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Sample records for a2a receptor complex

  1. Striatal adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors form functional heteromeric complexes that mediate the motor effects of cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriba, Paulina; Ortiz, Oskar; Patkar, Kshitij; Justinova, Zuzana; Stroik, Jessica; Themann, Andrea; Müller, Christa; Woods, Anima S; Hope, Bruce T; Ciruela, Francisco; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I; Lluis, Carme; Goldberg, Steven R; Moratalla, Rosario; Franco, Rafael; Ferré, Sergi

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of action responsible for the motor depressant effects of cannabinoids, which operate through centrally expressed cannabinoid CB1 receptors, is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we report that CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors form heteromeric complexes in co-transfected HEK-293T cells and rat striatum, where they colocalize in fibrilar structures. In a human neuroblastoma cell line, CB1 receptor signaling was found to be completely dependent on A2A receptor activation. Accordingly, blockade of A2A receptors counteracted the motor depressant effects produced by the intrastriatal administration of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist. These biochemical and behavioral findings demonstrate that the profound motor effects of cannabinoids depend on physical and functional interactions between striatal A2A and CB1 receptors.

  2. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

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    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  3. NCS-1 associates with adenosine A2A receptors and modulates receptor function

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    Gemma eNavarro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signalling by local changes in intracellular calcium concentration is an established function of Calmodulin which is known to interact with many GPCRs. Less is known about the functional role of the closely related neuronal EF-hand Ca2+-sensor proteins that frequently associate with calmodulin targets with different functional outcome. In the present study we aimed to investigate if a target of calmodulin – the A2A adenosine receptor, is able to associate with two other neuronal calcium binding proteins, namely NCS-1 and caldendrin. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation experiments we show the existence of A2A - NCS-1 complexes in living cells whereas caldendrin did not associate with A2A receptors under the conditions tested. Interestingly, NCS-1 binding modulated downstream A2A receptor intracellular signalling in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Taken together this study provides further evidence that neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins play an important role in modulation of GPCR signalling.

  4. Understanding the Functional Plasticity in Neural Networks of the Basal Ganglia in Cocaine Use Disorder: A Role for Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in A2A-D2 Heteroreceptor Complexes

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    Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our hypothesis is that allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in homo- and heteroreceptor complexes may form the molecular basis of learning and memory. This principle is illustrated by showing how cocaine abuse can alter the adenosine A2AR-dopamine D2R heterocomplexes and their receptor-receptor interactions and hereby induce neural plasticity in the basal ganglia. Studies with A2AR ligands using cocaine self-administration procedures indicate that antagonistic allosteric A2AR-D2R heterocomplexes of the ventral striatopallidal GABA antireward pathway play a significant role in reducing cocaine induced reward, motivation, and cocaine seeking. Anticocaine actions of A2AR agonists can also be produced at A2AR homocomplexes in these antireward neurons, actions in which are independent of D2R signaling. At the A2AR-D2R heterocomplex, they are dependent on the strength of the antagonistic allosteric A2AR-D2R interaction and the number of A2AR-D2R and A2AR-D2R-sigma1R heterocomplexes present in the ventral striatopallidal GABA neurons. It involves a differential cocaine-induced increase in sigma1Rs in the ventral versus the dorsal striatum. In contrast, the allosteric brake on the D2R protomer signaling in the A2AR-D2R heterocomplex of the dorsal striatopallidal GABA neurons is lost upon cocaine self-administration. This is potentially due to differences in composition and allosteric plasticity of these complexes versus those in the ventral striatopallidal neurons.

  5. Understanding the Functional Plasticity in Neural Networks of the Basal Ganglia in Cocaine Use Disorder: A Role for Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in A2A-D2 Heteroreceptor Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Wydra, Karolina; Pintsuk, Julia; Narvaez, Manuel; Corrales, Fidel; Zaniewska, Magdalena; Agnati, Luigi F.; Franco, Rafael; Tanganelli, Sergio; Filip, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in homo- and heteroreceptor complexes may form the molecular basis of learning and memory. This principle is illustrated by showing how cocaine abuse can alter the adenosine A2AR-dopamine D2R heterocomplexes and their receptor-receptor interactions and hereby induce neural plasticity in the basal ganglia. Studies with A2AR ligands using cocaine self-administration procedures indicate that antagonistic allosteric A2AR-D2R heterocomplexes of the ventral striatopallidal GABA antireward pathway play a significant role in reducing cocaine induced reward, motivation, and cocaine seeking. Anticocaine actions of A2AR agonists can also be produced at A2AR homocomplexes in these antireward neurons, actions in which are independent of D2R signaling. At the A2AR-D2R heterocomplex, they are dependent on the strength of the antagonistic allosteric A2AR-D2R interaction and the number of A2AR-D2R and A2AR-D2R-sigma1R heterocomplexes present in the ventral striatopallidal GABA neurons. It involves a differential cocaine-induced increase in sigma1Rs in the ventral versus the dorsal striatum. In contrast, the allosteric brake on the D2R protomer signaling in the A2AR-D2R heterocomplex of the dorsal striatopallidal GABA neurons is lost upon cocaine self-administration. This is potentially due to differences in composition and allosteric plasticity of these complexes versus those in the ventral striatopallidal neurons. PMID:27872762

  6. The importance of the adenosine A(2A) receptor-dopamine D(2) receptor interaction in drug addiction.

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    Filip, M; Zaniewska, M; Frankowska, M; Wydra, K; Fuxe, K

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction is a serious brain disorder with somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and legal implications in the developed world. Illegal (e.g., psychostimulants, opioids, cannabinoids) and legal (alcohol, nicotine) drugs of abuse create a complex behavioral pattern composed of drug intake, withdrawal, seeking and relapse. One of the hallmarks of drugs that are abused by humans is that they have different mechanisms of action to increase dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the mesolimbic circuitry of the brain and indirectly activate DA receptors. Among the DA receptors, D(2) receptors are linked to drug abuse and addiction because their function has been proven to be correlated with drug reinforcement and relapses. The recognition that D(2) receptors exist not only as homomers but also can form heteromers, such as with the adenosine (A)(2A) receptor, that are pharmacologically and functionally distinct from their constituent receptors, has significantly expanded the range of potential drug targets and provided new avenues for drug design in the search for novel drug addiction therapies. The aim of this review is to bring current focus on A(2A) receptors, their physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, and to discuss the therapeutic relevance of these receptors to drug addiction. We concentrate on the contribution of A(2A) receptors to the effects of different classes of drugs of abuse examined in preclinical behavioral experiments carried out with pharmacological and genetic tools. The consequences of chronic drug treatment on A(2A) receptor-assigned functions in preclinical studies are also presented. Finally, the neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between A(2A) receptors and drugs of abuse in the context of the heteromeric A(2A)-D(2) receptor complex is discussed. Taken together, a significant amount of experimental analyses provide evidence that targeting A(2A) receptors may offer innovative translational strategies

  7. Adenosine A2A Receptors and A2A Receptor Heteromers as Key Players in Striatal Function

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    Ferré, Sergi; Quiroz, César; Orru, Marco; Guitart, Xavier; Navarro, Gemma; Cortés, Antonio; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    A very significant density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) is present in the striatum, where they are preferentially localized postsynaptically in striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In this localization A2ARs establish reciprocal antagonistic interactions with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). In one type of interaction, A2AR and D2R are forming heteromers and, by means of an allosteric interaction, A2AR counteracts D2R-mediated inhibitory modulation of the effects of NMDA receptor stimulation in the striatopallidal neuron. This interaction is probably mostly responsible for the locomotor depressant and activating effects of A2AR agonist and antagonists, respectively. The second type of interaction involves A2AR and D2R that do not form heteromers and takes place at the level of adenylyl cyclase (AC). Due to a strong tonic effect of endogenous dopamine on striatal D2R, this interaction keeps A2AR from signaling through AC. However, under conditions of dopamine depletion or with blockade of D2R, A2AR-mediated AC activation is unleashed with an increased gene expression and activity of the striatopallidal neuron and with a consequent motor depression. This interaction is probably the main mechanism responsible for the locomotor depression induced by D2R antagonists. Finally, striatal A2ARs are also localized presynaptically, in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that contact the striato-nigral MSN. These presynaptic A2ARs heteromerize with A1 receptors (A1Rs) and their activation facilitates glutamate release. These three different types of A2ARs can be pharmacologically dissected by their ability to bind ligands with different affinity and can therefore provide selective targets for drug development in different basal ganglia disorders. PMID:21731559

  8. Adenosine A2A receptors and A2A receptor heteromers as key players in striatal function

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    Sergi eFerre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A very significant density of adenosine adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs is present in the striatum, where they are preferentially localized postsynaptically in striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. In this localization A2ARs establish reciprocal antagonistic interactions with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs. In one type of interaction, A2AR and D2R are forming heteromers and, by means of an allosteric interaction, A2AR counteracts D2R-mediated inhibitory modulation of the effects of NMDA receptor stimulation in the striato-pallidal neuron. This interaction is probably mostly responsible for the locomotor depressant and activating effects of A2AR agonist and antagonists, respectively. The second type of interaction involves A2AR and D2R that do not form heteromers and takes place at the level of adenylyl-cyclase (AC. Due to a strong tonic effect of endogenous dopamine on striatal D2R, this interaction keeps A2AR from signaling through AC. However, under conditions of dopamine depletion or with blockade of D2R, A2AR-mediated AC activation is unleashed with an increased gene expression and activity of the striato-pallidal neuron and with a consequent motor depression. This interaction is probably the main mechanism responsible for the locomotor depression induced by D2R antagonists. Finally, striatal A2ARs are also localized presynaptically, in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that contact the striato-nigral MSN. These presynaptic A2ARs heteromerize with A1 receptors (A1Rs and their activation facilitates glutamate release. These three different types of A2ARs can be pharmacologically dissected by their ability to bind ligands with different affinity and can therefore provide selective targets for drug development in different basal ganglia disorders.

  9. A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interaction modulates gliotransmitter release from striatal astrocyte processes.

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    Cervetto, Chiara; Venturini, Arianna; Passalacqua, Mario; Guidolin, Diego; Genedani, Susanna; Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Esquela, Dasiel O; Cortelli, Pietro; Woods, Amina; Maura, Guido; Marcoli, Manuela; Agnati, Luigi F

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for striatal A2A-D2 heterodimers has led to a new perspective on molecular mechanisms involved in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Despite the increasing recognition of astrocytes' participation in neuropsychiatric disease vulnerability, involvement of striatal astrocytes in A2A and D2 receptor signal transmission has never been explored. Here, we investigated the presence of D2 and A2A receptors in isolated astrocyte processes prepared from adult rat striatum by confocal imaging; the effects of receptor activation were measured on the 4-aminopyridine-evoked release of glutamate from the processes. Confocal analysis showed that A2A and D2 receptors were co-expressed on the same astrocyte processes. Evidence for A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interactions was obtained by measuring the release of the gliotransmitter glutamate: D2 receptors inhibited the glutamate release, while activation of A2A receptors, per se ineffective, abolished the effect of D2 receptor activation. The synthetic D2 peptide VLRRRRKRVN corresponding to the receptor region involved in electrostatic interaction underlying A2A-D2 heteromerization abolished the ability of the A2A receptor to antagonize the D2 receptor-mediated effect. Together, the findings are consistent with heteromerization of native striatal astrocytic A2A-D2 receptors that via allosteric receptor-receptor interactions could play a role in the control of striatal glutamatergic transmission. These new findings suggest possible new pathogenic mechanisms and/or therapeutic approaches to neuropsychiatric disorders. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Structural and energetic effects of A2A adenosine receptor mutations on agonist and antagonist binding.

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    Henrik Keränen

    Full Text Available To predict structural and energetic effects of point mutations on ligand binding is of considerable interest in biochemistry and pharmacology. This is not only useful in connection with site-directed mutagenesis experiments, but could also allow interpretation and prediction of individual responses to drug treatment. For G-protein coupled receptors systematic mutagenesis has provided the major part of functional data as structural information until recently has been very limited. For the pharmacologically important A(2A adenosine receptor, extensive site-directed mutagenesis data on agonist and antagonist binding is available and crystal structures of both types of complexes have been determined. Here, we employ a computational strategy, based on molecular dynamics free energy simulations, to rationalize and interpret available alanine-scanning experiments for both agonist and antagonist binding to this receptor. These computer simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental data and, most importantly, reveal the molecular details behind the observed effects which are often not immediately evident from the crystal structures. The work further provides a distinct validation of the computational strategy used to assess effects of point-mutations on ligand binding. It also highlights the importance of considering not only protein-ligand interactions but also those mediated by solvent water molecules, in ligand design projects.

  11. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Felicita Pedata; Anna Maria Pugliese; Elisabetta Coppi; Ilaria Dettori; Giovanna Maraula; Lucrezia Cellai; Alessia Melani

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by ...

  12. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

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    Felicita Pedata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes. Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke.

  13. Regulatory effects of adenosine A2A receptors on psychomotor ability and mood behavior of mice

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    Li JIANG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of gene knock-out,agonist or inhibitor of adenosine A2A receptor on the locomotor activity,and anxiety-or depression-like behavior of mice.Methods Male C57BL/6 mice,comprising those underwent gene knock-out of adenosine A2A receptor(A2AKO and their wild-type(WT littermates,were assigned into A2AKO group and WT group.Another batch of male C57BL/6,specific-pathogen-free(SPF mice,were assigned into SCH58261 group,CGS21680 group and control group.Mice of aforesaid 3 groups were transperitoneally administered with SCH58261,a specific inhibitor of adenosine A2A receptor at a dose of 2mg/kg,CGS21680,a specific agonist of adenosine A2A receptor at a dose of 0.5mg/kg,and vehicle(0.25ml,comprising DMSO and saline,respectively.Ten minutes after injection,mice of the 3 groups underwent open-field test,elevated plus-maze test and forced swimming test to detect their locomotor activity,anxiety-and depression-like behavior.Results a Compared with WT group,the total movement distance decreased(P 0.05.b Compared with control group,the total movement distance decreased and the stay time in the peripheral area increased significantly in the open field test(P 0.05.Conclusions The agonist of adenosine A2A receptor may depress the spontaneous motility and exploratory behavior,and exacerbate the anxiety and depression,and it simulates the effect induced by knock-out of A2A receptor gene,but it is opposite to the effect induced by A2A receptor inhibitor.

  14. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

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    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  15. New chromene scaffolds for adenosine A(2A) receptors: synthesis, pharmacology and structure-activity relationships.

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    Areias, Filipe; Costa, Marta; Castro, Marián; Brea, José; Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Proença, M Fernanda; Mestres, Jordi; Loza, María I

    2012-08-01

    In silico screening of a collection of 1584 academic compounds identified a small molecule hit for the human adenosine A(2A) receptor (pK(i) = 6.2) containing a novel chromene scaffold (3a). To explore the structure-activity relationships of this new chemical series for adenosine receptors, a focused library of 43 2H-chromene-3-carboxamide derivatives was synthesized and tested in radioligand binding assays at human adenosine A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) receptors. The series was found to be enriched with bioactive compounds for adenosine receptors, with 14 molecules showing submicromolar affinity (pK(i) ≥ 6.0) for at least one adenosine receptor subtype. These results provide evidence that the chromene scaffold, a core structure present in natural products from a wide variety of plants, vegetables, and fruits, constitutes a valuable source for novel therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Adenosine activates brown adipose tissue and recruits beige adipocytes via A2A receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Thorsten; Scheibler, Saskia; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2014-01-01

    hamster or rat. However, the role of adenosine in human BAT is unknown. Here we show that adenosine activates human and murine brown adipocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. Adenosine is released in BAT during stimulation of sympathetic nerves as well as from brown adipocytes. The adenosine A2A...... of A2A receptors or injection of lentiviral vectors expressing the A2A receptor into white fat induces brown-like cells-so-called beige adipocytes. Importantly, mice fed a high-fat diet and treated with an A2A agonist are leaner with improved glucose tolerance. Taken together, our results demonstrate...... that adenosine-A2A signalling plays an unexpected physiological role in sympathetic BAT activation and protects mice from diet-induced obesity. Those findings reveal new possibilities for developing novel obesity therapies....

  17. Expression, Purification and Crystallisation of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Bound to an Engineered Mini G Protein.

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    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G

    2017-04-20

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) promote cytoplasmic signalling by activating heterotrimeric G proteins in response to extracellular stimuli such as light, hormones and nucleosides. Structure determination of GPCR-G protein complexes is central to understanding the precise mechanism of signal transduction. However, these complexes are challenging targets for structural studies due to their conformationally dynamic and inherently transient nature. We recently developed an engineered G protein, mini-Gs, which addressed these problems and allowed the formation of a stable GPCR-G protein complex. Mini-Gs facilitated the structure determination of the human adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) in its G protein-bound conformation at 3.4 Å resolution. Here, we describe a step by step protocol for the expression and purification of A2AR, and crystallisation of the A2AR-mini-Gs complex.

  18. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

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    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  19. Targeting Adenosine A2A Receptors in Parkinson’s Disease

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    2006-11-01

    University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ USA Background: The blockade of A2A receptors...IRP/NIH/DHHS Baltimore MD Gilberto Fisone Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden Laura Font University of Connecticut Storrs CT Yolanda Fortin

  20. Adenosine A2A receptor binding profile of two antagonists, ST1535 and KW6002: consideration on the presence of atypical adenosine A2A binding sites

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    Teresa Riccioni

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors seem to exist in typical (more in striatum and atypical (more in hippocampus and cortex subtypes. In the present study, we investigated the affinity of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, ST1535 [2 butyl -9-methyl-8-(2H-1,2,3-triazol 2-yl-9H-purin-6-xylamine] and KW6002 [(E-1,3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6,dione] to the “typical” and “atypical” A2A binding sites. Affinity was determined by radioligand competition experiments in membranes from rat striatum and hippocampus. Displacement of the adenosine analog [3H]CGS21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethylphenethyl-amino-5’-N-ethylcarbox-amidoadenosine] was evaluated in the absence or in the presence of either CSC [8-(3-chlorostyryl-caffeine], an adenosine A2A antagonist that pharmacologically isolates atypical binding sites, or DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist that pharmacologically isolates typical binding site. ZM241385 [84-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl [1,2,4]-triazol[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl amino]ethyl phenol] and SCH58261 [(5-amino-7-(β-phenylethyl-2-(8-furylpyrazolo(4,3-e-1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-c pyrimidine], two other adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, which were reported to differently bind to atypical and typical A2A receptors, were used as reference compounds. ST1535, KW6002, ZM241385 and SCH58261 displaced [3H]CGS21680 with higher affinity in striatum than in hippocampus. In hippocampus, no typical adenosine A2A binding was detected, and ST1535 was the only compound that occupied atypical A2A adenosine receptors. Present data are explained in terms of heteromeric association among adenosine A2A, A2B and A1 receptors, rather than with the presence of atypical A2A receptor subtype.

  1. A2A adenosine receptor antagonism enhances synaptic and motor effects of cocaine via CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation.

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    Alessandro Tozzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocaine increases the level of endogenous dopamine (DA in the striatum by blocking the DA transporter. Endogenous DA modulates glutamatergic inputs to striatal neurons and this modulation influences motor activity. Since D2 DA and A2A-adenosine receptors (A2A-Rs have antagonistic effects on striatal neurons, drugs targeting adenosine receptors such as caffeine-like compounds, could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. In this study, we analyzed the electrophysiological effects of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists in striatal slices and the motor effects produced by this pharmacological modulation in rodents. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Concomitant administration of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists reduced glutamatergic synaptic transmission in striatal spiny neurons while these drugs failed to produce this effect when given in isolation. This inhibitory effect was dependent on the activation of D2-like receptors and the release of endocannabinoids since it was prevented by L-sulpiride and reduced by a CB1 receptor antagonist. Combined application of cocaine and A2A-R antagonists also reduced the firing frequency of striatal cholinergic interneurons suggesting that changes in cholinergic tone might contribute to this synaptic modulation. Finally, A2A-Rs antagonists, in the presence of a sub-threshold dose of cocaine, enhanced locomotion and, in line with the electrophysiological experiments, this enhanced activity required activation of D2-like and CB1 receptors. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides a possible synaptic mechanism explaining how caffeine-like compounds could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine.

  2. Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor. Part 6: Further optimization of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides.

