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Sample records for a2a receptor complex

  1. NCS-1 associates with adenosine A2A receptors and modulates receptor function

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    Gemma eNavarro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signalling by local changes in intracellular calcium concentration is an established function of Calmodulin which is known to interact with many GPCRs. Less is known about the functional role of the closely related neuronal EF-hand Ca2+-sensor proteins that frequently associate with calmodulin targets with different functional outcome. In the present study we aimed to investigate if a target of calmodulin – the A2A adenosine receptor, is able to associate with two other neuronal calcium binding proteins, namely NCS-1 and caldendrin. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation experiments we show the existence of A2A - NCS-1 complexes in living cells whereas caldendrin did not associate with A2A receptors under the conditions tested. Interestingly, NCS-1 binding modulated downstream A2A receptor intracellular signalling in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Taken together this study provides further evidence that neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins play an important role in modulation of GPCR signalling.

  2. Receptor crosstalk: haloperidol treatment enhances A2A adenosine receptor functioning in a transfected cell model

    OpenAIRE

    Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Cuboni, Serena; Catena Dell’Osso, Mario; Maggio, Roberto; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Novi, Francesca; Panighini, Anna; Daniele, Simona; Martini, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors are considered an excellent target for drug development in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. It is noteworthy that the responses evoked by A2A adenosine receptors are regulated by D2 dopamine receptor ligands. These two receptors are co-expressed at the level of the basal ganglia and interact to form functional heterodimers. In this context, possible changes in A2A adenosine receptor functional responses caused by the chronic blockade/activation of D2 dop...

  3. Adenosine A2A receptors and A2A receptor heteromers as key players in striatal function

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    Sergi eFerre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A very significant density of adenosine adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs is present in the striatum, where they are preferentially localized postsynaptically in striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. In this localization A2ARs establish reciprocal antagonistic interactions with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs. In one type of interaction, A2AR and D2R are forming heteromers and, by means of an allosteric interaction, A2AR counteracts D2R-mediated inhibitory modulation of the effects of NMDA receptor stimulation in the striato-pallidal neuron. This interaction is probably mostly responsible for the locomotor depressant and activating effects of A2AR agonist and antagonists, respectively. The second type of interaction involves A2AR and D2R that do not form heteromers and takes place at the level of adenylyl-cyclase (AC. Due to a strong tonic effect of endogenous dopamine on striatal D2R, this interaction keeps A2AR from signaling through AC. However, under conditions of dopamine depletion or with blockade of D2R, A2AR-mediated AC activation is unleashed with an increased gene expression and activity of the striato-pallidal neuron and with a consequent motor depression. This interaction is probably the main mechanism responsible for the locomotor depression induced by D2R antagonists. Finally, striatal A2ARs are also localized presynaptically, in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that contact the striato-nigral MSN. These presynaptic A2ARs heteromerize with A1 receptors (A1Rs and their activation facilitates glutamate release. These three different types of A2ARs can be pharmacologically dissected by their ability to bind ligands with different affinity and can therefore provide selective targets for drug development in different basal ganglia disorders.

  4. Modulation of A2a receptor antagonist on D2 receptor internalization and ERK phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Li; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lin-yin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effects of heterodimerization of D2 receptor/A2a receptor (D2R/A2aR) on D2R internalization and D2R downstream signaling in primary cultured striatal neurons and HEK293 cells co-expressing A2aR and D2R in vitro. Methods: Primary cultured rat striatal neurons and HEK293 cells co-expressing A2aR and D2R were treated with A2aR- or D2R-specific agonists. D2R internalization was detected using a biotinylation assay and confocal microscopy. ERK, Src kinase and β-arrestin were me...

  5. The role of adenosine A2A receptors on neuromuscular transmission upon ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Pousinha, Paula Isabel Antunes, 1978-

    2012-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências Biomédicas (Neurociências), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2012 Adenosine is a neuromodulator with important actions in the nervous system. The activation of adenosine A2A receptors has been shown to modulate the action of other receptors. Considering that it was observed an interaction between adenosine A2A receptors and TrkB receptors in hippocampus, I hypothesized that the activation of A2A receptors could also facilitate BDNF actions on ne...

  6. Gene expression and function of adenosine A(2A) receptor in the rat carotid body.

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    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    2000-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether rat carotid bodies express adenosine (Ado) A(2A) receptors and whether this receptor is involved in the cellular response to hypoxia. Our results demonstrate that rat carotid bodies express the A(2A) and A(2B) Ado receptor mRNAs but not the A(1) or A(3) receptor mRNAs as determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of the A(2A) receptor mRNA. Immunohistochemical studies further showed that the A(2A) receptor is expressed in the carotid body and that it is colocalized with tyrosine hydroxylase in type I cells. Whole cell voltage-clamp studies using isolated type I cells showed that Ado inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents and that this inhibition was abolished by the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM-241385. Ca(2+) imaging studies using fura 2 revealed that exposure to severe hypoxia induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in type I cells and that extracellularly applied Ado significantly attenuated the hypoxia-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together, our findings indicate that A(2A) receptors are present in type I cells and that activation of A(2A) receptors modulates Ca(2+) accumulation during hypoxia. This mechanism may play a role in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and cellular excitability during hypoxia. PMID:10926550

  7. Nucleus tractus solitarii A(2a) adenosine receptors inhibit cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of sympathetic outputs.

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    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-02-01

    Previously we have shown that stimulation of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) evoked inhibition of renal, adrenal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Activation of facilitatory A2a adenosine receptors, which dominate over A1 receptors in the NTS, contrastingly alters baseline activity of regional sympathetic outputs: it decreases renal, increases adrenal and does not change lumbar nerve activity. Considering that NTS A2a receptors may facilitate release of inhibitory transmitters we hypothesized that A2a receptors will act in concert with A1 receptors differentially inhibiting regional sympathetic CCR responses (adrenal>lumbar>renal). In urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats (n=38) we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT3 receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide, (1-8μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation, blockade or combined blockade and stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors (microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 0.2-20pmol/50nl, ZM-241385 40pmol/100nl or ZM-241385+CGS-21680, respectively). We found that stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors uniformly inhibited the regional sympathetic and hemodynamic reflex responses and this effect was abolished by the selective blockade of NTS A2a receptors. This indicates that A2a receptor triggered inhibition of CCR responses and the contrasting shifts in baseline sympathetic activity are mediated via different mechanisms. These data implicate that stimulation of NTS A2a receptors triggers unknown inhibitory mechanism(s) which in turn inhibit transmission in the CCR pathway when adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hypotension. PMID:24216055

  8. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

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    Felicita Pedata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes. Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke.

  9. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

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    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  10. Cytotoxic purine nucleoside analogues bind to A1, A2A and A3 adenosine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Kyle; Johnson, L’Aurelle A.; Jacobson, Pamala A.; Kachler, Sonja; Kirstein, Mark N.; Lamba, Jatinder; Klotz, Karl-Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Fludarabine, clofarabine and cladribine are anti-cancer agents which are analogues of the purine nucleoside adenosine. These agents have been associated with cardiac and neurological toxicities. Because these agents are analogues of adenosine, they may act through adenosine receptors to elicit their toxic effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of cytotoxic nucleoside analogues to bind and activate adenosine receptor subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3). Radioligand bindin...

  11. Pharmacophore Distance Mapping and Docking Study of Some Benzimidazole Analogs as A2A Receptor Antagonists

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    Santosh P. Ghatol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular adenosine regulates a wide range of functions in higher organisms, in which the effects are mediated by a family of four class A (rhodopsin-like GPCRs, a, adenosine receptors known as A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. A2A antagonists, either alone or in combination with dopamine agonists, can have a role in the treatment of neurodegenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. The concept of a pharmacophore is widely used in modern drug design and it is generally defined as the 3D arrangement of certain features in the ligand that are responsible for its activity against a particular protein target. Docking involves, the process of fitting the ligand into receptor, and the compounds which fit in them properly are assumed to be active for that receptor and it gives corresponding docking scores.

  12. Adenosine A2A receptor binding profile of two antagonists, ST1535 and KW6002: consideration on the presence of atypical adenosine A2A binding sites

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    Teresa Riccioni

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors seem to exist in typical (more in striatum and atypical (more in hippocampus and cortex subtypes. In the present study, we investigated the affinity of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, ST1535 [2 butyl -9-methyl-8-(2H-1,2,3-triazol 2-yl-9H-purin-6-xylamine] and KW6002 [(E-1,3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6,dione] to the “typical” and “atypical” A2A binding sites. Affinity was determined by radioligand competition experiments in membranes from rat striatum and hippocampus. Displacement of the adenosine analog [3H]CGS21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethylphenethyl-amino-5’-N-ethylcarbox-amidoadenosine] was evaluated in the absence or in the presence of either CSC [8-(3-chlorostyryl-caffeine], an adenosine A2A antagonist that pharmacologically isolates atypical binding sites, or DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist that pharmacologically isolates typical binding site. ZM241385 [84-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl [1,2,4]-triazol[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl amino]ethyl phenol] and SCH58261 [(5-amino-7-(β-phenylethyl-2-(8-furylpyrazolo(4,3-e-1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-c pyrimidine], two other adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, which were reported to differently bind to atypical and typical A2A receptors, were used as reference compounds. ST1535, KW6002, ZM241385 and SCH58261 displaced [3H]CGS21680 with higher affinity in striatum than in hippocampus. In hippocampus, no typical adenosine A2A binding was detected, and ST1535 was the only compound that occupied atypical A2A adenosine receptors. Present data are explained in terms of heteromeric association among adenosine A2A, A2B and A1 receptors, rather than with the presence of atypical A2A receptor subtype.

  13. A2A adenosine receptor antagonism enhances synaptic and motor effects of cocaine via CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation.

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    Alessandro Tozzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocaine increases the level of endogenous dopamine (DA in the striatum by blocking the DA transporter. Endogenous DA modulates glutamatergic inputs to striatal neurons and this modulation influences motor activity. Since D2 DA and A2A-adenosine receptors (A2A-Rs have antagonistic effects on striatal neurons, drugs targeting adenosine receptors such as caffeine-like compounds, could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. In this study, we analyzed the electrophysiological effects of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists in striatal slices and the motor effects produced by this pharmacological modulation in rodents. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Concomitant administration of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists reduced glutamatergic synaptic transmission in striatal spiny neurons while these drugs failed to produce this effect when given in isolation. This inhibitory effect was dependent on the activation of D2-like receptors and the release of endocannabinoids since it was prevented by L-sulpiride and reduced by a CB1 receptor antagonist. Combined application of cocaine and A2A-R antagonists also reduced the firing frequency of striatal cholinergic interneurons suggesting that changes in cholinergic tone might contribute to this synaptic modulation. Finally, A2A-Rs antagonists, in the presence of a sub-threshold dose of cocaine, enhanced locomotion and, in line with the electrophysiological experiments, this enhanced activity required activation of D2-like and CB1 receptors. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides a possible synaptic mechanism explaining how caffeine-like compounds could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine.

  14. Activation of the A2A adenosine G-protein-coupled receptor by conformational selection.

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    Ye, Libin; Van Eps, Ned; Zimmer, Marco; Ernst, Oliver P; Prosser, R Scott

    2016-05-12

    Conformational selection and induced fit are two prevailing mechanisms to explain the molecular basis for ligand-based activation of receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors are the largest class of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets. A molecular understanding of their activation mechanism is critical for drug discovery and design. However, direct evidence that addresses how agonist binding leads to the formation of an active receptor state is scarce. Here we use (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance to quantify the conformational landscape occupied by the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), a prototypical class A G-protein-coupled receptor. We find an ensemble of four states in equilibrium: (1) two inactive states in millisecond exchange, consistent with a formed (state S1) and a broken (state S2) salt bridge (known as 'ionic lock') between transmembrane helices 3 and 6; and (2) two active states, S3 and S3', as identified by binding of a G-protein-derived peptide. In contrast to a recent study of the β2-adrenergic receptor, the present approach allowed identification of a second active state for A2AR. Addition of inverse agonist (ZM241385) increases the population of the inactive states, while full agonists (UK432097 or NECA) stabilize the active state, S3', in a manner consistent with conformational selection. In contrast, partial agonist (LUF5834) and an allosteric modulator (HMA) exclusively increase the population of the S3 state. Thus, partial agonism is achieved here by conformational selection of a distinct active state which we predict will have compromised coupling to the G protein. Direct observation of the conformational equilibria of ligand-dependent G-protein-coupled receptor and deduction of the underlying mechanisms of receptor activation will have wide-reaching implications for our understanding of the function of G-protein-coupled receptor in health and disease. PMID:27144352

  15. Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor. Part 6: Further optimization of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides.

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    Gillespie, Roger J; Bamford, Samantha J; Clay, Alex; Gaur, Suneel; Haymes, Tim; Jackson, Philip S; Jordan, Allan M; Klenke, Burkhard; Leonardi, Stefania; Liu, Jeanette; Mansell, Howard L; Ng, Sean; Saadi, Mona; Simmonite, Heather; Stratton, Gemma C; Todd, Richard S; Williamson, Douglas S; Yule, Ian A

    2009-09-15

    Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor have been reported to have potential therapeutic benefit in the alleviation of the symptoms associated with neurodegenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. As part of our efforts to discover potent and selective antagonists of this receptor, we herein describe the detailed optimization and structure-activity relationships of a series of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides. These optimized derivatives display desirable physiochemical and pharmacokinetic profiles, which have led to promising oral activity in clinically relevant models of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Adenosine activates brown adipose tissue and recruits beige adipocytes via A2A receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Thorsten; Scheibler, Saskia; von Kügelgen, Ivar;

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized in energy expenditure, making it a potential target for anti-obesity therapies. Following exposure to cold, BAT is activated by the sympathetic nervous system with concomitant release of catecholamines and activation of β-adrenergic receptors. Because BAT...... that adenosine-A2A signalling plays an unexpected physiological role in sympathetic BAT activation and protects mice from diet-induced obesity. Those findings reveal new possibilities for developing novel obesity therapies....

  17. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

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    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation.

  18. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

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    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  19. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  20. Ultraslow Water-Mediated Transmembrane Interactions Regulate the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor.

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    Lee, Yoonji; Kim, Songmi; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-09-20

    Water molecules inside a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) have recently been spotlighted in a series of crystal structures. To decipher the dynamics and functional roles of internal water molecules in GPCR activity, we studied the A2A adenosine receptor using microsecond molecular-dynamics simulations. Our study finds that the amount of water flux across the transmembrane (TM) domain varies depending on the receptor state, and that the water molecules of the TM channel in the active state flow three times more slowly than those in the inactive state. Depending on the location in solvent-protein interface as well as the receptor state, the average residence time of water in each residue varies from ∼O(10(2)) ps to ∼O(10(2)) ns. Especially, water molecules, exhibiting ultraslow relaxation (∼O(10(2)) ns) in the active state, are found around the microswitch residues that are considered activity hotspots for GPCR function. A continuous allosteric network spanning the TM domain, arising from water-mediated contacts, is unique in the active state, underscoring the importance of slow water molecules in the activation of GPCRs. PMID:27653477

  1. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

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    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  2. Computational study of the binding modes of caffeine to the adenosine A2A receptor.

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    Liu, Yuli; Burger, Steven K; Ayers, Paul W; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban

    2011-12-01

    Using the recently solved crystal structure of the human adenosine A(2A) receptor, we applied MM/PBSA to compare the binding modes of caffeine with those of the high-affinity selective antagonist ZM241385. MD simulations were performed in the environment of the lipid membrane bilayer. Four low-energy binding modes of caffeine-A(2A) were found, all of which had similar energies. Assuming an equal contribution of each binding mode of caffeine, the computed binding free energy difference between caffeine and ZM241385 is -2.4 kcal/mol, which compares favorably with the experimental value, -3.6 kcal/mol. The configurational entropy contribution of -0.9 kcal/mol from multiple binding modes of caffeine helps explain how a small molecule like caffeine can compete with a significantly larger molecule, ZM241385, which can form many more interactions with the receptor. We also performed residue-wise energy decomposition and found that Phe168, Leu249, and Ile274 contribute most significantly to the binding modes of caffeine and ZM241385. PMID:21970461

  3. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

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    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  4. Activation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of renal vs. adrenal sympathetic nerve activity.

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    Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2009-04-01

    The role of nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex mechanisms is controversial. Stimulation of these receptors releases glutamate within the NTS and elicits baroreflex-like decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas inhibition of these receptors attenuates HR baroreflex responses. In contrast, stimulation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors increases preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA), and the depressor and sympathoinhibitory responses are not markedly affected by sinoaortic denervation and blockade of NTS glutamatergic transmission. To elucidate the role of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex function, we compared full baroreflex stimulus-response curves for HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA (intravenous nitroprusside/phenylephrine) before and after bilateral NTS microinjections of selective adenosine A(2a) receptor agonist (CGS-21680; 2.0, 20 pmol/50 nl), selective A(2a) receptor antagonist (ZM-241385; 40 pmol/100 nl), and nonselective A(1) + A(2a) receptor antagonist (8-SPT; 1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats. Activation of A(2a) receptors decreased the range, upper plateau, and gain of baroreflex-response curves for RSNA, whereas these parameters all increased for pre-ASNA, consistent with direct effects of the agonist on regional sympathetic activity. However, no resetting of baroreflex-response curves along the MAP axis occurred despite the marked decreases in baseline MAP. The antagonists had no marked effects on baseline variables or baroreflex-response functions. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors differentially alters baroreflex control of HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA mostly via non-baroreflex mechanism(s), and these receptors have virtually no tonic action on baroreflex control of these sympathetic outputs.

  5. Overexpression of adenosine A2A receptors in rats: effects on depression, locomotion and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana E Coelho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are a sub-type of receptors enriched in basal ganglia, activated by the neuromodulator adenosine, which interact with dopamine D2 receptors. Although this reciprocal antagonistic interaction is well established in motor function, the outcome in dopamine-related behaviors remains uncertain, in particular in depression and anxiety. We have demonstrated an upsurge of A2AR associated to aging and chronic stress. Furthermore, Alzheimer’s disease patients present A2AR accumulation in cortical areas together with depressive signs. We now tested the impact of overexpressing A2AR in forebrain neurons on dopamine related behavior, namely depression. Adult male rats overexpressing human A2AR under the control of CaMKII promoter [Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR] and aged-matched wild-types (WT of the same strain (Sprague-Dawley were studied. The forced swimming test (FST, sucrose preference test (SPT and the open-field test (OFT were performed to evaluate behavioral despair, anhedonia, locomotion and anxiety. Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR animals spent more time floating and less time swimming in the FST and presented a decreased sucrose preference at 48h in the SPT. They also covered higher distances in the OFT and spent more time in the central zone than the WT. The results indicate that Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR rats exhibit depressive-like behavior, hyperlocomotion and altered exploratory behavior. This A2AR overexpression may explain the depressive signs found in aging, chronic stress and Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  7. Striatal pre- and postsynaptic profile of adenosine A(2A receptor antagonists.

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    Marco Orru

    Full Text Available Striatal adenosine A(2A receptors (A(2ARs are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D(2 receptors (D(2Rs. A(2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A(1 receptors (A(1Rs. It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A(2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A(2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A(2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A(2AR-D(2R and A(1R-A(2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A(2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A(2AR when co-expressed with D(2R than with A(1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A(2AR co-expressed with D(2R than co-expressed with A(1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile

  8. Continuous adenosine A2A receptor antagonism after focal cerebral ischemia in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronz, Ulrike; Deten, Alexander; Baumann, Frank; Kranz, Alexander; Weidlich, Sarah; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nieber, Karen; Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Antagonism of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has been shown to elicit substantial neuroprotective properties when given immediately after cerebral ischemia. We asked whether the continuous application of a selective A2AR antagonist within a clinically relevant time window will be a feasible and effective approach to treat focal cerebral ischemia. To answer this question, we subjected 20 male spontaneously hypertensive rats to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and randomized them equally to a verum and a control group. Two hours after stroke onset, the animals received a subcutaneous implantation of an osmotic minipump filled with 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) or vehicle solution. The serum level of CSC was measured twice a day for three consecutive days. The infarct volume was determined at days 1 and 3 using magnetic resonance imaging. We found the serum level of CSC showing a bell-shaped curve with its maximum at 36 h. The infarct volume was not affected by continuous CSC treatment. These results suggest that delayed and continuous CSC application was not sufficient to treat acute ischemic stroke, potentially due to unfavorable hepatic elimination and metabolization of the pharmaceutical. PMID:24170241

  9. Synthesis and Properties of a New Water-Soluble Prodrug of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonist MSX-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa E. Müller

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The compound L-valine-3-{8-[(E-2-[3-methoxyphenylethenyl]-7-methyl-1-propargylxanthine-3-yl}propyl ester hydrochloride (MSX-4 was synthesized as an aminoacid ester prodrug of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-2. It was found to bestable in artificial gastric acid, but readily cleaved by pig liver esterase.

  10. Differential role of nitric oxide in regional sympathetic responses to stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Tan, Nobusuke; O'Leary, Donal S

    2005-02-01

    Our previous studies showed that preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), lumbar, and postganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activities (post-ASNA) are inhibited after stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and glutamatergic and P2x receptors and are activated after stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors. However, stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas it activated pre-ASNA. Because the effects evoked by NTS A2a receptors may be mediated via activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms in NTS neurons, we tested the hypothesis that NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors would attenuate regional sympathetic responses to NTS A2a receptor stimulation, whereas NO donors would evoke contrasting responses from pre-ASNA versus RSNA and post-ASNA. Therefore, in chloralose/urethane-anesthetized rats, we compared hemodynamic and regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of selective A2a receptor agonist (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) after pretreatment with NOS inhibitors Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 nmol/100 nl) and 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]imidazole (100 pmol/100 nl) versus pretreatment with vehicle (100 nl). In addition, responses to microinjections into the NTS of different NO donors [40 and 400 pmol/50 nl sodium nitroprusside (SNP); 0.5 and 5 nmol/50 nl 3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (DETA NONOate, also known as NOC-18), and 2 nmol/50 nl 3-(2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-1-propylhydrazino)-1-propanamine (PAPA NONOate, also known as NOC-15)], the NO precursor L-arginine (10-50 nmol/50 nl), and sodium glutamate (500 pmol/50 nl) were evaluated. SNP, DETA NONOate, and PAPA NONOate activated pre-ASNA and inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas l-arginine and glutamate microinjected into the same site of the NTS inhibited all these sympathetic outputs. Decreases in heart rate and depressor or biphasic responses accompanied the neural responses. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors

  11. Vasopressin V1 receptors contribute to hemodynamic and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors in NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Activation of adenosine A2a receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas increases in preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) occur, a pattern similar to that observed during hypotensive hemorrhage. Central vasopressin V1 receptors may contribute to posthemorrhagic hypotension and bradycardia. Both V1 and A2a receptors are densely expressed in the NTS, and both of these receptors are involved in cardiovascular control; thus they may interact. The responses elicited by NTS A2a receptors are mediated mostly via nonglutamatergic mechanisms, possibly via release of vasopressin. Therefore, we investigated whether blockade of NTS V1 receptors alters the autonomic response patterns evoked by stimulation of NTS A2a receptors (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) in alpha-chloralose-urethane anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, we compared the regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of vasopressin (0.1-100 ng/50 nl) into the NTS. Blockade of V1 receptors reversed the normal decreases in MAP into increases (-95.6 +/- 28.3 vs. 51.4 +/- 15.7 integralDelta%), virtually abolished the decreases in HR (-258.3 +/- 54.0 vs. 18.9 +/- 57.8 integralDeltabeats/min) and RSNA (-239.3 +/- 47.4 vs. 15.9 +/- 36.1 integralDelta%), and did not affect the increases in pre-ASNA (279.7 +/- 48.3 vs. 233.1 +/- 54.1 integralDelta%) evoked by A2a receptor stimulation. The responses partially returned toward normal values approximately 90 min after the blockade. Microinjections of vasopressin into the NTS evoked dose-dependent decreases in HR and RSNA and variable MAP and pre-ASNA responses with a tendency toward increases. We conclude that the decreases in MAP, HR, and RSNA in response to NTS A2a receptor stimulation may be mediated via release of vasopressin from neural terminals in the NTS. The differential effects of NTS V1 and A2a receptors on

  12. Endogenous ion channel complexes: the NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, René A W

    2011-06-01

    Ionotropic receptors, including the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) mediate fast neurotransmission, neurodevelopment, neuronal excitability and learning. In the present article, the structure and function of the NMDAR is reviewed with the aim to condense our current understanding and highlight frontiers where important questions regarding the biology of this receptor remain unanswered. In the second part of the present review, new biochemical and genetic approaches for the investigation of ion channel receptor complexes will be discussed.

  13. Presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors mediate fade induced by neuromuscular relaxants that exhibit anticholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornia, Elaine Cs; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Alves-Do-Prado, Wilson

    2011-03-01

    1. Pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium are antinicotinic agents that, in contrast with d-tubocurarine and hexamethonium, exhibit anticholinesterase activity. Pancuronium-, cisatracurium- and vecuronium-induced fade results from blockade of facilitatory nicotinic receptors on motor nerves, but fade produced by such agents also depends on the presynaptic activation of inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptors by acetylcholine released from motor nerve terminals and activation of inhibitory adenosine A1 receptors by adenosine released from motor nerves and muscles. The participation of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors in fade caused by pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we determined the effects of ZM241385, an antagonist of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors, on fade produced by these neuromuscular relaxants in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparation. 2. The muscles were stimulated indirectly at 75±3Hz to induce a sustained tetanizing muscular contraction. The lowest concentration at which each antinicotinic agent produced fade without modifying initial tetanic tension (presynaptic action) was determined. 3. d-Tubocurarine-induced fade occurred only at 55 nmol/L, a concentration that also reduced maximal tetanic tension (post-synaptic action). At 10 nmol/L, ZM 241385 alone did not produce fade, but it did attenuate pancuronium (0.32 μmol/L)-, cisatracurium (0.32 μmol/L)- and vecuronium (0.36 μmol/L)-induced fade. 4. The fade induced by the 'pure' antinicotinic agents d-tubocurarine (55 nmol/L) and hexamethonium (413 μmol/L) was not altered by 10 nmol/L ZM 241385, indicating that presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors play a significant role in the fade produced by antinicotinic agents when such agents have anticholinesterase activity.

  14. Adenosine is required for sustained inflammasome activation via the A2A receptor and the HIF-1α pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xinshou; Ghani, Ayaz; Malik, Ahsan; Wilder, Tuere; Colegio, Oscar Rene; Flavell, Richard Anthony; Cronstein, Bruce Neil; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2013-12-01

    Inflammasome pathways are important in chronic diseases; however, it is not known how the signalling is sustained after initiation. Inflammasome activation is dependent on stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ATP that provide two distinct signals resulting in rapid production of interleukin (IL)-1β, with the lack of response to repeat stimulation. Here we report that adenosine is a key regulator of inflammasome activity, increasing the duration of the inflammatory response via the A2A receptor. Adenosine does not replace signals provided by stimuli such as LPS or ATP but sustains inflammasome activity via a cAMP/PKA/CREB/HIF-1α pathway. In the setting of the lack of IL-1β responses after previous exposure to LPS, adenosine can supersede this tolerogenic state and drive IL-1β production. These data reveal that inflammasome activity is sustained, after initial activation, by A2A receptor-mediated signalling.

  15. A2A adenosine receptor-mediated increase in coronary flow in hyperlipidemic APOE–knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Bunyen

    2011-01-01

    Bunyen Teng, S Jamal MustafaDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology and Center for Cardiovascular and Respiratory Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USAAbstract: Adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation is predominantly A2A adenosine receptor (AR)-mediated, whereas A1 AR is known to negatively modulate the coronary flow (CF). However, the coronary responses to adenosine in hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis are not well understood. Using hyperlipidemic/atherosclerotic apolip...

  16. Functional expression of adenosine A2A and A3 receptors in the mouse dendritic cell line XS-106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, John M; Reeder, Steve; Rees, Bob; Alexander, Steve; Kendall, Dave

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that adenosine receptors can modulate the function of cells involved in the immune system. For example, human dendritic cells derived from blood monocytes have recently been described to express functional adenosine A1, A2A and A3 receptors. Therefore, in the present study, we have investigated whether the recently established murine dendritic cell line XS-106 expresses functional adenosine receptors. The selective adenosine A3 receptor agonist 1-[2-chloro-6[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide (2-Cl-IB-MECA) inhibited forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and stimulated concentration-dependent increases in p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. The selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist 4-[2-[[-6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzene-propanoic acid (CGS 21680) stimulated a robust increase in [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. In contrast, the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine) did not inhibit forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation or stimulate increases in p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. These observations suggest that XS-106 cells express functional adenosine A2A and A3 receptors. The non-selective adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release from XS-106 cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. Furthermore, treatment with Cl-IB-MECA (1 microM) or CGS 21680 (1 microM) alone produced a partial inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha release (when compared to NECA), whereas a combination of both agonists resulted in the inhibition of TNF-alpha release comparable to that observed with NECA alone. Treatment of cells with the adenosine A2A receptor selective antagonists 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a

  17. Complex Pharmacology of Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond;

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are historically the most successful family of drug targets. In recent times it has become clear that the pharmacology of these receptors is far more complex than previously imagined. Understanding of the pharmacological regulation of GPCRs now extends beyond...... pharmacology have shaped understanding of the complex pharmacology of receptors that recognize and are activated by nonesterified or "free" fatty acids (FFAs). The FFA family of receptors is a recently deorphanized set of GPCRs, the members of which are now receiving substantial interest as novel targets...... for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Further understanding of the complex pharmacology of these receptors will be critical to unlocking their ultimate therapeutic potential....

  18. Blockage of A2A and A3 adenosine receptors decreases the desensitization of human GABAA receptors microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Cristina; Palma, Eleonora; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Morace, Roberta; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonietta; Giangaspero, Felice; Aronica, Eleonora; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Cristalli, Gloria; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Volpini, Rosaria; Limatola, Cristina; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, acting through A2A and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), alters the stability of currents (IGABA) generated by GABAA receptors expressed in the epileptic human mesial temporal lobe (MTLE). Here we examined whether ARs alter the stability (desensitization) of IGABA expressed in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and in periglioma epileptic tissues. The experiments were performed with tissues from 23 patients, using voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with membranes isolated from human MTLE and FCD tissues or using patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in epileptic tissue slices. On repetitive activation, the epileptic GABAA receptors revealed instability, manifested by a large IGABA rundown, which in most of the oocytes (≈70%) was obviously impaired by the new A2A antagonists ANR82, ANR94, and ANR152. In most MTLE tissue-microtransplanted oocytes, a new A3 receptor antagonist (ANR235) significantly improved IGABA stability. Moreover, patch-clamped pyramidal neurons from human neocortical slices of periglioma epileptic tissues exhibited altered IGABA rundown on ANR94 treatment. Our findings indicate that antagonizing A2A and A3 receptors increases the IGABA stability in different epileptic tissues and suggest that adenosine derivatives may offer therapeutic opportunities in various forms of human epilepsy. PMID:19721003

  19. Chemotaxis receptor complexes: from signaling to assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Endres

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of chemoreceptors in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane allow for the sensing of ligands with remarkable sensitivity. Despite the excellent characterization of the chemotaxis signaling network, very little is known about what controls receptor complex size. Here we use in vitro signaling data to model the distribution of complex sizes. In particular, we model Tar receptors in membranes as an ensemble of different sized oligomer complexes, i.e., receptor dimers, dimers of dimers, and trimers of dimers, where the relative free energies, including receptor modification, ligand binding, and interaction with the kinase CheA determine the size distribution. Our model compares favorably with a variety of signaling data, including dose-response curves of receptor activity and the dependence of activity on receptor density in the membrane. We propose that the kinetics of complex assembly can be measured in vitro from the temporal response to a perturbation of the complex free energies, e.g., by addition of ligand.

  20. Adenosine A(2A) receptor modulation of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse plasticity during associative learning in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontinha, Bruno M; Delgado-García, José M; Madroñal, Noelia; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Gruart, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies have characterized the electrophysiological and molecular signaling pathways of adenosine tonic modulation on long-lasting synaptic plasticity events, particularly for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it remains to be elucidated whether the long-term changes produced by endogenous adenosine in the efficiency of synapses are related to those required for learning and memory formation. Our goal was to understand how endogenous activation of adenosine excitatory A(2A) receptors modulates the associative learning evolution in conscious behaving mice. We have studied here the effects of the application of a highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, SCH58261, upon a well-known associative learning paradigm-classical eyeblink conditioning. We used a trace paradigm, with a tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electric shock presented to the supraorbital nerve as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A single electrical pulse was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) in the pyramidal CA1 area during the CS-US interval. In vehicle-injected animals, there was a progressive increase in the percentage of conditioning responses (CRs) and in the slope of fEPSPs through conditioning sessions, an effect that was completely prevented (and lost) in SCH58261 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) -injected animals. Moreover, experimentally evoked LTP was impaired in SCH58261-injected mice. In conclusion, the endogenous activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors plays a pivotal effect on the associative learning process and its relevant hippocampal circuits, including activity-dependent changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse.

  1. In vivo evaluation of [11C]preladenant positron emission tomography for quantification of adenosine A2A receptors in the rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Xiaoyun; Khanapur, Shivashankar; de Jong, Johan R; Willemsen, Antoon T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi Ajo; Elsinga, Philip H; de Vries, Erik Fj

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]Preladenant was developed as a novel adenosine A2A receptor positron emission tomography radioligand. The present study aims to evaluate the suitability of [(11)C]preladenant positron emission tomography for the quantification of striatal A2A receptor density and the assessment of striatal A2

  2. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Pun, R Y; Millhorn, D E

    1998-04-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. 2. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. 3. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. 4. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. 5. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6-22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. 6. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in

  3. Regulation of epithelial sodium channel a-subunit expression by adenosine receptor A2a in alveolar epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Wang; WANG Dao-xin; ZHANG Wei; LI Chang-yi

    2011-01-01

    Background The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel a-subunit (a-ENaC) is an important factor for alveolar fluid clearance during acute lung injury. The relationship between adenosine receptor A2a (A2aAR) expressed in alveolar epithelial cells and aα-ENaC is poorly understood. We targeted the A2aAR in this study to investigate its role in the expression of αa-ENaC and in acute lung injury.Methods A549 cells were incubated with different concentrations of A2aAR agonist CGS-21680 and with 100 μmol/L CGS-21680 for various times. Rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after CGS-21680 was injected. Animals were sacrificed and tissue was harvested for evaluation of lung injury by analysis of the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, lung permeability and myeloperoxidase activity. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of α-ENaC in A549 cells and alveolar type II epithelial cells.Results Both mRNA and protein levels of α-ENaC were markedly higher from 4 hours to 24 hours after exposure to 100μmol/L CGS-21680. There were significant changes from 0.1 umol/L to 100 μmol/L CGS-21680, with a positive correlation between increased concentrations of CGS-21680 and expression of α-ENaC. Treatment with CGS-21680during LPS induced lung injury protected the lung and promoted α-ENaC expression in the alveolar epithelial cells.Conclusion Activation of A2aAR has a protective effect during the lung injury, which may be beneficial to the prognosis of acute lung injury.

  4. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors with iron deficiency in rats: effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-07-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A(2A) receptors was found in rats fed during 3 weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A(2A) receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS.

  5. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

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    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  6. The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M B; Fuxe, K; Werge, T;

    2002-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 has shown effects similar to dopamine antagonists in behavioural assays in rats predictive for antipsychotic activity, without induction of extrapyramidal side-effects (EPS). In the present study, we examined whether this functional dopamine antagonism...... and lack of EPS in rodents could also be observed in non-human primates. We investigated the effects of CGS 21680 on behaviours induced by D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine in EPS-sensitized Cebus apella monkeys. CGS 21680 was administered s.c. in doses of 0.01, 0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg, alone......-induced behaviours (unrest, stereotypies, arousal) were unaffected. EPS were not observed at any dose. At 0.05 mg/kg CGS 21680 produced vomiting. The two lower doses did not produce observable side-effects. Though the differential effect on amphetamine- and apomorphine-induced behaviours is intriguing, CGS 21680...

  7. Attenuation of gastric mucosal inflammation induced by aspirin through activation of A2A adenosine receptor in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaru Odashima; Reina Ohba; Sumio Watanabe; Joel Linden; Michiro Otaka; Mario Jin; Koga Komatsu; Isao Wada; Youhei Horikawa; Tamotsu Matsuhashi; Natsumi Hatakeyama; Jinko Oyake

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether a specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist (ATL-146e) can ameliorate aspirin-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats, and reduce neutrophil accumulation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines.METHODS: Gastric lesions were produced by oral gavage of aspirin (200 mg/kg) and HCl (0.15 mol/L,8.0 mL/kg). 4-{3-[6-Amino-9-(5-ethylcarbamoyl-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-2-yl]-prop-2-ynyl}-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid methyl ester (ATL-146e,2.5-5 μg/kg, IP) was injected 30 min before the administration of aspirin. Tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration in gastric mucosa was measured as an index of neutrophil infiltration. Gastric mucosal concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were determined by ELISA. Also, we examined the effect of ATL-146e on tissue prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and gastric secretion.RESULTS: Intragastric administration of aspirin induced multiple hemorrhagic erosions in rat gastric mucosa. The total length of gastric erosions (ulcer index) in control rats was 29.8±7.75 mm and was reduced to 3.8±1.42 mm after pretreatment with 5.0 g/kg ATL-146e (P< 0.01).The gastric contents of MPO and pro-inflammatory cytokines were all increased after the administration of aspirin and reduced to nearly normal levels by ATL-146e.Gastric mucosal PGE2 concentration was not affected by intraperitoneal injection of ATL-146e.CONCLUSION: The specific adenosine A2A receptor agohist, ATL-146e, has potent anti-ulcer effects presumably mediated by its anti-inflammatory properties.

  8. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs.

  9. Adenosine A2A receptor deficiency up-regulates cystatin F expression in white matter lesions induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei; Ran, Hong; Zhou, Zhujuan; He, Qifen; Zheng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that the inactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced white matter lesions (WMLs) by enhancing neuroinflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor remains unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that cystatin F, a potent endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is selectively expressed in immune cells in association with inflammatory demyelination in central nervous system diseases. To understand the expression of cystatin F and its potential role in the effect of A2A receptor on WMLs induced through chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, we investigated cystatin F expression in the WMLs of A2A receptor gene knockout mice, the littermate wild-type mice and wild-type mice treated daily with the A2A receptor agonist CGS21680 or both CGS21680 and A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The results of quantitative-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that cystatin F mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated in the WMLs after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In addition, cystatin F expression in the corpus callosum was significantly increased in A2A receptor gene knockout mice and markedly decreased in mice treated with CGS21680 on both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, SCH58261 counteracted the attenuation of cystatin F expression produced by CGS21680 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, double immunofluorescence staining revealed that cystatin F was co-localized with the activated microglia marker CD11b. In conclusion, the cystatin F expression in the activated microglia is closely associated with the effect of the A2A receptors, which may be related to the neuroinflammatory responses occurring during the pathological process.

  10. Adenosine A2A receptor deficiency up-regulates cystatin F expression in white matter lesions induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

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    Wei Duan

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we have shown that the inactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced white matter lesions (WMLs by enhancing neuroinflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor remains unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that cystatin F, a potent endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is selectively expressed in immune cells in association with inflammatory demyelination in central nervous system diseases. To understand the expression of cystatin F and its potential role in the effect of A2A receptor on WMLs induced through chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, we investigated cystatin F expression in the WMLs of A2A receptor gene knockout mice, the littermate wild-type mice and wild-type mice treated daily with the A2A receptor agonist CGS21680 or both CGS21680 and A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The results of quantitative-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that cystatin F mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated in the WMLs after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In addition, cystatin F expression in the corpus callosum was significantly increased in A2A receptor gene knockout mice and markedly decreased in mice treated with CGS21680 on both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, SCH58261 counteracted the attenuation of cystatin F expression produced by CGS21680 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, double immunofluorescence staining revealed that cystatin F was co-localized with the activated microglia marker CD11b. In conclusion, the cystatin F expression in the activated microglia is closely associated with the effect of the A2A receptors, which may be related to the neuroinflammatory responses occurring during the pathological process.

  11. Adenosine A(2A receptors measured with [C]TMSX PET in the striata of Parkinson's disease patients.

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    Masahiro Mishina

    Full Text Available Adenosine A(2A receptors (A2ARs are thought to interact negatively with the dopamine D(2 receptor (D2R, so selective A2AR antagonists have attracted attention as novel treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD. However, no information about the receptor in living patients with PD is available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between A2ARs and the dopaminergic system in the striata of drug-naïve PD patients and PD patients with dyskinesia, and alteration of these receptors after antiparkinsonian therapy. We measured binding ability of striatal A2ARs using positron emission tomography (PET with [7-methyl-(11C]-(E-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine ([(11C]TMSX in nine drug-naïve patients with PD, seven PD patients with mild dyskinesia and six elderly control subjects using PET. The patients and eight normal control subjects were also examined for binding ability of dopamine transporters and D2Rs. Seven of the drug-naïve patients underwent a second series of PET scans following therapy. We found that the distribution volume ratio of A2ARs in the putamen were larger in the dyskinesic patients than in the control subjects (p<0.05, Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. In the drug-naïve patients, the binding ability of the A2ARs in the putamen, but not in the head of caudate nucleus, was significantly lower on the more affected side than on the less affected side (p<0.05, paired t-test. In addition, the A2ARs were significantly increased after antiparkinsonian therapy in the bilateral putamen of the drug-naïve patients (p<0.05, paired t-test but not in the bilateral head of caudate nucleus. Our study demonstrated that the A2ARs in the putamen were increased in the PD patients with dyskinesia, and also suggest that the A2ARs in the putamen compensate for the asymmetrical decrease of dopamine in drug-naïve PD patients and that antiparkinsonian therapy increases the A2ARs in the putamen. The A2ARs may play an

  12. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function. PMID:26056314

  13. The adenosine metabolite inosine is a functional agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor with a unique signaling bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welihinda, Ajith A; Kaur, Manmeet; Greene, Kelly; Zhai, Yongjiao; Amento, Edward P

    2016-06-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that is produced by catabolism of adenosine. Adenosine has a short half-life (approximately 10s) and is rapidly deaminated to inosine, a stable metabolite with a half-life of approximately 15h. Resembling adenosine, inosine acting through adenosine receptors (ARs) exerts a wide range of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in vivo. The immunomodulatory effects of inosine in vivo, at least in part, are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), an observation that cannot be explained fully by in vitro pharmacological characterization of inosine at the A2AR. It is unclear whether the in vivo effects of inosine are due to inosine or a metabolite of inosine engaging the A2AR. Here, utilizing a combination of label-free, cell-based, and membrane-based functional assays in conjunction with an equilibrium agonist-binding assay we provide evidence for inosine engagement at the A2AR and subsequent activation of downstream signaling events. Inosine-mediated A2AR activation leads to cAMP production with an EC50 of 300.7μM and to extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation with an EC50 of 89.38μM. Our data demonstrate that inosine produces ERK1/2-biased signaling whereas adenosine produces cAMP-biased signaling at the A2AR, highlighting pharmacological differences between these two agonists. Given the in vivo stability of inosine, our data suggest an additional, previously unrecognized, mechanism that utilizes inosine to functionally amplify and prolong A2AR activation in vivo. PMID:26903141

  14. Prevention of adenosine A2A receptor activation diminishes beat-to-beat alternation in human atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Cristina E; Llach, Anna; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Tarifa, Carmen; Barriga, Montserrat; Wiegerinck, Rob F; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benitéz, Raúl; Montiel, José; Cinca, Juan; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with increased spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and linked to increased adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expression and activation. Here we tested whether this may favor atrial arrhythmogenesis by promoting beat-to-beat alternation and irregularity. Patch-clamp and confocal calcium imaging was used to measure the beat-to-beat response of the calcium current and transient in human atrial myocytes. Responses were classified as uniform, alternating or irregular and stimulation of Gs-protein coupled receptors decreased the frequency where a uniform response could be maintained from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 0.6 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.01 for beta-adrenergic receptors and from 1.4 ± 0.1 to 0.5 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.05 for A2ARs. The latter was linked to increased spontaneous calcium release and after-depolarizations. Moreover, A2AR activation increased the fraction of non-uniformly responding cells in HL-1 myocyte cultures from 19 ± 3 to 51 ± 9 %; p < 0.02, and electrical mapping in perfused porcine atria revealed that adenosine induced electrical alternans at longer cycle lengths, doubled the fraction of electrodes showing alternation, and increased the amplitude of alternations. Importantly, protein kinase A inhibition increased the highest frequency where uniform responses could be maintained from 0.84 ± 0.12 to 1.86 ± 0.11 Hz; p < 0.001 and prevention of A2AR-activation with exogenous adenosine deaminase selectively increased the threshold from 0.8 ± 0.1 to 1.2 ± 0.1 Hz; p = 0.001 in myocytes from patients with AF. In conclusion, A2AR-activation promotes beat-to-beat irregularities in the calcium transient in human atrial myocytes, and prevention of A2AR activation may be a novel means to maintain uniform beat-to-beat responses at higher beating frequencies in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  15. Activation of the adenosine A2A receptor attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is associated with increased intracellular calcium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yumei; Zou, Haifeng; Zhao, Ping; Sun, Bo; Wang, Jinghua; Kong, Qingfei; Mu, Lili; Zhao, Sihan; Wang, Guangyou; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Jiaying; Yin, Pengqi; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Xiuli; Li, Hulun

    2016-08-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common autoimmune disease that inevitably causes inflammatory nerve demyelination. However, an effective approach to prevent its course is still lacking and urgently needed. Recently, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has emerged as a novel inflammation regulator. Manipulation of A2AR activity may suppress the MS process and protect against nerve damage. To test this hypothesis, we treated murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for MS, with the selective A2AR agonist, CGS21680 (CGS). We evaluated the effects of CGS on the pathological features of EAE progression, including CNS cellular infiltration, inflammatory cytokine expression, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell surface markers. Treatment with CGS significantly suppressed specific lymphocyte proliferation, reduced infiltration of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and attenuated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, which in turn inhibited the EAE progression. For the first time, we demonstrate that CGS can increase the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in murine lymphocytes, which may be the mechanism underlying the suppressive effects of CGS-induced A2AR activation on EAE progression. Our findings strongly suggest that A2AR is a potential therapeutic target for MS and provide insight into the mechanism of action of A2AR agonists, which may offer a therapeutic option for this disease. PMID:27217214

  16. Adenosine A2A Receptor and IL-10 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment

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    Beatrice Arosio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine suppresses immune responses through the A2A receptor (A2AR. This study investigated the interleukin 10 (IL-10 genetic profile and the expression of A2AR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, Alzheimer disease (AD, and age-matched controls to verify, if they may help distinguish different forms of cognitive decline. We analyzed the IL-10 genotype and the expression of A2AR in 41 subjects with AD, 10 with amnestic MCI (a-MCI, 49 with multiple cognitive domain MCI (mcd-MCI, and 46 controls. There was a significant linear increase in A2AR mRNA levels and A2AR density from mcd-MCI to a-MCI, with intermediate levels being found in AD. The IL-10 AA genotype frequency was 67% in a-MCI, 46% in AD, 35% in mcd-MCI, and 20% in controls. These data suggest that the assessment of the IL-10 genotype and the expression of A2AR in PBMCs may be a valuable means of differentiating between a-MCI and mcd-MCI.

  17. Adenosine A(2A receptor up-regulates retinal wave frequency via starburst amacrine cells in the developing rat retina.

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    Pin-Chien Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developing retinas display retinal waves, the patterned spontaneous activity essential for circuit refinement. During the first postnatal week in rodents, retinal waves are mediated by synaptic transmission between starburst amacrine cells (SACs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. The neuromodulator adenosine is essential for the generation of retinal waves. However, the cellular basis underlying adenosine's regulation of retinal waves remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether and how the adenosine A(2A receptor (A(2AR regulates retinal waves and whether A(2AR regulation of retinal waves acts via presynaptic SACs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed that A(2AR was expressed in the inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer of the developing rat retina. Knockdown of A(2AR decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ transients, suggesting that endogenous A(2AR may up-regulate wave frequency. To investigate whether A(2AR acts via presynaptic SACs, we targeted gene expression to SACs by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type II promoter. Ca²⁺ transient frequency was increased by expressing wild-type A(2AR (A2AR-WT in SACs, suggesting that A(2AR may up-regulate retinal waves via presynaptic SACs. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings on RGCs revealed that presynaptic A(2AR-WT increased the frequency of wave-associated postsynaptic currents (PSCs or depolarizations compared to the control, without changing the RGC's excitability, membrane potentials, or PSC charge. These findings suggest that presynaptic A(2AR may not affect the membrane properties of postsynaptic RGCs. In contrast, by expressing the C-terminal truncated A(2AR mutant (A(2AR-ΔC in SACs, the wave frequency was reduced compared to the A(2AR-WT, but was similar to the control, suggesting that the full-length A(2AR in SACs is required for A(2AR up-regulation of retinal waves. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A(2AR up-regulates the frequency of retinal waves via

  18. Genetic blockade of adenosine A2A receptors induces cognitive impairments and anatomical changes related to psychotic symptoms in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso-Castro, Maria; Gracia-Rubio, Irene; Ciruela, Francisco; Valverde, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic severe mental disorder with a presumed neurodevelopmental origin, and no effective treatment. Schizophrenia is a multifactorial disease with genetic, environmental and neurochemical etiology. The main theories on the pathophysiology of this disorder include alterations in dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in limbic and cortical areas of the brain. Early hypotheses also suggested that nucleoside adenosine is a putative affected neurotransmitter system, and clinical evidence suggests that adenosine adjuvants improve treatment outcomes, especially in poorly responsive patients. Hence, it is important to elucidate the role of the neuromodulator adenosine in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) subtypes are expressed in brain areas controlling motivational responses and cognition, including striatum, and in lower levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The aim of this study was to characterize A2AR knockout (KO) mice with complete and specific inactivation of A2AR, as an animal model for schizophrenia. We performed behavioral, anatomical and neurochemical studies to assess psychotic-like symptoms in adult male and female KO and wild-type (WT) littermates. Our results show impairments in inhibitory responses and sensory gating in A2AR KO animals. Hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and MK-801 was reduced in KO animals when compared to WT littermates. Moreover, A2AR KO animals show motor disturbances, social and cognitive alterations. Finally, behavioral impairments were associated with enlargement of brain lateral ventricles and decreased BDNF levels in the hippocampus. These data highlight the role of adenosine in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and provide new possibilities for the therapeutic management of schizophrenia. PMID:27133030

  19. Adenosine A2A receptor activation reduces recurrence and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection in mice following vancomycin treatment

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    Li Yuesheng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR decreases production of inflammatory cytokines, prevents C. difficile toxin A-induced enteritis and, in combination with antibiotics, increases survival from sepsis in mice. We investigated whether A2AAR activation improves and A2AAR deletion worsens outcomes in a murine model of C. difficile (strain VPI10463 infection (CDI. Methods C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with an antibiotic cocktail prior to infection and then treated with vancomycin with or without an A2AAR agonist. A2AAR-/- and littermate wild-type (WT mice were similarly infected, and IFNγ and TNFα were measured at peak of and recovery from infection. Results Infected, untreated mice rapidly lost weight, developed diarrhea, and had mortality rates of 50-60%. Infected mice treated with vancomycin had less weight loss and diarrhea during antibiotic treatment but mortality increased to near 100% after discontinuation of antibiotics. Infected mice treated with both vancomycin and an A2AAR agonist, either ATL370 or ATL1222, had minimal weight loss and better long-term survival than mice treated with vancomycin alone. A2AAR KO mice were more susceptible than WT mice to death from CDI. Increases in cecal IFNγ and blood TNFα were pronounced in the absence of A2AARs. Conclusion In a murine model of CDI, vancomycin treatment resulted in reduced weight loss and diarrhea during acute infection, but high recurrence and late-onset death, with overall mortality being worse than untreated infected controls. The administration of vancomycin plus an A2AAR agonist reduced inflammation and improved survival rates, suggesting a possible benefit of A2AAR agonists in the management of CDI to prevent recurrent disease.

