to prevent the rapid elimination of adenosine administered to construct concentration-effect (E/c) curves for the determination), the consequent accumulation of endogenous adenosine biases the results. To address this problem, we previously proposed a method, by means of which this bias can be mathematically corrected (utilizing a traditional receptor theory-independent approach). In the present investigation, we have offered in silico validation of this method by simulating E/c curves with the use of the operational model of agonism and then by evaluating them using our method. We have found that our method is suitable to reliably assess the receptor reserve for adenosine in our recently published experimental setting, suggesting that it may be capable for a qualitative determination of receptor reserve for rapidly eliminating agonists in general. In addition, we have disclosed a possible interference between FSCPX (8-cyclopentyl- N³ -[3-(4-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyloxy)propyl]- N ¹-propylxanthine), an irreversible A₁ adenosine receptor antagonist, and NBTI (S-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, i.e., FSCPX may blunt the effect of NBTI.

  16. Co-purification of A1 adenosine receptors and guanine nucleotide-binding proteins from bovine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, R; Linden, J

    1989-09-05

    A1 adenosine receptors and guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate have been co-purified from bovine cerebral cortex. A portion of solubilized receptors which displays high affinity GTP-sensitive agonist binding (40-50%) adheres tightly to agonist affinity columns composed of N6-aminobenzyladenosine-agarose. A1 adenosine receptors and G proteins are rapidly and selectively coeluted from agonist columns by the addition of 8-p-sulfophenyltheophylline, but only in combination with Mg2+-GTP or N-ethylmaleimide, agents which lower the affinity of receptors for agonists. Purified receptors and G protein alpha-subunits can be detected with the potent A1-selective antagonist radioligand, [125I]3-(4-amino-3-iodo)phenethyl-1-propyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (125I-BW-A844U) and [35S]guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate [( 35S]GTP gamma S), respectively. Pretreatment of solubilized receptors with 0.1 mM N-ethylmaleimide or 0.1 mM R-phenylisopropyladenosine abolishes adsorption of receptors and G proteins to affinity columns. Following removal of 8-p-sulfophenyltheophylline and GTP, purified receptors bind agonists (2 sites) and antagonists (1 site) with affinities similar to crude soluble receptors and typical of A1 receptors. Some receptors may be denatured as a result of purification since only 23% of the radioligand binding sites which adhere to the affinity column can be detected in the eluate. The Bmax of purified receptors, 820 +/- 100 pmol/mg protein (n = 3) is 1800-fold higher than crude soluble receptors. The specific activity of [35S]GTP gamma S binding sites in affinity column eluates is 4640 pmol/mg protein. Assuming a 1:1 stoichiometry, this specific activity indicates that receptor-G protein complexes are greater than 50% pure following affinity chromatography. The photoaffinity labeled purified receptor was identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a single band with a

  17. A2A adenosine receptor antagonists to weaken the hypoxia-HIF-1α driven immunosuppression and improve immunotherapies of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Stephen M; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxic and adenosine rich tumor microenvironments represent an important barrier that must be overcome to enable T and NK cells to reject tumors. The A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) on activated immune cells was identified as a critical and non-redundant mediator of physiological immunosuppression. Observations showing that tumor-protecting A2AR also suppress and redirect the anti-tumor immune response pointed to the importance of inhibiting this pathway to improve cancer immunotherapy. We advocated (i) blocking immunosuppressive adenosine-A2AR-cAMP-mediated intracellular signaling by A2AR antagonists and (ii) weakening hypoxia-HIF-1α-mediated accumulation of extracellular adenosine by oxygenation agents that also inhibits CD39/CD73 adenosine-generating enzymes. In view of commencing clinical trials of synthetic A2AR antagonists in combination with cancer immunotherapies, we discuss their promise and exclusion criteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Proteomics analysis of adenosine A1 receptor agonist-induced delayed myocardial protection in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianmei; Zou, Dingquan; Ran, Ke; Chang, Yetian

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the changes of myocardial protein expression profiles in 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), an adenosine A1 receptor agonist-induced delayed myocardial protection in New Zealand rabbits . A total of 8 rabbits were randomly divided into a CCPA group (CCPA group) and a normal saline group (NS group). CCPA and NS were infused into rabbits in the CCPA group and the NS group respectively. Twenty-four hours later, the rabbits were subjected to 30 min left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and were reperfused for 2 hours, then the ischemic zone tissues of left ventricle were sampled for proteomic analysis.A total of 12 other New Zeland rabbits were divided into a sham group (Sham group), a normal saline group (NS group) and a CCPA group (CCPA group). The expression of αB-crystalline, one of the differential proteins, was confirmed by Western blot. Analysis of two dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that the expression of 55 protein spots were different between the two groups, 17 protein spots were preliminarily identified with the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and Mascot and Expasy bioinformatics software. These proteins included stress proteins, metabolism-associated proteins, signal transduction pathway-related proteins, ionophorous proteins, immunity-associated proteins, and so on. Western blot showed that the expression of αB-crystalline was significantly up-regulated in the CCPA group. The myocardial protein expression profiles are changed markedly in the preconditioning late phase of CCPA .The differential proteins might be involved in the delayed cardioprotection induced by CCPA.

  19. Quantification of adenosine A(1) receptor biased agonism: Implications for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Gregory, Karen J; White, Paul J; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; May, Lauren T

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) stimulation is a powerful protective mechanism in cerebral and cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. Despite this, therapeutic targeting of the A1AR for the treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injury has been largely unsuccessful, as high concentrations of prototypical A1AR agonists impart significant hemodynamic effects, particularly pronounced bradycardia, atrioventricular block and hypotension. Exploiting the phenomenon of biased agonism to develop ligands that promote A1AR cytoprotection in the absence of adverse hemodynamic effects remains a relatively unexplored, but exciting, approach to overcome current limitations. In native systems, the atypical A1AR agonists VCP746 and capadenoson retain cytoprotective signaling in the absence of bradycardia, a phenomenon suggestive of biased agonism. The current study used pharmacological inhibitors to investigate A1AR mediated cytoprotective signal transduction in a CHO FlpIn cell background, thus identifying candidate pathways for quantitative bias profiling, including cAMP, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt1/2/3. Subsequently, effects on cell survival and the bias profile of VCP746 and capadenoson were determined and compared to that of the prototypical A1AR agonists, NECA, R-PIA, MeCCPA and CPA. We found that prototypical agonists do not display significant bias for any of the pathways assessed. In contrast, VCP746 and capadenoson show significant bias away from calcium mobilization relative to all pathways tested. These studies demonstrate that quantitative "fingerprinting" of biased agonism within a model system can enable ligands to be clustered by their bias profile, which in turn may be predictive of preferential physiologically relevant in vivo pharmacology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Locomotor activation by theacrine, a purine alkaloid structurally similar to caffeine: involvement of adenosine and dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduccia, Allison A; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simms, Jeffrey A; Yi, Henry Y; Li, Rui; Bjeldanes, Leonard; Ye, Chuangxing; Bartlett, Selena E

    2012-08-01

    Purine compounds, such as caffeine, have many health-promoting properties and have proven to be beneficial in treating a number of different conditions. Theacrine, a purine alkaloid structurally similar to caffeine and abundantly present in Camellia kucha, has recently become of interest as a potential therapeutic compound. In the present study, theacrine was tested using a rodent behavioral model to investigate the effects of the drug on locomotor activity. Long Evans rats were injected with theacrine (24 or 48 mg/kg, i.p.) and activity levels were measured. Results showed that the highest dose of theacrine (48 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased locomotor activity compared to control animals and activity remained elevated throughout the duration of the session. To test for the involvement of adenosine receptors underlying theacrine's motor-activating properties, rats were administered a cocktail of the adenosine A₁ agonist, N⁶-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) and A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS-21680; 0.2 mg/kg, i.p.). Pre-treatment with theacrine significantly attenuated the motor depression induced by the adenosine receptor agonists, indicating that theacrine is likely acting as an adenosine receptor antagonist. Next, we examined the role of DA D₁ and D₂ receptor antagonism on theacrine-induced hyperlocomotion. Both antagonists, D₁R SCH23390 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) and D₂R eticlopride (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), significantly reduced theacrine-stimulated activity indicating that this behavioral response, at least in part, is mediated by DA receptors. In order to investigate the brain region where theacrine may be acting, the drug (10 or 20 μg) was infused bilaterally into nucleus accumbens (NAc). Theacrine enhanced activity levels in a dose-dependent manner, implicating a role of the NAc in modulating theacrine's effects on locomotion. In addition, theacrine did not induce locomotor

  1. Theophylline, adenosine receptor antagonist prevents behavioral, biochemical and neurochemical changes associated with an animal model of tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Mahendra; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2007-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is considered to be the late onset adverse effect of prolonged administration of typical neuroleptic drugs. Adenosine is now widely accepted as the major inhibitory neuromodulators in the central nervous system besides GABA. Antagonists of A2A receptors are known to confer protection against neuronal damage caused by toxins and reactive oxygen species. The present study investigated the effect of adenosine receptor antagonist, theophylline (25 and 50 mg/kg, ip) in an animal model of tardive dyskinesia by using different behavioral (orofacial dyskinetic movements, stereotypy, locomotor activity, % retention), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione levels, antioxidant enzyme levels (SOD and catalase)) and neurochemical (neurotransmitter levels) parameters. Chronic administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg ip for 21 days) significantly increased vacuous chewing movements (VCMs), tongue protrusions, facial jerking in rats which was dose-dependently inhibited by theophylline. Chronic administration of haloperidol also resulted in the increased dopamine receptor sensitivity as evidenced by increased locomotor activity and stereotypic rearing. Further, it also decreased % retention time in elevated plus maze paradigm. Pretreatment with theophylline reversed these behavioral changes. Chronic administration of haloperidol also induced oxidative damage in all the brain regions which was prevented by theophylline, especially in the striatum. Chronic administration of haloperidol resulted in a decrease in dopamine levels which was reversed by treatment with theophylline (at higher doses). The findings of the present study suggested the involvement of adenosinergic receptor system in the development of tardive dyskinesia and possible therapeutic potential of theophylline in this disorder.

  2. Perinatal caffeine, acting on maternal adenosine A(1 receptors, causes long-lasting behavioral changes in mouse offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Björklund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are lingering concerns about caffeine consumption during pregnancy or the early postnatal period, partly because there may be long-lasting behavioral changes after caffeine exposure early in life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that pregnant wild type (WT mice given modest doses of caffeine (0.3 g/l in drinking water gave birth to offspring that as adults exhibited increased locomotor activity in an open field. The offspring also responded to cocaine challenge with greater locomotor activity than mice not perinatally exposed to caffeine. We performed the same behavioral experiments on mice heterozygous for adenosine A(1 receptor gene (A(1RHz. In these mice signaling via adenosine A(1 receptors is reduced to about the same degree as after modest consumption of caffeine. A(1RHz mice had a behavioral profile similar to WT mice perinatally exposed to caffeine. Furthermore, it appeared that the mother's genotype, not offspring's, was critical for behavioral changes in adult offspring. Thus, if the mother partially lacked A(1 receptors the offspring displayed more hyperactivity and responded more strongly to cocaine stimulation as adults than did mice of a WT mother, regardless of their genotype. This indicates that long-term behavioral alterations in the offspring result from the maternal effect of caffeine, and not a direct effect on fetus. WT offspring from WT mother but having a A(1R Hz grandmother preserved higher locomotor response to cocaine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that perinatal caffeine, by acting on adenosine A(1 receptors in the mother, causes long-lasting behavioral changes in the offspring that even manifest themselves in the second generation.

  3. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of platelet adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists and their clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Christopher N; Passacquale, Gabriella; Ferro, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Over the last two decades or more, anti-platelet therapy has become established as a cornerstone in the treatment of patients with ischaemic cardiovascular disease, since such drugs effectively reduce arterial thrombotic events. The original agent used in this context was aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) but, with the advent of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists, the use of dual anti-platelet therapy has resulted in further improvement in cardiovascular outcomes when compared with aspirin alone. The first group of platelet ADP receptor antagonists to be developed was the thienopyridine class, which comprise inactive pro-drugs that require in vivo metabolism to their active metabolites before exerting their inhibitory effect on the P2Y(12) receptor. Clopidogrel has been the principal ADP receptor antagonist in use over the past decade, but is limited by variability in its in vivo inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA). The pharmacokinetics of clopidogrel are unpredictable due to their vulnerability to multiple independent factors including genetic polymorphisms. Expression of the 3435T/T genetic variant encoding the MDR1 gene for the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter results in a significantly reduced maximum drug concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve as intestinal absorption of clopidogrel is reduced; and the expression of the mutant *2 allele of CYP2C19 results in similar pharmacokinetic effects as the two cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated steps required for the production of the active metabolite of clopidogrel are impaired. These variable pharmacokinetics lead to erratic pharmacodynamics and cannot reliably be overcome with increased dosing. Both prasugrel, a third-generation thienopyridine, and ticagrelor, a cyto-pentyl-triazolo-pyrimidine, have more predictable pharmacokinetics and enhanced pharmacodynamics than clopidogrel. Neither appears to be affected by the same genetic polymorphisms as clopidogrel; prasugrel requires

  4. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by the A sub 2 adenosine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilfillan, A.M.; Gobran, L.I.; Rooney, S.A. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1987-05-01

    The authors previously reported that adenosine (A) stimulates secretion of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major component of surfactant, in type II pneumocytes. To determine how this effect is mediated we examined the effect of P{sub 1} purinoceptor agonists -N{sup 6}-phenylisoprpyl-A (PIA), 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxyamido-A (NECA), 2-chloro-A (CA) - and antagonists - theophylline (T) and 8-phenyltheophylline (8PT) - on PC secretion and cAMP levels in type II cells isolated from the adult rat. The cells were preincubated with {sup 3}H-choline for 20 h, transferred to fresh medium and incubated {plus minus} test agents for 1.5 h after which {sup 3}H-PC in the cells and medium was measured. A and its analogs stimulated PC secretion in a dose-dependent manner. At the optimal concentration (A, 1 mM; analogs, 0.01 mM) secretion was stimulated approx. 2-fold from a basal rate of 0.08-1.02% of total PC in the medium after 1.5 h. The potency order was NECA>CA=L-PIA>A>D-PIA. The EC{sub 50} for NECA was 8.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M. The effect of NECA was significantly inhibited by 8PT (0.01 mM) and T (0.05 mM). NECA, A and L-PIA increased cellular cAMP levels 34, 12 and 8 fold, respectively, from a basal level of 0.23-0.28 pmol/10{sup 6} cells. These data suggest that the A{sub 2} subtype of the P{sub 1} receptor mediates the effect of A. In newborn rabbits, lung lavage PC increased form 24.1 {plus minus} 1.6 ug P/g lung dry wt at 0 h to 62.6 {plus minus} 7.7 after breathing for 3 h (n=13). 8PT (15 mg/kg, i.m.) at 0 h decreased the PC content at 3 h by 29% to 44.4 {plus minus} 5.1 ug/g. This suggests a functional role for the P{sub 1} receptor in lung surfactant secretion.

  5. Adenosine dysfunction in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boison, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular levels of the brain’s endogenous anticonvulsant and neuroprotectant adenosine largely depend on an astrocyte-based adenosine cycle, comprised of ATP release, rapid degradation of ATP into adenosine, and metabolic reuptake of adenosine through equilibrative nucleoside transporters and phosphorylation by adenosine kinase (ADK). Changes in ADK expression and activity therefore rapidly translate into changes of extracellular adenosine, which exerts its potent anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects by activation of pre- and postsynaptic adenosine A1 receptors. Increases in ADK increase neuronal excitability, whereas decreases in ADK render the brain resistant to seizures and injury. Importantly, ADK was found to be overexpressed and associated with astrogliosis and spontaneous seizures in rodent models of epilepsy, as well as in human specimen resected from patients with hippocampal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy. Several lines of evidence indicate that overexpression of astroglial ADK and adenosine deficiency are pathological hallmarks of the epileptic brain. Consequently, adenosine augmentation therapies constitute a powerful approach for seizure prevention, which is effective in models of epilepsy that are resistant to conventional antiepileptic drugs. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis suggests that adenosine dysfunction in epilepsy undergoes a biphasic response: An acute surge of adenosine that can be triggered by any type of injury might contribute to the development of astrogliosis via adenosine receptor –dependent and –independent mechanisms. Astrogliosis in turn is associated with overexpression of ADK, which was shown to be sufficient to trigger spontaneous recurrent electrographic seizures. Thus, ADK emerges as a promising target for the prediction and prevention of epilepsy. PMID:22700220

  6. A1 adenosine receptor inhibition of cyclic AMP formation and radioligand binding in the guinea-pig cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, S P; Curtis, A R; Kendall, D A; Hill, S J

    1994-12-01

    1. A1 adenosine receptors were investigated by radioligand binding and functional studies in slices and particulate preparations from guinea-pig cerebral cortex. 2. Binding of the adenosine receptor antagonist radioligand, 8-cyclopentyl-[3H]-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) to guinea-pig cerebral cortical membranes exhibited high density (1410 +/- 241 fmol mg-1 protein) and high affinity (Kd 3.8 +/- 0.3 nM). 3. [3H]-DPCPX binding to guinea-pig cerebral cortical membranes was displaced in a monophasic manner by adenosine receptor antagonists with the rank order of affinity (Ki values, nM): DPCPX (6) < xanthine amine congener (XAC, 153) < PD 115,199 (308). 4. Agonist displacement of [3H]-DPCPX binding was biphasic and exhibited the following rank order at the low affinity site (Ki values): 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyl-adenosine (CCPA, 513 nM) = N6-R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA, 526 nM) = N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 532 nM) < 2-chloroadenosine (2CA, 3.2 microM) = 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 4.6 microM) < N6-S-phenylisopropyladenosine (S-PIA, 19.9 microM). 5. In cerebral cortical slices, [3H]-DPCPX binding was displaced by antagonists and agonists in an apparently monophasic manner with the rank order of affinity (Ki values, nM): DPCPX (14) < XAC (45) < R-PIA (266) < PD 115,199 (666) < S-PIA (21000). 6. Cyclic AMP accumulation stimulated by 30 microM forskolin in guinea-pig cerebral cortical slices was inhibited by R-PIA, CCPA and CPA up to 1 microM in a concentration-dependent fashion with IC50 values of 14, 18, and 22 nM, respectively. All three analogues inhibited the forskolin response to a similar extent (82-93% inhibition). NECA, S-PTA and 2CA failed to inhibit the forskolin response, but rather enhanced the accumulation of cyclic AMP at concentrations of 100 nM or greater, presumably through activation of A2b adenosine receptors coupled to stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation in guinea-pig cerebral cortical slices.7. The inhibition of forskolin

  7. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 Labeled Antagonist of the A2A Adenosine Receptor: Application to a Fluorescence Polarization-Based Receptor Binding Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A2A adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A2AAR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a Ki value of 111±16 nM in radioligand binding using [3H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A2AAR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A2AAR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A1 and A3 ARs in binding or the A2BAR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10 μM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A2AAR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20 nM MRS5346 and 150 μg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The Kdvalue of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5 ± 4.7 nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, Ki values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with Ki values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs. PMID:20438717

  8. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Adenosine-induced neuroprotection : involvement of glia cells and cytokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittendorp, Maria Catharina

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine is released during pathological conditions and has significant neuroprotective effects mainly by stimulating adenosine A1 receptors in neurons. These neuroprotective effects are increased following upregulation of adenosine A1 receptors. Much research has been performed to enhance the

  10. Binding mode similarity measures for ranking of docking poses: a case study on the adenosine A2A receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anighoro, Andrew; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We report an investigation designed to explore alternative approaches for ranking of docking poses in the search for antagonists of the adenosine A2A receptor, an attractive target for structure-based virtual screening. Calculation of 3D similarity of docking poses to crystallographic ligand(s) as well as similarity of receptor-ligand interaction patterns was consistently superior to conventional scoring functions for prioritizing antagonists over decoys. Moreover, the use of crystallographic antagonists and agonists, a core fragment of an antagonist, and a model of an agonist placed into the binding site of an antagonist-bound form of the receptor resulted in a significant early enrichment of antagonists in compound rankings. Taken together, these findings showed that the use of binding modes of agonists and/or antagonists, even if they were only approximate, for similarity assessment of docking poses or comparison of interaction patterns increased the odds of identifying new active compounds over conventional scoring.

  11. Separation of on-target efficacy from adverse effects through rational design of a bitopic adenosine receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valant, Celine; May, Lauren T; Aurelio, Luigi; Chuo, Chung Hui; White, Paul J; Baltos, Jo-Anne; Sexton, Patrick M; Scammells, Peter J; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2014-03-25

    The concepts of allosteric modulation and biased agonism are revolutionizing modern approaches to drug discovery, particularly in the field of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Both phenomena exploit topographically distinct binding sites to promote unique GPCR conformations that can lead to different patterns of cellular responsiveness. The adenosine A1 GPCR (A1AR) is a major therapeutic target for cardioprotection, but current agents acting on the receptor are clinically limited for this indication because of on-target bradycardia as a serious adverse effect. In the current study, we have rationally designed a novel A1AR ligand (VCP746)--a hybrid molecule comprising adenosine linked to a positive allosteric modulator--specifically to engender biased signaling at the A1AR. We validate that the interaction of VCP746 with the A1AR is consistent with a bitopic mode of receptor engagement (i.e., concomitant association with orthosteric and allosteric sites) and that the compound displays biased agonism relative to prototypical A1AR ligands. Importantly, we also show that the unique pharmacology of VCP746 is (patho)physiologically relevant, because the compound protects against ischemic insult in native A1AR-expressing cardiomyoblasts and cardiomyocytes but does not affect rat atrial heart rate. Thus, this study provides proof of concept that bitopic ligands can be designed as biased agonists to promote on-target efficacy without on-target side effects.

  12. The hybrid molecule, VCP746, is a potent adenosine A2B receptor agonist that stimulates anti-fibrotic signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Elizabeth A; Chuo, Chung Hui; Baltos, Jo-Anne; Ford, Leigh; Scammells, Peter J; Wang, Bing H; Christopoulos, Arthur; White, Paul J; May, Lauren T

    2016-10-01

    We have recently described the rationally-designed adenosine receptor agonist, 4-(5-amino-4-benzoyl-3-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)-N-(6-(9-((2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxylmethyl)tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-6-ylamino)hexyl)benzamide (VCP746), a hybrid molecule consisting of an adenosine moiety linked to an adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) allosteric modulator moiety. At the A1AR, VCP746 mediated cardioprotection in the absence of haemodynamic side effects such as bradycardia. The current study has now identified VCP746 as an important pharmacological tool for the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR). The binding and function of VCP746 at the A2BAR was rigorously characterised in a heterologous expression system, in addition to examination of its anti-fibrotic signalling in cardiac- and renal-derived cells. In FlpInCHO cells stably expressing the human A2BAR, VCP746 was a high affinity, high potency A2BAR agonist that stimulated Gs- and Gq-mediated signal transduction, with an apparent lack of system bias relative to prototypical A2BAR agonists. The distinct agonist profile may result from an atypical binding mode of VCP746 at the A2BAR, which was consistent with a bivalent mechanism of receptor interaction. In isolated neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NCF), VCP746 stimulated potent inhibition of both TGF-β1- and angiotensin II-mediated collagen synthesis. Similar attenuation of TGF-β1-mediated collagen synthesis was observed in renal mesangial cells (RMC). The anti-fibrotic signalling mediated by VCP746 in NCF and RMC was selectively reversed in the presence of an A2BAR antagonist. Thus, we believe, VCP746 represents an important tool to further investigate the role of the A2BAR in cardiac (patho)physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Insulin-increased L-arginine transport requires A(2A adenosine receptors activation in human umbilical vein endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Guzmán-Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available Adenosine causes vasodilation of human placenta vasculature by increasing the transport of arginine via cationic amino acid transporters 1 (hCAT-1. This process involves the activation of A(2A adenosine receptors (A(2AAR in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Insulin increases hCAT-1 activity and expression in HUVECs, and A(2AAR stimulation increases insulin sensitivity in subjects with insulin resistance. However, whether A(2AAR plays a role in insulin-mediated increase in L-arginine transport in HUVECs is unknown. To determine this, we first assayed the kinetics of saturable L-arginine transport (1 minute, 37°C in the absence or presence of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI, 10 µmol/L, adenosine transport inhibitor and/or adenosine receptors agonist/antagonists. We also determined hCAT-1 protein and mRNA expression levels (Western blots and quantitative PCR, and SLC7A1 (for hCAT-1 reporter promoter activity. Insulin and NBTI increased the extracellular adenosine concentration, the maximal velocity for L-arginine transport without altering the apparent K(m for L-arginine transport, hCAT-1 protein and mRNA expression levels, and SLC7A1 transcriptional activity. An A2AAR antagonist ZM-241385 blocked these effects. ZM241385 inhibited SLC7A1 reporter transcriptional activity to the same extent in cells transfected with pGL3-hCAT-1(-1606 or pGL3-hCAT-1(-650 constructs in the presence of NBTI + insulin. However, SLC7A1 reporter activity was increased by NBTI only in cells transfected with pGL3-hCAT-1(-1606, and the ZM-241385 sensitive fraction of the NBTI response was similar in the absence or in the presence of insulin. Thus, insulin modulation of hCAT-1 expression and activity requires functional A(2AAR in HUVECs, a mechanism that may be applicable to diseases associated with fetal insulin resistance, such as gestational diabetes.

  14. Adenosine A1 receptor antagonist mitigates deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis and spatial reference memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, G; Ray, K; Sahu, S; Roy, K; Jain, V; Wadhwa, M; Panjwani, U; Kishore, K; Singh, S B

    2016-11-19

    Sleep deprivation (SD) upsurges intracellular levels of adenosine, impairs adult neuronal cell proliferation (NCP) and cognition while caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist improves cognition and adult NCP during SD. We examined the selective antagonistic effects of adenosine A1R using 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (8-CPT) on impairment of spatial reference memory and adult NCP during 48h SD. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were sleep deprived for 48h, using an automatic cage vibrating stimulus based on animal activity. Spatial reference memory was tested as a measure of cognitive performance employing Morris Water Maze. Rats were given 8-CPT dissolved in 50% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), twice daily (10mg/kg, i.p.) along with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) (50mg/kg/day, i.p.). The rats treated with 8-CPT showed significantly short mean latency and path-length to reach the platform compared to the SD rats. Consistent with these findings, 8-CPT-treated group was found to have significantly increased the number of BrdU, Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX) positive cells. However, no significant difference was seen in NeuN expression in the Dentate Gyrus (DG). Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) expression in the DG and CA1 region was observed to decrease significantly after SD and be rescued by 8-CPT treatment. Furthermore, latency to reach platform showed a negative correlation with number of BrdU, DCX type-1 cells and BDNF expression in DG. Thus, it may be concluded that treatment with 8-CPT, an adenosine A1R antagonist during SD mitigates SD induced decline in spatial reference memory and adult NCP possibly via up regulation of BDNF levels in DG and CA1 regions. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jiaming; Grenz, Almut; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Xia, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Normal penile erection is under the control of multiple factors and signaling pathways. Although adenosine signaling is implicated in normal and abnormal penile erection, the exact role and the underlying mechanism for adenosine signaling in penile physiology remain elusive. Here we report that shear stress leads to increased adenosine release from endothelial cells. Subsequently, we determined that ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is a key enzyme required for the production of elevated adenosine from ATP released by shear-stressed endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that shear stress-mediated elevated adenosine functions through the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) to activate the PI3K/AKT signaling cascade and subsequent increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. These in vitro studies led us to discover further that adenosine was induced during sustained penile erection and contributes to PI3K/AKT activation and subsequent eNOS phosphorylation via A2BR signaling in intact animal. Finally, we demonstrate that lowering adenosine in wild-type mice or genetic deletion of A2BR in mutant mice significantly attenuated PI3K/AKT activation, eNOS phosphorylation, and subsequent impaired penile erection featured with the reduction of ratio of maximal intracavernosal pressure to systemic arterial pressure from 0.49 ± 0.03 to 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.38 ± 0.04, respectively (both Ppenile erection via PI3K/AKT-dependent eNOS activation. These studies suggest that this signaling pathway may be a novel therapeutic target for erectile disorders.—Wen, J., Grenz, A., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Kellems, R. E., Blackburn, M. R., Eltzschig, H. K., Xia, Y. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation. PMID:21566208

  16. Leishmania infantum Parasites Subvert the Host Inflammatory Response through the Adenosine A2A Receptor to Promote the Establishment of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhael H. F. Lima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is an endogenously released purine nucleoside that signals through four widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Of these, A2AR is recognized as mediating major adenosine anti-inflammatory activity. During cutaneous leishmaniasis, adenosine induces immunosuppression, which promotes the establishment of infection. Herein, we demonstrated that A2AR signaling is exploited by Leishmania infantum parasites, the etiologic agent that causes Visceral Leishmaniasis, to successfully colonize the vertebrate host. A2AR gene-deleted mice exhibited a well-developed cellular reaction with a strong Th1 immune response in the parasitized organs. An intense infiltration of activated neutrophils into the disease-target organs was observed in A2AR−/− mice. These cells were characterized by high expression of CXCR2 and CD69 on their cell surfaces and increased cxcl1 expression. Interestingly, this phenotype was mediated by IFN-γ on the basis that a neutralizing antibody specific to this cytokine prevented neutrophilic influx into parasitized organs. In evaluating the immunosuppressive effects, we identified a decreased number of CD4+ FOXP3+ T cells and reduced il10 expression in A2AR−/− infected mice. During ex vivo cell culture, A2AR−/− splenocytes produced smaller amounts of IL-10. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the A2AR signaling pathway is detrimental to development of Th1-type adaptive immunity and that this pathway could be associated with the regulatory process. In particular, it promotes parasite surveillance.

  17. Constitutive activity of the A2A adenosine receptor and compartmentalised cyclic AMP signalling fine-tune noradrenaline release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrisimovic, Edin; Drobny, Helmut; Yang, Qiong; Höfer, Thomas; Boehm, Stefan; Nanoff, Christian; Schicker, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y (SH) cells endogenously express A(2A) adenosine receptors and can be differentiated into a sympathetic neuronal phenotype, capable of depolarisation-dependent noradrenaline release. Using differentiated SH culture, we here explored the link between A(2A)-receptor signalling and neurotransmitter release. In response to the receptor agonist CGS21680, the cells produced cyclic AMP (cAMP), and when depolarised, they released increased amounts of noradrenaline. An A(2A)-receptor antagonist, XAC, as well as an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), H89, depressed agonist-dependent release. In the presence of XAC or H89, noradrenaline release was found to be below basal values. This suggested that release facilitation also owes to constitutive receptor activity. We demonstrate that even in the absence of an agonist, the native A(2A)-receptor stimulated cAMP production, leading to the activation of PKA and enhanced noradrenaline release. Ancillary, non-cAMP-dependent effects of the receptor (i.e. phosphorylation of CREB, of Rabphilin3A) were refractory to constitutive activation. PKA-dependent facilitation of noradrenaline release was recapitulated with membrane-permeable 8-Br-cAMP; in addition to facilitation, 8-Br-cAMP caused marked inhibition of release, an effect not observed upon receptor activation. Inhibition by receptor-independent cAMP was likely due to suppression of voltage-dependent calcium current (VDCC) and increased activity of Src-family kinases. Receptor-mediated release facilitation was reproduced in the presence of tetrodotoxin (blocking action potentials); hence, the signalling occurred at the active zone comprising release sites. Our findings thus support (1) presynaptic localisation of the A(2A)-receptor and (2) suggest that compartmentalised pathways transmit cAMP signalling in order to facilitate depolarisation-dependent neurotransmitter release.

  18. Would calcium or potassium channels be responsible for cardiac arrest produced by adenosine and ATP in the right atria of Wistar rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Henrique; Rodrigues, Juliano Quintella Dantas; Alves, Gabriel Andrade; da Silva Junior, Edilson Dantas; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Garcia, Antônio G; Jurkiewicz, Aron

    2015-12-05

    Autonomic nerves release ATP, which is processed into adenosine in the synaptic cleft. Adenosine and ATP exert a negative chronotropic effect in the heart. This study aims to evaluate adenosine and P2 receptors and cellular signalling in cardiac arrest produced by purines in the heart. Right atria of adult Wistar rats were used to evaluate the effects of adenosine, ATP and CPA (an adenosine A1 receptor agonist), in the presence and absence of DPCPX, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. Effects of adenosine A2 and A3 receptors agonists and antagonists were also investigated. Finally, involvement of calcium and potassium channels in these responses was assessed using BayK 8644 and 4-Aminopyridine. Cumulative concentration-effect curves of adenosine and CPA resulted in a negative chronotropic effect culminating in cardiac arrest at 1000μM (adenosine) and 1µM (CPA). Furthermore, ATP produced a negative chronotropic effect at 1-300µM and cardiac arrest at 1000μM in the right atrium. ATPγS (a non-hydrolysable analogue of ATP) reduced chronotropism only. The effects of adenosine, CPA and ATP were inhibited by DPCPX, a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. The selective adenosine A2 and A3 receptors antagonists did not alter the chronotropic response of adenosine. 4-Aminopyridine, a blocker of potassium channels at 10mM, prevented the cardiac arrest produced by adenosine and ATP, while BayK 8644, activator of calcium channels, did not prevent cardiac arrest. Adenosine A1 receptor activation by adenosine and ATP produces cardiac arrest in the right atrium of Wistar rats predominantly through activation of potassium channels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Endogenous activation of adenosine A(1) receptors accelerates ischemic suppression of spontaneous electrocortical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilie, Andrei; Ciocan, Dragos; Zagrean, Ana-Maria

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces a rapid suppression of spontaneous brain rhythms prior to major alterations in ionic homeostasis. It was found in vitro during ischemia that the rapidly formed adenosine, resulting from the intracellular breakdown of ATP, may inhibit synaptic transmission via the A(1...

  20. Diadenosine diphosphate (Ap₂A) delays neutrophil apoptosis via the adenosine A2A receptor and cAMP/PKA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliyev, Boris K; Dimitrieva, Tatyana V; Savchenko, Valery G

    2014-10-01

    Diadenosine polyphosphates have been shown to inhibit neutrophil apoptosis, but mechanisms of the antiapoptotic effect are not known. Diadenosine diphosphate (Ap2A) is the simplest naturally occurring diadenosine polyphosphate, and its effect on neutrophil apoptosis has not previously been investigated. Here we report that Ap2A delays spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils, and the effect is reversed by the adenosine A2A receptor antagonists SCH442416 and ZM241385. Ap2A induced an elevation of intracellular cAMP and the elevation was blocked by the adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. The antiapoptotic effect of Ap2A was abrogated by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase, and Rp-8-Br-cAMPS, an inhibitor of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Together, these results demonstrate that Ap2A delays neutrophil apoptosis via the adenosine A2A receptor and cAMP/PKA signaling axis.

  1. Characterization of biochemical effects of CGS 21680C, an A2-adenosine receptor agonist, in the mammalian ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokník, P; Neumann, J; Schmitz, W; Scholz, H; Wenzlaff, H

    1997-12-01

    Effects of a putative A2-adenosine receptor agonist 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adeno sine (CGS 21680C) on force of contraction, protein phosphorylation, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) content, and the activity of phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in guinea pig ventricular (GPV) preparations were studied. CGS 21680C (1-100 microM) did not affect force of contraction in isolated electrically driven papillary muscles and was ineffective in increasing phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB) and the inhibitory subunit of troponin (TnI) in [32P]-labeled GPV cardiomyocytes. However, under the same conditions, CGS 21680C (10 microM) increased cAMP content from 4.3 +/- 0.2 to 13.0 +/- 0.6 pmol/mg protein, and this effect was completely abolished by A2-adenosine receptor antagonist 9-chloro-2-(2-furanyl)-5,6-dihydro-1,2,4-triazolo-(1,5-c)quinazolin++ +-5-imine (CGS 15943A). CGS 21680C (10 microM) inhibited PDE isoenzymes I, II, III, IV by 7.0, 8.3, 4.7, and 23.2%, respectively. Similarly, rolipram (100 microM), a selective PDE IV inhibitor, increased cAMP content from 4.4 +/- 0.3 to 7.2 +/- 0.3 pmol/mg protein without affecting the phosphorylation state of PLB and TnI. We conclude that CGS 21680C increases cAMP content in GPV cardiomyocytes by activation of adenylyl cyclase or in part by inhibition of PDE IV activity. The increase in cAMP content by CGS 21680C or rolipram is ineffective in increasing phosphorylation of PLB and TnI. These results support the concept of compartments for cAMP or protein kinase A or both in cardiomyocytes that are not coupled to phosphorylation and contractility.