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    Gillespie, Roger J; Bamford, Samantha J; Clay, Alex; Gaur, Suneel; Haymes, Tim; Jackson, Philip S; Jordan, Allan M; Klenke, Burkhard; Leonardi, Stefania; Liu, Jeanette; Mansell, Howard L; Ng, Sean; Saadi, Mona; Simmonite, Heather; Stratton, Gemma C; Todd, Richard S; Williamson, Douglas S; Yule, Ian A

    2009-09-15

    Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor have been reported to have potential therapeutic benefit in the alleviation of the symptoms associated with neurodegenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. As part of our efforts to discover potent and selective antagonists of this receptor, we herein describe the detailed optimization and structure-activity relationships of a series of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides. These optimized derivatives display desirable physiochemical and pharmacokinetic profiles, which have led to promising oral activity in clinically relevant models of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Role of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, G B; Bharmal, N H; Leite-Morris, K A; Adams, W R

    1999-10-01

    The role of adenosine receptor-mediated signaling was examined in the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. CD-1 mice received a liquid diet containing ethanol (6.7%, v/v) or a control liquid diet that were abruptly discontinued after 14 days of treatment. Mice consuming ethanol showed a progressive increase in signs of intoxication throughout the drinking period. Following abrupt discontinuation of ethanol diet, mice demonstrated reversible signs of handling-induced hyperexcitability that were maximal between 5-8 h. Withdrawing mice received treatment with adenosine receptor agonists at the onset of peak withdrawal (5.5 h) and withdrawal signs were blindly rated (during withdrawal hours 6 and 7). Adenosine A1-receptor agonist R-N6(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (0.15 and 0.3 mg/ kg) reduced withdrawal signs 0.5 and 1.5 h after drug administration in a dose-dependent fashion. Adenosine A2A-selective agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.3 mg/kg) reduced withdrawal signs at both time points. In ethanol-withdrawing mice, there were significant decreases in adenosine transporter sites in striatum without changes in cortex or cerebellum. In ethanol-withdrawing mice, there were no changes in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor concentrations in cortex, striatum, or cerebellum. There appears to be a role for adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the treatment of the ethanol withdrawal syndrome. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  4. Adenosine A2A receptor hyperexpression in patients with severe SIRS after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbaul, François; Bénard, Frédéric; Giorgi, Roch; Youlet, By; Carrega, Louis; Zouher, Ibrahim; Mercier, Laurence; Gérolami, Victoria; Bénas, Vincent; Blayac, Dorothée; Gariboldi, Vlad; Collart, Frédéric; Guieu, Régis

    2008-08-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous nucleoside, which has been involved in blood pressure failure during severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome (severe SIRS) after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Adenosine acts via its receptor subtypes, namely A1, A2A, A2B, or A3. Because A2A receptors are implicated in vascular tone, their expression might contribute to severe SIRS. We compared adenosine plasma levels (APLs) and A2A ADO receptor expression (ie, B, K, and mRNA amount) in patients with or without postoperative SIRS. : This was a prospective comparative observational study. Forty-four patients who underwent cardiac surgery involving CPB. Ten healthy subjects served as controls. Among the patients, 11 presented operative vasoplegia and postoperative SIRS (named complicated patients) and 33 were without vasoplegia or SIRS (named uncomplicated patients). Adenosine plasma levels, K, B, and mRNA amount (mean +/- SD) were measured on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Adenosine plasma levels, B, and K were significantly higher in complicated patients than in uncomplicated patients (APLs: 2.7 +/- 1.0 vs 1.0 +/- 0.5 micromol l, P SIRS after CPB.

  5. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation.

  6. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  7. Regulation of TrkB receptor translocation to lipid rafts by adenosine A2A receptors and its functional implications for BDNF-induced regulation of synaptic plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Sousa, Vasco C.; Pereira, Daniela B.; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.; Sebastião, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling is critical for neuronal development and transmission. Recruitment of TrkB receptors to lipid rafts has been shown to be necessary for the activation of specific signalling pathways and modulation of neurotransmitter release by BDNF. Since TrkB receptors are known to be modulated by adenosine A2A receptor activation, we hypothesized that activation of A2A receptors could influence TrkB receptor localization among different membrane microdoma...

  8. Ultraslow Water-Mediated Transmembrane Interactions Regulate the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonji; Kim, Songmi; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-09-20

    Water molecules inside a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) have recently been spotlighted in a series of crystal structures. To decipher the dynamics and functional roles of internal water molecules in GPCR activity, we studied the A2A adenosine receptor using microsecond molecular-dynamics simulations. Our study finds that the amount of water flux across the transmembrane (TM) domain varies depending on the receptor state, and that the water molecules of the TM channel in the active state flow three times more slowly than those in the inactive state. Depending on the location in solvent-protein interface as well as the receptor state, the average residence time of water in each residue varies from ∼O(10(2)) ps to ∼O(10(2)) ns. Especially, water molecules, exhibiting ultraslow relaxation (∼O(10(2)) ns) in the active state, are found around the microswitch residues that are considered activity hotspots for GPCR function. A continuous allosteric network spanning the TM domain, arising from water-mediated contacts, is unique in the active state, underscoring the importance of slow water molecules in the activation of GPCRs. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists exert motor and neuroprotective effects by distinct cellular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Liqun; Shen, Hai-Ying; Coelho, Joana E.; Araújo, Inês M.; HUANG, QING-YUAN; Day, Yuan-Ji; Rebola, Nelson; Canas, Paula M.; Rapp, Erica Kirsten; Ferrara, Jarrod; Taylor, Darcie; Müller, Christa E.; Linden, Joel; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2008-01-01

    To investigate whether the motor and neuroprotective effects of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists are mediated by distinct cell types in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of Parkinson's disease.We used the forebrain A2AR knock-out mice coupled with flow cytometric analyses and intracerebroventricular injection to determine the contribution of A2ARs in forebrain neurons and glial cells to A2AR antagonist-mediated motor and neuroprotective effects.The selecti...

  10. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  11. Drug-target residence time : a case for the adenosine A1 and A2A receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Ligand-receptor binding kinetics is increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in the early phase of drug design and discovery. In this thesis ligand-receptor binding kinetics, particularly residence time, at the adenosine A1 and A2A receptors was extensively investigated. Several case studies

  12. Activation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of renal vs. adrenal sympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2009-04-01

    The role of nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex mechanisms is controversial. Stimulation of these receptors releases glutamate within the NTS and elicits baroreflex-like decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas inhibition of these receptors attenuates HR baroreflex responses. In contrast, stimulation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors increases preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA), and the depressor and sympathoinhibitory responses are not markedly affected by sinoaortic denervation and blockade of NTS glutamatergic transmission. To elucidate the role of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex function, we compared full baroreflex stimulus-response curves for HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA (intravenous nitroprusside/phenylephrine) before and after bilateral NTS microinjections of selective adenosine A(2a) receptor agonist (CGS-21680; 2.0, 20 pmol/50 nl), selective A(2a) receptor antagonist (ZM-241385; 40 pmol/100 nl), and nonselective A(1) + A(2a) receptor antagonist (8-SPT; 1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats. Activation of A(2a) receptors decreased the range, upper plateau, and gain of baroreflex-response curves for RSNA, whereas these parameters all increased for pre-ASNA, consistent with direct effects of the agonist on regional sympathetic activity. However, no resetting of baroreflex-response curves along the MAP axis occurred despite the marked decreases in baseline MAP. The antagonists had no marked effects on baseline variables or baroreflex-response functions. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors differentially alters baroreflex control of HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA mostly via non-baroreflex mechanism(s), and these receptors have virtually no tonic action on baroreflex control of these sympathetic outputs.

  13. Overexpression of adenosine A2A receptors in rats: effects on depression, locomotion and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana E Coelho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are a sub-type of receptors enriched in basal ganglia, activated by the neuromodulator adenosine, which interact with dopamine D2 receptors. Although this reciprocal antagonistic interaction is well established in motor function, the outcome in dopamine-related behaviors remains uncertain, in particular in depression and anxiety. We have demonstrated an upsurge of A2AR associated to aging and chronic stress. Furthermore, Alzheimer’s disease patients present A2AR accumulation in cortical areas together with depressive signs. We now tested the impact of overexpressing A2AR in forebrain neurons on dopamine related behavior, namely depression. Adult male rats overexpressing human A2AR under the control of CaMKII promoter [Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR] and aged-matched wild-types (WT of the same strain (Sprague-Dawley were studied. The forced swimming test (FST, sucrose preference test (SPT and the open-field test (OFT were performed to evaluate behavioral despair, anhedonia, locomotion and anxiety. Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR animals spent more time floating and less time swimming in the FST and presented a decreased sucrose preference at 48h in the SPT. They also covered higher distances in the OFT and spent more time in the central zone than the WT. The results indicate that Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR rats exhibit depressive-like behavior, hyperlocomotion and altered exploratory behavior. This A2AR overexpression may explain the depressive signs found in aging, chronic stress and Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

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    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  15. GDNF control of the glutamatergic cortico-striatal pathway requires tonic activation of adenosine A2A Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Catarina A.R.V.; Simões, Patrícia F.; Canas, Paula M.; Quiroz, César; Sebastião, Ana M.; Ferré, Sergi; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.

    2009-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) affords neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease in accordance with its ability to bolster nigrostriatal innervation. We previously found that GDNF facilitates dopamine release in a manner dependent on adenosine A2A receptor activation. Since motor dysfunction also involves modifications of striatal glutamatergic innervation, we now tested if GDNF and its receptor system, Ret (rearranged during transfection) and GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor alpha 1) controlled the cortico-striatal glutamatergic pathway in an A2A receptor-dependent manner. GDNF (10 ng/ml) enhanced (by ≈13%) glutamate release from rat striatal nerve endings, an effect potentiated (up to ≈ 30%) by the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 (10 nM) and prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist, SCH 58261 (50 nM). Triple immunocytochemical studies revealed that Ret and GFRα1 were located in 50% of rat striatal glutamatergic terminals (immunopositive for vesicular glutamate transporters-1/2), where they were found to be co-located with A2A receptors. Activation of the glutamatergic system upon in vivo electrical stimulation of the rat cortico-striatal input induced striatal Ret phosphoprylation that was prevented by pre-treatment with the A2A receptor antagonist, MSX-3 (3 mg/kg). The results provide the first functional and morphological evidence that GDNF controls cortico-striatal glutamatergic pathways in a manner largely dependent on the co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors. PMID:19141075

  16. Striatal pre- and postsynaptic profile of adenosine A(2A receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orru

    Full Text Available Striatal adenosine A(2A receptors (A(2ARs are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D(2 receptors (D(2Rs. A(2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A(1 receptors (A(1Rs. It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A(2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A(2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A(2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A(2AR-D(2R and A(1R-A(2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A(2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A(2AR when co-expressed with D(2R than with A(1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A(2AR co-expressed with D(2R than co-expressed with A(1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile

  17. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D; Schiffmann, Serge N; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-07-07

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain.

  18. Continuous adenosine A2A receptor antagonism after focal cerebral ischemia in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronz, Ulrike; Deten, Alexander; Baumann, Frank; Kranz, Alexander; Weidlich, Sarah; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nieber, Karen; Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Antagonism of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has been shown to elicit substantial neuroprotective properties when given immediately after cerebral ischemia. We asked whether the continuous application of a selective A2AR antagonist within a clinically relevant time window will be a feasible and effective approach to treat focal cerebral ischemia. To answer this question, we subjected 20 male spontaneously hypertensive rats to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and randomized them equally to a verum and a control group. Two hours after stroke onset, the animals received a subcutaneous implantation of an osmotic minipump filled with 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) or vehicle solution. The serum level of CSC was measured twice a day for three consecutive days. The infarct volume was determined at days 1 and 3 using magnetic resonance imaging. We found the serum level of CSC showing a bell-shaped curve with its maximum at 36 h. The infarct volume was not affected by continuous CSC treatment. These results suggest that delayed and continuous CSC application was not sufficient to treat acute ischemic stroke, potentially due to unfavorable hepatic elimination and metabolization of the pharmaceutical.

  19. Role of Microglia Adenosine A2A Receptors in Retinal and Brain Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation mediated by microglial cells in the brain has been commonly associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Whether this microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still a matter of controversy. However, it is unequivocal that chronic neuroinflammation plays a role in disease progression and halting that process represents a potential therapeutic strategy. The neuromodulator adenosine emerges as a promising targeting candidate based on its ability to regulate microglial proliferation, chemotaxis, and reactivity through the activation of its G protein coupled A2A receptor (A2AR. This is in striking agreement with the ability of A2AR blockade to control several brain diseases. Retinal degenerative diseases have been also associated with microglia-mediated neuroinflammation, but the role of A2AR has been scarcely explored. This review aims to compare inflammatory features of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases with glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, discussing the therapeutic potential of A2AR in these degenerative conditions.

  20. A tail of two signals: the C terminus of the A(2A)-adenosine receptor recruits alternative signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gsandtner, Ingrid; Freissmuth, Michael

    2006-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are endowed with carboxyl termini that vary greatly in length and sequence. In most instances, the distal portion of the C terminus is dispensable for G protein coupling. This is also true for the A(2A)-adenosine receptor, where the last 100 amino acids are of very modest relevance to G(s) coupling. The C terminus was originally viewed mainly as the docking site for regulatory proteins of the beta-arrestin family. These beta-arrestins bind to residues that have been phosphorylated by specialized kinases (G protein-coupled receptor kinases) and thereby initiate receptor desensitization and endocytosis. More recently, it has become clear that many additional "accessory" proteins bind to C termini of G protein-coupled receptors. The article by Sun et al. in the current issue of Molecular Pharmacology identifies translin-associated protein-X as yet another interaction partner of the A(2A) receptor; translin-associated protein allows the A(2A) receptor to impinge on the signaling mechanisms by which p53 regulates neuronal differentiation, but the underlying signaling pathways are uncharted territory. With a list of five known interaction partners, the C terminus of the A(2A) receptor becomes a crowded place. Hence, there must be rules that regulate the interaction. This allows the C terminus to act as coincidence detector and as signal integrator. Despite our ignorance about the precise mechanisms, the article has exciting implications: the gene encoding for translin-associated protein-X maps to a locus implicated in some forms of schizophrenia; A(2A) receptor agonists are candidate drugs for the treatment of schizophrenic symptoms. It is of obvious interest to explore a possible link.

  1. Arginine 199 and leucine 208 have key roles in the control of adenosine A2A receptor signalling function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bertheleme

    Full Text Available One successful approach to obtaining high-resolution crystal structures of G-protein coupled receptors is the introduction of thermostabilising mutations within the receptor. This technique allows the generation of receptor constructs stabilised into different conformations suitable for structural studies. Previously, we functionally characterised a number of mutants of the adenosine A2A receptor, thermostabilised either in an agonist or antagonist conformation, using a yeast cell growth assay and demonstrated that there is a correlation between thermostability and loss of constitutive activity. Here we report the functional characterisation of 30 mutants intermediate between the Rag23 (agonist conformation mutant and the wild-type receptor using the same yeast signalling assay with the aim of gaining greater insight into the role individual amino acids have in receptor function. The data showed that R199 and L208 have important roles in receptor function; substituting either of these residues for alanine abolishes constitutive activity. In addition, the R199A mutation markedly reduces receptor potency while L208A reduces receptor efficacy. A184L and L272A mutations also reduce constitutive activity and potency although to a lesser extent than the R199A and L208A. In contrast, the F79A mutation increases constitutive activity, potency and efficacy of the receptor. These findings shed new light on the role individual residues have on stability of the receptor and also provide some clues as to the regions of the protein responsible for constitutive activity. Furthermore, the available adenosine A2A receptor structures have allowed us to put our findings into a structural context.

  2. Deletion of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptor spares latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition but impairs active avoidance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Philipp; Wei, Catherine J; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Boison, Detlev; Yee, Benjamin K

    2013-04-01

    Following early clinical leads, the adenosine A(2A)R receptor (A(2A)R) has continued to attract attention as a potential novel target for treating schizophrenia, especially against the negative and cognitive symptoms of the disease because of A(2A)R's unique modulatory action over glutamatergic in addition to dopaminergic signaling. Through (i) the antagonistic interaction with the dopamine D(2) receptor, and (ii) the regulation of glutamate release and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, striatal A(2A)R is ideally positioned to fine-tune the dopamine-glutamate balance, the disturbance of which is implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the precise function of striatal A(2A)Rs in the regulation of schizophrenia-relevant behavior is poorly understood. Here, we tested the impact of conditional striatum-specific A(2A)R knockout (st-A(2A)R-KO) on latent inhibition (LI) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) - behavior that is tightly regulated by striatal dopamine and glutamate. These are two common cross-species translational tests for the assessment of selective attention and sensorimotor gating deficits reported in schizophrenia patients; and enhanced performance in these tests is associated with antipsychotic drug action. We found that neither LI nor PPI was significantly affected in st-A(2A)R-KO mice, although a deficit in active avoidance learning was identified in these animals. The latter phenotype, however, was not replicated in another form of aversive conditioning - namely, conditioned taste aversion. Hence, the present study shows that neither learned inattention (as measured by LI) nor sensory gating (as indexed by PPI) requires the integrity of striatal A(2A)Rs - a finding that may undermine the hypothesized importance of A(2A)R in the genesis and/or treatment of schizophrenia.

  3. Both A1 and A2a purine receptors regulate striatal acetylcholine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S J; James, S; Reddington, M; Richardson, P J

    1990-07-01

    The receptors responsible for the adenosine-mediated control of acetylcholine release from immunoaffinity-purified rat striatal cholinergic nerve terminals have been characterized. The relative affinities of three analogues for the inhibitory receptor were (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than cyclohexyladenosine greater than N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), with binding being dependent of the presence of Mg2+ and inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] and adenosine receptor antagonists. Adenosine A1 receptor agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cholinergic adenylate cyclase activity, with an IC50 of 0.5 nM for (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine and 500 nM for (S)-phenylisopropyladenosine. A1 agonists inhibited acetylcholine release at concentrations approximately 10% of those required to inhibit the cholinergic adenylate cyclase. High concentrations (1 microM) of adenosine A1 agonists were less effective in inhibiting both adenylate cyclase and acetylcholine release, due to the presence of a lower affinity stimulatory A2 receptor. Blockade of the A1 receptor with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine revealed a half-maximal stimulation by NECA of the adenylate cyclase at 10 nM, and of acetylcholine release at approximately 100 nM. NECA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity copurified with choline acetyltransferase in the preparation of the cholinergic nerve terminals, suggesting that the striatal A2 receptor is localized to cholinergic neurones. The possible role of feedback inhibitory and stimulatory receptors on cholinergic nerve terminals is discussed.

  4. Endogenous ion channel complexes: the NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, René A W

    2011-06-01

    Ionotropic receptors, including the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) mediate fast neurotransmission, neurodevelopment, neuronal excitability and learning. In the present article, the structure and function of the NMDAR is reviewed with the aim to condense our current understanding and highlight frontiers where important questions regarding the biology of this receptor remain unanswered. In the second part of the present review, new biochemical and genetic approaches for the investigation of ion channel receptor complexes will be discussed.

  5. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of novel xanthine carboxylate amides as A2A adenosine receptor ligands exhibiting bronchospasmolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh; Bansal, Ranju; Rohilla, Suman; Kachler, Sonja; Klotz, Karl-Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The carboxylate amides of 8-phenyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine described herein represent a new series of selective ligands of the adenosine A2A receptors exhibiting bronchospasmolytic activity. The effects of location of 8-phenyl substitutions on the adenosine receptor (AR) binding affinities of the newly synthesized xanthines have also been studied. The compounds displayed moderate to potent binding affinities toward various adenosine receptor subtypes when evaluated through radioligand binding studies. However, most of the compounds showed the maximum affinity for the A2A subtype, some with high selectivity versus all other subtypes. Xanthine carboxylate amide 13b with a diethylaminoethylamino moiety at the para-position of the 8-phenylxanthine scaffold was identified as the most potent A2A adenosine receptor ligand with Ki=0.06μM. Similarly potent and highly A2A-selective are the isovanillin derivatives 16a and 16d. In addition, the newly synthesized xanthine derivatives showed good in vivo bronchospasmolytic activity when tested in guinea pigs.

  6. Synthesis and Properties of a New Water-Soluble Prodrug of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonist MSX-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa E. Müller

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The compound L-valine-3-{8-[(E-2-[3-methoxyphenylethenyl]-7-methyl-1-propargylxanthine-3-yl}propyl ester hydrochloride (MSX-4 was synthesized as an aminoacid ester prodrug of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-2. It was found to bestable in artificial gastric acid, but readily cleaved by pig liver esterase.