  20. Hyperthermia-induced seizures alter adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Navarro, David Agustín; Albasanz, José L; Martín, Mairena

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The neuromodulator adenosine exerts anticonvulsant actions through binding adenosine receptors. Here, the impact of hyperthermia-induced seizures on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity has been studied at different periods in the cerebral cortical area by using radioligand binding, real-time PCR, and 5'-nucleotidase activity assays. Hyperthermic seizures were induced in 13-day-old rats using a warmed air stream from a hair dryer. Neonates exhibited rearing and falling over associated with hindlimb clonus seizures (stage 5 on Racine scale criteria) after hyperthermic induction. A significant increase in A1 receptor density was observed using [(3) H]DPCPX as radioligand, and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density was detected, using [(3) H]ZM241385 as radioligand, 48 h after hyperthermia-evoked convulsions. These short-term changes in A1 and A2A receptors were also accompanied by a loss of 5'-nucleotidase activity. No significant variations either in A1 or A2A receptor density or 5'-nucleotidase were observed 5 and 20 days after hyperthermic seizures. Taken together, both regulation of A1 and A2A receptors and loss of 5'-nucleotidase in the cerebral cortex suggest the existence of a neuroprotective mechanism against seizures. Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The consequences of hyperthermia-induced seizures (animal model of febrile seizures) on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity have been studied at different periods in cerebral cortical area. A significant increase in A1 receptor density and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density and 5'-nucleotidase activity was detected 48 h after convulsions evoked by hyperthermia

  1. Homology modeling of adenosine A2A receptor and molecular docking for exploration of appropriate potent antagonists for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijai; Somvanshi, Pallavi

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of central nervous system (CNS) that impaired the patient motor skills, speech and other functions. Adenosine A2A receptors have a unique cellular distribution in the neuron, which is used as a potential target for PD. Homology modeling was used to construct the 3-D structure of A2A using the known template (PDB: 2VT4), and the stereochemical quality was validated. Several effective antagonist drugs were selected and active amino acid residues in A2A were targeted on the basis of robust binding affinity between protein-drug interactions in molecular docking. Six antagonists, Bromocriptine, Cabergoline, Etilevodopa, Lysuride, Melevodopa and Pramipexole, were found more potent for binding and the active amino acids residues were identified (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/) in A2A receptor. It could be used as the basis for rationale designing of novel antagonist drugs against Parkinson's disease. PMID:20021407

  2. Computational Modeling of T Cell Receptor Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Timothy P; Singh, Nishant K; Pierce, Brian G; Weng, Zhiping; Baker, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) binding to peptide/MHC determines specificity and initiates signaling in antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Structures of TCR-pMHC complexes have provided enormous insight to cellular immune functions, permitted a rational understanding of processes such as pathogen escape, and led to the development of novel approaches for the design of vaccines and other therapeutics. As production, crystallization, and structure determination of TCR-pMHC complexes can be challenging, there is considerable interest in modeling new complexes. Here we describe a rapid approach to TCR-pMHC modeling that takes advantage of structural features conserved in known complexes, such as the restricted TCR binding site and the generally conserved diagonal docking mode. The approach relies on the powerful Rosetta suite and is implemented using the PyRosetta scripting environment. We show how the approach can recapitulate changes in TCR binding angles and other structural details, and highlight areas where careful evaluation of parameters is needed and alternative choices might be made. As TCRs are highly sensitive to subtle structural perturbations, there is room for improvement. Our method nonetheless generates high-quality models that can be foundational for structure-based hypotheses regarding TCR recognition. PMID:27094300

  3. Diversity and Bias through Receptor-Receptor Interactions in GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes. Focus on Examples from Dopamine D2 Receptor Heteromerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Tarakanov, Alexander; Romero Fernandez, Wilber; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Filip, Malgorzata; Agnati, Luigi F; Garriga, Pere; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980s and 1990s, it was shown that neurotensin (NT) through selective antagonistic NTR-D2 like receptor interactions increased the diversity of DA signaling by reducing D2R-mediated dopamine signaling over D1R-mediated dopamine signaling. Furthermore, D2R protomer appeared to bias the specificity of the NTR orthosteric binding site toward neuromedin N vs. NT in the heteroreceptor complex. Complex CCK2R-D1R-D2R interactions in possible heteroreceptor complexes were also demonstrated further increasing receptor diversity. In D2R-5-HT2AR heteroreceptor complexes, the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI were recently found to exert a biased agonist action on the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer leading to the development of an active conformational state different from the one produced by 5-HT. Furthermore, as recently demonstrated allosteric A2A-D2R receptor-receptor interaction brought about not only a reduced affinity of the D2R agonist binding site but also a biased modulation of the D2R protomer signaling in A2A-D2R heteroreceptor complexes. A conformational state of the D2R was induced, which moved away from Gi/o signaling and instead favored β-arrestin2-mediated signaling. These examples on allosteric receptor-receptor interactions obtained over several decades serve to illustrate the significant increase in diversity and biased recognition and signaling that develop through such mechanisms. PMID:24860548

  4. Greater adenosine A2A receptor densities in cardiac and skeletal muscle in endurance-trained men: a [11C]TMSX PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the densities of adenosine A2A receptors in cardiac and skeletal muscles between untrained and endurance-trained subjects using positron emission tomography (PET) and [7-methyl-11C]-(E)-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine ([11C]TMSX), a newly developed radioligand for mapping adenosine A2A receptors. Five untrained and five endurance-trained subjects participated in this study. The density of adenosine A2A receptors was evaluated as the distribution volume of [11C]TMSX in cardiac and triceps brachii muscles in the resting state using PET. The distribution volume of [11C]TMSX in the myocardium was significantly greater than in the triceps brachii muscle in both groups. Further, distribution volumes [11C]TMSX in the trained subjects were significantly grater than those in untrained subjects (myocardium, 3.6±0.3 vs. 3.1±0.4 ml g-1; triceps brachii muscle, 1.7±0.3 vs. 1.2±0.2 ml g-1, respectively). These results indicate that the densities of adenosine A2A receptors in the cardiac and skeletal muscles are greater in the endurance-trained men than in the untrained men

  5. Stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors reduces intracellular cholesterol accumulation and rescues mitochondrial abnormalities in human neural cell models of Niemann-Pick C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, A; De Nuccio, C; Pepponi, R; Visentin, S; Martire, A; Bernardo, A; Minghetti, L; Popoli, P

    2016-04-01

    Niemann Pick C 1 (NPC1) disease is an incurable, devastating lysosomal-lipid storage disorder characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, progressive neurological impairment and early death. Current treatments are very limited and the research of new therapeutic targets is thus mandatory. We recently showed that the stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) rescues the abnormal phenotype of fibroblasts from NPC1 patients suggesting that A2AR agonists could represent a therapeutic option for this disease. However, since all NPC1 patients develop severe neurological symptoms which can be ascribed to the complex pathology occurring in both neurons and oligodendrocytes, in the present paper we tested the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS21680 in human neuronal and oligodendroglial NPC1 cell lines (i.e. neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and oligodendroglial MO3.13 transiently transfected with NPC1 small interfering RNA). The down-regulation of the NPC1 protein effectively resulted in intracellular cholesterol accumulation and altered mitochondrial membrane potential. Both effects were significantly attenuated by CGS21680 (500 nM). The protective effects of CGS were prevented by the selective A2AR antagonist ZM241385 (500 nM). The involvement of calcium modulation was demonstrated by the ability of Bapta-AM (5-7 μM) in reverting the effect of CGS. The A2A-dependent activity was prevented by the PKA-inhibitor KT5720, thus showing the involvement of the cAMP/PKA signaling. These findings provide a clear in vitro proof of concept that A2AR agonists are promising potential drugs for NPC disease. PMID:26631535

  6. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Vânia L.; Ferreira, Diana G.; Coelho, Joana E.; Valadas, Jorge S.; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E.; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer’s and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  7. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Valadas, Jorge S; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer's and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  8. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Valadas, Jorge S; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer's and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions.

  9. Amplification of neuromuscular transmission by methylprednisolone involves activation of presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors and redistribution of synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L; Costa, A C; Noronha-Matos, J B; Silva, I; Cavalcante, W L G; Timóteo, M A; Corrado, A P; Dal Belo, C A; Ambiel, C R; Alves-do-Prado, W; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying improvement of neuromuscular transmission deficits by glucocorticoids are still a matter of debate despite these compounds have been used for decades in the treatment of autoimmune myasthenic syndromes. Besides their immunosuppressive action, corticosteroids may directly facilitate transmitter release during high-frequency motor nerve activity. This effect coincides with the predominant adenosine A2A receptor tonus, which coordinates the interplay with other receptors (e.g. muscarinic) on motor nerve endings to sustain acetylcholine (ACh) release that is required to overcome tetanic neuromuscular depression in myasthenics. Using myographic recordings, measurements of evoked [(3)H]ACh release and real-time video microscopy with the FM4-64 fluorescent dye, results show that tonic activation of facilitatory A2A receptors by endogenous adenosine accumulated during 50 Hz bursts delivered to the rat phrenic nerve is essential for methylprednisolone (0.3 mM)-induced transmitter release facilitation, because its effect was prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist, ZM 241385 (10 nM). Concurrent activation of the positive feedback loop operated by pirenzepine-sensitive muscarinic M1 autoreceptors may also play a role, whereas the corticosteroid action is restrained by the activation of co-expressed inhibitory M2 and A1 receptors blocked by methoctramine (0.1 μM) and DPCPX (2.5 nM), respectively. Inhibition of FM4-64 loading (endocytosis) by methylprednisolone following a brief tetanic stimulus (50 Hz for 5 s) suggests that it may negatively modulate synaptic vesicle turnover, thus increasing the release probability of newly recycled vesicles. Interestingly, bulk endocytosis was rehabilitated when methylprednisolone was co-applied with ZM241385. Data suggest that amplification of neuromuscular transmission by methylprednisolone may involve activation of presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors by endogenous adenosine leading to synaptic

  10. Crystallization and Structure Determination of Superantigens and Immune Receptor Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödström, Karin E J; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination of superantigens and the complexes they form with immune receptors have over the years provided insight in their modes of action. This technique requires growing large and highly ordered crystals of the superantigen or receptor-superantigen complex, followed by exposure to X-ray radiation and data collection. Here, we describe methods for crystallizing superantigens and superantigen-receptor complexes using the vapor diffusion technique, how the crystals may be optimized, and lastly data collection and structure determination.

  11. Diversity and bias through receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteroreceptor complexes. Focus on examples from dopamine D2 receptor heteromerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980ies and 1990ies it was shown that neurotensin through selective antagonistic NTR-D2likeR interactions increased the diversity of DA signalling by reducing D2R mediated dopamine signalling over D1R mediated dopamine signalling. Furthermore, D2R protomer appeared to bias the specificity of the NTR orthosteric binding site towards neuromedin N vs neurotensin in the heteroreceptor complex. Complex CCK2R-D1R-D2R interactions in possible heteroreceptor complexes were also demonstrated further increasing receptor diversity. In D2R-5-HT2AR heteroreceptor complexes the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI were recently found to exert a biased agonist action on the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer leading to the development of an active conformational state different from the one produced by 5-HT. Furthermore, as recently demonstrated allosteric A2A-D2R receptor-receptor interaction brought about not only a reduced affinity of the D2R agonist binding site but also a biased modulation of the D2R protomer signalling in A2A-D2R heteroreceptor complexes. A conformational state of the D2R was induced which moved away from Gi/o signaling and instead favoured b-arrestin2 mediated signalling. These examples on allosteric receptor-receptor interactions obtained over several decades serve to illustrate the significant increase in diversity and biased recognition and signaling that develop through such mechanisms.

  12. The Length and Flexibility of the 2-Substituent of 9-Ethyladenine Derivatives Modulate Affinity and Selectivity for the Human A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ajiroghene; Buccioni, Michela; Dal Ben, Diego; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Santinelli, Claudia; Spinaci, Andrea; Kachler, Sonja; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Volpini, Rosaria

    2016-08-19

    The A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR) is a key target for the development of pharmacological tools for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. Previous works have demonstrated that the insertion of substituents at various positions on adenine leads to A2A AR antagonists with affinity in the micromolar to nanomolar range. In this work, a series of 9-ethyladenine derivatives bearing phenylalkylamino, phenylakyloxy or phenylakylthio groups of different lengths at the 2-position were synthesised and tested against the human adenosine receptors. The derivatives showed sub-micromolar affinity for these membrane proteins. The further introduction of a bromine atom at the 8-position has the effect of improving the affinity and selectivity for all ARs and led to compounds that are able bind to the A2A AR subtype at low nanomolar levels. Functional studies confirmed that the new adenine derivatives behave as A2A AR antagonists with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values in the nanomolar range. Molecular modelling studies provide a description of the possible binding mode of these compounds at the A2A AR and an interpretation of the affinity data at this AR subtype. PMID:27037522

  13. Different cellular sources and different roles of adenosine: A1 receptor-mediated inhibition through astrocytic-driven volume transmission and synapse-restricted A2A receptor-mediated facilitation of plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine is a prototypical neuromodulator, which mainly controls excitatory transmission through the activation of widespread inhibitory A1 receptors and synaptically located A2A receptors. It was long thought that the predominant A1 receptor-meditated modulation by endogenous adenosine was a homeostatic process intrinsic to the synapse. New studies indicate that endogenous extracellular adenosine is originated as a consequence of the release of gliotransmitters, namely ATP, which sets a glo...

  14. Insight into the binding mode and the structural features of the pyrimidine derivatives as human A2A adenosine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihui; Liu, Tianjun; Wang, Xia; Wang, Jinan; Li, Guohui; Li, Yan; Yang, Ling; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of 278 monocyclic and bicyclic pyrimidine derivatives with human A2A adenosine receptor (AR) was investigated by employing molecular dynamics, thermodynamic analysis and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) approaches. The binding analysis reveals that the pyrimidine derivatives are anchored in TM2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 of A2A AR by the aromatic stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The key residues involving Phe168, Glu169, and Asn253 stabilize the monocyclic and bicyclic cores of inhibitors. The thermodynamic analysis by molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) approach also confirms the reasonableness of the binding modes. In addition, the ligand-/receptor-based comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models of high statistical significance were generated and the resulting contour maps correlate well with the structural features of the antagonists essential for high A2A AR affinity. A minor/bulky group with negative charge at C2/C6 of pyrimidine ring respectively enhances the activity for all these pyrimidine derivatives. Particularly, the higher electron density of the ring in the bicyclic derivatives, the more potent the antagonists. The obatined results might be helpful in rational design of novel candidate of A2A adenosine receptor antagonist for treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:23665268

  15. Activation of Adenosine Receptor A2A Increases HSC Proliferation and Inhibits Death and Senescence by Down-regulation of p53 and Rb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kaimul eAhsan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: During fibrosis hepatic stellate cells (HSC undergo activation, proliferation and senescence but the regulation of these important processes is poorly understood. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2A is known to be present on HSC, and its activation results in liver fibrosis. In this study, we tested if A2A has a role in the regulation of HSC proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and the relevant molecular mechanism.Methods: The ability of adenosine to regulate p53 and Rb protein levels, proliferation, apoptosis and senescence was tested in the human HSC cell line LX-2 and rat primary HSC.Results: Adenosine receptor activation down-regulates p53 and Rb protein levels, increases BrdU incorporation and increases cell survival in LX-2 cells and in primary rat HSC. These effects of NECA were reproduced by an adenosine A2A receptor specific agonist (CGS21680 and blocked by a specific antagonist (ZM241385. By day twenty-one of culture primary rat HSC entered senescence and expressed -gal which was significantly inhibited by NECA. Furthermore, NECA induced down regulation of p53 and Rb and Rac1, and decreased phosphorylation of p44-42 MAP Kinase in LX-2 cells and primary rat HSC. These effects were reproduced by the cAMP analog 8-Bromo-cAMP, and the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin, and were blocked by PKA inhibitors.Conclusions: These results demonstrate that A2A receptor regulates a number of HSC fate decisions and induces greater HSC proliferation, reduces apoptosis and senescence by decreasing p53 and Rb through cAMP-PKA/Rac1/p38 MAPK pathway. This provides a mechanism for adenosine induced HSC regulation and liver fibrosis.

  16. Striatal adenosine A2A receptor-mediated positron emission tomographic imaging in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats using [18F]-MRS5425

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: A2A receptors are expressed in the basal ganglia, specifically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons in the striatum (caudate-putamen). This brain region undergoes degeneration of presynaptic dopamine projections and depletion of dopamine in Parkinson's disease. We developed an 18F-labeled A2A analog radiotracer ([18F]-MRS5425) for A2A receptor imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that this tracer could image A2A receptor changes in the rat model for Parkinson's disease, which is created following unilateral injection of the monoaminergic toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the substantia nigra. Methods: [18F]-MRS5425 was injected intravenously in anesthetized rats, and PET imaging data were collected. Image-derived percentage injected doses per gram (%ID/g) in regions of interest was measured in the striatum of normal rats and in rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA after intravenous administration of saline (baseline), D2 agonist quinpirole (1.0 mg/kg) or D2 antagonist raclopride (6.0 mg/kg). Results: Baseline %ID/g reached a maximum at 90 s and maintained plateau for 3.5 min, and then declined slowly thereafter. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, %ID/g was significantly higher in the lesioned side compared to the intact side, and the baseline total %ID/g (data from both hemispheres were combined) was significantly higher compared to quinpirole stimulation starting from 4.5 min until the end of acquisition at 30 min. Raclopride did not produce any change in uptake compared to baseline or between the hemispheres. Conclusion: Thus, increase of A2A receptor-mediated uptake of radioactive MRS5425 could be a superior molecular target for Parkinson's imaging.

  17. 2-(1-Hexyn-1-yl)adenosine-induced intraocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-08-22

    The present study was performed to clarify the mechanism of change in intraocular pressure by 2-(1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-H-Ado), a selective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, in rabbits. 2-H-Ado (0.1%, 50 microl)-induced ocular hypertension (E(max): 7.7 mm Hg) was inhibited by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine, ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glibenclamide or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A2B receptor antagonist alloxazine or a cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The outflow facility induced by 2-H-Ado seems to be independent of increase in intraocular pressure or ATP-sensitive K+ channel. In contrast, the recovery rate in intraocular pressure decreased by hypertonic saline was accelerated by 2-H-Ado, and this response was dependent on ATP-sensitive K+ channel. These results suggest that 2-H-Ado-induced ocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor, and this is probably due to aqueous formation, but independent of change in outflow facility or prostaglandin production.

  18. 2-(1-Hexyn-1-yl)adenosine-induced intraocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-08-22

    The present study was performed to clarify the mechanism of change in intraocular pressure by 2-(1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-H-Ado), a selective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, in rabbits. 2-H-Ado (0.1%, 50 microl)-induced ocular hypertension (E(max): 7.7 mm Hg) was inhibited by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine, ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glibenclamide or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A2B receptor antagonist alloxazine or a cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The outflow facility induced by 2-H-Ado seems to be independent of increase in intraocular pressure or ATP-sensitive K+ channel. In contrast, the recovery rate in intraocular pressure decreased by hypertonic saline was accelerated by 2-H-Ado, and this response was dependent on ATP-sensitive K+ channel. These results suggest that 2-H-Ado-induced ocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor, and this is probably due to aqueous formation, but independent of change in outflow facility or prostaglandin production. PMID:16023100

  19. Large-scale functional expression of WT and truncated human adenosine A2A receptor in Pichia pastoris bioreactor cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strange Philip G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large-scale production of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs for functional and structural studies remains a challenge. Recent successes have been made in the expression of a range of GPCRs using Pichia pastoris as an expression host. P. pastoris has a number of advantages over other expression systems including ability to post-translationally modify expressed proteins, relative low cost for production and ability to grow to very high cell densities. Several previous studies have described the expression of GPCRs in P. pastoris using shaker flasks, which allow culturing of small volumes (500 ml with moderate cell densities (OD600 ~15. The use of bioreactors, which allow straightforward culturing of large volumes, together with optimal control of growth parameters including pH and dissolved oxygen to maximise cell densities and expression of the target receptors, are an attractive alternative. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of expression of the human Adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR in P. pastoris under control of a methanol-inducible promoter in both flask and bioreactor cultures. Results Bioreactor cultures yielded an approximately five times increase in cell density (OD600 ~75 compared to flask cultures prior to induction and a doubling in functional expression level per mg of membrane protein, representing a significant optimisation. Furthermore, analysis of a C-terminally truncated A2AR, terminating at residue V334 yielded the highest levels (200 pmol/mg so far reported for expression of this receptor in P. pastoris. This truncated form of the receptor was also revealed to be resistant to C-terminal degradation in contrast to the WT A2AR, and therefore more suitable for further functional and structural studies. Conclusion Large-scale expression of the A2AR in P. pastoris bioreactor cultures results in significant increases in functional expression compared to traditional flask cultures.

  20. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Eismann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures.

  1. Caffeine promotes anti-tumor immune response during tumor initiation: Involvement of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Hadar; Frishman, Valeria; Yulzari, Robert; Kachko, Leonid; Lewis, Eli C; Chaimovitz, Cidio; Douvdevani, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies depict a negative correlation between caffeine consumption and incidence of tumors in humans. The main pharmacological effects of caffeine are mediated by antagonism of the adenosine receptor, A2AR. Here, we examine whether the targeting of A2AR by caffeine plays a role in anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the effects of caffeine are studied in wild-type and A2AR knockout (A2AR(-/-)) mice. Tumor induction was achieved using the carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA). Alternatively, tumor cells, comprised of 3-MCA-induced transformed cells or B16 melanoma cells, were inoculated into animal footpads. Cytokine release was determined in a mixed lymphocyte tumor reaction (MLTR). According to our findings, caffeine-consuming mice (0.1% in water) developed tumors at a lower rate compared to water-consuming mice (14% vs. 53%, respectively, p=0.0286, n=15/group). Within the caffeine-consuming mice, tumor-free mice displayed signs of autoimmune alopecia and pronounced leukocyte recruitment intocarcinogen injection sites. Similarly, A2AR(-/-) mice exhibited reduced rates of 3-MCA-induced tumors. In tumor inoculation studies, caffeine treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and elevation in proinflammatory cytokine release over water-consuming mice, as depicted by MLTR. Addition of the adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, to MLTR resulted in a sharp decrease in IFNγ levels; this was reversed by the highly selective A2AR antagonist, ZM241385. Thus, immune response modulation through either caffeine or genetic deletion of A2AR leads to a Th1 immune profile and suppression of carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of pharmacologic A2AR antagonists may hold therapeutic potential in diminishing the rate of cancer development.

  2. Chronic hypoxia reduces adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of calcium current in rat PC12 cells via downregulation of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Beitner-Johnson, D; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-10-15

    1. Adenosine has been shown to decrease Ca2+ current (ICa) and attenuate the hypoxia-induced enhancement of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in oxygen-sensitive rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These effects are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor and protein kinase A (PKA). The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of adenosine on Ca2+ current and hypoxia-induced change in [Ca2+]i during chronic hypoxia. 2. Whole cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the effect of adenosine on ICa was significantly reduced when PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia (10 % O2) for 24 and 48 h. 3. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 revealed that the anoxia-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly enhanced when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for up to 48 h. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of adenosine on anoxia-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted in PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia for 48 h. 4. Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNA for the A2A receptor, which is the only adenosine receptor subtype expressed in PC12 cells, was significantly upregulated by hypoxia. Radioligand binding analysis with [3H]CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor ligand, showed that the number of adenosine A2A receptor binding sites was similarly increased during exposure to 10% O2 for 48 h. 5. PKA enzyme activity was significantly inhibited when PC12 cells were exposed to 10% O2 for 24 and 48 h. However, we found that hypoxia failed to induce change in adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase enzyme activity. Chronic hypoxia also did not alter the immunoreactivity level of the G protein Gsalpha, an effector of the A2 signalling pathway. 6. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that the effect of 8-bromo-cAMP, an activator of PKA, on ICa was significantly attenuated during 48 h exposure to 10% O2.7. We conclude therefore that the reduced effect of adenosine on ICa and [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells exposed to chronic hypoxia is due to hypoxia

  3. 腺苷A2a受体在炎症反应中的作用%Effects of A2a adenosine receptor on inflammatory reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郦铮铮; 郑荣远

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine has a wide distribution in organs and tissues of the human body. It plays diverse physio-logical roles including the inhibition of inflammatory reactions, the resistance of ischemia/hypoxia and the mod-ulation of immunological reactions through binding with G-protein-coupled receptors on cell surfaces. There are four kinds of adenosine receptors, A1R,A2aR,A2bR and A3R. A2aR is widely expressed in virtually all cell typos involving in inflammatory/immune responses. These cell types include glial cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, mast cells, NK cells, endothelial cells, as well as epithelial cells. A2aR serves to regulate conventional inflammatory reactions and immunological reactions.%腺苷广泛分布于全身各组织器官,可通过与细胞表面相应G-蛋白偶联受体结合发挥抑制炎症反应,对抗缺血/缺氧和免疫调节等生物学作用.目前发现腺苷受体有4种亚型,即A1R、A2aR、A2bR和A3R.其中A2a腺苷受体(A2aR)广泛分布于神经胶质细胞,巨噬细胞,树突状细胞,肥大细胞,自然杀伤细胞等免疫细胞及内皮细胞和上皮细胞中,在相应的腺苷配体作用下,可通过腺苷-腺苷受体系统介导炎症反应和发挥免疫调节作用.

  4. Studying Nuclear Receptor Complexes in the Cellular Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    The ligand-regulated structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes are commonly determined by in vitro studies of isolated receptors, cofactors, and their fragments. However, in the living cell, the complexes that form are governed not just by the relative affinities of isolated cofactors for the receptor but also by the cell-specific sequestration or concentration of subsets of competing or cooperating cofactors, receptors, and other effectors into distinct subcellular domains and/or their temporary diversion into other cellular activities. Most methods developed to understand nuclear receptor function in the cellular environment involve the direct tagging of the nuclear receptor or its cofactors with fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the tracking of those FP-tagged factors by fluorescence microscopy. One of those approaches, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, quantifies the transfer of energy from a higher energy "donor" FP to a lower energy "acceptor" FP attached to a single protein or to interacting proteins. The amount of FRET is influenced by the ligand-induced changes in the proximities and orientations of the FPs within the tagged nuclear receptor complexes, which is an indicator of the structure of the complexes, and by the kinetics of the interaction between FP-tagged factors. Here, we provide a guide for parsing information about the structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes from FRET measurements in living cells.

  5. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control.

  6. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist ST1535 in a MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, Lucia; Borsini, Franco; Wardas, Jadwiga; Khairnar, Amit S; Schintu, Nicoletta; Morelli, Micaela

    2011-03-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists are one of the most attractive classes of drug for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) as they are effective in counteracting motor dysfunctions and display neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of PD. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist ST1535 in a subchronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. C57BL/6J mice were repeatedly administered with vehicle, MPTP (20 mg/kg), or MPTP + ST1535 (2 mg/kg). Mice were sacrificed three days after the last administration of MPTP. Immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and cresyl violet staining were employed to evaluate dopaminergic neuron degeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and caudate-putamen (CPu). CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity were, respectively, evaluated as markers of microglial and astroglial response in the SNc and CPu. Stereological analysis for TH revealed a 32% loss of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc after repeated MPTP administration, which was completely prevented by ST1535 coadministration. Similarly, CPu decrease in TH (25%) was prevented by ST1535. MPTP treatment induced an intense gliosis in both the SNc and CPu. ST1535 totally prevented CD11b immunoreactivity in both analyzed areas, but only partially blocked GFAP increase in the SNc and CPu. A(2A) receptor antagonism is a new opportunity for improving symptomatic PD treatment. With its neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neuron toxicity induced by MPTP and its antagonism on glial activation, ST1535 represents a new prospect for a disease-modifying drug. PMID:20665698

  7. The Role of Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors in the Caffeine Effect on MDMA-Induced DA and 5-HT Release in the Mouse Striatum

    OpenAIRE

    Górska, A. M.; Gołembiowska, K.

    2014-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “ecstasy”) popular as a designer drug is often used with caffeine to gain a stronger stimulant effect. MDMA induces 5-HT and DA release by interaction with monoamine transporters. Co-administration of caffeine and MDMA may aggravate MDMA-induced toxic effects on DA and 5-HT terminals. In the present study, we determined whether caffeine influences DA and 5-HT release induced by MDMA. We also tried to find out if adenosine A1 and A2A receptors play a ro...

  8. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...

  9. Identification of the mitochondrial receptor complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Moczko, Martin; Dietmeier, Klaus A.; Söllner, Thomas; Segui-Real, Bartolome; Steger, Heinrich F.; Neupert, Walter; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein import involves the recognition of preproteins by receptors and their subsequent translocation across the outer membrane. In Neurospora crassa, the two import receptors, MOM19 and MOM72, were found in a complex with the general insertion protein, GIP (formed by MOM7, MOM8, MOM30 and MOM38) and MOM22. We isolated a complex out of S. cerevisiae mitochondria consisting of MOM38/ISP42, the receptor MOM72, and five new yeast proteins, the putative equivalents of N. crassa MOM...

  10. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A2A Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR. The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p<0.001 change in recognition index (RI at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory.

  11. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors. PMID:23583933

  12. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Jacobsen, Christian;

    2005-01-01

    Heme released from heme-binding proteins on internal hemorrhage, hemolysis, myolysis, or other cell damage is highly toxic due to oxidative and proinflammatory effects. Complex formation with hemopexin, the high-affinity heme-binding protein in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, dampens these effects...... and is suggested to facilitate cellular heme metabolism. Using a ligand-affinity approach, we purified the human hemopexin-heme receptor and identified it as the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)/CD91, a receptor expressed in several cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes......, neurons, and syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding experiments, including Biacore analysis, showed that hemopexin-heme complex formation elicits the high receptor affinity. Uptake studies of radio-labeled hemopexin-heme complex in LRP/CD91-expressing COS cells and confocal microscopy of the cellular processing of...

  13. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej B; Jacobsen, Christian;

    2005-01-01

    , and syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding experiments, including Biacore analysis, showed that hemopexin-heme complex formation elicits the high receptor affinity. Uptake studies of radio-labeled hemopexin-heme complex in LRP/CD91-expressing COS cells and confocal microscopy of the cellular processing of fluorescent hemopexin...

  14. Effects of adenosine A2a receptor agonist and antagonist on cerebellar nuclear factor-kB expression preceded by MDMA toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanian, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Pourheydar, Bagher; Samzadeh-Kermani, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Farzaneh; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that has a neuromodulatory role in the central nervous system. The amphetamine derivative (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) is a synthetic amphetamine analogue used recreationally to obtain an enhanced affiliated emotional response. MDMA is a potent monoaminergic neurotoxin with the potential of damage to brain neurons. The NF-kB family of proteins are ubiquitously expressed and are inducible transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes involved in disparate processes such as immunity and ingrowth, development and cell-death regulation. In this study we investigated the effects of the A2a adenosine receptor (A2a-R) agonist (CGS) and antagonist (SCH) on NF-kB expression after MDMA administration. Methods: Sixty three male Sprague–Dawley rats were injected to MDMA (10 and 20mg/kg) followed by intraperitoneal CGS (0.03 mg/kg) or SCH (0.03mg/kg) injection. The cerebellum were then removed forcresylviolet staining, western blot and RT- PCR analyses. MDMA significantly elevated NF-kB expression. Our results showed that MDMA increased the number of cerebellar dark neurons. Results: We observed that administration of CGS following MDMA, significantly elevated the NF-kB expression both at mRNA and protein levels. By contrast, administration of the A2a-R antagonist SCH resulted in a decrease in the NF-kB levels. Conclusion: These results indicated that, co-administration of A2a agonist (CGS) can protect against MDMA neurotoxic effects by increasing NF-kB expression levels; suggesting a potential application for protection against the neurotoxic effects observed in MDMA users. PMID:25678999

  15. Complexity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volinsky, Natalia; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling advances with ever-increasing pace. Yet our understanding of how the spatiotemporal dynamics of RTK signaling control specific cellular outcomes has lagged behind. Systems-centered experimental and computational approaches can help reveal how overlapping networks of signal transducers downstream of RTKs orchestrate specific cell-fate decisions. We discuss how RTK network regulatory structures, which involve the immediate posttranslational and delayed transcriptional controls by multiple feed forward and feedback loops together with pathway cross talk, adapt cells to the combinatorial variety of external cues and conditions. This intricate network circuitry endows cells with emerging capabilities for RTK signal processing and decoding. We illustrate how mathematical modeling facilitates our understanding of RTK network behaviors by unraveling specific systems properties, including bistability, oscillations, excitable responses, and generation of intricate landscapes of signaling activities. PMID:23906711

  16. Adenosine elicits an eNOS-independent reduction in arterial blood pressure in conscious mice that involves adenosine A(2A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik; Jaff, Mohammad G; Høgh, Ditte;

    2011-01-01

    Aims:  Adenosine plays an important role in the regulation of heart rate and vascular reactivity. However, the mechanisms underlying the acute effect of adenosine on arterial blood pressure in conscious mice are unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the effect of the nucleoside on mean...... arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in conscious mice. Methods:  Chronic indwelling catheters were placed in C57Bl/6J (WT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knock-out (eNOS(-/-) ) mice for continuous measurements of MAP and HR. Using PCR and myograph analysis involment of adenosine...... receptors was investigated in human and mouse renal blood vessels Results:  Bolus infusion of 0.5 mg/kg adenosine elicited significant transient decreases in MAP (99.3±2.3 to 70.4±4.5 mmHg) and HR (603.2±18.3 to 364.3±49.2 min(-1) ) which were inhibited by the A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM 241385. Activation...

  17. Neuroprotection of Persea major extract against oxygen and glucose deprivation in hippocampal slices involves increased glutamate uptake and modulation of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielli Letícia Fedalto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is characterised by a lack of oxygen and glucose in the brain, leading to excessive glutamate release and neuronal cell death. Adenosine is produced in response to ATP depletion and acts as an endogenous neuromodulator that reduces excitotoxicity. Persea major (Meins. L.E. Kopp (Lauraceae is a medical plant that is indigenous to South Brazil, and the rural population has used it medicinally due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of Persea major methanolic extract against oxygen and glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation as well as to determine its underlying mechanism of action in hippocampal brain slices. Persea major methanolic extract (0.5 mg/ml has a neuroprotective effect on hippocampal slices when added before or during 15 min of oxygen and glucose deprivation or 2 h of re-oxygenation. Hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation showed significantly reduced glutamate uptake, and the addition of Persea major methanolic extract in the re-oxygenation period counteracted the reduction of glutamate uptake. The presence of A1 or A2A, but not A2B or A3 receptor antagonists, abolished the neuroprotective effect of Persea major methanolic extract. In conclusion, the neuroprotective effect of Persea majormethanolic extract involves augmentation of glutamate uptake and modulation of A1 and A2B adenosine receptors.

  18. Structural Allostery and Binding of the Transferring Receptor Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu,G.; Liu, R.; Zak, O.; Aisen, P.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    The structural allostery and binding interface for the human serum transferrin (Tf){center_dot}transferrin receptor (TfR) complex were identified using radiolytic footprinting and mass spectrometry. We have determined previously that the transferrin C-lobe binds to the receptor helical domain. In this study we examined the binding interactions of full-length transferrin with receptor and compared these data with a model of the complex derived from cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions. The footprinting results provide the following novel conclusions. First, we report characteristic oxidations of acidic residues in the C-lobe of native Tf and basic residues in the helical domain of TfR that were suppressed as a function of complex formation; this confirms ionic interactions between these protein segments as predicted by cryo-EM data and demonstrates a novel method for detecting ion pair interactions in the formation of macromolecular complexes. Second, the specific side-chain interactions between the C-lobe and N-lobe of transferrin and the corresponding interactions sites on the transferrin receptor predicted from cryo-EM were confirmed in solution. Last, the footprinting data revealed allosteric movements of the iron binding C- and N-lobes of Tf that sequester iron as a function of complex formation; these structural changes promote tighter binding of the metal ion and facilitate efficient ion transport during endocytosis.

  19. NMDA receptor complex mapping by an adamantane derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samnick, S.; Ametamey, S.M.; Eichholzer, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-08-01

    The memantine analogue, 1-amino-3-[{sup 18}F]fluoromethyl-adamantane ({sup 18}F-MEM), a potential tracer for mapping the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor complex was characterized using different in vivo and in vitro binding techniques. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  20. Transport of receptors, receptor signaling complexes and ion channels via neuropeptide-secretory vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Hai-Bo Wang; Ying-Jin Lu; Jian-Wen Hu; Lan Bao; Xu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Stimulus-induced exocytosis of large dense-core vesicles(LDCVs)leads to discharge of neuropeptides and fusion of LDCV membranes with the plasma membrane. However, the contribution of LDCVs to the properties of the neuronal membrane remains largely unclear. The present study found that LDCVs were associated with multiple receptors, channels and signaling molecules, suggesting that neuronal sensitivity is modulated by an LDCV-mediated mechanism. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with immunoblotting of subcellular fractions identified 298 proteins in LDCV membranes purified from the dorsal spinal cord, including Gprotein-coupled receptors, Gproteins and other signaling molecules, ion channels and trafficking-related proteins. Morphological assays showed that δ-opioid receptor 1(DORI), β2 adrenergic receptor(AR), Gα12,voltage-gated calcium channel a2δ1subunit and P2X purinoceptor 2 were localized in substance P(SP)-positive LDCVs in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons, whereas β1 AR, Wnt receptor frizzled 8 and dishevelled 1 were present in SP-negative LDCVs.Furthermore, DOR1/α12/Gβ1γ5/phospholipase C β2 complexes were associated with LDCVs. Blockade of the DOR1/Gαi2 interaction largely abolished the LDCV localization of Gαi2 and impaired stimulation-induced surface expression of Gαi2. Thus, LDCVs serve as carriers of receptors, ion channels and preassembled receptor signaling complexes, enabling a rapid, activity-dependent modulation of neuronal sensitivity.

  1. Reversible Intercalation of Fluoride-Anion Receptor Complexes in Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Leifer, Nicole; Greenbaum, Steve; Smart, Marshall; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Blanco, Mario; Narayanan, S. R.

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated a route to reversibly intercalate fluoride-anion receptor complexes in graphite via a nonaqueous electrochemical process. This approach may find application for a rechargeable lithium-fluoride dual-ion intercalating battery with high specific energy. The cell chemistry presented here uses graphite cathodes with LiF dissolved in a nonaqueous solvent through the aid of anion receptors. Cells have been demonstrated with reversible cathode specific capacity of approximately 80 mAh/g at discharge plateaus of upward of 4.8 V, with graphite staging of the intercalant observed via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction during charging. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and B-11 nuclear magnetic resonance studies suggest that cointercalation of the anion receptor with the fluoride occurs during charging, which likely limits the cathode specific capacity. The anion receptor type dictates the extent of graphite fluorination, and must be further optimized to realize high theoretical fluorination levels. To find these optimal anion receptors, we have designed an ab initio calculations-based scheme aimed at identifying receptors with favorable fluoride binding and release properties.

  2. Stimulation of expression for the adenosine A2A receptor gene by hypoxia in PC12 cells. A potential role in cell protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    1999-07-16

    The purpose of this study was to examine the regulation of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) gene expression during hypoxia in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that the A2AR mRNA level was substantially increased after a 3-h exposure to hypoxia (5% O2), which reached a peak at 12 h. Immunoblot analysis showed that the A2AR protein level was also increased during hypoxia. Inhibition of de novo protein synthesis blocked A2AR induction by hypoxia. In addition, removal of extracellular free Ca2+, chelation of intracellular free Ca2+, and pretreatment with protein kinase C inhibitors prevented A2AR induction by hypoxia. Moreover, depletion of protein kinase C activity by prolonged treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly inhibited the hypoxic induction of A2AR. A2AR antagonists led to a significant enhancement of A2AR mRNA levels during hypoxia, whereas A2AR agonists caused down-regulation of A2AR expression during hypoxia. This suggests that A2AR regulates its own expression during hypoxia by feedback mechanisms. We further found that activation of A2AR enhances cell viability during hypoxia and also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor expression in PC12 cells. Thus, increased expression of A2AR during hypoxia might protect cells against hypoxia and may act to inhibit hypoxia-induced angiogenic activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:10400659

  3. Current concepts regarding the HTLV-1 receptor complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Kathryn S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identity of the Human T lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1 receptor remained an unsolved puzzle for two decades, until the recent demonstration that three molecules, Glucose Transporter 1, Neuropilin-1 and Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans are involved in HTLV-1 binding and entry. Despite these advances, several questions remain unanswered, including the precise role of each of these molecules during virus entry. In light of the most recent data, we propose a model of the HTLV-1 receptor complex and discuss its potential impact on HTLV-1 infection.

  4. 3D model of amphioxus steroid receptor complexed with estradiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origins of signaling by vertebrate steroids are not fully understood. An important advance was the report that an estrogen-binding steroid receptor [SR] is present in amphioxus, a basal chordate with a similar body plan as vertebrates. To investigate the evolution of estrogen-binding to steroid receptors, we constructed a 3D model of amphioxus SR complexed with estradiol. This 3D model indicates that although the SR is activated by estradiol, some interactions between estradiol and human ERα are not conserved in the SR, which can explain the low affinity of estradiol for the SR. These differences between the SR and ERα in the steroid-binding domain are sufficient to suggest that another steroid is the physiological regulator of the SR. The 3D model predicts that mutation of Glu-346 to Gln will increase the affinity of testosterone for amphioxus SR and elucidate the evolution of steroid-binding to nuclear receptors.

  5. Receptor-like kinase complexes in plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan eGreeff

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-like kinases (RLKs are surface localized, transmembrane receptors comprising a large family of well-studied kinases. RLKs signal through their transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains with the aid of various interacting partners and downstream components. The N-terminal extracellular domain defines ligand specificity, and RLK families are sub-classed according to this domain. The most studied of these subfamilies include those with 1 leucine rich repeat (LRR domains, 2 LysM domains (LYM and 3 the Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L domain. These proteins recognize distinct ligands of microbial origin or ligands derived from intracellular protein/carbohydrate signals. For example, the pattern recognition receptor (PRR AtFLS2 recognizes flg22 from flagellin, and the PRR AtEFR recognizes elf18 from elongation factor (EF-Tu. Upon binding of their cognate ligands, the aforementioned RLKs activate generic immune responses termed pattern triggered immunity (PTI. RLKs can form complexes with other family members and engage a variety of intracellular signaling components and regulatory pathways upon stimulation. This review focuses on interesting new data about how these receptors form protein complexes to exert their function.

  6. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors.

  7. Assembly of Oligomeric Death Domain Complexes during Toll Receptor Signaling*

    OpenAIRE

    Moncrieffe, Martin C.; Grossmann, J. Günter; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila Toll receptor is activated by the endogenous protein ligand Spätzle in response to microbial stimuli in immunity and spatial cues during embryonic development. Downstream signaling is mediated by the adaptor proteins Tube, the kinase Pelle, and the Drosophila homologue of myeloid differentiation primary response protein (dMyD88). Here we have characterized heterodimeric (dMyD88-Tube) and heterotrimeric (dMyD88-Tube-Pelle) death domain complexes. We show ...

  8. Elucidating the role of the A2A adenosine receptor in neurodegeneration using neurons derived from Huntington's disease iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Feng-Lan; Lin, Jun-Tasi; Chuang, Ching-Yu; Chien, Ting; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Chen, Kai-Hsiang; Hsiao, Han-Yun; Lin, Yow-Sien; Chern, Yijuang; Kuo, Hung-Chih

    2015-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant degenerative disease caused by a cytosine-adenine-guanine trinucleotide expansion in the Huntingtin (htt) gene. The most vulnerable brain areas to mutant HTT-evoked toxicity are the striatum and cortex. In spite of the extensive efforts that have been devoted to the characterization of HD pathogenesis, no disease-modifying therapy for HD is currently available. The A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) is widely distributed in the brain, with the highest level observed in the striatum. We previously reported that stimulation of the A2AR triggers an anti-apoptotic effect in a rat neuron-like cell line (PC12). Using a transgenic mouse model (R6/2) of HD, we demonstrated that A2AR-selective agonists effectively ameliorate several major symptoms of HD. In the present study, we show that human iPSCs can be successfully induced to differentiate into DARPP32-positive, GABAergic neurons which express the A2AR in a similar manner to striatal medium spiny neurons. When compared with those derived from control subjects (CON-iPSCs), these HD-iPSC-derived neurons exhibited a higher DNA damage response, based on the observed expression of γH2AX and elevated oxidative stress. This is a critical observation, because oxidative damage and abnormal DNA damage/repair have been reported in HD patients. Most importantly, stimulation of the A2AR using selective agonists reduced DNA damage and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HD-iPSC-derived neurons through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway. These findings support our hypothesis that human neurons derived from diseased iPSCs might serve as an important platform to investigate the beneficial effects and underlying mechanisms of A2AR drugs. PMID:26264576

  9. Alterações dos receptores A1 e A2a da adenosina num modelo animal da doença de Parkinson : função neuroprotectora?

    OpenAIRE

    Rebelo, Patricia Celeste Soares

    2010-01-01

    Os receptores A2a da adenosina são actualmente considerados um alvo terapêutico na doença de Parkinson pois, devido à co-localização e interacção funcional com os receptores D2 da dopamina nos neurónios do estriado, a modulação com antagonistas A2a tem um efeito compensatório do défice de dopamina causado pela degeneração dos neurónios dopaminérgicos que projectam da substantia nigra para o estriado, melhorando a disfunção motora. Por outro lado, os antagonistas dos receptores A2a também most...

  10. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes.

  11. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes. PMID:27270123

  12. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  13. Optogenetic activation of intracellular adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger CREB phosphorylation and impair memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Rial, D; Canas, P M; Yoo, J-H; Li, W; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; van Westen, G J P; Payen, M-P; Augusto, E; Gonçalves, N; Tomé, A R; Li, Z; Wu, Z; Hou, X; Zhou, Y; IJzerman, A P; PIJzerman, Ad; Boyden, E S; Cunha, R A; Qu, J; Chen, J-F

    2015-11-01

    Human and animal studies have converged to suggest that caffeine consumption prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). To test if A2AR activation in the hippocampus is actually sufficient to impair memory function and to begin elucidating the intracellular pathways operated by A2AR, we have developed a chimeric rhodopsin-A2AR protein (optoA2AR), which retains the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin (conferring light responsiveness and eliminating adenosine-binding pockets) fused to the intracellular loop of A2AR to confer specific A2AR signaling. The specificity of the optoA2AR signaling was confirmed by light-induced selective enhancement of cAMP and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) (but not cGMP) levels in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which was abolished by a point mutation at the C terminal of A2AR. Supporting its physiological relevance, optoA2AR activation and the A2AR agonist CGS21680 produced similar activation of cAMP and p-MAPK signaling in HEK293 cells, of p-MAPK in the nucleus accumbens and of c-Fos/phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the hippocampus, and similarly enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Remarkably, optoA2AR activation triggered a preferential p-CREB signaling in the hippocampus and impaired spatial memory performance, while optoA2AR activation in the nucleus accumbens triggered MAPK signaling and modulated locomotor activity. This shows that the recruitment of intracellular A2AR signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger memory dysfunction. Furthermore, the demonstration that the biased A2AR signaling and functions depend on intracellular A2AR loops prompts the possibility of targeting the intracellular A2AR-interacting partners to selectively control different neuropsychiatric behaviors. PMID:25687775

  14. Role of iso-receptors in receptor-receptor interactions with a focus on dopamine iso-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnati, Luigi F; Guidolin, Diego; Cervetto, Chiara; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular and intracellular communication processes consist of signals and recognition/decoding apparatuses of these signals. In humans, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest family of cell surface receptors. More than 30 years ago, it has been proposed that GPCR could form dimers or higher-order oligomers (receptor mosaics [RMs] at the plasma membrane level and receptor-receptor interactions [RRIs] have been proposed as a new integrative mechanism for chemical signals impinging on cell plasma membranes). The basic phenomena involved in RRIs are allostery and cooperativity of membrane receptors, and the present paper provides basic information concerning their relevance for the integrative functions of RMs. In this context, the possible role of iso-receptor RM is discussed (with a special focus on dopamine receptor subtypes and on some of the RMs they form with other dopamine iso-receptors), and it is proposed that two types of cooperativity, namely, homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity, could allow distinguishing two types of functionally different RMs. From a general point of view, the presence of iso-receptors and their topological organization within RMs allow the use of a reduced number of signals for the intercellular communication processes, since the target cells can recognize and decode the same signal in different ways. This theoretical aspect is further analyzed here by means of an analogy with artificial information systems. Thus, it is suggested that the 'multiplexer' and 'demultiplexer' concepts could, at least in part, model the role of RMs formed by iso-receptors in the information handling by the cell. PMID:26418645

  15. Involvement of adenosine A2a receptor in intraocular pressure decrease induced by 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine or 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Murakami, Akira; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the mechanism for the decrease in intraocular pressure by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives in rabbits. The receptor binding analysis revealed that 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-O-Ado) and 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-CN-Ado) selectively bound to the A(2a) receptor with a high affinity. Ocular hypotensive responses to 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado were inhibited by the adenosine A(2a)-receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC), but not by the adenosine A(1)-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or the adenosine A(2b)-receptor antagonist alloxazine. In addition, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado caused an increase in outflow facility, which was inhibited by CSC, but not by DPCPX or alloxazine. Moreover, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado increased cAMP in the aqueous humor, and the 2-O-Ado-induced an increase in cAMP was inhibited by CSC. These results suggest that 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado reduced intraocular pressure via an increase in outflow facility. The ocular hypotension may be mainly mediated through the activation of adenosine A(2a) receptor, although a possible involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor cannot be completely ruled out. 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado are useful lead compounds for the treatment of glaucoma.

  16. Involvement of adenosine A2a receptor in intraocular pressure decrease induced by 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine or 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Murakami, Akira; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the mechanism for the decrease in intraocular pressure by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives in rabbits. The receptor binding analysis revealed that 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-O-Ado) and 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-CN-Ado) selectively bound to the A(2a) receptor with a high affinity. Ocular hypotensive responses to 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado were inhibited by the adenosine A(2a)-receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC), but not by the adenosine A(1)-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or the adenosine A(2b)-receptor antagonist alloxazine. In addition, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado caused an increase in outflow facility, which was inhibited by CSC, but not by DPCPX or alloxazine. Moreover, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado increased cAMP in the aqueous humor, and the 2-O-Ado-induced an increase in cAMP was inhibited by CSC. These results suggest that 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado reduced intraocular pressure via an increase in outflow facility. The ocular hypotension may be mainly mediated through the activation of adenosine A(2a) receptor, although a possible involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor cannot be completely ruled out. 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado are useful lead compounds for the treatment of glaucoma. PMID:15821340

  17. Scribble1/AP2 Complex Coordinates NMDA Receptor Endocytic Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas H. Piguel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate trafficking of glutamate receptors to synapses is crucial for basic synaptic function and synaptic plasticity. It is now accepted that NMDA receptors (NMDARs internalize and are recycled at the plasma membrane but also exchange between synaptic and extrasynaptic pools; these NMDAR properties are also key to governing synaptic plasticity. Scribble1 is a large PDZ protein required for synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Herein, we show that the level of Scribble1 is regulated in an activity-dependent manner and that Scribble1 controls the number of NMDARs at the plasma membrane. Notably, Scribble1 prevents GluN2A subunits from undergoing lysosomal trafficking and degradation by increasing their recycling to the plasma membrane following NMDAR activation. Finally, we show that a specific YxxR motif on Scribble1 controls these mechanisms through a direct interaction with AP2. Altogether, our findings define a molecular mechanism to control the levels of synaptic NMDARs via Scribble1 complex signaling.

  18. The Elastin Receptor Complex: a unique matricellular receptor with high anti-tumoral potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine eScandolera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elastin, one of the longest-lived proteins, confers elasticity to tissues with high mechanical constraints. During aging or pathophysiological conditions such as cancer progression, this insoluble polymer of tropoelastin undergoes an important degradation leading to the release of bioactive elastin-derived peptides (EDP, named elastokines. EDP exhibit several biological functions able to drive tumor development by regulating cell proliferation, invasion, survival, angiogenesis, and matrix metalloproteinase expression in various tumor and stromal cells. Although several receptors have been suggested to bind elastokines (αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, galectin-3, their main receptor remains the Elastin Receptor Complex (ERC. This heterotrimer comprises a peripheral subunit, named Elastin Binding Protein (EBP, associated to the Protective Protein/Cathepsin A (PPCA. The latter is bound to a membrane-associated protein called Neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1. The pro-tumoral effects of elastokines have been linked to their binding onto EBP. Additionally, Neu-1 sialidase activity is essential for their signal transduction. Consistently, EDP-EBP interaction and Neu-1 activity emerge as original anti-tumoral targets. Interestingly, besides its direct involvement in cancer progression, the ERC also regulates diabetes outcome and thrombosis, an important risk factor for cancer development and a vascular process highly increased in patients suffering from cancer. In this review, we will describe ERC and elastokines involvement in cancer development suggesting that this unique receptor would be a promising therapeutic target. We will also discuss the pharmacological concepts aiming at blocking its pro-tumoral activities. Finally, its emerging role in cancer-associated complications and pathologies such as diabetes and thrombotic events will be also considered.

  19. Cocaine Disrupts Histamine H3 Receptor Modulation of Dopamine D1 Receptor Signaling: σ1-D1-H3 Receptor Complexes as Key Targets for Reducing Cocaine's Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Moreno-Delgado, David; Navarro, Gemma; Hoffmann, Hanne M.; Fuentes, Silvia; Rosell-Vilar, Santi; Gasperini, Paola; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Medrano, Mireia; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The general effects of cocaine are not well understood at the molecular level. What is known is that the dopamine D1 receptor plays an important role. Here we show that a key mechanism may be cocaine's blockade of the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of D1 receptor function. This blockade requires the σ1 receptor and occurs upon cocaine binding to σ1-D1-H3 receptor complexes. The cocaine-mediated disruption leaves an uninhibited D1 receptor that activates Gs, freely recruits β-arrestin, increases p-ERK 1/2 levels, and induces cell death when over activated. Using in vitro assays with transfected cells and in ex vivo experiments using both rats acutely treated or self-administered with cocaine along with mice depleted of σ1 receptor, we show that blockade of σ1 receptor by an antagonist restores the protective H3 receptor-mediated brake on D1 receptor signaling and prevents the cell death from elevated D1 receptor signaling. These findings suggest that a combination therapy of σ1R antagonists with H3 receptor agonists could serve to reduce some effects of cocaine. PMID:24599455

  20. The mitochondrial receptor complex: Mom22 is essential for cell viability and directly interacts with preproteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Hönlinger, A; Kübrich, M; Moczko, M; Gärtner, F.; Mallet, L.; Bussereau, F.; Eckerskorn, C; Lottspeich, F; Dietmeier, K; Jacquet, M.

    1995-01-01

    A multisubunit complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane is responsible for targeting and membrane translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins. This receptor complex contains two import receptors, a general insertion pore and the protein Mom22. It was unknown if Mom22 directly interacts with preproteins, and two views existed about the possible functions of Mom22: a central role in transfer of preproteins from both receptors to the general insertion pore or a more limited function dependen...

  1. The significance of TGF-β expression in scar in adenosine receptor A_(2A) knockout mice%腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕增生中TGF-β的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖虎; 冉丽; 禚莹莹; 王德昌; 霍然; 王一兵; 冯永强; 李强

    2010-01-01

    Objective To discuss the mechanism of scar hypertrophy in adenosine receptor A_(2A) (A_(2A) R) knockout mice. Methods Animal models of hypertrophic scar were established in 12 A_(2A)R knockout mice and 12 wild-type mice as control. The thickness and the size of transverse section of the hypertrophic scar were observed by H-E staining. The hydroxyproline ( HYP) in the scar was measured colorimetrically. The TGF-p expression was tested by Western blotting method. Results The hypertrophic scar in wild-type mice was more severe than that in knockout mice. Compared with self-control , the increase of the thickness and the size of transverse section of hypertrophic scar was markedly higher in wild-type group than in the knockout group( P < 0. 01) . There was significant difference in HYP content between the two groups (P < 0. 01 ). Compared with self-control, the increase of TGF-p expression in wild-type group was much more than that in knockout group (P < 0. 01 ). Conclusions The TGF-p expression decreases in the A_(2A) R knockout mice. The scar hypertrophy is also much less in the A_(2A) R knockout mice.%目的 探讨腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠在瘢痕形成中的作用及其机制.方法 4周大腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠和同窝野生型小鼠各12只,制作瘢痕模型,利用HE染色观察瘢痕组织厚度、横截面积变化情况.采用比色氯胺T法测量组织羟脯氨酸含量,利用Western免疫印迹测量TGF-β表达.结果 野生型组小鼠瘢痕增生明显,其厚度、横截面积比自身对照增加倍数显著大于腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除组小鼠(P<0.01),腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕增生轻,羟脯氨酸含量与同窝野生型组小鼠瘢痕含量相比差异有统计学(P<0.01),野生型组小鼠瘢痕TGF-β表达比自身对照增加倍数显著大于腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠组(P<0.01).结论 腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕TGF-β表达降低,瘢痕增生显著减轻.