  2. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Chen; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Weiru; Qi, Lin; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Priapism is featured with prolonged and painful penile erection and is prevalent among males with sickle cell disease (SCD). The disorder is a dangerous urological and hematological emergency since it is associated with ischemic tissue damage and erectile disability. Here we report that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) gene expression and PDE activity is significantly reduced in penile tissues of two independent priapic models: SCD mice and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice. Moreover, using ADA enzyme therapy to reduce adenosine or a specific antagonist to block A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling, we successfully attenuated priapism in both ADA−/− and SCD mice by restoring penile PDE5 gene expression to normal levels. This finding led us to further discover that excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation directly reduces PDE5 gene expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent manner. Overall, we reveal that excess adenosine-mediated ADORA2B signaling underlies reduced penile PDE activity by decreasing PDE5 gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent manner and provide new insight for the pathogenesis of priapism and novel therapies for the disease.—Ning, C., Wen, J., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Wang, W., Zhang, W., Qi, L., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackburn, M. R., Kellems, R. E., Xia, Y. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression. PMID:24614760

  3. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  4. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) variants may increase autistic symptoms and anxiety in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christine M; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Huy, Ellen; Rothermundt, Matthias; Krakowitzky, Petra; Meyer, Jobst; Deckert, Jürgen; von Gontard, Alexander; Hohoff, Christa

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous disorders presenting with increased rates of anxiety. The adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) is associated with panic disorder and is located on chromosome 22q11.23. Its gene product, the adenosine A(2A) receptor, is strongly expressed in the caudate nucleus, which also is involved in ASD. As autistic symptoms are increased in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and large 22q11.2 deletions and duplications have been observed in ASD individuals, in this study, 98 individuals with ASD and 234 control individuals were genotyped for eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ADORA2A. Nominal association with the disorder was observed for rs2236624-CC, and phenotypic variability in ASD symptoms was influenced by rs3761422, rs5751876 and rs35320474. In addition, association of ADORA2A variants with anxiety was replicated for individuals with ASD. Findings point toward a possible mediating role of ADORA2A variants on phenotypic expression in ASD that need to be replicated in a larger sample.

  5. Immunomodulatory impact of the A2A adenosine receptor on the profile of chemokines produced by neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Shaun R.; St-Onge, Mireille; Dussault, Andrée-Anne; Laflamme, Cynthia; Bouchard, Line; Boulanger, Jean; Pouliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    In LPS-stimulated human neutrophils, engagement of the adenosine A2A receptor selectively prevented the expression and release of TNF-α, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MIP-2α/CXCL2, and MIP-3α/CCL20. In mice lacking the A2A receptor, granulocytes that migrated into the air pouch 4 h after LPS injection expressed higher mRNA levels of TNF-α, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β than PMNs from wild-type mice. In mononuclear cells present in the air pouch 72 h after LPS injection, expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-2/CCL6 was higher in A2AR knockout mice. In addition to highlighting neutrophils as an early and pivotal target for mediating adenosine anti-inflammatory activities, these results identify TNF-α and the MIP chemokine family as gene products whose expression is pivotally affected by activation of A2AR in LPS-activated PMNs. Modulation by A2AR in the production of inflammatory signals by PMNs may thus influence the evolution of an inflammatory response by reducing the activation status of inflammatory cells. PMID:16280366

  6. A1 adenosine receptor negatively modulates coronary reactive hyperemia via counteracting A2A-mediated H2O2 production and KATP opening in isolated mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xueping; Teng, Bunyen; Tilley, Stephen; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that A2A, but not A2B, adenosine receptors (ARs) mediate coronary reactive hyperemia (RH), possibly by producing H2O2 and, subsequently, opening ATP-dependent K(+) (KATP) channels in coronary smooth muscle cells. In this study, A1 AR knockout (KO), A3 AR KO, and A1 and A3 AR double-KO (A1/A3 DKO) mice were used to investigate the roles and mechanisms of A1 and A3 ARs in modulation of coronary RH. Coronary flow of isolated hearts was measured using the Langendorff system. A1 KO and A1/A3 DKO, but not A3 KO, mice showed a higher flow debt repayment [~30% more than wild-type (WT) mice, P H2O2 production in A1 KO mice (1.8 ± 0.3 times that of WT mice, P H2O2 production, KATP channel opening, and coronary vasodilation during RH. This is the first report implying that A1 AR has a role in coronary RH.

  7. Neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of parkinson's disease and its dependence on adenosine A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K; Di Luca, D G; Orrú, M; Xu, Y; Chen, J-F; Schwarzschild, M A

    2016-05-13

    Considerable epidemiological and laboratory data have suggested that caffeine, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, may protect against the underlying neurodegeneration of parkinson's disease (PD). Although both caffeine and more specific antagonists of the A2A subtype of adenosine receptor (A2AR) have been found to confer protection in animal models of PD, the dependence of caffeine's neuroprotective effects on the A2AR is not known. To definitively determine its A2AR dependence, the effect of caffeine on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity was compared in wild-type (WT) and A2AR gene global knockout (A2A KO) mice, as well as in central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific (conditional) A2AR knockout (cKO) mice that lack the receptor either in postnatal forebrain neurons or in astrocytes. In WT and in heterozygous A2AR KO mice caffeine pretreatment (25mg/kgip) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced depletion of striatal dopamine. By contrast in homozygous A2AR global KO mice caffeine had no effect on MPTP toxicity. In forebrain neuron A2AR cKO mice, caffeine lost its locomotor stimulant effect, whereas its neuroprotective effect was mostly preserved. In astrocytic A2AR cKO mice, both caffeine's locomotor stimulant and protective properties were undiminished. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of PD relies on the A2AR, although the specific cellular localization of these receptors remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  8. Anesthetic Cardioprotection: The Role of Adenosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Stephanie; Hughes, Kelly; Eckle, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Brief periods of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion exert a protective effect against subsequent longer ischemic periods, a phenomenon coined ischemic preconditioning. Similar, repeated brief episodes of coronary occlusion and reperfusion at the onset of reperfusion, called post-conditioning, dramatically reduce infarct sizes. Interestingly, both effects can be achieved by the administration of any volatile anesthetic. In fact, cardio-protection by volatile anesthetics is an older phenomenon than ischemic pre- or post-conditioning. Although the mechanism through which anesthetics can mimic ischemic pre- or post-conditioning is still unknown, adenosine generation and signaling are the most redundant triggers in ischemic pre- or postconditioning. In fact, adenosine signaling has been implicated in isoflurane-mediated cardioprotection. Adenosine acts via four receptors designated as A1, A2a, A2b, and A3. Cardioprotection has been associated with all subtypes, although the role of each remains controversial. Much of the controversy stems from the abundance of receptor agonists and antagonists that are, in fact, capable of interacting with multiple receptor subtypes. Recently, more specific receptor agonists and new genetic animal models have become available paving way towards new discoveries. As such, the adenosine A2b receptor was shown to be the only 1 of the adenosine receptors whose cardiac expression is induced by ischemia in both mice and humans and whose function is implicated in ischemic pre- or post-conditioning. In the current review, we will focus on adenosine signaling in the context of anesthetic cardioprotection and will highlight new discoveries, which could lead to new therapeutic concepts to treat myocardial ischemia using anesthetic preconditioning. PMID:24502579

  9. Role of Adenosine Receptor A2A in Traumatic Optic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt d South Western Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA e Department of Orthopedics , Georgia Regents...Burnstock, 1998). However, the apparently impaired protection in mice with TON reflects that protection by endogenous adenosine is in sufficient and...Liou a,⁎ a Department of Ophthalmology, Georgia Regents University, 30909, USA b Department of Orthopedics , Georgia Regents University, 30909, USA c

  10. Probing Biased/Partial Agonism at the G Protein-Coupled A2B Adenosine Receptorˇ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Kiselev, Evgeny; Wei, Qiang; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled A2B adenosine receptor (AR) regulates numerous important physiological functions, but its activation by diverse A2BAR agonists is poorly profiled. We probed potential partial and/or biased agonism in cell lines expressing variable levels of endogenous or recombinant A2BAR. In cAMP accumulation assays, both 5′-substituted NECA and C2-substituted MRS3997 are full agonists. However, only 5′-substituted adenosine analogs are full agonists in calcium mobilization, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and β-arrestin translocation. A2BAR overexpression in HEK293 cells markedly increased the agonist potency and maximum effect in cAMP accumulation, but less in calcium and ERK1/2. A2BAR siRNA silencing was more effective in reducing the maximum cAMP effect of non-nucleoside agonist BAY60-6583 than NECA's. A quantitative ‘operational model’ characterized C2-substituted MRS3997 as either balanced (cAMP accumulation, ERK1/2) or strongly biased agonist (against calcium, β-arrestin). N6-Substitution biased against ERK1/2 (weakly) and calcium and β-arrestin (strongly) pathways. BAY60-6583 is ERK1/2-biased, suggesting a mechanism distinct from adenosine derivatives. BAY60-6583, as A2BAR antagonist in MIN-6 mouse pancreatic β cells expressing low A2BAR levels, induced insulin release. This is the first relatively systematic study of structure-efficacy relationships of this emerging drug target. PMID:24853985

  11. Adenosine 2A receptor antagonist prevented and reversed liver fibrosis in a mouse model of ethanol-exacerbated liver fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian J Chiang

    Full Text Available The effect of moderate alcohol consumption on liver fibrosis is not well understood, but evidence suggests that adenosine may play a role in mediating the effects of moderate ethanol on tissue injury. Ethanol increases the concentration of adenosine in the liver. Adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR activation is known to enhance hepatic stellate cell (HSC activation and A2AR deficient mice are protected from fibrosis in mice. Making use of a novel mouse model of moderate ethanol consumption in which female C57BL/6J mice were allowed continued access to 2% (vol/vol ethanol (11% calories or pair-fed control diets for 2 days, 2 weeks or 5 weeks and superimposed with exposure to CCl4, we tested the hypothesis that moderate ethanol consumption increases fibrosis in response to carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 and that treatment of mice with an A2AR antagonist prevents and/or reverses this ethanol-induced increase in liver fibrosis. Neither the expression or activity of CYP2E1, required for bio-activation of CCl4, nor AST and ALT activity in the plasma were affected by ethanol, indicating that moderate ethanol did not increase the direct hepatotoxicity of CCl4. However, ethanol feeding enhanced HSC activation and exacerbated liver fibrosis upon exposure to CCl4. This was associated with an increased sinusoidal angiogenic response in the liver. Treatment with A2AR antagonist both prevented and reversed the ability of ethanol to exacerbate liver fibrosis.Moderate ethanol consumption exacerbates hepatic fibrosis upon exposure to CCl4. A2AR antagonism may be a potential pharmaceutical intervention to decrease hepatic fibrosis in response to ethanol.

  12. Adenosine Receptor Activation in the “Trigger” Limb of Remote Pre-Conditioning Mediates Human Endothelial Conditioning and Release of Circulating Cardioprotective Factor(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Contractor, MBChB, DPhil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote ischemic pre-conditioning (rIPC has emerged as a potential mechanism to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury. Clinical data, however, have been mixed, and its physiological basis remains unclear, although it appears to involve release of circulating factor(s and/or neural pathways. Here, the authors demonstrate that adenosine receptor activation is an important step in initiating human pre-conditioning; that pre-conditioning liberates circulating cardioprotective factor(s; and that exogenous adenosine infusion is able to recapitulate release of this factor. However, blockade of adenosine receptors in ischemic tissue does not block the protection afforded by pre-conditioning. These data have important implications for defining the physiology of human pre-conditioning and its translation to future clinical trials.

  13. Interaction of purified bovine brain A1-adenosine receptors with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of human platelet membranes following reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, R; Linden, J

    1990-08-01

    A1-adenosine receptors and associated guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) have been co-purified from bovine cerebral cortex by agonist affinity chromatography [J. Biol. Chem. 264:14853-14859 (1989)]. In this study we have reconstituted purified bovine brain A1 receptors into human platelet membranes that contain A2- but no detectable A1-adenosine receptors. The recovery of reconstituted receptors was assessed from the binding of the antagonist radioligand [125I]3-(4-amino-3-iodo)phenethyl-1-propyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine and ranged from 32 to 84%. Coupling of reconstituted A1 receptors to platelet G proteins was evaluated by measurement of the high affinity binding of an agonist radioligand, 125I-aminobenzyladenosine, to receptor-G protein complexes and by stereospecific photoaffinity labeling of a 35,000-Da receptor polypeptide with the agonist photoaffinity label 125I-azidobenzyladenosine. Fifty percent of receptors reconstituted into platelet membranes bound agonists with high affinity, indicative of coupling to platelet G proteins. Reconstituted A1 receptors bound various ligands with affinities characteristic of A1 receptors of bovine brain. Although platelets contain both pertussis toxin-sensitive and -insensitive G proteins, reconstituted high affinity agonist binding was almost completely abolished by treatment of platelet membranes with guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate, pertussis toxin, N-ethylmaleimide, or heparin. Following reconstitution, A1 receptors could be resolubilized in complexes with platelet G proteins. The data suggest that marked species differences in the binding affinity of ligands to adenosine receptors result from differences in the receptors rather than membrane structure or G proteins and, further, that A1 receptors couple selectively and tightly to pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins.

  14. Extracellular Loop 2 of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Has a Key Role in Orthosteric Ligand Affinity and Agonist Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh T N; Baltos, Jo-Anne; Thomas, Trayder; Nguyen, Toan D; Muñoz, Laura López; Gregory, Karen J; White, Paul J; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; May, Lauren T

    2016-12-01

    The adenosine A 1 G protein-coupled receptor (A 1 AR) is an important therapeutic target implicated in a wide range of cardiovascular and neuronal disorders. Although it is well established that the A 1 AR orthosteric site is located within the receptor's transmembrane (TM) bundle, prior studies have implicated extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) as having a significant role in contributing to orthosteric ligand affinity and signaling for various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We thus performed extensive alanine scanning mutagenesis of A 1 AR-ECL2 to explore the role of this domain on A 1 AR orthosteric ligand pharmacology. Using quantitative analytical approaches and molecular modeling, we identified ECL2 residues that interact either directly or indirectly with orthosteric agonists and antagonists. Discrete mutations proximal to a conserved ECL2-TM3 disulfide bond selectively affected orthosteric ligand affinity, whereas a cluster of five residues near the TM4-ECL2 juncture influenced orthosteric agonist efficacy. A combination of ligand docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and mutagenesis results suggested that the orthosteric agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine binds transiently to an extracellular vestibule formed by ECL2 and the top of TM5 and TM7, prior to entry into the canonical TM bundle orthosteric site. Collectively, this study highlights a key role for ECL2 in A 1 AR orthosteric ligand binding and receptor activation. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of disubstituted N6- cyclopentyladenine analogues: The search for a neutral antagonist with high affinity for the adenosine A1 receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligt, R.A.F. de; Klein, P.A.M. van der; Frijtag Drabbe Künzel, J.K. von; Lorenzen, A.; El Maate, F.A.; Fujikawa, S.; Westhoven, R. van; Hoven, T. van den; Brussee, J.; Ijzerman, A.P.

    2004-01-01

    Novel 3,8- and 8,9-disubstituted N6-cyclopentyladenine derivatives were synthesised in moderate overall yield from 6-chloropurine. The derivatives were made in an attempt to find a new neutral antagonist with high affinity for adenosine A1 receptors. N6-Cyclopentyl-9- methyladenine (N-0840) was used

  16. Caffeine consumption prevents memory impairment, neuronal damage, and adenosine A2A receptors upregulation in the hippocampus of a rat model of sporadic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Janaína; Rocha, Andreia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Schein, Vanessa; Kazlauckas, Vanessa; Kalinine, Eduardo; Souza, Diogo O; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) streptozotocin (STZ) administration induces pathological and behavioral alterations similar to those observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is thus considered an experimental model of sporadic AD. Since caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) and selective antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors modify the course of memory impairment in different amyloid-β-based experimental models of AD, we now tested the impact of caffeine on STZ-induced dementia and associated neurodegeneration in the hippocampus as well as on the expression and density of adenosine receptors. Adult male rats received a bilateral infusion of saline or STZ (3 mg/kg, icv), which triggered memory deficits after four weeks, as gauged by impaired object recognition memory. This was accompanied by a reduced NeuN immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region and an increased expression and density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), but not A1R, in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption (1 g/L in the drinking water starting 2 weeks before the STZ challenge) prevented the STZ-induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration as well as the upregulation of A2AR. These findings provide the first demonstration that caffeine prevents sporadic dementia and implicate the control of central A2AR as its likely mechanism of action.

  17. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  18. Adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression and the effects of systemic theophylline administration on respiratory function 4 months after C2 hemisection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantwi, Kwaku D; Basura, Gregory J; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that in an animal model of acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), respiratory function can be restored by theophylline. We also have shown that respiratory recovery occurs spontaneously after prolonged postinjury survival periods when a hemidiaphragm is paralyzed by an ipsilateral upper cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection. Theophylline mediates functional recovery by central nervous system adenosine A1 receptor antagonism; however, it is unclear whether adenosine receptors are altered after prolonged postinjury periods and whether theophylline can further enhance restored respiratory function that occurs spontaneously. To assess putative effects of systemic theophylline administration on further enhancing spontaneous respiratory muscle recovery 4 months after C2 hemisection in rats and to determine whether adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression is altered in these animals. Electrophysiologic assessment of respiratory activity in the phrenic nerves was conducted in C2 hemisected rats 4 months after hemisection under standardized conditions. Immediately thereafter, rats were killed and the cervical spinal cords were prepared for adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression by in situ hybridization. Spontaneous recovery of respiratory activity in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve was detected in a majority (15/20) of C2 hemisected animals and amounted to 44.06% +/- 2.38% when expressed as a percentage of activity in the homolateral phrenic nerve in noninjured animals. At the optimal dosage used in the acute studies, theophylline (15 mg/kg) did not enhance, but rather unexpectedly blocked, recovered respiratory activity in 4 out of 5 animals tested. At dosages of 5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg, the drug blocked recovered respiratory activity in 3 out of 4 and 3 out of 5 animals tested, respectively. Quantitative analysis of adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression did not reveal a significant difference between experimental animals

  19. The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M B; Fuxe, K; Werge, T

    2002-01-01

    and lack of EPS in rodents could also be observed in non-human primates. We investigated the effects of CGS 21680 on behaviours induced by D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine in EPS-sensitized Cebus apella monkeys. CGS 21680 was administered s.c. in doses of 0.01, 0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg, alone...... and in combination with D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine. The monkeys were videotaped after drug administration and the tapes were rated for EPS and psychosis-like symptoms. CGS 21680 decreased apomorphine-induced behavioural unrest, arousal (0.01-0.05 mg/kg) and stereotypies (0.05 mg/kg) while amphetamine...... showed a functional anti-dopaminergic effect in Cebus apella monkeys without production of EPS. This further substantiates that adenosine A2A receptor agonists may have potential as antipsychotics with atypical profiles....

  20. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of alpha 7, but not alpha 4 beta 2*nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metaxas, A.; Al-Hasani, R.; Farshim, P.; Tubby, K.; Berwick, A.; Ledent, C.; Hourani, S.; Kitchen, I.; Bailey, A.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A2Areceptors (A2ARs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A2Aand nAChRs, we examined if

  1. Caffeine promotes anti-tumor immune response during tumor initiation: Involvement of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Hadar; Frishman, Valeria; Yulzari, Robert; Kachko, Leonid; Lewis, Eli C; Chaimovitz, Cidio; Douvdevani, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies depict a negative correlation between caffeine consumption and incidence of tumors in humans. The main pharmacological effects of caffeine are mediated by antagonism of the adenosine receptor, A2AR. Here, we examine whether the targeting of A2AR by caffeine plays a role in anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the effects of caffeine are studied in wild-type and A2AR knockout (A2AR(-/-)) mice. Tumor induction was achieved using the carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA). Alternatively, tumor cells, comprised of 3-MCA-induced transformed cells or B16 melanoma cells, were inoculated into animal footpads. Cytokine release was determined in a mixed lymphocyte tumor reaction (MLTR). According to our findings, caffeine-consuming mice (0.1% in water) developed tumors at a lower rate compared to water-consuming mice (14% vs. 53%, respectively, p=0.0286, n=15/group). Within the caffeine-consuming mice, tumor-free mice displayed signs of autoimmune alopecia and pronounced leukocyte recruitment intocarcinogen injection sites. Similarly, A2AR(-/-) mice exhibited reduced rates of 3-MCA-induced tumors. In tumor inoculation studies, caffeine treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and elevation in proinflammatory cytokine release over water-consuming mice, as depicted by MLTR. Addition of the adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, to MLTR resulted in a sharp decrease in IFNγ levels; this was reversed by the highly selective A2AR antagonist, ZM241385. Thus, immune response modulation through either caffeine or genetic deletion of A2AR leads to a Th1 immune profile and suppression of carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of pharmacologic A2AR antagonists may hold therapeutic potential in diminishing the rate of cancer development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The GS Protein-coupled A2a Adenosine Receptor Controls T Cell Help in the Germinal Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Robert K; Silva, Murillo; Labuda, Jasmine; Thayer, Molly; Cain, Derek W; Philbrook, Phaethon; Sethumadhavan, Shalini; Hatfield, Stephen; Ohta, Akio; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2017-01-27

    T follicular helper (TFH) cells have been shown to be critically required for the germinal center (GC) reaction where B cells undergo class switch recombination and clonal selection to generate high affinity neutralizing antibodies. However, detailed knowledge of the physiological cues within the GC microenvironment that regulate T cell help is limited. The cAMP-elevating, Gs protein-coupled A2a adenosine receptor (A2aR) is an evolutionarily conserved receptor that limits and redirects cellular immunity. However, the role of A2aR in humoral immunity and B cell differentiation is unknown. We hypothesized that the hypoxic microenvironment within the GC facilitates an extracellular adenosine-rich milieu, which serves to limit TFH frequency and function, and also promotes immunosuppressive T follicular regulatory cells (TFR). In support of this hypothesis, we found that following immunization, mice lacking A2aR (A2aRKO) exhibited a significant expansion of T follicular cells, as well as increases in TFH to TFR ratio, GC T cell frequency, GC B cell frequency, and class switching of GC B cells to IgG1. Transfer of CD4 T cells from A2aRKO or wild type donors into T cell-deficient hosts revealed that these increases were largely T cell-intrinsic. Finally, injection of A2aR agonist, CGS21680, following immunization suppressed T follicular differentiation, GC B cell frequency, and class switching of GC B cells to IgG1. Taken together, these observations point to a previously unappreciated role of GS protein-coupled A2aR in regulating humoral immunity, which may be pharmacologically targeted during vaccination or pathological states in which GC-derived autoantibodies contribute to the pathology. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Integrating Pharmacophore into Membrane Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Improve Homology Modeling of G Protein-coupled Receptors with Ligand Selectivity: A2A Adenosine Receptor as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingxiao; Guan, Mengxin; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren

    2015-12-01

    Homology modeling has been applied to fill in the gap in experimental G protein-coupled receptors structure determination. However, achievement of G protein-coupled receptors homology models with ligand selectivity remains challenging due to structural diversity of G protein-coupled receptors. In this work, we propose a novel strategy by integrating pharmacophore and membrane molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to improve homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors with ligand selectivity. To validate this integrated strategy, the A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR), whose structures in both active and inactive states have been established, has been chosen as an example. We performed blind predictions of the active-state A2A AR structure based on the inactive-state structure and compared the performance of different refinement strategies. The blind prediction model combined with the integrated strategy identified ligand-receptor interactions and conformational changes of key structural elements related to the activation of A2 A AR, including (i) the movements of intracellular ends of TM3 and TM5/TM6; (ii) the opening of ionic lock; (iii) the movements of binding site residues. The integrated strategy of pharmacophore with molecular dynamics simulations can aid in the optimization in the identification of side chain conformations in receptor models. This strategy can be further investigated in homology modeling and expand its applicability to other G protein-coupled receptor modeling, which should aid in the discovery of more effective and selective G protein-coupled receptor ligands. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Insulin/adenosine axis linked signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Luis; Subiabre, Mario; Araos, Joaquín; Sáez, Tamara; Salsoso, Rocío; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; San Martín, Rody; Toledo, Fernando; Sobrevia, Luis

    Regulation of blood flow depends on systemic and local release of vasoactive molecules such as insulin and adenosine. These molecules cause vasodilation by activation of plasma membrane receptors at the vascular endothelium. Adenosine activates at least four subtypes of adenosine receptors (A(1)AR,

  5. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Andrea N; McNeely, Patrick M; Katsaras, John; Robinson, Anne Skaja

    2016-08-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. The studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein's purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Large-scale functional expression of WT and truncated human adenosine A2A receptor in Pichia pastoris bioreactor cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strange Philip G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large-scale production of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs for functional and structural studies remains a challenge. Recent successes have been made in the expression of a range of GPCRs using Pichia pastoris as an expression host. P. pastoris has a number of advantages over other expression systems including ability to post-translationally modify expressed proteins, relative low cost for production and ability to grow to very high cell densities. Several previous studies have described the expression of GPCRs in P. pastoris using shaker flasks, which allow culturing of small volumes (500 ml with moderate cell densities (OD600 ~15. The use of bioreactors, which allow straightforward culturing of large volumes, together with optimal control of growth parameters including pH and dissolved oxygen to maximise cell densities and expression of the target receptors, are an attractive alternative. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of expression of the human Adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR in P. pastoris under control of a methanol-inducible promoter in both flask and bioreactor cultures. Results Bioreactor cultures yielded an approximately five times increase in cell density (OD600 ~75 compared to flask cultures prior to induction and a doubling in functional expression level per mg of membrane protein, representing a significant optimisation. Furthermore, analysis of a C-terminally truncated A2AR, terminating at residue V334 yielded the highest levels (200 pmol/mg so far reported for expression of this receptor in P. pastoris. This truncated form of the receptor was also revealed to be resistant to C-terminal degradation in contrast to the WT A2AR, and therefore more suitable for further functional and structural studies. Conclusion Large-scale expression of the A2AR in P. pastoris bioreactor cultures results in significant increases in functional expression compared to traditional flask cultures.

  7. Activation of Adenosine Receptor A2A Increases HSC Proliferation and Inhibits Death and Senescence by Down-regulation of p53 and Rb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kaimul eAhsan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: During fibrosis hepatic stellate cells (HSC undergo activation, proliferation and senescence but the regulation of these important processes is poorly understood. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2A is known to be present on HSC, and its activation results in liver fibrosis. In this study, we tested if A2A has a role in the regulation of HSC proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and the relevant molecular mechanism.Methods: The ability of adenosine to regulate p53 and Rb protein levels, proliferation, apoptosis and senescence was tested in the human HSC cell line LX-2 and rat primary HSC.Results: Adenosine receptor activation down-regulates p53 and Rb protein levels, increases BrdU incorporation and increases cell survival in LX-2 cells and in primary rat HSC. These effects of NECA were reproduced by an adenosine A2A receptor specific agonist (CGS21680 and blocked by a specific antagonist (ZM241385. By day twenty-one of culture primary rat HSC entered senescence and expressed -gal which was significantly inhibited by NECA. Furthermore, NECA induced down regulation of p53 and Rb and Rac1, and decreased phosphorylation of p44-42 MAP Kinase in LX-2 cells and primary rat HSC. These effects were reproduced by the cAMP analog 8-Bromo-cAMP, and the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin, and were blocked by PKA inhibitors.Conclusions: These results demonstrate that A2A receptor regulates a number of HSC fate decisions and induces greater HSC proliferation, reduces apoptosis and senescence by decreasing p53 and Rb through cAMP-PKA/Rac1/p38 MAPK pathway. This provides a mechanism for adenosine induced HSC regulation and liver fibrosis.

  8. A New Class of Fluorinated A2A Adenosine Receptor Agonist with Application to Last-Step Enzymatic [18 F]Fluorination for PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Phillip T; Dall'Angelo, Sergio; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Zanda, Matteo; O'Hagan, David

    2017-11-02

    The A2A adenosine receptor belongs to a family of G-coupled protein receptors that have been subjected to extensive investigation over the last few decades. Due to their prominent role in the biological functions of the heart, lungs, CNS and brain, they have become a target for the treatment of illnesses ranging from cancer immunotherapy to Parkinson's disease. The imaging of such receptors by using positron emission tomography (PET) has also been of interest, potentially providing a valuable tool for analysing and diagnosing various myocardial and neurodegenerative disorders, as well as offering support to drug discovery trials. Reported herein are the design, synthesis and evaluation of two new 5'-fluorodeoxy-adenosine (FDA)-based receptor agonists (FDA-PP1 and FDA-PP2), each substituted at the C-2 position with a terminally functionalised ethynyl unit. The structures enable a synthesis of 18 F-labelled analogues by direct, last-step radiosynthesis from chlorinated precursors using the fluorinase enzyme (5'-fluoro-5'-deoxyadenosine synthase), which catalyses a transhalogenation reaction. This delivers a new class of A2A adenosine receptor agonist that can be directly radiolabelled for exploration in PET studies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Overcoming the blood-brain barrier for delivering drugs into the brain by using adenosine receptor nanoagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xihui; Qian, Jun; Zheng, Shuyan; Changyi, Yinzhi; Zhang, Jianping; Ju, Shenghong; Zhu, Jianhua; Li, Cong

    2014-04-22

    The extremely low permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) poses the greatest impediment in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Recent work indicated that BBB permeability can be up-regulated by activating A2A adenosine receptor (AR), which temporarily increases intercellular spaces between the brain capillary endothelial cells. However, due to transient circulation lifetime of adenosine-based agonists, their capability to enhance brain delivery of drugs, especially macromolecular drugs, is limited. In this work, a series of nanoagonists (NAs) were developed by labeling different copies of A2A AR activating ligands on dendrimers. In vitro transendothelial electrical resistance measurements demonstrated that the NAs increased permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer by compromising the tightness of tight junctions, the key structure that restricts the entry of blood-borne molecules into the brain. In vivo imaging studies indicated the remarkably up-regulated brain uptake of a macromolecular model drug (45 kDa) after intravenous injection of NAs. Autoradiographic imaging showed that the BBB opening time-window can be tuned in a range of 0.5-2.0 h by the NAs labeled with different numbers of AR-activating ligands. By choosing a suitable NA, it is possible to maximize brain drug delivery and minimize the uncontrollable BBB leakage by matching the BBB opening time-window with the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic agent. The NA-mediated brain drug delivery strategy holds promise for the treatment of CNS diseases with improved therapeutic efficiency and reduced side-effects.

  10. Traumatic brain injury causes platelet adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid receptor inhibition independent of hemorrhagic shock in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Francis J; Chapman, Michael P; Donahue, Deborah L; Thomas, Scott; Moore, Ernest E; Wohlauer, Max V; Fritz, Braxton; Yount, Robert; Ploplis, Victoria; Davis, Patrick; Evans, Edward; Walsh, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Coagulopathy in traumatic brain injury (CTBI) is a well-established phenomenon, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Various studies implicate protein C activation related to the global insult of hemorrhagic shock or brain tissue factor release with resultant platelet dysfunction and depletion of coagulation factors. We hypothesized that the platelet dysfunction of CTBI is a distinct phenomenon from the coagulopathy following hemorrhagic shock. We used thrombelastography with platelet mapping as a measure of platelet function, assessing the degree of inhibition of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA) receptor pathways. First, we studied the early effect of TBI on platelet inhibition by performing thrombelastography with platelet mapping on rats. We then conducted an analysis of admission blood samples from trauma patients with isolated head injury (n = 70). Patients in shock or on clopidogrel or aspirin were excluded. In rats, ADP receptor inhibition at 15 minutes after injury was 77.6% ± 6.7% versus 39.0% ± 5.3% for controls (p injury in patients with isolated head trauma. This phenomenon is observed in the absence of hemorrhagic shock or multisystem injury. Thus, TBI alone is shown to be sufficient to induce a profound platelet dysfunction.

  11. Ethanol and Caffeine Effects on Social Interaction and Recognition in Mice: Involvement of Adenosine A2A and A1 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cruz, Laura; San-Miguel, Noemí; Bayarri, Pilar; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E.; Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercé

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and caffeine are frequently consumed in combination and have opposite effects on the adenosine system: ethanol metabolism leads to an increase in adenosine levels, while caffeine is a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist. These receptors are highly expressed in striatum and olfactory tubercle, brain areas involved in exploration and social interaction in rodents. Ethanol modulates social interaction processes, but the role of adenosine in social behavior is still poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to study the impact of ethanol, caffeine and their combination on social behavior, and to explore the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors on those actions. Male CD1 mice were evaluated in a social interaction three-chamber paradigm, for preference of conspecific vs. object, and also for long-term recognition memory of familiar vs. novel conspecific. Ethanol showed a biphasic effect, with low doses (0.25 g/kg) increasing social contact and higher doses (1.0–1.5 g/kg) reducing social interaction. However, no dose changed social preference; mice always spent more time sniffing the conspecific than the object, independently of the ethanol dose. Ethanol, even at doses that did not change social exploration, produced amnestic effects on social recognition the following day. Caffeine reduced social contact (15.0–60.0 mg/kg), and even blocked social preference at higher doses (30.0–60.0 mg/kg). The A1 antagonist Cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT; 3–9 mg/kg) did not modify social contact or preference on its own, and the A2A antagonist MSX-3 (1.5–6 mg/kg) increased social interaction at all doses. Ethanol at intermediate doses (0.5–1.0 g/kg) was able to reverse the reduction in social exploration induced by caffeine (15.0–30.0 mg/kg). Although there was no interaction between ethanol and CPT or MSX-3 on social exploration in the first day, MSX-3 blocked the amnestic effects of ethanol observed on the following day. Thus, ethanol

  12. Ethanol and Caffeine Effects on Social Interaction and Recognition in Mice: Involvement of Adenosine A2A and A1 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cruz, Laura; San-Miguel, Noemí; Bayarri, Pilar; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercé

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and caffeine are frequently consumed in combination and have opposite effects on the adenosine system: ethanol metabolism leads to an increase in adenosine levels, while caffeine is a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist. These receptors are highly expressed in striatum and olfactory tubercle, brain areas involved in exploration and social interaction in rodents. Ethanol modulates social interaction processes, but the role of adenosine in social behavior is still poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to study the impact of ethanol, caffeine and their combination on social behavior, and to explore the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors on those actions. Male CD1 mice were evaluated in a social interaction three-chamber paradigm, for preference of conspecific vs. object, and also for long-term recognition memory of familiar vs. novel conspecific. Ethanol showed a biphasic effect, with low doses (0.25 g/kg) increasing social contact and higher doses (1.0-1.5 g/kg) reducing social interaction. However, no dose changed social preference; mice always spent more time sniffing the conspecific than the object, independently of the ethanol dose. Ethanol, even at doses that did not change social exploration, produced amnestic effects on social recognition the following day. Caffeine reduced social contact (15.0-60.0 mg/kg), and even blocked social preference at higher doses (30.0-60.0 mg/kg). The A1 antagonist Cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT; 3-9 mg/kg) did not modify social contact or preference on its own, and the A2A antagonist MSX-3 (1.5-6 mg/kg) increased social interaction at all doses. Ethanol at intermediate doses (0.5-1.0 g/kg) was able to reverse the reduction in social exploration induced by caffeine (15.0-30.0 mg/kg). Although there was no interaction between ethanol and CPT or MSX-3 on social exploration in the first day, MSX-3 blocked the amnestic effects of ethanol observed on the following day. Thus, ethanol impairs the

  13. Human Monocyte Recognition of Adenosine-Based Cyclic Dinucleotides Unveils the A2a Gαs Protein-Coupled Receptor Tonic Inhibition of Mitochondrially Induced Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, Frédéric; Bétous, Delphine; Ravet, Emmanuel; Ligat, Laetitia; Lopez, Frédéric; Poupot, Mary; Poirot, Marc; Pérouzel, Éric; Tiraby, Gérard; Verhoeyen, Els

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides are important messengers for bacteria and protozoa and are well-characterized immunity alarmins for infected mammalian cells through intracellular binding to STING receptors. We sought to investigate their unknown extracellular effects by adding cyclic dinucleotides to the culture medium of freshly isolated human blood cells in vitro. Here we report that adenosine-containing cyclic dinucleotides induce the selective apoptosis of monocytes through a novel apoptotic pathway. We demonstrate that these compounds are inverse agonist ligands of A2a, a Gαs-coupled adenosine receptor selectively expressed by monocytes. Inhibition of monocyte A2a by these ligands induces apoptosis through a mechanism independent of that of the STING receptors. The blockade of basal (adenosine-free) signaling from A2a inhibits protein kinase A (PKA) activity, thereby recruiting cytosolic p53, which opens the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and impairs mitochondrial respiration, resulting in apoptosis. A2a antagonists and inverse agonist ligands induce apoptosis of human monocytes, while A2a agonists are antiapoptotic. In vivo, we used a mock developing human hematopoietic system through NSG mice transplanted with human CD34+ cells. Treatment with cyclic di-AMP selectively depleted A2a-expressing monocytes and their precursors via apoptosis. Thus, monocyte recognition of cyclic dinucleotides unravels a novel proapoptotic pathway: the A2a Gαs protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-driven tonic inhibitory signaling of mitochondrion-induced cell death. PMID:25384972

  14. Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Nyoli; Van de Laar, Floris A; van Driel, Mieke L

    2012-11-14

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent complication of type 2 diabetes with an estimated 65% of people with type 2 diabetes dying from a cause related to atherosclerosis. Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists like clopidogrel, ticlopidine, prasugrel and ticagrelor impair platelet aggregation and fibrinogen-mediated platelet cross-linking and may be effective in preventing CVD. To assess the effects of adenosine-diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (issue 2, 2011), MEDLINE (until April 2011) and EMBASE (until May 2011). We also performed a manual search, checking references of original articles and pertinent reviews to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing an ADP receptor antagonist with another antiplatelet agent or placebo for a minimum of 12 months in patients with diabetes. In particular, we looked for trials assessing clinical cardiovascular outcomes. Two review authors extracted data for studies which fulfilled the inclusion criteria, using standard data extraction templates. We sought additional unpublished information and data from the principal investigators of all included studies. Eight studies with a total of 21,379 patients with diabetes were included. Three included studies investigated ticlopidine compared to aspirin or placebo. Five included studies investigated clopidogrel compared to aspirin or a combination of aspirin and dipyridamole, or compared clopidogrel in combination with aspirin to aspirin alone. All trials included patients with previous CVD except the CHARISMA trial which included patients with multiple risk factors for coronary artery disease. Overall the risk of bias of the trials was low. The mean duration of follow-up ranged from 365 days to 913 days.Data for diabetes patients on all-cause mortality, vascular

  15. Nuclear receptor 4a3 (nr4a3 regulates murine mast cell responses and granule content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Garcia-Faroldi

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor 4a3 (Nr4a3 is a transcription factor implicated in various settings such as vascular biology and inflammation. We have recently shown that mast cells dramatically upregulate Nuclear receptor 4a3 upon activation, and here we investigated the functional impact of Nuclear receptor 4a3 on mast cell responses. We show that Nuclear receptor 4a3 is involved in the regulation of cytokine/chemokine secretion in mast cells following activation via the high affinity IgE receptor. Moreover, Nuclear receptor 4a3 negatively affects the transcript and protein levels of mast cell tryptase as well as the mast cell's responsiveness to allergen. Together, these findings identify Nuclear receptor 4a3 as a novel regulator of mast cell function.