  7. Blunted dynamics of adenosine A2A receptors is associated with increased susceptibility to Candida albicans infection in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Lisa; Miranda, Isabel M.; Andrade, Geanne M.; Mota, Marta; Cortes, Luísa; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic gut infections and chronic inflammation, in particular due to overgrowth of Candida albicans present in the gut microbiota, are increasingly reported in the elder population. In aged, adult and young mice, we now compared the relative intestinal over-colonization by ingested C. albicans and their translocation to other organs, focusing on the role of adenosine A2A receptors that are a main stop signal of inflammation. We report that elderly mice are more prone to over-colonization by C. albicans than adult and young mice. This fungal over-growth seems to be related with higher growth rate in intestinal lumen, independent of gut tissues invasion, but resulting in higher GI tract inflammation. We observed a particularly high colonization of the stomach, with increased rate of yeast-to-hypha transition in aged mice. We found a correlation between A2A receptor density and tissue damage due to yeast infection: comparing with young and adults, aged mice have a lower gut A2A receptor density and C. albicans infection failed to increase it. In conclusion, this study shows that aged mice have a lower ability to cope with inflammation due to C. albicans over-colonization, associated with an inability to adaptively adjust adenosine A2A receptors density. PMID:27590517

  8. Differential role of nitric oxide in regional sympathetic responses to stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Tan, Nobusuke; O'Leary, Donal S

    2005-02-01

    Our previous studies showed that preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), lumbar, and postganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activities (post-ASNA) are inhibited after stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and glutamatergic and P2x receptors and are activated after stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors. However, stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas it activated pre-ASNA. Because the effects evoked by NTS A2a receptors may be mediated via activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms in NTS neurons, we tested the hypothesis that NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors would attenuate regional sympathetic responses to NTS A2a receptor stimulation, whereas NO donors would evoke contrasting responses from pre-ASNA versus RSNA and post-ASNA. Therefore, in chloralose/urethane-anesthetized rats, we compared hemodynamic and regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of selective A2a receptor agonist (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) after pretreatment with NOS inhibitors Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 nmol/100 nl) and 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]imidazole (100 pmol/100 nl) versus pretreatment with vehicle (100 nl). In addition, responses to microinjections into the NTS of different NO donors [40 and 400 pmol/50 nl sodium nitroprusside (SNP); 0.5 and 5 nmol/50 nl 3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (DETA NONOate, also known as NOC-18), and 2 nmol/50 nl 3-(2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-1-propylhydrazino)-1-propanamine (PAPA NONOate, also known as NOC-15)], the NO precursor L-arginine (10-50 nmol/50 nl), and sodium glutamate (500 pmol/50 nl) were evaluated. SNP, DETA NONOate, and PAPA NONOate activated pre-ASNA and inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas l-arginine and glutamate microinjected into the same site of the NTS inhibited all these sympathetic outputs. Decreases in heart rate and depressor or biphasic responses accompanied the neural responses. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors

  9. Role of Adenosine Receptor A2A in Traumatic Optic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    in vivo effect of CGS21680 is important for the development of a receptor based therapy for TON. Future chal lenges include the development of...receptor agonist CGS 21680 reduces JNK MAPK activation in oligodendrocytes in injured spinal cord. Shock 32, 578–585. Gerits, N., Kostenko, S...tissues of diabetic rat. They suggested that the expression of AK to some extent is controlled by insulin . Reduced AK expression is also reported in

  10. Vasopressin V1 receptors contribute to hemodynamic and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors in NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Activation of adenosine A2a receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas increases in preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) occur, a pattern similar to that observed during hypotensive hemorrhage. Central vasopressin V1 receptors may contribute to posthemorrhagic hypotension and bradycardia. Both V1 and A2a receptors are densely expressed in the NTS, and both of these receptors are involved in cardiovascular control; thus they may interact. The responses elicited by NTS A2a receptors are mediated mostly via nonglutamatergic mechanisms, possibly via release of vasopressin. Therefore, we investigated whether blockade of NTS V1 receptors alters the autonomic response patterns evoked by stimulation of NTS A2a receptors (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) in alpha-chloralose-urethane anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, we compared the regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of vasopressin (0.1-100 ng/50 nl) into the NTS. Blockade of V1 receptors reversed the normal decreases in MAP into increases (-95.6 +/- 28.3 vs. 51.4 +/- 15.7 integralDelta%), virtually abolished the decreases in HR (-258.3 +/- 54.0 vs. 18.9 +/- 57.8 integralDeltabeats/min) and RSNA (-239.3 +/- 47.4 vs. 15.9 +/- 36.1 integralDelta%), and did not affect the increases in pre-ASNA (279.7 +/- 48.3 vs. 233.1 +/- 54.1 integralDelta%) evoked by A2a receptor stimulation. The responses partially returned toward normal values approximately 90 min after the blockade. Microinjections of vasopressin into the NTS evoked dose-dependent decreases in HR and RSNA and variable MAP and pre-ASNA responses with a tendency toward increases. We conclude that the decreases in MAP, HR, and RSNA in response to NTS A2a receptor stimulation may be mediated via release of vasopressin from neural terminals in the NTS. The differential effects of NTS V1 and A2a receptors on

  11. De novo analysis of receptor binding affinity data of 8-ethenyl-xanthine antagonists to adenosine A1 and A2a receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpiaz, A; Gessi, S; Varani, K; Borea, P A

    1997-05-01

    The receptor binding affinity data to adenosine A1 and A2a receptors of a wide series of 8-ethenyl-xanthine derivatives has been analyzed by means of the Free-Wilson model. The analysis of the individual group contributions (aij) shows the importance of the presence of an ethenyl moiety at position 8 on the xanthine ring for obtaining selective A2a antagonists. The different aij values of the substituents for the adenosine. A1 receptor do not correlate with the corresponding ones for the A2a receptor, indicating the possibility to obtain A1 and A2a selective compounds. The presence of aromatic substituents at the 8-ethenyl group, such as 3,5-(OCH3)2-phenyl, permits to obtain strongly A2a selective compounds (affinity ratio of up to 100); moreover, it appears that 8-ethenyl-xanthinic derivatives cannot have high selectivity for the adenosine A1 receptor (affinity ratio < or = 10).

  12. Presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors mediate fade induced by neuromuscular relaxants that exhibit anticholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornia, Elaine Cs; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Alves-Do-Prado, Wilson

    2011-03-01

    1. Pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium are antinicotinic agents that, in contrast with d-tubocurarine and hexamethonium, exhibit anticholinesterase activity. Pancuronium-, cisatracurium- and vecuronium-induced fade results from blockade of facilitatory nicotinic receptors on motor nerves, but fade produced by such agents also depends on the presynaptic activation of inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptors by acetylcholine released from motor nerve terminals and activation of inhibitory adenosine A1 receptors by adenosine released from motor nerves and muscles. The participation of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors in fade caused by pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we determined the effects of ZM241385, an antagonist of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors, on fade produced by these neuromuscular relaxants in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparation. 2. The muscles were stimulated indirectly at 75±3Hz to induce a sustained tetanizing muscular contraction. The lowest concentration at which each antinicotinic agent produced fade without modifying initial tetanic tension (presynaptic action) was determined. 3. d-Tubocurarine-induced fade occurred only at 55 nmol/L, a concentration that also reduced maximal tetanic tension (post-synaptic action). At 10 nmol/L, ZM 241385 alone did not produce fade, but it did attenuate pancuronium (0.32 μmol/L)-, cisatracurium (0.32 μmol/L)- and vecuronium (0.36 μmol/L)-induced fade. 4. The fade induced by the 'pure' antinicotinic agents d-tubocurarine (55 nmol/L) and hexamethonium (413 μmol/L) was not altered by 10 nmol/L ZM 241385, indicating that presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors play a significant role in the fade produced by antinicotinic agents when such agents have anticholinesterase activity.

  13. Integrating Pharmacophore into Membrane Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Improve Homology Modeling of G Protein-coupled Receptors with Ligand Selectivity: A2A Adenosine Receptor as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingxiao; Guan, Mengxin; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren

    2015-12-01

    Homology modeling has been applied to fill in the gap in experimental G protein-coupled receptors structure determination. However, achievement of G protein-coupled receptors homology models with ligand selectivity remains challenging due to structural diversity of G protein-coupled receptors. In this work, we propose a novel strategy by integrating pharmacophore and membrane molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to improve homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors with ligand selectivity. To validate this integrated strategy, the A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR), whose structures in both active and inactive states have been established, has been chosen as an example. We performed blind predictions of the active-state A2A AR structure based on the inactive-state structure and compared the performance of different refinement strategies. The blind prediction model combined with the integrated strategy identified ligand-receptor interactions and conformational changes of key structural elements related to the activation of A2 A AR, including (i) the movements of intracellular ends of TM3 and TM5/TM6; (ii) the opening of ionic lock; (iii) the movements of binding site residues. The integrated strategy of pharmacophore with molecular dynamics simulations can aid in the optimization in the identification of side chain conformations in receptor models. This strategy can be further investigated in homology modeling and expand its applicability to other G protein-coupled receptor modeling, which should aid in the discovery of more effective and selective G protein-coupled receptor ligands. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Complex Pharmacology of Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are historically the most successful family of drug targets. In recent times it has become clear that the pharmacology of these receptors is far more complex than previously imagined. Understanding of the pharmacological regulation of GPCRs now extends beyond...... pharmacology have shaped understanding of the complex pharmacology of receptors that recognize and are activated by nonesterified or "free" fatty acids (FFAs). The FFA family of receptors is a recently deorphanized set of GPCRs, the members of which are now receiving substantial interest as novel targets...... for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Further understanding of the complex pharmacology of these receptors will be critical to unlocking their ultimate therapeutic potential....

  15. Complex pharmacology of free fatty acid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond; Hudson, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are historically the most successful family of drug targets. In recent times it has become clear that the pharmacology of these receptors is far more complex than previously imagined. Understanding of the pharmacological regulation of GPCRs now extends beyond simple competitive agonism or antagonism by ligands interacting with the orthosteric binding site of the receptor to incorporate concepts of allosteric agonism, allosteric modulation, signaling bias, c...

  16. Promotion of Wound Healing by an Agonist of Adenosine A2A Receptor Is Dependent on Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, M Carmen; Desai-Merchant, Avani; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2015-12-01

    Impaired wound healing, as it occurs in diabetes mellitus or long-term corticoid treatment, is commonly associated with disability, diminished quality of life, and high economic costs. Selective agonists of the A2A receptor subtype of adenosine, an endogenous regulator of inflammation, promote tissue repair in animal models, both healthy and with impaired healing. Plasmin-mediated proteolysis of fibrin and other matrix proteins is essential for cell migration at sites of injury. Since adenosine A2A receptor activation increases plasminogen activator release from macrophages and mast cells, we studied the effect of a selective agonist, CGS-21680, on full-thickness excisional wound closure in wild-type, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-deficient, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-deficient mice. Wound closure was impaired in tPA- and uPA-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice, and topical application of CGS-21680 significantly increased the rate at which wounds closed in wild-type mice and uPA-deficient mice, but not in tPA-deficient mice. Immunostaining of tissue sections showed that tPA was present in endothelial cells and histiocytes by day 3 post-wound and also by day 6. In contrast, uPA was more prominent in these cell types only by day 6 post-wound. Our results confirm that plasminogen activation contributes to wound repair and are consistent with the hypothesis that adenosine A2A receptor activation promotes wound closure by a mechanism that depends upon tPA, but not uPA. Moreover, our results suggest that topical adenosine A2A receptor agonists may be useful in promotion of wound closure in patients with impaired wound healing.

  17. ALTERED EXPRESSION AND FUNCTIONALITY OF A2A ADENOSINE RECEPTORS IN HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE AND OTHER POLYGLUTAMINE DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have suggested the possible involvement of A2A adenosine receptors in the pathogenesis of neuronal disorders, including Huntington’s disease. Huntington’s disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by motor, cognitive and behavioural impairments. The genetic cause of the disease is the expanded CAG triplet in a gene coding for huntingtin, a protein involved in several physiological processes. Huntington’s disease affects primarly ...

  18. Functional expression of adenosine A2A and A3 receptors in the mouse dendritic cell line XS-106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, John M; Reeder, Steve; Rees, Bob; Alexander, Steve; Kendall, Dave

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that adenosine receptors can modulate the function of cells involved in the immune system. For example, human dendritic cells derived from blood monocytes have recently been described to express functional adenosine A1, A2A and A3 receptors. Therefore, in the present study, we have investigated whether the recently established murine dendritic cell line XS-106 expresses functional adenosine receptors. The selective adenosine A3 receptor agonist 1-[2-chloro-6[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide (2-Cl-IB-MECA) inhibited forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and stimulated concentration-dependent increases in p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. The selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist 4-[2-[[-6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzene-propanoic acid (CGS 21680) stimulated a robust increase in [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. In contrast, the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine) did not inhibit forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation or stimulate increases in p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. These observations suggest that XS-106 cells express functional adenosine A2A and A3 receptors. The non-selective adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release from XS-106 cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. Furthermore, treatment with Cl-IB-MECA (1 microM) or CGS 21680 (1 microM) alone produced a partial inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha release (when compared to NECA), whereas a combination of both agonists resulted in the inhibition of TNF-alpha release comparable to that observed with NECA alone. Treatment of cells with the adenosine A2A receptor selective antagonists 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a

  19. Adenosine A2A receptors and uric acid mediate protective effects of inosine against TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Daneshmand, Ali; Mohammadi, Hamed; Bahremand, Arash; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2010-12-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease comprises chronic recurrent inflammation of gastrointestinal tract. This study was conducted to investigate inosine, a potent immunomodulator, in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced chronic model of experimental colitis, and contribution of adenosine A(2A) receptors and the metabolite uric acid as possible underlying mechanisms. Experimental colitis was rendered in rats by a single colonic administration of 10 mg of TNBS. Inosine, potassium oxonate (a hepatic uricase inhibitor), SCH-442416 (a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist), inosine+potassium oxonate, or inosine+SCH-442416 were given twice daily for 7 successive days. At the end of experiment, macroscopic and histopathologic scores, colonic malondialdehyde (MDA), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) levels, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assessed. Plasma uric acid level was measured throughout the experiment. Both macroscopic and histological features of colonic injury were markedly ameliorated by either inosine, oxonate or inosine+oxonate. Likewise, the elevated amounts of MPO and MDA abated as well as those of TNF-α and IL-1β (Pacid levels were significantly higher in inosine or oxonate groups compared to control. Inosine+oxonate resulted in an even more elvelated uric acid level than each treatment alone (Pacid and adenosine A(2A) receptors contribute to these salutary properties.

  20. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L. [Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology; Johnson, K.W. [Chiron Corp., Emeryville, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  1. Role of A1 and A2A adenosine receptor agonists in adipose tissue inflammation induced by obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeOliveira, Caroline Candida; Paiva Caria, Cintia Rabelo E; Ferreira Gotardo, Erica Martins; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2017-03-15

    Adenosine receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and control physiological and pathological events such as lipolysis and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a potent and selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist; 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS-21680), an A2A adenosine receptor agonist; and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a potent non-selective adenosine receptor agonist on adipose tissue inflammatory alterations induced by obesity in mice. Swiss mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and agonists were administered in the last two weeks. Body weight, adiposity and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Inflammation in adipose tissue was assessed by evaluation of adipokine production and macrophage infiltration. Adenosine receptor signaling in adipose tissue was also evaluated. Mice that received CGS21680 presented an improvement in glucose homeostasis in association with systemically reduced inflammatory markers (TNF-α, PAI-1) and in the visceral adipose tissue (TNF-α, MCP-1, macrophage infiltration). Activation of p38 signaling was found in adipose tissue of this group of mice. NECA-treated mice presented some improvements in glucose homeostasis associated with an observed weight loss. Mice that received CPA presented only a reduction in the ex vivo basal lipolysis rate measured within visceral adipose tissue. In conclusion, administration of the A2A receptor agonist to obese mice resulted in improvements in glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue inflammation, corroborating the idea that new therapeutics to treat obesity could emerge from these compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium modulates calmodulin/α-actinin 1 interaction with and agonist-dependent internalization of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Henni; Taura, Jaume; Kursula, Petri; Ciruela, Francisco; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2017-04-01

    Adenosine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that sense extracellular adenosine to transmit intracellular signals. One of the four adenosine receptor subtypes, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), has an exceptionally long intracellular C terminus (A2AR-ct) that mediates interactions with a large array of proteins, including calmodulin and α-actinin. Here, we aimed to ascertain the α-actinin 1/calmodulin interplay whilst binding to A2AR and the role of Ca(2+) in this process. First, we studied the A2AR-α-actinin 1 interaction by means of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance, using purified recombinant proteins. α-Actinin 1 binds the A2AR-ct through its distal calmodulin-like domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner with a dissociation constant of 5-12μM, thus showing an ~100 times lower affinity compared to the A2AR-calmodulin/Ca(2+) complex. Importantly, calmodulin displaced α-actinin 1 from the A2AR-ct in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, disrupting the A2AR-α-actinin 1 complex. Finally, we assessed the impact of Ca(2+) on A2AR internalization in living cells, a function operated by the A2AR-α-actinin 1 complex. Interestingly, while Ca(2+) influx did not affect constitutive A2AR endocytosis, it abolished agonist-dependent internalization. In addition, we demonstrated that the A2AR/α-actinin interaction plays a pivotal role in receptor internalization and function. Overall, our results suggest that the interplay of A2AR with calmodulin and α-actinin 1 is fine-tuned by Ca(2+), a fact that might power agonist-mediated receptor internalization and function.

  3. A selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist ameliorated hyperlocomotion in an animal model of lateral fluid percussion brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullah, Saad Habib-E-Rasul; Inaji, Motoki; Nariai, Tadashi; Ishibashi, Satoru; Ohno, Kikuo

    2013-01-01

    Increased concentration of extracellular adenosine after brain injury is supposed to be one of the causes of secondary brain damage. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether or not administration of adenosine A2A receptor antagonist may be efficacious in ameliorating neurological symptoms by blocking secondary brain damage through cascades initiated by adenosine A2a receptor.Mongolian gerbils were divided into four groups: the trauma-medication (T-M), trauma-saline (T-S), sham-medication (S-M), and sham-saline (S-S) groups. Trauma groups received lateral fluid percussion injury. Medication groups received i.p. injection of SCH58261 (selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist) until the fifth post-injury day. Open-field locomotion test and grabbing test were conducted before and 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days after injury.The total distance of movement in the T-S group was significantly greater than in the other three groups at all time points. In the T-M group, administration of SCH58261 significantly blocked hyperlocomotion, which was observed in the T-S group. There was no significant difference in the total distance among the T-M, S-M, and S-S groups. In the grabbing test, grabbing time was significantly increased in the T-S group 3, 5, 7, and 9 days after the operation. SCH58261 also improved grabbing time in the T-M group.Adenosine A2A antagonist successfully suppressed the trauma-induced hyperlocomotion, presumably by blocking secondary brain damage.

  4. Adenosine A(2A) receptor modulation of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse plasticity during associative learning in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontinha, Bruno M; Delgado-García, José M; Madroñal, Noelia; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Gruart, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies have characterized the electrophysiological and molecular signaling pathways of adenosine tonic modulation on long-lasting synaptic plasticity events, particularly for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it remains to be elucidated whether the long-term changes produced by endogenous adenosine in the efficiency of synapses are related to those required for learning and memory formation. Our goal was to understand how endogenous activation of adenosine excitatory A(2A) receptors modulates the associative learning evolution in conscious behaving mice. We have studied here the effects of the application of a highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, SCH58261, upon a well-known associative learning paradigm-classical eyeblink conditioning. We used a trace paradigm, with a tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electric shock presented to the supraorbital nerve as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A single electrical pulse was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) in the pyramidal CA1 area during the CS-US interval. In vehicle-injected animals, there was a progressive increase in the percentage of conditioning responses (CRs) and in the slope of fEPSPs through conditioning sessions, an effect that was completely prevented (and lost) in SCH58261 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) -injected animals. Moreover, experimentally evoked LTP was impaired in SCH58261-injected mice. In conclusion, the endogenous activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors plays a pivotal effect on the associative learning process and its relevant hippocampal circuits, including activity-dependent changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse.

  5. Neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of parkinson's disease and its dependence on adenosine A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K; Di Luca, D G; Orrú, M; Xu, Y; Chen, J-F; Schwarzschild, M A

    2016-05-13

    Considerable epidemiological and laboratory data have suggested that caffeine, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, may protect against the underlying neurodegeneration of parkinson's disease (PD). Although both caffeine and more specific antagonists of the A2A subtype of adenosine receptor (A2AR) have been found to confer protection in animal models of PD, the dependence of caffeine's neuroprotective effects on the A2AR is not known. To definitively determine its A2AR dependence, the effect of caffeine on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity was compared in wild-type (WT) and A2AR gene global knockout (A2A KO) mice, as well as in central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific (conditional) A2AR knockout (cKO) mice that lack the receptor either in postnatal forebrain neurons or in astrocytes. In WT and in heterozygous A2AR KO mice caffeine pretreatment (25mg/kgip) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced depletion of striatal dopamine. By contrast in homozygous A2AR global KO mice caffeine had no effect on MPTP toxicity. In forebrain neuron A2AR cKO mice, caffeine lost its locomotor stimulant effect, whereas its neuroprotective effect was mostly preserved. In astrocytic A2AR cKO mice, both caffeine's locomotor stimulant and protective properties were undiminished. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of PD relies on the A2AR, although the specific cellular localization of these receptors remains to be determined.

  6. In vivo evaluation of [11C]preladenant positron emission tomography for quantification of adenosine A2A receptors in the rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Xiaoyun; Khanapur, Shivashankar; de Jong, Johan R; Willemsen, Antoon T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi Ajo; Elsinga, Philip H; de Vries, Erik Fj

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]Preladenant was developed as a novel adenosine A2A receptor positron emission tomography radioligand. The present study aims to evaluate the suitability of [(11)C]preladenant positron emission tomography for the quantification of striatal A2A receptor density and the assessment of striatal A2

  7. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Andrea N; McNeely, Patrick M; Katsaras, John; Robinson, Anne Skaja

    2016-08-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. The studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein's purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) variants may increase autistic symptoms and anxiety in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christine M; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Huy, Ellen; Rothermundt, Matthias; Krakowitzky, Petra; Meyer, Jobst; Deckert, Jürgen; von Gontard, Alexander; Hohoff, Christa

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous disorders presenting with increased rates of anxiety. The adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) is associated with panic disorder and is located on chromosome 22q11.23. Its gene product, the adenosine A(2A) receptor, is strongly expressed in the caudate nucleus, which also is involved in ASD. As autistic symptoms are increased in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and large 22q11.2 deletions and duplications have been observed in ASD individuals, in this study, 98 individuals with ASD and 234 control individuals were genotyped for eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ADORA2A. Nominal association with the disorder was observed for rs2236624-CC, and phenotypic variability in ASD symptoms was influenced by rs3761422, rs5751876 and rs35320474. In addition, association of ADORA2A variants with anxiety was replicated for individuals with ASD. Findings point toward a possible mediating role of ADORA2A variants on phenotypic expression in ASD that need to be replicated in a larger sample.

  9. Ethanol and Caffeine effects on social interaction and recognition in mice: Involvement of adenosine A2A and A1 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura López-Cruz

    2016-11-01

    memories, and A2A adenosine antagonists can prevent the amnestic effects of ethanol, so that animals can recognice familiar conspecifics. On the other hand, ethanol can counteract the social withdrawal induced by caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist. These results show the complex set of interactions between ethanol and caffeine, some of which could be the

  10. Regulation of epithelial sodium channel a-subunit expression by adenosine receptor A2a in alveolar epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Wang; WANG Dao-xin; ZHANG Wei; LI Chang-yi

    2011-01-01

    Background The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel a-subunit (a-ENaC) is an important factor for alveolar fluid clearance during acute lung injury. The relationship between adenosine receptor A2a (A2aAR) expressed in alveolar epithelial cells and aα-ENaC is poorly understood. We targeted the A2aAR in this study to investigate its role in the expression of αa-ENaC and in acute lung injury.Methods A549 cells were incubated with different concentrations of A2aAR agonist CGS-21680 and with 100 μmol/L CGS-21680 for various times. Rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after CGS-21680 was injected. Animals were sacrificed and tissue was harvested for evaluation of lung injury by analysis of the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, lung permeability and myeloperoxidase activity. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of α-ENaC in A549 cells and alveolar type II epithelial cells.Results Both mRNA and protein levels of α-ENaC were markedly higher from 4 hours to 24 hours after exposure to 100μmol/L CGS-21680. There were significant changes from 0.1 umol/L to 100 μmol/L CGS-21680, with a positive correlation between increased concentrations of CGS-21680 and expression of α-ENaC. Treatment with CGS-21680during LPS induced lung injury protected the lung and promoted α-ENaC expression in the alveolar epithelial cells.Conclusion Activation of A2aAR has a protective effect during the lung injury, which may be beneficial to the prognosis of acute lung injury.