  2. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  3. Are different stoichiometries feasible for complexes between lymphotoxin-alpha and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascarenhas Nahren

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factors, TNF and lymphotoxin-α (LT, are cytokines that bind to two receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2 (TNF-receptor 1 and 2 to trigger their signaling cascades. The exact mechanism of ligand-induced receptor activation is still unclear. It is generally assumed that three receptors bind to the homotrimeric ligand to trigger a signaling event. Recent evidence, though, has raised doubts if the ligand:receptor stoichiometry should indeed be 3:3 for ligand-induced cellular response. We used molecular dynamics simulations, elastic network models, as well as MM/PBSA to analyze this question. Results Applying MM/PBSA methodology to different stoichiometric complexes of human LT-(TNFR1n=1,2,3 the free energy of binding in these complexes has been estimated by single-trajectory and separate-trajectory methods. Simulation studies rationalized the favorable binding energy in the LT-(TNFR11 complex, as evaluated from single-trajectory analysis to be an outcome of the interaction of cysteine-rich domain 4 (CRD4 and the ligand. Elastic network models (ENMs help to associate the difference in the global fluctuation of the receptors in these complexes. Functionally relevant transformation associated with these complexes reveal the difference in the dynamics of the receptor when free and in complex with LT. Conclusions MM/PBSA predicts complexes with a ligand-receptor molar ratio of 3:1 and 3:2 to be energetically favorable. The high affinity associated with LT-(TNFR11 is due to the interaction between the CRD4 domain with LT. The global dynamics ascertained from ENMs have highlighted the differential dynamics of the receptor in different states.

  4. Receptor-like kinase complexes in plant innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeff, Michael Christiaan; Roux, Milena Edna; Mundy, John;

    2012-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are surface localized, transmembrane receptors comprising a large family of well-studied kinases. RLKs signal through their transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains with the aid of various interacting partners and downstream components. The N-terminal extracellular...... domain defines ligand specificity, and RLK families are sub-classed according to this domain. The most studied of these subfamilies include those with (1) leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains, (2) LysM domains (LYM), and (3) the Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L) domain. These proteins recognize...... distinct ligands of microbial origin or ligands derived from intracellular protein/carbohydrate signals. For example, the pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) AtFLS2 recognizes flg22 from flagellin, and the PRR AtEFR recognizes elf18 from elongation factor (EF-Tu). Upon binding of their cognate ligands...

  5. SELECTIVITY AND SPECIFICITY OF SPHINGOSINE 1-PHOSPHATE RECEPTOR LIGANDS: ‘OFF-TARGETS’ OR COMPLEX PHARMACOLOGY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel John Pyne

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A recent perspective published in frontiers of Pharmacology by Salomone and Waeber (2011 discussed the selectivity and specificity of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P receptor ligands. This perspective surveyed the use of various S1P receptor ligands and attempted to reconcile a number of inconsistencies in the predicted biological outcomes: these were interpreted as ‘off-target’ effects. Therefore the perspective cautioned against the use of these S1P receptor ligands. Here we highlight the complex pharmacology of S1P receptors, which along with ‘inside-out’ signalling might provide an alternative explanation for ‘off-target’ effects.

  6. 腺苷A2a受体介导利血平引起的行为性抑郁%ADENOSINE A2A RECEPTOR MEDIATES RESERPINE-INDUCED DEPRESSION IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄庆军; 郝新玲; ThomasRMinor

    2003-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of reserpine (4, 6 or 8 mg/kg) increased floating time in the Porsolt swim test in a dose-and time-dependent manner in rats. Although such behavioral depression usually is attributed to drug-induced depletion of brain monoamines, the outcome might be more directly related to brain adenosine signaling associated neuronal overactivation or brain cytokine induction following excitotoxic tissue damage. We addressed these possibilities by pretreating rats with caffeine (7 mg/kg), a high affinity adenosine receptor antagonist, prior to reserpine treatment (6 mg/kg). Caffeine partially reversed the ensuing behavioral depression as measured in the Prosolt swim test conducted 1, 24 and 72 hours after reserpine treatment. Further investigation has also been done to determine the subtype of adenosine receptor, which should mediate reserpine's effect. The results showed that adenosine A2 receptor antagonist (DMPX) and A2a antagonist (CSC) reversed the reserpine-induced behavioral depression dose-dependently. These results suggest that adenosine mediates reserpine-induced depression via adenosine A2a receptor and provide evidence that adenosine plays a crucial role in mediating behavioral depression, which will benefit in understanding the mechanism of depression and finding new drug for anti-depressant treatment.%研究腺苷在利血平引起的大鼠行为性抑郁中的作用.应用Porsolt游泳试验,观察注射利血平引起的大鼠行为性抑郁,通过腹腔注射非特异性腺苷受体阻断剂咖啡因和特异性A1和A2腺苷受体阻断剂,确定腺苷在利血平诱导的大鼠行为性抑郁中的作用以及介导这种作用的受体.结果发现:腹腔注射利血平(4、6和8 mg/kg)可导致大鼠在游泳试验中漂浮时间明显延长,咖啡因和A2a腺苷受体阻断剂能明显缩短利血平导致的漂浮时间的延长.结论:腺苷通过A2a受体介导利血平引起的大鼠的行为性抑郁.

  7. Autoinactivation of the stargazin-AMPA receptor complex: subunit-dependency and independence from physical dissociation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Semenov

    Full Text Available Agonist responses and channel kinetics of native α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptors are modulated by transmembrane accessory proteins. Stargazin, the prototypical accessory protein, decreases desensitization and increases agonist potency at AMPA receptors. Furthermore, in the presence of stargazin, the steady-state responses of AMPA receptors show a gradual decline at higher glutamate concentrations. This "autoinactivation" has been assigned to physical dissociation of the stargazin-AMPA receptor complex and suggested to serve as a protective mechanism against overactivation. Here, we analyzed autoinactivation of GluA1-A4 AMPA receptors (all flip isoform expressed in the presence of stargazin. Homomeric GluA1, GluA3, and GluA4 channels showed pronounced autoinactivation indicated by the bell-shaped steady-state dose response curves for glutamate. In contrast, homomeric GluA2i channels did not show significant autoinactivation. The resistance of GluA2 to autoinactivation showed striking dependence on the splice form as GluA2-flop receptors displayed clear autoinactivation. Interestingly, the resistance of GluA2-flip containing receptors to autoinactivation was transferred onto heteromeric receptors in a dominant fashion. To examine the relationship of autoinactivation to physical separation of stargazin from the AMPA receptor, we analyzed a GluA4-stargazin fusion protein. Notably, the covalently linked complex and separately expressed proteins expressed a similar level of autoinactivation. We conclude that autoinactivation is a subunit and splice form dependent property of AMPA receptor-stargazin complexes, which involves structural rearrangements within the complex rather than any physical dissociation.

  8. Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emes Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity Results The vertebrate NMDA receptor was found to have subunits with C-terminal domains up to 500 amino acids longer than invertebrates. This extension was specific to the NR2 subunit and occurred before the duplication and subsequent divergence of NR2 in the vertebrate lineage. The shorter invertebrate C-terminus lacked vertebrate protein interaction motifs involved with forming a signaling complex although the terminal PDZ interaction domain was conserved. The vertebrate NR2 C-terminal domain was predicted to be intrinsically disordered but with a conserved secondary structure. Conclusion We highlight an evolutionary adaptation specific to vertebrate NMDA receptor NR2 subunits. Using in silico methods we find that evolution has shaped the NMDA receptor C-terminus into an unstructured but modular intracellular domain that parallels the expansion in complexity of an NMDA receptor signalling complex in the vertebrate lineage. We propose the NR2 C-terminus has evolved to be a natively unstructured yet flexible hub organising postsynaptic signalling. The evolution of

  9. TARM1 Is a Novel Leukocyte Receptor Complex-Encoded ITAM Receptor That Costimulates Proinflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Macrophages and Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radjabova, Valeria; Mastroeni, Piero; Skjødt, Karsten;

    2015-01-01

    We identified a novel, evolutionarily conserved receptor encoded within the human leukocyte receptor complex and syntenic region of mouse chromosome 7, named T cell-interacting, activating receptor on myeloid cells-1 (TARM1). The transmembrane region of TARM1 contained a conserved arginine residu...

  10. A C3 Symmetric Nitrate Complex with a Thiophene-Based Tripodal Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Işiklan, Muhammet; Saeed, Musabbir A.; Pramanik, Avijit; Wong, Bryan M.; Fronczek, Frank R.; Hossain, Alamgir

    2011-01-01

    A thiophene-based tripodal receptor has been synthesized and its complexes with nitrate and iodide have determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis. In the nitrate complex, one nitrate is encapsulated in a selective orientation forming a C3 symmetric complex, which is bonded to three protonated secondary amines with six NH···O bonds. The anion is coordinated in a plane perpendicular to the principal rotation axis passing through the tertiary nitrogen of the receptor and the nitrogen of the en...

  11. Dietary magnesium restriction reduces amygdala-hypothalamic GluN1 receptor complex levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafari, Maryam; Whittle, Nigel; Miklósi, András G; Kotlowski, Caroline; Kotlowsky, Caroline; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Berger, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Singewald, Nicolas; Lubec, Gert

    2015-07-01

    Reduced daily intake of magnesium (Mg(2+)) is suggested to contribute to depression. Indeed, preclinical studies show dietary magnesium restriction (MgR) elicits enhanced depression-like behaviour establishing a causal relationship. Amongst other mechanisms, Mg(2+) gates the activity of N-methyl-D-asparte (NMDA) receptors; however, it is not known whether reduced dietary Mg(2+) intake can indeed affect brain NMDA receptor complexes. Thus, the aim of the current study was to reveal whether MgR induces changes in brain NMDA receptor subunit composition that would indicate altered NMDA receptor regulation. The results revealed that enhanced depression-like behaviour elicited by MgR was associated with reduced amygdala-hypothalamic protein levels of GluN1-containing NMDA complexes. No change in GluN1 mRNA levels was observed indicating posttranslational changes were induced by dietary Mg(2+) restriction. To reveal possible protein interaction partners, GluN1 immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays were carried out revealing the expected GluN1 subunit association with GluN2A, GluN2B, but also novel interactions with GluA1, GluA2 in addition to known downstream signalling proteins. Chronic paroxetine treatment in MgR mice normalized enhanced depression-like behaviour, but did not alter protein levels of GluN1-containing NMDA receptors, indicating targets downstream of the NMDA receptor. Collectively, present data demonstrate that dietary MgR alters brain levels of GluN1-containing NMDA receptor complexes, containing GluN2A, GluN2B, AMPA receptors GluA1, GluA2 and several protein kinases. These data indicate that the modulation of dietary Mg(2+) intake may alter the function and signalling of this receptor complex indicating its involvement in the enhanced depression-like behaviour elicited by MgR.

  12. Development of novel mixed ligand technetium complexes for imaging 5-HT1A neural system receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of 99mTc complexes for imaging 5-HT1A neural system receptors using the 3 + 1 mixed ligand approach is described. Six novel complexes (I-VI) were designed using two different strategies. In complexes I-IV the pharmacophore 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine was attached to a monodentate thiol used as co-ligand and combined with tridentate dianionic aminothiols (SNS and NNS). On the other hand, complexes V and VI were obtained using thiophenol and 4-methoxy-thiophenol as co-ligand and a tridentate ligand (SNS) with the pharmacophore bound to the nitrogen through an alkyl chain. All complexes were prepared at tracer level using 99mTc-glucoheptonate as precursor. Ligand and co-ligand concentration, reaction time and temperature were optimized to achieve high substitution yield and radiochemical purity. Structure was studied at carrier level through the corresponding rhenium complexes. Complexes I and II presented the expected ReOLK structure and a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. The structure of the other four complexes has not been completely elucidated yet. Biodistribution studies of all the complexes demonstrated selective brain uptake and retention. Uptake of complex I in receptor-rich hippocampus was significantly higher than that of the cerebellum (P = 0.05) 1 h post-injection. Oxorhenium complexes I and II showed affinity for the 5-HT1A receptor binding sites, with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. The results demonstrate the potential of the mixed ligand approach for the design of 99mTc complexes with the ability to bind neuroreceptors. However, the goal of imaging 5-HT1A receptors with technetium requires further development of complexes with improved biological profiles. (author)

  13. Molecular and biochemical analysis of symbiotic plant receptor kinase complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Douglas R; Riely, Brendan K

    2010-09-01

    DE-FG02-01ER15200 was a 36-month project, initiated on Sept 1, 2005 and extended with a one-year no cost extension to August 31, 2009. During the project period we published seven manuscripts (2 in review). Including the prior project period (2002-2005) we published 12 manuscripts in journals that include Science, PNAS, The Plant Cell, Plant Journal, Plant Physiology, and MPMI. The primary focus of this work was to further elucidate the function of the Nod factor signaling pathway that is involved in initiation of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis and in particular to explore the relationship between receptor kinase-like proteins and downstream effectors of symbiotic development. During the project period we have map-base cloned two additional players in symbiotic development, including an ERF transcription factor and an ethylene pathway gene (EIN2) that negatively regulates symbiotic signaling; we have also further characterized the subcellular distribution and function of a nuclear-localized symbiosis-specific ion channel, DMI1. The major outcome of the work has been the development of systems for exploring and validating protein-protein interactions that connect symbiotic receptor-like proteins to downstream responses. In this regard, we have developed both homologous (i.e., in planta) and heterologous (i.e., in yeast) systems to test protein interactions. Using yeast 2-hybrid screens we isolated the only known interactor of the nuclear-localized calcium-responsive kinase DMI3. We have also used yeast 2-hybrid methodology to identify interactions between symbiotic signaling proteins and certain RopGTPase/RopGEF proteins that regulate root hair polar growth. More important to the long-term goals of our work, we have established a TAP tagging system that identifies in planta interactions based on co-immuno precipitation and mass spectrometry. The validity of this approach has been shown using known interactors that either co-iummnoprecipate (i.e., remorin) or co

  14. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  15. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  16. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  17. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes:understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kjell Fuxe; Dasiel O Borroto-Escuela

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neu-rons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular lfuid and the cerebral spinal lfuid through diffusion and lfow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume trans-mission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  18. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  19. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB1 cannabinoid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • OX1 and OX2 orexin and CB1 cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX1 orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB1 cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX1, OX2 and CB1 receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP2 green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB1 receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP2 to CB1 produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX1–OX2 interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB1 receptors, dimerization could be an effective way of forming signal complexes with optimal cannabinoid concentrations available for

  20. Olfactory receptor-like genes are located in the human major histocompatibility complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, W.; Liu, Y.C.; Parimoo, S. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Have, CT (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) includes sequences that are responsible for haplotype-specific odor types that, in turn, influence mating preference. The authors report that there are several olfactory receptor genes or pseudogenes in the Class I region of the human MHC. At least one of these genes is intact, appears to encode an mRNA, and is quite homologous to a previously reported murine olfactory receptor. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Assembly Stoichiometry of the GluK2/GluK5 Kainate Receptor Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Reiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionotropic glutamate receptors assemble as homo- or heterotetramers. One well-studied heteromeric complex is formed by the kainate receptor subunits GluK2 and GluK5. Retention motifs prevent trafficking of GluK5 homomers to the plasma membrane, but coassembly with GluK2 yields functional heteromeric receptors. Additional control over GluK2/GluK5 assembly seems to be exerted by the amino-terminal domains, which preferentially assemble into heterodimers as isolated domains. However, the stoichiometry of the full-length GluK2/GluK5 receptor complex has yet to be determined, as is the case for all non-NMDA glutamate receptors. Here, we address this question, using a single-molecule imaging technique that enables direct counting of the number of each GluK subunit type in homomeric and heteromeric receptors in the plasma membranes of live cells. We show that GluK2 and GluK5 assemble with 2:2 stoichiometry. This is an important step toward understanding the assembly mechanism, architecture, and functional consequences of heteromer formation in ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  2. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [125I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser449 to Ser467 were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  3. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwasako, Kenji, E-mail: kuwasako@fc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi [Division of Circulation and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kato, Johji [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  4. Development of novel mixed ligand technetium complexes (3 + 1 combination) for imaging central neural system receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of mixed ligand oxotechnetium-99m complexes carrying the 1-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazine moiety has been synthesized. For structural characterization, and for in vitro binding assays, the analogous oxorhenium or oxotechnetium-99 complexes were prepared. As demonstrated by appropriate competition binding tests in rat hippocampal preparations, all oxorhenium analogues showed affinity for the 5-HT1A receptor binding sites with 50% inhibitory concentration values in the nanomolar range (IC50=6-106nM). All 99mTcO[SN(R)S]/[S] complexes showed a significant brain uptake in rats at 2 min post-injection (0.24-1.31 dose/organ). The regional distribution is inhomogeneous but the ratio between areas rich and poor in 5-HT1A receptor was not high. Structural modifications to this system may further improve the biological profile of these compounds and eventually provide efficient 99mTc receptor imaging agents. (author)

  5. Adenosine and the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, upregulate CD39 and CD73 expression through E2F-1 and CREB in regulatory T cells isolated from septic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rui; Shui, Xianqi; Hou, Jiong; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The number of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and the expression of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1; also known as CD39) and 5'-ectonucleotidase (NT5E; also known as CD73) on the Treg cell surface are increased during sepsis. In this study, to determine the factors leading to the high expression of CD39 and CD73, and the regulation of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway in Treg cells under septic conditions, we constructed a mouse model of sepsis and separated the Treg cells using a flow cytometer. The Treg cells isolated from the peritoneal lavage and splenocytes of the mice were treated with adenosine or the specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, and were transfected with specific siRNA targeting E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F-1) or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB), which are predicted transcription regulatory factors of CD39 or CD73. The regulatory relationships among these factors were then determined by western blot analysis and dual-luciferase reporter assay. In addition, changes in adenosine metabolism were measured in the treated cells. The results revealed that adenosine and CGS21680 significantly upregulated CD39 and CD73 expression (PTreg cell surface during sepsis. Adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist served as the signal transducer factors of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway, accelerating adenosine generation. Our study may benefit further research on adenosine metabolism for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:27430240

  6. Arsenic Disruption of Steroid Receptor Gene Activation: Complex Dose-Response Effects Are Shared by Several Steroid Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodwell, Jack E.; Gosse, Julie A.; Nomikos, Athena P.; Hamilton, Joshua W.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intake of arsenic (As) has been associated with increased risk of cancer, diabetes, developmental and reproductive problems, and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies suggest increased health risks with drinking water levels as low as 5–10 ppb. We previously reported that As disrupts glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediated transcription in a very complex fashion. Low As levels (0.1 to 0.7 μM) stimulated transcription whereas slightly higher levels (1 to 3 μM) were inhibitory. The DNA Binding Domain (DBD) was the minimal region of GR required for the response to As. Mutations in the DBD that alter the conformation of the dimerization domain (D-Loop) to a DNA-bound GR conformation abolished the stimulatory effect and enhanced the inhibitory response to As. Here we report that receptors for progesterone (PR) and mineralocorticoids (MR) display a similar complex As response as the GR, suggesting a common mechanism for this effect. The complex response to As is not due to altered steroid or receptor levels. Moreover, a well-characterized GR dimerization mutant displayed a wild-type biphasic response to As for several divergent reporter genes, suggesting that dimerization is not critical for the response to As. Fluorescence polarization studies with purified PR and GR demonstrated that the specific PR/GR-DNA interaction is not altered in the presence of As. These results indicate that the numerous and diverse human health effects associated with As exposure maybe mediated, at least in part, through its ability to simultaneously disrupt multiple hormone receptor systems. PMID:17173375

  7. Arsenic disruption of steroid receptor gene activation: Complex dose-response effects are shared by several steroid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodwell, Jack E; Gosse, Julie A; Nomikos, Athena P; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2006-12-01

    Chronic intake of arsenic (As) has been associated with increased risk of cancer, diabetes, developmental and reproductive problems, and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies suggest increased health risks with drinking water levels as low as 5-10 ppb. We previously reported that As disrupts glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediated transcription in a very complex fashion. Low As levels (0.1-0.7 microM) stimulated transcription, whereas slightly higher levels (1-3 microM) were inhibitory. The DNA binding domain (DBD) was the minimal region of GR required for the response to As. Mutations in the DBD that alter the conformation of the dimerization domain (D-loop) to a DNA-bound GR conformation abolished the stimulatory effect and enhanced the inhibitory response to As. Here we report that receptors for progesterone (PR) and mineralocorticoids display a complex As response similar to that of the GR, suggesting a common mechanism for this effect. The complex response to As is not due to altered steroid or receptor levels. Moreover, a well-characterized GR dimerization mutant displayed a wild-type biphasic response to As for several divergent reporter genes, suggesting that dimerization is not critical for the response to As. Fluorescence polarization studies with purified PR and GR demonstrated that the specific PR/GR-DNA interaction is not altered in the presence of As. These results indicate that the numerous and diverse human health effects associated with As exposure may be mediated, at least in part, through its ability to simultaneously disrupt multiple hormone receptor systems. PMID:17173375

  8. Mincle, the receptor for mycobacterial cord factor, forms a functional receptor complex with MCL and FcεRI-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato-Pascual, Ana; Saether, Per Christian; Fossum, Sigbjørn; Dissen, Erik; Daws, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    Upon receptor activation, the myeloid C-type lectin receptor Mincle signals via the Syk-CARD9-Bcl10-MALT1 pathway. It does so by recruiting the ITAM-bearing FcεRI-γ. The related receptor macrophage C-type Lectin (MCL) has also been shown to be associated with Syk and to be dependent upon this signaling axis. We have previously shown that MCL co-precipitates with FcεRI-γ, but were unable to show a direct association, suggesting that MCL associates with FcεRI-γ via another molecule. Here, we have used rat primary cells and cell lines to investigate this missing link. A combination of flow cytometric and biochemical analysis showed that Mincle and MCL form heteromers on the cell surface. Furthermore, association with MCL and FcεRI-γ increased Mincle expression and enhanced phagocytosis of Ab-coated beads. The results presented in this paper suggest that the Mincle/MCL/FcεRI-γ complex is the functionally optimal form for these C-type lectin receptors on the surface of myeloid cells. PMID:23921530

  9. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate [( 35S]TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of [35S]TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 ± 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 ± 40 fmol/mg protein. [35S]TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of [35S]TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on [35S]TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current

  10. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. (School of Biological and Molecular Sciences, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford (England))

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  11. Caffeine inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells induced by acetaldehyde via adenosine A2A receptor mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK signal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cell (HSC activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR. Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine's inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway.Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III.

  12. Active-state models of ternary GPCR complexes: determinants of selective receptor-G-protein coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf C Kling

    Full Text Available Based on the recently described crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor--Gs-protein complex, we report the first molecular-dynamics simulations of ternary GPCR complexes designed to identify the selectivity determinants for receptor-G-protein binding. Long-term molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-bound β2AR-Gαs and D2R-Gαi complexes embedded in a hydrated bilayer environment and computational alanine-scanning mutagenesis identified distinct residues of the N-terminal region of intracellular loop 3 to be crucial for coupling selectivity. Within the G-protein, specific amino acids of the α5-helix, the C-terminus of the Gα-subunit and the regions around αN-β1 and α4-β6 were found to determine receptor recognition. Knowledge of these determinants of receptor-G-protein binding selectivity is essential for designing drugs that target specific receptor/G-protein combinations.

  13. Investigation of the receptor-mediated endocytosis of transcobalamin/intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm, Rasmus; Grissom, Charles B.; Fedosov, Sergey N.;

    receptor structure. This receptor is suggested to be regulated by the vitamin B12 level in the cells, which is interesting in relation to cancer growth. The cellular endocytosis of TC- B12 complex by this unknown receptor is being investigated, using confocal microscopy. Fluorescently labeled B12 molecules...

  14. Neurotransmitters and synaptic components in the Merkel cell-neurite complex, a gentle touch receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cells are an enigmatic group of rare cells found in the skin of vertebrates. Most make contacts with somatosensory afferents to form Merkel cell-neurite complexes, which are gentle-touch receptors that initiate slowly adapting type I responses. The function of Merkel cells within the complex remains debated despite decades of research. Numerous anatomical studies demonstrate that Merkel cells form synaptic-like contacts with sensory afferent terminals. Moreover, recent molecular analys...

  15. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1. PMID:27235398

  16. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  17. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  18. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling : how complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodkin, Alexey N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Plant, Nick; Mone, Martijn J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Campbell, Moray J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Carlberg, Carsten; Snoep, Jacky L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2010-01-01

    The topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of 'design' aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic models of

  19. Affinity capture of (Arg sup 8 )vasopressin-receptor complex using immobilized antisense peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Xian Lu; Aiyar, N.; Chaiken, I. (SmithKline Beecham, King of Prussia, PA (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Solubilized noncovalent complexes of (Arg{sup 8})-vasopressin (AVP) with receptor proteins from rat liver membranes were isolated by selective binding to silica-immobilized antisense (AS) peptide. The affinity chromatographic support was prepared with a chemically synthesized AS peptide whose sequence is encoded by the AS DNA corresponding to the 20 amino-terminal residues of the AVP bovine neurophysin II biosynthetic precursor (pro-AVP/BNPII-(20-1)), region that includes the AVP sequence at residues 1-9. The AS peptide-AVP interaction mechanism hypothesized, contact by hydropathic complementarity at multiple sites along the peptide chains, led to the prediction that AVP bound to its receptor would still have enough free surface to interact with immobilized AS peptide. To test this prediction of a three-way interaction, ({sup 3}H)AVP-receptor was obtained as a solubilized, partially purified fraction from rat liver membrane. Covalently crosslinked ({sup 3}H)AVP complex also was bound to the AS peptide column; binding was blocked by competition with unlabeled AVP in the elution buffer. Since the AVP-linked 31- and 38-kDa proteins have the same apparent molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as found previously by photoaffinity labeling, the authors conclude that the AS peptide column has affinity-captured AVP-receptor complexes. The 15-kDa protein appears to be an active AVP-receptor fragment of one or both of the larger proteins. It is generally concluded that immobilized AS peptides may be useful to isolate peptide and protein receptor complexes in other systems as well.

  20. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (U. of Texas-SMED); (UNC)

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  1. Model of the complex of Parathyroid hormone-2 receptor and Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aim to propose interactions between the parathyroid hormone-2 receptor (PTH2R and its ligand the tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39 by constructing a homology model of their complex. The two related peptides parathyroid hormone (PTH and parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP are compared with the complex to examine their interactions. Findings In the model, the hydrophobic N-terminus of TIP39 is buried in a hydrophobic part of the central cavity between helices 3 and 7. Comparison of the peptide sequences indicates that the main discriminator between the agonistic peptides TIP39 and PTH and the inactive PTHrP is a tryptophan-phenylalanine replacement. The model indicates that the smaller phenylalanine in PTHrP does not completely occupy the binding site of the larger tryptophan residue in the other peptides. As only TIP39 causes internalisation of the receptor and the primary difference being an aspartic acid in position 7 of TIP39 that interacts with histidine 396 in the receptor, versus isoleucine/histidine residues in the related hormones, this might be a trigger interaction for the events that cause internalisation. Conclusions A model is constructed for the complex and a trigger interaction for full agonistic activation between aspartic acid 7 of TIP39 and histidine 396 in the receptor is proposed.

  2. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäntti, Maria H., E-mail: maria.jantti@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mandrika, Ilona, E-mail: ilona@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites Str. 1, Riga LV 1067 (Latvia); Kukkonen, Jyrki P., E-mail: jyrki.kukkonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  3. Structure of complement receptor 2 in complex with its C3d ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakonyi, G; Guthridge, J M; Li, D; Young, K; Holers, V M; Chen, X S

    2001-06-01

    Complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) is an important receptor that amplifies B lymphocyte activation by bridging the innate and adaptive immune systems. CR2 ligands include complement C3d and Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein 350/220. We describe the x-ray structure of this CR2 domain in complex with C3d at 2.0 angstroms. The structure reveals extensive main chain interactions between C3d and only one short consensus repeat (SCR) of CR2 and substantial SCR side-side packing. These results provide a detailed understanding of receptor-ligand interactions in this protein family and reveal potential target sites for molecular drug design. PMID:11387479

  4. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili [Scripps; (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits A2A adenosine receptor agonist induced β-amyloid production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells via a cAMP dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Vijay Nagpure

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading cause of senile dementia in today's society. Its debilitating symptoms are manifested by disturbances in many important brain functions, which are influenced by adenosine. Hence, adenosinergic system is considered as a potential therapeutic target in AD treatment. In the present study, we found that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor, 100 µM attenuated HENECA (a selective A2A receptor agonist, 10-200 nM induced β-amyloid (1-42 (Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y cells. NaHS also interfered with HENECA-stimulated production and post-translational modification of amyloid precursor protein (APP by inhibiting its maturation. Measurement of the C-terminal APP fragments generated from its enzymatic cleavage by β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 showed that NaHS did not have any significant effect on β-secretase activity. However, the direct measurements of HENECA-elevated γ-secretase activity and mRNA expressions of presenilins suggested that the suppression of Aβ42 production in NaHS pretreated cells was mediated by inhibiting γ-secretase. NaHS induced reductions were accompanied by similar decreases in intracellular cAMP levels and phosphorylation of cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB. NaHS significantly reduced the elevated cAMP and Aβ42 production caused by forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase, AC agonist alone or forskolin in combination with IBMX (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but had no effect on those caused by IBMX alone. Moreover, pretreatment with NaHS significantly attenuated HENECA-elevated AC activity and mRNA expressions of various AC isoforms. These data suggest that NaHS may preferentially suppress AC activity when it was stimulated. In conclusion, H2S attenuated HENECA induced Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells through inhibiting γ-secretase via a cAMP dependent pathway.

  6. Structure of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor in complex with a peptide mimetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wu, Huixian; Vardy, Eyal; Huang, Xi-Ping; Trapella, Claudio; Guerrini, Remo; Calo, Girolamo; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Ferrara); (Scripps); (UNC)

    2012-07-11

    Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, {delta}, {kappa} and {mu} ({delta}-OR, {kappa}-OR and {mu}-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ({approx}60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors {kappa} (ref. 5) and {mu} (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.

  7. Shared receptor components but distinct complexes for alpha and beta interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewerenz, M; Mogensen, K E; Uzé, G

    1998-09-25

    The type I interferon family includes 13 alpha, one omega and one beta subtypes recognized by a complex containing the receptor subunits ifnar1 and ifnar2 and their associated Janus tyrosine kinases, Tyk2 and Jak1. To investigate the reported differences in the way that alpha and beta interferons signal through the receptor, we introduced alanine-substitutions in the ifnar2 extracellular domain, and expressed the mutants in U5A cells, lacking endogenous ifnar2. A selection, designed to recover mutants that responded preferentially to alpha or beta interferon yielded three groups: I, neutral; II, sensitive to alpha interferon, partially resistant to beta interferon; III, resistant to alpha interferon, partially sensitive to beta interferon. A mutant clone, TMK, fully resistant to alpha interferon with good sensitivity to beta interferon, was characterized in detail and compared with U5A cells complemented with wild-type ifnar2 and also with Tyk2-deficient 11.1 cells, which exhibit a similar alpha-unresponsive phenotype with a partial beta interferon response. Using anti-receptor antibodies and mutant forms of beta interferon, three distinct modes of ligand interaction could be discerned: (i) alpha interferon with ifnar1 and ifnar2; (ii) beta interferon with ifnar1 and ifnar2; (iii) beta interferon with ifnar2 alone. We conclude that alpha and beta interferons signal differently through their receptors because the two ligand subtypes interact with the receptor subunits ifnar 1 and ifnar2 in entirely different ways.

  8. Communication: Free energy of ligand-receptor systems forming multimeric complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Bachmann, Stephan J.; Parolini, Lucia; Mognetti, Bortolo M.

    2016-04-01

    Ligand-receptor interactions are ubiquitous in biology and have become popular in materials in view of their applications to programmable self-assembly. Although complex functionalities often emerge from the simultaneous interaction of more than just two linker molecules, state of the art theoretical frameworks enable the calculation of the free energy only in systems featuring one-to-one ligand/receptor binding. In this Communication, we derive a general formula to calculate the free energy of systems featuring simultaneous direct interaction between an arbitrary number of linkers. To exemplify the potential and generality of our approach, we apply it to the systems recently introduced by Parolini et al. [ACS Nano 10, 2392 (2016)] and Halverson and Tkachenko [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 094903 (2016)], both featuring functionalized Brownian particles interacting via three-linker complexes.

  9. Bacterial effectors target BAK1-associated receptor complexes: One stone two birds

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Dongping; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2010-01-01

    The long-standing association between hosts and microbes has generated some of most intricate relationships. The studies on molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interaction have been revealing many fascinating stories. Here we zoom in on a specific topic on the interplay between bacterial effectors and plant innate immune signaling. In particular, we will summarize our recent discovery that bacterial effector proteins, AvrPto and AvrPtoB, target plant immune signaling receptor complexes to in...

  10. Possible interaction of fluoroquinolones with the benzodiazepine-GABAA-receptor complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Unseld, E; Ziegler, G.; Gemeinhardt, A; Janssen, U.; Klotz, U

    1990-01-01

    1. The possible involvement of the benzodiazepine (BZD)-GABAA-receptor complex in mediating CNS stimulatory effects of fluoroquinolones was tested in vitro, in a binding inhibition assay and in vivo, in a clinical drug interaction study using electro-encephalogram (EEG) monitoring. 2. The specific binding of [3H]-flunitrazepam to rat synaptic brain membranes was inhibited by various fluoroquinolones in a concentration-dependent manner. 3. Ofloxacin had CNS-stimulating effects as revealed by t...

  11. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor by metal-ligand complexes decreases levels of extracellular amyloid beta peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Katherine A; Filiz, Gulay; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Sharples, Robyn A; Hill, Andrew F; Li, Qiao-Xin; Donnelly, Paul S; Barnham, Kevin J; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in a range of tissues and cell-types. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by a number of ligands induces downstream signalling that modulates critical cell functions including growth, survival and differentiation. Abnormal epidermal growth factor receptor expression and activation is also involved in a number of cancers. In addition to its cognate ligands, the epidermal growth factor receptor can be activated by metals such as zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Due to the important role of these metals in a number of diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic approaches are being developed based on the use of lipid permeable metal-complexing molecules. While these agents are showing promising results in animal models and clinical trials, little is known about the effects of metal-ligand complexes on cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the effects of clioquinol (CQ)-metal complexes on activation of epidermal growth factor receptor. We show here that CQ-Cu complexes induced potent epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation resulting in downstream activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Similar levels of epidermal growth factor receptor activation were observed with alternative lipid permeable metal-ligands including neocuproine and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. We found that CQ-Cu complexes induced a significant reduction in the level of extracellular Abeta1-40 in cell culture. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor activation by PD153035 blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and restored Abeta1-40 levels. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by CQ-Cu was mediated through up-regulation of src kinase activity by a cognate ligand-independent process involving membrane integrins. These findings provide the first evidence that metal-ligand complexes can activate the epidermal growth

  12. Disulfide Trapping for Modeling and Structure Determination of Receptor:Chemokine Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zheng, Yi; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent breakthrough advances in GPCR crystallography, structure determination of protein-protein complexes involving chemokine receptors and their endogenous chemokine ligands remains challenging. Here we describe disulfide trapping, a methodology for generating irreversible covalent binary protein complexes from unbound protein partners by introducing two cysteine residues, one per interaction partner, at selected positions within their interaction interface. Disulfide trapping can serve at least two distinct purposes: (i) stabilization of the complex to assist structural studies, and/or (ii) determination of pairwise residue proximities to guide molecular modeling. Methods for characterization of disulfide-trapped complexes are described and evaluated in terms of throughput, sensitivity, and specificity towards the most energetically favorable cross-links. Due to abundance of native disulfide bonds at receptor:chemokine interfaces, disulfide trapping of their complexes can be associated with intramolecular disulfide shuffling and result in misfolding of the component proteins; because of this, evidence from several experiments is typically needed to firmly establish a positive disulfide crosslink. An optimal pipeline that maximizes throughput and minimizes time and costs by early triage of unsuccessful candidate constructs is proposed. PMID:26921956

  13. On bio-diversity, complexity of M-CSF and its receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    With the development of science, the methods and the views of scientific research changed from analyses to syntheses. Recently, more attention has been paid to bio-diversity and complexity. According to the study on M-CSF and its receptor for years, the author suggests that, the multi-level of bio-diversity also appears at the bio-macromolecular level. Probability of bio-diversity is one of the bases for bio-complexity. Cellular sociology and topobiology are important aspects in bio-complexity, and should be developed. If taking Chinese traditional medicine together with the advantage from Reductionism, joining the study on complexity, Chinese scientist would make a chair in the international scientific society.

  14. Urea/thiourea derivatives and Zn(II)-DPA complex as receptors for anionic recognition—A brief account

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyadip Das; Prasenjit Mahato; Amrita Ghosh; Amal K Mandal; Tanmay Banerjee; Sukdeb Saha; Amitava Das

    2011-03-01

    This review covers few examples of anion complexation chemistry, with a special focus on urea/thiourea-based receptors and Zn(II)-dipicolyl amine-based receptors. This article specially focuses on structural aspects of the receptors and the anions for obtaining the desire specificity along with an efficient receptor-anion interaction. Two types of receptors have been described in this brief account; first one being the strong hydrogen bond donor urea/thiourea derivatives, which binds the anionic analytes through hydrogen bonded interactions; while, the second type of receptors are coordination complexes, where the coordination of the anion to the metal centre. In both the cases the anion binding modulate the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and thereby the spectroscopic response. Appropriate choice of the signalling unit may allow probing the anion binding phenomena through visual detection.

  15. Metal complexes of pyridine-fused macrocyclic polyamines targeting the chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamal, Sunil; D'huys, Thomas; Rowley, William F; Vermeire, Kurt; Aquaro, Stefano; Frost, Brian J; Schols, Dominique; Bell, Thomas W

    2015-11-14

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 acts as a key cell surface receptor in HIV infections, multiple forms of cancer, and various other pathologies, such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Macrocyclic polyamines and their metal complexes are known to exert anti-HIV activity, many acting as HIV entry inhibitors by specifically binding to CXCR4. Three series of pyridopentaazacylopentadecanes, in which the pyridine ring is fused to zero, one, or two saturated six-membered rings, were synthesized by manganese(ii)-templated Schiff-base cyclization of triethylenetetramine with various dicarbonyl compounds. By evaluating these macrocyclic polyamines and their complexes with Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and Zn(2+), we have discovered novel CXCR4-binding compounds. The MnCl2 complex of a new pentaazacyclopentadecane with one fused carbocyclic ring (11) was found to have the greatest potency as an antagonist of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (IC50: 0.014 μM), as evidenced by inhibiting binding of CXCL12 to PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells). Consequently, this compound inhibits replication of the CXCR4-using (X4) HIV-1 strain NL4-3 in the TZM-bl cell line with an IC50 value of 0.52 μM and low cytotoxicity (CC50: >100 μM). In addition, 18 other compounds were evaluated for their interaction with CXCR4 via their ability to interfere with ligand chemokine binding and HIV entry and infection. Of these, the metal complexes of the two more hydrophobic series with one or two fused carbocyclic rings exhibited the greatest potency. The Zn(2+) complex 21 was among the most potent, showing that redox activity of the metal center is not associated with CXCR4 antagonist activity. PMID:26338723

  16. Disruption of a dopamine receptor complex amplifies the actions of cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Melissa L; Hasbi, Ahmed; Shen, Maurice Y F; Fan, Theresa; Navarro, Gemma; Fletcher, Paul J; Franco, Rafael; Lanciego, José L; George, Susan R

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine-induced increases in dopamine signaling in nucleus accumbens (NAc) play a significant role in cocaine seeking behavior. The majority of cocaine addiction research has focused on neuroanatomically segregated dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-expressing neurons, yet an involvement for those NAc neurons coexpressing D1 and D2 receptors in cocaine addiction has never been explored. In situ proximity ligation assay, confocal fluorescence resonance energy transfer and coimmunoprecipitation were used to show native D1 and D2 receptors formed a heteromeric complex in D1/D2 receptor-coexpressing neurons in rat and non-human primate NAc. D1-D2 heteromer expression was lower in NAc of adolescent rats compared to their adult counterparts. Functional disruption of the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer, using a peptide targeting the site of interaction between the D1 and D2 receptor, induced conditioned place preference and increased NAc expression of ∆FosB. D1-D2 heteromer disruption also resulted in the promotion, exacerbation and acceleration of the locomotor activating and incentive motivational effects of cocaine in the self-administration paradigm. These findings support a model for tonic inhibition of basal and cocaine-induced reward processes by the D1-D2 heteromer thus highlighting its potential value as a novel target for drug discovery in cocaine addiction. Given that adolescents show increased drug abuse susceptibility, an involvement for reduced D1-D2 heteromer function in the heightened sensitivity to the rewarding effects of cocaine in adolescence is also implicated. PMID:27480020

  17. Effects of receptor modification and temperature on dynamics of sensory complexes in Escherichia coli chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosse Karin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular stimuli in chemotaxis of Escherichia coli and other bacteria are processed by large clusters of sensory complexes. The stable core of these clusters is formed by transmembrane receptors, a kinase CheA, and an adaptor CheW, whereas adaptation enzymes CheR and CheB dynamically associate with the clusters via interactions with receptors and/or CheA. Several biochemical studies have indicated the dependence of the sensory complex stability on the adaptive modification state of receptors and/or on temperature, which may potentially allow environment-dependent tuning of its signalling properties. However, the extent of such regulation in vivo and its significance for chemotaxis remained unclear. Results Here we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP to confirm in vivo that the exchange of CheA and CheW shows a modest dependency on the level of receptor modification/activity. An even more dramatic effect was observed for the exchange kinetics of CheR and CheB, indicating that their association with clusters may depend on the ability to bind substrate sites on receptors and on the regulatory phosphorylation of CheB. In contrast, environmental temperature did not have a discernible effect on stability of the cluster core. Strain-specific loss of E. coli chemotaxis at high temperature could instead be explained by a heat-induced reduction in the chemotaxis protein levels. Nevertheless, high basal levels of chemotaxis and flagellar proteins in common wild type strains MG1655 and W3110 enabled these strains to maintain their chemotactic ability up to 42°C. Conclusions Our results confirmed that clusters formed by less modified receptors are more dynamic, which can explain the previously observed adjustment of the chemotaxis response sensitivity according to the level of background stimulation. We further propose that the dependency of CheR exchange on the availability of unmethylated sites on receptors is

  18. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A complex by carbohydrate receptor mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna-Magdalena; Mahrhold, Stefan; Perry, Kay; Cheng, Luisa W; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes for botulism. BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and is subsequently transported through the intestinal epithelium into the general circulation. Several hemagglutinin proteins form a multi-protein complex (HA complex) that recognizes host glycans on the intestinal epithelial cell surface to facilitate BoNT absorption. Blocking carbohydrate binding to the HA complex could significantly inhibit the oral toxicity of BoNT. Here, we identify lactulose, a galactose-containing non-digestible sugar commonly used to treat constipation, as a prototype inhibitor against oral BoNT/A intoxication. As revealed by a crystal structure, lactulose binds to the HA complex at the same site where the host galactose-containing carbohydrate receptors bind. In vitro assays using intestinal Caco-2 cells demonstrated that lactulose inhibits HA from compromising the integrity of the epithelial cell monolayers and blocks the internalization of HA. Furthermore, co-administration of lactulose significantly protected mice against BoNT/A oral intoxication in vivo. Taken together, these data encourage the development of carbohydrate receptor mimics as a therapeutic intervention to prevent BoNT oral intoxication.

  19. Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Varga, Angelika; Selvarajah, Srikumaran; Jenes, Agnes; Dienes, Beatrix; Sousa-Valente, Joao; Kulik, Akos; Veress, Gabor; Brain, Susan D.; Baker, David; Urban, Laszlo; Mackie, Ken; Nagy, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) exhibit co-expression and complex, but largely unknown, functional interactions in a sub-population of primary sensory neurons (PSN). We report that PSN co-expressing CB1 receptor and TRPV1 form two distinct sub-populations based on their pharmacological properties, which could be due to the distribution pattern of the two receptors. Pharmacologically, neurons respond either only to capsaicin (COR neurons) or to both capsaicin and the endogenous TRPV1 and CB1 receptor ligand anandamide (ACR neurons). Blocking or deleting the CB1 receptor only reduces both anandamide- and capsaicin-evoked responses in ACR neurons. Deleting the CB1 receptor also reduces the proportion of ACR neurons without any effect on the overall number of capsaicin-responding cells. Regarding the distribution pattern of the two receptors, neurons express CB1 and TRPV1 receptors either isolated in low densities or in close proximity with medium/high densities. We suggest that spatial distribution of the CB1 receptor and TRPV1 contributes to the complexity of their functional interaction. PMID:27653550

  20. GABAA receptor complex function in frontal cortex membranes from control and neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, G K; Lowenthal, A; Javoy-Agid, F; Constantidinis, J

    1991-05-01

    The functional integrity of the GABAA receptor-benzodiazepine (BZ) recognition site-Cl- ionophore complex was assessed by means of [35S]TBPS (t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate) binding to frontal cortex membranes prepared from frozen postmortem brain tissue taken from control (n = 4), Alzheimer (n = 7), Parkinson (n = 3) and Huntington's chorea (n = 2) patients. Specific [35S]TBPS binding was similar in control, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea brains, but was significantly reduced (78% control, P less than 0.01) in frontal cortex membranes from Alzheimer's patients. The linkage between the BZ recognition sites and the GABAA receptor-linked Cl- ionophore was functionally intact in these membranes as BZ site agonists (zolpidem, alpidem, flunitrazepam and clonazepam) enhanced [35S]TBPS binding under the conditions used (well-washed membranes in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl). Zolpidem (BZ1 selective) exhibited a biphasic enhancement in control membranes whereas the other compounds induced a bell-shaped concentration-response curve. The enhancement of [35S]TBPS binding by alpidem, flunitrazepam and clonazepam was greater in frontal cortex membranes from Alzheimer's patients than in controls whereas it tended to be reduced in membranes from the brains of Huntington's chorea patients. These studies demonstrate the functional integrity of the GABAA receptor macromolecular complex and also the usefulness of [35S]TBPS binding in the study of human postmortem tissue. PMID:1654259

  1. Composition of cross-linked 125I-follitropin-receptor complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both of the alpha and beta subunits of intact human follitropin (FSH) were radioiodinated with 125I-sodium iodide and chloramine-T and could be resolved on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Radioiodinated FSH was affinity-cross-linked with a cleavable (nondisulfide) homobifunctional reagent to its membrane receptor on the porcine granulosa cell surface as well as to a Triton X-100-solubilized form of the receptor. Cross-linked samples revealed three additional bands of slower electrophoretic mobility, corresponding to 65, 83, and 117 kDa, in addition to the hormone bands. The hormone alpha beta dimer band corresponded to 43 kDa. Formation of the three bands requires the 125I-hormone to bind specifically to the receptor with subsequent cross-linking. Binding was prevented by an excess of the native hormone but not by other hormones. A monofunctional analog of the cross-linking reagent failed to produce the three bands. Reagent concentration-dependent cross-linking revealed that their formation was sequential; smaller complexes formed first and then larger ones. When gels of cross-linked complexes were treated to cleave covalent cross-links and then electrophoresed in a second dimension, 18-, 22-, and 34-kDa components were released, in addition to the alpha and beta subunits of the hormone

  2. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role...ivation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. Pub...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role

  3. The Mitochondrial Receptor Complex: A Central Role of MOM22 in Mediating Preprotein Transfer from Receptors to the General Insertion Pore

    OpenAIRE

    Kiebler, Michael; Keil, Petra; Schneider, Helmut; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Neupert, Walter

    1993-01-01

    The receptor complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane, which consists of at least seven different proteins, is responsible for the recognition and translocation of cytosolically synthesized preproteins. Two of its subunits, MOM19 and MOM72, function as surface receptors for preproteins. Four other subunits (MOM38, MOM30, MOM8, and MOM7) have been suggested to constitute the general insertion pore (GIP). Here we report on the structure and function of MOM22. MOM22 is anchored in the outer m...

  4. Computational analysis of the CB1 carboxyl-terminus in the receptor-G protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Khurana, Leepakshi; Kendall, Debra A

    2016-04-01

    Despite the important role of the carboxyl-terminus (Ct) of the activated brain cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) in the regulation of G protein signaling, a structural understanding of interactions with G proteins is lacking. This is largely due to the highly flexible nature of the CB1 Ct that dynamically adapts its conformation to the presence of G proteins. In the present study, we explored how the CB1 Ct can interact with the G protein by building on our prior modeling of the CB1-Gi complex (Shim, Ahn, and Kendall, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 2013;288:32449-32465) to incorporate a complete CB1 Ct (Glu416(Ct)-Leu472(Ct)). Based on the structural constraints from NMR studies, we employed ROSETTA to predict tertiary folds, ZDOCK to predict docking orientation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain two distinct plausible models of CB1 Ct in the CB1-Gi complex. The resulting models were consistent with the NMR-determined helical structure (H9) in the middle region of the CB1 Ct. The CB1 Ct directly interacted with both Gα and Gβ and stabilized the receptor at the Gi interface. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of Glu416(Ct), Asp423(Ct), Asp428(Ct), and Arg444(Ct) of CB1 Ct suggested that the CB1 Ct can influence receptor-G protein coupling by stabilizing the receptor at the Gi interface. This research provided, for the first time, models of the CB1 Ct in contact with the G protein. PMID:26994549

  5. Computational analysis of the CB1 carboxyl-terminus in the receptor-G protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Khurana, Leepakshi; Kendall, Debra A

    2016-04-01

    Despite the important role of the carboxyl-terminus (Ct) of the activated brain cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) in the regulation of G protein signaling, a structural understanding of interactions with G proteins is lacking. This is largely due to the highly flexible nature of the CB1 Ct that dynamically adapts its conformation to the presence of G proteins. In the present study, we explored how the CB1 Ct can interact with the G protein by building on our prior modeling of the CB1-Gi complex (Shim, Ahn, and Kendall, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 2013;288:32449-32465) to incorporate a complete CB1 Ct (Glu416(Ct)-Leu472(Ct)). Based on the structural constraints from NMR studies, we employed ROSETTA to predict tertiary folds, ZDOCK to predict docking orientation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain two distinct plausible models of CB1 Ct in the CB1-Gi complex. The resulting models were consistent with the NMR-determined helical structure (H9) in the middle region of the CB1 Ct. The CB1 Ct directly interacted with both Gα and Gβ and stabilized the receptor at the Gi interface. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of Glu416(Ct), Asp423(Ct), Asp428(Ct), and Arg444(Ct) of CB1 Ct suggested that the CB1 Ct can influence receptor-G protein coupling by stabilizing the receptor at the Gi interface. This research provided, for the first time, models of the CB1 Ct in contact with the G protein.

  6. Structures of Receptor Complexes of a North American H7N2 Influenza Hemagglutinin with a Loop Deletion in the Receptor Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Carney, Paul J.; Donis, Ruben O.; Stevens, James (CDC)

    2012-02-21

    Human infections with subtype H7 avian influenza viruses have been reported as early as 1979. In 1996, a genetically stable 24-nucleotide deletion emerged in North American H7 influenza virus hemagglutinins, resulting in an eight amino acid deletion in the receptor-binding site. The continuous circulation of these viruses in live bird markets, as well as its documented ability to infect humans, raises the question of how these viruses achieve structural stability and functionality. Here we report a detailed molecular analysis of the receptor binding site of the North American lineage subtype H7N2 virus A/New York/107/2003 (NY107), including complexes with an avian receptor analog (3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 3'SLN) and two human receptor analogs (6'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 6'SLN; sialyllacto-N-tetraose b, LSTb). Structural results suggest a novel mechanism by which residues Arg220 and Arg229 (H3 numbering) are used to compensate for the deletion of the 220-loop and form interactions with the receptor analogs. Glycan microarray results reveal that NY107 maintains an avian-type ({alpha}2-3) receptor binding profile, with only moderate binding to human-type ({alpha}2-6) receptor. Thus despite its dramatically altered receptor binding site, this HA maintains functionality and confirms a need for continued influenza virus surveillance of avian and other animal reservoirs to define their zoonotic potential.

  7. Single-molecule resolution of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kim C; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2016-01-01

    The organization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher-order oligomers has provided a potential mechanistic system in defining complex GPCR responses. Despite being studied for nearly 20 years it has, and still is, been an area of controversy. Although technology has developed to quantitatively measure these associations in real time, identify the structural interfaces and even systems to understand the physiological significance of di/oligomerization, key questions remain outstanding including the role of each individual complex from the monomer to the higher-order oligomer, in their native system. Recently, single-molecule microscopy approaches have provided the tools to directly visualize individual GPCRs in dimers and oligomers, though as with any technological development each have their advantages and limitations. This chapter will describe these recent developments in single-molecule fluorescent microscopy, focusing on our recent application of super-resolution imaging of the GPCR for the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin to quantify GPCR monomers and formation of protomers in to dimers and distinct oligomeric forms. We present our approach, considerations, strategy, and challenges to visualize this receptor beyond the light diffraction limit via photoactivated localization microscopy with photoactivatable dyes. The addition of super-resolution approaches to the GPCR "nano-tool kit" will pave the way for novel avenues to answer outstanding questions regarding the existence and significance of these complexes to GPCR signaling.

  8. The IL-2/IL-2-Receptor Complex in the Maturation of Rat T-Cell Progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Varas; Teresa Romo; Eva Jiménez; Luis Alonso; Angeles Vicente; Agustín G. Zapata

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of both the interleukin-2-receptor (IL-2R) α-chain expression on 16-day-old fetal rat thymocytes and the occurrence of interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA-containing cells early during rat thymus ontogeny, we have investigated the possible role of IL-2/IL-2R complex in rat T-cell maturation. For this purpose, we analyzed the effects of the addition of either recombinant rat IL- 2 or anti-CD25 (OX-39)-blocking monoclonal antibodies to fetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC), established from 16-...

  9. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2016-09-01

    TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component of the TNF-RSC The predicted PUB domain in the N-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with the USP domain of CYLD, whereas the C-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with HOIP SPATA2 is required for recruitment of CYLD to the TNF-RSC Downregulation of SPATA2 augments transcriptional activation of NF-κB and inhibits TNF-α-induced necroptosis, pointing to an important function of SPATA2 in modulating the outcomes of TNF-α signaling. Taken together, our study draws a detailed map of TNF-α signaling, identifies SPATA2 as a novel component of TNF-α signaling, and provides a rich resource for further functional investigations.

  10. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  11. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K [Brussels; (Trinity); (Michigan); (Stanford-MED); (Michigan-Med); (UW)

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  12. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O;

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide-MHC c...

  13. Toll-Like Receptor-Dependent Immune Complex Activation of B Cells and Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Krishna L; Uccellini, Melissa B; Avalos, Ana M; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Viglianti, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    High titers of autoantibodies reactive with DNA/RNA molecular complexes are characteristic of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In vitro and in vivo studies have implicated the endosomal Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) in the activation of the corresponding autoantibody producing B cells. Importantly, TLR9/TLR7-deficiency results in the inability of autoreactive B cells to proliferate in response to DNA/RNA-associated autoantigens in vitro, and in marked changes in the autoantibody repertoire of autoimmune-prone mice. Uptake of DNA/RNA-associated autoantigen immune complexes (ICs) also leads to activation of dendritic cells (DCs) through TLR9 and TLR7. The initial studies from our lab involved ICs formed by a mixture of autoantibodies and cell debris released from dying cells in culture. To better understand the nature of the mammalian ligands that can effectively activate TLR7 and TLR9, we have developed a methodology for preparing ICs containing defined DNA fragments that recapitulate the immunostimulatory activity of the previous "black box" ICs. As the endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 function optimally from intracellular acidic compartments, we developed a facile methodology to monitor the trafficking of defined DNA ICs by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. These reagents reveal an important role for nucleic acid sequence, even when the ligand is mammalian DNA and will help illuminate the role of IC trafficking in the response.