  16. Changes in the Biochemical Profiles of Mid-Cervically Located Adenosine A1 Receptors After Repeated Theophylline Administration in Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Rubabe S; Nantwi, Kwaku D

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: Adenosine A1 receptors localized in the phrenic motoneurons (PMNs), where the axons of the descending bulbospinal respiratory make synaptic contacts, may be involved in theophylline-induced respiratory-related activity in rats. The objective of this study was to characterize the biochemical profiles of adenosine A1 receptors in 2 groups of rats: (a) naïve and (b) theophylline-treated (3-day oral administration). Methods: Biochemical binding characteristics of adenosine A1 receptors in the C3 to C5 (PMN) of adult rats were assessed in naïve (n =6) and theophylline-treated animals (n =6) using [3H]-DPCPX (10 pmol/L to 30 nmol/L), the specific adenosine A1 receptor antagonist in saturation-binding assays. Competition assays used theophylline as the competing ligand (20 mmol/L to 20 pmol/L), and protein concentration was determined with the Bradford assay using a range of standards (0.016–1.0 mg/mL). Results: In saturation-binding assays in naïve animals, the A1 receptor was characterized by a single binding site with Bmax and Kd values of 256.00 ± 32.13 fmol/mg protein and 2.89 ± 0.45 nmol/L, respectively. Analysis of the isotherm in theophylline-treated animals showed 1 site with Bmax and Kd values of 219.00 ± 26.3 fmol/mg protein and 0.60 ± 0.21 nmol/L, respectively, and a second site characterized by Bmax and Kd values of 492.6 ± 3.15 fmol/mg protein and 14.09 ± 2.06 n mol/L, respectively. Conclusions: Theophylline administration revealed 2 binding sites on receptors (characterized by the specific adenosine A1 antagonist, [3H]-DPCPX) located in the vicinity of phrenic motoneurons (C3–C5). Alteration of the receptor profiles after theophylline may underlie the respiratory-related actions of the drug. PMID:17274491

  17. Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-11-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Although nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA depletions or antagonism leave aspects of appetite and primary food motivation intact, rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and that stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors produces behavioral effects that are similar to those induced by DA antagonism. The present review summarizes the literature on the role of NAc DA and adenosine in effort-related processes, and also presents original data on the effects of local stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NAc core. Local injections of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine directly into NAc core produces shifts in effort-related choice behavior similar to those induced by DA antagonism or A2A receptor stimulation, decreasing lever pressing but increasing chow intake in rats responding on a concurrent fixed ratio/chow feeding choice task. In contrast, injections into a neostriatal control site dorsal to the NAc were ineffective. The actions of pilocarpine on this task were attenuated by co-administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Thus, drugs that act on DA, adenosine A2A, and muscarinic receptors regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia that can be observed in depression and other disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of adenosine1-receptor blockade on renin release from rabbit isolated perfused juxtaglomerular apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihprecht, H; Lorenz, J N; Schnermann, J

    1990-01-01

    ,3-dipropylxanthine (CPX) on renin release from single isolated rabbit JGAs with macula densa perfused. The A1-receptor agonist, N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), applied in the bathing solution at 10(-7) M, was found to inhibit renin secretion, an effect that was completely blocked by adding CPX (10(-5) M) to the bath...

  19. Comparison of the Effects of Adenosine A1 Receptors Activity in CA1 Region of the Hippocampus on Entorhinal Cortex and Amygdala Kindled Seizures in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Heidarianpour

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In the CNS, adenosine is known to suppress repetitive neuronal Firing, suggesting a role as an endogenous modifier of seizures. Indeed, intracerebral adenosine concentrations rise acutely during seizure activity and are thought to be responsible for terminating seizures and establishing a period of post-ictal refractoriness. However, it is unclear whether this suppression results from a general depression of brain excitability or through action on particular sites critical for the control of after discharge generation and/or seizure development and propagation. In this regard, comparison of the effects of adenosine A1 receptors of CA1 (region of the ‎hippocampus on entorhinal cortex and amygdala kindled seizures was ‎investigated in this study. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, Animals were kindled by daily electrical stimulation of amygdale (group A or entorhinal cortex (group B. In the fully kindled animals, N6-‎cyclohexyladenosine (CHA;1 and 10 M; a selective adenosine A1 receptor ‎agonist and 1,3-dimethyl-8-cyclohexylxanthine(CPT;1 ‎µ‎M; a selective ‎adenosine A1 receptors antagonist were microinfused bilaterally into the CA1 ‎region of hippocampus (1l/2min and animals were stimulated at 5 and 15 minutes after drug ‎injection. All animals were received artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 24 h before ‎each drug injection and this result were used as control. Results: The seizure parameters were measured at 5 and 15min post injection. Obtained data showed that CHA at concentrations of 10 ‎µ‎M reduced ‎entorhinal cortex and amygdala after discharge and stage5 seizure durations and ‎increased stage4 latency. CHA at concentration 1‎µ‎M significantly alters ‎seizure parameters of group A but not effect on group B. Intrahippocampal (CA1 region pretreatment of CPT (1 ‎µ‎M before CHA abolished the effects of CHA on seizure parameters.Conclusion: It ‎may be

  20. Ethanol and Caffeine effects on social interaction and recognition in mice: Involvement of adenosine A2A and A1 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura López-Cruz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol and caffeine are frequently consumed in combination and have opposite effects on the adenosine system: ethanol metabolism leads to an increase in adenosine levels, while caffeine is a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist. These receptors are highly expressed in striatum and olfactory tubercle, brain areas involved in exploration and social interaction in rodents. Ethanol modulates social interaction processes, but the role of adenosine in social behavior is still poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to study the impact of ethanol, caffeine and their combination on social behavior, and to explore the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors on those actions. Male CD1 mice were evaluated in a social interaction three-chamber paradigm, for preference of conspecific vs. object, and also for long-term recognition memory of familiar vs. novel conspecific. Ethanol showed a biphasic effect, with low doses (0.25 g/kg increasing social contact and higher doses (1.0-1.5 g/kg reducing social interaction. However, no dose changed social preference; mice always spent more time sniffing the conspecific than the object, independently of the ethanol dose. Ethanol, even at doses that did not change social exploration, produced amnestic effects on social recognition the following day. Caffeine reduced social contact (15.0-60.0 mg/kg, and even blocked social preference at higher doses (30.0-60.0 mg/kg. The A1 antagonist CPT (3-9 mg/kg did not modify social contact or preference on its own, and the A2A antagonist MSX-3 (1.5-6 mg/kg increased social interaction at all doses. Ethanol at intermediate doses (0.5-1.0 g/kg was able to reverse the reduction in social exploration induced by caffeine (15.0-30.0 mg/kg. Although there was no interaction between ethanol and CPT or MSX-3 on social exploration in the first day, MSX-3 blocked the amnestic effects of ethanol observed on the following day. Thus, ethanol impairs the formation of social

  1. Adenosine A2A Receptor and IL-10 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Arosio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine suppresses immune responses through the A2A receptor (A2AR. This study investigated the interleukin 10 (IL-10 genetic profile and the expression of A2AR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, Alzheimer disease (AD, and age-matched controls to verify, if they may help distinguish different forms of cognitive decline. We analyzed the IL-10 genotype and the expression of A2AR in 41 subjects with AD, 10 with amnestic MCI (a-MCI, 49 with multiple cognitive domain MCI (mcd-MCI, and 46 controls. There was a significant linear increase in A2AR mRNA levels and A2AR density from mcd-MCI to a-MCI, with intermediate levels being found in AD. The IL-10 AA genotype frequency was 67% in a-MCI, 46% in AD, 35% in mcd-MCI, and 20% in controls. These data suggest that the assessment of the IL-10 genotype and the expression of A2AR in PBMCs may be a valuable means of differentiating between a-MCI and mcd-MCI.

  2. Use of molecular modeling aided design to dial out hERG liability in adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qiaolin; Lim, Yeon-Hee; Anand, Rajan; Yu, Younong; Kim, Jae-hun; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Junying; Tempest, Paul; Levorse, Dorothy; Zhang, Xiaoping; Greene, Scott; Mullins, Deborra; Culberson, Chris; Sherborne, Brad; Parker, Eric M; Stamford, Andrew; Ali, Amjad

    2015-08-01

    Molecular modeling was performed on a triazolo quinazoline lead compound to help develop a series of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists with improved hERG profile. Superposition of the lead compound onto MK-499, a benchmark hERG inhibitor, combined with pKa calculations and measurement, identified terminal fluorobenzene to be responsible for hERG activity. Docking of the lead compound into an A2A crystal structure suggested that this group is located at a flexible, spacious, and solvent-exposed opening of the binding pocket, making it possible to tolerate various functional groups. Transformation analysis (MMP, matched molecular pair) of in-house available experimental data on hERG provided suggestions for modifications in order to mitigate this liability. This led to the synthesis of a series of compounds with significantly reduced hERG activity. The strategy used in the modeling work can be applied to other medicinal chemistry programs to help improve hERG profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Binding of the Antagonist Caffeine to the Human Adenosine Receptor hA2AR in Nearly Physiological Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruyin Cao

    Full Text Available Lipid composition may significantly affect membrane proteins function, yet its impact on the protein structural determinants is not well understood. Here we present a comparative molecular dynamics (MD study of the human adenosine receptor type 2A (hA(2AR in complex with caffeine--a system of high neuro-pharmacological relevance--within different membrane types. These are POPC, mixed POPC/POPE and cholesterol-rich membranes. 0.8-μs MD simulations unambiguously show that the helical folding of the amphipathic helix 8 depends on membrane contents. Most importantly, the distinct cholesterol binding into the cleft between helix 1 and 2 stabilizes a specific caffeine-binding pose against others visited during the simulation. Hence, cholesterol presence (~33%-50% in synaptic membrane in central nervous system, often neglected in X-ray determination of membrane proteins, affects the population of the ligand binding poses. We conclude that including a correct description of neuronal membranes may be very important for computer-aided design of ligands targeting hA(2AR and possibly other GPCRs.

  4. Age-related decline of the acute local inflammation response: a mitigating role for the adenosine A2A receptor.

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    Laflamme, Cynthia; Mailhot, Geneviève Bertheau; Pouliot, Marc

    2017-10-18

    Aging is accompanied by an increase in markers of innate immunity. How aging affects neutrophil functions remains of debate.The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), essential to the resolution of inflammation, modulates neutrophil functions. We sought to determine whether or not A2AR protects against the effects of aging. We monitored neutrophil influx, viability, and activation as well as cytokine accumulation in wild-type (WT) and A2AR-knockout mice (KO) at three different ages.Several readouts decreased with aging: neutrophil counts in dorsal air pouches (by up to 55%), neutrophil viability (by up to 56%), elastase and total protein in exudates (by up to 80%), and local levels of cytokines (by up to 90%). Each of these parameters was significantly more affected in A2AR-KO mice. CXCL1-3 levels were largely unaffected. The effects of aging were not observed systemically. Preventing neutrophil influx into the air pouch caused a comparable cytokine pattern in young WT mice. Gene expression (mRNA) in leukocytes was affected, with CXCL1 and CCL4 increasing and with TNF and IL-1α decreasing.ConclusionAging has deleterious effects on the acute inflammatory response and neutrophil-related activities, and defective migration appears as an important factor. A functional A2AR signaling pathway delays some of these.

  5. Detection of coronary stenosis with myocardial contrast echocardiography using regadenoson, a selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, D Elizabeth; Bragadeesh, Thanjavur; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yue-Gang; Zha, Daogang; Kaul, Sanjiv

    2012-04-01

    Regadenoson is comparable to adenosine in pharmacologic radionuclide stress tests but has not been studied with stress myocardial contrast echocardiography. This study assessed the haemodynamic profile and ability of regadenoson, a novel selective A(2A) receptor agonist, to detect coronary artery stenosis during myocardial contrast echocardiography. Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed to measure myocardial blood volume, myocardial blood flow velocity, and total regional myocardial blood flow before and after administration of regadenoson (5 µg kg(-1), 10 s bolus) in 10 open-chest dogs with mild-to-moderate coronary stenosis that was not flow limiting at rest. Regadenoson decreased blood pressure but did not change heart rate. It increased coronary blood flow significantly (P regadenoson. No arrhythmias were noted with regadenoson either prior to or during myocardial contrast echocardiography. Regadenoson can be used as a vasodilator stress agent with myocardial contrast echocardiography to detect the presence of physiologically significant coronary stenosis. The optimum time for image acquisition was 3-10 min after drug administration.

  6. An A2A adenosine receptor agonist, ATL313, reduces inflammation and improves survival in murine sepsis models

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    Linden Joel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology of sepsis is due in part to early systemic inflammation. Here we describe molecular and cellular responses, as well as survival, in A2A adenosine receptor (AR agonist treated and untreated animals during experimental sepsis. Methods Sepsis was induced in mice by intraperitoneal inoculation of live bacteria (Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus or lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Mice inoculated with live bacteria were treated with an A2A AR agonist (ATL313 or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, with or without the addition of a dose of ceftriaxone. LPS inoculated mice were treated with ATL313 or PBS. Serum cytokines and chemokines were measured sequentially at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours after LPS was administered. In survival studies, mice were followed until death or for 7 days. Results There was a significant survival benefit in mice infected with live E. coli (100% vs. 20%, p = 0.013 or S. aureus (60% vs. 20%, p = 0.02 when treated with ATL313 in conjunction with an antibiotic versus antibiotic alone. ATL313 also improved survival from endotoxic shock when compared to PBS treatment (90% vs. 40%, p = 0.005. The serum concentrations of TNF-α, MIP-1α, MCP-1, IFN-γ, and IL-17 were decreased by ATL313 after LPS injection (p p p Conclusion Further studies are warranted to determine the clinical utility of ATL313 as a novel treatment for sepsis.

  7. Theobromine suppresses adipogenesis through enhancement of CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β degradation by adenosine receptor A1.

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    Mitani, Takakazu; Watanabe, Shun; Yoshioka, Yasukiyo; Katayama, Shigeru; Nakamura, Soichiro; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    Theobromine, a methylxanthine derived from cacao beans, reportedly has various health-promoting properties but molecular mechanism by which effects of theobromine on adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify the molecular mechanisms of the anti-adipogenic effect of theobromine in vitro and in vivo. ICR mice (4week-old) were administered with theobromine (0.1g/kg) for 7days. Theobromine administration attenuated gains in body and epididymal adipose tissue weights in mice and suppressed expression of adipogenic-associated genes in mouse adipose tissue. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, theobromine caused degradation of C/EBPβ protein by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Pull down assay showed that theobromine selectively interacts with adenosine receptor A1 (AR1), and AR1 knockdown inhibited theobromine-induced C/EBPβ degradation. Theobromine increased sumoylation of C/EBPβ at Lys133. Expression of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease 2 (SENP2) gene, coding for a desumoylation enzyme, was suppressed by theobromine. In vivo knockdown studies showed that AR1 knockdown in mice attenuated the anti-adipogenic effects of theobromine in younger mice. Theobromine suppresses adipocyte differentiation and induced C/EBPβ degradation by increasing its sumoylation. Furthermore, the inhibition of AR1 signaling is important for theobromine-induced C/EBPβ degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Salidroside attenuates chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension via adenosine A2a receptor related mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway.

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    Huang, Xiaoying; Zou, Lizhen; Yu, Xiaoming; Chen, Mayun; Guo, Rui; Cai, Hui; Yao, Dan; Xu, Xiaomei; Chen, Yanfan; Ding, Cheng; Cai, Xueding; Wang, Liangxing

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by pulmonary arterial remodeling mainly due to excess cellular proliferation and apoptosis resistance of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Salidroside, an active ingredient isolated from Rhodiola rosea is proposed to exert protective effects against PAH. However, the function of salidroside in PAH has not been investigated systematically and the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To investigate the effects of salidroside on PAH, the mice in chronic hypoxia model of PAH were given by an increasing concentration of salidroside (0, 16 mg/kg, 32 mg/kg, and 64 mg/kg). After salidroside treatment, the chronic hypoxia-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary arterial remodeling were attenuated, suggesting a protective role played by salidroside in PAH. To explore the potential mechanisms, the apoptosis of PASMCs after salidroside treatment under hypoxia conditions were determined in vivo and in vitro, and also the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis factors, Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome C, and caspase 9 were examined. The results revealed that salidroside reversed hypoxia-induced cell apoptosis resistance at least partially via a mitochondria-dependent pathway. In addition, salidroside upregulated the expression of adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) in lung tissues of mice and in PASMCs in vitro after hypoxia exposure. Combined the evidence above, we conclude that salidroside can attenuate chronic hypoxia-induced PAH by promoting PASMCs apoptosis via an A2aR related mitochondria dependent pathway. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Isolation and characterization of coronary endothelial and smooth muscle cells from A1 adenosine receptor-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Bunyen; Ansari, Habib R; Oldenburg, Peter J; Schnermann, J; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2006-04-01

    Mice have been used widely in in vivo and in vitro cardiovascular research. The availability of knockout mice provides further clues to the physiological significance of specific receptor subtypes. Adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)AR)-knockout (A(1)KO) mice and their wild-type (A(1)WT) controls were employed in this investigation. The heart and aortic arch were carefully removed and retroinfused with enzyme solution (1 mg/ml collagenase type I, 0.5 mg/ml soybean trypsin inhibitor, 3% BSA, and 2% antibiotics) through the aortic arch. The efflux was collected at 30-, 60-, and 90-min intervals. The cells were centrifuged, and the pellets were mixed with medium [medium 199-F-12 medium with 10% FBS and 2% antibiotics (for endothelial cells) and advanced DMEM with 10% FBS, 10% mouse serum, 2% GlutaMax, and 2% antibiotics (for smooth muscle cells)] and plated. Endothelial cells were characterized by a cobblestone appearance and positive staining with acetylated LDL labeled with 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate. Smooth muscle cells were characterized by positive staining of smooth muscle alpha-actin and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. Homogeneity of the smooth muscle cells was approximately 91%. Western blot analysis showed expression of smoothelin in the cells from passages 3, 7, and 11 in A(1)WT and A(1)KO mice. Furthermore, the A(1)AR was characterized by Western blot analysis using an A(1)AR-specific antibody. To our knowledge, this is the first isolation and successful characterization of smooth muscle cells from the mouse coronary system.

  10. Repetitive stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors in vivo : Changes in receptor numbers, G-proteins and A1 receptor agonist-induced hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roman, Viktor; Keijser, Johannes; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Meerlo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine is an important neuromodulator and neuroprotective molecule, which is produced in the brain as a function of neuronal activity, coupling energy expenditure to energy supply. Under conditions of increased need and reduced availability of energy, including hypoxia and prolonged wakefulness,

  11. Adenosine A(2A receptors measured with [C]TMSX PET in the striata of Parkinson's disease patients.

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    Masahiro Mishina

    Full Text Available Adenosine A(2A receptors (A2ARs are thought to interact negatively with the dopamine D(2 receptor (D2R, so selective A2AR antagonists have attracted attention as novel treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD. However, no information about the receptor in living patients with PD is available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between A2ARs and the dopaminergic system in the striata of drug-naïve PD patients and PD patients with dyskinesia, and alteration of these receptors after antiparkinsonian therapy. We measured binding ability of striatal A2ARs using positron emission tomography (PET with [7-methyl-(11C]-(E-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine ([(11C]TMSX in nine drug-naïve patients with PD, seven PD patients with mild dyskinesia and six elderly control subjects using PET. The patients and eight normal control subjects were also examined for binding ability of dopamine transporters and D2Rs. Seven of the drug-naïve patients underwent a second series of PET scans following therapy. We found that the distribution volume ratio of A2ARs in the putamen were larger in the dyskinesic patients than in the control subjects (p<0.05, Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. In the drug-naïve patients, the binding ability of the A2ARs in the putamen, but not in the head of caudate nucleus, was significantly lower on the more affected side than on the less affected side (p<0.05, paired t-test. In addition, the A2ARs were significantly increased after antiparkinsonian therapy in the bilateral putamen of the drug-naïve patients (p<0.05, paired t-test but not in the bilateral head of caudate nucleus. Our study demonstrated that the A2ARs in the putamen were increased in the PD patients with dyskinesia, and also suggest that the A2ARs in the putamen compensate for the asymmetrical decrease of dopamine in drug-naïve PD patients and that antiparkinsonian therapy increases the A2ARs in the putamen. The A2ARs may play an

  12. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoid, decreases inflammation in a murine model of acute lung injury: role for the adenosine A(2A) receptor.

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    Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Pinheiro, Milena L; Vitoretti, Luana B; Mariano-Souza, Domenica P; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley M; Akamine, Adriana T; Almeida, Vinícius I; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Hallak, Jaime E; Zuardi, Antônio W; Crippa, José A; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-03-05

    Acute lung injury is an inflammatory condition for which treatment is mainly supportive because effective therapies have not been developed. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), has potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the possible anti-inflammatory effect of cannabidiol in a murine model of acute lung injury. Analysis of total inflammatory cells and differential in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was used to characterize leukocyte migration into the lungs; myeloperoxidase activity of lung tissue and albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by colorimetric assays; cytokine/chemokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was also analyzed by Cytometric Bead Arrays and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A single dose of cannabidiol (20mg/kg) administered prior to the induction of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced acute lung injury decreases leukocyte (specifically neutrophil) migration into the lungs, albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) 1, 2, and 4days after the induction of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, adenosine A(2A) receptor is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol on LPS-induced acute lung injury because ZM241385 (4-(2-[7-Amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol) (a highly selective antagonist of adenosine A(2A) receptor) abrogated all of the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol previously described. Thus, we show that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury and that this effect is most likely associated with an increase in the extracellular adenosine offer and signaling through adenosine A(2A) receptor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of in vitro prolactin secretion from the rat anterior pituitary

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    D.L.W. Picanço-Diniz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we demonstrated biphasic purinergic effects on prolactin (PRL secretion stimulated by an adenosine A2 agonist. In the present study, we investigated the role of the activation of adenosine A1 receptors by (R-N6-(2-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA at the pituitary level in in vitro PRL secretion. Hemipituitaries (one per cuvette in five replicates from adult male rats were incubated. Administration of R-PIA (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 µM induced a reduction of PRL secretion into the medium in a U-shaped dose-response curve. The maximal reduction was obtained with 0.1 µM R-PIA (mean ± SEM, 36.01 ± 5.53 ng/mg tissue weight (t.w. treatment compared to control (264.56 ± 15.46 ng/mg t.w.. R-PIA inhibition (0.01 µM = 141.97 ± 15.79 vs control = 244.77 ± 13.79 ng/mg t.w. of PRL release was blocked by 1 µM cyclopentyltheophylline, a specific A1 receptor antagonist (1 µM = 212.360 ± 26.560 ng/mg t.w., whereas cyclopentyltheophylline alone (0.01, 0.1, 1 µM had no effect. R-PIA (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 µM produced inhibition of PRL secretion stimulated by both phospholipase C (0.5 IU/mL; 977.44 ± 76.17 ng/mg t.w. and dibutyryl cAMP (1 mM; 415.93 ± 37.66 ng/mg t.w. with nadir established at the dose of 0.1 µM (225.55 ± 71.42 and 201.9 ± 19.08 ng/mg t.w., respectively. Similarly, R-PIA (0.01 µM decreased (242.00 ± 24.00 ng/mg t.w. the PRL secretion stimulated by cholera toxin (0.5 mg/mL; 1050.00 ± 70.00 ng/mg t.w.. In contrast, R-PIA had no effect (468.00 ± 34.00 ng/mg t.w. on PRL secretion stimulation by pertussis toxin (0.5 mg/mL; 430.00 ± 26.00 ng/mg t.w.. These results suggest that inhibition of PRL secretion after A1 receptor activation by R-PIA is mediated by a Gi protein-dependent mechanism.

  14. Activation of transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3)-mediated Ca2+ entry by A1 adenosine receptor in cardiomyocytes disturbs atrioventricular conduction.

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    Sabourin, Jessica; Antigny, Fabrice; Robin, Elodie; Frieden, Maud; Raddatz, Eric

    2012-08-03

    Although the activation of the A(1)-subtype of the adenosine receptors (A(1)AR) is arrhythmogenic in the developing heart, little is known about the underlying downstream mechanisms. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel 3, functioning as receptor-operated channel (ROC), contributes to the A(1)AR-induced conduction disturbances. Using embryonic atrial and ventricular myocytes obtained from 4-day-old chick embryos, we found that the specific activation of A(1)AR by CCPA induced sarcolemmal Ca(2+) entry. However, A(1)AR stimulation did not induce Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Specific blockade of TRPC3 activity by Pyr3, by a dominant negative of TRPC3 construct, or inhibition of phospholipase Cs and PKCs strongly inhibited the A(1)AR-enhanced Ca(2+) entry. Ca(2+) entry through TRPC3 was activated by the 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) analog OAG via PKC-independent and -dependent mechanisms in atrial and ventricular myocytes, respectively. In parallel, inhibition of the atypical PKCζ by myristoylated PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor significantly decreased the A(1)AR-enhanced Ca(2+) entry in both types of myocytes. Additionally, electrocardiography showed that inhibition of TRPC3 channel suppressed transient A(1)AR-induced conduction disturbances in the embryonic heart. Our data showing that A(1)AR activation subtly mediates a proarrhythmic Ca(2+) entry through TRPC3-encoded ROC by stimulating the phospholipase C/DAG/PKC cascade provide evidence for a novel pathway whereby Ca(2+) entry and cardiac function are altered. Thus, the A(1)AR-TRPC3 axis may represent a potential therapeutic target.

  15. Adenosine receptors: regulatory players in the preservation of mitochondrial function induced by ischemic preconditioning of rat liver.

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    Duarte, Filipe V; Amorim, João A; Varela, Ana T; Teodoro, João S; Gomes, Ana P; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Palmeira, Carlos M; Rolo, Anabela P

    2017-06-01

    Although adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) have been associated to ischemic preconditioning (IPC), direct evidence for their ability to preserve mitochondrial function upon hepatic preconditioning is still missing and could represent a novel strategy to boost the quality of liver transplants. We tested if the A1R antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) prevented IPC in the liver and if the A1R agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) might afford a pharmacological preconditioning. Livers underwent a 120 min of 70% warm ischemia and 16 h of reperfusion (I/R), and the IPC group underwent a 5-min ischemic episode followed by a 10-min period of reperfusion before I/R. DPCPX or CCPA was administered intraperitoneally 2 h before IPC or I/R. The control of mitochondrial function emerged as the central element affected by IPC and controlled by endogenous A1R activation. Thus, livers from IPC- or CCPA-treated rats displayed an improved oxidative phosphorylation with higher state 3 respiratory rate, higher respiratory control ratio, increased ATP content, and decreased lag phase. IPC and CCPA also prevented the I/R-induced susceptibility to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition, the rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the decreased mitochondrial content of phospho-Ser(9) GSK-3β. DPCPX abrogated these effects of IPC. These implicate the control of GSK-3β activity by Akt-mediated Ser(9)-GSK-3β phosphorylation preserving the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS-mediated cell death in the ability of A1R activation to mimic IPC in the liver. In conclusion, the parallel between IPC and A1R-mediated preconditioning also paves the way to consider a putative therapeutic use of the later in liver transplants.

  16. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

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    Daniela L Buscariollo

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg or vehicle (0.09% NaCl i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  17. IL-17 receptor A and adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency in siblings with recurrent infections and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellmann, Florence; Angelini, Federica; Wassenberg, Jacqueline; Perreau, Matthieu; Arenas Ramirez, Natalia; Simon, Gregoire; Boyman, Onur; Demaria, Olivier; Christen-Zaech, Stephanie; Hohl, Daniel; Belfiore, Marco; von Scheven-Gete, Annette; Gilliet, Michel; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Perrin, Yannick; Beck Popovic, Maya; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Beckmann, Jacques S; Martinet, Danielle; Hofer, Michaël

    2016-04-01

    Data on patients affected by chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis underscore the preponderant role of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) in preserving mucocutaneous immunity. Little is known about the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) 2 in regulation of immune responses, although recent reports linked ADA2 deficiency with inflammation and vasculitis. We sought to investigate the mechanisms of chronic inflammation and vasculitis in a child lacking IL-17RA and ADA2 to identify therapeutic targets. We report a family with 2 siblings who have had recurrent mucocutaneous infections with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus and chronic inflammatory disease and vasculitis since early childhood, which were refractory to classical treatments. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed that both siblings are homozygous for a 770-kb deletion on chr22q11.1 encompassing both IL17RA and cat eye critical region 1 (CECR1). Immunologic studies were carried out by means of flow cytometry, ELISA, and RIA. As expected, in the affected child we found a lack of IL-17RA expression, which implies a severe malfunction in the IL-17 signaling pathway, conferring susceptibility to recurrent mucocutaneous infections. Surprisingly, we detected an in vitro and in vivo upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, notably IL-1β and TNF-α, which is consistent with the persistent systemic inflammation. This work emphasizes the utility of whole-genome analyses combined with immunologic investigation in patients with unresolved immunodeficiency. This approach is likely to provide an insight into immunologic pathways and mechanisms of disease. It also provides molecular evidence for more targeted therapies. In addition, our report further corroborates a potential role of ADA2 in modulating immunity and inflammation. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Embryonic Caffeine Exposure Acts via A1 Adenosine Receptors to Alter Adult Cardiac Function and DNA Methylation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Victoria; Xue, Huiling; Rivkees, Scott A.; Wendler, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.09% NaCl) i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2–4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8–10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation. PMID:24475304

  19. Caffeine reverses age-related deficits in olfactory discrimination and social recognition memory in rats. Involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediger, Rui D S; Batista, Luciano C; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2005-06-01

    Caffeine, a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, has been suggested as a potential drug to counteract age-related cognitive decline since critical changes in adenosinergic neurotransmission occur with aging. In the present study, olfactory discrimination and short-term social memory of 3, 6, 12 and 18 month-old rats were assessed with the olfactory discrimination and social recognition tasks, respectively. The actions of caffeine (3.0, 10.0 and 30.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and the A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) in relation to age-related effects on olfactory functions were also studied. The 12 and 18 month-old rats exhibited significantly impaired performance in both models, demonstrating deficits in their odor discrimination and in their ability to recognize a juvenile rat after a short period of time. Acute treatment with caffeine or ZM241385, but not with DPCPX, reversed these age-related olfactory deficits. The present results suggest the participation of adenosine receptors in the control of olfactory functions and confirm the potential of caffeine for the treatment of aged-related cognitive decline.

  20. Uridine adenosine tetraphosphate is a novel vasodilator in the coronary microcirculation which acts through purinergic P1 but not P2 receptors.

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    Zhou, Zhichao; Merkus, Daphne; Cheng, Caroline; Duckers, Henricus J; Jan Danser, A H; Duncker, Dirk J

    2013-01-01

    Uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up4A) has been identified as an endothelium-derived contracting factor, which acts through purinergic P2X and P2Y receptors. Since the coronary vascular actions of Up4A are unknown, we investigated the vasoactive profile of Up4A in coronary microvessels, and studied the involvement of purinergic receptor subtypes. Studies were performed in isolated porcine coronary small arteries (diameter∼250 μm), with and without endothelial denudation, mounted on a Mulvany wire myograph. Purinergic receptor expression was assessed by real-time PCR. Up4A (10(-9)-10(-5) M) failed to induce contraction at basal tone, but produced concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in precontracted microvessels. Up4A was slightly less potent than adenosine, ATP, and ADP in producing vasorelaxation, but significantly more potent than UTP and UDP. mRNA expression of P2X(4), P2Y(1), P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(6) and A(2A), but not P2X(1), receptors was observed. Up4A-induced vasodilation was unaffected by non-selective P2 receptor antagonist PPADS, P2X(1) antagonist MRS2159, P2Y(1) antagonist MRS2179 and P2Y(6) antagonist MRS2578, but was markedly attenuated by non-selective P1 receptor antagonist 8PT and A(2A) antagonist SCH58261. Up4A-induced vasodilation was not affected by ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, suggesting that A(2A) stimulation was not the result of Up4A breakdown to adenosine. Up4A-induced vasodilation was blunted in denuded vessels; additional A(2A) receptor blockade further attenuated Up4A-induced vasodilation, suggesting that A(2A) receptor-mediated vasodilation is only partly endothelium-dependent. In conclusion, Up4A exerts a vasodilator rather than a vasoconstrictor influence in coronary microvessels, which is mediated via A(2A) receptors and is partly endothelium-dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Adenosine A₂A receptors in striatal glutamatergic terminals and GABAergic neurons oppositely modulate psychostimulant action and DARPP-32 phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ying Shen

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are located postsynaptically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons, antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor functions, and are also located presynaptically at corticostriatal terminals, facilitating glutamate release. To address the hypothesis that these two A2AR populations differently control the action of psychostimulants, we characterized A2AR modulation of cocaine-induced effects at the level of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75, c-Fos expression, and psychomotor activity using two lines of cell-type selective A2AR knockout (KO mice with selective A2AR deletion in GABAergic neurons (striatum-A2AR-KO mice, or with A2AR deletion in both striatal GABAergic neurons and projecting cortical glutamatergic neurons (forebrain-A2AR-KO mice. We demonstrated that striatum-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs exclusively in striatal GABAergic terminals whereas forebrain-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs in both striatal GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals leading to a blunted A2AR-mediated facilitation of synaptosomal glutamate release. The inactivation of A2ARs in GABAergic neurons reduced striatal DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and increased its phosphorylation at Thr-75. Conversely, the additional deletion of corticostriatal glutamatergic A2ARs produced opposite effects on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75. This distinct modulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation was associated with opposite responses to cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression and psychomotor activity in striatum-A2AR KO (enhanced and forebrain-A2AR KO mice (reduced. Thus, A2ARs in glutamatergic corticostriatal terminals and in GABAergic striatal neurons modulate the action of psychostimulants and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in opposite ways. We conclude that A2ARs in glutamatergic terminals prominently control the action of psychostimulants and define a novel mechanism by which A2ARs fine-tune striatal activity by integrating GABAergic, dopaminergic and

  2. Adenosine Receptor Adora2b Plays a Mechanistic Role in the Protective Effect of the Volatile Anesthetic Sevoflurane during Liver Ischemia/Reperfusion.