  11. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

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    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  12. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors with iron deficiency in rats: effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission.

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    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-07-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A(2A) receptors was found in rats fed during 3 weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A(2A) receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A2A receptors with iron deficiency in rats. Effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A2A receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A2A receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A2A receptors was found in rats fed during three weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A2A receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. PMID:20385128

  14. Salidroside attenuates chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension via adenosine A2a receptor related mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoying; Zou, Lizhen; Yu, Xiaoming; Chen, Mayun; Guo, Rui; Cai, Hui; Yao, Dan; Xu, Xiaomei; Chen, Yanfan; Ding, Cheng; Cai, Xueding; Wang, Liangxing

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by pulmonary arterial remodeling mainly due to excess cellular proliferation and apoptosis resistance of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Salidroside, an active ingredient isolated from Rhodiola rosea is proposed to exert protective effects against PAH. However, the function of salidroside in PAH has not been investigated systematically and the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To investigate the effects of salidroside on PAH, the mice in chronic hypoxia model of PAH were given by an increasing concentration of salidroside (0, 16 mg/kg, 32 mg/kg, and 64 mg/kg). After salidroside treatment, the chronic hypoxia-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary arterial remodeling were attenuated, suggesting a protective role played by salidroside in PAH. To explore the potential mechanisms, the apoptosis of PASMCs after salidroside treatment under hypoxia conditions were determined in vivo and in vitro, and also the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis factors, Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome C, and caspase 9 were examined. The results revealed that salidroside reversed hypoxia-induced cell apoptosis resistance at least partially via a mitochondria-dependent pathway. In addition, salidroside upregulated the expression of adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) in lung tissues of mice and in PASMCs in vitro after hypoxia exposure. Combined the evidence above, we conclude that salidroside can attenuate chronic hypoxia-induced PAH by promoting PASMCs apoptosis via an A2aR related mitochondria dependent pathway. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M B; Fuxe, K; Werge, T;

    2002-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 has shown effects similar to dopamine antagonists in behavioural assays in rats predictive for antipsychotic activity, without induction of extrapyramidal side-effects (EPS). In the present study, we examined whether this functional dopamine antagonism...... and lack of EPS in rodents could also be observed in non-human primates. We investigated the effects of CGS 21680 on behaviours induced by D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine in EPS-sensitized Cebus apella monkeys. CGS 21680 was administered s.c. in doses of 0.01, 0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg, alone...... and in combination with D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine. The monkeys were videotaped after drug administration and the tapes were rated for EPS and psychosis-like symptoms. CGS 21680 decreased apomorphine-induced behavioural unrest, arousal (0.01-0.05 mg/kg) and stereotypies (0.05 mg/kg) while amphetamine...

  16. The adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M B; Fuxe, K; Werge, T

    2002-01-01

    and lack of EPS in rodents could also be observed in non-human primates. We investigated the effects of CGS 21680 on behaviours induced by D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine in EPS-sensitized Cebus apella monkeys. CGS 21680 was administered s.c. in doses of 0.01, 0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg, alone...... and in combination with D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine. The monkeys were videotaped after drug administration and the tapes were rated for EPS and psychosis-like symptoms. CGS 21680 decreased apomorphine-induced behavioural unrest, arousal (0.01-0.05 mg/kg) and stereotypies (0.05 mg/kg) while amphetamine...... showed a functional anti-dopaminergic effect in Cebus apella monkeys without production of EPS. This further substantiates that adenosine A2A receptor agonists may have potential as antipsychotics with atypical profiles....

  17. Attenuation of gastric mucosal inflammation induced by aspirin through activation of A2A adenosine receptor in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaru Odashima; Reina Ohba; Sumio Watanabe; Joel Linden; Michiro Otaka; Mario Jin; Koga Komatsu; Isao Wada; Youhei Horikawa; Tamotsu Matsuhashi; Natsumi Hatakeyama; Jinko Oyake

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether a specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist (ATL-146e) can ameliorate aspirin-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats, and reduce neutrophil accumulation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines.METHODS: Gastric lesions were produced by oral gavage of aspirin (200 mg/kg) and HCl (0.15 mol/L,8.0 mL/kg). 4-{3-[6-Amino-9-(5-ethylcarbamoyl-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-2-yl]-prop-2-ynyl}-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid methyl ester (ATL-146e,2.5-5 μg/kg, IP) was injected 30 min before the administration of aspirin. Tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration in gastric mucosa was measured as an index of neutrophil infiltration. Gastric mucosal concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were determined by ELISA. Also, we examined the effect of ATL-146e on tissue prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and gastric secretion.RESULTS: Intragastric administration of aspirin induced multiple hemorrhagic erosions in rat gastric mucosa. The total length of gastric erosions (ulcer index) in control rats was 29.8±7.75 mm and was reduced to 3.8±1.42 mm after pretreatment with 5.0 g/kg ATL-146e (P< 0.01).The gastric contents of MPO and pro-inflammatory cytokines were all increased after the administration of aspirin and reduced to nearly normal levels by ATL-146e.Gastric mucosal PGE2 concentration was not affected by intraperitoneal injection of ATL-146e.CONCLUSION: The specific adenosine A2A receptor agohist, ATL-146e, has potent anti-ulcer effects presumably mediated by its anti-inflammatory properties.

  18. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs.

  19. Adenosine A2A receptor and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 are upregulated in hippocampal astrocytes of human patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Barbosa, Aurora R; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Oliveira, Ângela; Mendes, Marina; Lobo, M Graça; Santos, Agostinho; Rangel, Rui; Pelletier, Julie; Sévigny, Jean; Cordeiro, J Miguel; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-12-01

    Refractoriness to existing medications of up to 80 % of the patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) prompts for finding new antiepileptic drug targets. The adenosine A2A receptor emerges as an interesting pharmacological target since its excitatory nature partially counteracts the dominant antiepileptic role of endogenous adenosine acting via inhibitory A1 receptors. Gain of function of the excitatory A2A receptor has been implicated in a significant number of brain pathologies commonly characterized by neuronal excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated changes in the expression and cellular localization of the A2A receptor and of the adenosine-generating enzyme, ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73, in the hippocampus of control individuals and MTLE human patients. Western blot analysis indicates that the A2A receptor is more abundant in the hippocampus of MTLE patients compared to control individuals. Immunoreactivity against the A2A receptor predominates in astrocytes staining positively for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). No co-localization was observed between the A2A receptor and neuronal cell markers, like synaptotagmin 1/2 (nerve terminals) and neurofilament 200 (axon fibers). Hippocampal astrogliosis observed in MTLE patients was accompanied by a proportionate increase in A2A receptor and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 immunoreactivities. Given our data, we hypothesize that selective blockade of excessive activation of astrocytic A2A receptors and/or inhibition of surplus adenosine formation by membrane-bound ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 may reduce neuronal excitability, thus providing a novel therapeutic target for drug-refractory seizures in MTLE patients.

  20. Adenosine A2A receptor blockade or deletion diminishes fibrocyte accumulation in the skin in a murine model of scleroderma, bleomycin-induced fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katebi, Majid; Fernandez, Patricia; Chan, Edwin S L; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2008-10-01

    Peripheral blood fibrocytes are a newly identified circulating leukocyte subpopulation that migrates into injured tissue where it may display fibroblast-like properties and participate in wound healing and fibrosis of skin and other organs. Previous studies in our lab demonstrated that A(2A) receptor-deficient and A(2A) antagonist-treated mice were protected from developing bleomycin-induced dermal fibrosis, thus the aim of this study was to determine whether the adenosine A(2A) receptor regulates recruitment of fibrocytes to the dermis in this bleomycin-induced model of dermal fibrosis. Sections of skin from normal mice and bleomycin-treated wild type, A(2A) knockout and A(2A) antagonist-treated mice were stained for Procollagen alpha2 Type I and CD34 and the double stained cells, fibrocytes, were counted in the tissue sections. There were more fibrocytes in the dermis of bleomycin-treated mice than normal mice and the increase was abrogated by deletion or blockade of adenosine A(2A) receptors. Because fibrocytes play a central role in tissue fibrosis these results suggest that diminished adenosine A(2A) receptor-mediated recruitment of fibrocytes into tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of fibrosing diseases of the skin. Moreover, these results provide further evidence that adenosine A(2A) receptors may represent a new target for the treatment of such fibrosing diseases as scleroderma or nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy.

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor deficiency up-regulates cystatin F expression in white matter lesions induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Duan

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we have shown that the inactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced white matter lesions (WMLs by enhancing neuroinflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor remains unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that cystatin F, a potent endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is selectively expressed in immune cells in association with inflammatory demyelination in central nervous system diseases. To understand the expression of cystatin F and its potential role in the effect of A2A receptor on WMLs induced through chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, we investigated cystatin F expression in the WMLs of A2A receptor gene knockout mice, the littermate wild-type mice and wild-type mice treated daily with the A2A receptor agonist CGS21680 or both CGS21680 and A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The results of quantitative-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that cystatin F mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated in the WMLs after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In addition, cystatin F expression in the corpus callosum was significantly increased in A2A receptor gene knockout mice and markedly decreased in mice treated with CGS21680 on both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, SCH58261 counteracted the attenuation of cystatin F expression produced by CGS21680 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, double immunofluorescence staining revealed that cystatin F was co-localized with the activated microglia marker CD11b. In conclusion, the cystatin F expression in the activated microglia is closely associated with the effect of the A2A receptors, which may be related to the neuroinflammatory responses occurring during the pathological process.

  2. Adenosine A2A receptor deficiency up-regulates cystatin F expression in white matter lesions induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei; Ran, Hong; Zhou, Zhujuan; He, Qifen; Zheng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that the inactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced white matter lesions (WMLs) by enhancing neuroinflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor remains unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that cystatin F, a potent endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is selectively expressed in immune cells in association with inflammatory demyelination in central nervous system diseases. To understand the expression of cystatin F and its potential role in the effect of A2A receptor on WMLs induced through chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, we investigated cystatin F expression in the WMLs of A2A receptor gene knockout mice, the littermate wild-type mice and wild-type mice treated daily with the A2A receptor agonist CGS21680 or both CGS21680 and A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The results of quantitative-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that cystatin F mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated in the WMLs after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In addition, cystatin F expression in the corpus callosum was significantly increased in A2A receptor gene knockout mice and markedly decreased in mice treated with CGS21680 on both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, SCH58261 counteracted the attenuation of cystatin F expression produced by CGS21680 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, double immunofluorescence staining revealed that cystatin F was co-localized with the activated microglia marker CD11b. In conclusion, the cystatin F expression in the activated microglia is closely associated with the effect of the A2A receptors, which may be related to the neuroinflammatory responses occurring during the pathological process.

  3. Adenosine A(2A receptors measured with [C]TMSX PET in the striata of Parkinson's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Mishina

    Full Text Available Adenosine A(2A receptors (A2ARs are thought to interact negatively with the dopamine D(2 receptor (D2R, so selective A2AR antagonists have attracted attention as novel treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD. However, no information about the receptor in living patients with PD is available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between A2ARs and the dopaminergic system in the striata of drug-naïve PD patients and PD patients with dyskinesia, and alteration of these receptors after antiparkinsonian therapy. We measured binding ability of striatal A2ARs using positron emission tomography (PET with [7-methyl-(11C]-(E-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine ([(11C]TMSX in nine drug-naïve patients with PD, seven PD patients with mild dyskinesia and six elderly control subjects using PET. The patients and eight normal control subjects were also examined for binding ability of dopamine transporters and D2Rs. Seven of the drug-naïve patients underwent a second series of PET scans following therapy. We found that the distribution volume ratio of A2ARs in the putamen were larger in the dyskinesic patients than in the control subjects (p<0.05, Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. In the drug-naïve patients, the binding ability of the A2ARs in the putamen, but not in the head of caudate nucleus, was significantly lower on the more affected side than on the less affected side (p<0.05, paired t-test. In addition, the A2ARs were significantly increased after antiparkinsonian therapy in the bilateral putamen of the drug-naïve patients (p<0.05, paired t-test but not in the bilateral head of caudate nucleus. Our study demonstrated that the A2ARs in the putamen were increased in the PD patients with dyskinesia, and also suggest that the A2ARs in the putamen compensate for the asymmetrical decrease of dopamine in drug-naïve PD patients and that antiparkinsonian therapy increases the A2ARs in the putamen. The A2ARs may play an

  4. Prevention of adenosine A2A receptor activation diminishes beat-to-beat alternation in human atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Cristina E; Llach, Anna; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Tarifa, Carmen; Barriga, Montserrat; Wiegerinck, Rob F; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benitéz, Raúl; Montiel, José; Cinca, Juan; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with increased spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and linked to increased adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expression and activation. Here we tested whether this may favor atrial arrhythmogenesis by promoting beat-to-beat alternation and irregularity. Patch-clamp and confocal calcium imaging was used to measure the beat-to-beat response of the calcium current and transient in human atrial myocytes. Responses were classified as uniform, alternating or irregular and stimulation of Gs-protein coupled receptors decreased the frequency where a uniform response could be maintained from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 0.6 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.01 for beta-adrenergic receptors and from 1.4 ± 0.1 to 0.5 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.05 for A2ARs. The latter was linked to increased spontaneous calcium release and after-depolarizations. Moreover, A2AR activation increased the fraction of non-uniformly responding cells in HL-1 myocyte cultures from 19 ± 3 to 51 ± 9 %; p < 0.02, and electrical mapping in perfused porcine atria revealed that adenosine induced electrical alternans at longer cycle lengths, doubled the fraction of electrodes showing alternation, and increased the amplitude of alternations. Importantly, protein kinase A inhibition increased the highest frequency where uniform responses could be maintained from 0.84 ± 0.12 to 1.86 ± 0.11 Hz; p < 0.001 and prevention of A2AR-activation with exogenous adenosine deaminase selectively increased the threshold from 0.8 ± 0.1 to 1.2 ± 0.1 Hz; p = 0.001 in myocytes from patients with AF. In conclusion, A2AR-activation promotes beat-to-beat irregularities in the calcium transient in human atrial myocytes, and prevention of A2AR activation may be a novel means to maintain uniform beat-to-beat responses at higher beating frequencies in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  5. Guanosine may increase absence epileptic activity by means of A2A adenosine receptors in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Todorov, Mihail Ivilinov; Kékesi, Katalin A; Juhász, Gábor; Aleksza, Magdolna; Kovács, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    The non-adenosine nucleoside guanosine (Guo) was demonstrated to decrease quinolinic acid(QA)-induced seizures, spontaneously emerged absence epileptic seizures and lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-evoked induction of absence epileptic seizures suggesting its antiepileptic potential. It was also described previously that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 20 and 50mg/kg Guo decreased the number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) in a well investigated model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats during 4th (20mg/kg Guo) and 3rd as well as 4th (50mg/kg Guo) measuring hours. Guanosine can potentially decrease SWD number by means of its putative receptors but absence epileptic activity changing effects of Guo by means of increased extracellular adenosine (Ado) cannot be excluded. An increase in the dose of i.p. injected Guo is limited by its low solubility in saline, therefore, we addressed in the present study whether higher doses of Guo, diluted in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, have more potent antiepileptic effect in WAG/Rij rats. We confirmed that i.p. 50mg/kg Guo decreased but, surprisingly, i.p. 100mg/kg Guo enhanced the number of SWDs in WAG/Rij rats. Combined i.p. injection of a non-selective Ado receptor antagonist theophylline (5mg/kg) or a selective Ado A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine) (1mg/kg) and a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2/COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor indomethacin (10mg/kg) with 100mg/kg Guo decreased the SWD number compared to i.p. 100mg/kg Guo alone. The results suggest that i.p. 100mg/kg Guo can increase SWD number by means of the adenosinergic system.

  6. A2A adenosine receptor and its modulators: overview on a druggable GPCR and on structure-activity relationship analysis and binding requirements of agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristalli, G; Lambertucci, C; Marucci, G; Volpini, R; Dal Ben, D

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of the biological effects of adenosine, the development of potent and selective agonists and antagonists of adenosine receptors has been the subject of medicinal chemistry research for several decades, even if their clinical evaluation has been discontinued. Main problems include side effects due to the ubiquity of the receptors and the possibility of side effects, or to low brain penetration (in particular for the targeting of CNS diseases), short half-life of compounds, lack of effects. Furthermore, species differences in the affinity of ligands make difficult preclinical testing in animal models. Nevertheless, adenosine receptors continue to represent promising drug targets. A(2A) receptor has proved to be a promising pharmacological target for small synthetic ligands, and while A(2A) agonists are undergoing clinical trials for myocardial perfusion imaging and as anti-inflammatory agents, A(2A) antagonists represent an attractive field of research to discover new drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, the information coming from bioinformatics and molecular modeling studies for the A(2A) receptor has made easier the understanding of ligand-target interaction and the rational design of agonists and antagonists for this subtype. The aim of this review is to show an overview of the most significant steps and progresses in developing A(2A) adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists.

  7. Adenosine A2A Receptor and IL-10 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment

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    Beatrice Arosio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine suppresses immune responses through the A2A receptor (A2AR. This study investigated the interleukin 10 (IL-10 genetic profile and the expression of A2AR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, Alzheimer disease (AD, and age-matched controls to verify, if they may help distinguish different forms of cognitive decline. We analyzed the IL-10 genotype and the expression of A2AR in 41 subjects with AD, 10 with amnestic MCI (a-MCI, 49 with multiple cognitive domain MCI (mcd-MCI, and 46 controls. There was a significant linear increase in A2AR mRNA levels and A2AR density from mcd-MCI to a-MCI, with intermediate levels being found in AD. The IL-10 AA genotype frequency was 67% in a-MCI, 46% in AD, 35% in mcd-MCI, and 20% in controls. These data suggest that the assessment of the IL-10 genotype and the expression of A2AR in PBMCs may be a valuable means of differentiating between a-MCI and mcd-MCI.

  8. Selected C8 two-chain linkers enhance the adenosine A1/A2A receptor affinity and selectivity of caffeine.

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    van der Walt, M M; Terre'Blanche, G

    2017-01-05

    Recent research exploring C8 substitution on the caffeine core identified 8-(2-phenylethyl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine as a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist. To elaborate further, we included various C8 two-chain-length linkers to enhance adenosine receptor affinity. The results indicated that the unsubstituted benzyloxy linker (1e A1Ki = 1.52 μM) displayed the highest affinity for the A1 adenosine receptor and the para-chloro-substituted phenoxymethyl (1d A2AKi = 1.33 μM) linker the best A2A adenosine receptor affinity. The position of the oxygen revealed that the phenoxymethyl linker favoured A1 adenosine receptor selectivity over the benzyloxy linker and, by introducing a para-chloro substituent, A2A adenosine receptor selectivity was obtained. Selected compounds (1c, 1e) behaved as A1 adenosine receptor antagonists in GTP shift assays and therefore represent selective and non-selective A1 and A2A adenosine receptor antagonists that may have potential for treating neurological disorders.

  9. Cannabidiol provides long-lasting protection against the deleterious effects of inflammation in a viral model of multiple sclerosis: a role for A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecha, M; Feliú, A; Iñigo, P M; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Guaza, C

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) is a complex process that involves a multitude of molecules and effectors, and it requires the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the activation of resident immune cells. Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid constituent of Cannabis sativa, has potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Yet, how this compound modifies the deleterious effects of inflammation in TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) remains unknown. Using this viral model of multiple sclerosis (MS), we demonstrate that CBD decreases the transmigration of blood leukocytes by downregulating the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5) and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, as well as by attenuating the activation of microglia. Moreover, CBD administration at the time of viral infection exerts long-lasting effects, ameliorating motor deficits in the chronic phase of the disease in conjunction with reduced microglial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Adenosine A2A receptors participate in some of the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD, as the A2A antagonist ZM241385 partially blocks the protective effects of CBD in the initial stages of inflammation. Together, our findings highlight the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD in this viral model of MS and demonstrate the significant therapeutic potential of this compound for the treatment of pathologies with an inflammatory component.

  10. Adenosine A(2A receptor up-regulates retinal wave frequency via starburst amacrine cells in the developing rat retina.

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    Pin-Chien Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developing retinas display retinal waves, the patterned spontaneous activity essential for circuit refinement. During the first postnatal week in rodents, retinal waves are mediated by synaptic transmission between starburst amacrine cells (SACs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. The neuromodulator adenosine is essential for the generation of retinal waves. However, the cellular basis underlying adenosine's regulation of retinal waves remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether and how the adenosine A(2A receptor (A(2AR regulates retinal waves and whether A(2AR regulation of retinal waves acts via presynaptic SACs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed that A(2AR was expressed in the inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer of the developing rat retina. Knockdown of A(2AR decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ transients, suggesting that endogenous A(2AR may up-regulate wave frequency. To investigate whether A(2AR acts via presynaptic SACs, we targeted gene expression to SACs by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type II promoter. Ca²⁺ transient frequency was increased by expressing wild-type A(2AR (A2AR-WT in SACs, suggesting that A(2AR may up-regulate retinal waves via presynaptic SACs. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings on RGCs revealed that presynaptic A(2AR-WT increased the frequency of wave-associated postsynaptic currents (PSCs or depolarizations compared to the control, without changing the RGC's excitability, membrane potentials, or PSC charge. These findings suggest that presynaptic A(2AR may not affect the membrane properties of postsynaptic RGCs. In contrast, by expressing the C-terminal truncated A(2AR mutant (A(2AR-ΔC in SACs, the wave frequency was reduced compared to the A(2AR-WT, but was similar to the control, suggesting that the full-length A(2AR in SACs is required for A(2AR up-regulation of retinal waves. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A(2AR up-regulates the frequency of retinal waves via

  11. Insulin-increased L-arginine transport requires A(2A adenosine receptors activation in human umbilical vein endothelium.