  14. ATP from synaptic terminals and astrocytes regulates NMDA receptors and synaptic plasticity through PSD-95 multi-protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, U; Palygin, O; Verkhratsky, A; Grant, S G N; Pankratov, Y

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of astrocyte-secreted molecules, such as ATP, for the slow modulation of synaptic transmission in central neurones. Biophysical mechanisms underlying the impact of gliotransmitters on the strength of individual synapse remain, however, unclear. Here we show that purinergic P2X receptors can bring significant contribution to the signalling in the individual synaptic boutons. ATP released from astrocytes facilitates a recruitment of P2X receptors into excitatory synapses by Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. P2X receptors, co-localized with NMDA receptors in the excitatory synapses, can be activated by ATP co-released with glutamate from pre-synaptic terminals and by glia-derived ATP. An activation of P2X receptors in turn leads to down-regulation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors via Ca(2+)-dependent de-phosphorylation and interaction with PSD-95 multi-protein complex. Genetic deletion of the PSD-95 or P2X4 receptors obliterated ATP-mediated down-regulation of NMDA receptors. Impairment of purinergic modulation of NMDA receptors in the PSD-95 mutants dramatically decreased the threshold of LTP induction and increased the net magnitude of LTP. Our findings show that synergistic action of glia- and neurone-derived ATP can pre-modulate efficacy of excitatory synapses and thereby can have an important role in the glia-neuron communications and brain meta-plasticity. PMID:27640997

  15. GTP synthases. Proton pumping and phosphorylation in ligand-receptor-G alpha-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederkoorn, P H; Timmerman, H; Donné-Op Den Kelder, G M; Timms, D; Wilkinson, A J; Kelly, D R; Broadley, K J; Davies, R H

    1996-01-01

    A structural model for a ligand-receptor-Gs alpha-protein complex to function as a GTP synthase is presented. The mechanism which is dependent on the movement and rotation of the G alpha-protein alpha 2-helix is seen to involve the delivery of, at least, one proton to the phosphorylation site in the rotation of this helix. The cycle is driven by a ligand-mediated proton pump through the alpha-helices of the receptor, attachment of the conserved Tyr-Arg-Tyr receptor proton shuttle being made to an aspartate group on the Gs alpha-protein terminal sidechain, which is itself linked to the Asn-Gln interaction known to control movement and rotation of the alpha 2-helix between .GDP and .GTP structures. The energetics of proton transfer through the shuttle mechanism and delivery of a proton to the aspartate group are shown to be sufficient to rupture this controlling interaction and its associated backbone bond. The complex leads to full spatial and energetic definition of the receptor proton shuttle mechanism, while there is a striking association of further Tyrosine and Arginine residues in the vicinity of the Gs alpha-protein Asn-Gln interaction. Calculations at the HF 6-31G** level confirm that a critical balance between ion pair and neutral forms of Tyr-Arg interactions under multiply hydrogen bonded conditions in a hydrophobic environment controls proton transfer and recovery mechanisms. The intrinsic preference of the neutral Tyr-Arg form over the ion-pair is 14.0 kcal/mol. Activation of the Tyrosine oxygen atom in the neutral form by single-NH or -OH groups reduces this difference by some 6.4-8.6 kcal/mol but the dominance of the neutral form is maintained. The expected slight overestimates are consistent with the maximum activation enthalpy of 11.0-12.0 kcal/ mol required to initiate proton transfer through the shuttle. The extended form of the shuttle with the Arginine acting competitively between the two Tyrosine residues allows interpretation of observed

  16. Functional properties of an isolated αβ heterodimeric human placenta insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of human placenta membranes at pH 8.5 in the presence of 2.0 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) for 5 min, followed by the simultaneous removal of the DTT and pH adjustment of pH 7.6, resulted in the formation of a functional αβ heterodimeric insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor complex from the native α2β2 heterotetrameric disulfide-linked state. The membrane-bound αβ heterodimeric complex displayed similar curvilinear 125I-IGF-1 equilibrium binding compared to the α2β2 heterotetrameric complex. 125I-IGF-1 binding to both the isolated α2β2 heterotetrameric and αβ heterodimeric complexes demonstrated a marked straightening of the Scatchard plots, compared to the placenta membrane-bound IGF-1 receptors, with a 2-fold increase in the high-affinity binding component. IGF-1 stimulation of IGF-1 receptor autophosphorylation indicated that the ligand-dependent activation of αβ heterodimeric protein kinase activity occurred concomitant with the reassociation into a covalent α2β2 heterotetrameric state. These data demonstrate that (i) a combination of alkaline pH and DTT treatment of human placenta membranes results in the formation of an αβ heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complex, (ii) unlike the insulin receptor, high-affinity homogeneous IGF-1 binding occurs in both the α2β2 heterotetrameric and αβ heterodimeric complexes, and (iii) IGF-1-dependent autophosphorylation of the αβ heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complex correlates wit an IGF-1 dependent covalent reassociation into an α2β2 heterotetrameric disulfide-linked state

  17. Stoichiometry and geometry of the CXC chemokine receptor 4 complex with CXC ligand 12: Molecular modeling and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Stephens, Bryan S.; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zhao, Chunxia; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Abagyan, Ruben; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors regulate cell migration during development, immune system function, and in inflammatory diseases, making them important therapeutic targets. Nevertheless, the structural basis of receptor:chemokine interaction is poorly understood. Adding to the complexity of the problem is the persistently dimeric behavior of receptors observed in cell-based studies, which in combination with structural and mutagenesis data, suggest several possibilities for receptor:chemokine complex stoichiometry. In this study, a combination of computational, functional, and biophysical approaches was used to elucidate the stoichiometry and geometry of the interaction between the CXC-type chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand CXCL12. First, relevance and feasibility of a 2:1 stoichiometry hypothesis was probed using functional complementation experiments with multiple pairs of complementary nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. Next, the importance of dimers of WT CXCR4 was explored using the strategy of dimer dilution, where WT receptor dimerization is disrupted by increasing expression of nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. The results of these experiments were supportive of a 1:1 stoichiometry, although the latter could not simultaneously reconcile existing structural and mutagenesis data. To resolve the contradiction, cysteine trapping experiments were used to derive residue proximity constraints that enabled construction of a validated 1:1 receptor:chemokine model, consistent with the paradigmatic two-site hypothesis of receptor activation. The observation of a 1:1 stoichiometry is in line with accumulating evidence supporting monomers as minimal functional units of G protein-coupled receptors, and suggests transmission of conformational changes across the dimer interface as the most probable mechanism of altered signaling by receptor heterodimers. PMID:25468967

  18. Low Resolution Structure and Dynamics of a Colicin-Receptor Complex Determined by Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Luke A [ORNL; Johnson, Christopher L [ORNL; Solovyova, Alexandra [University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Callow, Phil [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Weiss, Kevin L [ORNL; Ridley, Helen [University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Le Brun, Anton P [ORNL; Kinane, Christian [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Webster, John [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Holt, Stephen A [ORNL; Lakey, Jeremy H [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that translocate across cell membranes need to overcome a significant hydrophobic barrier. This is usually accomplished via specialized protein complexes, which provide a polar transmembrane pore. Exceptions to this include bacterial toxins, which insert into and cross the lipid bilayer itself. We are studying the mechanism by which large antibacterial proteins enter Escherichia coli via specific outer membrane proteins. Here we describe the use of neutron scattering to investigate the interaction of colicin N with its outer membrane receptor protein OmpF. The positions of lipids, colicin N, and OmpF were separately resolved within complex structures by the use of selective deuteration. Neutron reflectivity showed, in real time, that OmpF mediates the insertion of colicin N into lipid monolayers. This data were complemented by Brewster Angle Microscopy images, which showed a lateral association of OmpF in the presence of colicin N. Small angle neutron scattering experiments then defined the three-dimensional structure of the colicin N-OmpF complex. This revealed that colicin N unfolds and binds to the OmpF-lipid interface. The implications of this unfolding step for colicin translocation across membranes are discussed.

  19. Solubilization of high affinity corticotropin-releasing factor receptors from rat brain: Characterization of an active digitonin-solubilized receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding characteristics of CRF receptors in rat frontal cerebral cortex membranes solubilized in 1% digitonin were determined. The binding of [125I]Tyro-ovine CRF ([125I]oCRF) to solubilized membrane proteins was dependent on incubation time, temperature, and protein concentration, was saturable and of high affinity, and was absent in boiled tissue. The solubilized receptors retained their high affinity for [125I] oCRF in the solubilized state, exhibiting a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 200 pM, as determined by direct binding saturation isotherms. Solubilized CRF receptors maintained the rank order of potencies for various related and unrelated CRF peptides characteristic of the membrane CRF receptor: rat/human CRF congruent to ovine CRF congruent to Nle21,38-rat CRF greater than alpha-helical oCRF-(9-41) greater than oCRF-(7-41) much greater than vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, or the substance-P antagonist. Furthermore, the absolute potencies (Ki values) for the various CRF-related peptides in solubilized receptors were almost identical to those observed in the membrane preparations, indicating that the CRF receptor retained its high affinity binding capacity in the digitonin-solubilized state. Chemical affinity cross-linking of digitonin-solubilized rat cortical membrane proteins revealed a specifically labeled protein with an apparent mol wt of 58,000 which was similar to the labeled protein in native membrane homogenates. Although solubilized CRF receptors retained their high affinity for agonists, their sensitivity for guanine nucleotide was lost. Size exclusion chromatography substantiated these results, demonstrating that in the presence or absence of guanine nucleotides, [125I]oCRF labeled the same size receptor complex

  20. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures.

  1. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for 3H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and 3H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of 3H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances 3H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of 3H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures

  2. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  3. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with 3H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 μM. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table

  4. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (VCU); (Scripps); (UNC); (Res. Tri. Inst.)

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  5. Structural basis for integration of GluD receptors within synaptic organizer complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elegheert, Jonathan; Kakegawa, Wataru; Clay, Jordan E; Shanks, Natalie F; Behiels, Ester; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Miura, Eriko; Rossmann, Maxim; Mitakidis, Nikolaos; Motohashi, Junko; Chang, Veronica T; Siebold, Christian; Greger, Ingo H; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Aricescu, A Radu

    2016-07-15

    Ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) family members are integrated into supramolecular complexes that modulate their location and function at excitatory synapses. However, a lack of structural information beyond isolated receptors or fragments thereof currently limits the mechanistic understanding of physiological iGluR signaling. Here, we report structural and functional analyses of the prototypical molecular bridge linking postsynaptic iGluR δ2 (GluD2) and presynaptic β-neurexin 1 (β-NRX1) via Cbln1, a C1q-like synaptic organizer. We show how Cbln1 hexamers "anchor" GluD2 amino-terminal domain dimers to monomeric β-NRX1. This arrangement promotes synaptogenesis and is essential for D: -serine-dependent GluD2 signaling in vivo, which underlies long-term depression of cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses and motor coordination in developing mice. These results lead to a model where protein and small-molecule ligands synergistically control synaptic iGluR function. PMID:27418511

  6. Acute metal toxicology of olfaction in coho salmon: behavior, receptors, and odor-metal complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehnberg, B.C.; Schreck, C.B.

    1986-04-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the acute toxicities of mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) to coho salmon olfaction. The authors used a behavioral assay of olfaction based on an avoidance reaction to L-serine in a two-choice Y-trough. A second objective was to gain some understanding of the mechanism of metal-induced olfactory inhibition by observing how metals affect the binding of L-serine to its olfactory cell membrane receptor. They have also taken the novel approach of addressing olfactory toxicology from the perspective of the odor molecule by considering metal speciation and metal-serpine complexation chemistry on the basis of chemical equilibrium computations.

  7. Elucidation of AMPA receptor-stargazin complexes by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Edward C; Yelshanskaya, Maria V; Grassucci, Robert A; Frank, Joachim; Sobolevsky, Alexander I

    2016-07-01

    AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and contribute to high cognitive processes such as learning and memory. In the brain, AMPAR trafficking, gating, and pharmacology is tightly controlled by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Here, we used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate the structural basis of AMPAR regulation by one of these auxiliary proteins, TARP γ2, or stargazin (STZ). Our structures illuminate the variable interaction stoichiometry of the AMPAR-TARP complex, with one or two TARP molecules binding one tetrameric AMPAR. Analysis of the AMPAR-STZ binding interfaces suggests that electrostatic interactions between the extracellular domains of AMPAR and STZ play an important role in modulating AMPAR function through contact surfaces that are conserved across AMPARs and TARPs. We propose a model explaining how TARPs stabilize the activated state of AMPARs and how the interactions between AMPARs and their auxiliary proteins control fast excitatory synaptic transmission. PMID:27365450

  8. Pyrethroid insecticides and radioligand displacement from the GABA receptor chloride ionophore complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioligand binding displacement studies were conducted to determine the effects of Type I and II pyrethroids on 3H-flunitrazepam (FLU), 3H-muscimol (MUS), and (35S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Competition experiments with 3H-FLU and 3H-MUS indicate a lack of competition for binding by the pyrethroids. Type I pyrethroids failed to compete for the binding of (35S-TBPS at concentrations as high as 50 pM. Type II pyrethroids inhibited (35S-TBPS binding to rat brain synaptosomes with Ki values ranging from 5-10 pM. The data presented suggest that the interaction of Type II pyrethroids with the GABA receptor-ionophore complex is restricted to a site near the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site

  9. 腺苷A2A受体基因敲除对小鼠的空间参考记忆和工作记忆的影响%Effect of adenosine A2A receptors gene knock-out on spatial working memory and reference memory in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周赛君; 何金彩; 陈江帆; 舒丹; 朱美娥

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects and mechanism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2A R)on spatial memory in mice. Methods Mice with adenosine A2A receptors gene knocked out (A2A RKO, n = 13) were compared to their wild type littermates ( WT, n = 15 ). Eight-arm radial maze and Morris water maze were used to measure their spatial reference memory and spatial working memory. Results Compared to the WT littermates,A2A RKO mice displayed significantly improved working memory in both MWM and radial maze performance. However there was no significant difference in spatial reference memory in MWM test between the A2A RKO mice and WT littermate. Conclusion Genetic inactivation of A2A receptors significantly enhances spatial memory in both MWM and radial maze tests, indicating the important role of adenosine A2A receptors in learning spatial memory in mice. This enhancement of spatial memory is particularly evident for spatial working memory by A2A receptor inactivation.%目的 观察腺苷A2A受体基因敲除对小鼠空间学习记忆过程的影响,探讨腺苷A2A受体与空间学习记忆的关系及可能的调节机制.方法 选用腺苷A2A受体基因敲除小鼠模型(A2ARKO组,n=13)和同窝野生型小鼠(WT组,n=15).采用Morris水迷宫和八臂迷宫两种实验方法分别检测其空间参考记忆和工作记忆能力.结果 腺苷A2A受体基因敲除小鼠在八臂迷宫训练中工作记忆错误数显著少于野生型(RANOVA组间效应:F=146.11,P<0.01);在Morris水迷宫重复获得试验中工作记忆成绩显著优于野生型(trial4/trial1指数组间效应:F=6.17,P=0.026),而八臂迷宫训练空间参考记忆错误数(组间效应:F=0.083,P=0.777)及Morris水迷宫定位航行(组间效应:F=2.552,P=0.132)和空间探索试验成绩(A2ARKO:4.50±2.27;WT:2.50±1.93;t=1.901,P=0.078),2组差异无显著性.结论 腺苷A2A受体基因敲除小鼠表现为空间工作记忆增强,可见脑内腺苷A2A受体参与空间学习记忆的调节,它对

  10. Dinuclear Zinc(II) Macrocyclic Complex as Receptor for Selective Fluorescence Sensing of Pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Lígia M; André, Vânia; Esteves, Catarina V; Palmeira, Tiago; Berberan-Santos, Mário N; Mateus, Pedro; Delgado, Rita

    2016-03-01

    A new diethylenetriamine-derived macrocycle known as L, bearing 2-methylquinoline arms and containing m-xylyl spacers, was prepared in good yield by a one-pot [2 + 2] Schiff base condensation procedure, followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. Up to now this is the first hexaazamacrocycle with appended fluorophore units. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction determination of the dinuclear zinc(II) complex of L showed that metal centers are located at about 7.20(2) Å from one another. This complex exhibits only weak fluorescence in aqueous solution, but the addition of 1 equiv of pyrophosphate (PPi) caused a 21-fold enhancement of the fluorescence intensity. The sensor response is linear up to a value of 10 μM HPPi(3-) and has a detection limit of 300 nM. The receptor behaves as a highly selective sensor for pyrophosphate as other anions, including phosphate, phenylphosphate (PhP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), failed to induce any fluorescence change and practically do not affect the fluorescence intensity of the sensor in the presence of HPPi(3-). Competition titrations carried out in aqueous solution at pH 7.4 [in 20 mM 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) buffer] by spectrofluorometry revealed a high association constant value of 6.22 log units for binding of PPi by the dinuclear zinc(II) receptor, one of the highest reported values for colorimetric/fluorometric sensors able to work under real aqueous physiological conditions, while association constant values for binding of the other phosphorylated substrates are in the 5.51-4.03 log unit range. PMID:26871612

  11. Big Roles of Small Kinases:The Complex Functions of Receptor-Like Cytoplasmic Kinases in Plant Immunity and Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenwei Lin; Xiyu Ma; Libo Shan; Ping He

    2013-01-01

    Plants have evolved a large number of receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases (RLCKs) that often functionally and physically associate with receptor-like kinases (RLKs) to modulate plant growth, development and immune responses. Without any apparent extracellular domain, RLCKs relay intracellular signaling often via RLK complex-mediated transphosphorylation events. Recent advances have suggested essential roles of diverse RLCKs in concert with RLKs in regulating various cellular and physiological responses. We summarize here the complex roles of RLCKs in mediating plant immune responses and growth regulation, and discuss specific and overlapping functions of RLCKs in transducing diverse signaling pathways.

  12. 腺苷A2A受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕胶原亚型的变化%Detection of collagens in hypertrophic scars of adenosine receptor A2A knockout mice by picrosirius polarization method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖虎; 李少华; 王德昌; 霍然; 王一兵; 冯永强; 李强

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent study shows that the adenosine receptor agonists can promote the collagen synthesis, and the adenosine receptor antagonists can inhibit the collagen synthesis and reduce the proliferation of skin collagen fiber. The expression of transforming growth factorβ (TGF-β) in hypertrophic scar of adenosine A2A knockout mice models is decreased. OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of collagens in hypertrophic scars of adenosine receptor A2A knockout mice and its mechanism by picric acid-sirius red polarization method. METHODS: The models of hypertrophic scars were made by adenosine A2A knockout mice and wild-type mice. The character and the distribution of the collagen in the hypertrophic scars were observed by picric acid-sirius red polarization method, and the type of the collagen, distribution, arrangement and content was confirmed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A large amount of eosinophilic collagen protein fibers were observed under polarizing microscope in the hypertrophic scars of wild-type control group. Type collagen fibers were in red and compact bunchiness and Ⅰexhibited strong double refraction, the hypertrophic scars of adenosine A2A knockout mice were lack of thick collagen bundles and was in sparse bunchiness, and the collage bundles were well-arranged and well-distributed. Compared with the wild-type control group, adenosine A2A knockout mice showed significantly lower typecollagen fibers levⅠel (P < 0.01), as well as the hypertrophic scars. It indicated that adenosine A2A receptors played an active role in the proliferation of scars and could prevent the proliferation of scars.%背景:作者前期研究发现腺苷受体激动剂可以刺激胶原合成,腺苷受体拮抗剂可以抑制胶原合成,并且可以减轻皮肤胶原纤维增生.腺苷A2A 受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕转化生长因子β表达降低.目的:利用苦味酸-天狼星红偏振光法观察腺苷A2A 受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕胶原亚型的变化并

  13. Ion-Pair Complexation with Dibenzo[21]Crown-7 and Dibenzo[24]Crown-8 bis-Urea Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Toni; Kiesilä, Anniina; Kalenius, Elina; Rissanen, Kari

    2016-09-26

    Synthesis and ion-pair complexation properties of novel ditopic bis-urea receptors based on dibenzo[21]crown-7 (R(1) ) and dibenzo[24]crown-8 (R(2) ) scaffolds have been studied in the solid state, solution, and gas phase. In a 4:1 CDCl3 /[D6 ]DMSO solution, both receptors clearly show positive heterotropic cooperativity toward halide anions when complexed with Rb(+) or Cs(+) , with the halide affinity increasing in order I(-) complexes of both receptors have higher halide affinities compared to the caesium complexes. However, Rb(+) and Cs(+) complexes of R(2) show stronger affinities toward all the studied anions compared to the corresponding cationic complexes of R(1) . Similar selectivity of the receptors toward the studied ion pairs was also observed also in the gas phase by competition experiments with mass spectrometry. A total of eight crystal structures with different rubidium and caesium halides and oxyanions were obtained in addition to the crystal structure of R(2) ⋅BaCl2 . The selectivity observed in solution and in the gas phase is explainable by the conformational differences observed in the crystal structures of ion-pair complexes with R(1) and R(2) . In the solid state, R(1) has an open conformation due to the asymmetric crown-ether scaffold, whereas R(2) has a compact, folded conformation. Computational studies of the ion-pair complexes of R(2) show that the interaction energies of the complexes increase in the order CsI

  14. Nuclear pyruvate kinase M2 complex serves as a transcriptional coactivator of arylhydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shun; Adachi, Jun; Ihara, Masaru; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Kakizuka, Akira; Ikura, Masae; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2016-01-29

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) regulate production of acetyl-CoA, which functions as an acetyl donor in diverse enzymatic reactions, including histone acetylation. However, the mechanism by which the acetyl-CoA required for histone acetylation is ensured in a gene context-dependent manner is not clear. Here we show that PKM2, the E2 subunit of PDC and histone acetyltransferase p300 constitute a complex on chromatin with arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor associated with xenobiotic metabolism. All of these factors are recruited to the enhancer of AhR-target genes, in an AhR-dependent manner. PKM2 contributes to enhancement of transcription of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), an AhR-target gene, acetylation at lysine 9 of histone H3 at the CYP1A1 enhancer. Site-directed mutagenesis of PKM2 indicates that this enhancement of histone acetylation requires the pyruvate kinase activity of the enzyme. Furthermore, we reveal that PDC activity is present in nuclei. Based on these findings, we propose a local acetyl-CoA production system in which PKM2 and PDC locally supply acetyl-CoA to p300 from abundant PEP for histone acetylation at the gene enhancer, and our data suggest that PKM2 sensitizes AhR-mediated detoxification in actively proliferating cells such as cancer and fetal cells.

  15. Neurosteroid Binding Sites on the GABAA Receptor Complex as Novel Targets for Therapeutics to Reduce Alcohol Abuse and Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary W. Hulin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the prevalence of alcohol abuse and dependence in the US and Europe, there are only five approved pharmacotherapies for alcohol dependence. Moreover, these pharmacotherapeutic options have limited clinical utility. The purpose of this paper is to present pertinent literature suggesting that both alcohol and the neurosteroids interact at the GABAA receptor complex and that the neurosteroid sites on this receptor complex could serve as new targets for the development of novel therapeutics for alcohol abuse. This paper will also present data collected by our laboratory showing that one neurosteroid in particular, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, decreases ethanol intake in rats under a variety of conditions. In the process, we will also mention relevant studies from the literature suggesting that both particular subtypes and subunits of the GABAA receptor play an important role in mediating the interaction of neurosteroids and ethanol.

  16. Interaction of [3H] estradiol - and [3H] monohydroxytamoxifen-estrogen receptor complexes with a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, A C; DeSombre, E R; Greene, G L; Jensen, E V; Jordan, V C

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and contrast the interaction of estrogen [( 3H]17 beta-estradiol)- or antiestrogen [( 3H]monohydroxytamoxifen)-receptor complexes from human breast tumor cytosols with monoclonal antibodies raised to the human breast tumor estrogen receptor. Breast tumor cytosols containing estrogen receptor which sedimented as radiolabeled peaks in either the 8S, 8S and 4S, or 4S regions of sucrose density gradients, interacted with the monoclonal antibody D547 to produce a broad 9-10S peak, a broad 8S-10S peak, or a more discrete 8S peak, respectively. On high salt (0.4M KC1) sucrose density gradients the 4S ligand-receptor complex plus antibody produced a binding peak at approximately the 8S region of the gradient. These sedimentation studies with the monoclonal antibody D547, and similar studies with the monoclonal antibody D58, could detect no differences in the cytosolic estrogen receptor whether complexed with [3H]estradiol or with [3H]monohydroxytamoxifen. These observations were confirmed by Scatchard equilibrium saturation analysis and sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosols from the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The antibody D547 interacted with 8S ER from these cytosols to produce a broad 8S-10S peak, but the antibody produced no change in the affinity or number of binding sites present in these cytosols. It seems, therefore, that the antigenic determinants recognized by these particular antibodies on the breast tumor cytosolic receptor are not significantly altered by the binding of either an estrogen or an antiestrogen to the receptor. PMID:6671136

  17. Ion-Pair Complexation with Dibenzo[21]Crown-7 and Dibenzo[24]Crown-8 bis-Urea Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Toni; Kiesilä, Anniina; Kalenius, Elina; Rissanen, Kari

    2016-09-26

    Synthesis and ion-pair complexation properties of novel ditopic bis-urea receptors based on dibenzo[21]crown-7 (R(1) ) and dibenzo[24]crown-8 (R(2) ) scaffolds have been studied in the solid state, solution, and gas phase. In a 4:1 CDCl3 /[D6 ]DMSO solution, both receptors clearly show positive heterotropic cooperativity toward halide anions when complexed with Rb(+) or Cs(+) , with the halide affinity increasing in order I(-) studied anions compared to the corresponding cationic complexes of R(1) . Similar selectivity of the receptors toward the studied ion pairs was also observed also in the gas phase by competition experiments with mass spectrometry. A total of eight crystal structures with different rubidium and caesium halides and oxyanions were obtained in addition to the crystal structure of R(2) ⋅BaCl2 . The selectivity observed in solution and in the gas phase is explainable by the conformational differences observed in the crystal structures of ion-pair complexes with R(1) and R(2) . In the solid state, R(1) has an open conformation due to the asymmetric crown-ether scaffold, whereas R(2) has a compact, folded conformation. Computational studies of the ion-pair complexes of R(2) show that the interaction energies of the complexes increase in the order CsI

  18. Characterization and expression of the human T cell receptor-T3 complex by monoclonal antibody F101.01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Plesner, T; Pallesen, G;

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) F101.01 reacting with the T cell receptor (TCR)-T3 complex is presented. Immunohistological studies showed that F101.01 specifically stains T-zone lymphocytes in lymph nodes, tonsils, and splenic tissue. Two-colour immunofluorescence and flow cytometry demonstr...

  19. Complex positive selection pressures drive the evolution of HIV-1 with different co-receptor tropisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 co-receptor tropism is central for understanding the transmission and pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. We performed a genome-wide comparison between the adaptive evolution of R5 and X4 variants from HIV-1 subtypes B and C. The results showed that R5 and X4 variants experienced differential evolutionary patterns and different HIV-1 genes encountered various positive selection pressures, suggesting that complex selection pressures are driving HIV-1 evolution. Compared with other hypervariable regions of Gp120, significantly more positively selected sites were detected in the V3 region of subtype B X4 variants, V2 region of subtype B R5 variants, and V1 and V4 regions of subtype C X4 variants, indicating an association of positive selection with co-receptor recognition/binding. Intriguingly, a significantly higher proportion (33.3% and 55.6%, P<0.05) of positively selected sites were identified in the C3 region than other conserved regions of Gp120 in all the analyzed HIV-1 variants, indicating that the C3 region might be more important to HIV-1 adaptation than previously thought. Approximately half of the positively selected sites identified in the env gene were identical between R5 and X4 variants. There were three common positively selected sites (96, 113 and 281) identified in Gp41 of all X4 and R5 variants from subtypes B and C. These sites might not only suggest a functional importance in viral survival and adaptation, but also imply a potential cross-immunogenicity between HIV-1 R5 and X4 variants, which has important implications for AIDS vaccine development.

  20. Complex pharmacology of novel allosteric free fatty acid 3 receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Brian D; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Murdoch, Hannah;

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the roles of the short chain fatty acid receptor, free fatty acid 3 receptor (FFA3), has been severely limited by the low potency of its endogenous ligands, the crossover of function of these on the closely related free fatty acid 2 receptor, and a dearth of FFA3-selective synthetic l...

  1. Role of the multichain IL-2 receptor complex in the control of normal and malignant T-cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, T.A.

    1987-11-01

    Antigen-induced activation of resting T-cells induces the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2), as well as the expression of specific cell surface receptors for this lymphokine. There are at least two forms of the cellular receptors for IL-2, one with a very high affinity and the other with a lower affinity. The authors have identified two IL-2 binding peptides, a 55-kd peptide reactive with the anti-Tac monoclonal antibody, and a novel 75-kd non-Tac IL-2 binding peptide. Cell lines bearing either the p55, Tac, or the p75 peptide along manifested low-affinity IL-2 binding, whereas cell lines bearing both peptides manifested both high- and low-affinity receptors. Fusion of cell membranes from low-affinity IL-2 binding cells bearing the Tac peptide alone with membranes from a cell line bearing the p75 peptide alone generates hybrid membranes bearing high-affinity receptors. They propose a multichain model for the high-affinity IL-2 receptor in which both the Tac and the p75 IL-2 binding peptides are associated in a receptor complex. In contrast to resting T-cells, human T-cell lymphotropic virus I-associated adult T-cell leukemia cells constitutively express large numbers of IL-2 receptors. Because IL-2 receptors are present on the malignant T-cells but not on normal resting cells, clinical trials have been initiated in which patients with adult T-cell leukemia are being treated with either unmodified or toxin-conjugated forms of anti-Tac monoclonal antibody directed toward this growth factor receptor. Cross-linking studies were done using (/sup 125/I) IL-2.

  2. Structure and Function of Cross-class Complexes of G Protein-coupled Secretin and Angiotensin 1a Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Augustine, Mary Lou; Lee, Leo T O; Chow, Billy K C; Miller, Laurence J

    2016-08-12

    Complexes of secretin (SecR) and angiotensin 1a (Atr1a) receptors have been proposed to be functionally important in osmoregulation, providing an explanation for overlapping and interdependent functions of hormones that bind and activate different classes of GPCRs. However, the nature of these cross-class complexes has not been well characterized and their signaling properties have not been systematically explored. We now use competitive inhibition of receptor bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence complementation to establish the dominant functionally important state as a symmetrical homodimeric form of SecR decorated by monomeric Atr1a, interacting through lipid-exposed faces of Atr1a TM1 and TM4. Conditions increasing prevalence of this complex exhibited negative allosteric modulatory impact on secretin-stimulated cAMP responses at SecR. In contrast, activating Atr1a with full agonist in such a complex exhibited a positive allosteric modulatory impact on the same signaling event. This modulation was functionally biased, with secretin-stimulated calcium responses unaffected, whereas angiotensin-stimulated calcium responses through the complex were reduced or absent. Further supporting this interpretation, Atr1a with mutations of lipid-exposed faces of TM1 and TM4 that did not affect its ability to bind or signal, could be expressed in the same cell as SecR, yet not exhibit either the negative or positive allosteric impact on cAMP observed with the inactive or activated states of wild type Atr1a on function, and not interfere with angiotensin-stimulated calcium responses like complexes with Atr1a. This may provide a more selective means of exploring the physiologic functional impact of this cross-class receptor complex without interfering with the function of either component receptor. PMID:27330080

  3. Are different stoichiometries feasible for complexes between lymphotoxin-alpha and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1?

    OpenAIRE

    Mascarenhas Nahren; Kästner Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factors, TNF and lymphotoxin-α (LT), are cytokines that bind to two receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2 (TNF-receptor 1 and 2) to trigger their signaling cascades. The exact mechanism of ligand-induced receptor activation is still unclear. It is generally assumed that three receptors bind to the homotrimeric ligand to trigger a signaling event. Recent evidence, though, has raised doubts if the ligand:receptor stoichiometry should indeed be 3:3 for ligand-induced cell...

  4. The transcriptional coactivator DRIP/mediator complex is involved in vitamin D receptor function and regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yuko; Chalkley, Robert J; Burlingame, Alma L; Bikle, Daniel D

    2010-10-01

    Mediator is a multisubunit coactivator complex that facilitates transcription of nuclear receptors. We investigated the role of the mediator complex as a coactivator for vitamin D receptor (VDR) in keratinocytes. Using VDR affinity beads, the vitamin D receptor interacting protein (DRIP)/mediator complex was purified from primary keratinocytes, and its subunit composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The complex included core subunits, such as DRIP205/MED1 (MED1), that directly binds to VDR. Additional subunits were identified that are components of the RNA polymerase II complex. The functions of different mediator components were investigated by silencing its subunits. The core subunit MED1 facilitates VDR activity and regulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. A newly described subunit MED21 also has a role in promoting keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, whereas MED10 has an inhibitory role. Blocking MED1/MED21 expression caused hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 and/or glioma-associated oncogene homolog. Blocking MED1 or MED21 expression also resulted in defects in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation, as indicated by decreased expression of differentiation markers and decreased translocation of E-cadherin to the membrane. These results show that keratinocytes use the transcriptional coactivator mediator to regulate VDR functions and control keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  5. Complex formation between calsequestrin and the ryanodine receptor in fast- and slow-twitch rabbit skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B E; Ohlendieck, K

    1998-06-16

    Linkage between the high-capacity Ca2+-binding protein calsequestrin and the ryanodine receptor is proposed to be essential for proper Ca2+-release during skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling. However, no direct biochemical evidence exists showing a connection between these high-molecular-mass complexes in native skeletal muscle membranes. Here, using immunoblot analysis of chemically crosslinked membrane vesicles enriched in triad junctions, we have demonstrated that a very close neighborhood relationship exists between calsequestrin and the ryanodine receptor in both main fiber types. Hence, the luminal Ca2+-reservoir complex appears to be directly coupled to the membrane Ca2+-release complex and oligomerization seems to be of functional importance. PMID:9662440

  6. New estradiol based {sup 111}In complex towards the estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vultos, Filipe; Cunha, Susana; Fernandes, Celia; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Marques, Fernanda; Santos, Isabel; Gano, Lurdes [Universidade de Lisboa, Bobadela (Portugal). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares C2TN; Botelho, Maria Filomena [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Inst. de Biofisica/Biomatematica

    2015-07-01

    The oestrogen receptor (ER) is an important tumour target for molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy due to its overexpression in many malignant cells as compared to normal cells. Aiming to find new functional molecular imaging/therapeutic agents for ER positive tumours, we have synthesized a new estradiol derivative substituted at the 16-α position with a diethylene triamine tetraacetic acid (DTTA)-like chelating ligand through a four-carbon spacer. The new bioconjugate (H{sub 4}L), was used to synthesize the corresponding indium complexes (InL/[{sup 111}In]L). The radioactive complex [{sup 111}In]L was prepared in high yield (>98%) at final concentrations of 1 x 10{sup -4} M and its chemical identity was ascertained by comparing its HPLC gamma-chromatogram to the HPLC UV-vis-chromatogram of the InL analogue. [{sup 111}In]L is hydrophilic and kinetically stable in the presence of an excess of apo-transferrin and in human blood serum. Cellular studies in breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-431) suggest that [{sup 111}In]L uptake may be mediated by an ER dependent mechanism. Biodistribution studies were performed in mice indicating a rapid clearance from most organs and a slow total excretion that occurs mainly by hepatobiliar pathway. High in vivo stability of [{sup 111}In]L was confirmed by HPLC analysis of urine and blood samples. Nevertheless, the hydrophilicity, the low ER affinity and the biodistribution of [{sup 111}In]L indicate that structural modifications are required to improve its behaviour for ER targeting in vivo.

  7. Structure of Stem Cell Growth Factor R-spondin 1 in Complex with the Ectodomain of Its Receptor LGR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Chuan Peng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptors 4–6 (LGR4–LGR6 are receptors for R-spondins, potent Wnt agonists that exert profound trophic effects on Wnt-driven stem cells compartments. We present crystal structures of a signaling-competent fragment of R-spondin 1 (Rspo1 at a resolution of 2.0 Å and its complex with the LGR5 ectodomain at a resolution of 3.2 Å. Ecto-LGR5 binds Rspo1 at its concave leucine-rich-repeat (LRR surface, forming a dimeric 2:2 complex. Fully conserved residues on LGR4–LGR6 explain promiscuous binding of R-spondins. A phenylalanine clamp formed by Rspo1 Phe106 and Phe110 pinches Ala190 of LGR5 and is critical for binding. Mutations related to congenital anonychia reduce signaling, but not binding of Rspo1 to LGR5. Furthermore, antibody binding to the extended loop of the C-terminal LRR cap of LGR5 activates signaling in a ligand-independent manner. Thus, our data reveal binding of R-spondins to conserved sites on LGR4–LGR6 and, in analogy to FSHR and related receptors, suggest a direct signaling role for LGR4–LGR6 in addition to its formation of Wnt receptor and coreceptor complexes.

  8. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents

  9. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R.; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.

  10. The binding of [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex to hypothalamic chromatin of male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Burgos, J; Ventanas, J

    1985-01-01

    Histones and masking acidic proteins were removed from hypothalamic chromatin in order to evaluate/measure the number of available acceptor sites for the [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex. This number increases after dehistonizing and unmasking and is lower than published values for comparable preparations. No sex-related difference in [3H]oestradiol-receptor binding to hypothalamic chromatin in vitro was observed. Failure to observe such a difference suggests that sexual differentiation and steroid sensitivity cannot be attributed to marked differences in the degree of chromatin masking.

  11. The distribution of motilin receptor in the amygdala of rats and its role in migrating myoelectric complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the distribution of the motilin receptor in the amygdala of rats and its role in regulating the duodenal migrating myoelectric complex (MMC). Methods:The distribution of motilin receptor in the amygdala in adult SD rats was detected by immunohistochemistry methods, and the duodenal interdigestive MMC was recorded via the electrodes implanted in the duodenum and analyzed using a multichannel recorder. Results:Motilin receptor was observed in the amygdala of rats. The great amount of motilin receptor was found in the medial amygdaloid nucleus, which was also abundant in the basolateral nucleus but less abundant in the basomedial amygdaloid nucleus, the central amygdaloid nucleus and the lateral amygdaloid nucleus. The shortening of the duodenal MMC cycle duration and the in crease of the amplitude and the frequency of phase Ⅲ were recorded after motilin receptors being bound with exogenous motilin in the amygdala. The effects could be completely blocked by the subdiaphragmatic vagotomy but not by the intravenous injections of atropine, phentolamine or propranolol. Anti-motilin serum could partially block these effects, and the destruction of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala had no significant effects on the duodenal MMC. Conclusion: Motilin receptor is present in all the subnuclei of the amygdala, with the greatest amount of motilin receptor present in the medial amygdaloid nucleus. Microinjections of motilin in the amygdala can shorten the duodenal MMC cycle duration and increase the amplitude and the frequency of phase Ⅲ. These effects might be accomplished via the amygdala-hypothalamus-brainstem-vagus pathway, indicating the important role of the amygdala motilin receptor in the duodenal MMC regulation.

  12. Structure of the murine constitutive androstane receptor complexed to androstenol: a molecular basis for inverse agonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, L.; Vincent, J.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Dussault, I.; Lin, M.; Ianculescu, I.; Sherman, M.A.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E. (Tennesse)

    2010-03-08

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a 'reverse' paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligand binding pocket, but unlike many nuclear receptor ligands, it makes no contacts with helix H12/AF2. The transition from constitutive to basal activity (androstenol bound) appears to be associated with a ligand-induced kink between helices H10 and H11. This disrupts the previously predicted salt bridge that locks H12 in the transcriptionally active conformation. This mechanism of inverse agonism is distinct from traditional nuclear receptor antagonists thereby offering a new approach to receptor modulation.

  13. Structure of the Murine Constitutive Androstane Receptor Complexed to Androstenol: A Molecular Basis for Inverse Agonism

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Li; Vincent, Jeremy; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Dussault, Isabelle; Lin, Min; Ianculescu, Irina; Sherman, Mark A.; Forman, Barry M.; Fernandez, Elias J.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a “reverse” paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligan...

  14. Symmetric signaling by an asymmetric 1 erythropoietin: 2 erythropoietin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingxin L; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Tidor, Bruce; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-01-30

    Via sites 1 and 2, erythropoietin binds asymmetrically to two identical receptor monomers, although it is unclear how asymmetry affects receptor activation and signaling. Here we report the design and validation of two mutant erythropoietin receptors that probe the role of individual members of the receptor dimer by selectively binding either site 1 or site 2 on erythropoietin. Ba/F3 cells expressing either mutant receptor do not respond to erythropoietin, but cells co-expressing both receptors respond to erythropoietin by proliferation and activation of the JAK2-Stat5 pathway. A truncated receptor with only one cytosolic tyrosine (Y343) is sufficient for signaling in response to erythropoietin, regardless of the monomer on which it is located. Similarly, only one receptor in the dimer needs a juxtamembrane hydrophobic L253 or W258 residue, essential for JAK2 activation. We conclude that despite asymmetry in the ligand-receptor interaction, both sides are competent for signaling, and appear to signal equally.

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the complex of interferon-λ1 with its receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interferon-λ1 and the extracellular domain of its receptor IFN-λ1R1 were expressed in insect cells and purified to homogenity. Ligand–receptor complexes of ligands expressed in insect cells and in E. coli were formed, purified by size-exclusion chromatography and crystallized. Preliminary X-ray studies showed that the crystals diffracted to better than 2.2 Å resolution. Human interferon-λ1 (IFN-λ1Ins) and the extracellular domain of interferon-λ1 receptor (IFN-λ1R1) were expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and purified to homogeneity. Both IFN-λ1Ins and interferon-λ1 produced from Escherichia coli (IFN-λ1Bac) were coupled with IFN-λ1R1 at room temperature and the complexes were purified by gel filtration. Both complexes were crystallized; the crystals were flash-frozen at 100 K and diffraction data were collected to 2.16 and 2.1 Å, respectively. Although the IFN-λ1Bac–IFN-λ1R1 and IFN-λ1Ins–IFN-λ1R1 complexes differed only in the nature of the expression system used for the ligand, their crystallization conditions and crystal forms were quite different. A search for heavy-atom derivatives as well as molecular-replacement trials are in progress

  16. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Cornell); (Scripps); (NIDA); (Columbia); (UCSD); (Receptos)

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  17. Strategies for improved modeling of GPCR-drug complexes: blind predictions of serotonin receptors bound to ergotamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, David; Ranganathan, Anirudh; Carlsson, Jens

    2014-07-28

    The recent increase in the number of atomic-resolution structures of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has contributed to a deeper understanding of ligand binding to several important drug targets. However, reliable modeling of GPCR-ligand complexes for the vast majority of receptors with unknown structure remains to be one of the most challenging goals for computer-aided drug design. The GPCR Dock 2013 assessment, in which researchers were challenged to predict the crystallographic structures of serotonin 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(2B) receptors bound to ergotamine, provided an excellent opportunity to benchmark the current state of this field. Our contributions to GPCR Dock 2013 accurately predicted the binding mode of ergotamine with RMSDs below 1.8 Å for both receptors, which included the best submissions for the 5-HT(1B) complex. Our models also had the most accurate description of the binding sites and receptor-ligand contacts. These results were obtained using a ligand-guided homology modeling approach, which combines extensive molecular docking screening with incorporation of information from multiple crystal structures and experimentally derived restraints. In this work, we retrospectively analyzed thousands of structures that were generated during the assessment to evaluate our modeling strategies. Major contributors to accuracy were found to be improved modeling of extracellular loop two in combination with the use of molecular docking to optimize the binding site for ligand recognition. Our results suggest that modeling of GPCR-drug complexes has reached a level of accuracy at which structure-based drug design could be applied to a large number of pharmaceutically relevant targets. PMID:25030302

  18. Dynamics of mononuclear phagocyte system Fc receptor function in systemic lupus erythematosus. Relation to disease activity and circulating immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly, R P; Parris, T M; Inman, R D; McDougal, J S

    1983-02-01

    Seventeen pairs of longitudinal studies of mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) Fc receptor function in 15 patients with systemic lupus were performed to explore the dynamic range of Fc receptor dysfunction in lupus and to establish the relationships between MPS function, clinical disease activity and circulating immune complexes (CIC). Fc receptor function was measured by the clearance of IgG sensitized autologous erythrocytes. At the time of first study the degree of MPS dysfunction was correlated with both clinical activity (P less than 0.05) and CIC (P less than 0.05). At follow-up patients with a change in clinical status show significantly larger changes in clearance function compared to clinically stable patients (206 min vs 7 min; P less than 0.001). MPS function changed concordantly with a change in clinical status in all cases (P = 0.002). Longitudinal assessments did not demonstrate concordance of changes in MPS function and CIC, measured by three different assays. The MPS Fc receptor defect in systemic lupus is dynamic and closely associated with disease activity. The lack of concordance of the defect with changes in CIC suggests that either CIC does not adequately reflect receptor site saturation or that other factors may also contribute to the magnitude of MPS dysfunction. PMID:6839542

  19. Insulin/receptor binding: the last piece of the puzzle? What recent progress on the structure of the insulin/receptor complex tells us (or not) about negative cooperativity and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyts, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Progress in solving the structure of insulin bound to its receptor has been slow and stepwise, but a milestone has now been reached with a refined structure of a complex of insulin with a "microreceptor" that contains the primary binding site. The insulin receptor is a dimeric allosteric enzyme that belongs to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The insulin binding process is complex and exhibits negative cooperativity. Biochemical evidence suggested that insulin, through two distinct binding sites, crosslinks two receptor sites located on each α subunit. The structure of the unliganded receptor ectodomain showed a symmetrical folded-over conformation with an antiparallel disposition. Further work resolved the detailed structure of receptor site 1, both without and with insulin. Recently, a missing piece in the puzzle was added: the C-terminal portion of insulin's B-chain known to be critical for binding and negative cooperativity. Here I discuss these findings and their implications.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and binding affinities of rhenium(I) thiosemicarbazone complexes for the estrogen receptor (α/β).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Montenegro, Ara; Carballo, Rosa; Vázquez-López, Ezequiel M

    2014-11-01

    The binding affinities towards estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β of a set of thiosemicarbazone ligands (HL(n)) and their rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes [ReX(HL(n))(CO)3] (X=Cl, Br) were determined by a competitive standard radiometric assay with [(3)H]-estradiol. The ability of the coordinated thiosemicarbazone ligands to undergo deprotonation and the lability of the ReX bond were used as a synthetic strategy to obtain [Re(hpy)(L(n))(CO)3] (hpy=3- or 4-hydroxypyridine). The inclusion of the additional hpy ligand endows the new thiosemicarbazonate complexes with an improved affinity towards the estrogen receptors and, consequently, the values of the inhibition constant (Ki) could be determined for some of them. In general, the values of Ki for both ER subtypes suggest an appreciable selectivity towards ERα. PMID:25061691

  1. Regulatory effects of adenosine A2A receptors on psychomotor ability and mood behavior of mice%腺苷A2A受体对小鼠精神运动和情绪行为的调控作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜莉; 冉鸿; 段炜; 郑健

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨腺苷A2A受体基因敲除、A2A受体激动剂干预或A2A受体抑制剂干预对小鼠运动活性、焦虑和抑郁样行为的影响.方法 取腺苷A2A受体基因敲除(A2AKO)的雄性小鼠(A2AKO组)及同窝野生型(WT)C57BL/6小鼠(WT组)待用.另取雄性清洁级C57BL/6小鼠,随机分为SCH58261组、CGS21680组和对照组,分别给予腺苷A2A受体特异性拮抗剂SCH58261(2mg/kg)、腺苷A2A受体特异性激动剂CGS21680(0.5mg/kg)和同体积(0.25ml)载体溶液(二甲基亚砜+生理盐水)腹膜腔注射,10min后待用.前述各组别小鼠均进行旷场、高架十字迷宫和强迫游泳实验,测定各组小鼠的运动活性、焦虑和抑郁样行为.结果 与WT组比较,A2AKO组旷场总运动路程缩短(P<0.001),周边区域的滞留时间延长(P<0.05),进入高架十字迷宫开臂的次数及在开臂滞留时间减少(P<0.05),强迫游泳的累计不动时间无显著差异(P>0.05),而CGS21680组旷场总运动路程缩短(P<0.01),周边区域滞留时间延长(P<0.01),进入高架十字迷宫开臂的次数及在开臂的滞留时间减少(P<0.01),强迫游泳的累计不动时间延长(P<0.001),而SCH58261组旷场总运动路程和中心区域活动路程延长(P<0.001),强迫游泳的累计不动时间缩短(P<0.01),高架十字迷宫试验各项指标无显著差异(P>0.05).结论 腺苷A2A受体激动剂可减少小鼠的自发和探索行为,加重焦虑和抑郁情绪,该效应与腺苷A2A受体基因敲除引发的效应相似,与腺苷A2A受体拮抗剂引发效应相反.%Objective To explore the effects of gene knock-out, agonist or inhibitor of adenosine A2A receptor on the locomotor activity, and anxiety- or depression-like behavior of mice. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice, comprising those underwent gene knock-out of adenosine AjA receptor (AjaKO) and their wild-type (WT) littermates, were assigned into A2A KO group and WT group. Another batch of male C57BL/6, specific

  2. The elongation complex components BRD4 and MLLT3/AF9 are transcriptional coactivators of nuclear retinoid receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Sébastien Flajollet; Christophe Rachez; Maheul Ploton; Céline Schulz; Rozenn Gallais; Raphaël Métivier; Michal Pawlak; Aymeric Leray; Al Amine Issulahi; Laurent Héliot; Bart Staels; Gilles Salbert; Philippe Lefebvre

    2013-01-01

    International audience Nuclear all-trans retinoic acid receptors (RARs) initiate early transcriptional events which engage pluripotent cells to differentiate into specific lineages. RAR-controlled transactivation depends mostly on agonist-induced structural transitions in RAR C-terminus (AF-2), thus bridging coactivators or corepressors to chromatin, hence controlling preinitiation complex assembly. However, the contribution of other domains of RAR to its overall transcriptional activity r...

  3. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  4. Unique role of the complement receptor CR1 in the degradation of C3b associated with immune complexes

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The main finding of this paper is that CR1, the membrane receptor for C3b and C4b, together with C3b/C4b-inactivator (I), degrades C3b bound to immune complexes (C3b*). Two fragments are generated: C3c, which is released from the immune complexes, and C3d*. The C3c fragment released from the cell intermediate EAC1423b prepared with 125I-C3 was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and radioautography. It has a 135,000 mol wt and contains disulfide bo...

  5. Non-canonical interleukin 23 receptor complex assembly: p40 protein recruits interleukin 12 receptor β1 via site II and induces p19/interleukin 23 receptor interaction via site III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Jutta; Moll, Jens M; Baran, Paul; Grötzinger, Joachim; Scheller, Jürgen; Floss, Doreen M

    2015-01-01

    IL-23, composed of the cytokine subunit p19 and the soluble α receptor subunit p40, binds to a receptor complex consisting of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) and the IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1). Complex formation was hypothesized to follow the "site I-II-III" architectural paradigm, with site I of p19 being required for binding to p40, whereas sites II and III of p19 mediate binding to IL-12Rβ1 and IL-23R, respectively. Here we show that the binding mode of p19 to p40 and of p19 to IL-23R follow the canonical site I and III paradigm but that interaction of IL-23 to IL-12Rβ1 is independent of site II in p19. Instead, binding of IL-23 to the cytokine binding module of IL-12Rβ1 is mediated by domains 1 and 2 of p40 via corresponding site II amino acids of IL-12Rβ1. Moreover, domains 2 and 3 of p40 were sufficient for complex formation with p19 and to induce binding of p19 to IL-23R. The Fc-tagged fusion protein of p40_D2D3/p19 did, however, not act as a competitive IL-23 antagonist but, at higher concentrations, induced proliferation via IL-23R but independent of IL-12Rβ1. On the basis of our experimental validation, we propose a non-canonical topology of the IL-23·IL-23R·IL-12Rβ1 complex. Furthermore, our data help to explain why p40 is an antagonist of IL-23 and IL-12 signaling and show that site II of p19 is dispensable for IL-23 signaling.