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    Granja, Tiago F; Köhler, David; Schad, Jessica; de Oliveira, Claudia Bernardo; Konrad, Franziska; Hoch-Gutbrod, Michaela; Streienberger, Ariane; Rosenberger, Peter; Straub, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury is characterized by hepatic tissue damage and an inflammatory response. This is accompanied by the formation and vascular sequestration of platelet-neutrophil conjugates (PNCs). Signaling through Adora2b adenosine receptors can provide liver protection. Volatile anesthetics may interact with adenosine receptors. This study investigates potential antiinflammatory effects of the volatile anesthetic sevoflurane during liver IR. Experiments were performed ex vivo with human blood and in a liver IR model with wild-type, Adora2a, and Adora2b mice. The effect of sevoflurane on platelet activation, PNC formation and sequestration, cytokine release, and liver damage (alanine aminotransferase release) was analyzed using flow cytometry, luminometry, and immunofluorescence. Adenosine receptor expression in liver tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Ex vivo experiments indicate that sevoflurane inhibits platelet and leukocyte activation (n = 5). During liver IR, sevoflurane (2 Vol%) decreased PNC formation 2.4-fold in wild-type (P < 0.05) but not in Adora2b mice (n ≥ 5). Sevoflurane reduced PNC sequestration 1.9-fold (P < 0.05) and alanine aminotransferase release 3.5-fold (P < 0.05) in wild-type but not in Adora2b mice (n = 5). In Adora2a mice, sevoflurane also inhibited PNC formation and cytokine release. Sevoflurane diminished cytokine release (n ≥ 3) and increased Adora2b transcription and expression in liver tissue of wild-types (n = 4). Our experiments highlight antiinflammatory and tissue-protective properties of sevoflurane during liver IR and reveal a mechanistic role of Adora2b in sevoflurane-associated effects. The targeted use of sevoflurane not only as an anesthetic but also to prevent IR damage is a promising approach in the treatment of critically ill patients.

  3. Adenosine Deaminase That Acts on RNA 3 (ADAR3) Binding to Glutamate Receptor Subunit B Pre-mRNA Inhibits RNA Editing in Glioblastoma.

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    Oakes, Eimile; Anderson, Ashley; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron; Hundley, Heather A

    2017-03-10

    RNA editing is a cellular process that precisely alters nucleotide sequences, thus regulating gene expression and generating protein diversity. Over 60% of human transcripts undergo adenosine to inosine RNA editing, and editing is required for normal development and proper neuronal function of animals. Editing of one adenosine in the transcript encoding the glutamate receptor subunit B, glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA 2 (GRIA2), modifies a codon, replacing the genomically encoded glutamine (Q) with arginine (R); thus this editing site is referred to as the Q/R site. Editing at the Q/R site of GRIA2 is essential, and reduced editing of GRIA2 transcripts has been observed in patients suffering from glioblastoma. In glioblastoma, incorporation of unedited GRIA2 subunits leads to a calcium-permeable glutamate receptor, which can promote cell migration and tumor invasion. In this study, we identify adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA 3 (ADAR3) as an important regulator of Q/R site editing, investigate its mode of action, and detect elevated ADAR3 expression in glioblastoma tumors compared with adjacent brain tissue. Overexpression of ADAR3 in astrocyte and astrocytoma cell lines inhibits RNA editing at the Q/R site of GRIA2 Furthermore, the double-stranded RNA binding domains of ADAR3 are required for repression of RNA editing. As the Q/R site of GRIA2 is specifically edited by ADAR2, we suggest that ADAR3 directly competes with ADAR2 for binding to GRIA2 transcript, inhibiting RNA editing, as evidenced by the direct binding of ADAR3 to the GRIA2 pre-mRNA. Finally, we provide evidence that both ADAR2 and ADAR3 expression contributes to the relative level of GRIA2 editing in tumors from patients suffering from glioblastoma. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Differences between the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonists caffeine and theophylline in motor and mood effects: studies using medium to high doses in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cruz, Laura; Pardo, Marta; Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè

    2014-08-15

    Caffeine and theophylline are methylxanthines that are broadly consumed, sometimes at high doses, and act as minor psychostimulants. Both are nonselective adenosine antagonists for A1 and A2A receptors, which are colocalized with dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in striatal areas. Adenosine antagonists generally have opposite actions to those of dopamine antagonists. Although the effects of caffeine are widely known, theophylline has been much less well characterized, especially at high doses. Adult male CD1 mice were used to study the effect of a broad range of doses (25.0, 50.0 or 100.0mg/kg) of caffeine and theophylline on measures of spontaneous locomotion and coordination, as well as the pattern of c-Fos immunoreactivity in brain areas rich in adenosine and dopamine receptors. In addition, we evaluated possible anxiety and stress effects of these doses. Caffeine, at these doses, impaired or suppressed locomotion in several paradigms. However, theophylline was less potent than caffeine at suppressing motor parameters, and even stimulated locomotion. Both drugs induced corticosterone release, however caffeine was more efficacious at intermediate doses. While caffeine showed an anxiogenic profile at all doses, theophylline only did so at the highest dose used (50mg/kg). Only theophylline increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in cortical areas. Theophylline has fewer disruptive effects than caffeine on motor parameters and produces less stress and anxiety effects. These results are relevant for understanding the potential side effects of methylxanthines when consumed at high doses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Affinity labeling of a human platelet membrane protein with 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl adenosine. Concomitant inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation and fibrinogen receptor exposure.

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    Figures, W R; Niewiarowski, S; Morinelli, T A; Colman, R F; Colman, R W

    1981-08-10

    Incubation of washed human blood platelets with 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl [3H]adenosine (FSBA) covalently labels a single polypeptide of Mr = 100,000. Protection by ADP has suggested that an ADP receptor on the platelet surface membrane was modified. The modified cells, unlike native platelets, failed to aggregate in response to ADP (100 microM) and fibrinogen (1 mg/ml). The extent of binding of 125I-fibrinogen and aggregation was inhibited to a degree related to the incorporation of 5'-p-sulfonylbenzoyl adenosine (SBA) into platelets, indicating FSBA could inhibit the exposure of fibrinogen receptors by ADP necessary for aggregation. Incubation of SBA platelets with alpha-chymotrypsin cleaved the covalently labeled polypeptide and concomitantly reversed the inhibition of aggregation and fibrinogen binding. Platelets proteolytically digested by chymotrypsin prior to exposure to FSBA did not require ADP for aggregation and fibrinogen binding. Moreover, subsequent exposure to FSBA did not inhibit aggregation or fibrinogen binding. The affinity reagent FSBA can displace fibrinogen bound to platelets in the presence of ADP, as well as promote the rapid disaggregation of the platelets. The apparent initial pseudo-first order rate constant of dissociation of fibrinogen was linearly proportional to FSBA concentrations. These studies suggest that a single polypeptide can be altered either by ADP-induced conformational changes or proteolysis by chymotrypsin to reveal latent fibrinogen receptors and promote aggregation of platelets after fibrinogen binding.

  6. In search of novel ligands using a structure-based approach: a case study on the adenosine A2A receptor

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    Lenselink, Eelke B.; Beuming, Thijs; van Veen, Corine; Massink, Arnault; Sherman, Woody; van Vlijmen, Herman W. T.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we present a case study to explore the challenges associated with finding novel molecules for a receptor that has been studied in depth and has a wealth of chemical information available. Specifically, we apply a previously described protocol that incorporates explicit water molecules in the ligand binding site to prospectively screen over 2.5 million drug-like and lead-like compounds from the commercially available eMolecules database in search of novel binders to the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AAR). A total of seventy-one compounds were selected for purchase and biochemical assaying based on high ligand efficiency and high novelty (Tanimoto coefficient ≤0.25 to any A2AAR tested compound). These molecules were then tested for their affinity to the adenosine A2A receptor in a radioligand binding assay. We identified two hits that fulfilled the criterion of 50 % radioligand displacement at a concentration of 10 μM. Next we selected an additional eight novel molecules that were predicted to make a bidentate interaction with Asn2536.55, a key interacting residue in the binding pocket of the A2AAR. None of these eight molecules were found to be active. Based on these results we discuss the advantages of structure-based methods and the challenges associated with finding chemically novel molecules for well-explored targets.

  7. Synthesis and characterisation of new 4-oxo-N-(substituted-thiazol-2-yl)-4H-chromene-2-carboxamides as potential adenosine receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda; Gomes, Ligia R.; Low, John Nicolson

    2015-06-01

    Chromones are 4H-benzopyran-4-one heterocycles that have been thoroughly studied due to their interesting biological activities. Thiazole based compounds have been used in therapeutics as antimicrobial, antiviral and as antifungal agents for a long time but, in the past decades, they have been identified as potent and selective ligands for adenosine receptor. In continuation of our project related to the syntheses of pharmacologically important heterocycles, a new series of chromone-thiazole hybrids have been designed as potential ligands for human adenosine receptors. In this context, new 4-oxo-N-(substituted-thiazol-2-yl)-4H-chromene-2-carboxamides were synthesized from chromone-2-carboxylic acid by two different amidation methods. The development of dissimilar synthetic approaches provided the possibility of working with diverse reaction conditions, namely with conventional heating and/or microwave irradiation. The structure of the compounds has been established on the basis of NMR and MS spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Relevant data related to the molecular geometry and conformation of the chromone-thiazole hybrids has been acquired which can be of the utmost importance to understand ligand-receptor binding.

  8. Adenosine A(2a) receptor stimulation prevents hepatocyte lipotoxicity and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in rats.

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    Imarisio, Chiara; Alchera, Elisa; Sutti, Salvatore; Valente, Guido; Boccafoschi, Francesca; Albano, Emanuele; Carini, Rita

    2012-09-01

    NEFA (non-esterified 'free' fatty acid)-mediated lipotoxicity plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis). In the light of the growing need for new therapeutic options for NASH, we investigated the action of A2aR (adenosine A(2a) receptor) stimulation against lipotoxicity. The effects of the A(2a)R agonist CGS21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine] were evaluated 'in vitro' in liver cells exposed to SA (stearic acid) and 'in vivo' in rats with NASH induced by 8 weeks of feeding with an MCD diet (methionine/choline-deficient diet). In cultured hepatocytes, SA promoted apoptosis by inducing MKK4 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4)/SEK1 (stress-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase-1) and JNK-1/2 (c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1/2) activation. CGS21680 addition prevented JNK-1/2 activation and reduced apoptosis without interfering with lipid accumulation. CGS21680 action required PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt-mediated block of MKK4/SEK1. Consistently, PI3K inhibition with wortmannin abolished the cytoprotective action of CGS21680 and reverted MKK4 inhibition. SA lipotoxicity was also prevented by transfecting HTC cells with a specific MKK4/SEK1 siRNA (small interfering RNA). In rats receiving the MCD diet, the development of NASH was associated with MKK4/SEK1 and JNK-1/2 activation. CGS21680 (0.5 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneal) administration to MCD-fed rats prevented JNK-1/2 activation by acting on MKK4/SEK1. CGS21680 also effectively reduced NASH-associated ALT (alanine aminotransferase) release, hepatocyte apoptosis, liver inflammation and fibrosis without affecting hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that, by inhibiting JNK-1/2, A(2a)R stimulation reduces lipotoxicity and ameliorates NASH, giving a rationale to investigate A(2a)R agonists as possible new therapeutic agents in preventing fatty liver progression to NASH.

  9. Crystal structure of the adenosine A 2A receptor bound to an antagonist reveals a potential allosteric pocket

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    Sun, Bingfa; Bachhawat, Priti; Chu, Matthew Ling-Hon; Wood, Martyn; Ceska, Tom; Sands, Zara A.; Mercier, Joel; Lebon, Florence; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (ConfometRx); (UCB Pharma)

    2017-02-06

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has long been implicated in cardiovascular disorders. As more selective A2AR ligands are being identified, its roles in other disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, are starting to emerge, and A2AR antagonists are important drug candidates for nondopaminergic anti-Parkinson treatment. Here we report the crystal structure of A2A receptor bound to compound 1 (Cmpd-1), a novel A2AR/N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B) dual antagonist and potential anti-Parkinson candidate compound, at 3.5 Å resolution. The A2A receptor with a cytochrome b562-RIL (BRIL) fusion (A2AR–BRIL) in the intracellular loop 3 (ICL3) was crystallized in detergent micelles using vapor-phase diffusion. Whereas A2AR–BRIL bound to the antagonist ZM241385 has previously been crystallized in lipidic cubic phase (LCP), structural differences in the Cmpd-1–bound A2AR–BRIL prevented formation of the lattice observed with the ZM241385–bound receptor. The crystals grew with a type II crystal lattice in contrast to the typical type I packing seen from membrane protein structures crystallized in LCP. Cmpd-1 binds in a position that overlaps with the native ligand adenosine, but its methoxyphenyl group extends to an exosite not previously observed in other A2AR structures. Structural analysis revealed that Cmpd-1 binding results in the unique conformations of two tyrosine residues, Tyr91.35 and Tyr2717.36, which are critical for the formation of the exosite. The structure reveals insights into antagonist binding that are not observed in other A2AR structures, highlighting flexibility in the binding pocket that may facilitate the development of A2AR-selective compounds for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

  10. Role of Adenosine A2A Receptors in Modulating Synaptic Functions and Brain Levels of BDNF: a Possible Key Mechanism in the Pathophysiology of Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Tebano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, accumulating evidence has shown the existence of an important cross-talk between adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Not only are A2ARs involved in the mechanism of transactivation of BDNF receptor TrkB, they also modulate the effect of BDNF on synaptic transmission, playing a facilitatory and permissive role. The cAMP-PKA pathway, the main transduction system operated by A2ARs, is involved in such effects. Furthermore, a basal tonus of A2ARs is required to allow the regulation of BDNF physiological levels in the brain, as demonstrated by the reduced protein levels measured in A2ARs KO mice. The crucial role of adenosine A2ARs in the maintenance of synaptic functions and BDNF levels will be reviewed here and discussed in the light of possible implications for Huntington's disease therapy, in which a joint impairment of BDNF and A2ARs seems to play a pathogenetic role.

  11. Effects of KW-3902 (8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine), an adenosine A1-receptor antagonist, on urinary excretions of various electrolytes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, K; Karasawa, A

    1996-07-01

    We examined the effects of KW-3902 (8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine), an adenosine A1-receptor antagonist, on urine volume and urinary excretions of various electrolytes in saline-loaded rats, as compared with those of furosemide, trichlormethiazide (TCM), acetazolamide and amiloride. KW-3902 at doses of 0.001-1 mg/kg (p.o.) significantly increased urine volume and excretions of sodium, calcium, magnesium, chloride and bicarbonate. In addition, KW-3902 shifted urine pH to alkaline and decreased free water reabsorption. KW-3902 did not induce kaliuresis, whereas furosemide (30 mg/kg, p.o.), TCM (1 mg/kg, p.o.) and acetazolamide (25 mg/kg, p.o.) induced kaliuresis. In the KW-3902-treated group, the increases in bicarbonate excretion and urine pH were less prominent than those induced by acetazolamide, and the excretions of sodium, calcium, magnesium and chloride were similar to those induced by furosemide. The present results suggest that the adenosine A1-receptor antagonist exhibits diuresis by the inhibited reabsorption of electrolytes, not only at the proximal tubule but also at the distal tubule.

  12. Potential of [{sup 11}C]TMSX for the evaluation of adenosine A{sub 2A} receptors in the skeletal muscle by positron emission tomography

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    Ishiwata, Kiichi E-mail: ishiwata@pet.tmig.or.jp; Mizuno, Masaki; Kimura, Yuichi; Kawamura, Kazunori; Oda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Toru; Nakamura, Yoshio; Muraoka, Isao; Ishii, Kenji

    2004-10-01

    We examined the potential of [7-methyl-{sup 11}C]-(E)-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine ([{sup 11}C]TMSX) for the assessment of adenosine A{sub 2A} receptors in muscle. In rodents, specific binding of [{sup 11}C]TMSX was observed in muscle and heart by blockade with A{sub 2A}-selective CSC and non-selective theophylline, but not with A{sub 1}-selective DPCPX. Swimming exercise fluctuated radioligand-receptor binding in these tissues. In a PET study of two subjects, theophylline-infusion slightly deceased the distribution volume of [{sup 11}C]TMSX in the heart (20% reduction) and muscle (10% reduction), which suggested the specific binding.

  13. Mechanisms of adenosine-induced renal vasodilatation in hypertensive patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierema, T.K.; Houben, A.J.H.M.; Kroon, A.A.; Postma, C.T.; Koster, D.; Engelshoven, J.M. van; Smits, P.; Leeuw, P.W. de

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adenosine is an endogenous nucleoside with potent vasodilatory capacities, released under ischaemic conditions in particular. Its mechanisms of action, however, remain elusive. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of adenosine, using a non-selective purinergic receptor antagonist, and the

  14. Partial Adenosine A1 Agonist in Heart Failure.

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    Dinh, Wilfried; Albrecht-Küpper, Barbara; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Voors, Adriaan A; van der Laan, Michael; Sabbah, Hani N

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine exerts a variety of physiological effects by binding to cell surface G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes, namely, A1, A2a, A2b, and A3. The central physiological role of adenosine is to preclude tissue injury and promote repair in response to stress. In the heart, adenosine acts as a cytoprotective modulator, linking cardiac function to metabolic demand predominantly via activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs), which leads to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity, modulation of protein kinase C, and opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. Activation of myocardial adenosine A1Rs has been shown to modulate a variety of pathologies associated with ischemic cardiac injury, including arrhythmogenesis, coronary and ventricular dysfunction, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and ventricular remodeling. Partial A1R agonists are agents that are likely to elicit favorable pharmacological responses in heart failure (HF) without giving rise to the undesirable cardiac and extra-cardiac effects observed with full A1R agonism. Preclinical data have shown that partial adenosine A1R agonists protect and improve cardiac function at doses that do not result in undesirable effects on heart rate, atrioventricular conduction, and blood pressure, suggesting that these compounds may constitute a valuable new therapy for chronic HF. Neladenoson bialanate (BAY1067197) is the first oral partial and highly selective A1R agonist that has entered clinical development for the treatment of HF. This review provides an overview of adenosine A1R-mediated signaling in the heart, summarizes the results from preclinical and clinical studies of partial A1R agonists in HF, and discusses the potential benefits of these drugs in the clinical setting.

  15. Caffeine reduces 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression in human trophoblast cells through the adenosine A(2B receptor.

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    Saina Sharmin

    Full Text Available Maternal caffeine consumption is associated with reduced fetal growth, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. Since there is evidence that decreased placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2 is linked to fetal growth restriction, we hypothesized that caffeine may inhibit fetal growth partly through down regulating placental 11β-HSD2. As a first step in examining this hypothesis, we studied the effects of caffeine on placental 11β-HSD2 activity and expression using our established primary human trophoblast cells as an in vitro model system. Given that maternal serum concentrations of paraxanthine (the primary metabolite of caffeine were greater in women who gave birth to small-for-gestational age infants than to appropriately grown infants, we also studied the effects of paraxanthine. Our main findings were: (1 both caffeine and paraxanthine decreased placental 11β-HSD2 activity, protein and mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner; (2 this inhibitory effect was mediated by the adenosine A(2B receptor, since siRNA-mediated knockdown of this receptor prevented caffeine- and paraxanthine-induced inhibition of placental 11β-HSD2; and (3 forskolin (an activator of adenyl cyclase and a known stimulator of 11β-HSD2 abrogated the inhibitory effects of both caffeine and paraxanthine, which provides evidence for a functional link between exposure to caffeine and paraxanthine, decreased intracellular levels of cAMP and reduced placental 11β-HSD2. Taken together, these findings reveal that placental 11β-HSD2 is a novel molecular target through which caffeine may adversely affect fetal growth. They also uncover a previously unappreciated role for the adenosine A(2B receptor signaling in regulating placental 11β-HSD2, and consequently fetal development.

  16. Projections of nucleus accumbens adenosine A2A receptor neurons in the mouse brain and their implications in mediating sleep-wake regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Xu, Qi; Yuan, Xiang-Shan; Cherasse, Yoan; Schiffmann, Serge N; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; Qu, Wei-Min; Urade, Yoshihiro; Lazarus, Michael; Huang, Zhi-Li; Li, Rui-Xi

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in the nucleus accumbens (Acb) have been demonstrated to play an important role in the arousal effect of adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, and may be involved in physiological sleep. To better understand the functions of these receptors in sleep, projections of A2AR neurons were mapped utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) as a tracer for long axonal pathways. The Cre-dependent AAV was injected into the core (AcbC) and shell (AcbSh) of the Acb in A2AR-Cre mice. Immunohistochemistry was then used to visualize hrGFP, highlighting the perikarya of the A2AR neurons in the injection sites, and their axons in projection regions. The data revealed that A2AR neurons exhibit medium-sized and either round or elliptic perikarya with their processes within the Acb. Moreover, the projections from the Acb distributed to nuclei in the forebrain, diencephalon, and brainstem. In the forebrain, A2AR neurons from all Acb sub-regions jointly projected to the ventral pallidum, the nucleus of the diagonal band, and the substantia innominata. Heavy projections from the AcbC and the ventral AcbSh, and weaker projections from the medial AcbSh, were observed in the lateral hypothalamus and lateral preoptic area. In the brainstem, the Acb projections were found in the ventral tegmental area, while AcbC and ventral AcbSh also projected to the median raphe nucleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray. The results supply a solid base for understanding the roles of the A2AR and A2AR neurons in the Acb, especially in the regulation of sleep.

  17. Projections of nucleus accumbens adenosine A2A receptor neurons in the mouse brain and their implications in mediating sleep-wake regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping eZhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs in the nucleus accumbens (Acb have been demonstrated to play an important role in the arousal effect of adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, and may be involved in physiological sleep. To better understand the functions of these receptors in sleep, projections of A2AR neurons were mapped utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV encoding humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP as a tracer for long axonal pathways. The Cre-dependent AAV was injected into the core (AcbC and shell (AcbSh of the Acb in A2AR-Cre mice. Immunohistochemistry was then used to visualize hrGFP, highlighting the perikarya of the A2AR neurons in the injection sites, and their axons in projection regions. The data revealed that A2AR neurons exhibit medium-sized and either round or elliptic perikarya with their processes within the Acb. Moreover, the projections from the Acb distributed to nuclei in the forebrain, diencephalon, and brainstem. In the forebrain, A2AR neurons from all Acb sub-regions jointly projected to the ventral pallidum, the nucleus of the diagonal band, and the substantia innominata. Heavy projections from the AcbC and the ventral AcbSh, and weaker projections from the medial AcbSh, were observed in the lateral hypothalamus and lateral preoptic area. In the brainstem, the Acb projections were found in the ventral tegmental area, while AcbC and ventral AcbSh also projected to the median raphe nucleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray. The results supply a solid base for understanding the roles of the A2AR and A2AR neurons in the Acb, especially in the regulation of sleep.

  18. Caffeine and an adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist prevent memory impairment and synaptotoxicity in adult rats triggered by a convulsive episode in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognato, Giana P; Agostinho, Paula M; Hockemeyer, Jörg; Müller, Christa E; Souza, Diogo O; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2010-01-01

    Seizures early in life cause long-term behavioral modifications, namely long-term memory deficits in experimental animals. Since caffeine and adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) antagonists prevent memory deficits in adult animals, we now investigated if they also prevented the long-term memory deficits caused by a convulsive period early in life. Administration of kainate (KA, 2 mg/kg) to 7-days-old (P7) rats caused a single period of self-extinguishable convulsions which lead to a poorer memory performance in the Y-maze only when rats were older than 90 days, without modification of locomotion or anxiety-like behavior in the elevated-plus maze. In accordance with the relationship between synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction, the hippocampus of these adult rats treated with kainate at P7 displayed a lower density of synaptic proteins such as SNAP-25 and syntaxin (but not synaptophysin), as well as vesicular glutamate transporters type 1 (but not vesicular GABA transporters), with no changes in PSD-95, NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor subunits (GluR1, GluR2) compared with controls. Caffeine (1 g/L) or the A(2A)R antagonist, KW6002 (3 mg/kg) applied in the drinking water from P21 onwards, prevented these memory deficits in P90 rats treated with KA at P7, as well as the accompanying synaptotoxicity. These results show that a single convulsive episode in early life causes a delayed memory deficit in adulthood accompanied by a glutamatergic synaptotoxicity that was prevented by caffeine or adenosine A(2A)R antagonists.

  19. Adenosine A{sub 1} receptors in human sleep regulation studied by electroencephalography (EEG) and positron emission tomography (PET)[Dissertation 17227

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissler, E

    2007-07-01

    Sleep is an essential physiological process. However, the functions of sleep and the endogenous mechanisms involved in sleep regulation are only partially understood. Convergent lines of evidence support the hypothesis that the build-up of sleep propensity during wakefulness and its decline during sleep are associated with alterations in brain adenosine levels and adenosine receptor concentrations. The non-selective A{sub 1} and A{sub 2A} adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine stimulates alertness and is known to attenuate changes in the waking and sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) typically observed after prolonged waking. Several findings point to an important function of the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor (A{sub 1}AR) in the modulation of vigilance states. The A{sub 1}AR is densely expressed in brain regions involved in sleep regulation, and pharmacological manipulations affecting the A{sub 1}AR were shown to influence sleep propensity and sleep depth. However, an involvement of the A{sub 2A} adenosine receptor (A{sub 2A}AR) is also assumed. The distinct functions of the A{sub 1} and A{sub 2A} receptor subtypes in sleep-wake regulation and in mediating the effects of caffeine have not been identified so far. The selective adenosine A{sub 1} receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-3-(3-{sup 18}Ffluoropropyl)- 1-propylxanthine ({sup 18}F-CPFPX), offers the opportunity to get further insights into adenosinergic mechanisms by in vivo imaging of the A{sub 1}AR subtype with positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this thesis was to elucidate the role of adenosine A{sub 1} receptors in human sleep regulation, combining {sup 18}F-CPFPX PET brain imaging and EEG recordings, the gold standard in sleep research. It was hypothesized that sleep deprivation would induce adenosine accumulation and/or changes in A{sub 1}AR density. Thus, the question was addressed whether these effects of prolonged wakefulness can be visualized by altered {sup 18}F-CPFPX binding. Moreover, it was

  20. Tandem mass spectrometry, but not T-cell receptor excision circle analysis, identifies newborns with late-onset adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Canessa, Clementina; Giocaliere, Elisa; Romano, Francesca; Duse, Marzia; Malvagia, Sabrina; Lippi, Francesca; Funghini, Silvia; Bianchi, Leila; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Valleriani, Claudia; Ombrone, Daniela; Moriondo, Maria; Villanelli, Fabio; Speckmann, Carsten; Adams, Stuart; Gaspar, Bobby H; Hershfield, Michael; Santisteban, Ines; Fairbanks, Lynette; Ragusa, Giovanni; Resti, Massimo; de Martino, Maurizio; Guerrini, Renzo; Azzari, Chiara

    2013-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is caused by genetic variants that disrupt the function of ADA. In its early-onset form, it is rapidly fatal to infants. Delayed or late-onset ADA-SCID is characterized by insidious progressive immunodeficiency that leads to permanent organ damage or death. Quantification of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or tandem mass spectrometry (tandem-MS) analysis of dried blood spots (DBSs) collected at birth can identify newborns with early-onset ADA-SCID and are used in screening programs. However, it is not clear whether these analyses can identify newborns who will have delayed or late-onset ADA-SCID before symptoms appear. We performed a retrospective study to evaluate whether tandem-MS and quantitative TREC analyses of DBSs could identify newborns who had delayed-onset ADA-SCID later in life. We tested stored DBSs collected at birth from 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA-SCID using tandem-MS (PCT EP2010/070517) to evaluate levels of adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine and real-time PCR to quantify TREC levels. We also analyzed DBSs from 3 newborns with early-onset ADA-SCID and 2 healthy newborn carriers of ADA deficiency. The DBSs taken at birth from the 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA-SCID had adenosine levels of 10, 25, and 19 μmol/L (normal value, <1.5 μmol/L) and 2'-deoxyadenosine levels of 0.7, 2.7, and 2.4 μmol/L (normal value, <0.07 μmol/L); the mean levels of adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine were respectively 12.0- and 27.6-fold higher than normal values. DBSs taken at birth from all 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA deficiency had normal TREC levels, but TRECs were undetectable in blood samples taken from the same patients at the time of diagnosis. Tandem-MS but not TREC quantification identifies newborns with delayed- or late-onset ADA deficiency. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Wheel running alters patterns of uncontrollable stress-induced cfos mRNA expression in rat dorsal striatum direct and indirect pathways: a possible role for plasticity in adenosine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter J.; Ghasem, Parsa R.; Mika, Agnieszka; Day, Heidi E.; Herrera, Jonathan J.; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Fleshner, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that adenosine is a major regulator of striatum activity, in part, through the antagonistic modulation of dopaminergic function. Exercise can influence adenosine and dopamine activity, which may subsequently promote plasticity in striatum adenosine and dopamine systems. Such changes could alter activity of medium spiny neurons and impact striatum function. The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first was to characterize the effect of long-term wheel running on adenosine 1 (A1R), adenosine 2A (A2AR), dopamine 1 (D1R), and dopamine 2 (D2R) receptor mRNA expression in adult rat dorsal and ventral striatum structures using in situ hybridization. The second was to determine if changes to adenosine and dopamine receptor mRNA from running are associated with altered cfos mRNA induction in dynorphin- (direct pathway) and enkephalin- (indirect pathway) expressing neurons of the dorsal striatum following stress exposure. We report that chronic running, as well as acute uncontrollable stress, reduced A1R and A2AR mRNA levels in the dorsal and ventral striatum. Running also modestly elevated D2R mRNA levels in striatum regions. Finally, stress-induced cfos was potentiated in dynorphin and attenuated in enkephalin expressing neurons of running rats. These data suggest striatum adenosine and dopamine systems are targets for neuroplasticity from exercise, which may contribute to changes in direct and indirect pathway activity. These findings may have implications for striatum mediated motor and cognitive processes, as well as exercise facilitated stress-resistance. PMID:25017571

  2. Interleukin-6 enhances expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA and signaling in cultured rat cortical astrocytes and brain slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; Lubrich, B; Fiebich, BL; Boddeke, HWGM; van Calker, D

    The inhibitory neuromodulator adenosine is released in the brain in high concentrations under conditions of exaggerated neuronal activity such as ischemia and seizures, or electroconvulsive treatment. By inhibiting neural overactivity, adenosine counteracts seizure activity and promotes neuronal

  3. Interleukin-6-type cytokines in neuroprotection and neuromodulation: Oncostatin M, but not leukemia inhibitory factor, requires neuronal Adenosine A1 receptor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moidunny, S.; Dias, R.; Van Calker, D.; Boddeke, H.; Sebastiao, A.; Biber, K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Adenosine is a neuromodulator in the central nervous system exhibiting anticonvulsive, neuroprotective and sedating/sleep regulating properties. A pathophysiological importance of adenosine in various neuropsychiatric diseases (e.g. epilepsy, neurodegenerative disorders, apoplexia and

  4. Cross sectional PET study of cerebral adenosine A{sub 1} receptors in premanifest and manifest Huntington's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusch, Andreas; Elmenhorst, David [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-2), Juelich (Germany); Saft, Carsten; Kraus, Peter H.; Gold, Ralf [St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr University Bochum, Department of Neurology, Huntington Centre NRW, Bochum (Germany); Hartung, Hans-Peter [Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bauer, Andreas [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-2), Juelich (Germany); Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To study cerebral adenosine receptors (AR) in premanifest and manifest stages of Huntington's disease (HD). We quantified the cerebral binding potential (BP{sub ND}) of the A{sub 1}AR in carriers of the HD CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion using the radioligand [{sup 18} F]CPFPX and PET. Four groups were investigated: (i) premanifest individuals far (preHD-A; n = 7) or (ii) near (preHD-B; n = 6) to the predicted symptom onset, (iii) manifest HD patients (n = 8), and (iv) controls (n = 36). Cerebral A{sub 1}AR values of preHD-A subjects were generally higher than those of controls (by up to 31 %, p <.01, in the thalamus on average). Across stages a successive reduction of A{sub 1}AR BP{sub ND} was observed to the levels of controls in preHD-B and undercutting controls in manifest HD by down to 25 %, p <.01, in the caudatus and amygdala. There was a strong correlation between A{sub 1}AR BP{sub ND} and years to onset. Before onset of HD, the assumed annual rates of change of A{sub 1}AR density were -1.2 % in the caudatus, -1.7 % in the thalamus and -3.4 % in the amygdala, while the corresponding volume losses amounted to 0.6 %, 0.1 % and 0.2 %, respectively. Adenosine receptors switch from supra to subnormal levels during phenoconversion of HD. This differential regulation may play a role in the pathophysiology of altered energy metabolism. (orig.)

  5. Metabolism of the A{sub 1} adenosine receptor PET ligand [{sup 18}F]CPFPX by CYP1A2: implications for bolus/infusion PET studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusch, Andreas [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Aachen, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Bier, Dirk [Institute for Neuroscience and Biophysics (INB4)-Nuclear Chemistry, Research Center Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Holschbach, Marcus H. [Institute for Neuroscience and Biophysics (INB4)-Nuclear Chemistry, Research Center Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Woitalla, Dirk [Neurological Department, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44791 Bochum (Germany); Elmenhorst, David [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Winz, Oliver H. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Zilles, Karl [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Bauer, Andreas [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: an.bauer@fz-juelich.de

    2006-10-15

    The A{sub 1} adenosine receptor positron emission tomography (PET) ligand 8-cyclopentyl-3-(3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl)-1-propylxanthine ([{sup 18}F]CPFPX, ) undergoes a fast hepatic metabolism. An optimal design of PET quantitation approaches (e.g., bolus/infusion studies) necessitates the knowledge of factors that influence this metabolism. Metabolites of were separated by radio thin-layer chromatography. Metabolism in vivo, in pooled human liver microsomes and in recombinant human cytochrome isoenzyme preparations was studied. Dynamic PET studies using were performed on three controls and two patients, one treated with the antidepressant and inhibitor of cytochrome CYP1A2 fluvoxamine, the other suffering from liver cirrhosis. CPFPX is metabolized by cytochrome CYP1A2 with high selectivity [K {sub M}=1.1 {mu}M (95% confidence interval, or CI, 0.6-2.0 {mu}M) and V {sub max}=243 pmol min{sup -1} mg{sup -1} (95% CI, 112-373 pmol min{sup -1} mg{sup -1}) corresponding to 2.4 pmol min{sup -1} pmol{sup -1} cytochrome P-450]. This metabolism can competitively be inhibited by fluvoxamine with K {sub I}=68 nM (95% CI, 34-138 nM). At least eight compounds found in human plasma and in the CYP1A2 in vitro preparations have an identical migration pattern and account together for >90% and >80% of the respective metabolite yield. Metabolism was considerably delayed in the two patients. In conclusion, is metabolized by cytochrome CYP1A2. Its metabolism is therefore subdued to disease-related or xenobiotic-induced changes of CYP1A2 activity. The identification of the metabolic pathway of 1 allows to optimize image quantification in A{sub 1} adenosine receptor PET studies.