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    Enrique Guzmán-Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available Adenosine causes vasodilation of human placenta vasculature by increasing the transport of arginine via cationic amino acid transporters 1 (hCAT-1. This process involves the activation of A(2A adenosine receptors (A(2AAR in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Insulin increases hCAT-1 activity and expression in HUVECs, and A(2AAR stimulation increases insulin sensitivity in subjects with insulin resistance. However, whether A(2AAR plays a role in insulin-mediated increase in L-arginine transport in HUVECs is unknown. To determine this, we first assayed the kinetics of saturable L-arginine transport (1 minute, 37°C in the absence or presence of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI, 10 µmol/L, adenosine transport inhibitor and/or adenosine receptors agonist/antagonists. We also determined hCAT-1 protein and mRNA expression levels (Western blots and quantitative PCR, and SLC7A1 (for hCAT-1 reporter promoter activity. Insulin and NBTI increased the extracellular adenosine concentration, the maximal velocity for L-arginine transport without altering the apparent K(m for L-arginine transport, hCAT-1 protein and mRNA expression levels, and SLC7A1 transcriptional activity. An A2AAR antagonist ZM-241385 blocked these effects. ZM241385 inhibited SLC7A1 reporter transcriptional activity to the same extent in cells transfected with pGL3-hCAT-1(-1606 or pGL3-hCAT-1(-650 constructs in the presence of NBTI + insulin. However, SLC7A1 reporter activity was increased by NBTI only in cells transfected with pGL3-hCAT-1(-1606, and the ZM-241385 sensitive fraction of the NBTI response was similar in the absence or in the presence of insulin. Thus, insulin modulation of hCAT-1 expression and activity requires functional A(2AAR in HUVECs, a mechanism that may be applicable to diseases associated with fetal insulin resistance, such as gestational diabetes.

  12. Adenosine A2A receptor agonist prevents cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive male rats after myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jaqueline S; Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; Sudo, Roberto T; Wang, Hao; Groban, Leanne; Ferraz, Emanuele B; Nascimento, José Hamilton M; Fraga, Carlos Alberto M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2017-01-01

    Background This work evaluated the hypothesis that 3,4-methylenedioxybenzoyl-2-thienylhydrazone (LASSBio-294), an agonist of adenosine A2A receptor, could be beneficial for preventing cardiac dysfunction due to hypertension associated with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods Male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were randomly divided into four groups (six animals per group): sham-operation (SHR-Sham), and myocardial infarction rats (SHR-MI) were treated orally either with vehicle or LASSBio-294 (10 and 20 mg.kg−1.d−1) for 4 weeks. Echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamic parameters measured left ventricle (LV) structure and function. Exercise tolerance was evaluated using a treadmill test. Cardiac remodeling was accessed by LV collagen deposition and tumor necrosis factor α expression. Results Early mitral inflow velocity was significantly reduced in the SHR-MI group, and there was significant recovery in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with LASSBio-294. Exercise intolerance observed in the SHR-MI group was prevented by 10 mg.kg−1.d−1 of LASS-Bio-294, and exercise tolerance exceeded that of the SHR-Sham group at 20 mg.kg−1.d−1. LV end-diastolic pressure increased after MI, and this was prevented by 10 and 20 mg.kg−1.d−1 of LASSBio-294. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase levels were restored in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with LASSBio-294. Fibrosis and inflammatory processes were also counteracted by LASSBio-294, with reductions in LV collagen deposition and tumor necrosis factor α expression. Conclusion In summary, oral administration of LASSBio-294 after MI in a dose-dependent manner prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction, demonstrating this compound’s potential as an alternative treatment for heart failure in the setting of ischemic heart disease with superimposed chronic hypertension.

  13. Adenosine A2A receptor activation reduces recurrence and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection in mice following vancomycin treatment

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    Li Yuesheng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR decreases production of inflammatory cytokines, prevents C. difficile toxin A-induced enteritis and, in combination with antibiotics, increases survival from sepsis in mice. We investigated whether A2AAR activation improves and A2AAR deletion worsens outcomes in a murine model of C. difficile (strain VPI10463 infection (CDI. Methods C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with an antibiotic cocktail prior to infection and then treated with vancomycin with or without an A2AAR agonist. A2AAR-/- and littermate wild-type (WT mice were similarly infected, and IFNγ and TNFα were measured at peak of and recovery from infection. Results Infected, untreated mice rapidly lost weight, developed diarrhea, and had mortality rates of 50-60%. Infected mice treated with vancomycin had less weight loss and diarrhea during antibiotic treatment but mortality increased to near 100% after discontinuation of antibiotics. Infected mice treated with both vancomycin and an A2AAR agonist, either ATL370 or ATL1222, had minimal weight loss and better long-term survival than mice treated with vancomycin alone. A2AAR KO mice were more susceptible than WT mice to death from CDI. Increases in cecal IFNγ and blood TNFα were pronounced in the absence of A2AARs. Conclusion In a murine model of CDI, vancomycin treatment resulted in reduced weight loss and diarrhea during acute infection, but high recurrence and late-onset death, with overall mortality being worse than untreated infected controls. The administration of vancomycin plus an A2AAR agonist reduced inflammation and improved survival rates, suggesting a possible benefit of A2AAR agonists in the management of CDI to prevent recurrent disease.

  14. Hyperthermia-induced seizures alter adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

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    León-Navarro, David Agustín; Albasanz, José L; Martín, Mairena

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The neuromodulator adenosine exerts anticonvulsant actions through binding adenosine receptors. Here, the impact of hyperthermia-induced seizures on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity has been studied at different periods in the cerebral cortical area by using radioligand binding, real-time PCR, and 5'-nucleotidase activity assays. Hyperthermic seizures were induced in 13-day-old rats using a warmed air stream from a hair dryer. Neonates exhibited rearing and falling over associated with hindlimb clonus seizures (stage 5 on Racine scale criteria) after hyperthermic induction. A significant increase in A1 receptor density was observed using [(3) H]DPCPX as radioligand, and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density was detected, using [(3) H]ZM241385 as radioligand, 48 h after hyperthermia-evoked convulsions. These short-term changes in A1 and A2A receptors were also accompanied by a loss of 5'-nucleotidase activity. No significant variations either in A1 or A2A receptor density or 5'-nucleotidase were observed 5 and 20 days after hyperthermic seizures. Taken together, both regulation of A1 and A2A receptors and loss of 5'-nucleotidase in the cerebral cortex suggest the existence of a neuroprotective mechanism against seizures. Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The consequences of hyperthermia-induced seizures (animal model of febrile seizures) on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity have been studied at different periods in cerebral cortical area. A significant increase in A1 receptor density and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density and 5'-nucleotidase activity was detected 48 h after convulsions evoked by hyperthermia

  15. Adenosine A2A receptors in both bone marrow cells and non-bone marrow cells contribute to traumatic brain injury.

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    Dai, Shuang-Shuang; Li, Wei; An, Jian-Hong; Wang, Hao; Yang, Nan; Chen, Xing-Yun; Zhao, Yan; Li, Ping; Liu, Ping; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Zhou, Yuan-Guo

    2010-06-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A(2A)Rs) in bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) are involved in regulation of inflammation and outcome in several CNS injuries; however their relative contribution to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is unknown. In this study, we created a mouse cortical impact model, and BMDC A(2A)Rs were selectively inactivated in wild-type (WT) mice or reconstituted in global A(2A)R knockout (KO) mice (i.e. inactivation of non-BMDC A(2A)Rs) by bone marrow transplantation. When compared with WT mice, selective inactivation of BMDC A(2A)Rs significantly attenuated the neurological deficits, brain water content and cell apoptosis at 24 h post-TBI as global A(2A)R KO did. However, compared with the A(2A)R KO mice, selective reconstitution of BMDC A(2A)Rs failed to reinstate brain injury, indicating the contribution of the non-BMDC A(2A)R to TBI. Furthermore, the protective outcome by selective inactivation of BMDC A(2A)R or broad inactivation of non-BMDC A(2A)Rs was accompanied with reduced CSF glutamate level and suppression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1, or interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These findings demonstrate that inactivation of A(2A)Rs in either BMDCs or non-BMDCs is sufficient to confer the protective effect as global A(2A)R KO against TBI, indicating the A(2A)R involvement in TBI by multiple cellular mechanisms of A(2A)R involvement including inhibition of glutamate release and inflammatory cytokine expressions.

  16. 2-Amino-N-pyrimidin-4-ylacetamides as A2A receptor antagonists: 2. Reduction of hERG activity, observed species selectivity, and structure-activity relationships.

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    Slee, Deborah H; Moorjani, Manisha; Zhang, Xiaohu; Lin, Emily; Lanier, Marion C; Chen, Yongsheng; Rueter, Jaimie K; Lechner, Sandra M; Markison, Stacy; Malany, Siobhan; Joswig, Tanya; Santos, Mark; Gross, Raymond S; Williams, John P; Castro-Palomino, Julio C; Crespo, María I; Prat, Maria; Gual, Silvia; Díaz, José-Luis; Jalali, Kayvon; Sai, Yang; Zuo, Zhiyang; Yang, Chun; Wen, Jenny; O'Brien, Zhihong; Petroski, Robert; Saunders, John

    2008-03-27

    Previously we have described a series of novel A 2A receptor antagonists with excellent water solubility. As described in the accompanying paper, the antagonists were first optimized to remove an unsubstituted furyl moiety, with the aim of avoiding the potential metabolic liabilities that can arise from the presence of an unsubstituted furan. This effort identified a series of potent and selective methylfuryl derivatives. Herein, we describe the further optimization of this series to increase potency, maintain selectivity for the human A 2A vs the human A 1 receptor, and minimize activity against the hERG channel. In addition, the observed structure-activity relationships against both the human and the rat A 2A receptor are reported.

  17. Histamine H3 receptor activation counteracts adenosine A2A receptor-mediated enhancement of depolarization-evoked [3H]-GABA release from rat globus pallidus synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Figueroa, Guadalupe-Elide; Márquez-Gómez, Ricardo; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2014-08-20

    High levels of histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are found in the globus pallidus (GP), a neuronal nucleus in the basal ganglia involved in the control of motor behavior. By using rat GP isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes), we studied whether H3R activation modified the previously reported enhancing action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulation on depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release. At 3 and 10 nM, the A2AR agonist CGS-21680 enhanced [(3)H]-GABA release induced by high K(+) (20 mM) and the effect of 3 nM CGS-21680 was prevented by the A2AR antagonist ZM-241385 (100 nM). The presence of presynaptic H3Rs was confirmed by the specific binding of N-α-[methyl-(3)H]-histamine to membranes from GP synaptosomes (maximum binding, Bmax, 1327 ± 79 fmol/mg protein; dissociation constant, Kd, 0.74 nM), which was inhibited by the H3R ligands immepip, clobenpropit, and A-331440 (inhibition constants, Ki, 0.28, 8.53, and 316 nM, respectively). Perfusion of synaptosomes with the H3R agonist immepip (100 nM) had no effect on K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release, but inhibited the stimulatory action of A2AR activation. In turn, the effect of immepip was blocked by the H3R antagonist clobenpropit, which had no significant effect of its own on K(+)-induced [(3)H]-GABA release. These data indicate that H3R activation selectively counteracts the facilitatory action of A2AR stimulation on GABA release from striato-pallidal projections.

  18. Crystallization and Structure Determination of Superantigens and Immune Receptor Complexes.

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    Rödström, Karin E J; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination of superantigens and the complexes they form with immune receptors have over the years provided insight in their modes of action. This technique requires growing large and highly ordered crystals of the superantigen or receptor-superantigen complex, followed by exposure to X-ray radiation and data collection. Here, we describe methods for crystallizing superantigens and superantigen-receptor complexes using the vapor diffusion technique, how the crystals may be optimized, and lastly data collection and structure determination.

  19. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of dual acting ligands targeting the adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors for the potential treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörg, Manuela; May, Lauren T; Mak, Frankie S; Lee, Kiew Ching K; Miller, Neil D; Scammells, Peter J; Capuano, Ben

    2015-01-22

    A relatively new strategy in drug discovery is the development of dual acting ligands. These molecules are potentially able to interact at two orthosteric binding sites of a heterodimer simultaneously, possibly resulting in enhanced subtype selectivity, higher affinity, enhanced or modified physiological response, and reduced reliance on multiple drug administration regimens. In this study, we have successfully synthesized a series of classical heterobivalent ligands as well as a series of more integrated and "drug-like" dual acting molecules, incorporating ropinirole as a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and ZM 241385 as an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. The best compounds of our series maintained the potency of the original pharmacophores at both receptors (adenosine A2A and dopamine D2). In addition, the integrated dual acting ligands also showed promising results in preliminary blood-brain barrier permeability tests, whereas the classical heterobivalent ligands are potentially more suited as pharmacological tools.

  20. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Valadas, Jorge S; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V

    2016-08-11

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer's and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions.

  1. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Vânia L.; Ferreira, Diana G.; Coelho, Joana E.; Valadas, Jorge S.; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E.; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer’s and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  2. Diversity and bias through receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteroreceptor complexes. Focus on examples from dopamine D2 receptor heteromerization

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    Kjell eFuxe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980ies and 1990ies it was shown that neurotensin through selective antagonistic NTR-D2likeR interactions increased the diversity of DA signalling by reducing D2R mediated dopamine signalling over D1R mediated dopamine signalling. Furthermore, D2R protomer appeared to bias the specificity of the NTR orthosteric binding site towards neuromedin N vs neurotensin in the heteroreceptor complex. Complex CCK2R-D1R-D2R interactions in possible heteroreceptor complexes were also demonstrated further increasing receptor diversity. In D2R-5-HT2AR heteroreceptor complexes the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI were recently found to exert a biased agonist action on the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer leading to the development of an active conformational state different from the one produced by 5-HT. Furthermore, as recently demonstrated allosteric A2A-D2R receptor-receptor interaction brought about not only a reduced affinity of the D2R agonist binding site but also a biased modulation of the D2R protomer signalling in A2A-D2R heteroreceptor complexes. A conformational state of the D2R was induced which moved away from Gi/o signaling and instead favoured b-arrestin2 mediated signalling. These examples on allosteric receptor-receptor interactions obtained over several decades serve to illustrate the significant increase in diversity and biased recognition and signaling that develop through such mechanisms.

  3. Neuroleptics up-regulate adenosine A2a receptors in rat striatum: implications for the mechanism and the treatment of tardive dyskinesia.

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    Parsons, B; Togasaki, D M; Kassir, S; Przedborski, S

    1995-11-01

    Neuroleptics, which are potent dopamine receptor antagonists, are used to treat psychosis. In the striatum, dopamine subtype-2 (D2) receptors interact with high-affinity adenosine subtype-2 (A2a) receptors. To examine the effect of various neuroleptics on the major subtypes of striatal dopamine and adenosine receptors, rats received 28 daily intraperitoneal injections of these drugs. Haloperidol (1.5 mg/kg/day) increased the density of striatal D2 receptors by 24% without changing their affinity for [3H]sulpiride. Haloperidol increased the density of striatal A2a receptors by 33% (control, 522.4 +/- 20.7 fmol/mg of protein; haloperidol, 694.6 +/- 23.6 fmol/mg of protein; p sulpiride (100 mg/kg/day) and clozapine (20 mg/kg/day) did not (control, 290.3 +/- 8.7 fmol/mg of protein; haloperidol, 358.1 +/- 6.9 fmol/mg of protein; fluphenazine, 381.3 +/- 13.6 fmol/mg of protein; sulpiride, 319.8 +/- 18.9 fmol/mg of protein; clozapine, 309.2 +/- 13.7 fmol/mg of protein).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. L-DOPA-treatment in primates disrupts the expression of A(2A) adenosine-CB(1) cannabinoid-D(2) dopamine receptor heteromers in the caudate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Rico, Alberto J; Moreno, Estefanía; Sierra, Salvador; Sánchez, Marta; Luquin, Natasha; Farré, Daniel; Müller, Christa E; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Armentero, Marie-Therese; Pinna, Annalisa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; McCormick, Peter J; Lanciego, José L; Casadó, Vicent; Franco, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    The molecular basis of priming for L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease (PD), which depends on the indirect pathway of motor control, is not known. In rodents, the indirect pathway contains striatopallidal GABAergic neurons that express heterotrimers composed of A(2A) adenosine, CB(1) cannabinoid and D(2) dopamine receptors that regulate dopaminergic neurotransmission. The present study was designed to investigate the expression of these heteromers in the striatum of a primate model of Parkinson's disease and to determine whether their expression and pharmacological properties are altered upon L-DOPA treatment. By using the recently developed in situ proximity ligation assay and by identification of a biochemical fingerprint, we discovered a regional distribution of A(2A)/CB(1) /D(2) receptor heteromers that predicts differential D(2)-mediated neurotransmission in the caudate-putamen of Macaca fascicularis. Whereas heteromers were abundant in the caudate nucleus of both naïve and MPTP-treated monkeys, L-DOPA treatment blunted the biochemical fingerprint and led to weak heteromer expression. These findings constitute the first evidence of altered receptor heteromer expression in pathological conditions and suggest that drugs targeting A(2A)-CB(1) -D(2) receptor heteromers may be successful to either normalize basal ganglia output or prevent L-DOPA-induced side effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Activation of Adenosine Receptor A2A Increases HSC Proliferation and Inhibits Death and Senescence by Down-regulation of p53 and Rb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kaimul eAhsan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: During fibrosis hepatic stellate cells (HSC undergo activation, proliferation and senescence but the regulation of these important processes is poorly understood. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2A is known to be present on HSC, and its activation results in liver fibrosis. In this study, we tested if A2A has a role in the regulation of HSC proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and the relevant molecular mechanism.Methods: The ability of adenosine to regulate p53 and Rb protein levels, proliferation, apoptosis and senescence was tested in the human HSC cell line LX-2 and rat primary HSC.Results: Adenosine receptor activation down-regulates p53 and Rb protein levels, increases BrdU incorporation and increases cell survival in LX-2 cells and in primary rat HSC. These effects of NECA were reproduced by an adenosine A2A receptor specific agonist (CGS21680 and blocked by a specific antagonist (ZM241385. By day twenty-one of culture primary rat HSC entered senescence and expressed -gal which was significantly inhibited by NECA. Furthermore, NECA induced down regulation of p53 and Rb and Rac1, and decreased phosphorylation of p44-42 MAP Kinase in LX-2 cells and primary rat HSC. These effects were reproduced by the cAMP analog 8-Bromo-cAMP, and the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin, and were blocked by PKA inhibitors.Conclusions: These results demonstrate that A2A receptor regulates a number of HSC fate decisions and induces greater HSC proliferation, reduces apoptosis and senescence by decreasing p53 and Rb through cAMP-PKA/Rac1/p38 MAPK pathway. This provides a mechanism for adenosine induced HSC regulation and liver fibrosis.

  6. 2-(1-Hexyn-1-yl)adenosine-induced intraocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-08-22

    The present study was performed to clarify the mechanism of change in intraocular pressure by 2-(1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-H-Ado), a selective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, in rabbits. 2-H-Ado (0.1%, 50 microl)-induced ocular hypertension (E(max): 7.7 mm Hg) was inhibited by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine, ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glibenclamide or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A2B receptor antagonist alloxazine or a cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The outflow facility induced by 2-H-Ado seems to be independent of increase in intraocular pressure or ATP-sensitive K+ channel. In contrast, the recovery rate in intraocular pressure decreased by hypertonic saline was accelerated by 2-H-Ado, and this response was dependent on ATP-sensitive K+ channel. These results suggest that 2-H-Ado-induced ocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor, and this is probably due to aqueous formation, but independent of change in outflow facility or prostaglandin production.

  7. Large-scale functional expression of WT and truncated human adenosine A2A receptor in Pichia pastoris bioreactor cultures

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    Strange Philip G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large-scale production of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs for functional and structural studies remains a challenge. Recent successes have been made in the expression of a range of GPCRs using Pichia pastoris as an expression host. P. pastoris has a number of advantages over other expression systems including ability to post-translationally modify expressed proteins, relative low cost for production and ability to grow to very high cell densities. Several previous studies have described the expression of GPCRs in P. pastoris using shaker flasks, which allow culturing of small volumes (500 ml with moderate cell densities (OD600 ~15. The use of bioreactors, which allow straightforward culturing of large volumes, together with optimal control of growth parameters including pH and dissolved oxygen to maximise cell densities and expression of the target receptors, are an attractive alternative. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of expression of the human Adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR in P. pastoris under control of a methanol-inducible promoter in both flask and bioreactor cultures. Results Bioreactor cultures yielded an approximately five times increase in cell density (OD600 ~75 compared to flask cultures prior to induction and a doubling in functional expression level per mg of membrane protein, representing a significant optimisation. Furthermore, analysis of a C-terminally truncated A2AR, terminating at residue V334 yielded the highest levels (200 pmol/mg so far reported for expression of this receptor in P. pastoris. This truncated form of the receptor was also revealed to be resistant to C-terminal degradation in contrast to the WT A2AR, and therefore more suitable for further functional and structural studies. Conclusion Large-scale expression of the A2AR in P. pastoris bioreactor cultures results in significant increases in functional expression compared to traditional flask cultures.