  6. Sleep Disturbance Induced by Cocaine Abstinence Involving in A2A Receptor over-Expression in Rat Hypothalamus%可卡因戒断致大鼠睡眠结构失调涉及下丘脑腺苷A2A受体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪芬芳; 刘晓军; 贺长生; 杨树龙

    2012-01-01

    本实验于大鼠体内植入无线发射器,在可卡因用药前、停药第1(急性戒断)、第8(亚急性戒断)和第14 d(亚慢性戒断)记录自由活动大鼠脑电活动24 h.Western blot法检测腺苷受体在下丘脑和小脑组织表达水平,初步探索可卡因戒断致睡眠失调与腺苷受体之间的关系.结果发现可卡因停药第8d夜晚和白天,非快眼动(NREM)睡眠增加(P<0.05),快眼动(REM)睡眠下降(P<0.01);停药第14 d,NREM睡眠夜晚显著增加(P<0.01)而白天仅略加强,但白天和夜间REM睡眠均明显下降(P<0.01).可卡因戒断第8d和第14d下丘脑腺苷A2A受体表达明显增高(P<0.05),而腺苷A1受体在可卡因戒断仅第14 d降低(P<0.05),停药第1、第8和第14d腺苷A2B亚基表达变化不明显(P>0.05).而小脑腺苷A1、A2A和A2B受体表达均未见明显改变.这些证据提示亚急性和亚慢性可卡因戒断导致睡眠失调可能部分涉及大鼠下丘脑腺苷A2A受体过表达.%Adult rats were implanted with sleep-wake recording electrodes in our experiments. Polygraphic signs of undisturbed sleep-wake activities were recorded for 24 h before cocaine administration, cocaine withdrawal day 1 (a-cute), day 8 (subacute), and day 14 (subchronic). Western blot method was performed to examine the expression levels of adenosine receptor subtypes in hypothalamus and cerebellum. Non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was significantly increased during nighttime (P<0. 01) and daytime (P<0. 05) on withdrawal day 8. The increase of NREM sleep was significant during nighttime (P<0. 01) and slight during daytime on withdrawal day 14, whereas both daytime and nighttime rapid eye movement (REM) sleeps were reduced markedly (P<0. 01) on withdrawal day 8 and 14. In addition, A2A receptor level was significantly enhanced on cocaine withdrawal day 8 and day 14 (P< 0. 05), whereas A1 receptor level reduced markedly on withdrawal day 14 (P<0. 05). However, compared with that in the

  7. Antidepressant activity of fluoxetine in the zinc deficiency model in rats involves the NMDA receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doboszewska, Urszula; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Rafało, Anna; Ostachowicz, Beata; Lankosz, Marek; Nowak, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The zinc deficiency animal model of depression has been proposed; however, it has not been validated in a detailed manner. We have recently shown that depression-like behavior induced by dietary zinc restriction is associated with up-regulation of hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Here we examined the effects of chronic administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (FLX), on behavioral and biochemical alterations (within NMDAR signaling pathway) induced by zinc deficiency. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a zinc adequate diet (ZnA, 50mg Zn/kg) or a zinc deficient diet (ZnD, 3mg Zn/kg) for 4 weeks. Then, FLX treatment (10mg/kg, i.p.) begun. Following 2 weeks of FLX administration the behavior of the rats was examined in the forced swim test (FST) and the spontaneous locomotor activity test. Twenty four hours later tissue was harvested. The proteins of NMDAR (GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B) or AMPAR (GluA1) subunits, p-CREB and BDNF in the hippocampus (Western blot) and serum zinc level (TXRF) were examined. Depression-like behavior induced by ZnD in the FST was sensitive to chronic treatment with FLX. ZnD increased levels of GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and decreased pS485-GluA1, p-CREB and BDNF proteins. Administration of FLX counteracted the zinc restriction-induced changes in serum zinc level and hippocampal GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and p-CREB but not BDNF or pS845-GluA1 protein levels. This finding adds new evidence to the predictive validity of the proposed zinc deficiency model of depression. Antidepressant-like activity of FLX in the zinc deficiency model is associated with NMDAR complex. PMID:25845739

  8. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  9. Recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of xenobiotics and complex mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharewski, T. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology

    1995-12-31

    Exposure to naturally occurring or synthetic substances that possess sex steroid and/or dioxin-like activity may have long range effects on human health, reproductive fitness and environmental quality. Results from recent epidemiological studies have suggested that xenobiotics with sex steroid activity may contribute to the development of hormone-dependent cancers and disorders in the male reproductive tract as well as attenuate sperm production. However, most of these compounds, which are referred to as endocrine disruptors, are structurally dissimilar to sex steroids. Yet, based upon ambiguous assays, it has been conceded that the effects of these compounds are mediated by receptors. The authors have taken advantage of the mechanism of action of these compounds to develop recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for environmental estrogens and dioxin-like compounds. The assays use an easily measurable enzyme activity (i.e. firefly luciferase), exhibit improved sensitivity and selectivity and are amenable to automation. Data will be presented demonstrating that phytoestrogens (e.g. genistein) and xenobiotics such as pesticides (e.g. DDT, Kepone), nonionic surfactants (e.g. p-nonylphenol), and precursors used in the manufacture of plastics (e.g. Bisphenol A) exhibit estrogenic activity. In addition, the assays have been used to detect estrogenic and dioxin-like activity in complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent. These results demonstrate the utility of recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for identifying substances or complex mixtures with estrogenic and/or dioxin-like activity.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C;

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) belongs to the insulin family of peptides and acts as a growth factor in many fetal tissues and tumors. The gene expression of IGF-II is initiated at three different promoters which gives rise to multiple transcripts. In a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line...... the 4.8-kb mRNA is translated to IGF-II. The cell line secretes two forms of immunoreactive and bioactive IGF-II to the medium of molecular size 10 kd and 7.5 kd which may be involved in autocrine control of cell growth. IGF-II binds to two receptors on the surface of many cell types: the IGF-I receptor...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...

  11. Detailed Study of the Interaction between Human Herpesvirus 6B Glycoprotein Complex and Its Cellular Receptor, Human CD134

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Huamin; Wang, Junjie; Mahmoud, Nora F.; Mori, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel receptor, CD134, which interacts with the human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) glycoprotein (g)H/gL/gQ1/gQ2 complex and plays a key role in the entry of HHV-6B into target cells. However, details of the interaction between the HHV-6B gH/gL/gQ1/gQ2 complex and CD134 were unknown. In this study, we identified a cysteine-rich domain (CRD), CDR2, of CD134 that is critical for binding to the HHV-6B glycoprotein complex and HHV-6B infection. Furthermore, we found that the e...

  12. Role of dopamine--D2 receptor in spatial memory retention and retrieval determined using Hebb-Williams complex maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sanket B; Jadhav, Kshitij S; Marathe, Padmaja A

    2014-01-01

    Effects of bromocriptine and sulpiride were observed on encoding and retrieval of spatial memory in Wistar rats using Hebb-Williams complex maze. Rat was placed in entry chamber and allowed to reach reward chamber. Ten trials were given each day per rat for 3 consecutive days. Within-day encoding score indicative of learning and between-day retrieval score indicative of memory were calculated. Effects of bromocriptine and sulpiride were observed on encoding and retrieval of spatial memory. General learning index was calculated to compare the effect on spatial memory between groups. Bromocriptine increased while sulpiride decreased within-day encoding index but had no effect on retrieval index. In general learning index, sulpiride group showed more errors whereas bromocriptine group did not show any difference as compared to control. These results suggest that dopamine D2 receptors are involved in memory encoding but not retrieval. Also general learning is under positive modulation by D2 receptors. PMID:25906600

  13. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J.; Petrie, Emma J.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the L...

  14. Complex Determinants in Specific Members of the Mannose Receptor Family Govern Collagen Endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Johansson, Kristina; Madsen, Daniel H;

    2014-01-01

    Members of the well-conserved mannose receptor (MR) protein family have been functionally implicated in diverse biological and pathological processes. Importantly, a proposed common function is the internalization of collagen for intracellular degradation occurring during bone development, cancer...... in PLA2R or DEC-205. However, we also found that an active FN-II domain was not a sufficient determinant to allow collagen internalization through these receptors. Nevertheless, this ability could be acquired by the transfer of a larger segment of uPARAP/Endo180 (the Cys-rich domain, the FN-II domain...

  15. Protein interactome mining defines melatonin MT1 receptors as integral component of presynaptic protein complexes of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benleulmi-Chaachoua, Abla; Chen, Lina; Sokolina, Kate; Wong, Victoria; Jurisica, Igor; Emerit, Michel Boris; Darmon, Michèle; Espin, Almudena; Stagljar, Igor; Tafelmeyer, Petra; Zamponi, Gerald W; Delagrange, Philippe; Maurice, Pascal; Jockers, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the hormone melatonin is mainly produced by the pineal gland with nocturnal peak levels. Its peripheral and central actions rely either on its intrinsic antioxidant properties or on binding to melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors, belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) super-family. Melatonin has been reported to be involved in many functions of the central nervous system such as circadian rhythm regulation, neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, memory, sleep, and also in Alzheimer's disease and depression. However, little is known about the subcellular localization of melatonin receptors and the molecular aspects involved in neuronal functions of melatonin. Identification of protein complexes associated with GPCRs has been shown to be a valid approach to improve our understanding of their function. By combining proteomic and genomic approaches we built an interactome of MT1 and MT2 receptors, which comprises 378 individual proteins. Among the proteins interacting with MT1 , but not with MT2 , we identified several presynaptic proteins, suggesting a potential role of MT1 in neurotransmission. Presynaptic localization of MT1 receptors in the hypothalamus, striatum, and cortex was confirmed by subcellular fractionation experiments and immunofluorescence microscopy. MT1 physically interacts with the voltage-gated calcium channel Cav 2.2 and inhibits Cav 2.2-promoted Ca(2+) entry in an agonist-independent manner. In conclusion, we show that MT1 is part of the presynaptic protein network and negatively regulates Cav 2.2 activity, providing a first hint for potential synaptic functions of MT1. PMID:26514267

  16. A peptide derived from the parasite receptor, complement C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning, suppresses immune complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inal, Jameel M; Schneider, Brigitte; Armanini, Marta; Schifferli, Jürg A

    2003-04-15

    Complement C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT) is a Schistosoma protein that binds the human complement protein, C2. We recently showed that peptides based on the ligand binding region of CRIT inhibit the classical pathway (CP) of complement activation in human serum, using hemolytic assays and so speculated that on the parasite surface CRIT has the function of evading human complement. We now show that in vitro the C2-binding 11-aa C terminus of the first extracellular domain of CRIT, a 1.3-kDa peptide termed CRIT-H17, inhibits CP activation in a species-specific manner, inhibiting mouse and rat complement but not that from guinea pig. Hitherto, the ability of CRIT to regulate complement in vivo has not been assessed. In this study we show that by inhibiting the CP, CRIT-H17 is able to reduce immune complex-mediated inflammation (dermal reversed passive Arthus reaction) in BALB/c mice. Upon intradermal injection of CRIT-H17, and similarly with recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1, there was a 41% reduction in edema and hemorrhage, a 72% reduction in neutrophil influx, and a reduced C3 deposition. Furthermore, when H17 was administered i.v. at a 1 mg/kg dose, inflammation was reduced by 31%. We propose that CRIT-H17 is a potential therapeutic agent against CP complement-mediated inflammatory tissue destruction. PMID:12682267

  17. Resolution of complex fluorescence spectra of lipids and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by multivariate analysis reveals protein-mediated effects on the receptor's immediate lipid microenvironment

    CERN Document Server

    Wenz, Jorge J; 10.1186/1757-5036-1-6

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of fluorescent spectra from complex biological systems containing various fluorescent probes with overlapping emission bands is a challenging task. Valuable information can be extracted from the full spectra, however, by using multivariate analysis (MA) of measurements at different wavelengths. We applied MA to spectral data of purified Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) protein reconstituted into liposomes made up of dioleoylphosphatidic acid (DOPA) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) doped with two extrinsic fluorescent probes (NBD-cholesterol/pyrene-PC). Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was observed between the protein and pyrene-PC and between pyrene-PC and NBD-cholesterol, leading to overlapping emission bands. Partial least squares analysis was applied to ...

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stisova, Viktorie [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire CNRS, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Davidkova, Marie, E-mail: davidkova@ujf.cas.c [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERalpha, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with gamma rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  19. Age-associated alterations in hepatic. beta. -adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, S.M.; Herring, P.A.; Arinze, I.J.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of age on catecholamine regulation of hepatic glycogenolysis and on hepatic adenylate cyclase was studied in male rats up to 24 mo of age. Epinephrine and norepinephrine stimulated glycogenolysis in isolated hepatocytes at all age groups studied. Isoproterenol, however, stimulated glycogenolysis only at 24 mo. In isolated liver membranes, usual activators of adenylate cyclase increased the activity of the enzyme considerably more in membranes from 24-mo-old rats than in membranes from either 3- or 22-mo-old rats. The Mn/sup 2 +/-dependent activity of the cyclase was increased by 2.9-fold in 3-mo-old animals and approx. 5.7-fold in 24-mo-old rats, indicating a substantial age-dependent increase in the intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit. The density of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor, as measured by the binding of (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol to plasma membranes, was 5-8 fmol/mg protein in rats aged 3-12 mo but increased to 19 fmol/mg protein in 24-mo-old rats. Computer-aided analysis of isoproterenol competition of the binding indicated a small age-dependent increase in the proportion of ..beta..-receptors in the high-affinity state. These observations suggest that ..beta..-receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis in the aged rat is predicated upon increases in the density of ..beta..-receptors as well as increased intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  20. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong;

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist...

  1. Structural basis for receptor recognition of vitamin-B(12)-intrinsic factor complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Madsen, Mette; Storm, Tina;

    2010-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B(12)) is a bacterial organic compound and an essential coenzyme in mammals, which take it up from the diet. This occurs by the combined action of the gastric intrinsic factor (IF) and the ileal endocytic cubam receptor formed by the 460-kilodalton (kDa) protein cubilin...

  2. Bibenzimidazole containing mixed ligand cobalt(III) complex as a selective receptor for iodide

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Indumathy, R.; Parameswarana, P.S.; Aiswarya, C.V.; Nair, B.U.

    -, OH- and OAc- do not bring about any dramatic visual colorimetric changes. However, metallo-receptor 2 brings about vivid color change with iodide anion visually and this could be due to charge transfer transition via ion pair formation with iodide ion...

  3. Increased hsp70 of glucocorticoid receptor complex induced by scald and heat stress and its possible effect on the affinity of glucocorticoid receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hui; TANG Hong-tai; LU Jian; XIA Zhao-fan

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid (GC) insensitivity/GC resistance is an important etiological and prognostic factor in multiple diseases and pathophysiological processes such as scald, shock and asthma. The function of GC was mediated by glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Scald not only decreased the expression of GR but also reduced the affinity of GR, which played an important role in GC resistance in scalded rats. Whereas the molecular mechanism responsible for the decrease of GR affinity resulted from scald remains unclear. Recent studies showed that the changes of heat shock proteins (hsp) especially hsp90 and hsp70 of GR heterocomplex were associated with GR low affinity in vitro. Methods The affinity of GR in hepatic cytosols and in the cytosols of SMMC-7721 cells were determined by radioligand binding assay and scatchard plot. GR heterocomplex in cytosols were captured by coimmunoprecipation and the levels of hsp90 and hsp70 of GR complex were detected by quantitative Western blotting.Results Similar with that of hepatic cytosol of scalded rats, a remarkable decrease of GR affinity was also found in the cytosol of heat stressed SMMC-7721 cells. The level of hsp70 of GR complex in hepatic cytosol of scalded rats (30% total body surface area immersion scald) and in cytosol of heat stressed human hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 were both increased by 1.5 fold, whereas no change of hsp90 in GR heterocomplex was found. According to the correlation analysis, there may be a positive relationship between increased hsp70 of GR complex and decreased GR affinity in the cytosols.Conclusions The primary results indicated that the level of hsp70 of GR heterocomplex was increased in the hepatic cytosol of scalded rats and the cytosol of heat stressed SMMC-7721 cells. The increase of hsp70 of GR complex might be associated with the decrease of GR affinity.

  4. Higher-order assemblies of oligomeric cargo receptor complexes form the membrane scaffold of the Cvt vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertipaglia, Chiara; Schneider, Sarah; Jakobi, Arjen J; Tarafder, Abul K; Bykov, Yury S; Picco, Andrea; Kukulski, Wanda; Kosinski, Jan; Hagen, Wim Jh; Ravichandran, Arvind C; Wilmanns, Matthias; Kaksonen, Marko; Briggs, John Ag; Sachse, Carsten

    2016-07-01

    Selective autophagy is the mechanism by which large cargos are specifically sequestered for degradation. The structural details of cargo and receptor assembly giving rise to autophagic vesicles remain to be elucidated. We utilize the yeast cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, a prototype of selective autophagy, together with a multi-scale analysis approach to study the molecular structure of Cvt vesicles. We report the oligomeric nature of the major Cvt cargo Ape1 with a combined 2.8 Å X-ray and negative stain EM structure, as well as the secondary cargo Ams1 with a 6.3 Å cryo-EM structure. We show that the major dodecameric cargo prApe1 exhibits a tendency to form higher-order chain structures that are broken upon interaction with the receptor Atg19 in vitro The stoichiometry of these cargo-receptor complexes is key to maintaining the size of the Cvt aggregate in vivo Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we further visualize key stages of Cvt vesicle biogenesis. Our findings suggest that Atg19 interaction limits Ape1 aggregate size while serving as a vehicle for vacuolar delivery of tetrameric Ams1. PMID:27266708

  5. Emerging complexity and new roles for the RIG-I-like receptors in innate antiviral immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; S.Errett; Michael; Gale; Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is critical for the control of virus infection and operates to restrict viral susceptibility and direct antiviral immunity for protection from acute or chronic viral-associated diseases including cancer. RIG-I like receptors(RLRs) are cytosolic RNA helicases that function as pathogen recognition receptors to detect RNA pathogen associated molecular patterns(PAMPs) of virus infection. The RLRs include RIG-I, MDA5, and LGP2. They function to recognize and bind to PAMP motifs within viral RNA in a process that directs the RLR to trigger downstream signaling cascades that induce innate immunity that controls viral replication and spread. Products of RLR signaling also serve to modulate the adaptive immune response to infection. Recent studies have additionally connected RLRs to signaling cascades that impart inflammatory and apoptotic responses to virus infection. Viral evasion of RLR signaling supports viral outgrowth and pathogenesis, including the onset of viral-associated cancer.

  6. The GABA-A benzodiazepine receptor complex: Role of pet and spect in neurology and psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) for selective depiction of GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptor (GBZR) binding are complementary investigations in the diagnostic process of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review summarizes the current knowledge about options and limitations of PET and SPECT for in vivo diagnostics in neurology and psychiatry. The growing importance of GBZR-imaging for the understanding of pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment in different psychiatric syndromes is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L; James, Ho C S; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ''protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ''receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death. PMID:26561036

  8. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J; Petrie, Emma J; Bathgate, Ross A D; Gooley, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the LDLa-LRR linker, essential for the high affinity of H2 relaxin for the ectodomain of RXFP1, and show that residues within the LDLa-LRR linker are critical for receptor activation. We propose H2 relaxin binds and stabilizes a helical conformation of the LDLa-LRR linker that positions residues of both the linker and the LDLa module to bind the transmembrane domain and activate RXFP1. PMID:27088579

  9. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L; James, Ho C S; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-11-12

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ''protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ''receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death.

  10. Crystal structure of an affinity-matured prolactin complexed to its dimerized receptor reveals the topology of hormone binding site 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broutin, Isabelle; Jomain, Jean-Baptiste; Tallet, Estelle;

    2010-01-01

    We report the first crystal structure of a 1:2 hormone.receptor complex that involves prolactin (PRL) as the ligand, at 3.8-A resolution. Stable ternary complexes were obtained by generating affinity-matured PRL variants harboring an N-terminal tail from ovine placental lactogen, a closely relate...

  11. N-Ethylmaleimide Dissociates α7 ACh Receptor from a Complex with NSF and Promotes Its Delivery to the Presynaptic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive factor (NSF) associates with soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP), that binds to SNAP receptors (SNAREs) including syntaxin, SNAP25, and synaptobrevin. The complex of NSF/SNAP/SNAREs plays a critical role in the regulation of vesicular traffic. The present study investigated NEM-regulated α7 ACh receptor translocation. NSF associated with β-SNAP and the SNAREs syntaxin 1 and synaptobrevin 2 in the rat hippocampus. NSF also associated with the α7 ACh receptor subunit, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2, and the γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor γ2 subunit. NEM, an inhibitor of NSF, significantly dissociated the α7 ACh receptor subunit from a complex with NSF and increased cell surface localization of the receptor subunit, but such effect was not obtained with the GluA1, GluA2 or γ2 subunits. NEM, alternatively, dissociated synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2. NEM significantly increased the rate of nicotine-triggered AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, without affecting the amplitude, in rat hippocampal slices. The results of the present study indicate that NEM releases the α7 ACh receptor subunit and synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of α7 ACh receptor subunit/NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2, thereby promoting delivery of the α7 ACh receptor subunit to presynaptic membrane. PMID:27105867

  12. ELISA for complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor in lung cancer tissue extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Witte, H; Pappot, H; Brünner, N;

    1997-01-01

    A sandwich-type ELISA has been developed for the assessment of complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) in extracts of squamous cell lung carcinomas. The assay is based on a combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-uPA antibodies and a biotinylated mouse...... extraction of uPAR yields the highest amounts of uPA:uPAR complexes. Absorption of tumor extracts with anti-uPA or anti-uPAR MAbs results in a complete disappearance of the ELISA signal, demonstrating the specificity of the ELISA. The recovery of chemically cross-linked uPA:uPAR complexes added to tumor...... extracts varies between 80% and 105%. The intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients are 5.3% and 9.8%, respectively. Furthermore, a peptide antagonist for uPAR was employed to evaluate de novo uPA:uPAR complex formation during tumor tissue extraction and the immunoassay procedure. Our results strongly...

  13. The evolutionary origin of auditory receptors in Tettigonioidea: the complex tibial organ of Schizodactylidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Audition in insects is of polyphyletic origin. Tympanal ears derived from proprioceptive or vibratory receptor organs, but many questions of the evolution of insect auditory systems are still open. Despite the rather typical bauplan of the insect body, e.g., with a fixed number of segments, tympanal ears evolved at very different places, but only ensiferans have ears at the foreleg tibia, located in the tibial organ. The homology and monophyly of ensiferan ears is controversial, and no precursor organ was unambiguously identified for auditory receptors. The latter can only be identified by comparative study of recent atympanate taxa. These atympanate taxa are poorly investigated. In this paper, we report the neuroanatomy of the tibial organ of Comicus calcaris (Irish 1986), an atympanate Schizodactylid (splay-footed cricket). This representative of a Gondwana relict group has a tripartite sensory organ, homologous to tettigoniid ears. A comparison with morphology-based cladistic phylogeny indicates that the tripartite neuronal organization present in the majority of Tettigonioidea presumably preceded evolution of a hearing sense in the Tettigonioidea. Furthermore, the absence of a tripartite organ in Grylloidea argues against a monophyletic origin and homology of the cricket and katydid ears. The tracheal attachment of sensory neurons typical for ears of Tettigonioidea is present in C. calcaris and may have facilitated cooption for auditory function. The functional auditory organ was presumably formed in evolution by successive non-neural modifications of trachea and tympana. This first investigation of the neuroanatomy of Schizodactylidae suggests a non-auditory chordotonal organ as the precursor for auditory receptors of related tympanate taxa and adds evidence for the phylogenetic position of the group.

  14. Mouse hippocampal GABAB1 but not GABAB2 subunit-containing receptor complex levels are paralleling retrieval in the multiple-T-maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil eKeihan Falsafi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors known to be involved in learning and memory. Although a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive processes is evident, there is no information on hippocampal GABAB receptor complexes in a multiple T maze (MTM task, a robust paradigm for evaluation of spatial learning.Trained or untrained (yoked control C57BL/6J male mice (n=10/group were subjected to the MTM task and sacrificed 6 hours following their performance. Hippocampi were taken, membrane proteins extracted and run on blue native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies against GABAB1, GABAB1a and GABAB2. Immunoprecipitation with subsequent mass spectrometric identification of co-precipitates was carried out to show if GABAB1 and GABAB2 as well as other interacting proteins co-precipitate. An antibody shift assay (ASA and a proximity ligation assay (PLA were also used to see if the two GABAB subunits are present in the receptor complex.Single bands were observed on Western blots, each representing GABAB1, GABAB1a or GABAB2 at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 100 kDa. Subsequently, densitometric analysis revealed that levels of GABAB1 and GABAB1a but not GABAB2- containing receptor complexes were significantly higher in trained than untrained groups. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric studies confirmed the presence of GABAB1, GABAB2, calcium calmodulin kinases I and II, GluA1 and GluA2 as constituents of the complex. ASA and PLA also showed the presence of the two subunits of GABAB receptor within the complex. It is shown that increased levels of GABAB1 subunit-containing complexes are paralleling performance in a land maze.

  15. A hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine alpha 7-containing receptor complex is linked to memory retrieval in the multiple-T-maze in C57BL/6j mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Heo, Seok; Patil, Sudarshan; Li, Lin; Hoger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2014-08-15

    The link between the cholinergic and serotonergic system in cognitive function is well-documented. There is, however, limited information on spatial memory and this formed the rationale to carry out a study with the aim to show a specific link between nicotinic and serotonergic receptor complexes rather than the corresponding subunits, to spatial memory retrieval in a land maze. A total of 46 mice were used and divided into two groups, trained and untrained (yoked) in the multiple-T-Maze (MTM) and following training during the first four days, probe trials for memory retrieval were performed on days 8, 16 and 30. Six hours following scarification, hippocampi were taken for the analysis of native receptor complex levels using blue-native gels followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies. 5-HT1A-, 5-HT7-, nAChα4- and nACh-α7-containing receptor complexes were observed and were paralleling memory retrievals and receptor complex levels were shown to be significantly different between trained and yoked animals. Only levels of a nicotinic acetylcholine α7 receptor-containing complex at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 480kDa were shown to be linked to memory retrieval on day 8 but not to retrievals on days 16 and 30 when memory extinction has taken place. Correlation between nAChα4-, 5-HT1A- and 5-HT7-containing receptors and latencies on day 16 may point to a probable link in extinction mechanisms. A series of the abovementioned receptor complexes were correlating among each other probably indicating a serotonergic/cholinergic network paralleling spatial memory formation.

  16. Molecular Architecture of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-binding Site of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Cho, Sangwoo; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Kerzic, Melissa C.; Dam, Julie; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the detection and destruction of virally infected and tumor cells during innate immune responses. The highly polymorphic Ly49 family of NK receptors regulates NK cell function by sensing major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on target cells. Despite the determination of two Ly49-MHC-I complex structures, the molecular features of Ly49 receptors that confer specificity for particular MHC-I alleles have not been identified. To understand the functional architecture of Ly49-binding sites, we determined the crystal structures of Ly49C and Ly49G and completed refinement of the Ly49C-H-2Kb complex. This information, combined with mutational analysis of Ly49A, permitted a structure-based classification of Ly49s that we used to dissect the binding site into three distinct regions, each having different roles in MHC recognition. One region, located at the center of the binding site, has a similar structure across the Ly49 family and mediates conserved interactions with MHC-I that contribute most to binding. However, the preference of individual Ly49s for particular MHC-I molecules is governed by two regions that flank the central region and are structurally more variable. One of the flanking regions divides Ly49s into those that recognize both H-2D and H-2K versus only H-2D ligands, whereas the other discriminates among H-2D or H-2K alleles. The modular design of Ly49-binding sites provides a framework for predicting the MHC-binding specificity of Ly49s that have not been characterized experimentally. PMID:18426793

  17. In vivo molecular imaging of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in the aged rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Rojas, Santiago; Herance, Raúl; Pareto, Deborah; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Figueiras, Francisca P; Popota, Foteini; Ruiz, Alba; Flotats, Núria; Fernández, Francisco J; Rocha, Milagros; Rovira, Mariana; Víctor, Víctor M; Gispert, Juan D

    2012-07-01

    The GABA-ergic system, known to regulate neural tissue genesis during cortical development, has been postulated to play a role in cerebral aging processes. Using in vivo molecular imaging and voxel-wise quantification, we aimed to assess the effects of aging on the benzodiazepine (BDZ) recognition site of the GABA(A) receptor. To visualize BDZ site availability, [(11)C]-flumazenil microPET acquisitions were conducted in young and old rats. The data were analyzed and region of interest analyses were applied to validate the voxel-wise approach. We observed decreased [(11)C]-flumazenil binding in the aged rat brains in comparison with the young control group. More specifically, clusters of reduced radioligand uptake were detected in the bilateral hippocampus, cerebellum, midbrain, and bilateral frontal and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results support the pertinence of voxel-wise quantification in the analysis of microPET data. Moreover, these findings indicate that the aging process involves declines in neural BDZ recognition site availability, proposed to reflect alterations in GABA(A) receptor subunit polypeptide expression.

  18. Clustered coding variants in the glutamate receptor complexes of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René A W Frank

    Full Text Available Current models of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder implicate multiple genes, however their biological relationships remain elusive. To test the genetic role of glutamate receptors and their interacting scaffold proteins, the exons of ten glutamatergic 'hub' genes in 1304 individuals were re-sequenced in case and control samples. No significant difference in the overall number of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs was observed between cases and controls. However, cluster analysis of nsSNPs identified two exons encoding the cysteine-rich domain and first transmembrane helix of GRM1 as a risk locus with five mutations highly enriched within these domains. A new splice variant lacking the transmembrane GPCR domain of GRM1 was discovered in the human brain and the GRM1 mutation cluster could perturb the regulation of this variant. The predicted effect on individuals harbouring multiple mutations distributed in their ten hub genes was also examined. Diseased individuals possessed an increased load of deleteriousness from multiple concurrent rare and common coding variants. Together, these data suggest a disease model in which the interplay of compound genetic coding variants, distributed among glutamate receptors and their interacting proteins, contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in Vertebrates: Testing the Integration of Protein, Complex, and Pathway Data in the Protein Ontology Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia Arighi; Veronica Shamovsky; Anna Maria Masci; Alan Ruttenberg; Barry Smith; Natale, Darren A.; Cathy Wu; Peter D'Eustachio

    2015-01-01

    The Protein Ontology (PRO) provides terms for and supports annotation of species-specific protein complexes in an ontology framework that relates them both to their components and to species-independent families of complexes. Comprehensive curation of experimentally known forms and annotations thereof is expected to expose discrepancies, differences, and gaps in our knowledge. We have annotated the early events of innate immune signaling mediated by Toll-Like Receptor 3 and 4 complexes in hum...

  20. Structural characterisation of the nuclear import receptor importin alpha in complex with the bipartite NLS of Prp20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Roman

    Full Text Available The translocation of macromolecules into the nucleus is a fundamental eukaryotic process, regulating gene expression, cell division and differentiation, but which is impaired in a range of significant diseases including cancer and viral infection. The import of proteins into the nucleus is generally initiated by a specific, high affinity interaction between nuclear localisation signals (NLSs and nuclear import receptors in the cytoplasm, and terminated through the disassembly of these complexes in the nucleus. For classical NLSs (cNLSs, this import is mediated by the importin-α (IMPα adaptor protein, which in turn binds to IMPβ to mediate translocation of nuclear cargo across the nuclear envelope. The interaction and disassembly of import receptor:cargo complexes is reliant on the differential localisation of nucleotide bound Ran across the envelope, maintained in its low affinity, GDP-bound form in the cytoplasm, and its high affinity, GTP-bound form in the nucleus. This in turn is maintained by the differential localisation of Ran regulating proteins, with RanGAP in the cytoplasm maintaining Ran in its GDP-bound form, and RanGEF (Prp20 in yeast in the nucleus maintaining Ran in its GTP-bound form. Here, we describe the 2.1 Å resolution x-ray crystal structure of IMPα in complex with the NLS of Prp20. We observe 1,091 Å(2 of buried surface area mediated by an extensive array of contacts involving residues on armadillo repeats 2-7, utilising both the major and minor NLS binding sites of IMPα to contact bipartite NLS clusters (17RAKKMSK(23 and (3KR(4, respectively. One notable feature of the major site is the insertion of Prp20NLS Ala(18 between the P0 and P1 NLS sites, noted in only a few classical bipartite NLSs. This study provides a detailed account of the binding mechanism enabling Prp20 interaction with the nuclear import receptor, and additional new information for the interaction between IMPα and cargo.

  1. The changing of the guard: the Pto/Prf receptor complex of tomato and pathogen recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoukakis, Vardis; Saur, Isabel M L; Conlan, Brendon; Rathjen, John P

    2014-08-01

    One important model for disease resistance is the Prf recognition complex of tomato, which responds to different bacterial effectors. Prf incorporates a protein kinase called Pto as its recognition domain that mimics effector virulence targets, and activates resistance after interaction with specific effectors. Recent findings show that this complex is oligomeric, and reveal how this impacts mechanism. Oligomerisation brings two or more kinases into proximity, where they can phosphorylate each other after effector perception. Effector attack on one kinase activates another in trans, constituting a molecular trap for the effector. Oligomerisation of plant resistance proteins may be a general concept that broadens pathogen recognition and restricts the ability of pathogens to evolve virulence.

  2. Drebrin depletion alters neurotransmitter receptor levels in protein complexes, dendritic spine morphogenesis and memory-related synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gangsoo; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cicvaric, Ana; Sase, Sunetra; Gröger, Marion; Höger, Harald; Sialana, Fernando Jayson; Berger, Johannes; Monje, Francisco J; Lubec, Gert

    2015-07-01

    Drebrin an actin-bundling key regulator of dendritic spine genesis and morphology, has been recently proposed as a regulator of hippocampal glutamatergic activity which is critical for memory formation and maintenance. Here, we examined the effects of genetic deletion of drebrin on dendritic spine and on the level of complexes containing major brain receptors. To this end, homozygous and heterozygous drebrin knockout mice generated in our laboratory and related wild-type control animals were studied. Level of protein complexes containing dopamine receptor D1/dopamine receptor D2, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A (5-HT1(A)R), and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 7 (5-HT7R) were significantly reduced in hippocampus of drebrin knockout mice whereas no significant changes were detected for GluR1, 2, and 3 and NR1 as examined by native gel-based immunoblotting. Drebrin depletion also altered dendritic spine formation, morphology, and reduced levels of dopamine receptor D1 in dendritic spines as evaluated using immunohistochemistry/confocal microscopy. Electrophysiological studies further showed significant reduction in memory-related hippocampal synaptic plasticity upon drebrin depletion. These findings provide unprecedented experimental support for a role of drebrin in the regulation of memory-related synaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter receptor signaling, offer relevant information regarding the interpretation of previous studies and help in the design of future studies on dendritic spines.

  3. Palmitoylation regulates intracellular trafficking of β2 adrenergic receptor/arrestin/phosphodiesterase 4D complexes in cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijie Liu

    Full Text Available β(2 adrenergic receptor (β(2AR is a prototypical G-protein coupled receptor that stimulates the classic cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA signaling pathway. Recent studies indicate that the cAMP-PKA activities are spatiotemporally regulated in part due to dynamic association of β(2AR with phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D, a group of cAMP degradation enzymes. Here, we demonstrate that in cardiomyocytes, palmitoylation of β(2AR, the covalent acylation of cysteine residue 341, plays a critical role in shaping subcellular cAMP-PKA activities in cardiomyocytes via regulating β(2AR association with arrestin/PDE4D. Replacing cysteine 341 on β(2AR with alanine (C341A leads to an impaired binding to β arrestin 2. Surprisingly, the C341A mutant is able to internalize via an arrestin-independent pathway at saturated concentration of agonist stimulation; the internalization becomes caveolae-dependent and requires dynamin GTPase. However, the impaired binding to β arrestin 2 also leads to an impaired recruitment of PDE4D to the C341A mutant. Thus, the mutant C341A β(2AR is transported alone from the plasma membrane to the endosome without recruiting PDE4D. This alteration leads to an enhanced cytoplasmic cAMP signal for PKA activation under β(2AR stimulation. Functionally, Mutation of the C341 residue or inhibition of palmitoylation modification of β(2AR enhances the receptor-induced PKA activities in the cytoplasm and increases in myocyte contraction rate. Our data reveal a novel function of palmitoylation in shaping subcellular cAMP-PKA signaling in cardiomyocytes via modulating the recruitment of β arrestin 2-PDE4D complexes to the agonist-stimulated β(2AR.

  4. Complex control of GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression: variation, covariation, and genetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Megan K; Wang, Xusheng; Adler, Adrienne L; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    GABA type-A receptors are essential for fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are critical in brain function. Surprisingly, expression of receptor subunits is highly variable among individuals, but the cause and impact of this fluctuation remains unknown. We have studied sources of variation for all 19 receptor subunits using massive expression data sets collected across multiple brain regions and platforms in mice and humans. Expression of Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabrb2, Gabrb3, and Gabrg2 is highly variable and heritable among the large cohort of BXD strains derived from crosses of fully sequenced parents--C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. Genetic control of these subunits is complex and highly dependent on tissue and mRNA region. Remarkably, this high variation is generally not linked to phenotypic differences. The single exception is Gabrb3, a locus that is linked to anxiety. We identified upstream genetic loci that influence subunit expression, including three unlinked regions of chromosome 5 that modulate the expression of nine subunits in hippocampus, and that are also associated with multiple phenotypes. Candidate genes within these loci include, Naaa, Nos1, and Zkscan1. We confirmed a high level of coexpression for subunits comprising the major channel--Gabra1, Gabrb2, and Gabrg2--and identified conserved members of this expression network in mice and humans. Gucy1a3, Gucy1b3, and Lis1 are novel and conserved associates of multiple subunits that are involved in inhibitory signaling. Finally, proximal and distal regions of the 3' UTRs of single subunits have remarkably independent expression patterns in both species. However, corresponding regions of different subunits often show congruent genetic control and coexpression (proximal-to-proximal or distal-to-distal), even in the absence of sequence homology. Our findings identify novel sources of variation that modulate subunit expression and highlight the extraordinary capacity of biological networks to buffer 4-100 fold

  5. Complex control of GABA(A receptor subunit mRNA expression: variation, covariation, and genetic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K Mulligan

    Full Text Available GABA type-A receptors are essential for fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are critical in brain function. Surprisingly, expression of receptor subunits is highly variable among individuals, but the cause and impact of this fluctuation remains unknown. We have studied sources of variation for all 19 receptor subunits using massive expression data sets collected across multiple brain regions and platforms in mice and humans. Expression of Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabrb2, Gabrb3, and Gabrg2 is highly variable and heritable among the large cohort of BXD strains derived from crosses of fully sequenced parents--C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. Genetic control of these subunits is complex and highly dependent on tissue and mRNA region. Remarkably, this high variation is generally not linked to phenotypic differences. The single exception is Gabrb3, a locus that is linked to anxiety. We identified upstream genetic loci that influence subunit expression, including three unlinked regions of chromosome 5 that modulate the expression of nine subunits in hippocampus, and that are also associated with multiple phenotypes. Candidate genes within these loci include, Naaa, Nos1, and Zkscan1. We confirmed a high level of coexpression for subunits comprising the major channel--Gabra1, Gabrb2, and Gabrg2--and identified conserved members of this expression network in mice and humans. Gucy1a3, Gucy1b3, and Lis1 are novel and conserved associates of multiple subunits that are involved in inhibitory signaling. Finally, proximal and distal regions of the 3' UTRs of single subunits have remarkably independent expression patterns in both species. However, corresponding regions of different subunits often show congruent genetic control and coexpression (proximal-to-proximal or distal-to-distal, even in the absence of sequence homology. Our findings identify novel sources of variation that modulate subunit expression and highlight the extraordinary capacity of biological networks to buffer

  6. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  7. Neuropilin-1 forms complexes with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsaka, Akimichi, E-mail: ohsaka@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Stem Cell Regulation, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Hirota-Komatsu, Satoko; Shibata, Miki [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Stem Cell Regulation, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Komatsu, Norio [Department of Hematology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    We investigated whether the gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR and neuropilin-1 [NRP-1]) could be specifically regulated during the megakaryocytic differentiation of human thrombopoietin (TPO)-dependent UT-7/TPO cells. Undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells expressed a functional VEGFR-2, leading to VEGF binding and VEGF{sub 165}-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis inhibition. The megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells on treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was accompanied by a marked up-regulation of NRP-1 mRNA and protein expression and by an increase in VEGF-binding activity, which was mainly mediated by VEGFR-2. VEGF{sub 165} promoted the formation of complexes containing NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 in undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells in a dose-dependent manner. Unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells, PMA-differentiated UT-7/TPO cells exhibited complex formation between NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 even in the absence of VEGF{sub 165}. These findings suggest that NRP-1-VEGFR-2-complex formation may contribute to effective cellular functions mediated by VEGF{sub 165} in megakaryocytic cells.

  8. Unraveling the Complexities of Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Heemers, Hannelore V.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    Androgen signaling is critical for proliferation of prostate cancer cells but cannot be fully inhibited by current androgen deprivation therapies. A study by Xu et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell provides insights into the complexities of androgen signaling in prostate cancer and suggests avenues to target a subset of androgen-sensitive genes.

  9. CD163: a signal receptor scavenging haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes from plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Madsen, Mette; Moestrup, Søren K

    2002-01-01

    hemolysis. Besides having a detoxificating effect by removing Hb from plasma, the CD163-mediated endocytosis of the Hp-Hb complex may represent a major pathway for uptake of iron in the tissue macrophages. The novel functional linkage of CD163 and Hp, which both are induced during inflammation, also reveal...

  10. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes and their interaction with complement C3 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ivan; Baatrup, Gunnar; Jepsen, H H;

    1985-01-01

    Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components of the me...

  11. Neuronal Fc gamma receptor I as a novel mediator for IgG immune complex-induced peripheral sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lintao Qu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain often accompanies immune-related diseases with an elevated level of IgG immune complex (IgG-IC) in the serum and/or the affected tissues though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), known as the receptors for the Fc domain of immunoglobulin G (IgG), are typically expressed on immune cells. A general consensus is that the activation of FcγRs by IgG-IC in such immune cells induces the release of proinflammatory cytokines from the immune cells, which may contribute to the IgG-IC-mediated peripheral sensitization. In addition to the immune cells, recent studies have revealed that FcγRI, but not FcγRII and FcγRIII, is also expressed in a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, IgG-IC directly excites the primary sensory neurons through neuronal FcγRI. These findings indicate that neuronal FcγRI provides a novel direct linkage between immunoglobulin and primary sensory neurons, which may be a novel target for the treatment of pain in the immune-related disorders. In this review, we summarize the expression pattern, functions, and the associated cellular signaling of FcγRs in the primary sensory neurons.

  12. Effect of adenosine A2A receptor on stress response of pituitary-adrenal axis in acute phase of craniocerebral trauma in mice%小鼠颅脑创伤急性期腺苷A2A受体对垂体-肾上腺轴应激反应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨楠; 宁亚蕾; 陈惺; 张岫竹; 代维; 赵艳; 周元国

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of adenosine A2A receptor on pituitary-adrenal axis response in acute phase of moderate craniocerebral trauma.Methods Eighteen adenosine A2A receptor knock-out mice in a C57BL/6 background and another eighteen their wild-type littermates were divided into normal control group and craniocerebral trauma for 4 hours group,and craniocerebral trauma for 24 hours group according to random number table,with siμ mice per group.Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic-hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone at hours 4 and 24 postinjury were determined using ELISA method.Results At 4 and 24 hours,brain water content in wild-type mice [(80.950 ± 0.184) %,(82.178 ± 0.255)% respectively] was higher than that in gene knock-out mice [(80.006 ± 0.199)%,(81.091 ± 0.295)% respectively,P < 0.01].Besides,brain water content in both wild-type and gene knock-out mice increased after injury (P < 0.01).Plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone were higher in geneknock-out sham mice than in wild-type sham mice [(120.214 ± 2.472) ng/L vs (91.767 ±7.395) ng/L,(27.814 ±0.888) μg/L vs (11.430 ±0.644) μg/L respectively,P <0.0l].At 4 and 24 hours,plasma levels of ACTH [(174.776-± 5.040) ng/L,(189.613 ± 4.802) ng/L respectively] in geneknock-out mice showed a higher increase than those in wild-type mice [(119.594 ± 6.945) ng/L,(124.93-± 11.001 7) ng/L respectively,P < 0.05].Moreover,plasma levels of corticosterone [(40.138 ±-0.805) μg/L] at 4 hours and [(37.440-0.485)μg/L] at 24 hours in gene knock-out mice showed a same result as compared with that in wild-type mice [(19.702 ± 0.804) μg/L,(17.602 ± 0.743) μg/L respectively,P < 0.05].Conclusions Knock-out of adenosine A2A receptor increases the release of ACTH and corticosterone in acute stage of moderate craniocerebral trauma and promotes pituitary-adrenal stress response.This may provide a novel explanation for the neuroprotective effect of A2A receptor deficiency.%目的

  13. Components of the CCR4-NOT complex function as nuclear hormone receptor coactivators via association with the NRC-interacting Factor NIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapaty, Shivani; Mahajan, Muktar A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2008-03-14

    CCR4-NOT is an evolutionarily conserved, multicomponent complex known to be involved in transcription as well as mRNA degradation. Various subunits (e.g. CNOT1 and CNOT7/CAF1) have been reported to be involved in influencing nuclear hormone receptor activities. Here, we show that CCR4/CNOT6 and RCD1/CNOT9, members of the CCR4-NOT complex, potentiate nuclear receptor activity. RCD1 interacts in vivo and in vitro with NIF-1 (NRC-interacting factor), a previously characterized nuclear receptor cotransducer that activates nuclear receptors via its interaction with NRC. As with NIF-1, RCD1 and CCR4 do not directly associate with nuclear receptors; however, they enhance ligand-dependent transcriptional activation by nuclear hormone receptors. CCR4 mediates its effect through the ligand binding domain of nuclear receptors and small interference RNA-mediated silencing of endogenous CCR4 results in a marked decrease in nuclear receptor activation. Furthermore, knockdown of CCR4 results in an attenuated stimulation of RARalpha target genes (e.g. Sox9 and HoxA1) as shown by quantitative PCR assays. The silencing of endogenous NIF-1 also resulted in a comparable decrease in the RAR-mediated induction of both Sox9 and HoxA1. Furthermore, CCR4 associates in vivo with NIF-1. In addition, the CCR4-enhanced transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors is dependent on NIF-1. The small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of NIF-1 blocks the ligand-dependent potentiating effect of CCR4. Our results suggest that CCR4 plays a role in the regulation of certain endogenous RARalpha target genes and that RCD1 and CCR4 might mediate their function through their interaction with NIF-1.

  14. Structure of Foot-and-mouth Disease virus serotype A1061 alone and complexed with oligosaccharide receptor: receptor conservation in the face of antigenic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth Disease viruses (FMDVs) target epithelial cells via integrin receptors, but can acquire the capacity to bind cell-surface heparan sulphate (or alternative receptors) on passage in cell culture. Vaccine viruses must be propagated in cell culture and, hence, some rationale for the selec...

  15. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  16. Complement receptors 1 and 2 in murine antibody responses to IgM-complexed and uncomplexed sheep erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rutemark

    Full Text Available Early complement components are important for normal antibody responses. In this process, complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2, expressed on B cells and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs in mice, play a central role. Complement-activating IgM administered with the antigen it is specific for, enhances the antibody response to this antigen. Here, bone marrow chimeras between Cr2(-/- and wildtype mice were used to analyze whether FDCs or B cells must express CR1/2 for antibody responses to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC, either administered alone or together with specific IgM. For robust IgG anti-SRBC responses, CR1/2 must be expressed on FDCs. Occasionally, weak antibody responses were seen when only B cells expressed CR1/2, probably reflecting extrafollicular antibody production enabled by co-crosslinking of CR2/CD19/CD81 and the BCR. When SRBC alone was administered to mice with CR1/2(+ FDCs, B cells from wildtype and Cr2(-/- mice produced equal amounts of antibodies. Most likely antigen is then deposited on FDCs in a way that optimizes engagement of the B cell receptor, making CR2-facilitated signaling to the B cell superfluous. SRBC bound to IgM will have more C3 fragments, the ligands for CR1/2, on their surface than SRBC administered alone. Specific IgM, forming a complex with SRBC, enhances antibody responses in two ways when FDCs express CR1/2. One is dependent on CR1/2(+ B cells and probably acts via increased transport of IgM-SRBC-complement complexes bound to CR1/2 on marginal zone B cells. The other is independent on CR1/2(+ B cells and the likely mechanism is that IgM-SRBC-complement complexes bind better to FDCs than SRBC administered alone. These observations suggest that the immune system uses three different CR1/2-mediated effector functions to generate optimal antibody responses: capture by FDCs (playing a dominant role, transport by marginal zone B cells and enhanced B cell signaling.

  17. Structural complexes of the agonist, inverse agonist and antagonist bound C5a receptor: insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-04-26

    The C5a receptor (C5aR) is a pharmacologically important G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that interacts with (h)C5a, by recruiting both the "orthosteric" sites (site1 at the N-terminus and site2 at the ECS, extra cellular surface) on C5aR in a two site-binding model. However, the complex pharmacological landscape and the distinguishing chemistry operating either at the "orthosteric" site1 or at the functionally important "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR are still not clear, which greatly limits the understanding of C5aR pharmacology. One of the major bottlenecks is the lack of an experimental structure or a refined model structure of C5aR with appropriately defined active sites. The study attempts to understand the pharmacology at the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR rationally by generating a highly refined full-blown model structure of C5aR through advanced molecular modeling techniques, and further subjecting it to automated docking and molecular dynamics (MD) studies in the POPC bilayer. The first series of structural complexes of C5aR respectively bound to a linear native peptide agonist ((h)C5a-CT), a small molecule inverse agonist (NDT) and a cyclic peptide antagonist (PMX53) are reported, apparently establishing the unique pharmacological landscape of the "orthosteric" site2, which also illustrates an energetically distinct but coherent competitive chemistry ("cation-π" vs. "π-π" interactions) involved in distinguishing the established ligands known for targeting the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR. Over a total of 1 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the POPC bilayer, it is evidenced that while the agonist prefers a "cation-π" interaction, the inverse agonist prefers a "cogwheel/L-shaped" interaction in contrast to the "edge-to-face/T-shaped" type π-π interactions demonstrated by the antagonist by engaging the F275(7.28) of the C5aR. In the absence of a NMR or crystallographically guided model structure of C5aR, the computational model complexes not only

  18. The SOCS2 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Regulates Growth Hormone Receptor Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterlund, Mattias; Zadjali, Fahad; Persson, Torbjörn;

    2011-01-01

    to GH is under regulatory control to avoid excessive and off-target effects upon GHR activation. The suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (SOCS) is a key regulator of GHR sensitivity. This is clearly shown in mice where the SOCS2 gene has been inactivated, which show 30-40% increase in body length, a...... phenotype that is dependent on endogenous GH secretion. SOCS2 is a GH-stimulated, STAT5b-regulated gene that acts in a negative feedback loop to downregulate GHR signalling. Since the biochemical basis for these actions is poorly understood, we studied the molecular function of SOCS2. We demonstrated that...... SOCS2 is part of a multimeric complex with intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutational analysis shows that the interaction with Elongin B/C controls SOCS2 protein turnover and affects its molecular activity. Increased GHR levels were observed in livers from SOCS2(-/-) mice and in the absence of...

  19. Clobazam and its active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam display significantly greater affinities for α₂- versus α₁-GABA(A-receptor complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Sindal Jensen

    Full Text Available Clobazam (CLB, a 1,5-benzodiazepine (BZD, was FDA-approved in October 2011 for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS in patients 2 years and older. BZDs exert various CNS effects through allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. The structurally distinct, 1,4-BZD clonazepam (CLN is also approved to treat LGS. The precise mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy of both are unknown. Data show that the GABAA α₁-subunit-selective compound zolpidem [ZOL] exhibits hypnotic/sedative effects. Conversely, data from knock-in mice carrying BZD binding site mutations suggest that the α₂ subunit mediates anticonvulsant effects, without sedative actions. Hence, the specific pattern of interactions across the GABAA receptor complexes of BZDs might be reflected in their clinical efficacies and adverse effect profiles. In this study, GABAA-receptor binding affinities of CLB, N-desmethylclobazam (N-CLB, the major metabolite of CLB, CLN, and ZOL were characterized with native receptors from rat-brain homogenates and on cloned receptors from HEK293 cells transfected with combinations of α (α₁, α₂, α₃, or α₅, β₂, and γ₂ subtypes. Our results demonstrate that CLB and N-CLB have significantly greater binding affinities for α₂- vs. α₁-receptor complexes, a difference not observed for CLN, for which no distinction between α₂ and α₁ receptors was observed. Our experiments with ZOL confirmed the high preference for α₁ receptors. These results provide potential clues to a new understanding of the pharmacologic modes of action of CLB and N-CLB.

  20. The Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 Interacts with the WAVE1 Complex and Plays a Role in Actin Dynamics and Structural Plasticity in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoo, Christian; Agarwal, Nitin; Lutz, Beat; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    The molecular composition of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor complex beyond the classical G-protein signaling components is not known. Using proteomics on mouse cortex in vivo, we pulled down proteins interacting with CB1 in neurons and show that the CB1 receptor assembles with multiple members of the WAVE1 complex and the RhoGTPase Rac1 and modulates their activity. Activation levels of CB1 receptor directly impacted on actin polymerization and stability via WAVE1 in growth cones of developing neurons, leading to their collapse, as well as in synaptic spines of mature neurons, leading to their retraction. In adult mice, CB1 receptor agonists attenuated activity-dependent remodeling of dendritic spines in spinal cord neurons in vivo and suppressed inflammatory pain by regulating the WAVE1 complex. This study reports novel signaling mechanisms for cannabinoidergic modulation of the nervous system and demonstrates a previously unreported role for the WAVE1 complex in therapeutic applications of cannabinoids.

  1. Joint inflammation and chondrocyte death become independent of Fcgamma receptor type III by local overexpression of interferon-gamma during immune complex-mediated arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabbe, K.C.A.M.; Boross, P.; Holthuysen, A.E.M.; Sloetjes, A.W.; Kolls, J.; Verbeek, S.; Lent, P.L.E.M. van; Berg, W.B. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has previously been shown that the onset and the degree of joint inflammation during immune complex (IC)-mediated arthritis depend on Fcgamma receptor type III (FcgammaRIII). Local adenoviral overexpression of interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) in the knee joint prior to onset of IC-mediated

  2. Oxygen binding and activation by the complexes of PY2- and TPA-appended diphenylglycoluril receptors with copper and other metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprakel, VSI; Feiters, MC; Klaucke, WM; Klopstra, M; Brinksma, J; Feringa, BL; Karlin, KD; Nolte, RJM; Sprakel, Vera S.I.; Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Feringa, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    The copper( I) complexes of diphenylglycoluril basket receptors 1 and 2, appended with bis(2-ethylpyridine) amine (PY2) and tris(2-methylpyridine) amine (TPA), respectively, and their dioxygen adducts were studied with low-temperature UV-vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The copper(I) com

  3. High Affinity Binding of the Receptor-associated Protein D1D2 Domains with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Involves Bivalent Complex Formation: CRITICAL ROLES OF LYSINES 60 AND 191.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Joni M; Young, Patricia A; Strickland, Dudley K

    2016-08-26

    The LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that binds and mediates the endocytosis of numerous structurally diverse ligands. Currently, the basis for ligand recognition by LRP1 is not well understood. LRP1 requires a molecular chaperone, termed the receptor-associated protein (RAP), to escort the newly synthesized receptor from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. RAP is a three-domain protein that contains the following two high affinity binding sites for LRP1: one is located within domains 1 and 2, and one is located in its third domain. Studies on the interaction of the RAP third domain with LRP1 reveal critical contributions by lysine 256 and lysine 270 for this interaction. From these studies, a model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors has been proposed. Here, we employed surface plasmon resonance to investigate the binding of RAP D1D2 to LRP1. Our results reveal that the high affinity of D1D2 for LRP1 results from avidity effects mediated by the simultaneous interactions of lysine 60 in D1 and lysine 191 in D2 with sites on LRP1 to form a bivalent D1D2-LRP1 complex. When lysine 60 and 191 are both mutated to alanine, the binding of D1D2 to LRP1 is ablated. Our data also reveal that D1D2 is able to bind to a second distinct site on LRP1 to form a monovalent complex. The studies confirm the canonical model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors, which is initiated by pairs of lysine residues that dock into acidic pockets on the receptor. PMID:27402839

  4. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  5. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited [3H]flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not [3H]muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-[3H]butylbicycloorthobenzoate [( 3H] TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively [3H] flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-[3H]CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated [3H]muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-[3H]CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for [3H]flunitrazepam, [3H]muscimol and [3H]TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested

  6. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-05-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(-) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl-amino)-phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes.