  6. Adenosine AA Receptor Antagonists Do Not Disrupt Rodent Prepulse Inhibition: An Improved Side Effect Profile in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina J. Bleickardt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Current treatments for PD focus on dopaminergic therapies, including L-dopa and dopamine receptor agonists. However, these treatments induce neuropsychiatric side effects. Psychosis, characterized by delusions and hallucinations, is one of the most serious such side effects. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonism is a nondopaminergic treatment for PD with clinical and preclinical efficacy. The present studies assessed A2A antagonists SCH 412348 and istradefylline in rodent prepulse inhibition (PPI, a model of psychosis. Dopamine receptor agonists pramipexole (0.3–3 mg/kg, pergolide (0.3–3 mg/kg, and apomorphine (0.3–3 mg/kg significantly disrupted PPI; ropinirole (1–30 mg/kg had no effect; L-dopa (100–300 mg/kg disrupted rat but not mouse PPI. SCH 412348 (0.3–3 mg/kg did not disrupt rodent PPI; istradefylline (0.1–1 mg/kg marginally disrupted mouse but not rat PPI. These results suggest that A2A antagonists, unlike dopamine agonists, have an improved neuropsychiatric side effect profile.

  7. Adenosine inhibits glutamatergic input to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, J. M.; Ferrari, L. L.; Keating, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous homeostatic sleep factor that accumulates during waking and inhibits wake-active neurons to promote sleep. It has been specifically hypothesized that adenosine decreases wakefulness and promotes sleep recovery by directly inhibiting wake-active neurons of the basal forebrain (BF), particularly BF cholinergic neurons. We previously showed that adenosine directly inhibits BF cholinergic neurons. Here, we investigated 1) how adenosine modulates glutamatergic input to BF cholinergic neurons and 2) how adenosine uptake and adenosine metabolism are involved in regulating extracellular levels of adenosine. Our experiments were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. We found that in BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine reduced the amplitude of AMPA-mediated evoked glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs through presynaptic A1 receptors. Thus we have demonstrated that in addition to directly inhibiting BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine depresses excitatory inputs to these neurons. It is therefore possible that both direct and indirect inhibition may synergistically contribute to the sleep-promoting effects of adenosine in the BF. We also found that blocking the influx of adenosine through the equilibrative nucleoside transporters or inhibiting adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase increased endogenous adenosine inhibitory tone, suggesting a possible mechanism through which adenosine extracellular levels in the basal forebrain are regulated. PMID:22357797

  8. Differential effects of presynaptic versus postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptor blockade on Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) self-administration in squirrel monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justinová, Zuzana; Redhi, Godfrey H; Goldberg, Steven R; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-05-07

    Different doses of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 [3,7-dihydro-8-[(1E)-2-(3-ethoxyphenyl)ethenyl]-7 methyl-3-[3-(phosphooxy)propyl-1-(2 propynil)-1H-purine-2,6-dione] were found previously to either decrease or increase self-administration of cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or anandamide in squirrel monkeys. It was hypothesized that the decrease observed with a relatively low dose of MSX-3 was related to blockade of striatal presynaptic A2A receptors that modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, whereas the increase observed with a higher dose was related to blockade of postsynaptic A2A receptors localized in striatopallidal neurons. This hypothesis was confirmed in the present study by testing the effects of the preferential presynaptic and postsynaptic A2A receptor antagonists SCH-442416 [2-(2-furanyl)-7-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propyl]-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine] and KW-6002 [(E)-1, 3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6-dione], respectively, in squirrel monkeys trained to intravenously self-administer THC. SCH-442416 produced a significant shift to the right of the THC self-administration dose-response curves, consistent with antagonism of the reinforcing effects of THC. Conversely, KW-6002 produced a significant shift to the left, consistent with potentiation of the reinforcing effects of THC. These results show that selectively blocking presynaptic A2A receptors could provide a new pharmacological approach to the treatment of marijuana dependence and underscore corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission as a possible main mechanism involved in the rewarding effects of THC.

  9. ( sup 3 H)CGS 21680, a selective A2 adenosine receptor agonist directly labels A2 receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, M.F.; Schulz, R.; Hutchison, A.J.; Do, U.H.; Sills, M.A.; Williams, M. (CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, Summit, NJ (USA))

    1989-12-01

    In the present study, the binding of a highly A2-selective agonist radioligand, (3H)CGS 21680 (2-(p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine) is described. (3H)CGS 21680 specific binding to rat striatal membranes was saturable, reversible and dependent upon protein concentration. Saturation studies revealed that (3H)CGS 21680 bound with high affinity (Kd = 15.5 nM) and limited capacity (apparent Bmax = 375 fmol/mg of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. Estimates of ligand affinity (16 nM) determined from association and dissociation kinetic experiments were in close agreement with the results from the saturation studies. (3H)CGS 21680 binding was greatest in striatal membranes with negligible specific binding obtained in rat cortical membranes. Adenosine agonists ligands competed for the binding of 5 nM (3H)CGS 21680 to striatal membranes with the following order of activity; CGS 21680 = 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine greater than 2-phenylaminoadenosine (CV-1808) = 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine = 2-chloroadenosine greater than R-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than N6-cyclohexyladenosine greater than N6cyclopentyltheophylline greater than S-phenylisopropyladenosine. The nonxanthine adenosine antagonist, CGS 15943A, was the most active compound in inhibiting the binding of (3H)CGS 21680. Other adenosine antagonists inhibited binding in the following order; xanthine amine congener = 1,3-dipropyl-8-(2-amino-4-chloro)phenylxanthine greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine greater than 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine greater than 8-phenyltheophylline greater than 8-cyclopentyltheophylline = xanthine carboxylic acid congener greater than 8-parasulfophenyltheophylline greater than theophylline greater than caffeine.

  10. [Pulmonary surfactant protein adenosine triphosphate-binding-cassette-A3 gene composite mutations in infant congenital interstitial lung disease: report of a case and review of literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, N; Chen, D H; Lin, Y N; Wu, S Z; Gu, Y Y; Zeng, Q S; Zhai, Y Y; Yang, L Y; Xu, J X

    2016-10-02

    Objective: To report a case of the pulmonary surfactant protein(SP) adenosine triphosphate-binding-cassette-A3 (ABCA3) gene mutations in infant congenital interstitial lung disease(ILD), and review the related literature, to investigate the relationships of ABCA3 gene mutation associated with ILD in infants. Method: A 6-months-old boy was hospitalized in the department of Pediatrics of the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University. The clinical, radiological, histological information from transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) and genetic testing in this case was analyzed; 12 reports retrieved on literature search at Pubmed, OVID databases from 2004 to 2015 by using the ABCA3 as keyword were reviewed and analyzed. Result: (1)The patient, a 6-months-old boy, had progressive tachypnea and dyspnea since 4 months old. Physical examination on admission revealed respiratory rate of 78 times/min , heart rate of 187 times/min, SpO2 0.93(mask oxygen-inspiration with 6 L/min), scattered fine moist crackles could be heard over the both lungs, clubbing fingers were found. High-resolution computed tomography(HRCT) revealed diffuse ground-glass opacity, interlobular and intralobular septal thickening. Lung biopsies showed evidences of the alveolar cavity atelectatic changes and interstitial fibrosis. SP-A and SP-B were negative in immunohistochemical stainting. SP-related gene sequence analysis found that there was compound heterozygous missense mutation of ABCA3 gene in c. 1942A>G, c.2701-33G>C and c. 991-105C>A. (2)The review of related literature found that totally 12 cases were reported. The main manifestations were progressive tachypnea and dyspnea, age of onset was between birth and 4 years of age. The imaging characteristics of chest HRCT revealed diffuse infiltration or diffuse ground-glass pattern in the lung. 6 cases died, and 6 cases survived, including 4 cases with pulmonary function disturbance to different degrees; 12 cases had ABCA3 gene mutations, 9

  11. Homeostatic Control of Synaptic Activity by Endogenous Adenosine is Mediated by Adenosine Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diógenes, Maria José; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Scianni, Maria; Theofilas, Panos; Lopatář, Jan; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.; Maggi, Laura; Frenguelli, Bruno G.; Limatola, Cristina; Boison, Detlev; Sebastião, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine, a key regulator of neuronal excitability, is metabolized by astrocyte-based enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). We hypothesized that ADK might be an upstream regulator of adenosine-based homeostatic brain functions by simultaneously affecting several downstream pathways. We therefore studied the relationship between ADK expression, levels of extracellular adenosine, synaptic transmission, intrinsic excitability, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent synaptic actions in transgenic mice underexpressing or overexpressing ADK. We demonstrate that ADK: 1) Critically influences the basal tone of adenosine, evaluated by microelectrode adenosine biosensors, and its release following stimulation; 2) determines the degree of tonic adenosine-dependent synaptic inhibition, which correlates with differential plasticity at hippocampal synapses with low release probability; 3) modulates the age-dependent effects of BDNF on hippocampal synaptic transmission, an action dependent upon co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors; and 4) influences GABAA receptor-mediated currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We conclude that ADK provides important upstream regulation of adenosine-based homeostatic function of the brain and that this mechanism is necessary and permissive to synaptic actions of adenosine acting on multiple pathways. These mechanistic studies support previous therapeutic studies and implicate ADK as a promising therapeutic target for upstream control of multiple neuronal signaling pathways crucial for a variety of neurological disorders. PMID:22997174

  12. A role for a specific cholesterol interaction in stabilizing the Apo configuration of the human A(2A) adenosine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Edward; Higgs, Chris; Kim, Byungchan; Lupyan, Dmitry; Shelley, John C; Farid, Ramy; Voth, Gregory A

    2009-12-09

    The function of G-protein-coupled receptors is tightly modulated by the lipid environment. Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (totaling approximately 3 mus) of the A(2A) receptor in cholesterol-free bilayers, with and without the antagonist ZM241385 bound, demonstrate the instability of helix II in the apo receptor in cholesterol-poor membrane regions. We directly observe that the effect of cholesterol binding is to stabilize helix II against a buckling-type deformation, perhaps rationalizing the observation that the A(2A) receptor couples to G protein only in the presence of cholesterol (Zezula and Freissmuth, 2008). The results suggest a mechanism by which the A(2A) receptor may function as a coincidence detector, activating only in the presence of both cholesterol and agonist. We also observed a previously hypothesized conformation of the tryptophan "rotameric switch" on helix VI in which a phenylalanine on helix V positions the tryptophan out of the ligand binding pocket.

  13. Changes of Cerebral and/or Peripheral Adenosine A1 Receptor and IGF-I Concentrations under Extended Sleep Duration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Chennaoui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Extended sleep improves sustained attention and reduces sleep pressure in humans. Downregulation of adenosine A1 receptor (A1R and modulation of the neurotrophic factor insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-I in brain structures controlling attentional capacities could be involved. In the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats, we measured adenosine A1R and IGF-I protein concentrations after photoperiod-induced sleep extension. Two groups of twelve rats were adapted over 14 days to a habitual (CON 12:12 light–dark (LD schedule and an extended (EXT 16:8 LD schedule. IGF-I content was also measured in plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle. In EXT, compared to CON rats, A1R content in the frontal cortex was significantly lower (p < 0.05, while IGF-I content was higher (p < 0.001, and no significant change was observed in the hippocampus. IGF-I content in plasma and muscle was higher (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, while it was lower in liver (p < 0.001. The absolute weight and weight gain were higher in EXT rats (p < 0.01. These data suggest that 14 days under a 16:8 LD photoperiod respectively down- and upregulated cortical A1R and IGF-I levels. This photoperiod induced an anabolic profile with increased weight gain and circulating and muscular IGF-I levels. An extension of sleep duration might favor cerebral and peripheral anabolism, which may help attentional and physical capacities.

  14. Fragment optimization for GPCRs by molecular dynamics free energy calculations: Probing druggable subpockets of the A 2A adenosine receptor binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricon, Pierre; Ranganathan, Anirudh; Warnick, Eugene; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Rudling, Axel; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Ezzati, Aitakin; Jaiteh, Mariama; Dal Ben, Diego; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Carlsson, Jens

    2017-07-25

    Fragment-based lead discovery is becoming an increasingly popular strategy for drug discovery. Fragment screening identifies weakly binding compounds that require optimization to become high-affinity leads. As design of leads from fragments is challenging, reliable computational methods to guide optimization would be invaluable. We evaluated using molecular dynamics simulations and the free energy perturbation method (MD/FEP) in fragment optimization for the A2A adenosine receptor, a pharmaceutically relevant G protein-coupled receptor. Optimization of fragments exploring two binding site subpockets was probed by calculating relative binding affinities for 23 adenine derivatives, resulting in strong agreement with experimental data (R2 = 0.78). The predictive power of MD/FEP was significantly better than that of an empirical scoring function. We also demonstrated the potential of the MD/FEP to assess multiple binding modes and to tailor the thermodynamic profile of ligands during optimization. Finally, MD/FEP was applied prospectively to optimize three nonpurine fragments, and predictions for 12 compounds were evaluated experimentally. The direction of the change in binding affinity was correctly predicted in a majority of the cases, and agreement with experiment could be improved with rigorous parameter derivation. The results suggest that MD/FEP will become a powerful tool in structure-driven optimization of fragments to lead candidates.

  15. Enantiospecific Recognition at the A2B Adenosine Receptor by Alkyl 2-Cyanoimino-4-substituted-6-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajales, Carlos; Azuaje, Jhonny; Oliveira, Ana; Loza, María I; Brea, José; Cadavid, María I; Masaguer, Christian F; García-Mera, Xerardo; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sotelo, Eddy

    2017-04-27

    A novel family of structurally simple, potent, and selective nonxanthine A2BAR ligands was identified, and its antagonistic behavior confirmed through functional experiments. The reported alkyl 2-cyanoimino-4-substituted-6-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahy-dropyrimidine-5-carboxylates (16) were designed by bioisosteric replacement of the carbonyl group at position 2 in a series of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2-ones. The scaffold (16) documented herein contains a chiral center at the heterocycle. Accordingly, the most attractive ligand of the series [(±)16b, Ki = 24.3 nM] was resolved into its two enantiomers by chiral HPLC, and the absolute configuration was established by circular dichroism. The biological evaluation of both enantiomers demonstrated enantiospecific recognition at A2BAR, with the (S)-16b enantiomer retaining all the affinity (Ki = 15.1 nM), as predicted earlier by molecular modeling. This constitutes the first example of enantiospecific recognition at the A2B adenosine receptor and opens new possibilities in ligand design for this receptor.

  16. New generic approach to the treatment of organophosphate poisoning : Adenosine receptor mediated inhibition of ACh-release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, HPM; Moor, E; Westerink, BHC; Bruijnzeel, PLB

    1998-01-01

    Current treatment of acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning includes a combined administration of a cholinesterase reactivator (oxime), a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine) and an anticonvulsant (diazepam). This treatment is not adequate since it does not prevent neuronal brain damage and

  17. The Role of Extracellular Adenosine in Chemical Neurotransmission in the Hippocampus and Basal Ganglia: Pharmacological and Clinical Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlágh, Beáta; Vizi, E. Sylvester

    2011-01-01

    Now there is general agreement that the purine nucleoside adenosine is an important neuromodulator in the central nervous system, playing a crucial role in neuronal excitability and synaptic/non-synaptic transmission in the hippocampus and basal ganglia. Adenosine is derived from the breakdown of extra- or intracellular ATP and is released upon a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli from neuronal and non-neuronal sources, i.e. from glial cells and exerts effects diffusing far away from release sites. The resultant elevation of adenosine levels in the extracellular space reaches micromolar level, and leads to the activation A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptors, localized to pre- and postsynaptic as well as extrasynaptic sites. Activation of presynaptic A1 receptors inhibits the release of the majority of transmitters including glutamate, acetylcholine, noradrenaline, 5-HT and dopamine, whilst the stimulation of A2A receptors facilitates the release of glutamate and acetylcholine and inhibits the release of GABA. These actions underlie modulation of neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and coordination of neural networks and provide intriguing target sites for pharmacological intervention in ischemia and Parkinson’s disease. However, despite that adenosine is also released during ischemia, A1 adenosine receptors do not participate in the modulation of excitotoxic glutamate release, which is nonsynaptic and is due to the reverse operation of transporters. Instead, extrasynaptic A1 receptors might be responsible for the neuroprotection afforded by A1 receptor activation. PMID:21401497

  18. Adenosine A2A  receptor agonist prevents cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive male rats after myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva JS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jaqueline S da Silva,1 Daniele Gabriel-Costa,1 Roberto T Sudo,1 Hao Wang,2 Leanne Groban,2 Emanuele B Ferraz,3 José Hamilton M Nascimento,3 Carlos Alberto M Fraga,1 Eliezer J Barreiro,1 Gisele Zapata-Sudo1 1Research Program Development of Drugs, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 3Institute of Biophysics Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Background: This work evaluated the hypothesis that 3,4-methylenedioxybenzoyl-2- thienylhydrazone (LASSBio-294, an agonist of adenosine A2A  receptor, could be beneficial for preventing cardiac dysfunction due to hypertension associated with myocardial infarction (MI. Methods: Male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR were randomly divided into four groups (six animals per group: sham-operation (SHR-Sham, and myocardial infarction rats (SHR-MI were treated orally either with vehicle or LASSBio-294 (10 and 20 mg.kg-1.d-1 for 4 weeks. Echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamic parameters measured left ventricle (LV structure and function. Exercise tolerance was evaluated using a treadmill test. Cardiac remodeling was accessed by LV collagen deposition and tumor necrosis factor α expression. Results: Early mitral inflow velocity was significantly reduced in the SHR-MI group, and there was significant recovery in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with LASSBio-294. Exercise intolerance observed in the SHR-MI group was prevented by 10 mg.kg-1.d-1 of LASSBio-294, and exercise tolerance exceeded that of the SHR-Sham group at 20 mg.kg-1.d-1. LV end-diastolic pressure increased after MI, and this was prevented by 10 and 20 mg.kg-1.d-1 of LASSBio-294. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase levels were restored in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with LASSBio-294. Fibrosis and inflammatory processes were also

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of 2-amino-3-aroyl thiophene derivatives as agonist allosteric modulators of the A1 adenosine receptor. A position-dependent effect study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Lopez-Cara, Carlota; Cruz-Lopez, Olga; Moorman, Allan R; Massink, Arnault; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-08-28

    The 2-amino-3-(p-chlorobenzoyl)thiophene scaffold has been widely employed as a pharmacophore for the identification of small molecules acting as allosteric modulators at the adenosine A1 receptor. A new series of 2-amino-3-(p-chlorobenzoyl)-4-benzyl-5-arylthiophene derivatives, characterized by the absence as well as the presence of electron-releasing or electron-withdrawing groups on the phenyl ring at the 4- and 5-positions of the thiophene ring, were identified as positive allosteric enhancers at the adenosine A1 receptor in binding (saturation, competition and dissociation kinetics) and functional assays. To better understand the positional requirements of substituents on the 2-amino-3-(p-chlorobenzoyl)thiophene core, the corresponding regioisomeric 4-aryl-5-benzylthiophene analogues were synthesized and found to possess reduced allosteric enhancer activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. In silico study of naphtha [1, 2-d] thiazol-2-amine with adenosine A 2A receptor and its role in antagonism of haloperidol-induced motor impairments in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Prakash, Amresh; Barodia, Sandeep Kumar; Kumari, Rita; Mishra, Chandra Bhushan; Kumar, J B Senthil

    2009-10-09

    Loss of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons in the substantia nigra leads to Parkinson's disease (PD). Adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) have been anticipated as novel therapeutic target for PD. A(2A)Rs potentiate locomotor behavior and are predominantly expressed in striatum. Naphtha [1, 2-d] thiazol-2-amine (NATA), a tricyclic thiazole have been studied as new anti-Parkinsonian compound. AutoDock analysis and pharmacophore study of NATA with known A(2A)R antagonists explicit its efficacy as a possible adenosine receptor antagonist. In vivo pharmacology of NATA showed reduction of haloperidol (HAL)-induced motor impairments in Swiss albino male mice. Relatively elevated levels of dopamine in NATA pre-treated mice are suggestive of its possible role as neuromodulator in PD.

  1. Crystal structure of the adenosine A2A receptor bound to an antagonist reveals a potential allosteric pocket

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bingfa; Bachhawat, Priti; Chu, Matthew Ling-Hon; Wood, Martyn; Ceska, Tom; Sands, Zara A.; Mercier, Joel; Lebon, Florence; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2017-01-01

    The A2AR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays important roles in cardiovascular physiology and immune function. The A2AR is also a target for the treatment of Parkinson?s disease, where A2AR antagonists have been shown to enhance signaling through the D2 dopamine receptor. Here we present the crystal structure of the A2AR bound to a novel bitopic antagonist. As a result of structural changes needed to accommodate the bound antagonist, crystals could not be grown in lipidic cubic ...

  2. Activation of A1-adenosine receptors promotes leukocyte recruitment to the lung and attenuates acute lung injury in mice infected with influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeffner, Famke; Woods, Parker S; Davis, Ian C

    2014-09-01

    We have shown that bronchoalveolar epithelial A1-adenosine receptors (A1-AdoR) are activated in influenza A virus-infected mice. Alveolar macrophages and neutrophils also express A1-AdoRs, and we hypothesized that activation of A1-AdoRs on these cells will promote macrophage and neutrophil chemotaxis and activation and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of influenza virus-induced acute lung injury. Wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, congenic A1-AdoR knockout (A1-KO) mice, and mice that had undergone reciprocal bone marrow transfer were inoculated intranasally with 10,000 PFU/mouse influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. Alternatively, WT mice underwent daily treatment with the A1-AdoR antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) from 1 day prior to inoculation. Infection increased bronchoalveolar lining fluid (BALF) adenosine comparably in WT and A1-KO mice. Infection of WT mice resulted in reduced carotid arterial O2 saturation (hypoxemia), lung pathology, pulmonary edema, reduced lung compliance, increased basal airway resistance, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. These effects were absent or significantly attenuated in A1-KO mice. Levels of BALF leukocytes, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and interleukin 10 (IL-10) were significantly reduced in infected A1-KO mice, but levels of KC, IP-10, and MCP-1 were increased. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer resulted in WT-like lung injury severity, but BALF leukocyte levels increased only in WT and A1-KO mice with WT bone barrow. Hypoxemia, pulmonary edema, and levels of BALF alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, IFN-γ, and IL-10 were reduced in DPCPX-treated WT mice. Levels of viral replication did not differ between mouse strains or treatment groups. These findings indicate that adenosine activation of leukocyte A1-AdoRs plays a significant role in their recruitment to the infected lung and contributes to influenza pathogenesis. A1-AdoR inhibitor therapy may therefore be beneficial in patients with influenza virus

  3. The role of 5-arylalkylamino- and 5-piperazino- moieties on the 7-aminopyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine core in affecting adenosine A1 and A2A receptor affinity and selectivity profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squarcialupi, Lucia; Betti, Marco; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Falsini, Matteo; Ravani, Annalisa; Pasquini, Silvia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Salmaso, Veronica; Sturlese, Mattia; Varani, Katia; Moro, Stefano; Colotta, Vittoria

    2017-12-01

    New 7-amino-2-phenylpyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives, substituted at the 5-position with aryl(alkyl)amino- and 4-substituted-piperazin-1-yl- moieties, were synthesized with the aim of targeting human (h) adenosine A1 and/or A2A receptor subtypes. On the whole, the novel derivatives 1-24 shared scarce or no affinities for the off-target hA2B and hA3 ARs. The 5-(4-hydroxyphenethylamino)- derivative 12 showed both good affinity (Ki = 150 nM) and the best selectivity for the hA2A AR while the 5-benzylamino-substituted 5 displayed the best combined hA2A (Ki = 123 nM) and A1 AR affinity (Ki = 25 nM). The 5-phenethylamino moiety (compound 6) achieved nanomolar affinity (Ki = 11 nM) and good selectivity for the hA1 AR. The 5-(N4-substituted-piperazin-1-yl) derivatives 15-24 bind the hA1 AR subtype with affinities falling in the high nanomolar range. A structure-based molecular modeling study was conducted to rationalize the experimental binding data from a molecular point of view using both molecular docking studies and Interaction Energy Fingerprints (IEFs) analysis.[Formula: see text].

  4. Effects of ethanolic extract and naphthoquinones obtained from the bulbs of Cipura paludosa on short-term and long-term memory: involvement of adenosine A₁ and A₂A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Greice M R S; Matheus, Filipe C; Ferreira, Vania M; Tessele, Priscila B; Azevedo, Mariangela S; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Prediger, Rui D

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies from our group have indicated important biological properties of the ethanolic extract and isolated compounds from the bulbs of Cipura paludosa (Iridaceae), a native plant widely distributed in northern Brazil, including antioxidant, neuroprotective and anti-nociceptive activities. In the present study, the effects of the ethanolic extract and its two naphthoquinones (eleutherine and isoeleutherine) on the short- and long-term memory of adult rodents were assessed in social recognition and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Acute pre-training oral administration of the ethanolic extract improved the short-term social memory in rats as well as facilitated the step-down inhibitory avoidance short- and long-term memory in mice. Moreover, the co-administration of 'non-effective' doses of the extract of Cipura paludosa and the adenosine receptor antagonists caffeine (non-selective), DPCPX (adenosine A1 receptor antagonist) and ZM241385 (adenosine A2A receptor antagonist) improved the social recognition memory of rats. In the inhibitory avoidance task, the co-administration of sub-effective doses of the extract with caffeine or ZM241385, but not with DPCPX, improved the short- and long-term memory of mice. Finally, the acute oral administration of eleutherine and isoeleutherine facilitated the inhibitory avoidance short- and long-term memory in mice. These results demonstrate for the first time the cognitive-enhancing properties of the extract and isolated compounds from the bulbs of Cipura paludosa in rodents and suggest a possible involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in these effects. © 2012 The Authors Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2012 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  5. When Cytokinin, a Plant Hormone, Meets the Adenosine A2A Receptor: A Novel Neuroprotectant and Lead for Treating Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuen-Lin; Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Yang, De-Ming; Huang, Nai-Kuei

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that cytokinins are a class of phytohormones that promote cell division in plant roots and shoots. However, their targets, biological functions, and implications in mammalian systems have rarely been examined. In this study, we show that one cytokinin, zeatin riboside, can prevent pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells from serum deprivation-induced apoptosis by acting on the adenosine A2A receptor (A2A-R), which was blocked by an A2A-R antagonist and a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, demonstrating the functional ability of zeatin riboside by mediating through A2A-R signaling event. Since the A2A-R was implicated as a therapeutic target in treating Huntington’s disease (HD), a cellular model of HD was applied by transfecting mutant huntingtin in PC12 cells. By using filter retardation assay and confocal microscopy we found that zeatin riboside reversed mutant huntingtin (Htt)-induced protein aggregations and proteasome deactivation through A2A-R signaling. PKA inhibitor blocked zeatin riboside-induced suppression of mutant Htt aggregations. In addition, PKA activated proteasome activity and reduced mutant Htt protein aggregations. However, a proteasome inhibitor blocked both zeatin riboside-and PKA activator-mediated suppression of mutant Htt aggregations, confirming mediation of the A2A-R/PKA/proteasome pathway. Taken together, zeatin riboside might have therapeutic potential as a novel neuroprotectant and a lead for treating neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22719969

  6. Sickle cell vaso-occlusion causes activation of iNKT cells that is decreased by the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Joshua J; Lin, Gene; Okam, Maureen M; Majerus, Elaine; Keefer, Jeffrey; Onyekwere, Onyinye; Ross, Ainsley; Campigotto, Federico; Neuberg, Donna; Linden, Joel; Nathan, David G

    2013-04-25

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonists reduce invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell activation and decrease inflammation in sickle cell disease (SCD) mice. We conducted a phase 1 trial of the A2AR agonist regadenoson in adults with SCD. The target dose was 1.44 μg/kg/h. iNKT cell activation was evaluated using antibodies targeting the p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (phospho-NF-κB p65), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and A2AR. Regadenoson was administered to 27 adults with SCD. We examined 21 patients at steady state and 6 during painful vaso-occlusive crises (pVOC). iNKT cell activation was also measured in 14 African-American controls. During pVOC, the fraction of iNKT cells demonstrating increased phospho-NF-κB p65 and A2AR expression was significantly higher compared with controls (P regadenoson during pVOC, phospho-NF-κB p65 activation in iNKT cells decreased compared to baseline by a median of 48% (P = .03) to levels similar to controls and steady-state SCD. No toxicities were identified. Infusional regadenoson administered to adults with SCD at 1.44 μg/kg/h during pVOC decreases activation of iNKT cells without toxicity.

  7. Regadenoson, a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist, causes dose-dependent increases in coronary blood flow velocity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Hsiao D; Shryock, John C; von Mering, Gregory O; Gordi, Toufigh; Blackburn, Brent; Olmsted, Ann W; Belardinelli, Luiz; Kerensky, Richard A

    2007-07-01

    Regadenoson is a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist and vasodilator used to increase the heterogeneity of distribution of coronary blood flow during myocardial perfusion imaging. This study characterized the dose dependence of regadenoson-induced coronary hyperemia. An open-label, dose-escalation study of regadenoson (10-500 microg, rapid intravenous bolus) was performed in 34 subjects; in 4 additional subjects, the effect of aminophylline to reverse the response to regadenoson was determined. Intracoronary peak blood flow velocity in either the left anterior descending or left circumflex artery was measured by continuous Doppler signal recording, heart rate, central aortic blood pressure, and adverse effects were recorded. Regadenoson increased peak blood flow velocity by up to 3.4-fold in a dose-dependent manner. The mean duration of the increase in flow velocity of 2.5-fold or greater caused by 400 to 500 microg of regadenoson was 2.3 to 2.4 minutes. Regadenoson (400-500 microg) increased heart rate by up to 21 +/- 6 beats/min and decreased systolic blood pressure (-5 +/- 8 mm Hg to -24 +/- 16 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (-8 +/- 4 mm Hg to -15 +/- 14 mm Hg). Aminophylline (100 mg) attenuated the increase in peak flow velocity but not tachycardia caused by 400 microg of regadenoson. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of regadenoson as a coronary vasodilator for myocardial perfusion imaging.

  8. Molecular docking studies of 1-(substituted phenyl)-3-(naphtha [1, 2-d] thiazol-2-yl) urea/thiourea derivatives with human adenosine A2A receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Faizul; Prasad, Medapati Vijaya Vara; Thangavel, Neelaveni; Ali, Hamed Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Computational assessment of the binding interactions of drugs is an important component of computer-aided drug design paradigms. In this perspective, a set of 30 1-(substituted phenyl)-3-(naphtha[1, 2-d] thiazol-2-yl) urea/thiourea derivatives showing antiparkinsonian activity were docked into inhibitor binding cavity of human adenosine A2A receptor (AA2AR) to understand their mode of binding interactions in silico. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.483) between docking score and antiparkinsonian activity (in terms of % reduction in catalepsy score). Potent antiparkinsonian agents carried methoxy group in the phenyl ring, exhibited both hydrophilic and lipophilic interactions with lower energy of binding at the AA2AR. These molecular docking analyses should, in our view, contribute for further development of selective AA2AR antagonists for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:21814389

  9. Molecular docking studies of 1-(substituted phenyl)-3-(naphtha [1, 2-d] thiazol-2-yl) urea/thiourea derivatives with human adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Faizul; Prasad, Medapati Vijaya Vara; Thangavel, Neelaveni; Ali, Hamed Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Computational assessment of the binding interactions of drugs is an important component of computer-aided drug design paradigms. In this perspective, a set of 30 1-(substituted phenyl)-3-(naphtha[1, 2-d] thiazol-2-yl) urea/thiourea derivatives showing antiparkinsonian activity were docked into inhibitor binding cavity of human adenosine A(2A) receptor (AA2AR) to understand their mode of binding interactions in silico. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r(2) = 0.483) between docking score and antiparkinsonian activity (in terms of % reduction in catalepsy score). Potent antiparkinsonian agents carried methoxy group in the phenyl ring, exhibited both hydrophilic and lipophilic interactions with lower energy of binding at the AA(2A)R. These molecular docking analyses should, in our view, contribute for further development of selective AA(2A)R antagonists for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  10. Role of Adenosine Signaling in Penile Erection and Erectile Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatarpekar, Prasad V.; Wen, Jiaming; Xia, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Penile erection is a hemodynamic process, which results from increased flow and retention of blood in the penile organ due to the relaxation of smooth muscle cells. Adenosine, a physiological vasorelaxant, has been shown to be a modulator of penile erection. Aim To summarize the research on the role of adenosine signaling in normal penile erection and erectile disorders. Main Outcome Measures Evidence in the literature on the association between adenosine signaling and normal and abnormal penile erection, i.e., erectile dysfunction (ED) and priapism. Methods The article reviews the literature on the role of endogenous and exogenous adenosine in normal penile erection, as well as in erectile disorders namely, ED and priapism. Results Adenosine has been shown to relax corpus cavernosum from various species including human in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Neuromodulatory role of adenosine in corpus cavernosum has also been demonstrated. Impaired adenosine signaling through A2B receptor causes partial resistance of corpus cavernosum, from men with organic ED, to adenosine-mediated relaxation. Increased level of adenosine has been shown to be a causative factor for priapism. Conclusion Overall, the research reviewed here suggests a general role of exogenous and endogenous adenosine signaling in normal penile erection. From this perspective, it is not surprising that impaired adenosine signaling is associated with ED, and excessive adenosine signaling is associated with priapism. Adenosine signaling represents a potentially important diagnostic and therapeutic target for the treatment of ED and priapism. PMID:19889148

  11. Role of adenosine signaling in penile erection and erectile disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatarpekar, Prasad V; Wen, Jiaming; Xia, Yang

    2010-11-01

    Penile erection is a hemodynamic process, which results from increased flow and retention of blood in the penile organ due to the relaxation of smooth muscle cells. Adenosine, a physiological vasorelaxant, has been shown to be a modulator of penile erection. To summarize the research on the role of adenosine signaling in normal penile erection and erectile disorders. Evidence in the literature on the association between adenosine signaling and normal and abnormal penile erection, i.e., erectile dysfunction (ED) and priapism. The article reviews the literature on the role of endogenous and exogenous adenosine in normal penile erection, as well as in erectile disorders namely, ED and priapism. Adenosine has been shown to relax corpus cavernosum from various species including human in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Neuromodulatory role of adenosine in corpus cavernosum has also been demonstrated. Impaired adenosine signaling through A(2B) receptor causes partial resistance of corpus cavernosum, from men with organic ED, to adenosine-mediated relaxation. Increased level of adenosine has been shown to be a causative factor for priapism. Overall, the research reviewed here suggests a general role of exogenous and endogenous adenosine signaling in normal penile erection. From this perspective, it is not surprising that impaired adenosine signaling is associated with ED, and excessive adenosine signaling is associated with priapism. Adenosine signaling represents a potentially important diagnostic and therapeutic target for the treatment of ED and priapism. © 2009 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  12. A Meta-Analysis of Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists on Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Wen Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLong-term use of levodopa (l-dopa is inevitably complicated with highly disabling fluctuations and drug-induced dyskinesias, which pose major challenges to the existing drug therapy of Parkinson’s disease.MethodsIn this study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of A2A receptor antagonists on reducing l-dopa-induced dyskinesias (LID.ResultsNine studies with a total of 152 animals were included in this meta-analysis. Total abnormal involuntary movements (AIM score, locomotor activity, and motor disability were reported as outcome measures in 5, 5, and 3 studies, respectively. Combined standardized mean difference (SMD estimates were calculated using a random-effects model. We pooled the whole data and found that, when compared to l-dopa alone, A2A receptor antagonists plus l-dopa treatment showed no effect on locomotor activity (SMD −0.00, 95% confidence interval (CI: −2.52 to 2.52, p = 1.0, superiority in improvement of motor disability (SMD −5.06, 95% CI: −9.25 to −0.87, p = 0.02 and more effective in control of AIM (SMD −1.82, 95% CI: −3.38 to −0.25, p = 0.02.ConclusionTo sum up, these results demonstrated that A2A receptor antagonists appear to have efficacy in animal models of LID. However, large randomized clinical trials testing the effects of A2A receptor antagonists in LID patients are always warranted.

  13. Blockade of A2b Adenosine Receptor Reduces Tumor Growth and Immune Suppression Mediated by Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in a Mouse Model of Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Iannone

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The A2b receptor (A2bR belongs to the adenosine receptor family. Emerging evidence suggest that A2bR is implicated in tumor progression in some murine tumor models, but the therapeutic potential of targeting A2bR in melanoma has not been examined. This study first shows that melanoma-bearing mice treated with Bay 60-6583, a selective A2bR agonist, had increased melanoma growth. This effect was associated with higher levels of immune regulatory mediators interleukin-10 (IL-10 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 and accumulation of tumor-associated CD11b positive Gr1 positive cells (CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Depletion of CD11b+Gr1+ cells completely reversed the protumor activity of Bay 60-6583. Conversely, pharmacological blockade of A2bR with PSB1115 reversed immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment, leading to a significant melanoma growth delay. PSB1115 treatment reduced both levels of IL-10 and MCP-1 and CD11b+Gr1+ cell number in melanoma lesions. These effects were associated with higher frequency of tumor-infiltrating CD8 positive (CD8+ T cells and natural killer T (NKT cells and increased levels of T helper 1 (Th1-like cytokines. Adoptive transfer of CD11b+Gr1+ cells abrogated the antitumor activity of PSB1115. These data suggest that the antitumor activity of PSB1115 relies on its ability to lower accumulation of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and restore an efficient antitumor T cell response. The antitumor effect of PSB1115 was not observed in melanoma-bearing nude mice. Furthermore, PSB1115 enhanced the antitumor efficacy of dacarbazine. These data indicate that A2bR antagonists such as PSB1115 should be investigated as adjuvants in the treatment of melanoma.