  8. Creatine, similarly to ketamine, affords antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test via adenosine A₁ and A2A receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Pazini, Francis L; Rosa, Julia M; Ramos-Hryb, Ana B; Oliveira, Ágatha; Kaster, Manuella P; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-06-01

    The benefits of creatine supplementation have been reported in a broad range of central nervous systems diseases, including depression. A previous study from our group demonstrated that creatine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test (TST), a predictive model of antidepressant activity. Since depression is associated with a dysfunction of the adenosinergic system, we investigated the involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of creatine in the TST. The anti-immobility effect of creatine (1 mg/kg, po) or ketamine (a fast-acting antidepressant, 1 mg/kg, ip) in the TST was prevented by pretreatment of mice with caffeine (3 mg/kg, ip, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) (2 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist), and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-{2-furyl}{1,2,4}triazolo-{2,3-a}{1,3,5}triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)-phenol (ZM241385) (1 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist). In addition, the combined administration of subeffective doses of creatine and adenosine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, nonselective adenosine receptor agonist) or inosine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, nucleoside formed by the breakdown of adenosine) reduced immobility time in the TST. Moreover, the administration of subeffective doses of creatine or ketamine combined with N-6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) (0.05 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist), N-6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) (0.1 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist), or dipyridamole (0.1 μg/mouse, icv, adenosine transporter inhibitor) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the TST. These results indicate that creatine, similarly to ketamine, exhibits antidepressant-like effect in the TST probably mediated by the activation of both adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, further reinforcing the potential of targeting the purinergic system to the management of mood disorders.

  9. When cytokinin, a plant hormone, meets the adenosine A2A receptor: a novel neuroprotectant and lead for treating neurodegenerative disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chao Lee

    Full Text Available It is well known that cytokinins are a class of phytohormones that promote cell division in plant roots and shoots. However, their targets, biological functions, and implications in mammalian systems have rarely been examined. In this study, we show that one cytokinin, zeatin riboside, can prevent pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells from serum deprivation-induced apoptosis by acting on the adenosine A(2A receptor (A(2A-R, which was blocked by an A(2A-R antagonist and a protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, demonstrating the functional ability of zeatin riboside by mediating through A(2A-R signaling event. Since the A(2A-R was implicated as a therapeutic target in treating Huntington's disease (HD, a cellular model of HD was applied by transfecting mutant huntingtin in PC12 cells. By using filter retardation assay and confocal microscopy we found that zeatin riboside reversed mutant huntingtin (Htt-induced protein aggregations and proteasome deactivation through A(2A-R signaling. PKA inhibitor blocked zeatin riboside-induced suppression of mutant Htt aggregations. In addition, PKA activated proteasome activity and reduced mutant Htt protein aggregations. However, a proteasome inhibitor blocked both zeatin riboside-and PKA activator-mediated suppression of mutant Htt aggregations, confirming mediation of the A(2A-R/PKA/proteasome pathway. Taken together, zeatin riboside might have therapeutic potential as a novel neuroprotectant and a lead for treating neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Eismann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures.

  11. The TNF receptor 1: a split personality complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Bryan C; Peter, Marcus E

    2003-07-25

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), a prototypic member of the death receptor family signals both cell survival and apoptosis. In this issue of Cell, report that apoptotic TNFR1 signaling proceeds via the sequential formation of two distinct complexes. Since the first complex can activate survival signals and influence the activity of the second complex, this mechanism provides a checkpoint to control the execution of apoptosis.

  12. A genetic variation in the adenosine A2A receptor gene (ADORA2A) contributes to individual sensitivity to caffeine effects on sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rétey, J V; Adam, M; Khatami, R; Luhmann, U F O; Jung, H H; Berger, W; Landolt, H-P

    2007-05-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant in Western countries. Some people voluntarily reduce caffeine consumption because it impairs the quality of their sleep. Studies in mice revealed that the disruption of sleep after caffeine is mediated by blockade of adenosine A2A receptors. Here we show in humans that (1) habitual caffeine consumption is associated with reduced sleep quality in self-rated caffeine-sensitive individuals, but not in caffeine-insensitive individuals; (2) the distribution of distinct c.1083T>C genotypes of the adenosine A2A receptor gene (ADORA2A) differs between caffeine-sensitive and -insensitive adults; and (3) the ADORA2A c.1083T>C genotype determines how closely the caffeine-induced changes in brain electrical activity during sleep resemble the alterations observed in patients with insomnia. These data demonstrate a role of adenosine A2A receptors for sleep in humans, and suggest that a common variation in ADORA2A contributes to subjective and objective responses to caffeine on sleep.

  13. Caffeine consumption prevents memory impairment, neuronal damage, and adenosine A2A receptors upregulation in the hippocampus of a rat model of sporadic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Janaína; Rocha, Andreia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Schein, Vanessa; Kazlauckas, Vanessa; Kalinine, Eduardo; Souza, Diogo O; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) streptozotocin (STZ) administration induces pathological and behavioral alterations similar to those observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is thus considered an experimental model of sporadic AD. Since caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) and selective antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors modify the course of memory impairment in different amyloid-β-based experimental models of AD, we now tested the impact of caffeine on STZ-induced dementia and associated neurodegeneration in the hippocampus as well as on the expression and density of adenosine receptors. Adult male rats received a bilateral infusion of saline or STZ (3 mg/kg, icv), which triggered memory deficits after four weeks, as gauged by impaired object recognition memory. This was accompanied by a reduced NeuN immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region and an increased expression and density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), but not A1R, in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption (1 g/L in the drinking water starting 2 weeks before the STZ challenge) prevented the STZ-induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration as well as the upregulation of A2AR. These findings provide the first demonstration that caffeine prevents sporadic dementia and implicate the control of central A2AR as its likely mechanism of action.

  14. Studying Nuclear Receptor Complexes in the Cellular Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    The ligand-regulated structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes are commonly determined by in vitro studies of isolated receptors, cofactors, and their fragments. However, in the living cell, the complexes that form are governed not just by the relative affinities of isolated cofactors for the receptor but also by the cell-specific sequestration or concentration of subsets of competing or cooperating cofactors, receptors, and other effectors into distinct subcellular domains and/or their temporary diversion into other cellular activities. Most methods developed to understand nuclear receptor function in the cellular environment involve the direct tagging of the nuclear receptor or its cofactors with fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the tracking of those FP-tagged factors by fluorescence microscopy. One of those approaches, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, quantifies the transfer of energy from a higher energy "donor" FP to a lower energy "acceptor" FP attached to a single protein or to interacting proteins. The amount of FRET is influenced by the ligand-induced changes in the proximities and orientations of the FPs within the tagged nuclear receptor complexes, which is an indicator of the structure of the complexes, and by the kinetics of the interaction between FP-tagged factors. Here, we provide a guide for parsing information about the structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes from FRET measurements in living cells.

  15. Caffeine promotes anti-tumor immune response during tumor initiation: Involvement of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Hadar; Frishman, Valeria; Yulzari, Robert; Kachko, Leonid; Lewis, Eli C; Chaimovitz, Cidio; Douvdevani, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies depict a negative correlation between caffeine consumption and incidence of tumors in humans. The main pharmacological effects of caffeine are mediated by antagonism of the adenosine receptor, A2AR. Here, we examine whether the targeting of A2AR by caffeine plays a role in anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the effects of caffeine are studied in wild-type and A2AR knockout (A2AR(-/-)) mice. Tumor induction was achieved using the carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA). Alternatively, tumor cells, comprised of 3-MCA-induced transformed cells or B16 melanoma cells, were inoculated into animal footpads. Cytokine release was determined in a mixed lymphocyte tumor reaction (MLTR). According to our findings, caffeine-consuming mice (0.1% in water) developed tumors at a lower rate compared to water-consuming mice (14% vs. 53%, respectively, p=0.0286, n=15/group). Within the caffeine-consuming mice, tumor-free mice displayed signs of autoimmune alopecia and pronounced leukocyte recruitment intocarcinogen injection sites. Similarly, A2AR(-/-) mice exhibited reduced rates of 3-MCA-induced tumors. In tumor inoculation studies, caffeine treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and elevation in proinflammatory cytokine release over water-consuming mice, as depicted by MLTR. Addition of the adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, to MLTR resulted in a sharp decrease in IFNγ levels; this was reversed by the highly selective A2AR antagonist, ZM241385. Thus, immune response modulation through either caffeine or genetic deletion of A2AR leads to a Th1 immune profile and suppression of carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of pharmacologic A2AR antagonists may hold therapeutic potential in diminishing the rate of cancer development.

  16. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control.

  17. A Novel Antagonist of the Immune Checkpoint Protein Adenosine A2a Receptor Restores Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocyte Activity in the Context of the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Mediavilla-Varela

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic strategies targeting immune checkpoint proteins have led to significant responses in patients with various tumor types. The success of these studies has led to the development of various antibodies/inhibitors for the different checkpoint proteins involved in immune evasion of the tumor. Adenosine present in high concentrations in the tumor microenvironment activates the immune checkpoint adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR, leading to the suppression of antitumor responses. Inhibition of this checkpoint has the potential to enhance antitumor T-cell responsiveness. METHODS: We developed a novel A2aR antagonist (PBF-509 and tested its antitumor response in vitro, in a mouse model, and in non-small cell lung cancer patient samples. RESULTS: Our studies showed that PBF-509 is highly specific to the A2aR as well as inhibitory of A2aR function in an in vitro model. In a mouse model, we found that lung metastasis was decreased after treatment with PBF-509 compared with its control. Furthermore, freshly resected tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from lung cancer patients showed increased A2aR expression in CD4+ cells and variable expression in CD8+ cells. Ex vivo studies showed an increased responsiveness of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes when PBF-509 was combined with anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies demonstrate that inhibition of the A2aR using the novel inhibitor PBF-509 could lead to novel immunotherapeutic strategies in non-small cell lung cancer.

  18. Interleukin-1beta but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha potentiates neuronal damage by quinolinic acid: protection by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Trevor W; Behan, Wilhelmina M H

    2007-04-01

    Quinolinic acid is an agonist at glutamate receptors sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). It has been implicated in neural dysfunction associated with infections, trauma, and ischemia, although its neurotoxic potency is relatively low. This study was designed to examine the effects of a combination of quinolinic acid and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Compounds were administered to the hippocampus of anesthetized male rats, animals being allowed to recover for 7 days before histological analysis of the hippocampus for neuronal damage estimated by counting of intact, healthy neurons. A low dose of quinolinic acid or IL-1beta produced no damage by itself, but the two together induced a significant loss of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. Higher doses produced almost total loss of pyramidal cells. Intrahippocampal TNF-alpha produced no effect alone but significantly reduced the neuronal loss produced by quinolinic acid. The adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM241385 reduced neuronal loss produced by the combinations of quinolinic acid and IL-1beta. The results suggest that simultaneous quinolinic acid and IL-1beta, both being induced by cerebral infection or injury, are synergistic in the production of neuronal damage and could together contribute substantially to traumatic, infective, or ischemic cerebral damage. Antagonism of adenosine A(2A) receptors protects neurons against the combination of quinolinic acid and IL-1beta.

  19. Structure of a human rhinovirus complexed with its receptor molecule.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Cryoelectron microscopy has been used to determine the structure of a virus when complexed with its glycoprotein cellular receptor. Human rhinovirus 16 complexed with the two amino-terminal, immunoglobulin-like domains of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 shows that the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 binds into the 12-A deep "canyon" on the viral surface. This result confirms the prediction that the viral-receptor attachment site lies in a cavity inaccessible to the host's antibodies. ...

  20. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...

  1. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...

  2. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoid, decreases inflammation in a murine model of acute lung injury: role for the adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Pinheiro, Milena L; Vitoretti, Luana B; Mariano-Souza, Domenica P; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley M; Akamine, Adriana T; Almeida, Vinícius I; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Hallak, Jaime E; Zuardi, Antônio W; Crippa, José A; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-03-05

    Acute lung injury is an inflammatory condition for which treatment is mainly supportive because effective therapies have not been developed. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), has potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the possible anti-inflammatory effect of cannabidiol in a murine model of acute lung injury. Analysis of total inflammatory cells and differential in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was used to characterize leukocyte migration into the lungs; myeloperoxidase activity of lung tissue and albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by colorimetric assays; cytokine/chemokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was also analyzed by Cytometric Bead Arrays and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A single dose of cannabidiol (20mg/kg) administered prior to the induction of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced acute lung injury decreases leukocyte (specifically neutrophil) migration into the lungs, albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) 1, 2, and 4days after the induction of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, adenosine A(2A) receptor is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol on LPS-induced acute lung injury because ZM241385 (4-(2-[7-Amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol) (a highly selective antagonist of adenosine A(2A) receptor) abrogated all of the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol previously described. Thus, we show that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury and that this effect is most likely associated with an increase in the extracellular adenosine offer and signaling through adenosine A(2A) receptor.

  3. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Jacobsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    and is suggested to facilitate cellular heme metabolism. Using a ligand-affinity approach, we purified the human hemopexin-heme receptor and identified it as the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)/CD91, a receptor expressed in several cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes, neurons......-heme complex established the ability of LRP/CD91 to mediate hemopexin-heme internalization resulting in cellular heme uptake and lysosomal hemopexin degradation. Uptake of hemopexin-heme complex induced LRP/CD91-dependent heme-oxygenase 1 mRNA transcription in cultured monocytes. In conclusion, hemopexin...

  4. 2-Amino-N-pyrimidin-4-ylacetamides as A2A receptor antagonists: 1. Structure-activity relationships and optimization of heterocyclic substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slee, Deborah H; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiaohu; Moorjani, Manisha; Lanier, Marion C; Lin, Emily; Rueter, Jaimie K; Williams, John P; Lechner, Sandra M; Markison, Stacy; Malany, Siobhan; Santos, Mark; Gross, Raymond S; Jalali, Kayvon; Sai, Yang; Zuo, Zhiyang; Yang, Chun; Castro-Palomino, Julio C; Crespo, María I; Prat, Maria; Gual, Silvia; Díaz, José-Luis; Saunders, John

    2008-03-27

    Previously we have described a novel series of potent and selective A 2A receptor antagonists (e.g., 1) with excellent aqueous solubility. While these compounds are efficacious A 2A antagonists in vivo, the presence of an unsubstituted furyl moiety was a cause of some concern. In order to avoid the potential metabolic liabilities that could arise from an unsubstituted furyl moiety, an optimization effort was undertaken with the aim of replacing the unsubstituted furan with a more metabolically stable group while maintaining potency and selectivity. Herein, we describe the synthesis and SAR of a range of novel heterocyclic systems and the successful identification of a replacement for the unsubstituted furan moiety with a methylfuran or thiazole moiety while maintaining potency and selectivity.

  5. Receptor complexes for each of the Class 3 Semaphorins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R Harvey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Class 3 Semaphorins (Sema3s are a sub-family of proteins whose known biological roles are varied and growing. The mechanism of action of the Sema3s requires binding to transmembrane receptors that comprise heteromeric complexes of Neuropilins, Plexins and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs. However, knowledge of the receptor components of the Sema3s remains incomplete, and there may be receptor components which are yet undiscovered. The receptor complexes of the Sema3s share receptor components with each other, and it is the specific combination of these components within a heteromeric complex that is thought to give rise to selective binding and signalling for individual Sema3s. This crosstalk makes it experimentally difficult to define a single holoreceptor for each Sema3. Furthermore, the receptor composition for a given Sema3 may differ between cell types, and change as a function of developmental state or pathological situation. Nevertheless, there are at least some known differences in the constitutive structure of the receptors for the Sema3s. For example in neural cells, Sema3a and Sema3f signal through different Neuropilins (Nrp1 and Nrp2 respectively and L1cam only appears important for Sema3a signaling, while Nrcam forms a complex with Nrp2. Further complexity arises from crosstalk of other families of ligands (e.g. VEGF with Sema3 receptor components. Thus the Sema3s, which have been shown as antagonists for each other, can also act as antagonists for other families of molecules. This review compiles experimental evidence describing the receptor components for the Sema3s, detailing the current state of knowledge of which components are important for signaling of each Sema3 before going on to consider possible future directions for the field.

  6. Regulación epigenética de la expresión estriatal del receptor de adenosina A(2A) en enfermedades neurológicas con trastorno motor asociado

    OpenAIRE

    Villar Menéndez, Izaskun

    2014-01-01

    La adenosina es un metabolito presente en todo el organismo con distintas funciones fisiológicas. En el sistema nervioso central, desempeña un importante papel como neuromodulador a través de la interacción con sus receptores de membrana: los receptores de adenosina A(1), A(2A), A(2B) y A(3), siendo los más abundantes en el cerebro el A(1 )y el A(2A). El receptor de adenosina A(2A) (A(2A)R) presenta una elevada expresión en el estriado, especialmente en las neuronas GABAérgicas medianas e...

  7. Adenosine A2A receptor regulation of microglia morphological remodeling-gender bias in physiology and in a model of chronic anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, L; Pinheiro, H; Patrício, P; Mateus-Pinheiro, A; Alves, N D; Coimbra, B; Baptista, F I; Henriques, S N; Cunha, C; Santos, A R; Ferreira, S G; Sardinha, V M; Oliveira, J F; Ambrósio, A F; Sousa, N; Cunha, R A; Rodrigues, A J; Pinto, L; Gomes, C A

    2016-10-11

    Developmental risk factors, such as the exposure to stress or high levels of glucocorticoids (GCs), may contribute to the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. The immunomodulatory role of GCs and the immunological fingerprint found in animals prenatally exposed to GCs point towards an interplay between the immune and the nervous systems in the etiology of these disorders. Microglia are immune cells of the brain, responsive to GCs and morphologically altered in stress-related disorders. These cells are regulated by adenosine A2A receptors, which are also involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety. We now compare animal behavior and microglia morphology in males and females prenatally exposed to the GC dexamethasone. We report that prenatal exposure to dexamethasone is associated with a gender-specific remodeling of microglial cell processes in the prefrontal cortex: males show a hyper-ramification and increased length whereas females exhibit a decrease in the number and in the length of microglia processes. Microglial cells re-organization responded in a gender-specific manner to the chronic treatment with a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, which was able to ameliorate microglial processes alterations and anxiety behavior in males, but not in females.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 October 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.173.

  8. Complexity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volinsky, Natalia; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling advances with ever-increasing pace. Yet our understanding of how the spatiotemporal dynamics of RTK signaling control specific cellular outcomes has lagged behind. Systems-centered experimental and computational approaches can help reveal how overlapping networks of signal transducers downstream of RTKs orchestrate specific cell-fate decisions. We discuss how RTK network regulatory structures, which involve the immediate posttranslational and delayed transcriptional controls by multiple feed forward and feedback loops together with pathway cross talk, adapt cells to the combinatorial variety of external cues and conditions. This intricate network circuitry endows cells with emerging capabilities for RTK signal processing and decoding. We illustrate how mathematical modeling facilitates our understanding of RTK network behaviors by unraveling specific systems properties, including bistability, oscillations, excitable responses, and generation of intricate landscapes of signaling activities. PMID:23906711

  9. The effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists on hydroxyl radical, dopamine, and glutamate in the striatum of rats with altered function of VMAT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-08-01

    It has been shown that a decreased vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) function and the disruption of dopamine (DA) storage is an early contributor to oxidative damage of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). In our previous study, we demonstrated that adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists suppressed oxidative stress in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats suggesting that this effect may account for neuroprotective properties of drugs. In the present study, rats were injected with reserpine (10 mg/kg sc) and 18 h later the effect of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on extracellular DA, glutamate and hydroxyl radical formation was studied in the rat striatum using in vivo microdialysis. By disrupting VMAT2 function, reserpine depleted DA stores, and increased glutamate and hydroxyl radical levels in the rat striatum. CSC (1 mg/kg) but not ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) increased extracellular DA level and production of hydroxyl radical in reserpinised rats. Both antagonists decreased the reserpine-induced increase in extracellular glutamate. L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) (25 mg/kg) significantly enhanced extracellular DA, had no effect on reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production and decreased extracellular glutamate concentration. CSC but not ZM 241385 given jointly with L-DOPA increased the effect of L-DOPA on extracellular DA and augmented the reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production. CSC and ZM 241385 did not influence extracellular glutamate level, which was decreased by L-DOPA. It seems that by decreasing the MAO-dependent DA metabolism rate, CSC raised cytosolic DA and by DA autoxidation, it induced hydroxyl radical overproduction. Thus, the methylxanthine A(2A) receptor antagonists bearing properties of MAO-B inhibitor, like CSC, may cause a risk of oxidative stress resulting from dysfunctional DA storage

  10. Activation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates experimental autoimmune neuritis in Lewis rats in association with enhanced humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Li, Xiao-Li; Li, Heng; Wang, Shan; Wang, Cong-Cong; Yue, Long-Tao; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Hui; Yang, Bing; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2016-04-15

    Accumulated evidence demonstrated that Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is involved in the inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we showed that a selective A2AR agonist, CGS21680, exacerbated experimental autoimmune neuritis in Lewis rats induced with bovine peripheral myelin. The exacerbation was accompanied with reduced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, increased CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and antigen-specific autoantibodies, which is possibly due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced by CGS21680. Combined with previous studies, our data indicate that the effects of A2AR stimulation in vivo are variable in different diseases. Caution should be taken in the use of A2AR agonists.

  11. Unprecedented therapeutic potential with a combination of A2A/NR2B receptor antagonists as observed in the 6-OHDA lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Michel

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease, the long-term use of dopamine replacing agents is associated with the development of motor complications; therefore, there is a need for non-dopaminergic drugs. This study evaluated the potential therapeutic impact of six different NR2B and A2A receptor antagonists given either alone or in combination in unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without (monotherapy or with (add-on therapy the co-administration of L-Dopa: Sch-58261+ Merck 22; Sch-58261+Co-101244; Preladenant + Merck 22; Preladenant + Radiprodil; Tozadenant + Radiprodil; Istradefylline + Co-101244. Animals given monotherapy were assessed on distance traveled and rearing, whereas those given add-on therapy were assessed on contralateral rotations. Three-way mixed ANOVA were conducted to assess the main effect of each drug separately and to determine whether any interaction between two drugs was additive or synergistic. Additional post hoc analyses were conducted to compare the effect of the combination with the effect of the drugs alone. Motor activity improved significantly and was sustained for longer when the drugs were given in combination than when administered separately at the same dose. Similarly, when tested as add-on treatment to L-Dopa, the combinations resulted in higher levels of contralateral rotation in comparison to the single drugs. Of special interest, the activity observed with some combinations could not be described by a simplistic additive effect and involved more subtle synergistic pharmacological interactions. The combined administration of A2A/NR2B-receptor antagonists improved motor behaviour in 6-OHDA rats. Given the proven translatability of this model such a combination may be expected to be effective in improving motor symptoms in patients.