  7. From Phytocannabinoids to Cannabinoid Receptors and Endocannabinoids: Pleiotropic Physiological and Pathological Roles Through Complex Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    Apart from having been used and misused for at least four millennia for, among others, recreational and medicinal purposes, the cannabis plant and its most peculiar chemical components, the plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), have the merit to have led humanity to discover one of the most intriguing and pleiotropic endogenous signaling systems, the endocannabinoid system (ECS). This review article aims to describe and critically discuss, in the most comprehensive possible manner, the multifaceted aspects of 1) the pharmacology and potential impact on mammalian physiology of all major phytocannabinoids, and not only of the most famous one Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and 2) the adaptive pro-homeostatic physiological, or maladaptive pathological, roles of the ECS in mammalian cells, tissues, and organs. In doing so, we have respected the chronological order of the milestones of the millennial route from medicinal/recreational cannabis to the ECS and beyond, as it is now clear that some of the early steps in this long path, which were originally neglected, are becoming important again. The emerging picture is rather complex, but still supports the belief that more important discoveries on human physiology, and new therapies, might come in the future from new knowledge in this field. PMID:27630175

  8. From Phytocannabinoids to Cannabinoid Receptors and Endocannabinoids: Pleiotropic Physiological and Pathological Roles Through Complex Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    Apart from having been used and misused for at least four millennia for, among others, recreational and medicinal purposes, the cannabis plant and its most peculiar chemical components, the plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), have the merit to have led humanity to discover one of the most intriguing and pleiotropic endogenous signaling systems, the endocannabinoid system (ECS). This review article aims to describe and critically discuss, in the most comprehensive possible manner, the multifaceted aspects of 1) the pharmacology and potential impact on mammalian physiology of all major phytocannabinoids, and not only of the most famous one Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and 2) the adaptive pro-homeostatic physiological, or maladaptive pathological, roles of the ECS in mammalian cells, tissues, and organs. In doing so, we have respected the chronological order of the milestones of the millennial route from medicinal/recreational cannabis to the ECS and beyond, as it is now clear that some of the early steps in this long path, which were originally neglected, are becoming important again. The emerging picture is rather complex, but still supports the belief that more important discoveries on human physiology, and new therapies, might come in the future from new knowledge in this field.

  9. 腺苷A2A受体在CIA小鼠电针抗炎效应中的作用机制研究%Mechanism Research of Adenosine A2A Receptor on Anti-inflammatory Effects of Electric Acupuncture in CIA Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓佩; 李方; 李芝慧; 李营营; 李奇辉; 谢文霞; 叶天申

    2013-01-01

    目的:建立稳定的C57BL/6小鼠胶原性关节炎模型,初步探讨电针抗炎效应与腺苷A2A受体(A2AR)的关系.方法:用鸡Ⅱ型胶原与完全弗氏佐剂在小鼠尾根部皮内注射免疫造模.选取造模成功的40只小鼠随机分为模型组、电针组、电针加A2AR拮抗剂组和A2AR激动剂组.初次免疫后5周开始电针治疗,针刺前腹腔注射拮抗剂或激动剂,每日1次,连续干预14天.观察干预后小鼠肿瘤坏死因子α(TNF-α)、膝踝关节组织病理和X线的变化.结果:①电针组和A2AR激动剂组小鼠的TNF-α含量、病理切片评分和X线评分明显低于模型组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),电针组和A2AR激动剂组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);②电针加A2AR拮抗剂组小鼠的的以上指标与模型组比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论:根据本研究结果推测:电针可能增加内源性腺苷的含量,通过激动A2AR而发挥抗炎效应,这可能是其治疗类风湿关节炎的作用机制之一.%Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of acupuncture for collage - induced arthritis (CIA) in C57BL/ 6 mice and discuss its underlying mechanism with adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Methods:C57BL/6 mice were immunized by intradermal injection at the base of the tail with chick collagen Ⅱ and complete Freund adjuvant emulsion. A total of 40 mice were randomized into model, EA, EA + SCH58261 and CGS21680 groups, with 10 cases in each group. Acupuncture was carried out from the 5th week on after the initial immunization, A2AR antagonist or agonist was transperitone-ally administered before acupuncture, once a day for 2 weeks. After treatment with acupuncture and drug, serum TNF -α level, joint pathology and X - ray were examined. Results: Compared with the model group, significant diminutions were found between the EA and CGS21680 groups in TNF - α level, pathological score and radiographic score(P 0. 05). In comparison with the model group

  10. Delineation of the complement receptor type 2-C3d complex by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Craig D; Storek, Michael J; Young, Kendra A; Kovacs, James M; Thurman, Joshua M; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2010-12-10

    The interactions between the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) and the C3 complement fragments C3d, C3dg, and iC3b are essential for the initiation of a normal immune response. A crystal-derived structure of the two N-terminal short consensus repeat (SCR1-2) domains of CR2 in complex with C3d has previously been elucidated. However, a number of biochemical and biophysical studies targeting both CR2 and C3d appear to be in conflict with these structural data. Previous mutagenesis and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy studies directed toward the C3d-binding site on CR2 have indicated that the CR2-C3d cocrystal structure may represent an encounter/intermediate or nonphysiological complex. With regard to the CR2-binding site on C3d, mutagenesis studies by Isenman and coworkers [Isenman, D. E., Leung, E., Mackay, J. D., Bagby, S. & van den Elsen, J. M. H. (2010). Mutational analyses reveal that the staphylococcal immune evasion molecule Sbi and complement receptor 2 (CR2) share overlapping contact residues on C3d: Implications for the controversy regarding the CR2/C3d cocrystal structure. J. Immunol. 184, 1946-1955] have implicated an electronegative "concave" surface on C3d in the binding process. This surface is discrete from the CR2-C3d interface identified in the crystal structure. We generated a total of 18 mutations targeting the two (X-ray crystallographic- and mutagenesis-based) proposed CR2 SCR1-2 binding sites on C3d. Using ELISA analyses, we were able to assess binding of mutant forms of C3d to CR2. Mutations directed toward the concave surface of C3d result in substantially compromised CR2 binding. By contrast, targeting the CR2-C3d interface identified in the cocrystal structure and the surrounding area results in significantly lower levels of disruption in binding. Molecular modeling approaches used to investigate disparities between the biochemical data and the X-ray structure of the CR2-C3d cocrystal result in highest-scoring solutions in which CR2 SCR1-2 is

  11. Delineation of the complement receptor type 2-C3d complex by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Craig D; Storek, Michael J; Young, Kendra A; Kovacs, James M; Thurman, Joshua M; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2010-12-10

    The interactions between the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) and the C3 complement fragments C3d, C3dg, and iC3b are essential for the initiation of a normal immune response. A crystal-derived structure of the two N-terminal short consensus repeat (SCR1-2) domains of CR2 in complex with C3d has previously been elucidated. However, a number of biochemical and biophysical studies targeting both CR2 and C3d appear to be in conflict with these structural data. Previous mutagenesis and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy studies directed toward the C3d-binding site on CR2 have indicated that the CR2-C3d cocrystal structure may represent an encounter/intermediate or nonphysiological complex. With regard to the CR2-binding site on C3d, mutagenesis studies by Isenman and coworkers [Isenman, D. E., Leung, E., Mackay, J. D., Bagby, S. & van den Elsen, J. M. H. (2010). Mutational analyses reveal that the staphylococcal immune evasion molecule Sbi and complement receptor 2 (CR2) share overlapping contact residues on C3d: Implications for the controversy regarding the CR2/C3d cocrystal structure. J. Immunol. 184, 1946-1955] have implicated an electronegative "concave" surface on C3d in the binding process. This surface is discrete from the CR2-C3d interface identified in the crystal structure. We generated a total of 18 mutations targeting the two (X-ray crystallographic- and mutagenesis-based) proposed CR2 SCR1-2 binding sites on C3d. Using ELISA analyses, we were able to assess binding of mutant forms of C3d to CR2. Mutations directed toward the concave surface of C3d result in substantially compromised CR2 binding. By contrast, targeting the CR2-C3d interface identified in the cocrystal structure and the surrounding area results in significantly lower levels of disruption in binding. Molecular modeling approaches used to investigate disparities between the biochemical data and the X-ray structure of the CR2-C3d cocrystal result in highest-scoring solutions in which CR2 SCR1-2 is

  12. Crystal Structure of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Complex with the Extracellular Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Garibay, P.; Knudsen, L.B.;

    2010-01-01

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) is an incretin released from intestinal L-cells in response to food intake. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor potentiates the synthesis and release of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor belongs to class B of the G......-protein-coupled receptors, a subfamily characterized by a large N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. Exendin-4 and GLP-1 are 50% identical, and exendin-4 is a full agonist with similar affinity and potency for the GLP-1 receptor. We recently solved the crystal structure of the GLP-1 receptor extracellular domain...... in complex with the competitive antagonist exendin-4(9-39). Interestingly, the isolated extra-cellular domain binds exendin-4 with much higher affinity than the endogenous agonist GLP-1. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of the extracellular domain in complex with GLP-1 to 2.1 angstrom resolution...

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel folic acid receptor-targeted, β-cyclodextrin-based drug complexes for cancer treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Juan Yin

    Full Text Available Drug targeting is an active area of research and nano-scaled drug delivery systems hold tremendous potential for the treatment of neoplasms. In this study, a novel cyclodextrin (CD-based nanoparticle drug delivery system has been assembled and characterized for the therapy of folate receptor-positive [FR(+] cancer. Water-soluble folic acid (FA-conjugated CD carriers (FACDs were successfully synthesized and their structures were confirmed by 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and circular dichroism. Drug complexes of adamatane (Ada and cytotoxic doxorubicin (Dox with FACD were readily obtained by mixed solvent precipitation. The average size of FACD-Ada-Dox was 1.5-2.5 nm. The host-guest association constant K a was 1,639 M(-1 as determined by induced circular dichroism and the hydrophilicity of the FACDs was greatly enhanced compared to unmodified CD. Cellular uptake and FR binding competitive experiments demonstrated an efficient and preferentially targeted delivery of Dox into FR-positive tumor cells and a sustained drug release profile was seen in vitro. The delivery of Dox into FR(+ cancer cells via endocytosis was observed by confocal microscopy and drug uptake of the targeted nanoparticles was 8-fold greater than that of non-targeted drug complexes. Our docking results suggest that FA, FACD and FACD-Ada-Dox could bind human hedgehog interacting protein that contains a FR domain. Mouse cardiomyocytes as well as fibroblast treated with FACD-Ada-Dox had significantly lower levels of reactive oxygen species, with increased content of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity, indicating a reduced potential for Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. These results indicate that the targeted drug complex possesses high drug association and sustained drug release

  14. Calixarene receptors in the selective separation of alachlor. Characterization of the separated complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    concentrate solutions, solvents as chloroform and acetonitrile did not interfere in the formation of the species. At the same time and based on the structure of the reactants and information from the scientific literature related to this particular topic, using the M M3, CONFLEX and MOPAC/PM5/COSMO procedures, we calculated the optimized geometry which rendered the most stable molecular structures of reactants and products, this means those with the lowest minimum energies, the lowest energies of the most stable conformers and the heat of formation of the most stable conformational structures of the calixarene-substrate species. The latter were those formed by hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions. Species formed with HnbLn stabilized by hydrogen bonding through CH2-Cl interaction of alachlor with OH groups of the calixarenes. Concerning the phosphinoylated calixarenes, the P=O groups immobilize the alachlor by hydrogen bonding with the benzyl of the acetanilide. However, the species formed with alachlor and parents or functionalized calixarenes demanded a second interaction between calixarene phenyl-π-π-benzyl-alachlor to be stabilised. Heat of formation of reactants and products allowed to calculate the heat o reaction associated to the formation of the hosts...guest species, these results were surprising in line with the experimental results. Based on the solution and computational results we synthesized and isolated the calixarene---alachlor complexes in sizeable amounts. The latter were characterized by spectroscopic techniques like IR, UV-Vis, luminescence and elemental analysis. The results from the solution and solid studies of the reagents and products as molar absorption coefficients, the features of the luminescence and IR spectra, luminescence lifetimes and minimum formulae of the isolated complexes are in good agreement with the parameters and tendencies of the minimum energies of the geometrical and conformational structures found. With respect to the

  15. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the tumour necrosis factor α–tumour necrosis factor receptor type 2 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the tumour necrosis factor α (TNF)–tumour necrosis factor receptor type 2 (TNFR2) complex are described. The initial electron-density map, which was calculated using only the phases of refined TNF trimer structures, could detect the main chains and side chains of TNFR2 around the TNF trimer. Tumour necrosis factor receptor type 2 (TNFR2, TNFRSF1B) is an essential receptor for various host-defence functions of tumour necrosis factor α (TNF). As part of studies to determine the structure of TNFR2, the formation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the TNF–TNFR2 complex are described. The TNF–TNFR2 complex, which comprises one TNF trimer and three TNFR2 monomers, was confirmed and purified by size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the TNF–TNFR2 complex were obtained using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.5, b = 117.4, c = 246.8 Å. Assuming the presence of two TNF–TNFR2 complexes in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient VM was 2.49 Å3 Da−1 and the solvent content of the crystal was 50.7%. The crystal diffracted to 2.95 Å resolution

  17. σ-1 Receptor Inhibition of ASIC1a Channels is Dependent on a Pertussis Toxin-Sensitive G-Protein and an AKAP150/Calcineurin Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Yelenis; Katnik, Christopher; Cuevas, Javier

    2015-10-01

    ASIC1a channels play a major role in various pathophysiological conditions including depression, anxiety, epilepsy, and neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke. Sigma-1 (σ-1) receptor stimulation depresses the activity of ASIC1a channels in cortical neurons, but the mechanism(s) by which σ-1 receptors exert their influence on ASIC1a remains unknown. Experiments were undertaken to elucidate the signaling cascade linking σ-1 receptors to ASIC1a channels. Immunohistochemical studies showed that σ-1 receptors, ASIC1a and A-kinase anchoring peptide 150 colocalize in the plasma membrane of the cell body and processes of cortical neurons. Fluorometric Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that disruption of the macromolecular complexes containing AKAP150 diminished the effects of the σ-1 on ASIC1a, as did application of the calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A and FK-506. Moreover, whole-cell patch clamp experiments showed that σ-1 receptors were less effective at decreasing ASIC1a-mediated currents in the presence of the VIVIT peptide, which binds to calcineurin and prevents cellular effects dependent on AKAP150/calcineurin interaction. The coupling of σ-1 to ASIC1a was also disrupted by preincubation of the neurons in the G-protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX). Taken together, our data reveal that σ-1 receptor block of ASIC1a function is dependent on activation of a PTX-sensitive G-protein and stimulation of AKAP150 bound calcineurin. PMID:24925261

  18. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities in the arcuate-median eminence complex and their link to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Romero-Fernandez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region.  Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly

  19. TWIST Represses Estrogen Receptor-alpha Expression by Recruiting the NuRD Protein Complex in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjiang Fu, Lianmei Zhang, Tao He, Xiuli Xiao, Xiaoyan Liu, Li Wang, Luquan Yang, Manman Yang, Tiandan Zhang, Rui Chen, Jianming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of estrogen receptor α (ERα expression and gain of TWIST (TWIST1 expression in breast tumors correlate with increased disease recurrence and metastasis and poor disease-free survival. However, the molecular and functional regulatory relationship between TWIST and ERα are unclear. In this study, we found TWIST was associated with a chromatin region in intron 7 of the human ESR1 gene coding for ERα. This association of TWIST efficiently recruited the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD repressor complex to this region, which subsequently decreased histone H3K9 acetylation, increased histone H3K9 methylation and repressed ESR1 expression in breast cancer cells. In agreement with these molecular events, TWIST expression was inversely correlated with ERα expression in both breast cancer cell lines and human breast ductal carcinomas. Forced expression of TWIST in TWIST-negative and ERα-positive breast cancer cells such as T47D and MCF-7 cells reduced ERα expression, while knockdown of TWIST in TWIST-positive and ERα-negative breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-435 and 4T1 cells increased ERα expression. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity including the one in NuRD complex significantly increased ERα expression in MDA-MB-435 and 4T1 cells. HDAC inhibition together with TWIST knockdown did not further increase ERα expression in 4T1 and MDA-MB-435 cells. These results demonstrate that TWIST/NuRD represses ERα expression in breast cancer cells. Therefore, TWIST may serve as a potential molecular target for converting ERα-negative breast cancers to ERα-positive breast cancers, allowing these cancers to restore their sensitivity to endocrine therapy with selective ERα antagonists such as tamoxifen and raloxifene.

  20. Expression and cellular distribution of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in cortical tubers of the tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Yang, Meihua; Sun, Feiji; Liang, Chao; Wei, Yujia; Wang, Lukang; Yue, Jiong; Chen, Bing; Li, Song; Liu, Shiyong; Yang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are highly associated with intractable epilepsy. Recent evidence has shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has direct effects on both neurons and glial cells. To understand the role of TRPV4 in pathogenesis of cortical tubers, we investigated the expression patterns of TRPV4 in cortical tubers of TSC compared with normal control cortex (CTX). We found that TRPV4 was clearly up-regulated in cortical tubers at the protein levels. Immunostaining indicated that TRPV4 was specially distributed in abnormal cells, including dysplastic neurons (DNs) and giant cells (GCs). In addition, double immunofluorescent staining revealed that TRPV4 was localized on neurofilament proteins (NF200) positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic portein (GFAP) positive reactive astrocytes. Moreover, TRPV4 co-localized with both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Furthermore, protein levels of protein kinase C (PKC), but not protein kinase A (PKA), the important upstream factors of the TRPV4, were significantly increased in cortical tubers. Taken together, the overexpression and distribution patterns of TRPV4 may be linked with the intractable epilepsy caused by TSC. PMID:26874068

  1. Complex Control of GABA(A) Receptor Subunit mRNA Expression: Variation, Covariation, and Genetic Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mulligan, Megan K.; Wang, Xusheng; Adler, Adrienne L.; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    GABA type-A receptors are essential for fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are critical in brain function. Surprisingly, expression of receptor subunits is highly variable among individuals, but the cause and impact of this fluctuation remains unknown. We have studied sources of variation for all 19 receptor subunits using massive expression data sets collected across multiple brain regions and platforms in mice and humans. Expression of Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabrb2, Gabrb3, and Gabrg2 is highly...

  2. Further EST analysis of endocrine genes that are preferentially expressed in the neural complex of Ciona intestinalis: receptor and enzyme genes associated with endocrine system in the neural complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Toshio; Kawashima, Takeshi; Satou, Yutaka; Satoh, Nori

    2007-01-15

    Identification of orthologs of vertebrate neuropeptides and hypothalamic hormones in the neural complex of ascidians suggests integral roles of the ascidian neural complex in the endocrine system. In the present study, we investigated endocrine-related genes expressed in the neural complex of Ciona intestinalis. Comprehensive analyses of 3'-end sequences of the neural complex cDNAs placed 10,029 clones into 4051 independent clusters or genes, 1524 of them being expressed preferentially in this organ. Comparison of the 1524 genes with the human proteome databank demonstrated that 476 matched previously identified human proteins with distinct functions. Further analyses of sequence similarity of the 476 genes demonstrated that 21 genes are candidates for those involved in the endocrine system. Although we cannot detect hormone or peptide candidates, we found 21 genes such as receptors for peptide ligands, receptor-modulating proteins, and processing enzymes. We then characterized the Ciona prohormone convertase 2 (Ci-PC2) and carboxypeptidase E (Ci-CPE), which are associated with endoproteolytic processing of peptide hormone precursors. Furthermore, genes encoding these transcripts are expressed specifically in the neural complex of young adult ascidians. These data provide the molecular basis for further functional studies of the endocrine role of the neural complex of ascidians.

  3. Evolution of the C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor Genes of the DECTIN-1 Cluster in the NK Gene Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Sattler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors are crucial in initiating and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses and often belong to families of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins. The human C-type lectin-like receptors encoded in the DECTIN-1 cluster within the NK gene complex contain prominent receptors with pattern recognition function, such as DECTIN-1 and LOX-1. All members of this cluster share significant homology and are considered to have arisen from subsequent gene duplications. Recent developments in sequencing and the availability of comprehensive sequence data comprising many species showed that the receptors of the DECTIN-1 cluster are not only homologous to each other but also highly conserved between species. Even in Caenorhabditis elegans, genes displaying homology to the mammalian C-type lectin-like receptors have been detected. In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive phylogenetic survey and give an up-to-date overview of the currently available data on the evolutionary emergence of the DECTIN-1 cluster genes.

  4. The ligand-receptor-G-protein ternary complex as a GTP-synthase. steady-state proton pumping and dose-response relationships for beta -adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, K J; Nederkoorn, P H; Timmerman, H; Timms, D; Davies, R H

    2000-07-21

    Steady-state solutions are developed for the rate of G alpha.GTP production in a synthase model of the ligand-receptor-G-protein ternary complex activated by a ligand-receptor proton pumping mechanism. The effective rate, k(31), defining the proton transfer, phosphorylation and G alpha.GTP release is a controlling rate of the synthase in the presence of a ligand with an efficient mode of signal activation, the ligand-receptor interaction taking place under effectively equilibrium conditions. The composite rate, however, becomes an amplifying factor in any dose-response relationship. The amplification is a triple product of the rate, k(31), the equilibrium constant associated with the activation of the proton signal, K(act)and the fraction of agonist conformer transmitting the signal, f(*). Where the rate of activation of the proton signal becomes critically inefficient, the rate of activation, k(act 1)replaces k(31)K(act). A correlation between beta(1)-adrenergic receptor-stimulated GDP release and adenylate cyclase activation shows that this correlation is not unique to an exchange reaction. Within the initiating Tyr-Arg-Tyr receptor proton shuttle mechanism, the position of Arg(r156) paralleldictates the high-(R(p)) and low-(R(u)) ligand-binding affinities. These states are close to R(*)and R(0)of the equilibrium model (De Lean et al., 1980, J. Biol. Chem.255, 7108-7117). An increased rate of hydrogen ion diffusion into a receptor mutant can give rise to constitutive activity while increased rates of G-protein release and changes in receptor state balance can contribute to the resultant level of action. Constitutive action will arise from a faster rate of G-protein release alone if proton diffusion in the wild-type receptor contributes to a basal level of G-protein activation. Competitive ligand-receptor occupancy for constitutive mutants shows that, where the rate of G-protein activation from the proportion of ligand-occupied receptors is less than the

  5. From Sanger to NGS: Detecting MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) Class II and OR (Olfactory Receptors) Genetic Variability in Italian Wolves (Canis Lupus) and relative Canids

    OpenAIRE

    Lapalombella, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    In this PhD thesis I will describe different aspects of conservation genetics and genomics of two wild Canidae species, the wolf (Canis lupus) and the golden jackal (Canis aureus), through the study of two of the most variable gene families: the Major Histocompatibility Complex genes (MHC), and Olfactory Receptors genes (OR). In order to perform these studies both Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS) DNA techniques have been used. The background of the thesis is described in the “Gener...

  6. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 is a functional part of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor complex in pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Robitaille, Mélanie; Showalter, Aaron D; Huang, Xinyi; Liu, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Willard, Francis S; Han, Junfeng; Froese, Sean; Wei, Li; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Angers, Stéphane; Sloop, Kyle W; Dai, Feihan F; Wheeler, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. Because of their direct stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are now important therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To better understand the mechanisms that control the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) were employed to uncover potential proteins that functionally interact with the GLP-1R. AP-MS performed on Chinese hamster ovary cells or MIN6 β cells, both expressing the human GLP-1R, revealed 99 proteins potentially associated with the GLP-1R. Three novel GLP-1R interactors (PGRMC1, Rab5b, and Rab5c) were further validated through co-immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and immunofluorescence. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of PGRMC1, a novel cell surface receptor that associated with liganded GLP-1R, enhanced GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) with the most robust effect. Knockdown of PGRMC1 in β cells decreased GIIS, indicative of positive interaction with GLP-1R. To gain insight mechanistically, we demonstrated that the cell surface PGRMC1 ligand P4-BSA increased GIIS, whereas its antagonist AG-205 decreased GIIS. It was then found that PGRMC1 increased GLP-1-induced cAMP accumulation. PGRMC1 activation and GIIS induced by P4-BSA could be blocked by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase/EPAC signaling or the EGF receptor-PI3K signal transduction pathway. These data reveal a dual mechanism for PGRMC1-increased GIIS mediated through cAMP and EGF receptor signaling. In conclusion, we identified several novel GLP-1R interacting proteins. PGRMC1 expressed on the cell surface of β cells was shown to interact with the activated GLP-1R to enhance the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1.

  7. Inducible production of recombinant human Flt3 ectodomain variants in mammalian cells and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Flt3 ligand–receptor complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparative purification and crystallization of Flt3 receptor–ligand complexes are described. The extracellular complex between the haematopoietic receptor Flt3 and its cytokine ligand (FL) is the cornerstone of signalling cascades that are central to early haematopoiesis and the immune system. Here, efficient protocols for the production of two ectodomain variants of human Flt3 receptor, Flt3D1–D5 and Flt3D1–D4, for structural studies are reported based on tetracycline-inducible stable cell lines in HEK293S cells deficient in N-acetylglycosaminyltransferase I (GnTI−/−) that can secrete the target proteins with limited and homogeneous N-linked glycosylation to milligram amounts. The ensuing preparative purification of Flt3 receptor–ligand complexes yielded monodisperse complex preparations that were amenable to crystallization. Crystals of the Flt3D1–D4–FL and Flt3D1–D5–FL complexes diffracted to 4.3 and 7.8 Å resolution, respectively, and exhibited variable diffraction quality even within the same crystal. The resulting data led to the successful structure determination of Flt3D1–D4–FL via a combination of molecular-replacement and density-modification protocols exploiting the noncrystallographic symmetry and high solvent content of the crystals

  8. JAK1 kinase forms complexes with interleukin-4 receptor and 4PS/insulin receptor substrate-1-like protein and is activated by interleukin-4 and interleukin-9 in T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, T; Tsang, M L; Yang, Y C

    1994-10-28

    Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-9 regulate the proliferation of T lymphocytes through interactions with their receptors. Previous studies have shown that unknown tyrosine kinases are involved in the proliferative signaling triggered by IL-4 and IL-9. Here we show that IL-4 and IL-9 induce overlapping (170, 130, and 125 kilodalton (kDa)) and distinct (45 and 88/90 kDa, respectively) protein tyrosine phosphorylation in T lymphocytes. We further identify the 170-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein as 4PS/insulin receptor substrate-1-like (IRS-1L) protein and 130-kDa protein as JAK1 kinase. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that JAK1 forms complexes with the IL-4 receptor and 4PS/IRS-1L protein following ligand-receptor interaction. In addition, we demonstrate that IL-9, but not IL-4, induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat 91 transcriptional factor. The overlapping and distinct protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the same JAK1 kinase in T lymphocytes strongly suggests that IL-4 and IL-9 share the common signal transduction pathways and that the specificity for each cytokine could be achieved through the unique tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins triggered by individual cytokines.

  9. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  10. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms

  11. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P. [The University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Jiráček, Jiří [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Brzozowski, Andrzej M., E-mail: marek.brzozowski@york.ac.uk [The University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-01

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms.

  12. Expression of triggering receptor on myeloid cell 1 and histocompatibility complex molecules in sepsis and major abdominal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nestor González-Roldán; Constantino López-Macías; Armando Isibasi; Eduardo Ferat-Osorio; Rosalía Aduna-Vicente; Isabel Wong-Baeza; Noemí Esquivel-Callejas; Horacio Astudillo-de la Vega; Patricio Sánchez-Fernández; Lourdes Arriaga-Pizano; Miguel Angel Villasís Keever

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the surface expression of triggering receptor on myeloid cell 1 (TREM-1), class Ⅱ major histocompatibility complex molecules (HLA-DR), andthe expression of the splicing variant (svTREM-1) ofTREM-1 in septic patients and those subjected to major abdominal surgery.METHODS: Using flow cytometry, we examined the surface expression of TREM-1 and HLA-DR in peripheral blood monocytes from 11 septic patients, 7 elective gastrointestinal surgical patients, and 10 healthy volunteers. svTREM-1 levels were analyzed by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Basal expression of TREM-1 and HLA-DR in healthy volunteers was 35.91±14.75 MFI and75.8±18.3%, respectively. In septic patients, TREM-1 expression was 59.9±23.9 MFI and HLA-DR expression was 44.39±20.25%, with a significant differencebetween healthy and septic groups (P<0.05) for bothmolecules. In the surgical patients, TREM-1 and HLA-DR expressions were 56.8±20.85 MFI and 71±13.8% before surgery and 72.65±29.92 MlFI and 72.82±22.55% after surgery. TREM-1 expression was significantly different(P = 0.0087) between the samples before and aftersurgery and svTREM-1 expression was 0.8590±0.1451 MF1, 0.8820±0.1460 MF1, and 2.210±0.7873MF1 in the healthy, surgical (after surgery) and septic groups, respectively. There was a significant difference (P = 0.048) in svTREM-1 expression between the healthy and surgical groups and the septic group.CONCLUSION: TREM-1 expression is increased during systemic inflammatory conditions such as sepsis and the postoperative phase. Simultaneous low expression of HLA-DR molecules correlates with the severity of illness and increases susceptibility to infection. Additionally, TREM-1 expression is distinctly different in surgical patients at different stages of the inflammatory response before and after surgery. Thus, surface TREM-1 appears to be an endogenous signal during the course of the inflammatory response. svTREM-1 expression is significantly increased during sepsis, appearing to be

  13. Expression of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid 2A-B and 2B receptors in anterior thalamic nucleus and subiculum complex of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanshan Fu; Xiaokai Ma; Xiaoling Yue; Bin Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glutamate acid ionotropic receptor N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) takes part in long-term potentiation, thereby influencing the process of learning and memory.OBJECTIVE: To verify expression of NMDA 2A/B and 2B receptors in the anterior thalamic nucleus and subieulum complex of rats.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A single-sample observation was performed at Department of Anatomy in Dalian Mcdical University (Dalian, Liaoning, China) from April to September in 2007.MATERIALS: Ten adult Wistar rats were used for this study, as well as rabbit anti-NMDA 2A/B and 2Bantibodies.METHODS: The rats were anesthetized and perfused, followed by brain resection and coronal sectioning of the brain tissue. A 1:3 series was selected for immunohistochemistry, using antibodies specific to NMDA 2A/B and 2B receptors. Photos were taken using the Nikon image analysis system.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Expression and distribution of immunohistochemistry staining of NMDA 2A/B and 2B receptor subunits.RESULTS: There were a large number of NMDA 2A/B and 2B receptor-positive neurons distributed throughout the anterior dorsal thalamic nucleus. In the anterior ventral thalamic nucleus, distribution of positive neurons was rare, staining intensity was lighter, and cell bodies were smaller compared with the anterior dorsal thalamic nucleus. In the subiculum complex, staining intensity of NMDA 2A/B and 2B-positive neurons was weakest in the molecular layer and stronger in the pyramidal layer, in particular the region with large cell bodies adjacent to the molecular layer. In the multiform layer, more positive neurons of various sizes were detected.CONCLUSION: NMDA 2A/B and 2B receptor subunits were richly distributed in the anterior thalamic nucleus, with a small difference existing between the anterior dorsal nucleus and anterior ventral nucleus.These neurons were also differentially distributed within the three layers of the subiculum complex.

  14. Targeted ubiquitination and degradation of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 by the DDB1-CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyan Wu

    Full Text Available The G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs phosphorylate agonist occupied G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and desensitize GPCR-mediated signaling. Recent studies indicate they also function non-catalytically via interaction with other proteins. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to screen interacting proteins of GRK5 in MDA-MB-231 cells and HUVEC cells. Mass spectrometry analysis reveals several proteins in the GRK5 immunocomplex including damaged DNA-binding protein 1 (DDB1, an adaptor subunit of the CUL4-ROC1 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the association of GRK5 with DDB1-CUL4 complex, and reveal that DDB1 acts as an adapter to link GRK5 to CUL4 to form the complex. Overexpression of DDB1 promoted, whereas knockdown of DDB1 inhibited the ubiquitination of GRK5, and the degradation of GRK5 was reduced in cells deficient of DDB1. Furthermore, the depletion of DDB1 decreased Hsp90 inhibitor-induced GRK5 destabilization and UV irradiation-induced GRK5 degradation. Thus, our study identified potential GRK5 interacting proteins, and reveals the association of GRK5 with DDB1 in cell and the regulation of GRK5 level by DDB1-CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex-dependent proteolysis pathway.

  15. The binding of 3H-labelled androgen-receptor complexes to hypothalamic chromatin of neonatal mice: effect of sex and androgenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventanas, J; Garcia, C; López-Bote, C; López, A; Burgos, J

    1990-03-01

    The binding of 3H-labelled androgen-receptor complexes, prepared by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation from the 105,000 g supernatant of hypothalamic cytosol, to hypothalamic chromatin of neonatal mice covalently coupled to cellulose was measured in vitro. Saturation binding was also determined after extraction of histones and the masking of acidic proteins with high molarities of guanidine hydrochloride. This investigation showed the presence of high-affinity, low-capacity acceptor sites for [3H]-testosterone-receptor complexes in male hypothalamic chromatin (Kd value = 0.39 x 10(-10) M and binding sites of 41 fmol per mg of DNA). Acceptor activity seems to be associated with the acidic protein fraction of chromatin. No specific acceptor sites of similar nature were found in chromatin taken from the hypothalami of female mice. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that the androgen-unresponsiveness of female mice is related to the absence of acceptors for the androgen-receptor in female mice hypothalami.

  16. Neuropeptide S ameliorates olfactory spatial memory impairment induced by scopolamine and MK801 through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the subiculum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Wang, Can; Xie, Jun-Fan; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Xin, Le; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Ren, Wen-Ting; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that neuropeptide S (NPS), via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPS receptor (NPSR) in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function. High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the subiculum complex of hippocampal formation suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory spatial memory. The present study was undertaken to investigate effects of NPS on the scopolamine- or MK801-induced impairment of olfactory spatial memory using computer-assisted 4-hole-board spatial memory test, and by monitoring Fos expression in the subiculum complex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence microscopy was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos-immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. Intracerebroventricular administration of NPS (0.5 nmol) significantly increased the number of visits to switched odorants in recall trial in mice suffering from odor-discriminating inability induced by scopolamine, a selective muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, or MK801, a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, after training trials. The improvement of olfactory spatial memory by NPS was abolished by the NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS (40 nmol). Ex vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced Fos expression in the subiculum complex encompassing the subiculum (S), presubiculum (PrS) and parasubiculum (PaS). The percentages of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 91.3, 86.5 and 90.0 % in the S, PrS and PaS, respectively. The present findings demonstrate that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the subiculum complex, ameliorates olfactory spatial memory impairment induced by scopolamine and MK801 in mice. PMID:26323488

  17. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M

    2014-10-01

    The structural characterization of the insulin-insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21-B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms. PMID:25286859

  18. Toll-like receptor signaling in vertebrates: testing the integration of protein, complex, and pathway data in the protein ontology framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Arighi

    Full Text Available The Protein Ontology (PRO provides terms for and supports annotation of species-specific protein complexes in an ontology framework that relates them both to their components and to species-independent families of complexes. Comprehensive curation of experimentally known forms and annotations thereof is expected to expose discrepancies, differences, and gaps in our knowledge. We have annotated the early events of innate immune signaling mediated by Toll-Like Receptor 3 and 4 complexes in human, mouse, and chicken. The resulting ontology and annotation data set has allowed us to identify species-specific gaps in experimental data and possible functional differences between species, and to employ inferred structural and functional relationships to suggest plausible resolutions of these discrepancies and gaps.

  19. 2-Aminopyrimidines as dual adenosine A1/A2A antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sarel J; Petzer, Jacobus P; Terre'Blanche, Gisella; Petzer, Anél; van der Walt, Mietha M; Bergh, Jacobus J; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-01

    In this study thirteen 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives were synthesised and screened as potential antagonists of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in order to further investigate the structure activity relationships of this class of compounds. 4-(5-Methylfuran-2-yl)-6-[3-(piperidine-1-carbonyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-amine (8m) was identified as a compound with high affinities for both receptors, with an A2AKi value of 6.34 nM and an A1Ki value of 9.54 nM. The effect of selected compounds on the viability of cultured cells was assessed and preliminary results indicate low cytotoxicity. In vivo efficacy at A2A receptors was illustrated for compounds 8k and 8m since these compounds attenuated haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. A molecular docking study revealed that the interactions between the synthesised compounds and the adenosine A2A binding site most likely involve Phe168 and Asn253, interactions which are similar for structurally related adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. PMID:26462195

  20. Is the Framework of Cohn's 'Tritope Model' for How T Cell Receptors Recognize Peptide/Self-MHC Complexes and Allo-MHC Plausible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretscher, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Cohn has developed the tritope model to describe how distinct domains of the T cell receptor (TcR) recognize peptide/self-MHC complexes and allo-MHC. He has over the years employed this model as a framework for considering how the TcR might mediate various signals [1-5]. In a recent publication [5], Cohn employs the Tritope Model to propose a detailed mechanism for the T cell receptor's involvement in positive thymic selection [5]. During a review of this proposal, I became uneasy over the plausibility of the underlying framework of the Tritope Model. I outline here the evolutionary considerations making me question this framework. I also suggest that the proposed framework underlying the Tritope Model makes strong predictions whose validity can most probably be assessed by considering observations reported in the literature.

  1. Modulation of radioligand binding to the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex by a new component from Cyperus rotundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Lee, Kwang-Youn; Choi, Hyoung-Chul; Cho, Jungsook; Kang, Byung-Soo; Lim, Jae-Chul; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2002-01-01

    Four sesquiterpenes, beta-selinene, isocurcumenol, nootkatone and aristolone and one triterpene, oleanolic acid were isolated from the ethylacetate fraction of the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus and tested for their ability to modulate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine receptor function by radioligand binding assays using rat cerebrocortical membranes. Among these compounds, only isocurcumenol, one of the newly identified constituents of this plant, was found to inhibit [3H]Ro15-1788 binding and enhance [3H]flunitrazepam binding in the presence of GABA. These results suggest that isocurcumenol may serve as a benzodiazepine receptor agonist and allosterically modulate GABAergic neurotransmission via enhancement of endogenous receptor ligand binding. PMID:11824542

  2. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Ancestral 3-Ketosteroid Receptor-Progesterone-Mifepristone Complex Shows Mifepristone Bound at the Coactivator Binding Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, Jennifer K.; Ortlund, Eric A. [Emory-MED

    2013-12-12

    Steroid receptors are a subfamily of nuclear receptors found throughout all metazoans. They are highly important in the regulation of development, inflammation, and reproduction and their misregulation has been implicated in hormone insensitivity syndromes and cancer. Steroid binding to SRs drives a conformational change in the ligand binding domain that promotes nuclear localization and subsequent interaction with coregulator proteins to affect gene regulation. SRs are important pharmaceutical targets, yet most SR-targeting drugs have off-target pharmacology leading to unwanted side effects. A better understanding of the structural mechanisms dictating ligand specificity and the evolution of the forces that created the SR-hormone pairs will enable the design of better pharmaceutical ligands. In order to investigate this relationship, we attempted to crystallize the ancestral 3-ketosteroid receptor (ancSR2) with mifepristone, a SR antagonist. Here, we present the x-ray crystal structure of the ancestral 3-keto steroid receptor (ancSR2)-progesterone complex at a resolution of 2.05 Å. This improves upon our previously reported structure of the ancSR2-progesterone complex, permitting unambiguous assignment of the ligand conformation within the binding pocket. Surprisingly, we find mifepristone, fortuitously docked at the protein surface, poised to interfere with coregulator binding. Recent attention has been given to generating pharmaceuticals that block the coregulator binding site in order to obstruct coregulator binding and achieve tissue-specific SR regulation independent of hormone binding. Mifepristone’s interaction with the coactivator cleft of this SR suggests that it may be a useful molecular scaffold for further coactivator binding inhibitor development.

  3. Activation of serotonin2A receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex enhanced working memory in the hemiparkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Bo; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yi-Na; Han, Ling-Na; Wu, Zhong-Heng; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors are highly expressed in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex (MS-DB), especially in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons linked to hippocampal theta rhythm, which is involved in cognition. Cognitive impairments commonly occur in Parkinson's disease. Here we performed behavioral, electrophysiological, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies in rats with complete unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to assess the importance of dopamine (DA) depletion and MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors for working memory. The MFB lesions resulted in working memory impairment and decreases in firing rate and density of MS-DB PV-positive neurons, peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, and DA levels in septohippocampal system and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to control rats. Intra-MS-DB injection of high affinity 5-HT2A receptor agonist TCB-2 enhanced working memory, increased firing rate of PV-positive neurons and peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, elevated DA levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, and decreased 5-HT level in the hippocampus in control and lesioned rats. Compared to control rats, the duration of the excitatory effect produced by TCB-2 on the firing rate of PV-positive neurons was markedly shortened in lesioned rats, indicating dysfunction of 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that unilateral lesions of the MFB in rats induced working memory deficit, and activation of MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors enhanced working memory, which may be due to changes in the activity of septohippocampal network and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and mPFC.

  4. Identification of the first small-molecule ligand of the neuronal receptor sortilin and structure determination of the receptor–ligand complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Jacob Lauwring, E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Schrøder, Tenna Juul; Christensen, Søren [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Strandbygård, Dorthe [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Pallesen, Lone Tjener [Aarhus University, Ole Worms Allé 3, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); García-Alai, Maria Marta [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Lindberg, Samsa; Langgård, Morten; Eskildsen, Jørgen Calí; David, Laurent; Tagmose, Lena; Simonsen, Klaus Baek; Maltas, Philip James; Rønn, Lars Christian Biilmann; Jong, Inge E. M. de; Malik, Ibrahim John; Egebjerg, Jan; Karlsson, Jens-Jacob [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Uppalanchi, Srinivas; Sakumudi, Durga Rao; Eradi, Pradheep [GVK BioScience, Plot No. 28 A, IDA Nacharam, Hyderabad 500 076 (India); Watson, Steven P., E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Thirup, Søren, E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-02-01

    The identification of the first small-molecule ligand of the neuronal receptor sortilin and structure determination of the receptor–ligand complex are reported. Sortilin is a type I membrane glycoprotein belonging to the vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein (Vps10p) family of sorting receptors and is most abundantly expressed in the central nervous system. Sortilin has emerged as a key player in the regulation of neuronal viability and has been implicated as a possible therapeutic target in a range of disorders. Here, the identification of AF40431, the first reported small-molecule ligand of sortilin, is reported. Crystals of the sortilin–AF40431 complex were obtained by co-crystallization and the structure of the complex was solved to 2.7 Å resolution. AF40431 is bound in the neurotensin-binding site of sortilin, with the leucine moiety of AF40431 mimicking the binding mode of the C-terminal leucine of neurotensin and the 4-methylumbelliferone moiety of AF40431 forming π-stacking with a phenylalanine.

  5. Sustained Brown Fat Stimulation and Insulin Sensitization by a Humanized Bispecific Antibody Agonist for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1/βKlotho Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Kolumam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissipating excess calories as heat through therapeutic stimulation of brown adipose tissues (BAT has been proposed as a potential treatment for obesity-linked disorders. Here, we describe the generation of a humanized effector-less bispecific antibody that activates fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR 1/βKlotho complex, a common receptor for FGF21 and FGF19. Using this molecule, we show that antibody-mediated activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex in mice induces sustained energy expenditure in BAT, browning of white adipose tissue, weight loss, and improvements in obesity-associated metabolic derangements including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. In mice and cynomolgus monkeys, FGFR1/βKlotho activation increased serum high-molecular-weight adiponectin, which appears to contribute over time by enhancing the amplitude of the metabolic benefits. At the same time, insulin sensitization by FGFR1/βKlotho activation occurs even before the onset of weight loss in a manner that is independent of adiponectin. Together, selective activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex with a long acting therapeutic antibody represents an attractive approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-linked disorders through enhanced energy expenditure, insulin sensitization and induction of high-molecular-weight adiponectin.

  6. Sustained Brown Fat Stimulation and Insulin Sensitization by a Humanized Bispecific Antibody Agonist for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1/βKlotho Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolumam, Ganesh; Chen, Mark Z.; Tong, Raymond; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Kates, Lance; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Ross, Jed; Wyatt, Shelby K.; Gandham, Vineela D.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Dunshee, Diana Ronai; Wu, Ai-Luen; Haley, Benjamin; Anderson, Keith; Warming, Søren; Rairdan, Xin Y.; Lewin-Koh, Nicholas; Zhang, Yingnan; Gutierrez, Johnny; Baruch, Amos; Gelzleichter, Thomas R.; Stevens, Dale; Rajan, Sharmila; Bainbridge, Travis W.; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y. Gloria; Ziai, James; Soriano, Robert H.; Brauer, Matthew J.; Chen, Yongmei; Stawicki, Scott; Kim, Hok Seon; Comps-Agrar, Laëtitia; Luis, Elizabeth; Spiess, Christoph; Wu, Yan; Ernst, James A.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Peterson, Andrew S.; Sonoda, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Dissipating excess calories as heat through therapeutic stimulation of brown adipose tissues (BAT) has been proposed as a potential treatment for obesity-linked disorders. Here, we describe the generation of a humanized effector-less bispecific antibody that activates fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 1/βKlotho complex, a common receptor for FGF21 and FGF19. Using this molecule, we show that antibody-mediated activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex in mice induces sustained energy expenditure in BAT, browning of white adipose tissue, weight loss, and improvements in obesity-associated metabolic derangements including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. In mice and cynomolgus monkeys, FGFR1/βKlotho activation increased serum high-molecular-weight adiponectin, which appears to contribute over time by enhancing the amplitude of the metabolic benefits. At the same time, insulin sensitization by FGFR1/βKlotho activation occurs even before the onset of weight loss in a manner that is independent of adiponectin. Together, selective activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex with a long acting therapeutic antibody represents an attractive approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-linked disorders through enhanced energy expenditure, insulin sensitization and induction of high-molecular-weight adiponectin. PMID:26288846

  7. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-dependent Long-term Depression is Impaired Due to Elevated ERK Signaling in the ΔRG Mouse Model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Chévere-Torres, Itzamarie; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Kang, Areum; Maki, Jordan M.; Michael J Gambello; Arbiser, Jack L.; Santini, Emanuela; Klann, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and fragile X syndrome (FXS) are caused by mutations in negative regulators of translation. FXS model mice exhibit enhanced metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). Therefore, we hypothesized that a mouse model of TSC, ΔRG transgenic mice, also would exhibit enhanced mGluR-LTD. We measured the impact of TSC2-GAP mutations on the mTORC1 and ERK signaling pathways and protein synthesis-dependent hippocampal synaptic plasticity ...

  8. Toll-like receptor 4 promotes macrophage foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density/β2-glycoprotein I/β2-glycoprotein I antibodies complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓蕾

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of toll-like receptor 4(TLR4)on oxidized low-density/β2-glycoprotein I/β2-glycoprotein I(ox-LDL/β2GPI/anti-β2GPI)antibodies complex induced macrophage foam cell formation.Methods The peritoneal macrophages were separated from TLR4 intact C3H/HeN mice and TLR4 defective C3H/HeJ mice.The cells were treated with ox-LDL,ox-LDL/

  9. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  10. Competitive counterion complexation allows the true host : guest binding constants from a single titration by ionic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessêgo, Márcia; Basílio, Nuno; Muñiz, M Carmen; García-Río, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Counterion competitive complexation is a background process currently ignored by using ionic hosts. Consequently, guest binding constants are strongly affected by the design of the titration experiments in such a way that the results are dependent on the guest concentration and on the presence of added salts, usually buffers. In the present manuscript we show that these experimental difficulties can be overcome by just considering the counterion competitive complexation. Moreover a single titration allows us to obtain not only the true binding constants but also the stoichiometry of the complex showing the formation of 1 : 1 : 1 (host : guest : counterion) complexes. The detection of high stoichiometry complexes is not restricted to a single titration experiment but also to a displacement assay where both competitive and competitive-cooperative complexation models are taken into consideration. PMID:27278457

  11. Atg6/UVRAG/Vps34-Containing Lipid Kinase Complex Is Required for Receptor Downregulation through Endolysosomal Degradation and Epithelial Polarity during Drosophila Wing Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Lőrincz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atg6 (Beclin 1 in mammals is a core component of the Vps34 PI3K (III complex, which promotes multiple vesicle trafficking pathways. Atg6 and Vps34 form two distinct PI3K (III complexes in yeast and mammalian cells, either with Atg14 or with UVRAG. The functions of these two complexes are not entirely clear, as both Atg14 and UVRAG have been suggested to regulate both endocytosis and autophagy. In this study, we performed a microscopic analysis of UVRAG, Atg14, or Atg6 loss-of-function cells in the developing Drosophila wing. Both autophagy and endocytosis are seriously impaired and defective endolysosomes accumulate upon loss of Atg6. We show that Atg6 is required for the downregulation of Notch and Wingless signaling pathways; thus it is essential for normal wing development. Moreover, the loss of Atg6 impairs cell polarity. Atg14 depletion results in autophagy defects with no effect on endocytosis or cell polarity, while the silencing of UVRAG phenocopies all but the autophagy defect of Atg6 depleted cells. Thus, our results indicate that the UVRAG-containing PI3K (III complex is required for receptor downregulation through endolysosomal degradation and for the establishment of proper cell polarity in the developing wing, while the Atg14-containing complex is involved in autophagosome formation.

  12. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist or N-acetylcysteine combined with omeprazol protect against mitochondrial complex II inhibition in a rat model of gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Petronilho, Fabricia C; Araújo, João H; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Cardoso, Mariane R; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2011-03-01

    The pathophysiology of gastritis involves an imbalance between gastric acid attack and mucosal defence. In addition, the gastric mucosal injury results in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Several studies have shown the association of mitochondrial disorders with gastrointestinal dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activity in the stomach of rats with gastritis induced by indomethacin (IDM) and treated with omeprazole (OM), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist RC-3095. Adult male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 7 days with OM, NAC, RC-3095, combination of OM plus RC-3095, OM plus NAC and water (control). The animals were then submitted to fasting for 24 hr; IDM was administered. The rats were killed 6 hr later, and the stomachs were used for evaluation of macroscopic damage and respiratory chain activity. Our results showed that complex I and IV activities were not affected by administration of IDM. On the other hand, complex II and III activities were inhibited. In addition, OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC did not reverse complex II activity inhibition. However, the complex III activity inhibition was reversed only with the combined use of OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC. Our results are in agreement with previous studies indicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal tract disease and we suggest that GRPR antagonism might be a novel therapeutic strategy in gastritis. PMID:21138529

  13. Vasoactivity of rucaparib, a PARP-1 inhibitor, is a complex process that involves myosin light chain kinase, P2 receptors, and PARP itself.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian M McCrudden

    Full Text Available Therapeutic inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, as monotherapy or to supplement the potencies of other agents, is a promising strategy in cancer treatment. We previously reported that the first PARP inhibitor to enter clinical trial, rucaparib (AG014699, induced vasodilation in vivo in xenografts, potentiating response to temozolomide. We now report that rucaparib inhibits the activity of the muscle contraction mediator myosin light chain kinase (MLCK 10-fold more potently than its commercially available inhibitor ML-9. Moreover, rucaparib produces additive relaxation above the maximal degree achievable with ML-9, suggesting that MLCK inhibition is not solely responsible for dilation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis using L-NMMA also failed to impact rucaparib's activity. Rucaparib contains the nicotinamide pharmacophore, suggesting it may inhibit other NAD+-dependent processes. NAD+ exerts P2 purinergic receptor-dependent inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. Indiscriminate blockade of the P2 purinergic receptors with suramin abrogated rucaparib-induced vasodilation in rat arterial tissue without affecting ML-9-evoked dilation, although the specific receptor subtypes responsible have not been unequivocally identified. Furthermore, dorsal window chamber and real time tumor vessel perfusion analyses in PARP-1-/- mice indicate a potential role for PARP in dilation of tumor-recruited vessels. Finally, rucaparib provoked relaxation in 70% of patient-derived tumor-associated vessels. These data provide tantalising evidence of the complexity of the mechanism underlying rucaparib-mediated vasodilation.

  14. The M/GP(5 glycoprotein complex of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus binds the sialoadhesin receptor in a sialic acid-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wander Van Breedam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is a major threat to swine health worldwide and is considered the most significant viral disease in the swine industry today. In past years, studies on the entry of the virus into its host cell have led to the identification of a number of essential virus receptors and entry mediators. However, viral counterparts for these molecules have remained elusive and this has made rational development of new generation vaccines impossible. The main objective of this study was to identify the viral counterparts for sialoadhesin, a crucial PRRSV receptor on macrophages. For this purpose, a soluble form of sialoadhesin was constructed and validated. The soluble sialoadhesin could bind PRRSV in a sialic acid-dependent manner and could neutralize PRRSV infection of macrophages, thereby confirming the role of sialoadhesin as an essential PRRSV receptor on macrophages. Although sialic acids are present on the GP(3, GP(4 and GP(5 envelope glycoproteins, only the M/GP(5 glycoprotein complex of PRRSV was identified as a ligand for sialoadhesin. The interaction was found to be dependent on the sialic acid binding capacity of sialoadhesin and on the presence of sialic acids on GP(5. These findings not only contribute to a better understanding of PRRSV biology, but the knowledge and tools generated in this study also hold the key to the development of a new generation of PRRSV vaccines.

  15. Individual phases of contextual fear conditioning differentially modulate dorsal and ventral hippocampal GluA1-3, GluN1-containing receptor complexes and subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Sunetra; Sase, Ajinkya; Sialana, Fernando J; Gröger, Marion; Bennett, Keiryn L; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-12-01

    In contextual fear conditioning (CFC), the use of pharmacological and lesion approaches has helped to understand that there are differential roles for the dorsal hippocampus (DH) and the ventral hippocampus (VH) in the acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases. Concomitant analysis of the DH and the VH in individual phases with respect to α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subtype N1 (GluN1)-containing complexes (RCC) and subunits has not been reported so far. Herein, CFC was performed in mice that were euthanized at different time points. DH and VH samples were taken for the determination of RCC and subunit levels using BN- and SDS-PAGE, respectively, with subsequent Western blotting. Evaluation of spine densities, morphology, and immunohistochemistry of GluA1 and GluA2 was performed. In the acquisition phase levels of GluA1-RCC and subunits in VH were increased. In the consolidation phase GluA1- and GluA2-RCC levels were increased in DH and VH, while both receptor subunit levels were increased in the VH only. In the retrieval phase GluA1-RCC, subunits thereof and GluA2-RCC were increased in DH and VH, whereas GluA2 subunits were increased in the VH only. GluN1-RCC levels were increased in acquisition and consolidation phase, while subunit levels in the acquisition phase were increased only in the DH. The immunohistochemical studies in the individual phases in subareas of hippocampus supported immunochemical changes of GluA1 and GluA2 RCC's. Dendritic spine densities and the prevalence of thin spines in the acquisition phase of VH and mushroom spines in the retrieval phase of the VH and DH were increased. The findings from the current study suggest different receptor and receptor complex patterns in the individual phases in CFC and in DH and VH. The results propose that different RCCs are formed in the individual phases and that VH and DH may be involved in CFC.