  14. Pulling habits out of rats: adenosine 2A receptor antagonism in dorsomedial striatum rescues meth-amphetamine-induced deficits in goal-directed action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Teri M; Supit, Alva S A; Corbit, Laura H; Killcross, Simon; Balleine, Bernard W

    2017-01-01

    Addiction is characterized by a persistent loss of behavioral control resulting in insensitivity to negative feedback and abnormal decision-making. Here, we investigated the influence of methamphetamine (METH)-paired contextual cues on decision-making in rats. Choice between goal-directed actions was sensitive to outcome devaluation in a saline-paired context but was impaired in the METH-paired context, a deficit that was also found when negative feedback was provided. Reductions in c-Fos-related immunoreactivity were found in dorsomedial striatum (DMS) but not dorsolateral striatum after exposure to the METH context suggesting this effect reflected a loss specifically in goal-directed control in the METH context. This reduction in c-Fos was localized to non-enkephalin-expressing neurons in the DMS, likely dopamine D1-expressing direct pathway neurons, suggesting a relative change in control by the D1-direct versus D2-indirect pathways originating in the DMS may have been induced by METH-context exposure. To test this suggestion, we infused the adenosine 2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 into the DMS prior to test to reduce activity in D2 neurons relative to D1 neurons in the hope of reducing the inhibitory output from this region of the striatum. We found that this treatment fully restored sensitivity to negative feedback in a test conducted in the METH-paired context. These results suggest that drug exposure alters decision-making by downregulation of the circuitry mediating goal-directed action, an effect that can be ameliorated by acute A2A receptor inhibition in this circuit. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Adenosine Signaling During Acute and Chronic Disease States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Xia, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a signaling nucleoside that is produced following tissue injury, particularly injury involving ischemia and hypoxia. The production of extracellular adenosine and its subsequent signaling through adenosine receptors plays an important role in orchestrating injury responses in multiple organs. There are four adenosine receptors that are widely distributed on immune, epithelial, endothelial, neuronal and stromal cells throughout the body. Interestingly, these receptors are subject to altered regulation following injury. Studies in mouse models and human cells and tissues have identified that the production of adenosine and its subsequent signaling through its receptors plays largely beneficial roles in acute disease states, with the exception of brain injury. In contrast, if elevated adenosine levels are sustained beyond the acute injury phase, adenosine responses can become detrimental by activating pathways that promote tissue injury and fibrosis. Understanding when during the course of disease adenosine signaling is beneficial as opposed to detrimental and defining the mechanisms involved will be critical for the advancement of adenosine based therapies for acute and chronic diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss key observations that define the beneficial and detrimental aspects of adenosine signaling during acute and chronic disease states with an emphasis on cellular processes such as inflammatory cell regulation, vascular barrier function and tissue fibrosis. PMID:23340998

  16. Pulsed electromagnetic fields increased the anti-inflammatory effect of A₂A and A₃ adenosine receptors in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Vincenzi

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs have an important role in the regulation of inflammation and their activation is involved in the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs on inflammation have been reported and we have demonstrated that PEMFs increased A2A and A3AR density and functionality in different cell lines. Chondrocytes and osteoblasts are two key cell types in the skeletal system that play important role in cartilage and bone metabolism representing an interesting target to study the effect of PEMFs. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PEMF exposure potentiated the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A and/or A3ARs in T/C-28a2 chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts. Immunofluorescence, mRNA analysis and saturation binding assays revealed that PEMF exposure up-regulated A2A and A3AR expression. A2A and A3ARs were able to modulate cAMP production and cell proliferation. The activation of A2A and A3ARs resulted in the decrease of some of the most relevant pro-inflammatory cytokine release such as interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8, following the treatment with IL-1β as an inflammatory stimuli. In human chondrocyte and osteoblast cell lines, the inhibitory effect of A2A and A3AR stimulation on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, an important lipid inflammatory mediator, was observed. In addition, in T/C-28a2 cells, the activation of A2A or A3ARs elicited an inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion. In hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts, PEMF exposure determined an increase of osteoprotegerin (OPG production. The effect of the A2A or A3AR agonists in the examined cells was enhanced in the presence of PEMFs and completely blocked by using well-known selective antagonists. These results demonstrated that PEMF exposure significantly increase the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A or A3ARs suggesting their potential therapeutic use in the therapy of inflammatory bone and joint

  17. Detection of Heteromers Formed by Cannabinoid CB1, Dopamine D2, and Adenosine A2A G-Protein-Coupled Receptors by Combining Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation and Bioluminescence Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Navarro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional interactions in signaling occur between dopamine D2 (D2R and cannabinoid CB1 (CB1R receptors, between CB1R and adenosine A2A (A2AR receptors, and between D2R and A2AR. Furthermore, direct molecular interactions have been reported for the pairs CB1R-D2R, A2AR-D2R, and CB1R-A2AR. Here a combination of bimolecular fluorescence complementation and bioluminescence energy transfer techniques was used to identify the occurrence of D2R-CB1R-A2AR hetero-oligomers in living cells.

  18. Intracellular ATP concentration contributes to the cytotoxic and cytoprotective effects of adenosine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujue Li

    Full Text Available Extracellular adenosine (ADE interacts with cells by two pathways: by activating cell surface receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations; and by interfering with the homeostasis of the intracellular nucleotide pool at millimolar concentrations. Ade shows both cytotoxic and cytoprotective effects; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of adenosine-mediated ATP on cell viability were investigated. Adenosine treatment was found to be cytoprotective in the low intracellular ATP state, but cytotoxic under the normal ATP state. Adenosine-mediated cytotoxicity and cytoprotection rely on adenosine-derived ATP formation, but not via the adenosine receptor pathway. Ade enhanced proteasome inhibition-induced cell death mediated by ATP generation. These data provide a new pathway by which adenosine exerts dual biological effects on cell viability, suggesting an important role for adenosine as an ATP precursor besides the adenosine receptor pathway.

  19. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogs on ( sup 14 C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells

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    Ota, S.; Hiraishi, H.; Terano, A.; Mutoh, H.; Kurachi, Y.; Shimada, T.; Ivey, K.J.; Sugimoto, T. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-12-01

    Adenosine receptors that modulate adenylate cyclase activity have been identified recently in a number of tissues. Adenosine A2 receptor is stimulatory to adenylate cyclase, whereas adenosine A1 receptor is inhibitory to adenylate cyclase. We investigated the effect of adenosine and its analogs on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were isolated by enzyme digestion. Parietal cells were enriched by nonlinear percoll gradients. (14C)Aminopyrine accumulation was used as an indicator of acid secretion. The effect of 2-chloroadenosine on histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation was studied. The effects of N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, stable analogs of adenosine, and adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation were assessed. Cyclic AMP content of parietal cells was determined by radioimmunoassay. Histamine and carbachol, known secretagogues, stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine did not suppress histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine dose dependently increased (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. The order of potency was N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than adenosine. 8-Phenyltheophylline and theophylline, adenosine-receptor antagonists, or cimetidine did not have significant effects on the increase of AP uptake induced by 2-chloroadenosine. Coadministration of dipyridamole, and adenosine uptake inhibitor, augmented the effect of adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine each induced a significant increase in cellular cyclic AMP. We conclude that there may be adenosine A2 receptors on rabbit parietal cells which modulate gastric acid secretion.

  20. Role of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors, Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Kinase, and Adiponectin in the Ovary

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    Joëlle Dupont

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms controlling the interaction between energy balance and reproduction are the subject of intensive investigations. The integrated control of these systems is probably a multifaceted phenomenon involving an array of signals governing energy homeostasis, metabolism, and fertility. Two fuel sensors, PPARs, a superfamily of nuclear receptors and the kinase AMPK, integrate energy control and lipid and glucose homeostasis. Adiponectin, one of the adipocyte-derived factors mediate its actions through the AMPK or PPARs pathway. These three molecules are expressed in the ovary, raising questions about the biological actions of fuel sensors in fertility and the use of these molecules to treat fertility problems. This review will highlight the expression and putative role of PPARs, AMPK, and adiponectin in the ovary, particularly during folliculogenesis, steroidogenesis, and oocyte maturation.

  1. Blockade of adenosine A2A receptors prevents interleukin-1β-induced exacerbation of neuronal toxicity through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

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    Simões Ana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR affords robust neuroprotection in a number of brain conditions, although the mechanisms are still unknown. A likely candidate mechanism for this neuroprotection is the control of neuroinflammation, which contributes to the amplification of neurodegeneration, mainly through the abnormal release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin(IL-1β. We investigated whether A2AR controls the signaling of IL-1β and its deleterious effects in cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods Hippocampal neuronal cultures were treated with IL-1β and/or glutamate in the presence or absence of the selective A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nmol/l. The effect of SCH58261 on the IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 was evaluated by western blotting and immunocytochemistry. The effect of SCH58261 on glutamate-induced neurodegeneration in the presence or absence of IL-1β was evaluated by nucleic acid and by propidium iodide staining, and by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Finally, the effect of A2AR blockade on glutamate-induced intracellular calcium, in the presence or absence of IL-1β, was studied using single-cell calcium imaging. Results IL-1β (10 to 100 ng/ml enhanced both JNK and p38 phosphorylation, and these effects were prevented by the IL-1 type 1 receptor antagonist IL-1Ra (5 μg/ml, in accordance with the neuronal localization of IL-1 type 1 receptors, including pre-synaptically and post-synaptically. At 100 ng/ml, IL-1β failed to affect neuronal viability but exacerbated the neurotoxicity induced by treatment with 100 μmol/l glutamate for 25 minutes (evaluated after 24 hours. It is likely that this resulted from the ability of IL-1β to enhance glutamate-induced calcium entry and late calcium deregulation, both of which were unaffected by IL-1β alone. The selective A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nmol

  2. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the A{sub 1} adenosine receptor ligand {sup 18}F-CPFPX determined from human whole-body PET

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    Herzog, Hans; Elmenhorst, David; Winz, Oliver [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics - Medicine, Juelich (Germany); Bauer, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics - Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Neurology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    {sup 18}F-8-cyclopentyl-3-(3-fluoropropyl)-1-propylxanthine ({sup 18}F-CPFPX) is a potent radioligand to study human cerebral A{sub 1} adenosine receptors and their neuromodulatory and neuroprotective functions with positron emission tomography (PET). The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution and the radiation dose of {sup 18}F-CPFPX by whole-body scans in humans. Six normal volunteers were examined with 12 whole-body PET scans from 1.5 min to 4.5 h after injection. Volumes of interest were defined over all visually identifiable organs, i.e. liver, gallbladder, kidneys, small intestines, heart, and brain to obtain the organs' volumes and time-activity curves (TACs). TACs were fitted with exponential functions, extrapolated, multiplied with the physical decay and normalized to injected activities so that the residence times could be computed as area under the curve. Radiation doses were calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software for internal dose assessment in nuclear medicine. The liver uptake shows peak values (decay-corrected) of up to 35% of the injected radioactivity. About 30% is eliminated by bladder voiding. The highest radiation dose is received by the gallbladder (136.2 {+-} 66.1 {mu}Sv/MBq), followed by the liver (84.4 {+-} 10.6 {mu}Sv/MBq) and the urinary bladder (78.3 {+-} 7.1 {mu}Sv/MBq). The effective dose was 17.6 {+-} 0.5 {mu}Sv/MBq. With 300 MBq of injected {sup 18}F-CPFPX a subject receives an effective dose (ICRP 60) of 5.3 mSv. Thus the effective dose of an {sup 18}F-CPFPX study is comparable to that of other {sup 18}F-labelled neuroreceptor ligands. (orig.)

  3. Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonism Abolished the Anti-seizure Effects of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk Rats

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    Zsolt Kovács

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The state of therapeutic ketosis can be achieved by using the ketogenic diet (KD or exogenous ketone supplementation. It was suggested previously that the adenosinergic system may be involved in the mediating effect of KD on suppressing seizure activity in different types of epilepsies, likely by means of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs. Thus, we tested in the present study whether exogenous ketone supplements (ketone ester: KE, 2.5 g/kg/day; ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT: KSMCT, 2.5 g/kg/day applied sub-chronically (for 7 days by intragastric gavage can modulate absence epileptic activity in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij rats. The number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs significantly and similarly decreased after both KE and KSMCT treatment between 3rd and 7th days of gavage. Moreover, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB levels were significantly increased alike after KE and KSMCT gavage, compared to control levels. The SWD number and βHB levels returned to the baseline levels on the first day without ketone supplementation. To determine whether A1Rs can modify ketone supplement-evoked changes in absence epileptic activity, we applied a non-pro-epileptic dose of a specific A1R antagonist DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (intraperitoneal/i.p. 0.2 mg/kg in combination with KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day, gavage. As expected, DPCPX abolished the KSMCT-evoked decrease in SWD number. Thus, we concluded that application of exogenous ketone supplements may decrease absence epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats. Moreover, our results suggest that among others the adenosinergic system, likely via A1Rs, may modulate the exogenous ketone supplements-evoked anti-seizure effects.

  4. Cocaine-induced changes of synaptic transmission in the striatum are modulated by adenosine A2A receptors and involve the tyrosine phosphatase STEP.

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    Chiodi, Valentina; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Ferrante, Antonella; Chen, Jiang F; Lombroso, Paul J; Di Stasi, Anna Maria Michela; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2014-02-01

    The striatum is a brain area implicated in the pharmacological action of drugs of abuse. Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in the striatum and mediate, at least in part, cocaine-induced psychomotor effects in vivo. Here we studied the synaptic mechanisms implicated in the pharmacological action of cocaine in the striatum and investigated the influence of A2ARs. We found that synaptic transmission was depressed in corticostriatal slices after perfusion with cocaine (10 μM). This effect was reduced by the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 and almost abolished in striatal A2AR-knockout mice (mice lacking A2ARs in striatal neurons, stA2ARKO). The effect of cocaine on synaptic transmission was also prevented by the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) inhibitor sodium orthovanadate (Na3VO4). In synaptosomes prepared from striatal slices, we found that the activity of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) was upregulated by cocaine, prevented by ZM241385, and absent in synaptosomes from stA2ARKO. The role played by STEP in cocaine modulation of synaptic transmission was investigated in whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from medium spiny neurons of the striatum. We found that TAT-STEP, a peptide that renders STEP enzymatically inactive, prevented cocaine-induced reduction in AMPA- and NMDA-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents, whereas the control peptide, TAT-myc, had no effect. These results demonstrate that striatal A2ARs modulate cocaine-induced synaptic depression in the striatum and highlight the potential role of PTPs and specifically STEP in the effects of cocaine.

  5. Activation of microglial cells triggers a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) inducing their proliferation in an adenosine A2A receptor-dependent manner: A2A receptor blockade prevents BDNF release and proliferation of microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to control microglial responses in neuropathic pain. Since adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) control neuroinflammation, as well as the production and function of BDNF, we tested to see if A2AR controls the microglia-dependent secretion of BDNF and the proliferation of microglial cells, a crucial event in neuroinflammation. Methods Murine N9 microglial cells were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/mL) in the absence or in the presence of the A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM), as well as other modulators of A2AR signaling. The BDNF cellular content and secretion were quantified by Western blotting and ELISA, A2AR density was probed by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry and cell proliferation was assessed by BrdU incorporation. Additionally, the A2AR modulation of LPS-driven cell proliferation was also tested in primary cultures of mouse microglia. Results LPS induced time-dependent changes of the intra- and extracellular levels of BDNF and increased microglial proliferation. The maximal LPS-induced BDNF release was time-coincident with an LPS-induced increase of the A2AR density. Notably, removing endogenous extracellular adenosine or blocking A2AR prevented the LPS-mediated increase of both BDNF secretion and proliferation, as well as exogenous BDNF-induced proliferation. Conclusions We conclude that A2AR activation plays a mandatory role controlling the release of BDNF from activated microglia, as well as the autocrine/paracrine proliferative role of BDNF. PMID:23363775

  6. The activation mechanisms of G protein-coupled receptors : the case of the adenosine A2B and HCA2/3 receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, R.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and elucidating the functions and activation of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery. We confirmed that a yeast system with an extended library of G proteins is very well suited for the study of GPCR activation, G protein coupling profiles, receptor-G protein binding

  7. Inosine, an Endogenous Purine Nucleoside, Suppresses Immune Responses and Protects Mice from Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: a Role for A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Stella Célio; Dos Santos Coelho, Igor; Lieberknecht, Vicente; Cunha, Mauricio Peña; Calixto, João B; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Dutra, Rafael Cypriano

    2017-07-01

    were blocked by inosine treatment. Additionally, inosine consistently inhibited IL-17 levels in peripheral lymphoid tissue, as well as IL-4 levels and A2AR up-regulation in the spinal cord, likely, through an ERK1-independent pathway. EAE: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; MS: multiple sclerosis; A2AR: adenosine A2A receptor; IL-17: interleukin-17; IL-4: interleukin-4.

  8. Caffeine inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells induced by acetaldehyde via adenosine A2A receptor mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK signal pathway.

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    He Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cell (HSC activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR. Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine's inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway.Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III.

  9. Caffeine inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells induced by acetaldehyde via adenosine A2A receptor mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Guan, Wenjie; Yang, Wanzhi; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine's inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway. Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III.

  10. Adenosine signalling in diabetes mellitus--pathophysiology and therapeutic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonioli, Luca; Blandizzi, Corrado; Csóka, Balázs; Pacher, Pál; Haskó, György

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine is a key extracellular signalling molecule that regulates several aspects of tissue function by activating four G-protein-coupled receptors, A1, A2A, A2B and A1 adenosine receptors. Accumulating evidence highlights a critical role for the adenosine system in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although adenosine signalling is known to affect insulin secretion, new data indicate that adenosine signalling also contributes to the regulation of β-cell homeostasis and activity by controlling the proliferation and regeneration of these cells as well as the survival of β cells in inflammatory microenvironments. Furthermore, adenosine is emerging as a major regulator of insulin responsiveness by controlling insulin signalling in adipose tissue, muscle and liver; adenosine also indirectly mediates effects on inflammatory and/or immune cells in these tissues. This Review critically discusses the role of the adenosine-adenosine receptor system in regulating both the onset and progression of T1DM and T2DM, and the potential of pharmacological manipulation of the adenosinergic system as an approach to manage T1DM, T2DM and their associated complications.

  11. Transcriptional control of adenosine signaling by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors during ischemic or inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poth, Jens M; Brodsky, Kelley; Ehrentraut, Heidi; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2013-02-01

    Inflammatory lesions, ischemic tissues, or solid tumors are characterized by the occurrence of severe tissue hypoxia within the diseased tissue. Subsequent stabilization of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors-particularly of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1A)--results in significant alterations of gene expression of resident cells or inflammatory cells that have been recruited into such lesions. Interestingly, studies of hypoxia-induced changes of gene expression identified a transcriptional program that promotes extracellular adenosine signaling. Adenosine is a signaling molecule that functions through the activation of four distinct adenosine receptors--the ADORA1, ADORA2A, ADORA2B, and ADORA3 receptors. Extracellular adenosine is predominantly derived from the phosphohydrolysis of precursor nucleotides, such as adenosine triphosphate or adenosine monophosphate. HIF1A-elicited alterations in gene expression enhance the enzymatic capacity within inflamed tissues to produce extracellular adenosine. Moreover, hypoxia-elicited induction of adenosine receptors--particularly of ADORA2B--results in increased signal transduction. Functional studies in genetic models for HIF1A or adenosine receptors implicate this pathway in an endogenous feedback loop that dampens excessive inflammation and promotes injury resolution, while at the same time enhancing ischemia tolerance. Therefore, pharmacological strategies to enhance HIF-elicited adenosine production or to promote adenosine signaling through adenosine receptors are being investigated for the treatment of acute inflammatory or ischemic diseases characterized by tissue hypoxia.

  12. NF-κB is activated in CD4+ iNKT cells by sickle cell disease and mediates rapid induction of adenosine A2A receptors.

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    Gene Lin

    Full Text Available Reperfusion injury following tissue ischemia occurs as a consequence of vaso-occlusion that is initiated by activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells. Sickle cell disease (SDC results in widely disseminated microvascular ischemia and reperfusion injury as a result of vaso-occlusion by rigid and adhesive sickle red blood cells. In mice, iNKT cell activation requires NF-κB signaling and can be inhibited by the activation of anti-inflammatory adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs. Human iNKT cells are divided into subsets of CD4+ and CD4- cells. In this study we found that human CD4+ iNKT cells, but not CD4- cells undergo rapid NF-κB activation (phosphorylation of NF-κB on p65 and induction of A2ARs (detected with a monoclonal antibody 7F6-G5-A2 during SCD painful vaso-occlusive crises. These findings indicate that SCD primarily activates the CD4+ subset of iNKT cells. Activation of NF-κB and induction of A2ARs is concordant, i.e. only CD4+ iNKT cells with activated NF-κB expressed high levels of A2ARs. iNKT cells that are not activated during pVOC express low levels of A2AR immunoreactivity. These finding suggest that A2AR transcription may be induced in CD4+ iNKT cells as a result of NF-κB activation in SCD. In order to test this hypothesis further we examined cultured human iNKT cells. In cultured cells, blockade of NF-κB with Bay 11-7082 or IKK inhibitor VII prevented rapid induction of A2AR mRNA and protein upon iNKT activation. In conclusion, NF-κB-mediated induction of A2ARs in iNKT cells may serve as a counter-regulatory mechanism to limit the extent and duration of inflammatory immune responses. As activated iNKT cells express high levels of A2ARs following their activation, they may become highly sensitive to inhibition by A2AR agonists.

  13. Adenosine A2A receptor blockade prevents synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction caused by beta-amyloid peptides via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

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    Canas, Paula M; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Cunha, Geanne M A; Silva, Carla G; Machado, Nuno J; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2009-11-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory impairment, neurochemically by accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (namely Abeta(1-42)) and morphologically by an initial loss of nerve terminals. Caffeine consumption prevents memory dysfunction in different models, which is mimicked by antagonists of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs), which are located in synapses. Thus, we now tested whether A(2A)R blockade prevents the early Abeta(1-42)-induced synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction and what are the underlying signaling pathways. The intracerebral administration of soluble Abeta(1-42) (2 nmol) in rats or mice caused, 2 weeks later, memory impairment (decreased performance in the Y-maze and object recognition tests) and a loss of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP-25) without overt neuronal loss, astrogliosis, or microgliosis. These were prevented by pharmacological blockade [5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH58261); 0.05 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1), i.p.; for 15 d] in rats, and genetic inactivation of A(2A)Rs in mice. Moreover, these were synaptic events since purified nerve terminals acutely exposed to Abeta(1-42) (500 nm) displayed mitochondrial dysfunction, which was prevented by A(2A)R blockade. SCH58261 (50 nm) also prevented the initial synaptotoxicity (loss of MAP-2, synaptophysin, and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity) and subsequent loss of viability of cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Abeta(1-42) (500 nm). This A(2A)R-mediated control of neurotoxicity involved the control of Abeta(1-42)-induced p38 phosphorylation and was independent from cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) pathway. Together, these results show that A(2A)Rs play a crucial role in the development of Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity leading to memory dysfunction through a p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway and provide a molecular basis for the benefits of caffeine consumption in AD.

  14. Effects of milrinone on contractility and cyclic adenosine monophosphate production induced by beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptor activation in human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceles, Mafía D; Fuentes, Teodomiro; Aroca, Vicente; Lopez, Jesús; Hernández, Jesús

    2007-08-01

    Because milrinone is a widely used phosphodiesterase-3 (PDE3) inhibitor, it would be of interest to know whether it interacts with beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists in human myocardium. This in vitro study was conducted to test whether milrinone differentially regulates cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) production and to examine the effect of milrinone on the positive inotropic responses and cAMP production induced by activation of the beta1-AR with norepinephrine (NE) and activation of the beta2-AR with epinephrine (EPI) in human atrial myocardium. Right atrial trabeculae were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery for valve repair. Concentration-response curves for inotropic responses mediated through the beta1-AR (NE in the presence of the beta2-blocker ICI 118, 551) and the beta2-AR (EPI in the presence of the beta1-blocker CGP 20712A) were obtained in the absence and presence of milrinone 1 micromol/L. This concentration of milrinone was chosen because it corresponded to its 50% inhibitory concentration as a PDE3 inhibitor and its therapeutic plasma concentration. The production of cAMP induced by exposure to selective beta1- and beta2-AR stimulation was also measured in the absence and presence of milrinone. Right atrial tissue samples were obtained from 12 white patients (7 women, 5 men; mean [SE] age, 64.6 [6.3] years) undergoing cardiac surgery for valve repair (8 mitral, 4 aortic). The presence of milrinone was associated with leftward shifts in the concentration-response curves for both NE and EPI. cAMP production in myocardial tissue samples in the presence of milrinone was increased only with NE induction (mean [SEM], 745.0 [136.7] pmol/g in the absence of milrinone vs 1620.5 [372.3] pmol/g in the presence of milrinone; P < 0.05). In this preliminary study in human atrial myocardium, milrinone potentiated the contractile responses to both NE and EPI. However, only the effect of NE on tissue levels of cAMP was

  15. A modelling-experimental approach reveals insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-dependent regulation of adenosine monosphosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK) by insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonntag, Annika G; Dalle Pezze, Piero; Shanley, Daryl P; Thedieck, Kathrin

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase responds to growth factors, nutrients and cellular energy status and is a central controller of cellular growth. mTOR exists in two multiprotein complexes that are embedded into a complex signalling network. Adenosine monophosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK)

  16. Total and partial sleep deprivation: Effects on plasma TNF-αRI, TNF-αRII, and IL-6, and reversal by caffeine operating through adenosine A2 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, William T.; Reuben, James M.; Lee, Bang-Ning; Mullington, Janet; Price, Nicholas; Dinges, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α are elevated in individuals who are deprived of sleep. TNF-α regulates expression of its soluble receptors, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII. Sleep deprivation (SD) also increases extracellular adenosine that induces sedation and sleep. An antagonist of adenosine, caffeine, raises exogenous adenosine levels, stimulates the expression of IL-6 and inhibits the release of TNF-α. Our objective was to determine the effect of total SD (TSD) or partial SD (PSD) on the levels of these sleep regulatory molecules in volunteers who experienced SD with or without the consumption of caffeine. Plasma levels of IL-6, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII were assayed by ELISA in samples collected at 90-min intervals from each subject over an 88-hour period. The results were analyzed by the repeated measures ANOVA. Whereas only TSD significantly increased sTNF-αRI over time, caffeine suppressed both sTNF-α receptors in TSD and PSD subjects. The selective increase in the expression of sTNF-αRI and not sTNF-αRII in subjects experiencing TSD with caffeine compared with others experiencing PSD with caffeine has not been previously reported. Moreover, caffeine significantly increased IL-6 in TSD subjects compared with those who did not receive caffeine. However, subjects who were permitted intermittent naps (PSD) ablated the effects of caffeine and reduced their level of IL-6 to that of the TSD group. These data further lend support to the hypothesis that the sTNF-αRI and not the sTNF-αRII plays a significant role in sleep regulation by TNF-α. .

  17. Presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine autoreceptors (M1, M2 and M4 subtypes), adenosine receptors (A1 and A2A) and tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB) modulate the developmental synapse elimination process at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria A; Santafé, Manel; Tomàs, Josep

    2016-06-23

    The development of the nervous system involves an initially exuberant production of neurons that make an excessive number of synaptic contacts. The initial overproduction of synapses promotes connectivity. Hebbian competition between axons with different activities (the least active are punished) leads to the loss of roughly half of the overproduced elements and this refines connectivity and increases specificity. The neuromuscular junction is innervated by a single axon at the end of the synapse elimination process and, because of its relative simplicity, has long been used as a model for studying the general principles of synapse development. The involvement of the presynaptic muscarinic ACh autoreceptors may allow for the direct competitive interaction between nerve endings through differential activity-dependent acetylcholine release in the synaptic cleft. Then, the most active ending may directly punish the less active ones. Our previous results indicate the existence in the weakest axons on the polyinnervated neonatal NMJ of an ACh release inhibition mechanism based on mAChR coupled to protein kinase C and voltage-dependent calcium channels. We suggest that this mechanism plays a role in the elimination of redundant neonatal synapses. Here we used confocal microscopy and quantitative morphological analysis to count the number of brightly fluorescent axons per endplate in P7, P9 and P15 transgenic B6.Cg-Tg (Thy1-YFP)16 Jrs/J mice. We investigate the involvement of individual mAChR M1-, M2- and M4-subtypes in the control of axonal elimination after the Levator auris longus muscle had been exposed to agonist and antagonist in vivo. We also analysed the role of adenosine receptor subtypes (A1 and A2A) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor. The data show that postnatal axonal elimination is a regulated multireceptor mechanism that guaranteed the monoinnervation of the neuromuscular synapses. The three receptor sets considered (mAChR, AR and TrkB receptors

  18. Synaptic plasticity through activation of GluA3-containing AMPA-receptors

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    Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolas; Reinders, Niels R; van Huijstee, Aile N; Xiong, Hui; Lodder, Tessa R

    2017-01-01

    Excitatory synaptic transmission is mediated by AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). In CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus two types of AMPARs predominate: those that contain subunits GluA1 and GluA2 (GluA1/2), and those that contain GluA2 and GluA3 (GluA2/3). Whereas subunits GluA1 and GluA2 have been extensively studied, the contribution of GluA3 to synapse physiology has remained unclear. Here we show in mice that GluA2/3s are in a low-conductance state under basal conditions, and although present at synapses they contribute little to synaptic currents. When intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels rise, GluA2/3 channels shift to a high-conductance state, leading to synaptic potentiation. This cAMP-driven synaptic potentiation requires the activation of both protein kinase A (PKA) and the GTPase Ras, and is induced upon the activation of β-adrenergic receptors. Together, these experiments reveal a novel type of plasticity at CA1 hippocampal synapses that is expressed by the activation of GluA3-containing AMPARs. PMID:28762944

  19. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  20. Extracellular 2,3-cyclic adenosine monophosphate is a potent inhibitor of preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cell and mesangial cell growth [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Edwin K; Ren, Jin; Gillespie, Delbert G; Dubey, Raghvendra K

    2010-07-01

    Recently we discovered that intact kidneys release into the extracellular compartment 2',3'-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP with unknown pharmacology) and metabolize 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and adenosine. Because adenosine inhibits growth of vascular smooth muscle cells and mesangial cells, we tested the hypothesis that extracellular 2',3'-cAMP attenuates growth of preglomerular vascular smooth muscle and mesangial cells via production of adenosine. For comparison, all of the experiments were performed with both 2',3'-cAMP and 3',5'-cAMP. In study 1, 2',3'-cAMP, 3',5'-cAMP, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, or 2'-AMP was incubated with cells and purines measured in the medium by mass spectrometry. Both preglomerular vascular smooth muscle and mesangial cells metabolized 3',5'-cAMP to 5'-AMP and adenosine; 5'-AMP to adenosine; 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and adenosine; and 2'-AMP and 3'-AMP to adenosine. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) and 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine (ecto-phosphodiesterase inhibitor) blocked conversion of 3',5'-cAMP to 5'-AMP and adenosine, and alpha,beta-methylene-adenosine-5'-diphosphate (CD73 inhibitor) blocked conversion of 5'-AMP to adenosine. These enzyme inhibitors had little effect on metabolism of 2',3'-cAMP, 2'-AMP, or 3'-AMP. For study 2, 2',3'-cAMP and 3',5'-cAMP profoundly inhibited proliferation (thymidine incorporation and cell number) of both cell types, with 2',3'-cAMP more potent than 3',5'-cAMP. Antagonism of A(2B) receptors (MRS-1724), but not A(1) (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine), A(2A) (SCH-58261), or A(3) (VUF-5574) receptors, attenuated the growth inhibitory effects of 2',3'-cAMP and 3',5'-cAMP. Extracellular 2',3'-cAMP inhibits growth of preglomerular vascular smooth muscle and mesangial cells more profoundly than does 3',5'-cAMP. Although both cAMPs inhibit growth in part via conversion to adenosine followed by A(2B) receptor activation, their metabolism is mediated by different enzymes.

  1. Neuronal transporter and astrocytic ATP exocytosis underlie activity-dependent adenosine release in the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Mark J; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine plays an important role in many physiological and pathological processes within the mammalian CNS. However, the precise mechanisms of how the concentration of extracellular adenosine increases following neural activity remain contentious. Here we have used microelectrode biosensors to directly measure adenosine release induced by focal stimulation in stratum radiatum of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Adenosine release was both action potential and Ca2+ dependent and could be evoked with low stimulation frequencies and small numbers of stimuli. Adenosine release required the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and could be evoked by local application of glutamate receptor agonists. Approximately 40% of stimulated-adenosine release occurred by translocation of adenosine via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). This component of release persisted in the presence of the gliotoxin fluoroacetate and thus results from the direct release of adenosine from neurons. A reduction of adenosine release in the presence of NTPDase blockers, in slices from CD73−/− and dn-SNARE mice, provides evidence that a component of adenosine release arises from the extracellular metabolism of ATP released from astrocytes. This component of release appeared to have slower kinetics than the direct ENT-mediated release of adenosine. These data suggest that activity-dependent adenosine release is surprisingly complex and, in the hippocampus, arises from at least two distinct mechanisms with different cellular sources. PMID:23713028

  2. Genetic deletion of GPR52 enhances the locomotor-stimulating effect of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist in mice: A potential role of GPR52 in the function of striatopallidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keiji; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Maruyama, Minoru; Yoshihara, Tomoki; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 52 (GPR52) is largely co-expressed with dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, and this expression pattern is similar to that of adenosine A2A receptor (ADORA2A). GPR52 has been proposed as a therapeutic target for positive symptoms of schizophrenia, based on observations from pharmacological and transgenic mouse studies. However, the physiological role of GPR52 in dopaminergic functions in the basal ganglia remains unclear. Here, we used GPR52 knockout (KO) mice to examine the role of GPR52 in dopamine receptor-mediated and ADORA2A-mediated locomotor activity and dopamine receptor signaling. High expression of GPR52 protein in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, and lateral globus pallidus of wild type (WT) littermates was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. GPR52 KO and WT mice exhibited almost identical locomotor responses to the dopamine releaser methamphetamine and the N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist MK-801. In contrast, the locomotor response to the ADORA2A antagonist istradefylline was significantly augmented in GPR52 KO mice compared to WT mice. Gene expression analysis revealed that striatal expression of DRD2, but not of dopamine D1 receptor and ADORA2A, was significantly decreased in GPR52 KO mice. Moreover, a significant reduction in the mRNA expression of enkephalin, a marker of the activity of striatopallidal neurons, was observed in the striatum of GPR52 KO mice, suggesting that GPR52 deletion could enhance DRD2 signaling. Taken together, these results imply the physiological relevance of GPR52 in modulating the function of striatopallidal neurons, possibly by interaction of GPR52 with ADORA2A and DRD2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of adenosine A₂A receptors suppresses the emission of pro-social and drug-stimulated 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in rats: possible relevance to reward and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simola, Nicola; Costa, Giulia; Morelli, Micaela

    2016-02-01

    Rats emit 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in response to pleasurable stimuli, and these USVs are considered a tool for investigating reward and motivation. This study aimed to clarify how activity of adenosine A2A receptors, which modulate reward and motivation, influences 50-kHz USV emission in rats. Rats received one of the following treatments in a test cage: (1) acute administration of the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 (0.05-0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) during social interactions; (2) long-term amphetamine (1 or 2 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (7.5 mg/kg, s.c.) administration on alternate days, alone or with CGS 21680, followed after 7 days of discontinuation by test cage re-exposure, to assess drug-conditioning effects, and thereafter drug challenge; (3) acute administration of the D1/D2 receptor agonist apomorphine (4 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or with CGS 21680; and (4) long-term administration of the non-selective A1/A2A receptor antagonist caffeine (15 mg/kg, i.p.), on alternate days. USVs and locomotor activity were evaluated throughout the treatments. CGS 21680 attenuated 50-kHz USV emission stimulated by social interactions, amphetamine, apomorphine, and morphine, and rats administered CGS 21680 with amphetamine or morphine emitted fewer conditioned 50-kHz USVs upon test cage re-exposure, compared with rats administered amphetamine or morphine alone. Moreover, CGS 21680 administration prevented long-term changes in locomotor activity in amphetamine- and morphine-treated rats. Finally, caffeine had no effect on 50-kHz USVs. These results indicate that activation of A2A receptors attenuates 50-kHz USV emission in rats and further elucidate how these receptors modulate the motivational properties of natural and pharmacological stimuli.