  12. Neuroprotection of Persea major extract against oxygen and glucose deprivation in hippocampal slices involves increased glutamate uptake and modulation of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielli Letícia Fedalto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is characterised by a lack of oxygen and glucose in the brain, leading to excessive glutamate release and neuronal cell death. Adenosine is produced in response to ATP depletion and acts as an endogenous neuromodulator that reduces excitotoxicity. Persea major (Meins. L.E. Kopp (Lauraceae is a medical plant that is indigenous to South Brazil, and the rural population has used it medicinally due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of Persea major methanolic extract against oxygen and glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation as well as to determine its underlying mechanism of action in hippocampal brain slices. Persea major methanolic extract (0.5 mg/ml has a neuroprotective effect on hippocampal slices when added before or during 15 min of oxygen and glucose deprivation or 2 h of re-oxygenation. Hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation showed significantly reduced glutamate uptake, and the addition of Persea major methanolic extract in the re-oxygenation period counteracted the reduction of glutamate uptake. The presence of A1 or A2A, but not A2B or A3 receptor antagonists, abolished the neuroprotective effect of Persea major methanolic extract. In conclusion, the neuroprotective effect of Persea majormethanolic extract involves augmentation of glutamate uptake and modulation of A1 and A2B adenosine receptors.

  13. Role of Adenosine A2A Receptors in Modulating Synaptic Functions and Brain Levels of BDNF: a Possible Key Mechanism in the Pathophysiology of Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Tebano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, accumulating evidence has shown the existence of an important cross-talk between adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Not only are A2ARs involved in the mechanism of transactivation of BDNF receptor TrkB, they also modulate the effect of BDNF on synaptic transmission, playing a facilitatory and permissive role. The cAMP-PKA pathway, the main transduction system operated by A2ARs, is involved in such effects. Furthermore, a basal tonus of A2ARs is required to allow the regulation of BDNF physiological levels in the brain, as demonstrated by the reduced protein levels measured in A2ARs KO mice. The crucial role of adenosine A2ARs in the maintenance of synaptic functions and BDNF levels will be reviewed here and discussed in the light of possible implications for Huntington's disease therapy, in which a joint impairment of BDNF and A2ARs seems to play a pathogenetic role.

  14. Adenosine elicits an eNOS-independent reduction in arterial blood pressure in conscious mice that involves adenosine A(2A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik; Jaff, Mohammad G; Høgh, Ditte;

    2011-01-01

    Aims:  Adenosine plays an important role in the regulation of heart rate and vascular reactivity. However, the mechanisms underlying the acute effect of adenosine on arterial blood pressure in conscious mice are unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the effect of the nucleoside on mean...... arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in conscious mice. Methods:  Chronic indwelling catheters were placed in C57Bl/6J (WT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knock-out (eNOS(-/-) ) mice for continuous measurements of MAP and HR. Using PCR and myograph analysis involment of adenosine...... receptors was investigated in human and mouse renal blood vessels Results:  Bolus infusion of 0.5 mg/kg adenosine elicited significant transient decreases in MAP (99.3±2.3 to 70.4±4.5 mmHg) and HR (603.2±18.3 to 364.3±49.2 min(-1) ) which were inhibited by the A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM 241385. Activation...

  15. Projections of nucleus accumbens adenosine A2A receptor neurons in the mouse brain and their implications in mediating sleep-wake regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping eZhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs in the nucleus accumbens (Acb have been demonstrated to play an important role in the arousal effect of adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, and may be involved in physiological sleep. To better understand the functions of these receptors in sleep, projections of A2AR neurons were mapped utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV encoding humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP as a tracer for long axonal pathways. The Cre-dependent AAV was injected into the core (AcbC and shell (AcbSh of the Acb in A2AR-Cre mice. Immunohistochemistry was then used to visualize hrGFP, highlighting the perikarya of the A2AR neurons in the injection sites, and their axons in projection regions. The data revealed that A2AR neurons exhibit medium-sized and either round or elliptic perikarya with their processes within the Acb. Moreover, the projections from the Acb distributed to nuclei in the forebrain, diencephalon, and brainstem. In the forebrain, A2AR neurons from all Acb sub-regions jointly projected to the ventral pallidum, the nucleus of the diagonal band, and the substantia innominata. Heavy projections from the AcbC and the ventral AcbSh, and weaker projections from the medial AcbSh, were observed in the lateral hypothalamus and lateral preoptic area. In the brainstem, the Acb projections were found in the ventral tegmental area, while AcbC and ventral AcbSh also projected to the median raphe nucleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray. The results supply a solid base for understanding the roles of the A2AR and A2AR neurons in the Acb, especially in the regulation of sleep.

  16. NMDA receptor complex mapping by an adamantane derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samnick, S.; Ametamey, S.M.; Eichholzer, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-08-01

    The memantine analogue, 1-amino-3-[{sup 18}F]fluoromethyl-adamantane ({sup 18}F-MEM), a potential tracer for mapping the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor complex was characterized using different in vivo and in vitro binding techniques. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  17. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej B; Jacobsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Heme released from heme-binding proteins on internal hemorrhage, hemolysis, myolysis, or other cell damage is highly toxic due to oxidative and proinflammatory effects. Complex formation with hemopexin, the high-affinity heme-binding protein in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, dampens these effects......, and syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding experiments, including Biacore analysis, showed that hemopexin-heme complex formation elicits the high receptor affinity. Uptake studies of radio-labeled hemopexin-heme complex in LRP/CD91-expressing COS cells and confocal microscopy of the cellular processing of fluorescent hemopexin...

  18. Transport of receptors, receptor signaling complexes and ion channels via neuropeptide-secretory vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Hai-Bo Wang; Ying-Jin Lu; Jian-Wen Hu; Lan Bao; Xu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Stimulus-induced exocytosis of large dense-core vesicles(LDCVs)leads to discharge of neuropeptides and fusion of LDCV membranes with the plasma membrane. However, the contribution of LDCVs to the properties of the neuronal membrane remains largely unclear. The present study found that LDCVs were associated with multiple receptors, channels and signaling molecules, suggesting that neuronal sensitivity is modulated by an LDCV-mediated mechanism. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with immunoblotting of subcellular fractions identified 298 proteins in LDCV membranes purified from the dorsal spinal cord, including Gprotein-coupled receptors, Gproteins and other signaling molecules, ion channels and trafficking-related proteins. Morphological assays showed that δ-opioid receptor 1(DORI), β2 adrenergic receptor(AR), Gα12,voltage-gated calcium channel a2δ1subunit and P2X purinoceptor 2 were localized in substance P(SP)-positive LDCVs in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons, whereas β1 AR, Wnt receptor frizzled 8 and dishevelled 1 were present in SP-negative LDCVs.Furthermore, DOR1/α12/Gβ1γ5/phospholipase C β2 complexes were associated with LDCVs. Blockade of the DOR1/Gαi2 interaction largely abolished the LDCV localization of Gαi2 and impaired stimulation-induced surface expression of Gαi2. Thus, LDCVs serve as carriers of receptors, ion channels and preassembled receptor signaling complexes, enabling a rapid, activity-dependent modulation of neuronal sensitivity.

  19. Reversible Intercalation of Fluoride-Anion Receptor Complexes in Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Leifer, Nicole; Greenbaum, Steve; Smart, Marshall; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Blanco, Mario; Narayanan, S. R.

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated a route to reversibly intercalate fluoride-anion receptor complexes in graphite via a nonaqueous electrochemical process. This approach may find application for a rechargeable lithium-fluoride dual-ion intercalating battery with high specific energy. The cell chemistry presented here uses graphite cathodes with LiF dissolved in a nonaqueous solvent through the aid of anion receptors. Cells have been demonstrated with reversible cathode specific capacity of approximately 80 mAh/g at discharge plateaus of upward of 4.8 V, with graphite staging of the intercalant observed via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction during charging. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and B-11 nuclear magnetic resonance studies suggest that cointercalation of the anion receptor with the fluoride occurs during charging, which likely limits the cathode specific capacity. The anion receptor type dictates the extent of graphite fluorination, and must be further optimized to realize high theoretical fluorination levels. To find these optimal anion receptors, we have designed an ab initio calculations-based scheme aimed at identifying receptors with favorable fluoride binding and release properties.

  20. Receptor-like kinase complexes in plant innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeff, Michael Christiaan; Roux, Milena Edna; Mundy, John;

    2012-01-01

    , the aforementioned RLKs activate generic immune responses termed pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). RLKs can form complexes with other family members and engage a variety of intracellular signaling components and regulatory pathways upon stimulation. This review focuses on interesting new data about how......Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are surface localized, transmembrane receptors comprising a large family of well-studied kinases. RLKs signal through their transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains with the aid of various interacting partners and downstream components. The N-terminal extracellular...

  1. Current concepts regarding the HTLV-1 receptor complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Kathryn S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identity of the Human T lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1 receptor remained an unsolved puzzle for two decades, until the recent demonstration that three molecules, Glucose Transporter 1, Neuropilin-1 and Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans are involved in HTLV-1 binding and entry. Despite these advances, several questions remain unanswered, including the precise role of each of these molecules during virus entry. In light of the most recent data, we propose a model of the HTLV-1 receptor complex and discuss its potential impact on HTLV-1 infection.

  2. Molecular docking studies of 1-(substituted phenyl)-3-(naphtha [1, 2-d] thiazol-2-yl) urea/thiourea derivatives with human adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Faizul; Prasad, Medapati Vijaya Vara; Thangavel, Neelaveni; Ali, Hamed Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Computational assessment of the binding interactions of drugs is an important component of computer-aided drug design paradigms. In this perspective, a set of 30 1-(substituted phenyl)-3-(naphtha[1, 2-d] thiazol-2-yl) urea/thiourea derivatives showing antiparkinsonian activity were docked into inhibitor binding cavity of human adenosine A(2A) receptor (AA2AR) to understand their mode of binding interactions in silico. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r(2) = 0.483) between docking score and antiparkinsonian activity (in terms of % reduction in catalepsy score). Potent antiparkinsonian agents carried methoxy group in the phenyl ring, exhibited both hydrophilic and lipophilic interactions with lower energy of binding at the AA(2A)R. These molecular docking analyses should, in our view, contribute for further development of selective AA(2A)R antagonists for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Molecular docking studies of 1-(substituted phenyl)-3-(naphtha [1, 2-d] thiazol-2-yl) urea/thiourea derivatives with human adenosine A2A receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Faizul; Prasad, Medapati Vijaya Vara; Thangavel, Neelaveni; Ali, Hamed Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Computational assessment of the binding interactions of drugs is an important component of computer-aided drug design paradigms. In this perspective, a set of 30 1-(substituted phenyl)-3-(naphtha[1, 2-d] thiazol-2-yl) urea/thiourea derivatives showing antiparkinsonian activity were docked into inhibitor binding cavity of human adenosine A2A receptor (AA2AR) to understand their mode of binding interactions in silico. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.483) between docking score and antiparkinsonian activity (in terms of % reduction in catalepsy score). Potent antiparkinsonian agents carried methoxy group in the phenyl ring, exhibited both hydrophilic and lipophilic interactions with lower energy of binding at the AA2AR. These molecular docking analyses should, in our view, contribute for further development of selective AA2AR antagonists for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:21814389

  4. A study of the possible association between adenosine A2A receptor gene polymorphisms and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero, Y; Gumpert, C; Serlachius, E; Lichtenstein, P; Walum, H; Johansson, D; Anckarsäter, H; Westberg, L; Eriksson, E; Halldner, L

    2013-04-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (ADORA2A) is linked to the dopamine neurotransmitter system and is also implicated in the regulation of alertness, suggesting a potential association with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) traits. Furthermore, animal studies suggest that the ADORA2A may influence ADHD-like behavior. For that reason, the ADORA2A gene emerges as a promising candidate for studying the etiology of ADHD traits. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between ADORA2A gene polymorphisms and ADHD traits in a large population-based sample. This study was based on the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS), and included 1747 twins. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder traits were assessed through parental reports, and samples of DNA were collected. Associations between six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ADHD traits were examined, and results suggested a nominal association between ADHD traits and three of these SNPs: rs3761422, rs5751876 and rs35320474. For one of the SNPs, rs35320474, results remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. These results indicate the possibility that the ADORA2A gene may be involved in ADHD traits. However, more studies replicating the present results are warranted before this association can be confirmed. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  5. Adenosine A2A Receptors Mediate Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Electroacupuncture on Synovitis in Mice with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-hui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the role of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect of electroacupuncture (EA on synovitis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, C57BL/6 mice were divided into five treatment groups: Sham-control, CIA-control, CIA-EA, CIA-SCH58261 (A2AR antagonist, and CIA-EA-SCH58261. All mice except those in the Sham-control group were immunized with collagen II for arthritis induction. EA treatment was administered using the stomach 36 and spleen 6 points, and stimulated with a continuous rectangular wave for 30 min daily. EA treatment and SCH58261 were administered daily from days 35 to 49 (n=10. After treatment, X-ray radiography of joint bone morphology was established at day 60 and mouse blood was collected for ELISA determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α levels. Mice were sacrificed and processed for histological examination of pathological changes of joint tissue, including hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry of A2AR expression. EA treatment resulted in significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α concentrations, and bone damage X-ray scores. Importantly, the anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effect of EA treatment was reversed by coadministration of SCH58261. Thus, EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect resulting in significant protection of cartilage by activation of A2AR in the synovial tissue of CIA.

  6. Receptor-like kinase complexes in plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan eGreeff

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-like kinases (RLKs are surface localized, transmembrane receptors comprising a large family of well-studied kinases. RLKs signal through their transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains with the aid of various interacting partners and downstream components. The N-terminal extracellular domain defines ligand specificity, and RLK families are sub-classed according to this domain. The most studied of these subfamilies include those with 1 leucine rich repeat (LRR domains, 2 LysM domains (LYM and 3 the Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L domain. These proteins recognize distinct ligands of microbial origin or ligands derived from intracellular protein/carbohydrate signals. For example, the pattern recognition receptor (PRR AtFLS2 recognizes flg22 from flagellin, and the PRR AtEFR recognizes elf18 from elongation factor (EF-Tu. Upon binding of their cognate ligands, the aforementioned RLKs activate generic immune responses termed pattern triggered immunity (PTI. RLKs can form complexes with other family members and engage a variety of intracellular signaling components and regulatory pathways upon stimulation. This review focuses on interesting new data about how these receptors form protein complexes to exert their function.

  7. Inosine, an Endogenous Purine Nucleoside, Suppresses Immune Responses and Protects Mice from Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: a Role for A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Stella Célio; Dos Santos Coelho, Igor; Lieberknecht, Vicente; Cunha, Mauricio Peña; Calixto, João B; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Dutra, Rafael Cypriano

    2016-04-30

    were blocked by inosine treatment. Additionally, inosine consistently inhibited IL-17 levels in peripheral lymphoid tissue, as well as IL-4 levels and A2AR up-regulation in the spinal cord, likely, through an ERK1-independent pathway. EAE: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; MS: multiple sclerosis; A2AR: adenosine A2A receptor; IL-17: interleukin-17; IL-4: interleukin-4.

  8. Topical application of the adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680 prevents phorbol-induced epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasa, Jorge; Martos, Patricio; Terencio, María Carmen; Valcuende-Cavero, Francisca; Montesinos, María Carmen

    2014-08-01

    The nucleoside adenosine is a known regulator of immunity and inflammation that mediates, at least in part, the anti-inflammatory effect of methotrexate, an immunosuppressive agent widely used to treat autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Adenosine A2A receptors play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process besides promoting wound healing. Therefore, we aimed to determine the topical effect of a selective agonist, CGS-21680, on a murine model of skin hyperplasia with a marked inflammatory component. Pretreatment with either CGS-21680 (5 μg per site) or the reference agent dexamethasone (200 μg/site) prevented the epidermal hyperplasia and inflammatory response induced by topical application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, 2 nmol/site) for three consecutive days. The histological analysis showed that both CGS-21680 and dexamethasone produced a marked reduction of inflammatory cell infiltrate, which correlated with diminished myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in skin homogenates. Both treatments reduced the levels of the chemotactic mediators LTB4 and CXCL-1, and the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, through the suppression of NFκB phosphorylation. The immunohistochemical analysis of the hyperproliferative markers cytokeratin 6 (CK6) and Ki67 revealed that while both agents inhibit the number of proliferating cells in the epidermis, CGS-21680 treatment promoted dermal fibroblasts proliferation. Consistently, increased collagen deposition in dermis was observed in tissue sections from agonist-treated mice. Our results showed that CGS 21680 efficiently prevents phorbol-induced epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation in mice without the deleterious atrophic effect of topical corticosteroids.

  9. Cocaine-induced changes of synaptic transmission in the striatum are modulated by adenosine A2A receptors and involve the tyrosine phosphatase STEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Valentina; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Ferrante, Antonella; Chen, Jiang F; Lombroso, Paul J; Di Stasi, Anna Maria Michela; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2014-02-01

    The striatum is a brain area implicated in the pharmacological action of drugs of abuse. Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in the striatum and mediate, at least in part, cocaine-induced psychomotor effects in vivo. Here we studied the synaptic mechanisms implicated in the pharmacological action of cocaine in the striatum and investigated the influence of A2ARs. We found that synaptic transmission was depressed in corticostriatal slices after perfusion with cocaine (10 μM). This effect was reduced by the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 and almost abolished in striatal A2AR-knockout mice (mice lacking A2ARs in striatal neurons, stA2ARKO). The effect of cocaine on synaptic transmission was also prevented by the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) inhibitor sodium orthovanadate (Na3VO4). In synaptosomes prepared from striatal slices, we found that the activity of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) was upregulated by cocaine, prevented by ZM241385, and absent in synaptosomes from stA2ARKO. The role played by STEP in cocaine modulation of synaptic transmission was investigated in whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from medium spiny neurons of the striatum. We found that TAT-STEP, a peptide that renders STEP enzymatically inactive, prevented cocaine-induced reduction in AMPA- and NMDA-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents, whereas the control peptide, TAT-myc, had no effect. These results demonstrate that striatal A2ARs modulate cocaine-induced synaptic depression in the striatum and highlight the potential role of PTPs and specifically STEP in the effects of cocaine.

  10. Leishmania infantum Parasites Subvert the Host Inflammatory Response through the Adenosine A2A Receptor to Promote the Establishment of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhael H. F. Lima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is an endogenously released purine nucleoside that signals through four widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Of these, A2AR is recognized as mediating major adenosine anti-inflammatory activity. During cutaneous leishmaniasis, adenosine induces immunosuppression, which promotes the establishment of infection. Herein, we demonstrated that A2AR signaling is exploited by Leishmania infantum parasites, the etiologic agent that causes Visceral Leishmaniasis, to successfully colonize the vertebrate host. A2AR gene-deleted mice exhibited a well-developed cellular reaction with a strong Th1 immune response in the parasitized organs. An intense infiltration of activated neutrophils into the disease-target organs was observed in A2AR−/− mice. These cells were characterized by high expression of CXCR2 and CD69 on their cell surfaces and increased cxcl1 expression. Interestingly, this phenotype was mediated by IFN-γ on the basis that a neutralizing antibody specific to this cytokine prevented neutrophilic influx into parasitized organs. In evaluating the immunosuppressive effects, we identified a decreased number of CD4+ FOXP3+ T cells and reduced il10 expression in A2AR−/− infected mice. During ex vivo cell culture, A2AR−/− splenocytes produced smaller amounts of IL-10. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the A2AR signaling pathway is detrimental to development of Th1-type adaptive immunity and that this pathway could be associated with the regulatory process. In particular, it promotes parasite surveillance.

  11. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  12. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes.

  13. Differential expression of functional Fc-receptors and additional immune complex receptors on mouse kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E

    2013-12-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Ig binding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury.

  14. In silico study of naphtha [1, 2-d] thiazol-2-amine with adenosine A 2A receptor and its role in antagonism of haloperidol-induced motor impairments in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Prakash, Amresh; Barodia, Sandeep Kumar; Kumari, Rita; Mishra, Chandra Bhushan; Kumar, J B Senthil

    2009-10-09

    Loss of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons in the substantia nigra leads to Parkinson's disease (PD). Adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) have been anticipated as novel therapeutic target for PD. A(2A)Rs potentiate locomotor behavior and are predominantly expressed in striatum. Naphtha [1, 2-d] thiazol-2-amine (NATA), a tricyclic thiazole have been studied as new anti-Parkinsonian compound. AutoDock analysis and pharmacophore study of NATA with known A(2A)R antagonists explicit its efficacy as a possible adenosine receptor antagonist. In vivo pharmacology of NATA showed reduction of haloperidol (HAL)-induced motor impairments in Swiss albino male mice. Relatively elevated levels of dopamine in NATA pre-treated mice are suggestive of its possible role as neuromodulator in PD.

  15. Mechanisms of Cellular Uptake of Thrombin-Antithrombin II Complexes Role of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein as a Serpin-Enzyme Complex Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, D K; Kounnas, M Z

    1997-01-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) such as antithrombin III inhibit target proteinases by forming a stable complexwith the enzyme. Once formed, several serpin-enzyme complexes (SECs) are removed from the circulation by a receptor, termed the SEC receptor, that is present in the liver. Until recently, the identity of this clearance receptor remained unknown; however, data are now available that strongly implicates one member of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family as a candidate for the SEC receptor. This receptor, known as the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP), is a prominent liver receptor that is known to bind numerous ligands that include proteinase-inhibitor complexes, matrix proteins, and certain apolipoprotein E- and lipoprotein lipase-enriched lipoproteins. © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:9-16).