  16. Reduced GABA{sub A} receptor density contralateral to a potentially epileptogenic MRI abnormality in a patient with complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwert, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Stodieck, S.R.G. [Dept. of Neurology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Puskas, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Diehl, B. [Dept. of Neurology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Puskas, Z. [Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Schuierer, G. [Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Vollet, B. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Schober, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    Imaging cerebral GABA{sub A} receptor density (GRD) with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and iodine-123 iomazenil is highly accurate in lateralizing epileptogenic foci in patients with complex partial seizures of temporal origin. Limited knowledge exists on how iomazenil SPET compares with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this regard. We present a patient with complex partial seizures in whom MRI had identified an arachnoid cyst anterior to the tip of the left temporal lobe. Contralaterally to this structural abnormality, interictal electroencephalography (EEG) performed after sleep deprivation disclosed an intermittent frontotemporal dysrhythmic focus with slow and sharp waves. On iomazenil SPET images GRD was significantly reduced in the right temporal lobe and thus contralaterally to the MRI abnormality, but ipsilaterally to the pathological EEG findings. These data suggest that iomazenil SPET may significantly contribute to the presurgical evaluation of epileptic patients even when MRI identifies potentialy epileptogenic structural lesions. (orig.)

  17. Ecto-F_1-ATPase: A moonlighting protein complex and an unexpected apoA-I receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre; Vantourout; Claudia; Radojkovic; Laeticia; Lichtenstein; Véronique; Pons; Eric; Champagne; Laurent; O; Martinez

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATP synthase has been recently detected at the surface of different cell types, where it is a high affinity receptor for apoA-I, the major protein component in high density lipoproteins (HDL). Cell surface ATP synthase (namely ecto-F1-ATPase) expression is related to different biological effects, such as regulation of HDL uptake by hepatocytes, endothelial cell proliferation or antitumor activity of Vγ9/Vδ2 T lymphocytes. This paper reviews the recently discovered functions and regulations of ...

  18. A complex interaction between glycine/NMDA receptors and serotonergic/noradrenergic antidepressants in the forced swim test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Kasperek, Regina; Wróbel, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    Both clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate the antidepressant activity of the functional NMDA receptor antagonists. In this study, we assessed the effects of two glycine/NMDA receptor ligands, namely L-701,324 (antagonist) and D: -cycloserine (a partial agonist) on the action of antidepressant drugs with different pharmacological profiles in the forced swim test in mice. Swim sessions were conducted by placing mice individually in glass cylinders filled with warmed water for 6 min. The duration of behavioral immobility during the last 4 min of the test was evaluated. The locomotor activity of mice was measured with photoresistor actimeters. L-701,324 and D: -cycloserine given with reboxetine (administered in subeffective doses) did not change the behavior of animals in the forced swim test. A potentiating effect was seen when both tested glycine site ligands were given concomitantly with imipramine or fluoxetine in this test. The lesion of noradrenaline nerve terminals produced by DSP-4 neither altered the baseline activity nor influenced the antidepressant-like action of L-701,324 or D: -cycloserine. The depletion of serotonin by p-CPA did not alter baseline activity in the forced swim test. However, it completely antagonized the antidepressant-like action produced by L-701,324 and D: -cycloserine. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine, fluoxetine and reboxetine were abolished by D: -serine, a full agonist of glycine/NMDA receptors. The present study demonstrates that glycine/NMDA receptor functional antagonists enhance the antidepressant-like action of serotonin, but not noradrenaline-based antidepressants and such their activity seems to depend on serotonin rather than noradrenaline pathway.

  19. A heterocyclic compound CE-103 inhibits dopamine reuptake and modulates dopamine transporter and dopamine D1-D3 containing receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Ajinkya; Aher, Yogesh D; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Ganesan, Minu Karthika; Sase, Sunetra; Holy, Marion; Höger, Harald; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Ecker, Gerhard F; Langer, Thierry; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann; Lubec, Gert

    2016-03-01

    A series of compounds have been reported to enhance memory via the DA system and herein a heterocyclic compound was tested for working memory (WM) enhancement. 2-((benzhydrylsulfinyl)methyl)thiazole (CE-103) was synthesized in a six-step synthesis. Binding of CE-103 to the dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters and dopamine reuptake inhibition was tested as well as blood brain permeation and a screen for GPCR targets. 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups: CE-103 treated 1-10 mg/kg body weight, trained (TDI) and yoked (YDI) and vehicle treated, trained (TVI) and yoked (YVI) rats. Daily single intraperitoneal injections for a period of 10 days were administered and rats were tested in a radial arm maze (RAM). Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT) and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits were determined. CE-103 was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 14.73 μM). From day eight the compound was decreasing WM errors in the RAM significantly at both doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. In the trained CE-103-treated group levels of the complex containing the phosphorylated dopamine transporter (pDAT) as well as D1R were decreased while levels of complexes containing D2R and D3R were significantly increased. CE-103 was shown to enhance spatial WM and DA reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3 receptors is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26407764

  20. Protease-activated Receptor-4 Signaling and Trafficking Is Regulated by the Clathrin Adaptor Protein Complex-2 Independent of β-Arrestins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas H; Coronel, Luisa J; Li, Julia G; Dores, Michael R; Nieman, Marvin T; Trejo, JoAnn

    2016-08-26

    Protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin and is proteolytically activated, similar to the prototypical PAR1. Due to the irreversible activation of PAR1, receptor trafficking is intimately linked to signal regulation. However, unlike PAR1, the mechanisms that control PAR4 trafficking are not known. Here, we sought to define the mechanisms that control PAR4 trafficking and signaling. In HeLa cells depleted of clathrin by siRNA, activated PAR4 failed to internalize. Consistent with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, expression of a dynamin dominant-negative K44A mutant also blocked activated PAR4 internalization. However, unlike most GPCRs, PAR4 internalization occurred independently of β-arrestins and the receptor's C-tail domain. Rather, we discovered a highly conserved tyrosine-based motif in the third intracellular loop of PAR4 and found that the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2) is important for internalization. Depletion of AP-2 inhibited PAR4 internalization induced by agonist. In addition, mutation of the critical residues of the tyrosine-based motif disrupted agonist-induced PAR4 internalization. Using Dami megakaryocytic cells, we confirmed that AP-2 is required for agonist-induced internalization of endogenous PAR4. Moreover, inhibition of activated PAR4 internalization enhanced ERK1/2 signaling, whereas Akt signaling was markedly diminished. These findings indicate that activated PAR4 internalization requires AP-2 and a tyrosine-based motif and occurs independent of β-arrestins, unlike most classical GPCRs. Moreover, these findings are the first to show that internalization of activated PAR4 is linked to proper ERK1/2 and Akt activation. PMID:27402844

  1. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface. PMID:23580642

  2. Crosstalk between Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF Receptor and Integrin through Direct Integrin Binding to FGF and Resulting Integrin-FGF-FGFR Ternary Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Mori

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs play a critical role in diverse physiological processes and the pathogenesis of diseases. Integrins are involved in FGF signaling, since integrin antagonists suppress FGF signaling. This is called integrin-FGF crosstalk, while the specifics of the crosstalk are unclear. This review highlights recent findings that FGF1 directly interacts with integrin αvβ3, and the resulting integrin-FGF-fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR ternary complex formation is essential for FGF1-induced cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. An integrin-binding defective FGF1 mutant (Arg-50 to Glu, R50E is defective in ternary complex formation and in inducing cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis, while R50E still binds to the FGF receptor and heparin. In addition, R50E suppressed tumorigenesis in vivo, while wild-type (WT FGF1 enhanced it. Thus, the direct interaction between FGF1 and integrin αvβ3 is a potential therapeutic target, and R50E is a potential therapeutic agent.

  3. The Adhesion Molecule KAL-1/anosmin-1 Regulates Neurite Branching through a SAX-7/L1CAM–EGL-15/FGFR Receptor Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Díaz-Balzac

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurite branching is essential for correct assembly of neural circuits, yet it remains a poorly understood process. For example, the neural cell adhesion molecule KAL-1/anosmin-1, which is mutated in Kallmann syndrome, regulates neurite branching through mechanisms largely unknown. Here, we show that KAL-1/anosmin-1 mediates neurite branching as an autocrine co-factor with EGL-17/FGF through a receptor complex consisting of the conserved cell adhesion molecule SAX-7/L1CAM and the fibroblast growth factor receptor EGL-15/FGFR. This protein complex, which appears conserved in humans, requires the immunoglobulin (Ig domains of SAX-7/L1CAM and the FN(III domains of KAL-1/anosmin-1 for formation in vitro as well as function in vivo. The kinase domain of the EGL-15/FGFR is required for branching, and genetic evidence suggests that ras-mediated signaling downstream of EGL-15/FGFR is necessary to effect branching. Our studies establish a molecular pathway that regulates neurite branching during development of the nervous system.

  4. PET and SPECT in medically non-refractory complex partial seizures. Temporal asymmetries of glucose consumption, Benzodiazepine receptor density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheja, P.; Kuwert, T.; Wolf, K.; Schober, O. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Kliniken und Polikliniken fuer Nuklearmedizin; Stodieck, S.R.G.; Diehl, B.; Ringelstein, E.B. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Neurologie; Schuierer, G. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    1998-12-31

    Aim: In contrast to medically refractory complex partial seizures (CPS), only limited knowledge exists on cerebral perfusion and metabolism in medically non-refractory CPS. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of temporal asymmetries in regional cerebral glucose consumption (rCMRGlc), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral benzodiazepine receptor density (BRD) in this group of patients. Methods: The study included 49 patients with medically non-refractory cryptogenic CPS (age: 36.0{+-}16.1 years). rCMRGlc was studied with F-18-FDG-PET (FDG), rCBF with Tc-99m-ECD-SPECT (ECD), and BRD with I-123-iomazenil-SPECT (IMZ). All studies were performed interictally and within four weeks in each patient. Duration of epilepsy ranged from 0.1 to 42 years (median 4.0 years). SPECT was performed with the triple-headed SPECT camera Multispect 3, PET with the PET camera ECAT EXACT 47. Using linear profiles, glucose consumption, as well as uptake of ECD and IMZ, were measured in four temporal regions of interest (ROIs), and asymmetry indices were calculated (ASY). The results were compared to 95% confidence intervals determined in control subjects. Results: Thirty-five of the 49 (71%) patients had at least one significantly elevated ASY; temporal rCMRGlc was asymmetrical in 41% of the patients, temporal BRD in 29%, and temporal rCBF in 24%. One patient had an asymmetry of all three variables, two of temporal rCMRGlc and BRD, three of temporal rCMRGlc and rCBF, and another four of rCBF and BRD. Fourteen patients had an isolated temporal asymmetry in rCMRGlc, seven in BRD, and four in rCBF. A discrepancy in lateralization between the three modalities was not observed. Conclusion: The majority of patients with medically non-refractory CPS have focal abnormalities of blood flow and metabolism in their temporal lobe. In this group of patients, FDG-PET demonstrates abnormalities with the highest frequency of the three modalities studied, followed by

  5. Aspartate-Based CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor Binding of Cross-Bridged Tetraazamacrocyclic Copper(II) and Zinc(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maples, Randall D; Cain, Amy N; Burke, Benjamin P; Silversides, Jon D; Mewis, Ryan E; D'huys, Thomas; Schols, Dominique; Linder, Douglas P; Archibald, Stephen J; Hubin, Timothy J

    2016-08-26

    The CXCR4 chemokine receptor is implicated in a number of diseases including HIV infection and cancer development and metastasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that configurationally restricted bis-tetraazamacrocyclic metal complexes are high-affinity CXCR4 antagonists. Here, we present the synthesis of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) acetate complexes of six cross-bridged tetraazamacrocycles to mimic their coordination interaction with the aspartate side chains known to bind them to CXCR4. X-ray crystal structures for three new Cu(2+) acetate complexes and two new Zn(2+) acetate complexes demonstrate metal-ion-dependent differences in the mode of binding the acetate ligand concomitantly with the requisite cis-V-configured cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyle. Concurrent density functional theory molecular modelling studies produced an energetic rationale for the unexpected [Zn(OAc)(H2 O)](+) coordination motif present in all of the Zn(2+) cross-bridged tetraazamacrocycle crystal structures, which differs from the chelating acetate [Zn(OAc)](+) structures of known unbridged and side-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic Zn(2+) -containing CXCR4 antagonists. PMID:27458983

  6. Free IL-15 Is More Abundant Than IL-15 Complexed With Soluble IL-15 Receptor-α in Murine Serum: Implications for the Mechanism of IL-15 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barbara G; Quinn, LeBris S

    2016-03-01

    IL-15 is a cytokine that is part of the innate immune system, as well as a proposed myokine released from skeletal muscle during physical exercise that mediates many of the positive physiological effects of exercise. Many of the immune functions of IL-15 are mediated by juxtacrine signaling via externalized IL-15 bound to membrane-associated IL-15 receptor-α (IL-15Rα). Serum and plasma samples also contain measurable concentrations of IL-15, believed to arise from proteolytic cleavage of membrane-associated IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes to generate soluble IL-15/IL-15Rα species. Here, we validate commercial assays that can distinguish the free form of IL-15 and IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes. These assays showed that most (86%) IL-15 in mouse serum resides in the free state, with a minor proportion (14%) residing in complex with IL-15Rα. Given the much shorter half-life of free IL-15 compared with IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes, these findings cast doubt on the currently accepted model for IL-15 secretion from cleavage of membrane-bound IL-15/IL-15Rα and suggest that IL-15 is released as a free molecule by an unknown mechanism. PMID:26812159

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma recruits the positive transcription elongation factor b complex to activate transcription and promote adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iankova, Irena; Petersen, Rasmus K; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien;

    2006-01-01

    in adipogenesis. In this study we show that the expression of the cdk9 p55 isoform is highly regulated during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at RNA and protein levels. Furthermore, cdk9, as well as cyclin T1 and cyclin T2, shows differences in nuclear localization at distinct stages of adipogenesis...... with and phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), which is the master regulator of this process, on the promoter of PPARgamma target genes. PPARgamma-cdk9 interaction results in increased transcriptional activity of PPARgamma and therefore increased adipogenesis....

  8. Ligation of the functional domain of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) is relevant for complex formation in T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodinger, W M; Larcher, C; Schwendinger, M; Dierich, M P

    1996-04-01

    We investigated the potential of CD21, the complement receptor type 2, to form receptor complexes with other membrane molecules on T cell lines. CD21 from T cell lines transformed with human T cell leukemia virus type I (MT2, HUT-102, C5.MJ, Mondi, and C91.PL) and T cell lines that were not virus transformed was analyzed by coprecipitation following cell lysis with digitonin. mAbs binding to functional and nonfunctional epitopes of CD21 and a polyclonal antiserum against its intracellular portion precipitated CD21, which was indistinguishable from CD21 on B cell lines. In contrast to B cells, where CD21 is complexed with CD19 and CD81 (target of anti-proliferative Ab 1) or, alternatively, with CD35 (CR1), no surface molecules could be coprecipitated with three of four mAbs from these T cell lines. Therefore, we assume that CD21 is not part of a preformed complex in T cell lines. OKB7, the only mAb directed against the functional C3d binding site, coprecipitated two proteins of 105 and 55 Mr with CD21 from MT2 and Mondi cells and from the T cell lines Jurkat E6-1 and SupT1. These bands were also recovered with CD21 precipitated from MT2 cells with C3d bound to Sepharose via the internal thioester, but were absent in CD21-expressing B cell lines. As C3d and OKB7 are functional ligands for B cells, we propose that upon ligation on T cells, CD21 associates with molecules of 105/55 Mr in the plasma membrane. Whether this is the first event of a signal delivered to the T cell is under current investigation. PMID:8786322

  9. IL-33 enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production from mouse macrophages by regulating lipopolysaccharide receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinassous, Quentin; Garcia-de-Paco, Elvira; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Synguelakis, Monique; von Aulock, Sonja; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Kanellopoulos, Jean

    2009-07-15

    Bacterial LPS triggers monocytes and macrophages to produce several inflammatory cytokines and mediators. However, once exposed to LPS, they become hyporesponsive to a subsequent endotoxin challenge. This phenomenon is defined as LPS desensitization or tolerance. Previous studies have identified some components of the biochemical pathways involved in negative modulation of LPS responses. In particular, it has been shown that the IL-1R-related protein ST2 could be implicated in LPS tolerance. The natural ligand of ST2 was recently identified as IL-33, a new member of the IL-1 family. In this study, we investigated whether IL-33 triggering of ST2 was able to induce LPS desensitization of mouse macrophages. We found that IL-33 actually enhances the LPS response of macrophages and does not induce LPS desensitization. We demonstrate that this IL-33 enhancing effect of LPS response is mediated by the ST2 receptor because it is not found in ST2 knockout mice. The biochemical consequences of IL-33 pretreatment of mouse macrophages were investigated. Our results show that IL-33 increases the expression of the LPS receptor components MD2 (myeloid differentiation protein 2) and TLR-4, the soluble form of CD14 and the MyD88 adaptor molecule. In addition, IL-33 pretreatment of macrophages enhances the cytokine response to TLR-2 but not to TLR-3 ligands. Thus, IL-33 treatment preferentially affects the MyD88-dependent pathway activated by the TLR. PMID:19553541

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of sonic hedgehog-receptor and inhibitor complexes and their applications for potential anticancer agent discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swan Hwang

    Full Text Available The sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is necessary for a variety of development and differentiation during embryogenesis as well as maintenance and renascence of diverse adult tissues. However, an abnormal activation of the signaling pathway is related to various cancers. In this pathway, the Shh signaling transduction is facilitated by binding of Shh to its receptor protein, Ptch. In this study, we modeled the 3D structure of functionally important key loop peptides of Ptch based on homologous proteins. Using this loop model, the molecular interactions between the structural components present in the pseudo-active site of Shh and key residues of Ptch was investigated in atomic level through molecular dynamics (MD simulations. For the purpose of developing inhibitor candidates of the Shh signaling pathway, the Shh pseudo-active site of this interface region was selected as a target to block the direct binding between Shh and Ptch. Two different structure-based pharmacophore models were generated considering the key loop of Ptch and known inhibitor-induced conformational changes of the Shh through MD simulations. Finally two hit compounds were retrieved through a series of virtual screening combined with molecular docking simulations and we propose two hit compounds as potential inhibitory lead candidates to block the Shh signaling pathway based on their strong interactions to receptor or inhibitor induced conformations of the Shh.

  11. Calixarene receptors in the selective separation of alachlor. Characterization of the separated complexes; Receptores calixarenicos en la separacion selectiva de alaclor. Caracterizacion de los complejos separados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, M.C

    2004-07-01

    while 165 h were necessary with H{sub n}bL{sup n} in dilute as concentrate solutions, solvents as chloroform and acetonitrile did not interfere in the formation of the species. At the same time and based on the structure of the reactants and information from the scientific literature related to this particular topic, using the M M3, CONFLEX and MOPAC/PM5/COSMO procedures, we calculated the optimized geometry which rendered the most stable molecular structures of reactants and products, this means those with the lowest minimum energies, the lowest energies of the most stable conformers and the heat of formation of the most stable conformational structures of the calixarene-substrate species. The latter were those formed by hydrogen bonding and {pi}-{pi} interactions. Species formed with H{sub n}bL{sup n} stabilized by hydrogen bonding through CH{sub 2}-Cl interaction of alachlor with OH groups of the calixarenes. Concerning the phosphinoylated calixarenes, the P=O groups immobilize the alachlor by hydrogen bonding with the benzyl of the acetanilide. However, the species formed with alachlor and parents or functionalized calixarenes demanded a second interaction between calixarene phenyl-{pi}-{pi}-benzyl-alachlor to be stabilised. Heat of formation of reactants and products allowed to calculate the heat o reaction associated to the formation of the hosts...guest species, these results were surprising in line with the experimental results. Based on the solution and computational results we synthesized and isolated the calixarene---alachlor complexes in sizeable amounts. The latter were characterized by spectroscopic techniques like IR, UV-Vis, luminescence and elemental analysis. The results from the solution and solid studies of the reagents and products as molar absorption coefficients, the features of the luminescence and IR spectra, luminescence lifetimes and minimum formulae of the isolated complexes are in good agreement with the parameters and tendencies of the

  12. Calixarene receptors in the selective separation of alachlor. Characterization of the separated complexes; Receptores calixarenicos en la separacion selectiva de alaclor. Caracterizacion de los complejos separados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, M.C

    2004-07-01

    while 165 h were necessary with H{sub n}bL{sup n} in dilute as concentrate solutions, solvents as chloroform and acetonitrile did not interfere in the formation of the species. At the same time and based on the structure of the reactants and information from the scientific literature related to this particular topic, using the M M3, CONFLEX and MOPAC/PM5/COSMO procedures, we calculated the optimized geometry which rendered the most stable molecular structures of reactants and products, this means those with the lowest minimum energies, the lowest energies of the most stable conformers and the heat of formation of the most stable conformational structures of the calixarene-substrate species. The latter were those formed by hydrogen bonding and {pi}-{pi} interactions. Species formed with H{sub n}bL{sup n} stabilized by hydrogen bonding through CH{sub 2}-Cl interaction of alachlor with OH groups of the calixarenes. Concerning the phosphinoylated calixarenes, the P=O groups immobilize the alachlor by hydrogen bonding with the benzyl of the acetanilide. However, the species formed with alachlor and parents or functionalized calixarenes demanded a second interaction between calixarene phenyl-{pi}-{pi}-benzyl-alachlor to be stabilised. Heat of formation of reactants and products allowed to calculate the heat o reaction associated to the formation of the hosts...guest species, these results were surprising in line with the experimental results. Based on the solution and computational results we synthesized and isolated the calixarene---alachlor complexes in sizeable amounts. The latter were characterized by spectroscopic techniques like IR, UV-Vis, luminescence and elemental analysis. The results from the solution and solid studies of the reagents and products as molar absorption coefficients, the features of the luminescence and IR spectra, luminescence lifetimes and minimum formulae of the isolated complexes are in good agreement with the parameters and tendencies of the

  13. TGF-α/HA complex promotes tympanic membrane keratinocyte migration and proliferation via ErbB1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei Teh, Bing, E-mail: bing.teh@earscience.org.au [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head, Neck and Skull Base Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Redmond, Sharon L. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Shen, Yi [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck, Ningbo Lihuili Hospital (Ningbo Medical Centre), Ningbo, Zhejiang (China); Atlas, Marcus D. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head, Neck and Skull Base Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Marano, Robert J.; Dilley, Rodney J. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia)

    2013-04-01

    Tympanic membrane perforations are common and represent a management challenge to clinicians. Current treatments for chronic perforations involve a graft surgery and require general anaesthesia, including associated costs and morbidities. Bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors, cytokines) play an important role in promoting TM wound healing following perforation and the use of growth factors as a topical treatment for tympanic membrane perforations has been suggested as an alternative to surgery. However, the choice of bioactive molecules best suited to promote wound healing has yet to be identified. We investigated the effects of hyaluronic acid, vitronectin, TGF-α, IL-24 and their combinations on migration, proliferation and adhesion of cultured human tympanic membrane-derived keratinocytes (hTM), in addition to their possible mechanisms of action. We found that TGF-α, TGF-α/HA and TGF-α/IL-24 promoted wound healing by significantly increasing both migration and proliferation. TGF-α and/or HA treated cells showed comparable cell–cell adhesion whilst maintaining an epithelial cell phenotype. With the use of receptor binding inhibitors for ErbB1 (AG1478) and CD44 (BRIC235), we revealed that the activation of ErbB1 is required for TGF-α/HA-mediated migration and proliferation. These results suggest factors that may be incorporated into a tissue-engineered membrane or directly as topical treatment for tympanic membrane perforations and hence reduce the need for a surgery. - Highlights: ► TGF-α, TGF-α/HA and TGF-α/IL-24 improved hTM keratinocyte migration and proliferation. ► TGF-α and/or HA maintained epithelial cell phenotype. ► TGF-α/HA-mediated migration and proliferation requires activation of ErbB1 receptor.

  14. Regulation of protease-activated receptor 1 signaling by the adaptor protein complex 2 and R4 subfamily of regulator of G protein signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Buxin; Siderovski, David P; Neubig, Richard R; Lawson, Mark A; Trejo, Joann

    2014-01-17

    The G protein-coupled protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is irreversibly proteolytically activated by thrombin. Hence, the precise regulation of PAR1 signaling is important for proper cellular responses. In addition to desensitization, internalization and lysosomal sorting of activated PAR1 are critical for the termination of signaling. Unlike most G protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 internalization is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2) and epsin-1, rather than β-arrestins. However, the function of AP-2 and epsin-1 in the regulation of PAR1 signaling is not known. Here, we report that AP-2, and not epsin-1, regulates activated PAR1-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis via two different mechanisms that involve, in part, a subset of R4 subfamily of "regulator of G protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. A significantly greater increase in activated PAR1 signaling was observed in cells depleted of AP-2 using siRNA or in cells expressing a PAR1 (420)AKKAA(424) mutant with defective AP-2 binding. This effect was attributed to AP-2 modulation of PAR1 surface expression and efficiency of G protein coupling. We further found that ectopic expression of R4 subfamily members RGS2, RGS3, RGS4, and RGS5 reduced activated PAR1 wild-type signaling, whereas signaling by the PAR1 AKKAA mutant was minimally affected. Intriguingly, siRNA-mediated depletion analysis revealed a function for RGS5 in the regulation of signaling by the PAR1 wild type but not the AKKAA mutant. Moreover, activation of the PAR1 wild type, and not the AKKAA mutant, induced Gαq association with RGS3 via an AP-2-dependent mechanism. Thus, AP-2 regulates activated PAR1 signaling by altering receptor surface expression and through recruitment of RGS proteins. PMID:24297163

  15. FLP-4 neuropeptide and its receptor in a neuronal circuit regulate preference choice through functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yonglin; Zhi, Lingtong; Guan, Xiangmin; Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Preference choice on food is an important response strategy for animals living in the environment. Using assay system of preference choice on bacterial foods, OP50 and PA14, we identified the involvement of ADL sensory neurons in the control of preference choice in Caenorhabditis elegans. Both genetically silencing and ChR2-mediated activation of ADL sensory neurons significantly affected preference choice. ADL regulated preference choice by inhibiting function of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)/SRH-220. ADL sensory neurons might regulate preference choice through peptidergic signals of FLP-4 and NLP-10, and function of FLP-4 or NLP-10 in regulating preference choice was regulated by SRH-220. FLP-4 released from ADL sensory neurons further regulated preference choice through its receptor of NPR-4 in AIB interneurons. In AIB interneurons, NPR-4 was involved in the control of preference choice by activating the functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex consisting of SET-2, ASH-2, and WDR-5, implying the crucial role of molecular machinery of trimethylation of histone H3K4 in the preference choice control. The identified novel neuronal circuit and the underlying molecular mechanisms will strengthen our understanding neuronal basis of preference choice in animals. PMID:26887501

  16. The potent opioid agonist, (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl binds pseudoirreversibly to the opioid receptor complex in vitro and in vivo: Evidence for a novel mechanism of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, L.; Xu, Heng; Bykov, V.; Rothman, R.B.; Kim, Chongho; Newman, A.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. (NIDDK, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Greig, N. (NIA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that pretreatment of rat brain membranes with (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl ((+)-cis-MF), followed by extensive washing of the membranes, produces a wash-resistant decreasing in the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5})enkephalin to the d binding site of the opioid receptor complex ({delta}{sub cx} binding site). Intravenous administration of (+)-cis-MF (50 {mu}g/kg) to rats produced a pronounced catalepsy and also produced a wash-resistant masking of {delta}{sub cx} and {mu} binding sites in membranes prepared 120 min post-injection. Administration of 1 mg/kg i.v. of the opioid antagonist, 6-desoxy-6{beta}-fluoronaltrexone (cycloFOXY), 100 min after the injection of (+)-cis-MF (20 min prior to the preparation of membranes) completely reversed the catatonia and restored masked {delta}{sub cx} binding sites to control levels. This was not observed with (+)-cycloFOXY. The implications of these and other findings for the mechanism of action of (+)-cis-MF and models of the opioid receptors are discussed.

  17. Crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of parathyroid hormone-related protein in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody Fab fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, Thomas J.; Parker, Michael W.; (SVIMR-A); (Chugai); (Melbourne)

    2009-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays an important role in regulating embryonic skeletal development and is abnormally regulated in the pathogenesis of skeletal complications observed with many cancers and osteoporosis. It exerts its action through binding to a G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane cell-surface receptor (GPCR). Structurally, GPCRs are very difficult to study by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment which recognizes the same region of PTHrP as its receptor, PTH1R, was used to aid in the crystallization of PTHrP. The resultant protein complex was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.6, b = 96.3, c = 88.5 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure will shed light on the nature of the key residues of PTHrP that interact with the antibody and will provide insights into how the antibody is able to discriminate between PTHrP and the related molecule parathyroid homone.

  18. An appetitive experience after fear memory destabilization attenuates fear retention: involvement GluN2B-NMDA receptors in the Basolateral Amygdala Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer Monti, Roque I; Giachero, Marcelo; Alfei, Joaquín M; Bueno, Adrián M; Cuadra, Gabriel; Molina, Victor A

    2016-09-01

    It is known that a consolidated memory can return to a labile state and become transiently malleable following reactivation. This instability is followed by a restabilization phase termed reconsolidation. In this work, we explored whether an unrelated appetitive experience (voluntary consumption of diluted sucrose) can affect a contextual fear memory in rats during the reactivation-induced destabilization phase. Our findings show that exposure to an appetitive experience following reactivation can diminish fear retention. This effect persisted after 1 wk. Importantly, it was achieved only under conditions that induced fear memory destabilization. This result could not be explained as a potentiated extinction, because sucrose was unable to promote extinction. Since GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) have been implicated in triggering fear memory destabilization, we decided to block pharmacologically these receptors to explore the neurobiological bases of the observed effect. Intra-BLA infusion with ifenprodil, a GluN2B-NMDA antagonist, prevented the fear reduction caused by the appetitive experience. In sum, these results suggest that the expression of a fear memory can be dampened by an unrelated appetitive experience, as long as memory destabilization is achieved during reactivation. Possible mechanisms behind this effect and its clinical implications are discussed.

  19. Conformational coupling between receptor and kinase binding sites through a conserved salt bridge in a signaling complex scaffold protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi R Ortega

    Full Text Available Bacterial chemotaxis is one of the best studied signal transduction pathways. CheW is a scaffold protein that mediates the association of the chemoreceptors and the CheA kinase in a ternary signaling complex. The effects of replacing conserved Arg62 of CheW with other residues suggested that the scaffold protein plays a more complex role than simply binding its partner proteins. Although R62A CheW had essentially the same affinity for chemoreceptors and CheA, cells expressing the mutant protein are impaired in chemotaxis. Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations (MD, NMR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD, we addressed the role of Arg62. Here we show that Arg62 forms a salt bridge with another highly conserved residue, Glu38. Although this interaction is unimportant for overall protein stability, it is essential to maintain the correct alignment of the chemoreceptor and kinase binding sites of CheW. Computational and experimental data suggest that the role of the salt bridge in maintaining the alignment of the two partner binding sites is fundamental to the function of the signaling complex but not to its assembly. We conclude that a key feature of CheW is to maintain the specific geometry between the two interaction sites required for its function as a scaffold.

  20. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC.

  1. Role of CD4 molecule in the induction of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2 receptor in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-specific T helper clones. T cell receptor/CD3 complex transmits CD4-dependent and CD4-independent signals.

    OpenAIRE

    Oyaizu, N; Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S.

    1992-01-01

    The CD4 molecule plays an essential role in antigen-induced activation of T helper (Th) cells, but its contribution to signal transduction events resulting in physiologic T cell function is ill defined. By utilizing anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize distinct epitopes of CD4, we have investigated the role of CD4 molecule in antigen-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) alpha chain expression in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-spe...

  2. Systemic administration of the adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 induces sedation at doses that suppress lever pressing and food intake

    OpenAIRE

    Mingote, Susana; Pereira, Mariana; Farrar, Andrew M.; McLaughlin, Peter J.; Salamone, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors are involved in the regulation of several behavioral functions. Adenosine A2A antagonists exert antiparkinsonian effects in animal models, and adenosine A2A agonists suppress locomotion and impair various aspects of motor control. The present experiments were conducted to study the effects of low doses of the adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 on lever pressing, specific parameters of food intake, and sedation. In the first experiment, the effects of CGS 21680 on fixed ra...

  3. Plasticity in the contribution of T cell receptor variable region residues to binding of peptide-HLA-A2 complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheena N.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Blevins, Sydney J.; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang; Baker, Brian M.; Kranz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for MHC-restriction by T cell receptors (TCRs) holds that there are several evolutionary-conserved residues in TCR variable regions that contact MHC. While this ‘germline-codon’ hypothesis is supported by various lines of evidence, it has been difficult to test. The difficulty stems in part from the fact that TCRs exhibit low affinities for pep/MHC, thus limiting the range of binding energies that can be assigned to these key interactions using mutational analyses. To measure the magnitude of binding energies involved, here we used high-affinity TCRs engineered by mutagenesis of CDR3. The TCRs included a high-affinity, MART-1/HLA-A2-specific single-chain TCR and two other high-affinity TCRs that all contain the same Vα (HLA-A2), with different peptides and Vβ regions. Mutational analysis of residues in CDR1 and CDR2 of the three Vα2 regions showed the importance of the key ‘germline codon” residue Y51. However, two other proposed key residues showed significant differences among the TCRs in their relative contributions to binding. Using single-position, yeast-display libraries in two of the key residues, MART-1/HLA-A2 selections also revealed strong preferences for wild-type ‘germline codon’ residues, but several alternative residues could also accommodate binding and hence, MHC-restriction. Thus, although a single residue (Y51) could account for a proportion of the energy associated with positive selection (i.e. MHC-restriction), there is significant plasticity in requirements for particular side-chains in CDR1 and CDR2 and in their relative binding contributions among different TCRs. PMID:23954306

  4. A Molecular Dynamics Approach to Ligand-Receptor Interaction in the Aspirin-Human Serum Albumin Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ariel Alvarez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a study of the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, C9H8O4 by molecular dynamics simulations (MD. Starting from an experimentally resolved structure of the complex, we performed the extraction of the ligand by means of the application of an external force. After stabilization of the system, we quantified the force used to remove the ASA from its specific site of binding to HSA and calculated the mechanical nonequilibrium external work done during this process. We obtain a reasonable value for the upper boundary of the Gibbs free energy difference (an equilibrium thermodynamic potential between the complexed and noncomplexed states. To achieve this goal, we used the finite sampling estimator of the average work, calculated from the Jarzynski Equality. To evaluate the effect of the solvent, we calculated the so-called “viscous work,” that is, the work done to move the aspirin in the same trajectory through the solvent in absence of the protein, so as to assess the relevance of its contribution to the total work. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data for the albumin affinity constant for aspirin, obtained through quenching fluorescence methods.

  5. The polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy inhibits the APC/C(Cdh1) ubiquitin ligase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Laura C; Salomons, Florian A; Maric, Dragan; Liu, Yuhong; Merry, Diane; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Dantuma, Nico P

    2016-06-17

    Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an X-linked neuromuscular disease that is fully manifest only in males. It has been suggested that proteins with expanded polyglutamine tracts impair ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis due to their propensity to aggregate, but recent studies indicate that the overall activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is preserved in SBMA models. Here we report that AR selectively interferes with the function of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which, together with its substrate adaptor Cdh1, is critical for cell cycle arrest and neuronal architecture. We show that both wild-type and mutant AR physically interact with the APC/C(Cdh1) complex in a ligand-dependent fashion without being targeted for proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of APC/C(Cdh1) by mutant but not wild-type AR in PC12 cells results in enhanced neurite outgrowth which is typically followed by rapid neurite retraction and mitotic entry. Our data indicate a role of AR in neuronal differentiation through regulation of APC/C(Cdh1) and suggest abnormal cell cycle reactivation as a pathogenic mechanism in SBMA.

  6. Urokinase plasminogen receptor and the fibrinolytic complex play a role in nerve repair after nerve crush in mice, and in human neuropathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rivellini

    Full Text Available Remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM is a critical step in peripheral nerve regeneration. In fact, in human neuropathies, endoneurial ECM enriched in fibrin and vitronectin associates with poor regeneration and worse clinical prognosis. Accordingly in animal models, modification of the fibrinolytic complex activity has profound effects on nerve regeneration: high fibrinolytic activity and low levels of fibrin correlate with better nerve regeneration. The urokinase plasminogen receptor (uPAR is a major component of the fibrinolytic complex, and binding to urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA promotes fibrinolysis and cell movement. uPAR is expressed in peripheral nerves, however, little is known on its potential function on nerve development and regeneration. Thus, we investigated uPAR null mice and observed that uPAR is dispensable for nerve development, whereas, loss of uPAR affects nerve regeneration. uPAR null mice showed reduced nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. This was a consequence of reduced fibrinolytic activity and increased deposition of endoneurial fibrin and vitronectin. Exogenous fibrinolysis in uPAR null mice rescued nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. Finally, we measured the fibrinolytic activity in sural nerve biopsies from patients with peripheral neuropathies. We showed that neuropathies with defective regeneration had reduced fibrinolytic activity. On the contrary, neuropathies with signs of active regeneration displayed higher fibrinolytic activity. Overall, our results suggest that enforced fibrinolysis may facilitate regeneration and outcome of peripheral neuropathies.

  7. Saponins do not affect the ecdysteroid receptor complex but cause membrane permeation in insect culture cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geyter, Ellen; Swevers, Luc; Soin, Thomas; Geelen, Danny; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-01-01

    This project studied the effects of four saponins with a triterpenoid (Quillajasaponaria saponin and aescin) or steroid structure (digitonin and diosgenin which is the deglycosylated form of dioscin) on insect cells, namely Schneider S2 cells of Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera). A series of different experiments were performed to investigate potential mechanisms of action by saponins with regard to ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) responsiveness, cell viability, cell membrane permeation, and induction of apoptosis with DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 like activity. Major results were that (1) exposure of S2 cells containing an EcR-based reporter construct to a concentration series of each saponin scored no EcR activation, while (2) a loss of ecdysteroid signaling was observed with median inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)'s) of 3-50 μM, and in parallel (3) a concentration-dependent change in loss of cell numbers in an cell viability assay with median effective concentrations (EC(50)'s) of 8-699 μM. In continuation, it was of interest that (4) a trypan blue assay with Q. saponaria saponin confirmed the cell membrane permeation effect leading to cell toxicity with a median lethal concentration (LC(50)) value of 44 μM, and interestingly this effect was very rapid. Another three interesting observations were that (5) exposure to 20E at 500 nM as used in the EcR-based report assay induced caspase-3 like activities which may help to explain the discrepancies between loss of EcR-responsiveness and cell viability, (6) low concentrations of saponins induced DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 like activities, confirming their potential to induce apoptosis, and (7) the saponin effects were counteracted with addition of cholesterol to the culture medium. In general the data obtained provide evidence that the anti-ecdysteroid action by saponins is not based on a true antagonistic interaction with EcR signaling, but can be explained by a cytotoxic action due to permeation of the

  8. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  9. N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors Contribute to Complex Spike Signaling in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells: An In vivo Study in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Lan, Yan; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are post-synaptically expressed at climbing fiber-Purkinje cell (CF-PC) synapses in cerebellar cortex in adult mice and contributed to CF-PC synaptic transmission under in vitro conditions. In this study, we investigated the role of NMDARs at CF-PC synapses during the spontaneous complex spike (CS) activity in cerebellar cortex in urethane-anesthetized mice, by in vivo whole-cell recording technique and pharmacological methods. Under current-clamp conditions, cerebellar surface application of NMDA (50 μM) induced an increase in the CS-evoked pause of simple spike (SS) firing accompanied with a decrease in the SS firing rate. Under voltage-clamp conditions, application of NMDA enhanced the waveform of CS-evoked inward currents, which expressed increases in the area under curve (AUC) and spikelet number of spontaneous CS. NMDA increased the AUC of spontaneous CS in a concentration-dependent manner. The EC50 of NMDA for increasing AUC of spontaneous CS was 33.4 μM. Moreover, NMDA significantly increased the amplitude, half-width and decay time of CS-evoked after-hyperpolarization (AHP) currents. Blockade of NMDARs with D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-APV, 250 μM) decreased the AUC, spikelet number, and amplitude of AHP currents. In addition, the NMDA-induced enhancement of CS activity could not be observed after α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors were blocked. The results indicated that NMDARs of CF-PC synapses contributed to the spontaneous CS activity by enhancing CS-evoked inward currents and AHP currents. PMID:27445699

  10. Molecular organization of the complex between the muscarinic M3 receptor and the regulator of G protein signaling, Gbeta(5)-RGS7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Simone L; Wang, Qiang; Levay, Konstantin; Buchwald, Peter; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2010-06-22

    The complex of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS), Gbeta(5)-RGS7, can inhibit signal transduction via the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R). RGS7 consists of three distinct structural entities: the DEP domain and its extension DHEX, the Ggamma-like (GGL) domain, which is permanently bound to Gbeta subunit Gbeta(5), and the RGS domain responsible for the interaction with Galpha subunits. Inhibition of the M3R by Gbeta(5)-RGS7 is independent of the RGS domain but requires binding of the DEP domain to the third intracellular loop of the receptor. Recent studies identified the dynamic intramolecular interaction between the Gbeta(5) and DEP domains, which suggested that the Gbeta(5)-RGS7 dimer could alternate between the "open" and "closed" conformations. Here, we identified point mutations that weaken DEP-Gbeta(5) binding, presumably stabilizing the open state, and tested their effects on the interaction of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 with the M3R. We found that these mutations facilitated binding of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 to the recombinant third intracellular loop of the M3R but did not enhance its ability to inhibit M3R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization. This led us to the idea that the M3R can effectively induce the Gbeta(5)-RGS7 dimer to open; such a mechanism would require a region of the receptor distinct from the third loop. Indeed, we found that the C-terminus of M3R interacts with Gbeta(5)-RGS7. Truncation of the C-terminus rendered the M3R insensitive to inhibition by wild-type Gbeta(5)-RGS7; however, the open mutant of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 was able to inhibit signaling by the truncated M3R. The GST fusion of the M3R C-tail could not bind to wild-type Gbeta(5)-RGS7 but could associate with its open mutant as well as with the separated recombinant DEP domain or Gbeta(5). Taken together, our data are consistent with the following model: interaction of the M3R with Gbeta(5)-RGS7 causes the DEP domain and Gbeta(5) to dissociate from each other and bind to the C-tail, and the DEP

  11. Uncovering the lipidic basis for the preparation of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor detergent complexes for structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Orestes; González-Freire, Carol; Ferrer, María Carla; Colón-Sáez, José O; Fernández-García, Emily; Mercado, Juan; Dávila, Alejandro; Morales, Reginald; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the lipid composition, including individual phospholipid molecular species of solubilized nAChR detergent complexes (nAChR-DCs) with those of the bulk lipids from their source, Torpedo californica (Tc) electric tissue. This lipidomic analysis revealed seventy-seven (77) phospholipid species in the Tc tissue. Analysis of affinity-purified nAChR-DCs prepared with C-12 to C-16 phospholipid analog detergents alkylphosphocholine (FC) and lysofoscholine (LFC) demonstrated that nAChR-DCs prepared with FC12, LFC14, and LFC16 contained >60 phospholipids/nAChR, which was more than twice of those prepared with FC14, FC16, and LFC12. Significantly, all the nAChR-DCs lacked ethanolamine and anionic phospholipids, contained only four cholesterol molecules, and a limited number of phospholipid molecular species per nAChR. Upon incorporation into oocytes, FC12 produce significant functionality, whereas LFC14 and LFC16 nAChR-DCs displayed an increased functionality as compared to the crude Tc membrane. All three nAChR-DCs displayed different degrees of alterations in macroscopic activation and desensitization kinetics. PMID:27641515

  12. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy

  13. Structural basis of LaDR5, a novel agonistic anti-death receptor 5 (DR5 monoclonal antibody, to inhibit DR5/TRAIL complex formation

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    Qiao Chunxia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a member of the TNF superfamily, TRAIL could induce human tumor cell apoptosis through its cognate death receptors DR4 or DR5, which can induce formation of the death inducing signaling complex (DISC and activation of the membrane proximal caspases (caspase-8 or caspase-10 and mitochondrial pathway. Some monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5 have been reported to have anti-tumor activity. Results In this study, we reported a novel mouse anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody, named as LaDR5, which could compete with TRAIL to bind DR5 and induce the apoptosis of Jurkat cells in the absence of second cross-linking in vitro. Using computer-guided molecular modeling method, the 3-D structure of LaDR5 Fv fragment was constructed. According to the crystal structure of DR5, the 3-D complex structure of DR5 and LaDR5 was modeled using molecular docking method. Based on distance geometry method and intermolecular hydrogen bonding analysis, the key functional domain in DR5 was predicted and the DR5 mutants were designed. And then, three mutants of DR5 was expressed in prokaryotic system and purified by affinity chromatograph to determine the epitope of DR5 identified by LaDR5, which was consistent with the theoretical results of computer-aided analysis. Conclusions Our results demonstrated the specific epitope located in DR5 that plays a crucial role in antibody binding and even antineoplastic bioactivity. Meanwhile, revealed structural features of DR5 may be important to design or screen novel drugs agonist DR5.

  14. Zipper-interacting protein kinase is involved in regulation of ubiquitination of the androgen receptor, thereby contributing to dynamic transcription complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felten, A; Brinckmann, D; Landsberg, G; Scheidtmann, K H

    2013-10-10

    We have recently identified apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), tumor-susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) as novel coactivators of the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanisms of coactivation remained obscure, however. Here we investigated the interplay and interdependence between these coactivators and the AR using the endogenous prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene as model for AR-target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that recruitment of AATF and ZIPK to the PSA enhancer was dependent on AR, whereas recruitment of TSG101 was dependent on AATF. Association of AR and its coactivators with the PSA enhancer or promoter occurred in cycles. Dissociation of AR-transcription complexes was due to degradation because inhibition of the proteasome system by MG132 caused accumulation of AR at enhancer/promoter elements. Moreover, inhibition of degradation strongly reduced transcription, indicating that continued and efficient transcription is based on initiation, degradation and reinitiation cycles. Interestingly, knockdown of ZIPK by siRNA had a similar effect as MG132, leading to reduced transcription but enhanced accumulation of AR at androgen-response elements. In addition, knockdown of ZIPK, as well as overexpression of a dominant-negative ZIPK mutant, diminished polyubiquitination of AR. Furthermore, ZIPK cooperated with the E3 ligase Mdm2 in AR-dependent transactivation, assembled into a single complex on chromatin and phosphorylated Mdm2 in vitro. These results suggest that ZIPK has a crucial role in regulation of ubiquitination and degradation of the AR, and hence promoter clearance and efficient transcription.

  15. Preparation and biodistribution of 99mTc-tricarbonyl complex with 4-[(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-dithioformate as a potential 5-HT1A receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study is to develop a novel 5-HT1A receptor imaging agent. 4-[(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-dithioformate (MPPDTF) was labeled with 99mTc-tricarbonyl core via dithioformate moiety in high yield (>96% by HPLC). 99mTc(CO)3-MPPDTF is a neutral and lipophilic complex, which was confirmed by paper electrophoresis and octanol/water partition coefficient (P=27.0±1.4, n=3), respectively. In vivo biodistribution indicated that this complex had moderate brain uptake (0.53±0.10% ID/g at 5 min and 0.42±0.02% ID/g at 120 min) and good retention (about 80% of the activity was retained in the brain at 120 min post-injection). Regional brain distribution study showed that hippocampus, where the 5-HT1A receptor density is high, had the highest uptake (0.60±0.02% ID/g at 5 min p.i.) and the cerebellum, where the 5-HT1A receptor density is low, had the lowest uptake (0.10±0.02% ID/g at 5 min p.i.). After blocking with 8-OH-DPAT, the hippocampus uptake was decreased obviously while the cerebellum uptake was increased slightly. This result indicates that 99mTc(CO)3-MPPDTF complex has specific binding to 5-HT1A receptor

  16. A pair of dopamine neurons target the D1-like dopamine receptor DopR in the central complex to promote ethanol-stimulated locomotion in Drosophila.

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    Eric C Kong

    Full Text Available Dopamine is a mediator of the stimulant properties of drugs of abuse, including ethanol, in mammals and in the fruit fly Drosophila. The neural substrates for the stimulant actions of ethanol in flies are not known. We show that a subset of dopamine neurons and their targets, through the action of the D1-like dopamine receptor DopR, promote locomotor activation in response to acute ethanol exposure. A bilateral pair of dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain mediates the enhanced locomotor activity induced by ethanol exposure, and promotes locomotion when directly activated. These neurons project to the central complex ellipsoid body, a structure implicated in regulating motor behaviors. Ellipsoid body neurons are required for ethanol-induced locomotor activity and they express DopR. Elimination of DopR blunts the locomotor activating effects of ethanol, and this behavior can be restored by selective expression of DopR in the ellipsoid body. These data tie the activity of defined dopamine neurons to D1-like DopR-expressing neurons to form a neural circuit that governs acute responding to ethanol.

  17. Assembly of splicing complexes on exon 11 of the human insulin receptor gene does not correlate with splicing efficiency in-vitro

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    Caples Matt

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incorporation of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene is both developmentally and hormonally-regulated. Previously, we have shown the presence of enhancer and silencer elements that modulate the incorporation of the small 36-nucleotide exon. In this study, we investigated the role of inherent splice site strength in the alternative splicing decision and whether recognition of the splice sites is the major determinant of exon incorporation. Results We found that mutation of the flanking sub-optimal splice sites to consensus sequences caused the exon to be constitutively spliced in-vivo. These findings are consistent with the exon-definition model for splicing. In-vitro splicing of RNA templates containing exon 11 and portions of the upstream intron recapitulated the regulation seen in-vivo. Unexpectedly, we found that the splice sites are occupied and spliceosomal complex A was assembled on all templates in-vitro irrespective of splicing efficiency. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the exon-definition model explains alternative splicing of exon 11 in the IR gene in-vivo but not in-vitro. The in-vitro results suggest that the regulation occurs at a later step in spliceosome assembly on this exon.

  18. Low capacity of erythrocytes to bind with immune complexes via C3b receptor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation with pathological proteinuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erythrocytes from 51 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and 75 controls were tested for the capacity to bind aggregated human gamma-globulin labeled with radioiodine in the presence of complement. Both in patients and controls, a trimodal distribution of binding capacity was observed. Low (less than 9% of the added radioactivity), intermediate (9-17%), and high binding (more than 17%) were observed in 13, 58, and 29% in controls and in 49, 43 and 8% in lupus patients. The low binding capacity of erythrocytes persisted even after patients entered remission following steroid therapy. A genetic control of binding capacity was supported by familial surveys. Prevalence of pathological proteinuria was significantly higher in patients with low binding capacity than those with intermediate or high binding capacity (16/25 vs 7/26, P less than 0.01). These results indicate that an impaired physiological disposal of immune complexes via the erythrocyte C3b receptor in lupus patients may contribute to the development of renal involvement

  19. mGlu5 Receptor Functional Interactions and Addiction

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    Robyn eBrown

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of ‘receptor mosaics’ suggests that proteins can form complex and dynamic networks, with respect to time and protein make up, which has the potential to make significant contributions to the diversity and specificity of GPCR signalling, particularly in neuropharmacology, where a few key receptors have been implicated in multiple neurological and psychiatric disorders such as addiction. Metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors (mGlu5 have been shown to heterodimerise and form complexes with other GPCRs including adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors. mGlu5-containing complexes are found in the striatum, a region of the brain known to be critical for mediating the rewarding and incentive motivational properties of drugs of abuse. Indeed, initial studies indicate a role for mGlu5-containing complexes in rewarding and conditioned effects of drugs, as well as drug-seeking behaviour. This is consistent with the substantial influence that mGlu5 complexes appear to have on striatal function, regulating both GABAergic output of striatopallidal neurons and glutamatergic input from corticostriatal afferents. Given their discrete localization, mGlu5-containing complexes represent a novel way in which to minimize the off-target effects and therefore provide us with an exciting therapeutic avenue for drug discovery efforts. Indeed, the therapeutic targeting of receptor mosaics in a tissue specific or temporal manner (for example, a sub-population of receptors in a ‘pathological state’ has the potential to dramatically reduce detrimental side effects that may otherwise impair vital brain function.

  20. Production of bioactive soluble interleukin-15 in complex with interleukin-15 receptor alpha from a conditionally-replicating oncolytic HSV-1.