  4. Comprehensive extraction method integrated with NMR metabolomics: a new bioactivity screening method for plants, adenosine A1 receptor binding compounds in Orthosiphon stamineus Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliana, Nancy Dewi; Khatib, Alfi; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2011-09-01

    A large number of plant metabolites has provided as an incomparable chemical source for drug development. However, the wide range of the polarity of metabolites has been a big obstacle for full use of the chemical diversity. The initial step conventional extraction method by a single solvent does not make use of all the metabolites contained in plants. Also, it takes a long time to confirm the target activity of a single compound because of tedious separation steps. To solve the problem, a new extraction method coupled to NMR-based metabolomics is applied to identify bioactive natural products. A comprehensive extraction method consisting of a continuous flow of solvent mixtures through plant material was developed to provide extracts with a wider chemical variety than those yielded with a single solvent extraction. As the model experiment, (1)H NMR spectra of the extracts obtained from the comprehensive extraction of Orthosiphon stamineus were subjected to multivariate data analysis to find its adenosine A1 binding activity. On the basis of the results, two flavonoids from a large number of chemicals were clearly verified to show the adenosine A1 binding activity without any further purification steps. This method could provide a solution to the major drawbacks of natural products in drug development.

  5. Contraction induced secretion of VEGF from skeletal muscle cells is mediated by adenosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Olsen, Karina; Nyberg, Michael Permin

    2010-01-01

    The role of adenosine and contraction for secretion of VEGF in skeletal muscle was investigated in human subjects and rat primary skeletal muscle cells. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the thigh muscle of seven male subjects and dialysate was collected at rest, during infusion of adenosine...... and during knee extensor exercise. The dialysate was analyzed for content of VEGF protein and adenosine. The mechanism of VEGF secretion from muscle cells in culture was examined in resting and electro stimulated cells, and in response to the adenosine analogue NECA, and the adenosine A(2A) receptor specific...... infusion enhanced (Pmuscle cells, NECA...

  6. Elevated Placental Adenosine Signaling Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Takayuki; Sun, Kaiqi; Parchim, Nicholas F.; Li, Jessica; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Anren; Hart, Laura A.; Blackwell, Sean C.; Sibai, Baha M.; Chan, Lee-Nien L.; Chan, Teh-Sheng; Hicks, M. John; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia (PE) is a prevalent hypertensive disorder of pregnancy and a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. This pathogenic condition is speculated to be due to placental abnormalities that contribute to the maternal syndrome. However, the specific factors and signaling pathways leading to impaired placentas and maternal disease development remain elusive. Methods and Results By using two independent animal models of PE—1) genetically-engineered pregnant mice with elevated adenosine exclusively in placentas, and 2) a pathogenic autoantibody-induced PE mouse model—we demonstrated here that chronically elevated placental adenosine was sufficient to induce hallmark features of PE including hypertension, proteinuria, small fetuses, and impaired placental vasculature. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches revealed that elevated placental adenosine coupled with excessive A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling contributed to the development of these features of PE. Mechanistically, we provided both human and mouse evidence that elevated placental CD73 is a key enzyme causing increased placental adenosine, thereby contributing to PE. Conclusions We determined that elevated placental adenosine signaling is a previously unrecognized pathogenic factor for PE. Moreover, our findings revealed the molecular basis underlying the elevation of placental adenosine and the detrimental role of excess placental adenosine in the pathophysiology of PE, and, thereby highlight novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25538227

  7. Elevated placental adenosine signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Takayuki; Sun, Kaiqi; Parchim, Nicholas F; Li, Jessica; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Anren; Hart, Laura A; Blackwell, Sean C; Sibai, Baha M; Chan, Lee-Nien L; Chan, Teh-Sheng; Hicks, M John; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-02-24

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent hypertensive disorder of pregnancy and a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. This pathogenic condition is speculated to be caused by placental abnormalities that contribute to the maternal syndrome. However, the specific factors and signaling pathways that lead to impaired placentas and maternal disease development remain elusive. Using 2 independent animal models of preeclampsia (genetically engineered pregnant mice with elevated adenosine exclusively in placentas and a pathogenic autoantibody-induced preeclampsia mouse model), we demonstrated that chronically elevated placental adenosine was sufficient to induce hallmark features of preeclampsia, including hypertension, proteinuria, small fetuses, and impaired placental vasculature. Genetic and pharmacological approaches revealed that elevated placental adenosine coupled with excessive A₂B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling contributed to the development of these features of preeclampsia. Mechanistically, we provided both human and mouse evidence that elevated placental CD73 is a key enzyme causing increased placental adenosine, thereby contributing to preeclampsia. We determined that elevated placental adenosine signaling is a previously unrecognized pathogenic factor for preeclampsia. Moreover, our findings revealed the molecular basis underlying the elevation of placental adenosine and the detrimental role of excess placental adenosine in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, and thereby, we highlight novel therapeutic targets. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Adenosine contributes to blood flow regulation in the exercising human leg by increasing prostaglandin and nitric oxide formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan; Nyberg, Michael; Thaning, Pia

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine can induce vasodilation in skeletal muscle, but to what extent adenosine exerts its effect via formation of other vasodilators and whether there is redundancy between adenosine and other vasodilators remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that adenosine, prostaglandins, and NO act...... in synergy to regulate skeletal muscle hyperemia by determining the following: (1) the effect of adenosine receptor blockade on skeletal muscle exercise hyperemia with and without simultaneous inhibition of prostaglandins (indomethacin; 0.8 to 1.8 mg/min) and NO (N(G)-mono-methyl-l-arginine; 29 to 52 mg....../min); (2) whether adenosine-induced vasodilation is mediated via formation of prostaglandins and/or NO; and (3) the femoral arterial and venous plasma adenosine concentrations during leg exercise with the microdialysis technique in a total of 24 healthy, male subjects. Inhibition of adenosine receptors...

  9. Adenosine-mediated modulation of ventral horn interneurons and spinal motoneurons in neonatal mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witts, Emily C.; Nascimento, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulation allows neural networks to adapt to varying environmental and biomechanical demands. Purinergic signaling is known to be an important modulatory system in many parts of the CNS, including motor control circuitry. We have recently shown that adenosine modulates the output of mammalian spinal locomotor control circuitry (Witts EC, Panetta KM, Miles GB. J Neurophysiol 107: 1925–1934, 2012). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying this adenosine-mediated modulation. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on ventral horn interneurons and motoneurons within in vitro mouse spinal cord slice preparations. We found that adenosine hyperpolarized interneurons and reduced the frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to interneurons. Both effects were blocked by the A1-type adenosine receptor antagonist DPCPX. Analysis of miniature postsynaptic currents recorded from interneurons revealed that adenosine reduced their frequency but not amplitude, suggesting that adenosine acts on presynaptic receptors to modulate synaptic transmission. In contrast to interneurons, recordings from motoneurons revealed an adenosine-mediated depolarization. The frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to motoneurons were again reduced by adenosine, but we saw no effect on miniature postsynaptic currents. Again these effects on motoneurons were blocked by DPCPX. Taken together, these results demonstrate differential effects of adenosine, acting via A1 receptors, in the mouse spinal cord. Adenosine has a general inhibitory action on ventral horn interneurons while potentially maintaining motoneuron excitability. This may allow for adaptation of the locomotor pattern generated by interneuronal networks while helping to ensure the maintenance of overall motor output. PMID:26311185

  10. Activity-Dependent Adenosine Release May Be Linked to Activation of Na+-K+ ATPase: An In Vitro Rat Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Robert Edward; Dale, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, extracellular adenosine increases as a result of neuronal activity. The mechanisms by which this occurs are only incompletely understood. Here we investigate the hypothesis that the Na+ influxes associated with neuronal signalling activate the Na+-K+ ATPase which, by consuming ATP, generates intracellular adenosine that is then released via transporters. By measuring adenosine release directly with microelectrode biosensors, we have demonstrated that AMPA-receptor evoked adenosine release in basal forebrain and cortex depends on extracellular Na+. We have simultaneously imaged intracellular Na+ and measured adenosine release. The accumulation of intracellular Na+ during AMPA receptor activation preceded adenosine release by some 90 s. By removing extracellular Ca2+, and thus preventing indiscriminate neuronal activation, we used ouabain to test the role of the Na+-K+ ATPase in the release of adenosine. Under conditions which caused a Na+ influx, brief applications of ouabain increased the accumulation of intracellular Na+ but conversely rapidly reduced extracellular adenosine levels. In addition, ouabain greatly reduced the amount of adenosine released during application of AMPA. Our data therefore suggest that activity of the Na+-K+ ATPase is directly linked to the efflux of adenosine and could provide a universal mechanism that couples adenosine release to neuronal activity. The Na+-K+ ATPase-dependent adenosine efflux is likely to provide adenosine-mediated activity-dependent negative feedback that will be important in many diverse functional contexts including the regulation of sleep. PMID:24489921

  11. Specific inhibition of transcriptional activity of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) by the splicing factor SF3a3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hye Jin; Kwon, Jungsun; Seol, Wongi

    2008-10-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and plays an important role in the degradation of xenobiotics in the liver. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified SF3a3, a 60-kDa subunit of the splicing factor 3a complex, as a specific CAR-interacting protein. We further confirmed their interaction by both co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay. Functional studies showed that overexpression of SF3a3 inhibited the reporter activity driven by a promoter containing CAR binding sequences by up to 50%, whereas reduced expression of SF3a3 activated the same reporter activity by approximately three-fold. The inhibitory function of SF3a3 is independent of the presence of TCPOBOP, a CAR ligand. These data suggest that SF3a3 functions as a co-repressor of CAR transcriptional activity, in addition to its canonical function.

  12. Cluster-randomized clinical trial examining the impact of platelet function testing on practice: the treatment with adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors: longitudinal assessment of treatment patterns and events after acute coronary syndrome prospective open label antiplatelet therapy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tracy Y; Henry, Timothy D; Effron, Mark B; Honeycutt, Emily; Hess, Connie N; Zettler, Marjorie E; Cohen, David J; Baker, Brian A; Berger, Peter B; Anstrom, Kevin J; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Peterson, Eric D

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about how clinicians use platelet function testing to guide choice and dosing of adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor (ADPri) therapy in routine community practice. The Treatment With Adenosine Diphosphate Receptor Inhibitors: Longitudinal Assessment of Treatment Patterns and Events After Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS)-Prospective, Open Label, Antiplatelet Therapy Study (TRANSLATE-POPS) was a cluster-randomized trial in which 100 hospitals were assigned access to no-cost platelet function testing versus usual care for acute myocardial infarction patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. In both arms, ADPri treatment decisions were left up to the care team. The primary end point was the frequency of ADPri therapy adjustment before discharge. Secondary end points included 30-day rates of major adverse cardiovascular events and Global Utilization of Streptokinase and Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Occluded Coronary Arteries-defined bleeding events. Platelet function testing was performed in 66.9% of patients treated in intervention sites versus 1.4% of patients in usual care sites. Intervention arm patients were more likely to have ADPri therapy adjustment than usual care patients (14.8% versus 10.5%, P=0.004; odds ratio 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.40); however, there were no significant differences in 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events (4.8% versus 5.4%, P=0.73; odds ratio 0.94, 95% confidence interval 0.66-1.34) or bleeding (4.3% versus 4.2%, P=0.33; odds ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.55-1.34). One-year outcomes were also not significantly different between groups. An as-treated analysis showed higher incidence of ADPri therapy adjustment among intervention arm patients who received platelet function testing than untested usual care arm (16.4% versus 10.2%, P<0.0001), but no significant differences in major adverse cardiovascular events or bleeding. TRANSLATE-POPS found that when clinicians routinely used

  13. Allosteric modulation by sodium ions and amilorides of G protein-coupled receptors : a closer look at the sodium ion site of the adenosine A2a receptor and development of a mass spectrometry ligand binding assay for adenosine A1 and A2a receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massink, A.

    2016-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis, allosteric modulation effectuated through the sodium ion site of GPCRs, is inspired by the important role that this site appears to play in GPCR signaling. As sodium ions are abundant under physiological conditions they may affect GPCR signaling considerably. Receptor

  14. Endogenous adenosine and hemorrhagic shock: effects of caffeine administration or caffeine withdrawal.

    OpenAIRE

    Conlay, L A; Evoniuk, G; Wurtman, R J

    1988-01-01

    Plasma adenosine concentrations doubled when rats were subjected to 90 min of profound hemorrhagic shock. Administration of caffeine (20 mg per kg of body weight), an adenosine-receptor antagonist, attenuated the hemorrhage-induced decrease in blood pressure. In contrast, chronic caffeine consumption (0.1% in drinking water), followed by a brief period of caffeine withdrawal, amplified the hypotensive response to hemorrhage. These data suggest that endogenous adenosine participates in the hyp...

  15. Ticagrelor and Rosuvastatin Have Additive Cardioprotective Effects via Adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Yochai; Birnbaum, Gilad D; Birnbaum, Itamar; Nylander, Sven; Ye, Yumei

    2016-12-01

    Ticagrelor inhibits the equilibrative-nucleoside-transporter-1 and thereby, adenosine cell re-uptake. Ticagrelor limits infarct size (IS) in non-diabetic rats and the effect is adenosine-dependent. Statins, via ecto-5'-nucleotidase activation, also increase adenosine levels and limit IS. Ticagrelor and rosuvastatin have additive effects on myocardial adenosine levels, and therefore, on IS and post-reperfusion activation of the NLRP3-inflammasome. Diabetic ZDF rats received via oral gavage; water (control), ticagrelor (150 mg/kg/d), prasugrel (7.5 mg/kg/d), rosuvastatin (5 mg/kg/d), ticagrelor + rosuvastatin and prasugrel + rosuvastatin for 3d. On day 4, rats underwent 30 min coronary artery occlusion and 24 h of reperfusion. Two additional groups received, ticagrelor + rosuvastatin or water in combination with CGS15943 (CGS, an adenosine receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg i.p. 1 h before ischemia). Both ticagrelor and rosuvastatin increased myocardial adenosine levels with an additive effect of the combination whereas prasugrel had no effect. Similarly, both ticagrelor and rosuvastatin significantly reduced IS with an additive effect of the combination whereas prasugrel had no effect. The effect on IS was adenosine dependent as CGS15943 reversed the effect of ticagrelor + rosuvastatin. The ischemia-reperfusion injury increased myocardial mRNA levels of NLRP3, ASC, IL-1β and IL-6. Ticagrelor and rosuvastatin, but not prasugrel, significantly decreased these pro-inflammatory mediators with a trend to an additive effect of the combination. The combination also increased the levels of anti-inflammatory 15-epilipoxin A4. Ticagrelor and rosuvastatin when given in combination have an additive effect on local myocardial adenosine levels in the setting of ischemia reperfusion. This translates into an additive cardioprotective effect mediated by adenosine-induced effects including downregulation of pro- but upregulation of anti-inflammatory mediators.

  16. Rat cardiac myocyte adenosine transport and metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, D.A.; Rovetto, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the importance of myocardial adenosine and adenine nucleotide metabolism, the adenosine salvage pathway in ventricular myocytes was studied. Accurate estimates of transport rates, separate from metabolic fllux, were determined. Adenosine influx was constant between 3 and 60 s. Adenosine metabolism maintained intracellular adenosine concentrations < 10% of the extracellular adenosine concentrations and thus unidirectional influx could be measured. Myocytes transported adenosine via saturable and nonsaturable processes. A minimum estimate of the V/sub max/ of myocytic adenosine kinase indicated the saturable component of adenosine influx was independent of adenosine kinase activity. Saturable transport was inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine and verapamil. Extracellular adenosine taken up myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine taken up by myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine nucleotides. Not all extracellular adenosine, though, was phosphorylated on entering myocytes, since free, as opposed to protein-bound, intracellular adenosine was detected after digitonin extraction of cells in the presence of 1 mM ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.

  17. Striatal adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated positron emission tomographic imaging in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats using [{sup 18}F]-MRS5425

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Lang Lixin; Jacobson, Orit [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Shinkre, Bidhan [Chemical Biology Unit, Laboratory of Cell Biochemistry and Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Ma Ying [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Niu Gang [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Trenkle, William C. [Chemical Biology Unit, Laboratory of Cell Biochemistry and Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Jacobson, Kenneth A. [Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Chen Xiaoyuan [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kiesewetter, Dale O., E-mail: dk7k@nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: A{sub 2A} receptors are expressed in the basal ganglia, specifically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons in the striatum (caudate-putamen). This brain region undergoes degeneration of presynaptic dopamine projections and depletion of dopamine in Parkinson's disease. We developed an {sup 18}F-labeled A{sub 2A} analog radiotracer ([{sup 18}F]-MRS5425) for A{sub 2A} receptor imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that this tracer could image A{sub 2A} receptor changes in the rat model for Parkinson's disease, which is created following unilateral injection of the monoaminergic toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the substantia nigra. Methods: [{sup 18}F]-MRS5425 was injected intravenously in anesthetized rats, and PET imaging data were collected. Image-derived percentage injected doses per gram (%ID/g) in regions of interest was measured in the striatum of normal rats and in rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA after intravenous administration of saline (baseline), D{sub 2} agonist quinpirole (1.0 mg/kg) or D{sub 2} antagonist raclopride (6.0 mg/kg). Results: Baseline %ID/g reached a maximum at 90 s and maintained plateau for 3.5 min, and then declined slowly thereafter. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, %ID/g was significantly higher in the lesioned side compared to the intact side, and the baseline total %ID/g (data from both hemispheres were combined) was significantly higher compared to quinpirole stimulation starting from 4.5 min until the end of acquisition at 30 min. Raclopride did not produce any change in uptake compared to baseline or between the hemispheres. Conclusion: Thus, increase of A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated uptake of radioactive MRS5425 could be a superior molecular target for Parkinson's imaging.

  18. Discovery of 3,4-Dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones As a Novel Class of Potent and Selective A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Abel; El Maatougui, Abdelaziz; Biagini, Pierfrancesco; Azuaje, Jhonny; Coelho, Alberto; Brea, José; Loza, María Isabel; Cadavid, María Isabel; García-Mera, Xerardo; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sotelo, Eddy

    2013-11-14

    We describe the discovery and optimization of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones as a novel family of (nonxanthine) A2B receptor antagonists that exhibit an unusually high selectivity profile. The Biginelli-based hit optimization process enabled a thoughtful exploration of the structure-activity and structure-selectivity relationships for this chemotype, enabling the identification of ligands that combine structural simplicity with excellent hA2B AdoR affinity and remarkable selectivity profiles.

  19. Adenosine hypothesis of schizophrenia –opportunities for pharmacotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boison, Detlev; Singer, Philipp; Shen, Hai-Ying; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia based on the dopamine hypothesis remains unsatisfactory for the negative and cognitive symptoms of the disease. Enhancing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) function is expected to alleviate such persistent symptoms, but successful development of novel clinically effective compounds remains challenging. Adenosine is a homeostatic bioenergetic network modulator that is able to affect complex networks synergistically at different levels (receptor dependent pathways, biochemistry, bioenergetics, and epigenetics). By affecting brain dopamine and glutamate activities it represents a promising candidate for restoring the functional imbalance in these neurotransmitter systems believed to underlie the genesis of schizophrenia symptoms, as well as restoring homeostasis of bioenergetics. Suggestion of an adenosine hypothesis of schizophrenia further posits that adenosinergic dysfunction might contribute to the emergence of multiple neurotransmitter dysfunctionscharacteristic of schizophrenia via diverse mechanisms. Given the importance of adenosine in early brain development and regulation of brain immune response, it also bears direct relevance to the aetiology of schizophrenia. Here, we provide an overview of the rationale and evidence in support of the therapeutic potential of multiple adenosinergic targets, including the high-affinity adenosine receptors (A1R and A2AR), and the regulatory enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Key preliminary clinical data and preclinical findings are reviewed. PMID:21315743

  20. [Hypocretins and adenosine in the regulation of sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salín-Pascual, R J

    To review the recent discovery of hypocretins (orexins) and their link to the pathophysiology of narcolepsy and the role of adenosine in the integration of brain metabolism and sleep. The importance of the functions carried out by the hypothalamus in the regulation of sleep and the waking state has been consolidated by the discovery of hypocretins and the role played by cerebral adenosine. Hypocretins are two peptides made up of 33 and 28 amino acids whose neurons are located predominantly in the lateral hypothalamus and surrounding regions. In the Doberman canine narcolepsy model, in which this disease is presented with an autosomal recessive pattern, a mutation was detected in one of the receptors involved in the hypocretin system, namely the hypocretin-2 receptor. Failures in the hypocretin system have been confirmed as a key factor in narcolepsy by other findings in laboratory animals and humans. Adenosine, on the other hand, is accumulated during the waking state as a result of neuronal metabolism and this in turn is related to drowsiness. Sleep episodes lower the levels of this substance in the brain. Adenosine receptor antagonists increase wakefulness (e.g. caffeine), while the agonists promote slow-wave sleep. Hypocretins and adenosine from the hypothalamus perform functions involving the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. Understanding these two systems can have repercussions on clinical problems such as insomnia, hypersomnia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. Effect of an inhaled adenosine A(2A) agonist on the allergen-induced late asthmatic response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijk, B.; van den Berge, M.; Kerstjens, H. A. M.; Postma, D. S.; Cass, L.; Sabin, A.; Lammers, J. -W. J.

    Background: Adenosine receptor activation is suggested to play a role in asthmatic airway inflammation. Inhibition of adenosine receptors may have an effect on the late asthmatic response (LAR) after allergen inhalation and this mechanism could offer a potential new treatment in asthma. Methods: We

  2. Receptor Surface Models in the Classroom: Introducing Molecular Modeling to Students in a 3-D World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldenhuys, Werner J.; Hayes, Michael; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J.; Allen, David D.; Malan, Sarel F.

    2007-01-01

    A simple, novel and generally applicable method to demonstrate structure-activity associations of a group of biologically interesting compounds in relation to receptor binding is described. This method is useful for undergraduates and graduate students in medicinal chemistry and computer modeling programs.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized ...

  4. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Dias, Ana Sofia; Pelletier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders. PMID:25210228

  5. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders.

  6. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found...... in brain tissue of patients with ALF we investigated whether hyperammonemia could induce adenosine release in brain tissue. Since adenosine is a potent vasodilator and modulator of cerebral metabolism we furthermore studied the effect of adenosine receptor ligands on intracranial pressure (ICP......) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). We measured the adenosine concentration with biosensors in rat brain slices exposed to ammonia and in a rat model with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation. Exposure to ammonia in concentrations from 0.15-10 mM led to increases in the cortical adenosine concentration up to 18...

  7. Cell Type-Specific Effects of Adenosine on Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aerde, Karlijn I.; Qi, Guanxiao; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine is widely considered to be a key regulator of sleep homeostasis and an indicator of sleep need. Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date. To that purpose, we performed in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and biocytin staining of pyramidal neurons and interneurons throughout all layers of rat prefrontal and somatosensory cortex, followed by morphological analysis. We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location. Interneurons and pyramidal neurons in layer 2 and a subpopulation of layer 3 pyramidal neurons that displayed regular spiking were insensitive to adenosine application, whereas other pyramidal cells in layers 3–6 were hyperpolarized (range 1.2–10.8 mV). Broad tufted pyramidal neurons with little spike adaptation showed a small adenosine response, whereas slender tufted pyramidal neurons with substantial adaptation showed a bigger response. These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening. PMID:24108800

  8. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  9. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Khalaf F.; Thomas, Mark R.; Judge, Heather M.; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R.; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C.; Storey, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7% ± 4.4 vs. control 22.6% ± 2.4; p ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6 ± 6.6 vs. 28.0 ± 6.6; p = 0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection. PMID:25869515

  10. Skeletal muscle expresses the extracellular cyclic AMP–adenosine pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavegatti, T; Costa, V L; Araújo, M S; Godinho, R O

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: cAMP is a key intracellular signalling molecule that regulates multiple processes of the vertebrate skeletal muscle. We have shown that cAMP can be actively pumped out from the skeletal muscle cell. Since in other tissues, cAMP efflux had been associated with extracellular generation of adenosine, in the present study we have assessed the fate of interstitial cAMP and the existence of an extracellular cAMP-adenosine signalling pathway in skeletal muscle. Experimental approach: cAMP efflux and/or its extracellular degradation were analysed by incubating rat cultured skeletal muscle with exogenous cAMP, forskolin or isoprenaline. cAMP and its metabolites were quantified by radioassay or HPLC, respectively. Key results: Incubation of cells with exogenous cAMP was followed by interstitial accumulation of 5′-AMP and adenosine, a phenomenon inhibited by selective inhibitors of ecto-phosphodiesterase (DPSPX) and ecto-nucleotidase (AMPCP). Activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in cultured cells with forskolin or isoprenaline increased cAMP efflux and extracellular generation of 5′-AMP and adenosine. Extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway was also observed after direct and receptor-dependent stimulation of AC in rat extensor muscle ex vivo. These events were attenuated by probenecid, an inhibitor of ATP binding cassette family transporters. Conclusions and implications: Our results show the existence of an extracellular biochemical cascade that converts cAMP into adenosine. The functional relevance of this extracellular signalling system may involve a feedback modulation of cellular response initiated by several G protein-coupled receptor ligands, amplifying cAMP influence to a paracrine mode, through its metabolite, adenosine. PMID:18157164

  11. Unplanned Inpatient and Observation Rehospitalizations After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insights From the Treatment With Adenosine Diphosphate Receptor Inhibitors: Longitudinal Assessment of Treatment Patterns and Events After Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRANSLATE-ACS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Connie N; Wang, Tracy Y; McCoy, Lisa A; Messenger, John C; Effron, Mark B; Zettler, Marjorie E; Henry, Timothy D; Peterson, Eric D; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-02-02

    Previous studies examining early readmission after acute myocardial infarction have focused exclusively on inpatient readmissions. However, from a patient's perspective, any unplanned inpatient or observation rehospitalization after acute myocardial infarction represents a significant event; these unplanned rehospitalizations have not been well characterized. We examined all patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention and discharged alive from 233 hospitals in the Treatment With Adenosine Diphosphate Receptor Inhibitors: Longitudinal Assessment of Treatment Patterns and Events After Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRANSLATE-ACS) study from 2010 to 2012. Our primary outcome was unplanned rehospitalizations (inpatient or observation status) within 30 days after discharge. We identified factors associated with unplanned rehospitalizations using multivariable logistic regression. Among 12 312 patients, 1326 (10.8%) had 1483 unplanned rehospitalizations within 30 days of the index event: 1028 (69.3%) were inpatient readmissions, and 455 (30.7%) were observation stays. The majority of unplanned rehospitalizations (72%) were for cardiovascular reasons. Variation in hospital rates of 30-day unplanned rehospitalization ranged from 5.4% to 20.0%, with a median of 10.7%. After multivariable modeling, the factors most strongly associated with unplanned rehospitalization were baseline quality of life and depression, followed by index hospital length of stay. Early unplanned rehospitalizations are common after acute myocardial infarction, and close to one third were classified as an observation stay. Predischarge and postdischarge assessments of overall, not just cardiovascular, health and strategies to optimize patient functional status may help to reduce unplanned rehospitalizations. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01088503. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  13. Adenosine Signaling in Striatal Circuits and Alcohol Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Bruner, Robert C.; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Numerous studies have indicated a role for A1 receptors (A1R) in acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination, while A2A receptors (A2AR) mainly regulate the rewarding effect of ethanol in mice. Recent findings have demonstrated that dampened A2AR-mediated signaling in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) promotes ethanol-seeking behaviors. Moreover, ...

  14. Adenosine signaling promotes neuronal, catecholaminergic differentiation of primary neural crest cells and CNS-derived CAD cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Matthew L; Ji, Ming; Paris, Maryline; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2005-07-01

    In neural crest (NC) cultures cAMP signaling is an instructive signal in catecholaminergic, sympathoadrenal cell development. However, the extracellular signals activating the cAMP pathway during NC cell development have not been identified. We demonstrate that in avian NC cultures, evidenced by tyrosine hydroxylase expression and catecholamine biosynthesis, adenosine and not adrenergic signaling, together with BMP2, promotes sympathoadrenal cell development. In NC cultures, addition of the adenosine receptor agonist NECA in the presence of BMP2 promotes sympathoadrenal cell development, whereas the antagonist CGS 15943 or the adenosine degrading enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) suppresses TH expression. Importantly, NC cells express A2A and A2B receptors which couple with Gsalpha increasing intracellular cAMP. Employing the CNS-derived catecholaminergic CAD cell line, we also demonstrate that neuronal differentiation mediated by serum withdrawal is further enhanced by treatment with IBMX, a cAMP-elevating agent, or the adenosine receptor agonist NECA, acting via cAMP. By contrast, the adenosine receptor antagonist CGS 15943 or the adenosine degrading enzyme ADA inhibits CAD cell neuronal differentiation mediated by serum withdrawal. These results support that adenosine is a physiological signal in neuronal differentiation of the CNS-derived catecholaminergic CAD cell line and suggest that adenosine signaling is involved in NC cell development in vivo.

  15. Mechanical stimulation evokes rapid increases in extracellular adenosine concentration in the prefrontal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ashley E.; Nguyen, Michael D.; Privman, Eve; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical perturbations can release ATP, which is broken down to adenosine. In this work, we used carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to measure mechanically-stimulated adenosine in the brain by lowering the electrode 50 μm. Mechanical stimulation evoked adenosine in vivo (average: 3.3 ± 0.6 μM) and in brain slices (average: 0.8 ± 0.1 μM) in the prefrontal cortex. The release was transient, lasting 18 ± 2 s. Lowering a 15 μm diameter glass pipette near the carbon-fiber microelectrode produced similar results as lowering the actual microelectrode. However, applying a small puff of artificial cerebral spinal fluid was not sufficient to evoke adenosine. Multiple stimulations within a 50 μm region of a slice did not significantly change over time or damage cells. Chelating calcium with EDTA or blocking sodium channels with tetrodotoxin (TTX) significantly decreased mechanically evoked adenosine, signifying that the release is activity-dependent. An alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), did not affect mechanically-stimulated adenosine; however, the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1,2 and 3 (NTDPase) inhibitor POM-1 significantly reduced adenosine so a portion of adenosine is dependent on extracellular ATP metabolism. Thus, mechanical perturbations from inserting a probe in the brain cause rapid, transient adenosine signaling which might be neuroprotective. PMID:24606335

  16. PAP and NT5E inhibit nociceptive neurotransmission by rapidly hydrolyzing nucleotides to adenosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) produce extracellular adenosine from the nucleotide AMP in spinal nociceptive (pain-sensing) circuits; however, it is currently unknown if these are the main ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine or how rapidly they generate adenosine. Results We found that AMP hydrolysis, when measured histochemically, was nearly abolished in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and lamina II of spinal cord from Pap/Nt5e double knockout (dKO) mice. Likewise, the antinociceptive effects of AMP, when combined with nucleoside transport inhibitors (dipyridamole or 5-iodotubericidin), were reduced by 80-100% in dKO mice. In addition, we used fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure adenosine production at subsecond resolution within lamina II. Adenosine was maximally produced within seconds from AMP in wild-type (WT) mice but production was reduced >50% in dKO mice, indicating PAP and NT5E rapidly generate adenosine in lamina II. Unexpectedly, we also detected spontaneous low frequency adenosine transients in lamina II with FSCV. Adenosine transients were of short duration (60%) in frequency in Pap-/-, Nt5e-/- and dKO mice, suggesting these ectonucleotidases rapidly hydrolyze endogenously released nucleotides to adenosine. Field potential recordings in lamina II and behavioral studies indicate that adenosine made by these enzymes acts through the adenosine A1 receptor to inhibit excitatory neurotransmission and nociception. Conclusions Collectively, our experiments indicate that PAP and NT5E are the main ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive circuits and indicate these enzymes transform pulsatile or sustained nucleotide release into an inhibitory adenosinergic signal. PMID:22011440

  17. Adenosine induces growth-cone turning of sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Benjamin; Eilert, John-Christian; Munck, Sebastian; Harz, Hartmann

    2008-12-01

    The formation of appropriate connections between neurons and their specific targets is an essential step during development and repair of the nervous system. Growth cones are located at the leading edges of the growing neurites and respond to environmental cues in order to be guided to their final targets. Directional information can be coded by concentration gradients of substrate-bound or diffusible-guidance molecules. Here we show that concentration gradients of adenosine stimulate growth cones of sensory neurons (dorsal root ganglia) from chicken embryos to turn towards the adenosine source. This response is mediated by adenosine receptors. The subsequent signal transduction process involves cAMP. It may be speculated that the in vivo function of this response is concerned with the formation or the repair and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system.

  18. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  19. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits A2A adenosine receptor agonist induced β-amyloid production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells via a cAMP dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Vijay Nagpure

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading cause of senile dementia in today's society. Its debilitating symptoms are manifested by disturbances in many important brain functions, which are influenced by adenosine. Hence, adenosinergic system is considered as a potential therapeutic target in AD treatment. In the present study, we found that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor, 100 µM attenuated HENECA (a selective A2A receptor agonist, 10-200 nM induced β-amyloid (1-42 (Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y cells. NaHS also interfered with HENECA-stimulated production and post-translational modification of amyloid precursor protein (APP by inhibiting its maturation. Measurement of the C-terminal APP fragments generated from its enzymatic cleavage by β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 showed that NaHS did not have any significant effect on β-secretase activity. However, the direct measurements of HENECA-elevated γ-secretase activity and mRNA expressions of presenilins suggested that the suppression of Aβ42 production in NaHS pretreated cells was mediated by inhibiting γ-secretase. NaHS induced reductions were accompanied by similar decreases in intracellular cAMP levels and phosphorylation of cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB. NaHS significantly reduced the elevated cAMP and Aβ42 production caused by forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase, AC agonist alone or forskolin in combination with IBMX (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but had no effect on those caused by IBMX alone. Moreover, pretreatment with NaHS significantly attenuated HENECA-elevated AC activity and mRNA expressions of various AC isoforms. These data suggest that NaHS may preferentially suppress AC activity when it was stimulated. In conclusion, H2S attenuated HENECA induced Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells through inhibiting γ-secretase via a cAMP dependent pathway.