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    David C Gaston

    Full Text Available Oncolytic type-1 herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs lacking the γ134.5 neurovirulence gene are being evaluated for treatment of a variety of malignancies. oHSVs replicate within and directly kill permissive cancer cells. To augment their anti-tumor activity, oHSVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory molecules, including cytokines, to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. Interleukin-15 (IL-15 holds potential as an immunotherapeutic cytokine because it has been demonstrated to promote both natural killer (NK cell-mediated and CD8(+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The purpose of these studies was to engineer an oHSV producing bioactive IL-15. Two oHSVs were constructed encoding murine (mIL-15 alone (J100 or with the mIL-15 receptor α (mIL-15Rα, J100D to determine whether co-expression of these proteins is required for production of bioactive mIL-15 from oHSV. The following were demonstrated: i both oHSVs retain replication competence and cytotoxicity in permissive tumor cell lines. ii Enhanced production of mIL-15 was detected in cell lysates of neuro-2a cells following J100D infection as compared to J100 infection, suggesting that mIL-15Rα improved mIL-15 production. iii Soluble mIL-15 in complex with mIL-15Rα was detected in supernates from J100D-infected, but not J100-infected, neuro-2a, GL261, and CT-2A cells. These cell lines vary in permissiveness to oHSV replication and cytotoxicity, demonstrating soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex production from J100D was independent of direct oHSV effects. iv The soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex produced by J100D was bioactive, stimulating NK cells to proliferate and reduce the viability of syngeneic GL261 and CT-2A cells. v J100 and J100D were aneurovirulent inasmuch as no neuropathologic effects were documented following direct inoculation into brains of CBA/J mice at up to 1x10(7 plaque forming units. The production of mIL-15/mIL-15Rα from multiple tumor lines, as well

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis and mutagenesis predict involvement of multiple cysteines in redox regulation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel complex

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    Evgeniy V Petrotchenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evgeniy V Petrotchenko1,2,4, Naohiro Yamaguchi1,3,4, Daniel A Pasek1, Christoph H Borchers1,2, Gerhard Meissner11Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2University of Victoria, Genome BC Proteomics Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; 3Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA 4Contributed equally to the workAbstract: The tetrameric skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel complex (RyR1 contains a large number of free cysteines that are potential targets for redox-active molecules. Here, we report the mass spectrometric analysis of free thiols in RyR1 using the lipophilic, thiol-specific probe monobromobimane (MBB. In the presence of reduced glutathione, MBB labeled 14 cysteines per RyR1 subunit in tryptic peptides in five of five experiments. Forty-six additional MBB-labeled cysteines per RyR1 subunit were detected with lower frequency in tryptic peptides, bringing the total number of MBB-labeled cysteines to 60 per RyR1 subunit. A combination of fluorescence detection and mass spectrometry of RyR1, labeled in the presence of reduced and oxidized glutathione, identified two redox-sensitive cysteines (C1040 and C1303. Regulation of RyR activity by reduced and oxidized glutathione was investigated in skeletal muscle mutant RyR1s in which 18 cysteines were substituted with serine or alanine, using a [3H]ryanodine ligand binding assay. Three single-site RyR1 mutants (C1781S, C2436S, and C2606S and two multisite mutants with five and seven substituted cysteines exhibited a reduced redox response compared with wild-type RyR1. The results suggest that multiple cysteines determine the redox state and activity of RyR1.Keywords: mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, ryanodine receptor, redox modification of cysteines

  2. Preparation and characterization of 99mTc(CO)3-BPy-RGD complex as αvβ3 integrin receptor-targeted imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to develop a novel arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-containing ligand for 99mTc labeling as αvβ3 integrin receptor-targeted imaging agent. BPy-RGD conjugate was successfully synthesized by coupling of 5-carboxylate-2,2'-bipyridine and c(RGDyK) peptide through EDC/SNHS in aqueous solution and was characterized by MADLI-TOF-MS (m/z=802.72, C38H48N11O9). 99mTc(CO)3-BPy-RGD was prepared by exchange reaction between [99mTc(H2O)3(CO)3]+ and BPy-RGD. Final product was purified by HPLC and tested for octanol/water partition coefficient. Cell-binding assays of BPy-RGD and unmodified c(RGDyK) were tested in MDA-MB-435 cells (125I-echistatin as radioligand). Preliminary biodistribution of the 99mTc(I)-labeled radiotracer in orthotopic MDA-MB-435 breast tumor xenograft model was also evaluated. The BPy-RGD conjugate had good integrin-binding affinity (50% inhibitory concentration (IC50)=92.51+/-22.69nM), slightly lower than unmodified c(RGDyK) (IC50=59.07+/-11.03nM). The hydrophilic radiotracer also had receptor-mediated activity accumulation in MDA-MB-435 tumor (1.45+/-0.25 percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 1.5h postinjection (p.i.)), which is known to be integrin positive. After blocking with c(RGDyK), the tumor uptake was reduced from 0.71+/-0.01%ID/g to 0.33+/-0.18%ID/g at 4h p.i. 99mTc(I) tricarbonyl complex of cyclic RGD peptide is a promising strategy for integrin targeting. Further modification of the bipyridine-conjugated RGD peptide by using more potent RGD peptides and fine tuning of the tether group between the RGD moiety and 99mTc(CO)3+ core to improve the tumor targeting efficacy and in vivo kinetic profiles is currently in progress

  3. Ganglioside GD3 Enhances Invasiveness of Gliomas by Forming a Complex with Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor α and Yes Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Yuki; Momota, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akira; Hashimoto, Noboru; Tsuda, Yusuke; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi; Suzumura, Akio; Furukawa, Keiko; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Natsume, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    There have been a few studies on the ganglioside expression in human glioma tissues. However, the role of these gangliosides such as GD3 and GD2 has not been well understood. In this study we employed a genetically engineered mouse model of glioma to clarify the functions of GD3 in gliomas. Forced expression of platelet-derived growth factor B in cultured astrocytes derived from p53-deficient mice resulted in the expression of GD3 and GD2. GD3-positive astrocytes exhibited increased cell growth and invasion activities along with elevated phosphorylation of Akt and Yes kinase. By enzyme-mediated activation of radical sources reaction and mass spectrometry, we identified PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) as a GD3-associated molecule. GD3-positive astrocytes showed a significant amount of PDGFRα in glycolipid-enriched microdomains/rafts compared with GD3-negative cells. Src kinase family Yes was co-precipitated with PDGFRα, and its pivotal role in the increased cell invasion of GD3-positive astrocytes was demonstrated by silencing with anti-Yes siRNA. Direct association between PDGFRα and GD3 was also shown, suggesting that GD3 forms ternary complex with PDGFRα and Yes. The fact that GD3, PDGFRα, and activated Yes were colocalized in lamellipodia and the edge of tumors in cultured cells and glioma tissues, respectively, suggests that GD3 induced by platelet-derived growth factor B enhances PDGF signals in glycolipid-enriched microdomain/rafts, leading to the promotion of malignant phenotypes such as cell proliferation and invasion in gliomas. PMID:25940087

  4. From pure compounds to complex exposure: Effects of dietary cadmium and lignans on estrogen, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Hurmerinta, Teija; Nurmi, Tarja; Berglund, Marika; Rüegg, Joelle; Poutanen, Matti; Halldin, Krister; Mäkelä, Sari; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina

    2016-06-24

    Exposure to environmental endocrine active compounds correlates with altered susceptibility to disease in human populations. Chemical risk assessment is single compound based, although exposure often takes place as heterogeneous mixtures of man-made and natural substances within complex matrices like diet. Here we studied whether the effects of cadmium and enterolactone on endocrine endpoints in dietary exposure can be predicted based on pure compound effects. Ovariectomized estrogen reporter ERE-luciferase (ERE-luc) mice were maintained on diets that intrinsically contain increasing concentrations of cadmium and enterolactone precursors for three and 21 days. The activation of the ERE-luc, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-ERK1/2, and classical estrogen responses were measured. Interactions between the diets and endogenous hormone were evaluated by challenging the animals with 17β-estradiol. Compared to animals on basal purified diet, mice consuming experimental diets were exposed to significantly higher levels of cadmium and enterolactone, yet the exposure remained comparable to typical human dietary intake. Surprisingly, we could not detect effects on endpoints regulated by pure enterolactone, such as ERE-luc activation. However, cadmium accumulation in the liver was accompanied with activation of EGFR and MAPK-ERK1/2 in line with our earlier CdCl2 studies. Further, attenuation of 17β-estradiol-induced ERE-luc response in liver by experimental diets was observed. Our findings indicate that the exposure context can have substantial effects on the activity of endocrine active compounds in vivo. Thus, whenever possible, a context that mimics human exposure should be tested along with pure compounds. PMID:27108949

  5. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  6. Rhythm generation by the pre-Bötzinger Complex in medullary slice and island preparations: Effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shields Edward J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC is a central pattern generator within the ventrolateral medulla oblongata's ventral respiratory group that is important for the generation of respiratory rhythm. Activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1R depresses preBötC rhythmogenesis. Although it remains unclear whether A1R activation is important for organisms in a normal metabolic state, A1R activation is important to the response of the preBötC to metabolic stress, such as hypoxia. This study examined mechanisms linking A1R activation to depression of preBötC rhythmogenesis in medullary slice and island preparations from neonatal mice. Results Converting medullary slices to islands by cutting away much of the medullary tissue adjacent to the preBötC decreased the amplitude of action potential bursts generated by a population of neurons within the preBötC (recorded with an extracellular electrode, and integrated using a hardware integrator, without noticeably affecting burst frequency. The A1R agonist N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (NCPA reduced population burst frequency in slices by ca. 33% and in islands by ca. 30%. As in normal (drug-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF, NCPA decreased burst frequency in slices when GABAAergic or GABAAergic and glycinergic transmission were blocked, and in islands when GABAAergic transmission was antagonized. Converting slices to island preparations decreased synaptic input to inspiratory neurons. NCPA further decreased the frequency of synaptic inputs to neurons in island preparations and lowered the input resistance of inspiratory neurons, even when chemical communication between neurons and other cells was impeded. Conclusion Together these data support the suggestion that depression of preBötC activity by A1R activation involves both decreased neuronal excitability and diminished inter-neuronal communication.

  7. Thermostabilisation of the neurotensin receptor NTS1

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, Yoko; White, Jim F.; Serrano-Vega, Maria J.; Magnani, Francesca; Aloia, Amanda L.; Grisshammer, Reinhard; Tate, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been hampered for many years by their instability in detergent solution and by the number of potential conformations that receptors can adopt. Recently, the structures of the β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors and the adenosine A2a receptor were determined with antagonist bound, a receptor conformation that is thought to be more stable than the agonist-bound state. In contrast to these receptors, the neurotensin receptor NTS1 is much ...

  8. Increased orbitofrontal brain activation after administration of a selective adenosine A2A antagonist in cocaine dependent subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gerard eMoeller

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Positron Emission Tomography imaging studies provide evidence of reduced dopamine function in cocaine dependent subjects in the striatum, which is correlated with prefrontal cortical glucose metabolism, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex. However, whether enhancement of dopamine in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects would be associated with changes in prefrontal cortical brain activation is unknown. One novel class of medications that enhance dopamine function via heteromer formation with dopamine receptors in the striatum is the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. This study sought to determine the effects administration of the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SYN115 on brain function in cocaine dependent subjects. Methodology/Principle Findings: Twelve cocaine dependent subjects underwent two fMRI scans (one after a dose of placebo and one after a dose of 100 mg of SYN115 while performing a working memory task with 3 levels of difficulty (3, 5, and 7 digits. fMRI results showed that for 7-digit working memory activation there was significantly greater activation from SYN115 compared to placebo in portions of left (L lateral orbitofrontal cortex, L insula, and L superior and middle temporal pole. Conclusion/Significance: These findings are consistent with enhanced dopamine function in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors producing increased brain activation in the orbitofrontal cortex and other cortical regions. This suggests that at least some of the changes in brain activation in prefrontal cortical regions in cocaine dependent subjects may be related to altered striatal dopamine function, and that enhancement of dopamine function via adenosine A2A receptor blockade could be explored further for amelioration of neurobehavioral deficits associated with chronic cocaine use.

  9. Increased Orbitofrontal Brain Activation after Administration of a Selective Adenosine A2A Antagonist in Cocaine Dependent Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, F. Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L.; Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Ma, Liangsuo; Ferre, Sergi; Schmitz, Joy M.; Green, Charles E.; Bandak, Stephen I.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Kramer, Larry A.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Positron Emission Tomography imaging studies provide evidence of reduced dopamine function in cocaine dependent subjects in the striatum, which is correlated with prefrontal cortical glucose metabolism, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex. However, whether enhancement of dopamine in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects would be associated with changes in prefrontal cortical brain activation is unknown. One novel class of medications that enhance dopamine function via heteromer formation with dopamine receptors in the striatum is the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. This study sought to determine the effects administration of the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SYN115 on brain function in cocaine dependent subjects. Methodology/Principle Findings: Twelve cocaine dependent subjects underwent two fMRI scans (one after a dose of placebo and one after a dose of 100 mg of SYN115) while performing a working memory task with three levels of difficulty (3, 5, and 7 digits). fMRI results showed that for 7-digit working memory activation there was significantly greater activation from SYN115 compared to placebo in portions of left (L) lateral orbitofrontal cortex, L insula, and L superior and middle temporal pole. Conclusion/Significance: These findings are consistent with enhanced dopamine function in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors producing increased brain activation in the orbitofrontal cortex and other cortical regions. This suggests that at least some of the changes in brain activation in prefrontal cortical regions in cocaine dependent subjects may be related to altered striatal dopamine function, and that enhancement of dopamine function via adenosine A2A receptor blockade could be explored further for amelioration of neurobehavioral deficits associated with chronic cocaine use. PMID:22654774

  10. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaasse, E.C.; IJzerman, A.P.; Grip, W.J. de; Beukers, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein clas

  11. Expression and characterization of purinergic receptors in rat middle meningeal artery-potential role in migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Agmund Haanes

    Full Text Available The dura mater and its vasculature have for decades been central in the hypothesis of migraine and headache pathophysiology. Although recent studies have questioned the role of the vasculature as the primary cause, dural vessel physiology is still relevant in understanding the complex pathophysiology of migraine. The aim of the present study was to isolate the middle meningeal artery (MMA from rodents and characterize their purinergic receptors using a sensitive wire myograph method and RT-PCR. The data presented herein suggest that blood flow through the MMA is, at least in part, regulated by purinergic receptors. P2X1 and P2Y6 receptors are the strongest contractile receptors and, surprisingly, ADPβS caused contraction most likely via P2Y1 or P2Y13 receptors, which is not observed in other arteries. Adenosine addition, however, caused relaxation of the MMA. The adenosine relaxation could be inhibited by SCH58261 (A2A receptor antagonist and caffeine (adenosine receptor antagonist. This gives one putative molecular mechanism for the effect of caffeine, often used as an adjuvant remedy of cranial pain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR expression data for the receptors correlate well with the functional findings. Together these observations could be used as targets for future understanding of the in vivo role of purinergic receptors in the MMA.

  12. Cyclopentadienyl tricarbonyl complexes of 99mTc for the in vivo imaging of the serotonin 5-HT 1a receptor in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present interest in the 5-HT 1a receptor is due to its implicated role in several major neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression, eating disorders and anxiety. For the diagnosis of these pathophysiological processes it is important to have radioligands in hand able to specifically bind on the 5-HT 1a receptor in order to allow brain imaging. due to the optimal radiation properties of 99mTc there is a considerable interest in the development of 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for imaging serotonergic CNS receptors using single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Here we introduce two cyclopentadienyl technitium tricarbonyl conjugates of piperidine derivatives which show high accumulation of radioactivity in brain areas rich in 5-HT 1a receptors

  13. New insights into receptor regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poste, G

    1984-11-01

    This review provides a brief summary of certain recent advances in our understanding of receptor regulation, signal transduction, and the diverse pathways by which receptor-ligand complexes are internalized and delivered to specific organelles, together with recycling of receptors back to the cell surface. Emphasis is also given to the importance of methodological advances in receptor isolation, immunologic analysis of receptor structure and function, the development of new instrumentation for microchemical characterization of very small amounts of receptor material, and the increasing use of genetic engineering techniques to isolate the genes for receptors and their regulatory subunits, to transfer such genes between cells, and to study receptor function by creating structurally modified receptors via subtle changes in gene structure. PMID:6151557

  14. U1-RNP and TLR receptors in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue diseasePart I. The U1-RNP complex and its biological significance in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare autoimmune syndrome, signified by complex interactions between disease-related phenomena, including inflammation, proliferative vascular arteriopathy, thrombotic events and humoral autoimmune processes. It is still controversial whether MCTD is a distinct clinical entity among systemic connective tissue diseases, although several authors consider that it is distinct and underline characteristic, distinct clinical, serological and immunogenetic features. The putative target of autoimmunity in MCTD is U1-RNP, which is a complex of U1-RNA and small nuclear RNP. Both the U1-RNA component and the specific proteins, particularly U1-70K, engage immune cells and their receptors in a complex network of interactions that ultimately lead to autoimmunity, inflammation, and tissue injury. U1-RNA is capable of inducing manifestations consistent with TLR activation. Stimulation of innate immunity by native RNA molecules with a double-stranded secondary structure may help explain the high prevalence of autoimmunity to RNA binding proteins.

  15. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke Hansen;

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes...... in the presence of 30% autologous serum. Blocking the CR2 ligand-binding site with monoclonal antibody (mAb) FE8 resulted in significant reduction (37.9+/-11.9%) in C3-fragment deposition, whereas MAC formation was only marginally affected (12.1+/-22.2% reduction). Blocking the CR1 binding-site resulted...

  16. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke;

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing a...... subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the......) bearing CR1, however, markedly reduced both C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation. Our data suggest that C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation on B lymphocytes in vivo may involve both AP and classical pathway activation, with CR1 contributing significantly to the latter. On the other hand, the...

  17. Demonstration of a non-Tac peptide that binds interleukin 2: a potential participant in a multichain interleukin 2 receptor complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsudo, M; Kozak, R W; Goldman, C K; Waldmann, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor system plays a key role in the T-cell immune response. Although IL-2 binding was reported to be restricted to the Tac peptide, we have identified an IL-2 binding peptide that does not react with anti-human IL-2 receptor monoclonal antibodies, including anti-Tac on MLA 144, a gibbon ape T-cell line. The MLA 144 cell line expressed 6800 IL-2 binding sites per cell with a low (Kd = 14 nM) affinity for human recombinant IL-2. Using cross-linking methodology, we d...

  18. Stimuli of sensory-motor nerves terminate arterial contractile effects of endothelin-1 by CGRP and dissociation of ET-1/ET(A)-receptor complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meens, Merlijn J P M T; Compeer, Matthijs G; Hackeng, Tilman M;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a long-acting paracrine mediator, is implicated in cardiovascular diseases but clinical trials with ET-receptor antagonists were not successful in some areas. We tested whether the quasi-irreversible receptor-binding of ET-1 (i) limits reversing effects of the...... antagonists and (ii) can be selectively dissociated by an endogenous counterbalancing mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In isolated rat mesenteric resistance arteries, ET(A)-antagonists, endothelium-derived relaxing factors and synthetic vasodilators transiently reduced contractile effects of ET-1...

  19. Untangling dopamine-adenosine receptor-receptor assembly in experimental parkinsonism in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Fernández-Dueñas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a dopaminergic-related pathology in which functioning of the basal ganglia is altered. It has been postulated that a direct receptor-receptor interaction – i.e. of dopamine D2 receptor (D2R with adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR (forming D2R-A2AR oligomers – finely regulates this brain area. Accordingly, elucidating whether the pathology prompts changes to these complexes could provide valuable information for the design of new PD therapies. Here, we first resolved a long-standing question concerning whether D2R-A2AR assembly occurs in native tissue: by means of different complementary experimental approaches (i.e. immunoelectron microscopy, proximity ligation assay and TR-FRET, we unambiguously identified native D2R-A2AR oligomers in rat striatum. Subsequently, we determined that, under pathological conditions (i.e. in a rat PD model, D2R-A2AR interaction was impaired. Collectively, these results provide definitive evidence for alteration of native D2R-A2AR oligomers in experimental parkinsonism, thus conferring the rationale for appropriate oligomer-based PD treatments.

  20. Immune complex-induced inhibition of osteoclastogenesis is mediated via activating but not inhibitory Fc gamma receptors on myeloid precursor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Grevers; T.J. de Vries; V. Everts; J.S. Verbeek; W.B. van den Berg; P.L.E.M. van Lent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) in osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function. Methods Bone destruction was analysed in arthritic knee joints of several FcγR-knockout mouse strains. Unfractionated bone marrow cells were differentiated in vitro towards osteoclasts in the ab

  1. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    Nutrients, biological waste-products, toxins, pathogens, and other ligands for endocytosis are typically captured by multidomain receptors with multiligand specificity. Upon internalization, the receptor-ligand complex segregates, followed by lysosomal degradation of the ligand and recycling of t...

  2. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  3. Assembly of splicing complexes on exon 11 of the human insulin receptor gene does not correlate with splicing efficiency in-vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Caples Matt; Evans Lui-Guojing; Webster Nicholas JG; Erker Laura; Chew Shern L

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Incorporation of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene is both developmentally and hormonally-regulated. Previously, we have shown the presence of enhancer and silencer elements that modulate the incorporation of the small 36-nucleotide exon. In this study, we investigated the role of inherent splice site strength in the alternative splicing decision and whether recognition of the splice sites is the major determinant of exon incorporation. Results We found that mutation of...

  4. PDZ domain-containing 1 (PDZK1) protein regulates phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3)-specific activation of somatostatin by forming a ternary complex with PLC-β3 and somatostatin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Kwon, Ohman; Kim, Jinho; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Park, Hye Kyung; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, Kyung Lock; Choi, Jung Woong; Lim, Seyoung; Seok, Heon; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Choi, Jang Hyun; Kang, Byoung Heon; Kim, Sanguk; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2012-06-15

    Phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) is a key molecule in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signaling. Many studies have shown that the four PLC-β subtypes have different physiological functions despite their similar structures. Because the PLC-β subtypes possess different PDZ-binding motifs, they have the potential to interact with different PDZ proteins. In this study, we identified PDZ domain-containing 1 (PDZK1) as a PDZ protein that specifically interacts with PLC-β3. To elucidate the functional roles of PDZK1, we next screened for potential interacting proteins of PDZK1 and identified the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) as another protein that interacts with PDZK1. Through these interactions, PDZK1 assembles as a ternary complex with PLC-β3 and SSTRs. Interestingly, the expression of PDZK1 and PLC-β3, but not PLC-β1, markedly potentiated SST-induced PLC activation. However, disruption of the ternary complex inhibited SST-induced PLC activation, which suggests that PDZK1-mediated complex formation is required for the specific activation of PLC-β3 by SST. Consistent with this observation, the knockdown of PDZK1 or PLC-β3, but not that of PLC-β1, significantly inhibited SST-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, which further attenuated subsequent ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the formation of a complex between SSTRs, PDZK1, and PLC-β3 is essential for the specific activation of PLC-β3 and the subsequent physiologic responses by SST.

  5. IgG antibodies in food allergy influence allergen-antibody complex formation and binding to B cells: a role for complement receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroek, L.A.; Jong, R.J.; Hartog Jager, den C.F.; Monsuur, H.N.; Wouters, D.; Nauta, A.; Knippels, L.M.; Neerven, van R.J.J.; Ruiter, B.; Leusen, J.H.; Hack, C.E.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.; Knulst, A.C.; Garssen, J.; Hoffen, van E.

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-IgE complexes are more efficiently internalized and presented by B cells than allergens alone. It has been suggested that IgG Abs induced by immunotherapy inhibit these processes. Food-allergic patients have high allergen-specific IgG levels. However, the role of these Abs in complex format

  6. Serotonin receptors as cardiovascular targets

    OpenAIRE

    Villalón, Carlos; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod Ranjan

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSerotonin exerts complex effects in the cardiovascular system, including hypotension or hypertension, vasodilatation or vasoconstriction, and/or bradycardia or tachycardia; the eventual response depends primarily on the nature of the 5-HT receptors involved. In the light of current 5-HT receptor classification, the authors reanalyse the cardiovascular responses mediated by 5-HT receptors and discuss the established and potential therapeutic applications of 5-HT ligands in the trea...

  7. An adenosine A(2A) antagonist injected in the NTS reverses thermal prolongation of the LCR in decerebrate piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Luxi; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J C

    2008-12-31

    Hyperthermia prolongs the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR). Under normothermic conditions, adenosine antagonists shorten and adenosine A(2A) (Ad-A(2A)) agonists prolong the LCR. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that SCH-58261, an Ad-A(2A) receptor antagonist, would prevent thermal prolongation of the LCR when injected unilaterally within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We studied decerebrate piglets aged 4-13 days. We elicited the LCR by injecting 0.1ml of water into the larynx and recorded integrated phrenic nerve activity. The laryngeal chemoreflex was prolonged when the body temperature of each piglet was raised approximately 2.5 degrees C, and SCH-58261 reversed the thermal prolongation of the LCR when injected into the NTS (n=13), but not when injected in the nucleus ambiguus (n=9). Injections of vehicle alone into the NTS did not alter the thermal prolongation of the LCR (n=9). We conclude that activation of adenosine receptors, perhaps located on GABAergic neurons in the NTS, contributes to thermal prolongation of the LCR.

  8. Helix 8 and the i3 loop of the muscarinic M3 receptor are crucial sites for its regulation by the Gβ5-RGS7 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinsky-Semper, Darla; Tayou, Junior; Levay, Konstantin; Schuchardt, Brett J; Bhat, Vikas; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Farooq, Amjad; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2015-02-01

    The muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) is a Gq-coupled receptor and is known to interact with many intracellular regulatory proteins. One of these molecules is Gβ5-RGS7, the permanently associated heterodimer of G protein β-subunit Gβ5 and RGS7, a regulator of G protein signaling. Gβ5-RGS7 can attenuate M3R-stimulated release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores or enhance the influx of Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane. Here we show that deletion of amino acids 304-345 from the central portion of the i3 loop renders M3R insensitive to regulation by Gβ5-RGS7. In addition to the i3 loop, interaction of M3R with Gβ5-RGS7 requires helix 8. According to circular dichroism spectroscopy, the peptide corresponding to amino acids 548-567 in the C-terminus of M3R assumes an α-helical conformation. Substitution of Thr553 and Leu558 with Pro residues disrupts this α-helix and abolished binding to Gβ5-RGS7. Introduction of the double Pro substitution into full-length M3R (M3R(TP/LP)) prevents trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface. Using atropine or other antagonists as pharmacologic chaperones, we were able to increase the level of surface expression of the TP/LP mutant to levels comparable to that of wild-type M3R. However, M3R-stimulated calcium signaling is still severely compromised. These results show that the interaction of M3R with Gβ5-RGS7 requires helix 8 and the central portion of the i3 loop.

  9. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Forms a Highly Stable, EDTA-Resistant Complex with Its Principal Receptor, Integrin αvβ6: Implications for Infectiousness▿

    OpenAIRE

    DiCara, Danielle; Burman, Alison; Clark, Stuart; Berryman, Stephen; Howard, Mark J.; Hart, Ian R.; Marshall, John F; Jackson, Terry

    2007-01-01

    The initial stage of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection is virus binding to cell surface integrins via the RGD motif in the GH loop of the VP1 capsid protein. As for all ligand/integrin interactions, the initial contact between FMDV and its integrin receptors is cation dependent and hence inhibited by EDTA. We have investigated this binding process with RGD-containing peptides derived from the VP1 capsid protein of FMDV and discovered that, upon binding, some of these peptides form...

  10. Monoclonal antibodies against complement 3 neoantigens for detection of immune complexes and complement activation. Relationship between immune complex levels, state of C3, and numbers of receptors for C3b.

    OpenAIRE

    Aguado, M. T.; LAMBRIS, J. D.; Tsokos, G C; de Burger, R; Bitter-Suermann, D.; Tamerius, J D; Dixon, F J; Theofilopoulos, A N

    1985-01-01

    C3-bearing immune complexes and C3 activation products were detected by using two monoclonal antibodies, one specific for a neoantigenic determinant on C3c and the other for C3d. To quantitate immune complexes, the anti-C3c or anti-C3d antibodies were fixed to microtiter plates and reacted with test plasma. The binding of C3-bearing immune complexes in this plasma was then measured with radioisotope- or enzyme-labeled anti-human IgG. To test for C3 breakdown products, solid-phase monoclonal a...

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the periplasmic domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar and its complex with aspartate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mise, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Maruyama, Ichiro N., E-mail: ichi@oist.jp [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan)

    2014-08-27

    The periplasmic domain of the E. coli aspartate receptor Tar was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized with and without bound ligand. The crystals obtained diffracted to resolutions of 1.58 and 1.95 Å, respectively. The cell-surface receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni{sup 2+}. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by its ligands, the Escherichia coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate (Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively) were each crystallized in two different forms. Using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 2.10 and 2.40 Å, respectively. Alternatively, using sodium chloride as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 1.95 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 adopted space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, while those of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 adopted space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C2, respectively.

  12. The Anticonvulsant Activity of a Flavonoid-Rich Extract from Orange Juice Involves both NMDA and GABA-Benzodiazepine Receptor Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Citraro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The usage of dietary supplements and other natural products to treat neurological diseases has been growing over time, and accumulating evidence suggests that flavonoids possess anticonvulsant properties. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a flavonoid-rich extract from orange juice (OJe in some rodent models of epilepsy and to explore its possible mechanism of action. The genetically audiogenic seizures (AGS-susceptible DBA/2 mouse, the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced seizures in ICR-CD1 mice and the WAG/Rij rat as a genetic model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depression were used. Our results demonstrate that OJe was able to exert anticonvulsant effects on AGS-sensible DBA/2 mice and to inhibit PTZ-induced tonic seizures, increasing their latency. Conversely, it did not have anti-absence effects on WAG/Rij rats. Our experimental findings suggest that the anti-convulsant effects of OJe are likely mediated by both an inhibition of NMDA receptors at the glycine-binding site and an agonistic activity on benzodiazepine-binding site at GABAA receptors. This study provides evidences for the antiepileptic activity of OJe, and its results could be used as scientific basis for further researches aimed to develop novel complementary therapy for the treatment of epilepsy in a context of a multitarget pharmacological strategy.

  13. Microarray analysis of E9.5 reduced folate carrier (RFC1; Slc19a1 knockout embryos reveals altered expression of genes in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Linda K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reduced folate carrier (RFC1 is an integral membrane protein and facilitative anion exchanger that mediates delivery of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate into mammalian cells. Adequate maternal-fetal transport of folate is necessary for normal embryogenesis. Targeted inactivation of the murine RFC1 gene results in post-implantation embryolethality, but daily folic acid supplementation of pregnant dams prolongs survival of homozygous embryos until mid-gestation. At E10.5 RFC1-/- embryos are developmentally delayed relative to wildtype littermates, have multiple malformations, including neural tube defects, and die due to failure of chorioallantoic fusion. The mesoderm is sparse and disorganized, and there is a marked absence of erythrocytes in yolk sac blood islands. The identification of alterations in gene expression and signaling pathways involved in the observed dysmorphology following inactivation of RFC1-mediated folate transport are the focus of this investigation. Results Affymetrix microarray analysis of the relative gene expression profiles in whole E9.5 RFC1-/- vs. RFC1+/+ embryos identified 200 known genes that were differentially expressed. Major ontology groups included transcription factors (13.04%, and genes involved in transport functions (ion, lipid, carbohydrate (11.37%. Genes that code for receptors, ligands and interacting proteins in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex accounted for 9.36% of the total, followed closely by several genes involved in hematopoiesis (8.03%. The most highly significant gene network identified by Ingenuity™ Pathway analysis included 12 genes in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex. Altered expression of these genes was validated by quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that megalin protein expression disappeared from the visceral yolk sac of RFC1-/- embryos, while cubilin protein was widely misexpressed

  14. Complexity of the T cell receptor Cbeta isotypes in the Mexican axolotl: structure and diversity of the VDJCbeta3 and VDJCbeta4 chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellah, J S; Durand, C; Kerfourn, F; Charlemagne, J

    2001-02-01

    We have reported previously the presence of two T cell receptor beta-chain constant region (Cbeta) isotypes in the Mexican axolotl. Specific Dbeta and Jbeta segments were present at the Vbeta-Cbeta1 and Vbeta-Cbeta2 junctions and nine Vbeta families which associate with both isotypes were characterized. This report describes two new Cbeta isotypes, Cbeta3 and Cbeta4. About 70 % of the amino acids in Cbeta3 are identical to Cbeta1 and Cbeta2. A Dbeta3 and a single Jbeta3 were found at the Vbeta-Cbeta3 junctions. The Dbeta3 consensus core sequence (TACGTGGCTACGTGGG) differs to all the presently known Dbeta and the CDR3beta loops of the Vbeta-Cbeta3 junctions (mean: 11.1 amino acids) contain a majority of aromatic, small hydrophobic and basic residues. The CDR3beta loops of the other isotypes are shorter (mean: 8.5 amino acids), contain a majority of acidic residues and very few aromatic residues. The axolotl Cbeta4 sequence has about 46 % similarity to Cbeta1, Cbeta2 and Cbeta3. Dbeta4 is identical to Dbeta2 and six new Jbeta segments are used at the Vbeta-Cbeta4 junctions. Four new families of Vbeta segments (Vbeta10-Vbeta13) are preferentially associated to Cbeta4. A strong selective pressure must operate in most vertebrates to preserve the structural stability of the extracellular part of the Cbeta chain. The four axolotl Cbeta seem to have evolved more freely, perhaps to favor the early emergence of a large diversity of T cell receptors in an amphibian species which is not fully immunocompetent before the 5th month of development. PMID:11180104

  15. Efficient targeting of protein antigen to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 in the steady state leads to antigen presentation on major histocompatibility complex class I products and peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2002-12-16

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal alphaDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c- cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When alphaDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4-48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of alphaDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4-7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with alphaDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic alphaCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation.

  16. Efficient Targeting of Protein Antigen to the Dendritic Cell Receptor DEC-205 in the Steady State Leads to Antigen Presentation on Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Products and Peripheral CD8+ T Cell Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal αDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c− cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When αDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4–48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of αDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4–7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with αDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic αCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon γ, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation. PMID:12486105

  17. 核受体FXR的配体及复合物结构研究进展%Progress in the ligands and their complex structures of farnesoid X receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卫华; 付静; 郑明月; 刘桂霞; 唐赟

    2012-01-01

    法尼醇x受体(FXR)属于核受体超家族,与代谢综合征的形成以及葡萄糖在体内的动态平衡等过程密切相关,是研发代谢疾病和抗糖尿病药物的重要靶标.近几年,FXR的激动剂、拮抗剂以及晶体结构等方面的研究有了较快的发展.本文综述了目前报道的不同类型的FXR配体及其构效关系,以及FXR复合物晶体结构的最新进展.%Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfaraily. It is highly related to the formation of metabolic syndrome and the glucose homeostasis, and therefore represents an important drug target against metabolic diseases and diabetes. In recent years, great progress has been made in the agonists, antagonists, and crystal structures of FXR. The diverse FXR ligands and their structure-activity relationship are reviewed in this article. The advances in the crystal structures of FXR in complex with different ligands are also introduced.

  18. Stimulation of adenosine receptors in the nucleus accumbens reverses the expression of cocaine sensitization and cross-sensitization to dopamine D2 receptors in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hobson, Benjamin D.; Merritt, Kathryn E.; Bachtell, Ryan K.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptors co-localize with dopamine receptors on medium spiny nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons where they antagonize dopamine receptor activity. It remains unclear whether adenosine receptor stimulation in the NAc restores cocaine-induced enhancements in dopamine receptor sensitivity. The goal of these studies was to determine whether stimulating A1 or A2A receptors in the NAc reduces the expression of cocaine sensitization. Rats were sensitized with 7 daily treatments of cocaine (15...

  19. A Receptor-Like Kinase, Related to Cell Wall Sensor of Higher Plants, is Required for Sexual Reproduction in the Unicellular Charophycean Alga, Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Naoko; Marukawa, Yuka; Abe, Jun; Hashiba, Sayuri; Ichikawa, Machiko; Tanabe, Yoichi; Ito, Motomi; Nishii, Ichiro; Tsuchikane, Yuki; Sekimoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Here, we cloned the CpRLK1 gene, which encodes a receptor-like protein kinase expressed during sexual reproduction, from the heterothallic Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex, one of the closest unicellular alga to land plants. Mating-type plus (mt(+)) cells with knockdown of CpRLK1 showed reduced competence for sexual reproduction and formed an abnormally enlarged conjugation papilla after pairing with mt(-) cells. The knockdown cells were unable to release a naked gamete, which is indispensable for zygote formation. We suggest that the CpRLK1 protein is an ancient cell wall sensor that now functions to regulate osmotic pressure in the cell to allow proper gamete release.

  20. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis in a patient with a 7-year history of being diagnosed as schizophrenia: complexities in diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chaohua Huang,1,2,4,* Yukun Kang,1,* Bo Zhang,1 Bin Li,1 Changjian Qiu,1 Shanming Liu,1 Hongyan Ren,1,2 Yanchun Yang,1 Xiehe Liu,1 Tao Li,1–3 Wanjun Guo1,21Mental Health Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Psychiatric Laboratory, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 3Mental Health Education Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 4Mental Health Center, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR encephalitis is a form of autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies against the NR1 subunits of NMDARs. Although new-onset acute prominent psychotic syndromes in patients with NMDAR encephalitis have been well documented, there is a lack of case studies on differential diagnosis and treatment of anti-NMDAR encephalitis after a long-term diagnostic history of functional psychotic disorders. The present study reports an unusual case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. The patient had been diagnosed with schizophrenia 7 years earlier, and was currently hospitalized for acute-onset psychiatric symptoms. The diagnosis became unclear when the initial psychosis was confounded with considerations of other neurotoxicities (such as neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Finally, identification of specific immunoglobulin G NR1 autoantibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid and greater effectiveness of immunotherapy over antipsychotics alone (which has been well documented in anti-NMDAR encephalitis indicated the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in this case. Based on the available evidence, however, the relationship between the newly diagnosed anti-NMDAR encephalitis and the seemingly clear, long-term history of schizophrenia in the preceding 7

  1. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-05-05

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4/sup 0/C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37/sup 0/C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation.

  2. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 40C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 370C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation

  3. Chemokine Receptors and Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinquan Tan; Gang Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A complex process including both the innate and acquired immune responses results in allograft rejection. Some chemokine receptors and their ligands play essential roles not only for leukocyte migration into the graft but also in facilitating dendritic and T cell trafficking between lymph nodes and the transplant in the early and late stage of the allogeneic response. This review focuses on the impact of these chemoattractant proteins on transplant outcome and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for antirejection therapy based on targeting of chemokine receptors and/or their ligands. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  4. CX3 chemokine receptor 1 defciency leads to reduced dendritic complexity and delayed maturation of newborn neurons in the adult mouse hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that microglia impact the proliferation and differentiation of neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis via the fractalkine/CX3 chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1 signaling pathway. However, whether microglia can influence the maturation and dendritic growth of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampus was decreased, and the dendritic length and number of intersections in newborn neurons in the hippocampus were reduced in transgenic adult mice with CX3CR1 deficiency (CX3CR1GFP/GFP. Furthermore, after experimental seizures were induced with kainic acid in these CX3CR1-deficient mice, the expression of c-fos, a marker of neuronal activity, was reduced compared with wild-type mice. Collectively, the experimental findings indicate that the functional maturation of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice is delayed by CX3CR1 deficiency.

  5. CX3 chemokine receptor 1 deficiency leads to reduced dendritic complexity and delayed maturation of newborn neurons in the adult mouse hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiao; Jun-mei Xu; Xing-hua Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that microglia impact the proliferation and differentiation of neu-rons during hippocampal neurogenesisvia the fractalkine/CX3 chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling pathway. However, whether microglia can influence the maturation and dendritic growth of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampus was decreased, and the dendritic length and number of intersections in newborn neurons in the hippocampus were reduced in transgenic adult mice with CX3CR1 deifciency (CX3CR1GFP/GFP). Furthermore, after experimental seizures were induced with kainic acid in these CX3CR1-deifcient mice, the expression of c-fos, a marker of neuronal activity, was reduced compared with wild-type mice. Collectively, the experimental ifndings indicate that the functional maturation of newborn neu-rons during hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice is delayed by CX3CR1 deifciency.

  6. The efficacy of oral adenosine A(2A) antagonist istradefylline for the treatment of moderate to severe Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorovenci, Ruxandra Julia; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The moderate and severe stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) are marked by motor and non-motor complications that still remain difficult to control with the currently available therapy. Adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists target non-dopaminergic systems, and have emerged as promising add-on therapy in the management of PD, a little more than a decade ago. While the development of this new drug class was slower than initially expected, istradefylline was recently registered in Japan, because it provides reduction of the off-time, when given in association with levodopa. Effects on some non-motor features have also been suggested, and preliminary studies further suggest a potential neuroprotective effect. Associations of A(2A) receptor antagonists with dopaminergic agents, as well as enzyme blockers like catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitors, should provide even greater benefit in advanced PD patients, and, thus, a more individualized treatment approach would be at hand. PMID:26630457

  7. Analysis of various types of single-polypeptide-chain (sc) heterodimeric A{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R complexes and their allosteric receptor–receptor interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Toshio, E-mail: kamiya@z2.keio.jp [Department of Molecular Cell Signaling, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, 2-6 Musashidai, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8526 (Japan); Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, 2-6 Musashidai, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8526 (Japan); Cell Biology Laboratory, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Nakata, Hiroyasu [Department of Molecular Cell Signaling, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, 2-6 Musashidai, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8526 (Japan)

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Various scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R constructs, with spacers between the two receptors, were created. • Using whole cell binding assay, constructs were examined for their binding activity. • Although the apparent ratio of A{sub 2A}R to D{sub 2}R binding sites should be 1, neither was 1. • Counter agonist-independent binding cooperativity occurred in context of scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R. - Abstract: Adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor (A{sub 2A}R) heteromerizes with dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (D{sub 2}R). However, these class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) dimers are not fully formed, but depend on the equilibrium between monomer and dimer. In order to stimulate the heteromerization, we have previously shown a successful design for a fusion receptor, single-polypeptide-chain (sc) heterodimeric A{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R complex. Here, using whole cell binding assay, six more different scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R constructs were examined. Not only in scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R ‘liberated’ with longer spacers between the two receptors, which confer the same configuration as the prototype, the A{sub 2A}R-odr4TM-D{sub 2L}R, but differ in size (Forms 1–3), but also in scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2L}R (Form 6) fused with a transmembrane (TM) of another type II TM protein, instead of odr4TM, neither of their fixed stoichiometry (the apparent ratios of A{sub 2A}R to D{sub 2}R binding sites) was 1, suggesting their compact folding. This suggests that type II TM, either odr4 or another, facilitates the equilibrial process of the dimer formation between A{sub 2A}R and D{sub 2L}R, resulting in the higher-order oligomer formation from monomer of scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2L}R itself. Also, in the reverse type scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2L}R, i.e., the D{sub 2L}R-odr4TM-A{sub 2A}R, counter agonist-independent binding cooperativity (cooperative folding) was found to occur (Forms 4 and 5). In this way, the scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2L}R system has unveiled the cellular phenomenon as a snapshot of the

  8. Autoregulation of PhoP/PhoQ and positive regulation of the cyclic AMP receptor protein-cyclic AMP complex by PhoP in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiquan; Wang, Li; Han, Yanping; Yan, Yanfeng; Tan, Yafang; Zhou, Lei; Cui, Yujun; Du, Zongmin; Wang, Xiaoyi; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Huiying; Song, Yajun; Zhang, Pingping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2013-03-01

    Yersinia pestis is one of the most dangerous bacterial pathogens. PhoP and cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) are global regulators of Y. pestis, and they control two distinct regulons that contain multiple virulence-related genes. The PhoP regulator and its cognate sensor PhoQ constitute a two-component regulatory system. The regulatory activity of CRP is triggered only by binding to its cofactor cAMP, which is synthesized from ATP by adenylyl cyclase (encoded by cyaA). However, the association between the two regulatory systems PhoP/PhoQ and CRP-cAMP is still not understood for Y. pestis. In the present work, the four consecutive genes YPO1635, phoP, phoQ, and YPO1632 were found to constitute an operon, YPO1635-phoPQ-YPO1632, transcribed as a single primary RNA, whereas the last three genes comprised another operon, phoPQ-YPO1632, transcribed with two adjacent transcriptional starts. Through direct PhoP-target promoter association, the transcription of these two operons was stimulated and repressed by PhoP, respectively; thus, both positive autoregulation and negative autoregulation of PhoP/PhoQ were detected. In addition, PhoP acted as a direct transcriptional activator of crp and cyaA. The translational/transcriptional start sites, promoter -10 and -35 elements, PhoP sites, and PhoP box-like sequences were determined for these PhoP-dependent genes, providing a map of the PhoP-target promoter interaction. The CRP and PhoP regulons have evolved to merge into a single regulatory cascade in Y. pestis because of the direct regulatory association between PhoP/PhoQ and CRP-cAMP. PMID:23264579

  9. An Estrogen Receptor-α/p300 Complex Activates the BRCA-1 Promoter at an AP-1 Site That Binds Jun/Fos Transcription Factors: Repressive Effects of p53 on BRCA-1 Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon D. Jeffy

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles in cancer predisposition is that women carrying BRCA-1 mutations preferentially develop tumors in epithelial tissues of the breast, ovary. Moreover, sporadic breast tumors contain lower levels of BRCA-1 in the absence of mutations in the BRCA-1 gene. The problem of tissue specificity requires analysis of factors that are unique to tissues of the breast. For example, the expression of estrogen receptor-α (ERα is inversely correlated with breast cancer risk, 90% of BRCA-1 tumors are negative for ERα. Here, we show that estrogen stimulates BRCA-1 promoter activity in transfected cells, the recruitment of ERα, its cofactor p300 to an AP-1 site that binds Jun/Fos transcription factors. The recruitment of ERα/dp300 coincides with accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle, is antagonized by the antiestrogen tamoxifen. Conversely, we document that overexpression of wild-type p53 prevents the recruitment of ERα to the AP-1 site, represses BRCA-1 promoter activity. Taken together, our findings support a model in which an ERα/AP-1 complex modulates BRCA-1 transcription under conditions of estrogen stimulation. Conversely, the formation of this transcription complex is abrogated in cells overexpressing p53.

  10. The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M B; Fuxe, K; Werge, T;

    2002-01-01

    and lack of EPS in rodents could also be observed in non-human primates. We investigated the effects of CGS 21680 on behaviours induced by D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine in EPS-sensitized Cebus apella monkeys. CGS 21680 was administered s.c. in doses of 0.01, 0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg, alone...... and in combination with D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine. The monkeys were videotaped after drug administration and the tapes were rated for EPS and psychosis-like symptoms. CGS 21680 decreased apomorphine-induced behavioural unrest, arousal (0.01-0.05 mg/kg) and stereotypies (0.05 mg/kg) while amphetamine......-induced behaviours (unrest, stereotypies, arousal) were unaffected. EPS were not observed at any dose. At 0.05 mg/kg CGS 21680 produced vomiting. The two lower doses did not produce observable side-effects. Though the differential effect on amphetamine- and apomorphine-induced behaviours is intriguing, CGS 21680...

  11. A1 and A2A Adenosine receptors expression in ALS transgenic mice for the human gene SOD1

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Gonçalo Luis Monteiro, 1988-

    2012-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Biologia Molecular e Genética). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2012 A Esclerose Lateral Amiotrópica (ELA) é uma doença progressiva e fatal caracterizada pela degeneração selectiva dos neurónios motores do córtex motor, tronco cerebral e medula espinal, que provoca atrofia muscular, paralesia e morte por falha respiratória. A etiologia da doença continua desconhecida, mas com um consenso de que o dano dos neurónios motores é causado por uma rede d...

  12. CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex II signaling induces B cells to express interleukin 2 receptors and complements help provided through CD40 ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    We have examined signaling roles for CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II as contact ligands during T help for B cell activation. We used a T helper 1 (Th1)-dependent helper system that was previously shown to be contact as well as interleukin 2 (IL-2......) dependent to demonstrate the relative roles of CD54, MHC II, and CD40 signaling in the events leading to the induction of B cell proliferation and responsiveness to IL-2. Paraformaldehyde-fixed activated Th1-induced expression of IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and B7, and upregulated MHC II and CD54 on B cells...

  13. How to deal with weak interactions in noncovalent complexes analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry: cyclopeptidic inhibitors of the nuclear receptor coactivator 1-STAT6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touboul, David; Maillard, Ludovic; Grässlin, Anja; Moumne, Roba; Seitz, Markus; Robinson, John; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-02-01

    Mass spectrometry, and especially electrospray ionization, is now an efficient tool to study noncovalent interactions between proteins and inhibitors. It is used here to study the interaction of some weak inhibitors with the NCoA-1/STAT6 protein with K(D) values in the microM range. High signal intensities corresponding to some nonspecific electrostatic interactions between NCoA-1 and the oppositely charged inhibitors were observed by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry, due to the use of high ligand concentrations. Diverse strategies have already been developed to deal with nonspecific interactions, such as controlled dissociation in the gas phase, mathematical modeling, or the use of a reference protein to monitor the appearance of nonspecific complexes. We demonstrate here that this last methodology, validated only in the case of neutral sugar-protein interactions, i.e., where dipole-dipole interactions are crucial, is not relevant in the case of strong electrostatic interactions. Thus, we developed a novel strategy based on half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) measurements in a competitive assay with readout by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. IC(50) values determined by MS were finally converted into dissociation constants that showed very good agreement with values determined in the liquid phase using a fluorescence polarization assay. PMID:18996720

  14. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  15. Lipoxin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Romano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxins (LXs represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL. In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1. This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed.

  16. Effects of beta-amyloid protein on M1 and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band complex of the rat: relationship with cholinergic, GABAergic, and calcium-binding protein perikarya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia

    2007-06-01

    Cortical cholinergic dysfunction has been correlated with the expression and processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein. However, it remains unclear as to how cholinergic dysfunction and beta-amyloid (Abeta) formation and deposition might be related to one another. Since the M1- and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are considered key molecules that transduce the cholinergic message, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the injected Abeta peptide on the number of M1mAchR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum-diagonal band (MS-nDBB) complex of the rat. Injections of Abeta protein into the retrosplenial cortex resulted in a decrease in M1mAChR and M2mAChR immunoreactivity in the MS-nDBB complex. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum nucleus (MS) and in the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) as compared to the corresponding hemisphere in control animals and with that seen in the contralateral hemisphere, which corresponds to the PBS-injected side. Co-localization studies showed that the M1mAChR protein is localized in GABA-immunoreactive cells of the MS-nDBB complex, in particular those of the MS nucleus, while M2mAChR protein is localized in both the cholinergic and GABAergic cells. Moreover, GABAergic cells containing M2mAChR are mainly localized in the MS nucleus, while cholinergic cells containing M2mAChR are localized in the MS and the HDB nuclei. Our findings suggest that Abeta induces a reduction in M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-containing cells, which may contribute to impairments of cholinergic and GABAergic transmission in the MS-nDBB complex.

  17. Structure and binding analysis of Polyporus squamosus lectin in complex with the Neu5Ac[alpha]2-6Gal[beta]1-4GlcNAc human-type influenza receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Grant, Oliver C.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Winter, Harry C.; Tateno, Hiroaki; Fadda, Elisa; Woods, Robert J. (Michigan-Med); (NUI-Ireland); (Georgia)

    2013-03-07

    Glycan chains that terminate in sialic acid (Neu5Ac) are frequently the receptors targeted by pathogens for initial adhesion. Carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) with specificity for Neu5Ac are particularly useful in the detection and isolation of sialylated glycoconjugates, such as those associated with pathogen adhesion as well as those characteristic of several diseases including cancer. Structural studies of lectins are essential in order to understand the origin of their specificity, which is particularly important when employing such reagents as diagnostic tools. Here, we report a crystallographic and molecular dynamics (MD) analysis of a lectin from Polyporus squamosus (PSL) that is specific for glycans terminating with the sequence Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal{beta}. Because of its importance as a histological reagent, the PSL structure was solved (to 1.7 {angstrom}) in complex with a trisaccharide, whose sequence (Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal{beta}1-4GlcNAc) is exploited by influenza A hemagglutinin for viral adhesion to human tissue. The structural data illuminate the origin of the high specificity of PSL for the Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal sequence. Theoretical binding free energies derived from the MD data confirm the key interactions identified crystallographically and provide additional insight into the relative contributions from each amino acid, as well as estimates of the importance of entropic and enthalpic contributions to binding.

  18. Glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P;

    2006-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS relies almost entirely on the neurotransmitter glutamate and its family of ion channel receptors. An appreciation of the coupling between agonist binding and channel opening has advanced rapidly during the past five years, largely as a result of ne...

  19. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette;

    2003-01-01

    In 1972, Brazeau et al. isolated somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting factor, SRIF), a cyclic polypeptide with two biologically active isoforms (SRIF-14 and SRIF-28). This event prompted the successful quest for SRIF receptors. Then, nearly a quarter of a century later, it was announced...

  20. Efficient Amide Based Halogenide Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xing WU; Feng Hua LI; Hai LIN; Shou Rong ZHU; Hua Kuan LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and anion recognition properties of the amide based phenanthroline derivatives 1, 2 and 3. In all cases 1:1 receptor: anion complexes were observed. The receptors were found to be selective for fluoride and chloride respectively over other putative anionic guest species.

  1. A threading receptor for polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J.; Casas-Solvas, Juan M.; Harniman, Robert L.; Renney, Charles M.; Carter, Tom S.; Crump, Matthew P.; Davis, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (Ka up to 19,000 M-1), and is shown—by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy—to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules.

  2. The cellular RNA export receptor TAP/NXF1 is required for ICP27-mediated export of herpes simplex virus 1 RNA, but the TREX complex adaptor protein Aly/REF appears to be dispensable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lisa A; Li, Ling; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M

    2009-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) protein ICP27 has been shown to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and to bind viral RNA during infection. ICP27 was found to interact with the cellular RNA export adaptor protein Aly/REF, which is part of the TREX complex, and to relocalize Aly/REF to viral replication sites. ICP27 is exported to the cytoplasm through the export receptor TAP/NXF1, and ICP27 must be able to interact with TAP/NXF1 for efficient export of HSV-1 early and late transcripts. We examined the dynamics of ICP27 movement and its localization with respect to Aly/REF and TAP/NXF1 in living cells during viral infection. Recombinant viruses with a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) tag on the N or C terminus of ICP27 were constructed. While the N-terminally tagged ICP27 virus behaved like wild-type HSV-1, the C-terminally tagged virus was defective in viral replication and gene expression, and ICP27 was confined to the nucleus, suggesting that the C-terminal YFP tag interfered with ICP27's C-terminal interactions, including the interaction with TAP/NXF1. To assess the role of Aly/REF and TAP/NXF1 in viral RNA export, these factors were knocked down using small interfering RNA. Knockdown of Aly/REF had little effect on the export of ICP27 or poly(A)(+) RNA during infection. In contrast, a decrease in TAP/NXF1 levels severely impaired export of ICP27 and poly(A)(+) RNA. We conclude that TAP/NXF1 is essential for ICP27-mediated export of RNA during HSV-1 infection, whereas Aly/REF may be dispensable.

  3. Structural modeling of HLA-B*1502/peptide/carbamazepine/T-cell receptor complex architecture: implication for the molecular mechanism of carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Shilei; Wang, Yewang; Yang, Chao; Huang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced adverse reactions are a significant problem in healthcare worldwide and are estimated to cost billions of dollars annually in the United States. A portion of such reactions is observed to strongly associate with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles; one of the strongest associations is the HLA-B*1502 protein with carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) - the odds ratio value can even be higher than one thousand. The particularly strong association in CBZ-induced SJS/TEN suggests that the HLA-B*1502 is not only a genetic marker but also a participant in the pathogenesis of the disease. In the current study, we attempt to computationally model the atomic-level structure of the complete HLA-B*1502/peptide/CBZ/T-cell receptor (TCR) complex architecture based on prior knowledge obtained from epidemiological investigations as well as in vitro and in vivo assays. The model tells a different story about the molecular mechanism of CBZ-induced SJS/TEN from that previously reported for abacavir (ABC)-induced hypersensitivity (HSR); the CBZ molecule is located at the interface between HLA-B*1502/peptide and TCR, directly contacts the P3-P6 residues of antigen peptide, and bound within a pocket region encompassed by two TCR CDR3 fingers. Molecular dynamics simulation and binding energy analysis further reveal that the CBZ shows considerably high affinity to TCR over HLA-B*1502/peptide, which can tightly interact with the former rather than the latter. From the model, two hypotheses are proposed that can well explain most previous observations and are expected to guide next wet-lab experiments. This study could help to promote our understanding of the molecular mechanism and pathological implication underlying CBZ-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:26488421

  4. Serotonin receptors as cardiovascular targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Villalón (Carlos); P.A.M. de Vries (Peter); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSerotonin exerts complex effects in the cardiovascular system, including hypotension or hypertension, vasodilatation or vasoconstriction, and/or bradycardia or tachycardia; the eventual response depends primarily on the nature of the 5-HT receptors in