  20. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling affects IL-21/IL-22 cytokines and GATA3/T-bet transcription factor expression in CD4+T cells from a BTBR T+Itpr3tf/J mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sheikh F; Ansari, Mushtaq A; Nadeem, Ahmed; Bakheet, Saleh A; Almutairi, Mashal M; Attia, Sabry M

    2017-10-15

    Autism is a complex heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder; previous studies have identified altered immune responses among individuals diagnosed with autism. An imbalance in the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors plays a role in neurodevelopmental behavioral and autism disorders. BTBR T + Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) mice are used as a model for autism, as they exhibit social deficits, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors compared with C57BL/6J (B6) mice. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) appears to be a potential target for the improvement of behavioral, inflammatory, immune, and neurological disorders. We investigated the effects of the A2AR antagonist SCH 5826 (SCH) and agonist CGS 21680 (CGS) on IL-21, IL-22, T-bet, T-box transcription factor (T-bet), GATA3 (GATA Binding Protein 3), and CD152 (CTLA-4) expression in BTBR mice. Our results showed that BTBR mice treated with SCH had increased CD4 + IL-21 + , CD4 + IL-22 + , CD4 + GATA3 + , and CD4 + T-bet + and decreased CD4 + CTLA-4 + expression in spleen cells compared with BTBR control mice. Moreover, CGS efficiently decreased CD4 + IL-21 + , CD4 + IL-22 + , CD4 + GATA3 + , and CD4 + T-bet + and increased CD4 + CTLA-4 production in spleen cells compared with SCH-treated and BTBR control mice. Additionally, SCH treatment significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-21, IL-22, GATA3, and T-bet in brain tissue compared with CGS-treated and BTBR control mice. The augmented levels of IL-21/IL-22 and GATA3/T-bet could be due to altered A2AR signaling. Our results indicate that A2AR agonists may represent a new class of compounds that can be developed for use in the treatment of autistic and neuroimmune dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of Adenosine Signaling on Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Schaefer, Isabel da Costa; Frantz, Juliana Zanetti; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adenosine is a well-known endogenous modulator of neuronal excitability with anticonvulsant properties. Thus, the modulation exerted by adenosine might be an effective tool to control seizures. In this study, we investigated the effects of drugs that are able to modulate adenosinergic signaling on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in adult zebrafish. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) increased the latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure stage. Both the adenosine A2A receptor agonist and antagonist, CGS 21680 and ZM 241385, respectively, did not promote changes in seizure parameters. Pretreatment with the ecto-5′nucleotidase inhibitor adenosine 5′-(α,β-methylene) diphosphate (AMPCP) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. However, when pretreated with the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), or with the nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitors, dipyridamole and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), animals showed longer latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure status. Finally, our molecular analysis of the c-fos gene expression corroborates these behavioral results. Our findings indicate that the activation of adenosine A1 receptors is an important mechanism to control the development of seizures in zebrafish. Furthermore, the actions of ecto-5′-nucleotidase, ADA, and NTs are directly involved in the control of extracellular adenosine levels and have an important role in the development of seizure episodes in zebrafish. PMID:25560904

  2. Localized adenosine signaling provides fine-tuned negative feedback over a wide dynamic range of neocortical network activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Magnus J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the patterns of activity produced by neocortical networks are now better understood, how these states are activated, sustained, and terminated still remains unclear. Negative feedback by the endogenous neuromodulator adenosine may potentially play an important role, as it can be released by activity and there is dense A1 receptor expression in the neocortex. Using electrophysiology, biosensors, and modeling, we have investigated the properties of adenosine signaling during physiological and pathological network activity in rat neocortical slices. Both low- and high-rate network activities were reduced by A1 receptor activation and enhanced by block of A1 receptors, consistent with activity-dependent adenosine release. Since the A1 receptors were neither saturated nor completely unoccupied during either low- or high-rate activity, adenosine signaling provides a negative-feedback mechanism with a wide dynamic range. Modeling and biosensor experiments show that during high-rate activity increases in extracellular adenosine concentration are highly localized and are uncorrelated over short distances that are certainly adenosine release during low-rate activity, although it is present, is probably a consequence of small localized increases in adenosine concentration that are rapidly diminished by diffusion and active removal mechanisms. Saturation of such removal mechanisms when higher concentrations of adenosine are released results in the accumulation of inosine, explaining the strong purine signal during high-rate activity. PMID:25392170

  3. Characterization of Spontaneous, Transient Adenosine Release in the Caudate-Putamen and Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michael D.; Lee, Scott T.; Ross, Ashley E.; Ryals, Matthew; Choudhry, Vishesh I.; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuroprotective agent that inhibits neuronal activity and modulates neurotransmission. Previous research has shown adenosine gradually accumulates during pathologies such as stroke and regulates neurotransmission on the minute-to-hour time scale. Our lab developed a method using carbon-fiber microelectrodes to directly measure adenosine changes on a sub-second time scale with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). Recently, adenosine release lasting a couple of seconds has been found in murine spinal cord slices. In this study, we characterized spontaneous, transient adenosine release in vivo, in the caudate-putamen and prefrontal cortex of anesthetized rats. The average concentration of adenosine release was 0.17±0.01 µM in the caudate and 0.19±0.01 µM in the prefrontal cortex, although the range was large, from 0.04 to 3.2 µM. The average duration of spontaneous adenosine release was 2.9±0.1 seconds and 2.8±0.1 seconds in the caudate and prefrontal cortex, respectively. The concentration and number of transients detected do not change over a four hour period, suggesting spontaneous events are not caused by electrode implantation. The frequency of adenosine transients was higher in the prefrontal cortex than the caudate-putamen and was modulated by A1 receptors. The A1 antagonist DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, 6 mg/kg i.p.) increased the frequency of spontaneous adenosine release, while the A1 agonist CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine, 1 mg/kg i.p.) decreased the frequency. These findings are a paradigm shift for understanding the time course of adenosine signaling, demonstrating that there is a rapid mode of adenosine signaling that could cause transient, local neuromodulation. PMID:24494035

  4. A high affinity recombinant antibody to the human EphA3 receptor with enhanced ADCC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasevic, Nenad; Luehrsen, Kenneth; Baer, Mark; Palath, Varghese; Martinez, David; Williams, Jason; Yi, Christina; Sujatha-Bhaskar, Swathi; Lanke, Rohini; Leung, John; Ching, Wendy; Lee, Andreia; Bai, Lu; Yarranton, Geoffrey; Bebbington, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    EphA3 is expressed in solid tumors and leukemias and is an attractive target for the therapy. We have generated a panel of Humaneered® antibodies to the ligand-binding domain using a Fab epitope-focused library that has the same specificity as monoclonal antibody mIIIA4. A high-affinity antibody was selected that competes with the mIIIA4 antibody for binding to EphA3 and has an improved affinity of ∼1 nM. In order to generate an antibody with potent cell-killing activity the variable regions were assembled with human IgG1k constant regions and expressed in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line deficient in fucosyl transferase. Non-fucosylated antibodies have been reported to have enhanced binding affinity for the IgG receptor CD16a (FcγRIIIa). The affinity of the antibody for recombinant CD16a was enhanced approximately 10-fold. This resulted in enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity against EphA3-expressing leukemic cells, providing a potent antibody for the evaluation as a therapeutic agent.

  5. Adenosine Shifts Plasticity Regimes between Associative and Homeostatic by Modulating Heterosynaptic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakova, Marina; Chen, Jen-Yung; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous extracellular adenosine level fluctuates in an activity-dependent manner and with sleep–wake cycle, modulating synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity. Hebbian-type long-term plasticity introduces intrinsic positive feedback on synaptic weight changes, making them prone to runaway dynamics. We previously demonstrated that co-occurring, weight-dependent heterosynaptic plasticity can robustly prevent runaway dynamics. Here we show that at neocortical synapses in slices from rat visual cortex, adenosine modulates the weight dependence of heterosynaptic plasticity: blockade of adenosine A1 receptors abolished weight dependence, while increased adenosine level strengthened it. Using model simulations, we found that the strength of weight dependence determines the ability of heterosynaptic plasticity to prevent runaway dynamics of synaptic weights imposed by Hebbian-type learning. Changing the weight dependence of heterosynaptic plasticity within an experimentally observed range gradually shifted the operating point of neurons between an unbalancing regime dominated by associative plasticity and a homeostatic regime of tightly constrained synaptic changes. Because adenosine tone is a natural correlate of activity level (activity increases adenosine tone) and brain state (elevated adenosine tone increases sleep pressure), modulation of heterosynaptic plasticity by adenosine represents an endogenous mechanism that translates changes of the brain state into a shift of the regime of synaptic plasticity and learning. We speculate that adenosine modulation may provide a mechanism for fine-tuning of plasticity and learning according to brain state and activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Associative learning depends on brain state and is impaired when the subject is sleepy or tired. However, the link between changes of brain state and modulation of synaptic plasticity and learning remains elusive. Here we show that adenosine regulates weight dependence of

  6. Beneficial and detrimental role of adenosine signaling in diseases and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a major signaling nucleoside that orchestrates cellular and tissue adaptation under energy depletion and ischemic/hypoxic conditions by activation of four G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). The regulation and generation of extracellular adenosine in response to stress are critical in tissue protection. Both mouse and human studies reported that extracellular adenosine signaling plays a beneficial role during acute states. However, prolonged excess extracellular adenosine is detrimental and contributes to the development and progression of various chronic diseases. In recent years, substantial progress has been made to understand the role of adenosine signaling in different conditions and to clarify its significance during the course of disease progression in various organs. These efforts have and will identify potential therapeutic possibilities for protection of tissue injury at acute stage by upregulation of adenosine signaling or attenuation of chronic disease progression by downregulation of adenosine signaling. This review is to summarize current progress and the importance of adenosine signaling in different disease stages and its potential therapeutic effects. PMID:26316513

  7. Adenosine in peripheral chemoreception: new insights into a historically overlooked molecule--invited article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, S V; Monteiro, E C; Obeso, A; Gonzalez, C

    2009-01-01

    In the present article we review in a concise manner the literature on the general biology of adenosine signalling. In the first section we describe briefly the historical aspects of adenosine research. In the second section is presented the biochemical characteristics of this nucleoside, namely its metabolism and regulation, and its physiological actions. In the third section we have succinctly described the role of adenosine and its metabolism in hypoxia. The final section is devoted to the role of adenosine in chemoreception in the carotid body, providing a review of the literature on the presence of adenosine receptors in the carotid body; on the effects of adenosine at presynaptic level in carotid body chemoreceptor cells, as well as, its metabolism and regulation; and at postsynaptic level in carotid sinus nerve activity. Additionally, a review on the effects of adenosine in ventilation was done. This review discusses evidence for a key role of adenosine in the hypoxic response of carotid body and emphasizes new research likely to be important in the future.

  8. Extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dongmei; Jackson, Travis C.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels. Rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated with adenosine, guanosine, or both. Guanosine (30 μmol/l) per se had little effect on extracellular adenosine levels. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) were 0.125 ± 0.020 μmol/l, indicating rapid disposition of extracellular adenosine. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) plus guanosine (30 μmol/l) were 1.173 ± 0.061 μmol/l, indicating slow disposition of extracellular adenosine. Cell injury increased extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine and guanosine, and the effects of cell injury on endogenous extracellular adenosine were modulated by altering the levels of endogenous extracellular guanosine with exogenous purine nucleoside phosphorylase (converts guanosine to guanine) or 8-aminoguanosine (inhibits purine nucleoside phosphorylase). Extracellular guanosine also slowed the disposition of extracellular adenosine in rat preglomerular vascular endothelial cells, mesangial cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and kidney epithelial cells and in human aortic and coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells and coronary artery endothelial cells. The effects of guanosine on adenosine levels were not mimicked or attenuated by 5-iodotubericidin (adenosine kinase inhibitor), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (adenosine deaminase inhibitor), 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (guanine deaminase inhibitor), aristeromycin (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitor), low sodium (inhibits concentrative nucleoside transporters), S-(4-nitrobenzyl)−6-thioinosine [inhibits equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) type 1], zidovudine (inhibits ENT type 2), or acadesine (known modulator of adenosine levels). Guanosine also increases extracellular inosine, uridine, thymidine, and cytidine, yet decreases

  9. Release of adenosine from human neutrophils stimulated by platelet activating factor, leukotriene B4 and opsonized zymosan

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    S. Sipka

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL stimulated by platelet activating factor (PAF, leukotriene B4 (LTB4 or opsonized zymosan (OZ released adenosine measured by thermospray high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in the cell-free supernatants. Stimulation by PAF or LTB4 resulted in a bellshaped concentration-effect curve; 5 × 10−7 M PAF, 10−8 M LTB4 and 500 μg ml−1 OZ induced peak adenosine release, thus cytotoxic concentrations did not elevate adenosine level in the supernatants. Therefore adenosine release was characteristic of viable cells. As calculated from concentration-effect curves, the rank order of potency for adenosine release was PAF > LTB > OZ. These resuits suggest that adenosine, when bound specifically to membrane receptor sites, may initiate signal transduction, and, in co-operation with other inflammatory mediators, may modulate phagocyte function, e.g. production of chemoluminescence (CL.

  10. Ticagrelor Does Not Inhibit Adenosine Transport at Relevant Concentrations: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects In Vivo.

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    T N A van den Berg

    Full Text Available In patients with myocardial infarction, ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular and sepsis-related mortality, and can cause dyspnea. It is suggested that this is caused by adenosine receptor stimulation, because in preclinical studies, ticagrelor blocks the nucleoside transporter and increases cellular ATP release. We now investigated the effects of ticagrelor on the adenosine system in humans in vivo.In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in 14 healthy subjects, we have tested whether ticagrelor (180 mg affects adenosine- and dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation, as surrogates of nucleoside uptake inhibition and adenosine formation, respectively. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was measured. Primary endpoint was adenosine-induced vasodilation.Ticagrelor did not affect adenosine- or dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was not affected by ticagrelor. In vitro, ticagrelor dose-dependently inhibited nucleoside uptake, but only at supra-physiological concentrations.In conclusion, at relevant plasma concentration, ticagrelor does not affect adenosine transport, nor adenosine formation in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is unlikely that this mechanism is a relevant pleiotropic effect of ticagrelor.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01996735.

  11. Ticagrelor Does Not Inhibit Adenosine Transport at Relevant Concentrations: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, G. A.; van den Broek, P. H. H.; Bilos, A.; Donders, A. R. T.; Gomes, M. E.; Riksen, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In patients with myocardial infarction, ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular and sepsis-related mortality, and can cause dyspnea. It is suggested that this is caused by adenosine receptor stimulation, because in preclinical studies, ticagrelor blocks the nucleoside transporter and increases cellular ATP release. We now investigated the effects of ticagrelor on the adenosine system in humans in vivo. Experimental Approach In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in 14 healthy subjects, we have tested whether ticagrelor (180 mg) affects adenosine- and dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation, as surrogates of nucleoside uptake inhibition and adenosine formation, respectively. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was measured. Primary endpoint was adenosine-induced vasodilation. Key Results Ticagrelor did not affect adenosine- or dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was not affected by ticagrelor. In vitro, ticagrelor dose-dependently inhibited nucleoside uptake, but only at supra-physiological concentrations. Conclusion and Implications In conclusion, at relevant plasma concentration, ticagrelor does not affect adenosine transport, nor adenosine formation in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is unlikely that this mechanism is a relevant pleiotropic effect of ticagrelor. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01996735 PMID:26509673

  12. Regional distribution of high affinity binding of 3H-adenosine in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traversa, U.; Puppini, P.; de Angelis, L.; Vertua, R.

    1984-06-01

    The high and low affinity adenosine binding sites with Kd values ranging respectively from 0.8 to 1.65 microM and from 3.1 to 13.86 microM were demonstrated in the following rat brain areas: cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, diencephalon, and pons-medulla. Adenosine receptors involved in the high affinity binding seem to be mainly Ra-type. The analysis of the regional distribution of 3H-Adenosine showed the highest levels of specific binding in striatum and hippocampus; somewhat smaller values in cortex, cerebellum, and diencephalon, and even lower in pons-medulla.

  13. Selective inhibition of KCa3.1 channels mediates adenosine regulation of the motility of human T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimote, Ameet A.; Hajdu, Peter; Kucher, Vladimir; Boiko, Nina; Kuras, Zerrin; Szilagyi, Orsolya; Yun, Yeo-Heung; Conforti, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine, a purine nucleoside, is present at high concentrations in tumors where it contributes to the failure of immune cells to eliminate cancer cells. The mechanisms responsible for the immunosuppressive properties of adenosine are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that adenosine’s immunosuppressive functions in human T lymphocytes are in part mediated via modulation of ion channels. The activity of T lymphocytes relies on ion channels. KCa3.1 and Kv1.3 channels control cytokine release and, together with TRPM7, regulate T cell motility. Adenosine selectively inhibited KCa3.1, but not Kv1.3 and TRPM7, in activated human T cells. This effect of adenosine was mainly mediated by A2A receptors as KCa3.1 inhibition was reversed by SCH58261 (selective A2A receptor antagonist), but not by MRS1754 (A2B receptor antagonist) and it was mimicked by the A2A receptor agonist CGS21680. Furthermore, it was mediated by the cAMP/PKAI signaling pathway as adenylyl-cyclase and PKAI inhibition prevented adenosine effect on KCa3.1. The functional implication of the effect of adenosine on KCa3.1 was determined by measuring T cell motility on ICAM-1 surfaces. Adenosine and CGS21680 inhibited T cell migration. Comparable effects were obtained by KCa3.1 blockade with TRAM-34. Furthermore, the effect of adenosine on cell migration was abolished by pre-exposure to TRAM-34. Additionally, adenosine suppresses IL-2 secretion via KCa3.1 inhibition. Our data indicate that adenosine inhibits KCa3.1 in human T cells via A2A receptor and PKAI thereby resulting in decreased T cell motility and cytokine release. This mechanism is likely to contribute to decreased immune surveillance in solid tumors. PMID:24227782

  14. Adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Bruner, Robert C; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-09-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Numerous studies have indicated a role for A1 receptors (A1R) in acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination, while A2A receptors (A2AR) mainly regulate the rewarding effect of ethanol in mice. Recent findings have demonstrated that dampened A2AR-mediated signaling in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) promotes ethanol-seeking behaviors. Moreover, decreased A2AR function is associated with decreased CREB activity in the DMS, which enhances goal-oriented behaviors and contributes to excessive ethanol drinking in mice. Interestingly, caffeine, the most commonly used psychoactive substance, is known to inhibit both the A1R and A2AR. This dampened adenosine receptor function may mask some of the acute intoxicating effects of ethanol. Furthermore, based on the fact that A2AR activity plays a role in goal-directed behavior, caffeine may also promote ethanol-seeking behavior. The A2AR is enriched in the striatum and exclusively expressed in striatopallidal neurons, which may be responsible for the regulation of inhibitory behavioral control over drug rewarding processes through the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuit. Furthermore, the antagonistic interactions between adenosine and dopamine receptors in the striatum also play an integral role in alcoholism and addiction-related disorders. This review focuses on regulation of adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and the possible implication of caffeine in goal-directed behaviors and addiction.

  15. Ticagrelor Does Not Inhibit Adenosine Transport at Relevant Concentrations: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T.N.A. van den; Messaoudi, S. El; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Broek, P.H.H. van den; Bilos, A.; Donders, A.R.T.; Gomes, M.E.; Riksen, N.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In patients with myocardial infarction, ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular and sepsis-related mortality, and can cause dyspnea. It is suggested that this is caused by adenosine receptor stimulation, because in preclinical studies, ticagrelor blocks the nucleoside transporter

  16. Adenosine derived from Staphylococcus aureus-engulfed macrophages functions as a potent stimulant for the induction of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Kim, Chan-Hee; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to isolate novel mast cell-stimulating molecules from Staphylococcus aureus. Water-soluble extract of S. aureus cell lysate strongly induced human interleukin- 8 in human mast cell line-1 and mouse interleukin-6 in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. The active...... adenosine receptor blocker, verified that purified adenosine can induce interleukin-8 production via adenosine receptors on mast cells. Moreover, adenosine was purified from S. aureusengulfed RAW264.7 cells, a murine macrophage cell line, used to induce phagocytosis of S. aureus. These results show a novel...

  17. Smoke Extract Impairs Adenosine Wound Healing. Implications of Smoke-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Zhang, Hui; Castellanos, Glenda; O’Malley, Jennifer K.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Horacio; Kharbanda, Kusum; Sisson, Joseph H.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine concentrations are elevated in the lungs of patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, where it balances between tissue repair and excessive airway remodeling. We previously demonstrated that the activation of the adenosine A2A receptor promotes epithelial wound closure. However, the mechanism by which adenosine-mediated wound healing occurs after cigarette smoke exposure has not been investigated. The present study investigates whether cigarette smoke exposure alters adenosine-mediated reparative properties via its ability to induce a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance. Using an in vitro wounding model, bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract, were wounded, and were then stimulated with either 10 μM adenosine or the specific A2A receptor agonist, 5′-(N-cyclopropyl)–carboxamido–adenosine (CPCA; 10 μM), and assessed for wound closure. In a subset of experiments, bronchial epithelial cells were infected with adenovirus vectors encoding human superoxide dismutase and/or catalase or control vector. In the presence of 5% smoke extract, significant delay was evident in both adenosine-mediated and CPCA-mediated wound closure. However, cells pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a nonspecific antioxidant, reversed smoke extract–mediated inhibition. We found that cells overexpressing mitochondrial catalase repealed the smoke extract inhibition of CPCA-stimulated wound closure, whereas superoxide dismutase overexpression exerted no effect. Kinase experiments revealed that smoke extract significantly reduced the A2A-mediated activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate–dependent protein kinase. However, pretreatment with NAC reversed this effect. In conclusion, our data suggest that cigarette smoke exposure impairs A2A-stimulated wound repair via a reactive oxygen species–dependent mechanism, thereby providing a better understanding of adenosine signaling that may direct the development of

  18. Distinctive Structure of the EphA3/Ephrin-A5 Complex Reveals a Dual Mode of Eph Receptor Interaction for Ephrin-A5.

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    Garry Jason Forse

    Full Text Available The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase/ephrin ligand system regulates a wide spectrum of physiological processes, while its dysregulation has been implicated in cancer progression. The human EphA3 receptor is widely upregulated in the tumor microenvironment and is highly expressed in some types of cancer cells. Furthermore, EphA3 is among the most highly mutated genes in lung cancer and it is also frequently mutated in other cancers. We report the structure of the ligand-binding domain of the EphA3 receptor in complex with its preferred ligand, ephrin-A5. The structure of the complex reveals a pronounced tilt of the ephrin-A5 ligand compared to its orientation when bound to the EphA2 and EphB2 receptors and similar to its orientation when bound to EphA4. This tilt brings an additional area of ephrin-A5 into contact with regions of EphA3 outside the ephrin-binding pocket thereby enlarging the size of the interface, which is consistent with the high binding affinity of ephrin-A5 for EphA3. This large variation in the tilt of ephrin-A5 bound to different Eph receptors has not been previously observed for other ephrins.

  19. Role of adenosine signalling and metabolism in β-cell regeneration

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    Andersson, Olov, E-mail: olov.andersson@ki.se

    2014-02-01

    Glucose homeostasis, which is controlled by the endocrine cells of the pancreas, is disrupted in both type I and type II diabetes. Deficiency in the number of insulin-producing β cells – a primary cause of type I diabetes and a secondary contributor of type II diabetes – leads to hyperglycemia and hence an increase in the need for insulin. Although diabetes can be controlled with insulin injections, a curative approach is needed. A potential approach to curing diabetes involves regenerating the β-cell mass, e.g. by increasing β-cell proliferation, survival, neogenesis or transdifferentiation. The nucleoside adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP have long been known to affect insulin secretion, but have more recently been shown to increase β-cell proliferation during homeostatic control and regeneration of the β-cell mass. Adenosine is also known to have anti-inflammatory properties, and agonism of adenosine receptors can promote the survival of β-cells in an inflammatory microenvironment. In this review, both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms of adenosine and ATP are discussed in terms of their established and putative effects on β-cell regeneration. - Highlights: • A potential way to cure diabetes is to regenerate the β-cell mass by promoting cell survival, proliferation or neogenesis. • Adenosine may promote β-cell regeneration through several cellular mechanisms. • Adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP can each promote β-cell proliferation. • Do adenosine and ATP interact in promoting β-cell proliferation?.

  20. Comparison of intravenous adenosine and intravenous regadenoson for the measurement of pressure-derived coronary fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugham, Pradeep; Figueredo, Vincent M; Patel, Parul B; Morris, D Lynn

    2013-02-22

    Defining the clinical and physiologic significance of an intermediate coronary artery stenosis is aided by measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR). Adenosine is the most common agent used in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory for the measurement of FFR. Regadenoson, a selective adenosine receptor agonist, with fewer side effects than adenosine has been used extensively in stress testing to induce hyperaemia. We postulated that FFR measurements would be equivalent following administration of regadenoson and adenosine. Twenty patients with an angiographic intermediate coronary artery stenosis (50% to 80%) were included in the study. FFR was measured during three minutes of intravenous (IV) adenosine infusion and for five minutes after an injection of regadenoson. The mean difference between the FFR measured by IV adenosine and IV regadenoson was 0.0040 (min -0.04, max +0.04, standard deviation [SD] 0.025). There was a strong linear correlation between the FFR measured by IV adenosine and IV regadenoson (R2 linear=0.933). The FFR at maximum hyperaemia was achieved earlier using regadenoson than adenosine (59±24.5 sec vs. 93±44.5 sec, p=0.01). Regadenoson produces similar pressure-derived FFR compared to IV adenosine infusion.

  1. Sleep-wake sensitive mechanisms of adenosine release in the basal forebrain of rodents: an in vitro study.

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    Robert Edward Sims

    Full Text Available Adenosine acting in the basal forebrain is a key mediator of sleep homeostasis. Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase during wakefulness, especially during prolonged wakefulness and lead to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. The release of endogenous adenosine during the sleep-wake cycle has mainly been studied in vivo with microdialysis techniques. The biochemical changes that accompany sleep-wake status may be preserved in vitro. We have therefore used adenosine-sensitive biosensors in slices of the basal forebrain (BFB to study both depolarization-evoked adenosine release and the steady state adenosine tone in rats, mice and hamsters. Adenosine release was evoked by high K(+, AMPA, NMDA and mGlu receptor agonists, but not by other transmitters associated with wakefulness such as orexin, histamine or neurotensin. Evoked and basal adenosine release in the BFB in vitro exhibited three key features: the magnitude of each varied systematically with the diurnal time at which the animal was sacrificed; sleep deprivation prior to sacrifice greatly increased both evoked adenosine release and the basal tone; and the enhancement of evoked adenosine release and basal tone resulting from sleep deprivation was reversed by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. These data indicate that characteristics of adenosine release recorded in the BFB in vitro reflect those that have been linked in vivo to the homeostatic control of sleep. Our results provide methodologically independent support for a key role for induction of iNOS as a trigger for enhanced adenosine release following sleep deprivation and suggest that this induction may constitute a biochemical memory of this state.

  2. Sleep-Wake Sensitive Mechanisms of Adenosine Release in the Basal Forebrain of Rodents: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Robert Edward; Wu, Houdini Ho Tin; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine acting in the basal forebrain is a key mediator of sleep homeostasis. Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase during wakefulness, especially during prolonged wakefulness and lead to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. The release of endogenous adenosine during the sleep-wake cycle has mainly been studied in vivo with microdialysis techniques. The biochemical changes that accompany sleep-wake status may be preserved in vitro. We have therefore used adenosine-sensitive biosensors in slices of the basal forebrain (BFB) to study both depolarization-evoked adenosine release and the steady state adenosine tone in rats, mice and hamsters. Adenosine release was evoked by high K+, AMPA, NMDA and mGlu receptor agonists, but not by other transmitters associated with wakefulness such as orexin, histamine or neurotensin. Evoked and basal adenosine release in the BFB in vitro exhibited three key features: the magnitude of each varied systematically with the diurnal time at which the animal was sacrificed; sleep deprivation prior to sacrifice greatly increased both evoked adenosine release and the basal tone; and the enhancement of evoked adenosine release and basal tone resulting from sleep deprivation was reversed by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, 1400 W. These data indicate that characteristics of adenosine release recorded in the BFB in vitro reflect those that have been linked in vivo to the homeostatic control of sleep. Our results provide methodologically independent support for a key role for induction of iNOS as a trigger for enhanced adenosine release following sleep deprivation and suggest that this induction may constitute a biochemical memory of this state. PMID:23326515

  3. Suppression of adenosine-activated chloride transport by ethanol in airway epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammeta V Raju

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is associated with increased lung infections. Molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is not complete. Airway epithelial ion transport regulates the homeostasis of airway surface liquid, essential for airway mucosal immunity and lung host defense. Here, air-liquid interface cultures of Calu-3 epithelial cells were basolaterally exposed to physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (0, 25, 50 and 100 mM for 24 hours and adenosine-stimulated ion transport was measured by Ussing chamber. The ethanol exposure reduced the epithelial short-circuit currents (I(SC in a dose-dependent manner. The ion currents activated by adenosine were chloride conductance mediated by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, a cAMP-activated chloride channel. Alloxazine, a specific inhibitor for A(2B adenosine receptor (A(2BAR, largely abolished the adenosine-stimulated chloride transport, suggesting that A(2BAR is a major receptor responsible for regulating the chloride transport of the cells. Ethanol significantly reduced intracellular cAMP production upon adenosine stimulation. Moreover, ethanol-suppression of the chloride secretion was able to be restored by cAMP analogs or by inhibitors to block cAMP degradation. These results imply that ethanol exposure dysregulates CFTR-mediated chloride transport in airways by suppression of adenosine-A(2BAR-cAMP signaling pathway, which might contribute to alcohol-associated lung infections.

  4. Novel aspects of extracellular adenosine dynamics revealed by adenosine sensor cells

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    Kunihiko Yamashiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine modulates diverse physiological and pathological processes in the brain, including neuronal activities, blood flow, and inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying the dynamics of extracellular adenosine are not fully understood. We have recently developed a novel biosensor, called an adenosine sensor cell, and we have characterized the neuronal and astrocytic pathways for elevating extracellular adenosine. In this review, the physiological implications and therapeutic potential of the pathways revealed by the adenosine sensor cells are discussed. We propose that the multiple pathways regulating extracellular adenosine allow for the diverse functions of this neuromodulator, and their malfunctions cause various neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  5. Role of adenosine in regulating the heterogeneity of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Nesterov, Sergey V; Kemppainen, Jukka

    2007-01-01

    Evidence from both animal and human studies suggests that adenosine plays a role in the regulation of exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle. We tested whether adenosine also plays a role in the regulation of blood flow (BF) distribution and heterogeneity among and within quadriceps femoris (QF......) muscles during exercise, measured using positron emission tomography. In six healthy young women, BF was measured at rest and then during three incremental low and moderate intermittent isometric one-legged knee-extension exercise intensities without and with theophylline-induced nonselective adenosine...... and with theophylline (P Adenosine receptor blockade did not have any effect on mean bulk BF or BF heterogeneity among the QF muscles, yet blockade increased within-muscle BF heterogeneity in all four QF muscles (P = 0.03). Taken together, these results show that BF becomes less heterogeneous with increasing...

  6. Adenosine diphosphate as an intracellular regulator of insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, C G; Shyng, S L; Nestorowicz, A; Glaser, B; Clement, J P; Gonzalez, G; Aguilar-Bryan, L; Permutt, M A; Bryan, J

    1996-06-21

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels couple the cellular metabolic state to electrical activity and are a critical link between blood glucose concentration and pancreatic insulin secretion. A mutation in the second nucleotide-binding fold (NBF2) of the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) of an individual diagnosed with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy generated KATP channels that could be opened by diazoxide but not in response to metabolic inhibition. The hamster SUR, containing the analogous mutation, had normal ATP sensitivity, but unlike wild-type channels, inhibition by ATP was not antagonized by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Additional mutations in NBF2 resulted in the same phenotype, whereas an equivalent mutation in NBF1 showed normal sensitivity to MgADP. Thus, by binding to SUR NBF2 and antagonizing ATP inhibition of KATP++ channels, intracellular MgADP may regulate insulin secretion.

  7. Orexin A attenuates the sleep-promoting effect of adenosine in the lateral hypothalamus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cun, Yanping; Tang, Lin; Yan, Jie; He, Chao; Li, Yang; Hu, Zhian; Xia, Jianxia

    2014-10-01

    Orexin neurons within the lateral hypothalamus play a crucial role in the promotion and maintenance of arousal. Studies have strongly suggested that orexin neurons are an important target in endogenous adenosine-regulated sleep homeostasis. Orexin A induces a robust increase in the firing activity of orexin neurons, while adenosine has an inhibitory effect. Whether the excitatory action of orexins in the lateral hypothalamus actually promotes wakefulness and reverses the sleep-producing effect of adenosine in vivo is less clear. In this study, electroencephalographic and electromyographic recordings were used to investigate the effects of orexin A and adenosine on sleep and wakefulness in rats. We found that microinjection of orexin A into the lateral hypothalamus increased wakefulness with a concomitant reduction of sleep during the first 3 h of post-injection recording, and this was completely blocked by a selective antagonist for orexin receptor 1, SB 334867. The enhancement of wakefulness also occurred after application of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the first 3 h post-injection. However, in the presence of the NMDA receptor antagonist APV, orexin A did not induce any change of sleep and wakefulness in the first 3 h. Further, exogenous application of adenosine into the lateral hypothalamus induced a marked increase of sleep in the first 3-h post-injection. No significant change in sleep and wakefulness was detected after adenosine application followed by orexin A administration into the same brain area. These findings suggest that the sleep-promoting action of adenosine can be reversed by orexin A applied to the lateral hypothalamus, perhaps by exciting glutamatergic input to orexin neurons via the action of orexin receptor 1.

  8. Adenosine as a signaling molecule in the retina: biochemical and developmental aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBERTO PAES-DE-CARVALHO

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The nucleoside adenosine plays an important role as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system, including the retina. In the present paper we review compelling evidence showing that adenosine is a signaling molecule in the developing retina. In the chick retina, adenosine transporters are present since early stages of development before the appearance of adenosine A1 receptors modulating dopamine-dependent adenylate cyclase activity or A2 receptors that directly activate the enzyme. Experiments using retinal cell cultures revealed that adenosine is taken up by specific cell populations that when stimulated by depolarization or neurotransmitters such as dopamine or glutamate, release the nucleoside through calcium-dependent transporter-mediated mechanisms. The presence of adenosine in the extracellular medium and the long-term activation of adenosine receptors is able to regulate the survival of retinal neurons and blocks glutamate excitoxicity. Thus, adenosine besides working as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the mature retina, is considered as an important signaling molecule during retinal development having important functions such as regulation of neuronal survival and differentiation.O nucleosídeo adenosina apresenta um importante papel como neurotransmissor ou neuromodulador no sistema nervoso central, inclusive na retina. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão das evidências que mostram que a adenosina é uma molécula sinalizadora na retina em desenvolvimento. Na retina de pinto, transportadores de adenosina estão presentes desde estágios precoces do desenvolvimento, antes do aparecimento dos receptores A1 que modulam a atividade adenilato ciclase dependente de dopamina ou dos receptores A2 que ativam diretamente a enzima. Experimentos usando culturas de células de retina revelaram que a adenosina é captada por populações celulares específicas que, quando estimuladas por despolarização ou por

  9. Extracellular Adenosine Generation in the Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Responses and Pathogen Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Samiul Alam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine, an immunomodulatory biomolecule, is produced by the ecto-enzymes CD39 (nucleoside triphosphate dephosphorylase and CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase by dephosphorylation of extracellular ATP. CD73 is expressed by many cell types during injury, infection and during steady-state conditions. Besides host cells, many bacteria also have CD39-CD73-like machinery, which helps the pathogen subvert the host inflammatory response. The major function for adenosine is anti-inflammatory, and most recent research has focused on adenosine’s control of inflammatory mechanisms underlying various autoimmune diseases (e.g., colitis, arthritis. Although adenosine generated through CD73 provides a feedback to control tissue damage mediated by a host immune response, it can also contribute to immunosuppression. Thus, inflammation can be a double-edged sword: it may harm the host but eventually helps by killing the invading pathogen. The role of adenosine in dampening inflammation has been an area of active research, but the relevance of the CD39/CD73-axis and adenosine receptor signaling in host defense against infection has received less attention. Here, we review our recent knowledge regarding CD73 expression during murine Salmonellosis and Helicobacter-induced gastric infection and its role in disease pathogenesis and bacterial persistence. We also explored a possible role for the CD73/adenosine pathway in regulating innate host defense function during infection.

  10. Reflex systemic sympatho-neural response to brachial adenosine infusion in treated heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijeysundera, H.C.; Parmar, G.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Floras, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: In healthy men, brachial artery adenosine infusion elicits a reflex increase in total body norepinephrine (NE) spillover (TBS) that is blunted by oral angiotensin AT(1) receptor blockade. Our objectives were to determine whether a similar reflex is active in treated heart failure (HF) patients

  11. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  12. Adenosine derived from Staphylococcus aureus-engulfed macrophages functions as a potent stimulant for the induction of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Kim, Chan-Hee; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to isolate novel mast cell-stimulating molecules from Staphylococcus aureus. Water-soluble extract of S. aureus cell lysate strongly induced human interleukin- 8 in human mast cell line-1 and mouse interleukin-6 in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. The active...... adenosine receptor blocker, verified that purified adenosine can induce interleukin-8 production via adenosine receptors on mast cells. Moreover, adenosine was purified from S. aureusengulfed RAW264.7 cells, a murine macrophage cell line, used to induce phagocytosis of S. aureus. These results show a novel...... view of the source of exogenous adenosine in vivo and provide a mechanistic link between inflammatory disease and bacterial infection....

  13. Modeling the adenosine system as a modulator of cognitive performance and sleep patterns during sleep restriction and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew J K; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Butler, James P

    2017-10-01

    Sleep loss causes profound cognitive impairments and increases the concentrations of ad