  16. Synthesis and in vivo Evaluation of Fluorine-18 and Iodine-123 Pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine Derivatives as PET and SPECT Radiotracers for Mapping A2A Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vala, Christine; Morley, Thomas J; Zhang, Xuechun; Papin, Caroline; Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S; Lee, H Sharon; Constantinescu, Cristian; Barret, Olivier; Carroll, Vincent M; Baldwin, Ronald M; Tamagnan, Gilles D; Alagille, David

    2016-09-06

    Imaging agents that target adenosine type 2A (A2A ) receptors play an important role in evaluating new pharmaceuticals targeting these receptors, such as those currently being developed for the treatment of movement disorders like Parkinson's disease. They are also useful for monitoring progression and treatment efficacy by providing a noninvasive tool to map changes in A2A receptor density and function in neurodegenerative diseases. We previously described the successful evaluation of two A2A -specific radiotracers in both nonhuman primates and in subsequent human clinical trials: [(123) I]MNI-420 and [(18) F]MNI-444. Herein we describe the development of both of these radiotracers by selection from a series of A2A ligands, based on the pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine core of preladenant. Each of this series of 16 ligands was found to bind to recombinant human A2A receptor in the low nanomolar range, and of these 16, six were radiolabeled with either fluorine-18 or iodine-123 and evaluated in nonhuman primates. These initial in vivo results resulted in the identification of 7-(2-(4-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-2-(furan-2-yl)-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine ([(18) F]MNI-444) and 7-(2-(4-(2-fluoro-4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-2-(furan-2-yl)-7H-imidazo[1,2-c]pyrazolo[4,3-e]pyrimidin-5-amine ([(123) I]MNI-420) as PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for mapping A2A receptors in brain.

  17. Ghrelin receptor conformational dynamics regulate the transition from a preassembled to an active receptor:Gq complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Marjorie; Mary, Sophie; Maingot, Mathieu; M'Kadmi, Céline; Gagne, Didier; Leyris, Jean-Philippe; Denoyelle, Séverine; Gaibelet, Gérald; Gavara, Laurent; Garcia de Souza Costa, Mauricio; Perahia, David; Trinquet, Eric; Mouillac, Bernard; Galandrin, Ségolène; Galès, Céline; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Floquet, Nicolas; Martinez, Jean; Marie, Jacky; Banères, Jean-Louis

    2015-02-03

    How G protein-coupled receptor conformational dynamics control G protein coupling to trigger signaling is a key but still open question. We addressed this question with a model system composed of the purified ghrelin receptor assembled into lipid discs. Combining receptor labeling through genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids, lanthanide resonance energy transfer, and normal mode analyses, we directly demonstrate the occurrence of two distinct receptor:Gq assemblies with different geometries whose relative populations parallel the activation state of the receptor. The first of these assemblies is a preassembled complex with the receptor in its basal conformation. This complex is specific of Gq and is not observed with Gi. The second one is an active assembly in which the receptor in its active conformation triggers G protein activation. The active complex is present even in the absence of agonist, in a direct relationship with the high constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor. These data provide direct evidence of a mechanism for ghrelin receptor-mediated Gq signaling in which transition of the receptor from an inactive to an active conformation is accompanied by a rearrangement of a preassembled receptor:G protein complex, ultimately leading to G protein activation and signaling.

  18. Involvement of adenosine A2a receptor in intraocular pressure decrease induced by 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine or 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Murakami, Akira; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the mechanism for the decrease in intraocular pressure by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives in rabbits. The receptor binding analysis revealed that 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-O-Ado) and 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-CN-Ado) selectively bound to the A(2a) receptor with a high affinity. Ocular hypotensive responses to 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado were inhibited by the adenosine A(2a)-receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC), but not by the adenosine A(1)-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or the adenosine A(2b)-receptor antagonist alloxazine. In addition, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado caused an increase in outflow facility, which was inhibited by CSC, but not by DPCPX or alloxazine. Moreover, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado increased cAMP in the aqueous humor, and the 2-O-Ado-induced an increase in cAMP was inhibited by CSC. These results suggest that 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado reduced intraocular pressure via an increase in outflow facility. The ocular hypotension may be mainly mediated through the activation of adenosine A(2a) receptor, although a possible involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor cannot be completely ruled out. 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado are useful lead compounds for the treatment of glaucoma.

  19. Scribble1/AP2 Complex Coordinates NMDA Receptor Endocytic Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas H. Piguel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate trafficking of glutamate receptors to synapses is crucial for basic synaptic function and synaptic plasticity. It is now accepted that NMDA receptors (NMDARs internalize and are recycled at the plasma membrane but also exchange between synaptic and extrasynaptic pools; these NMDAR properties are also key to governing synaptic plasticity. Scribble1 is a large PDZ protein required for synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Herein, we show that the level of Scribble1 is regulated in an activity-dependent manner and that Scribble1 controls the number of NMDARs at the plasma membrane. Notably, Scribble1 prevents GluN2A subunits from undergoing lysosomal trafficking and degradation by increasing their recycling to the plasma membrane following NMDAR activation. Finally, we show that a specific YxxR motif on Scribble1 controls these mechanisms through a direct interaction with AP2. Altogether, our findings define a molecular mechanism to control the levels of synaptic NMDARs via Scribble1 complex signaling.

  20. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang (Cornell); (UMM-MED); (Colorado)

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor regulates expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in feto-placental endothelium from normal and late-onset pre-eclamptic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acurio, Jesenia; Herlitz, Kurt; Troncoso, Felipe; Aguayo, Claudio; Bertoglia, Patricio; Escudero, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    We aim to investigate whether A2A/nitric oxide-mediated regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is impaired in feto-placental endothelial cells from late-onset pre-eclampsia. Cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human placental microvascular endothelial cells (hPMECs) from normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies were used. Assays by using small interference RNA (siRNA) for A2A were performed, and transfected cells were used for estimation of messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of VEGF, as well as for cell proliferation and angiogenesis in vitro. CGS-21680 (A2A agonist, 24 h) increases HUVEC and hPMEC proliferation in a dose response manner. Furthermore, similar to CGS-21680, the nitric oxide donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine oxide (SNAP), increased cell proliferation in a dose response manner (logEC50 10(-9.2) M). In hPMEC, CGS-21680 increased VEGF protein levels in both normal (∼1.5-fold) and pre-eclamptic pregnancies (∼1.2-fold), an effect blocked by the A2A antagonist, ZM-241385 (10(-5) M) and the inhibitor of NO synthase, N ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME). Subsequently, SNAP partially recovered cell proliferation and in vitro angiogenesis capacity of cells from normal pregnancies exposed to siRNA for A2A. CGS-21680 also increased (∼1.5-fold) the level of VEGF mRNA in HUVEC from normal pregnancies, but not in pre-eclampsia. Additionally, transfection with siRNA for A2A decrease (∼30 %) the level of mRNA for VEGF in normal pregnancy compared to untransfected cells, an effect partially reversed by co-incubation with SNAP. The A2A-NO-VEGF pathway is present in endothelium from microcirculation and macrocirculation in both normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. However, NO signaling pathway seems to be impaired in HUVEC from pre-eclampsia.

  2. The Elastin Receptor Complex: a unique matricellular receptor with high anti-tumoral potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine eScandolera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elastin, one of the longest-lived proteins, confers elasticity to tissues with high mechanical constraints. During aging or pathophysiological conditions such as cancer progression, this insoluble polymer of tropoelastin undergoes an important degradation leading to the release of bioactive elastin-derived peptides (EDP, named elastokines. EDP exhibit several biological functions able to drive tumor development by regulating cell proliferation, invasion, survival, angiogenesis, and matrix metalloproteinase expression in various tumor and stromal cells. Although several receptors have been suggested to bind elastokines (αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, galectin-3, their main receptor remains the Elastin Receptor Complex (ERC. This heterotrimer comprises a peripheral subunit, named Elastin Binding Protein (EBP, associated to the Protective Protein/Cathepsin A (PPCA. The latter is bound to a membrane-associated protein called Neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1. The pro-tumoral effects of elastokines have been linked to their binding onto EBP. Additionally, Neu-1 sialidase activity is essential for their signal transduction. Consistently, EDP-EBP interaction and Neu-1 activity emerge as original anti-tumoral targets. Interestingly, besides its direct involvement in cancer progression, the ERC also regulates diabetes outcome and thrombosis, an important risk factor for cancer development and a vascular process highly increased in patients suffering from cancer. In this review, we will describe ERC and elastokines involvement in cancer development suggesting that this unique receptor would be a promising therapeutic target. We will also discuss the pharmacological concepts aiming at blocking its pro-tumoral activities. Finally, its emerging role in cancer-associated complications and pathologies such as diabetes and thrombotic events will be also considered.

  3. GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex sensitivity in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice on a 129/Sv background.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pattij, T.; Groenink, L.; Oosting, R.S.; Gugten, J. van der; Maes, R.A.A.; Olivier, B.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout (1AKO) mice on a mixed Swiss Websterx129/Sv (SWx129/Sv) and a pure 129/Sv genetic background suggest a differential gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine receptor complex sensitivity in both strains, independent from the anxious phenotype. To

  4. Antigen-B Cell Receptor Complexes Associate with Intracellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II Molecules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Margarida; Tucker, Heidi; Drake, Lisa; Nichol, Kathleen; Drake, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen processing and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells and B cells allows the activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and cognate interactions between B cells and effector CD4+ T cells, respectively. B cells are unique among class II-restricted antigen-presenting cells in that they have a clonally restricted antigen-specific receptor, the B cell receptor (BCR), which allows the cell to recognize and respond to trace amounts of foreign antigen present in a sea of self-antigens. Moreover, engagement of peptide-class II complexes formed via BCR-mediated processing of cognate antigen has been shown to result in a unique pattern of B cell activation. Using a combined biochemical and imaging/FRET approach, we establish that internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular class II molecules. We demonstrate that the M1-paired MHC class II conformer, shown previously to be critical for CD4 T cell activation, is incorporated selectively into these complexes and loaded selectively with peptide derived from BCR-internalized cognate antigen. These results demonstrate that, in B cells, internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules, potentially defining a site of class II peptide acquisition, and reveal a selective role for the M1-paired class II conformer in the presentation of cognate antigen. These findings provide key insights into the molecular mechanisms used by B cells to control the source of peptides charged onto class II molecules, allowing the immune system to mount an antibody response focused on BCR-reactive cognate antigen. PMID:26400081

  5. BDNF prevents NMDA-induced toxicity in models of Huntington's disease: the effects are genotype specific and adenosine A2A receptor is involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Alberto; Pepponi, Rita; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Ferrante, Antonella; Chiodi, Valentina; Popoli, Patrizia

    2013-04-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is also highly involved in HD and whose effects are modulated by adenosine A2 ARs, influences the activity and expression of striatal NMDA receptors. In electrophysiology experiments, we investigated the role of BDNF toward NMDA-induced effects in HD models, and the possible involvement of A2ARs. In corticostriatal slices from wild-type mice and age-matched symptomatic R6/2 mice (a model of HD), NMDA application (75 μM) induced a transient or a permanent (i.e., toxic) reduction of field potential amplitude, respectively. BDNF (10 ng/mL) potentiated NMDA effects in wild-type, while it protected from NMDA toxicity in R6/2 mice. Both effects of BDNF were prevented by A2 AR blockade. The protective effect of BDNF against NMDA-induced toxicity was reproduced in a cellular model of HD. These findings may have very important implications for the neuroprotective potential of BDNF and A2 AR ligands in HD.

  6. Evidence that the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex is the endogenous molybdate factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodine, P V; Litwack, G

    1988-01-01

    We have recently purified the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex from rat liver. Purified modulator inhibits glucocorticoid-receptor complex activation and stabilizes the steroid-binding ability of the unoccupied glucocorticoid receptor. Since these activities are shared by exogenous sodium molybdate, modulator appears to be the endogenous factor that sodium molybdate mimics. In this report, we present additional evidence for the mechanism of action of purified modulator. (i) Mo...

  7. Dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 acts as a molecular chaperone for CCR5 chemokine receptor signaling complex organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Qun Kuang

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. CCR5 and CXCR4 act as co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and several efforts have been made to develop ligands to inhibit HIV infection by blocking those receptors. Removal of chemokine receptors from the cell surface using polymorphisms or other means confers some levels of immunity against HIV infection. Up to now, very limited success has been obtained using ligand therapies so we explored potential avenues to regulate chemokine receptor expression at the plasma membrane. We identified a molecular chaperone, DRiP78, that interacts with both CXCR4 and CCR5, but not the heterodimer formed by these receptors. We further characterized the effects of DRiP78 on CCR5 function. We show that the molecular chaperone inhibits CCR5 localization to the plasma membrane. We identified the interaction region on the receptor, the F(x6LL motif, and show that upon mutation of this motif the chaperone cannot interact with the receptor. We also show that DRiP78 is involved in the assembly of CCR5 chemokine signaling complex as a homodimer, as well as with the Gαi protein. Finally, modulation of DRiP78 levels will affect receptor functions, such as cell migration in cells that endogenously express CCR5. Our results demonstrate that modulation of the functions of a chaperone can affect signal transduction at the cell surface.

  8. Dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 acts as a molecular chaperone for CCR5 chemokine receptor signaling complex organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yi-Qun; Charette, Nicholle; Frazer, Jennifer; Holland, Patrick J; Attwood, Kathleen M; Dellaire, Graham; Dupré, Denis J

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. CCR5 and CXCR4 act as co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and several efforts have been made to develop ligands to inhibit HIV infection by blocking those receptors. Removal of chemokine receptors from the cell surface using polymorphisms or other means confers some levels of immunity against HIV infection. Up to now, very limited success has been obtained using ligand therapies so we explored potential avenues to regulate chemokine receptor expression at the plasma membrane. We identified a molecular chaperone, DRiP78, that interacts with both CXCR4 and CCR5, but not the heterodimer formed by these receptors. We further characterized the effects of DRiP78 on CCR5 function. We show that the molecular chaperone inhibits CCR5 localization to the plasma membrane. We identified the interaction region on the receptor, the F(x)6LL motif, and show that upon mutation of this motif the chaperone cannot interact with the receptor. We also show that DRiP78 is involved in the assembly of CCR5 chemokine signaling complex as a homodimer, as well as with the Gαi protein. Finally, modulation of DRiP78 levels will affect receptor functions, such as cell migration in cells that endogenously express CCR5. Our results demonstrate that modulation of the functions of a chaperone can affect signal transduction at the cell surface.

  9. Cocaine disrupts histamine H3 receptor modulation of dopamine D1 receptor signaling: σ1-D1-H3 receptor complexes as key targets for reducing cocaine's effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Moreno-Delgado, David; Navarro, Gemma; Hoffmann, Hanne M; Fuentes, Silvia; Rosell-Vilar, Santi; Gasperini, Paola; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Medrano, Mireia; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric; McCormick, Peter J

    2014-03-05

    The general effects of cocaine are not well understood at the molecular level. What is known is that the dopamine D1 receptor plays an important role. Here we show that a key mechanism may be cocaine's blockade of the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of D1 receptor function. This blockade requires the σ1 receptor and occurs upon cocaine binding to σ1-D1-H3 receptor complexes. The cocaine-mediated disruption leaves an uninhibited D1 receptor that activates Gs, freely recruits β-arrestin, increases p-ERK 1/2 levels, and induces cell death when over activated. Using in vitro assays with transfected cells and in ex vivo experiments using both rats acutely treated or self-administered with cocaine along with mice depleted of σ1 receptor, we show that blockade of σ1 receptor by an antagonist restores the protective H3 receptor-mediated brake on D1 receptor signaling and prevents the cell death from elevated D1 receptor signaling. These findings suggest that a combination therapy of σ1R antagonists with H3 receptor agonists could serve to reduce some effects of cocaine.

  10. The significance of TGF-β expression in scar in adenosine receptor A_(2A) knockout mice%腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕增生中TGF-β的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖虎; 冉丽; 禚莹莹; 王德昌; 霍然; 王一兵; 冯永强; 李强

    2010-01-01

    Objective To discuss the mechanism of scar hypertrophy in adenosine receptor A_(2A) (A_(2A) R) knockout mice. Methods Animal models of hypertrophic scar were established in 12 A_(2A)R knockout mice and 12 wild-type mice as control. The thickness and the size of transverse section of the hypertrophic scar were observed by H-E staining. The hydroxyproline ( HYP) in the scar was measured colorimetrically. The TGF-p expression was tested by Western blotting method. Results The hypertrophic scar in wild-type mice was more severe than that in knockout mice. Compared with self-control , the increase of the thickness and the size of transverse section of hypertrophic scar was markedly higher in wild-type group than in the knockout group( P < 0. 01) . There was significant difference in HYP content between the two groups (P < 0. 01 ). Compared with self-control, the increase of TGF-p expression in wild-type group was much more than that in knockout group (P < 0. 01 ). Conclusions The TGF-p expression decreases in the A_(2A) R knockout mice. The scar hypertrophy is also much less in the A_(2A) R knockout mice.%目的 探讨腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠在瘢痕形成中的作用及其机制.方法 4周大腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠和同窝野生型小鼠各12只,制作瘢痕模型,利用HE染色观察瘢痕组织厚度、横截面积变化情况.采用比色氯胺T法测量组织羟脯氨酸含量,利用Western免疫印迹测量TGF-β表达.结果 野生型组小鼠瘢痕增生明显,其厚度、横截面积比自身对照增加倍数显著大于腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除组小鼠(P<0.01),腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕增生轻,羟脯氨酸含量与同窝野生型组小鼠瘢痕含量相比差异有统计学(P<0.01),野生型组小鼠瘢痕TGF-β表达比自身对照增加倍数显著大于腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠组(P<0.01).结论 腺苷A_(2A)受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕TGF-β表达降低,瘢痕增生显著减轻.

  11. Effect of A2A receptor antagonist (SCH 442416) on the mRNA expression of glutamate aspartate transporter and glutamine synthetase in rat retinal Müller cells under hypoxic conditions in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jun; Huang, Xin; WU, QIRONG; Wang, Jun; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Peiquan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the A2A receptor antagonist (SCH 442416) on the mRNA expression of glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in rat retinal Müller cells under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Immunofluorescent staining of GS and GFAP was used for the identification of Müller cells. The GLAST and GS mRNA expression of Müller cells treated with 0.1, 1 and 10 μM SCH 442416 under hypoxic conditions was examined by real-time...

  12. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling affects IL-21/IL-22 cytokines and GATA3/T-bet transcription factor expression in CD4(+) T cells from a BTBR T(+) Itpr3tf/J mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sheikh F; Ansari, Mushtaq A; Nadeem, Ahmed; Bakheet, Saleh A; Almutairi, Mashal M; Attia, Sabry M

    2017-10-15

    Autism is a complex heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder; previous studies have identified altered immune responses among individuals diagnosed with autism. An imbalance in the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors plays a role in neurodevelopmental behavioral and autism disorders. BTBR T(+) Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) mice are used as a model for autism, as they exhibit social deficits, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors compared with C57BL/6J (B6) mice. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) appears to be a potential target for the improvement of behavioral, inflammatory, immune, and neurological disorders. We investigated the effects of the A2AR antagonist SCH 5826 (SCH) and agonist CGS 21680 (CGS) on IL-21, IL-22, T-bet, T-box transcription factor (T-bet), GATA3 (GATA Binding Protein 3), and CD152 (CTLA-4) expression in BTBR mice. Our results showed that BTBR mice treated with SCH had increased CD4(+)IL-21(+), CD4(+)IL-22(+), CD4(+)GATA3(+), and CD4(+)T-bet(+) and decreased CD4(+)CTLA-4(+) expression in spleen cells compared with BTBR control mice. Moreover, CGS efficiently decreased CD4(+)IL-21(+), CD4(+)IL-22(+), CD4(+)GATA3(+), and CD4(+)T-bet(+) and increased CD4(+)CTLA-4 production in spleen cells compared with SCH-treated and BTBR control mice. Additionally, SCH treatment significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-21, IL-22, GATA3, and T-bet in brain tissue compared with CGS-treated and BTBR control mice. The augmented levels of IL-21/IL-22 and GATA3/T-bet could be due to altered A2AR signaling. Our results indicate that A2AR agonists may represent a new class of compounds that can be developed for use in the treatment of autistic and neuroimmune dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Complexation of phenolic guests by endo- and exo-hydrogen-bonded receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, J.M.C.A.; Ish-i Tsutomu, T.I.; Paraschiv, V.; Timmerman, P.; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Shinkai, Seiji; Reinhoudt, David

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the complexation of phenol derivatives by hydrogen-bonded receptors. These phenol receptors are formed by self-assembly of calix[4]arene dimelamine or tetramelamine derivatives with 5,5-diethylbarbiturate (DEB) or cyanurate derivatives (CYA). The double rosette assemblies

  14. Androgen Receptor: A Complex Therapeutic Target for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Narayanan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and histopathological profiling have classified breast cancer into multiple sub-types empowering precision treatment. Although estrogen receptor (ER and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2 are the mainstay therapeutic targets in breast cancer, the androgen receptor (AR is evolving as a molecular target for cancers that have developed resistance to conventional treatments. The high expression of AR in breast cancer and recent discovery and development of new nonsteroidal drugs targeting the AR provide a strong rationale for exploring it again as a therapeutic target in this disease. Ironically, both nonsteroidal agonists and antagonists for the AR are undergoing clinical trials, making AR a complicated target to understand in breast cancer. This review provides a detailed account of AR’s therapeutic role in breast cancer.

  15. Androgen Receptor: A Complex Therapeutic Target for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T

    2016-12-02

    Molecular and histopathological profiling have classified breast cancer into multiple sub-types empowering precision treatment. Although estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) are the mainstay therapeutic targets in breast cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) is evolving as a molecular target for cancers that have developed resistance to conventional treatments. The high expression of AR in breast cancer and recent discovery and development of new nonsteroidal drugs targeting the AR provide a strong rationale for exploring it again as a therapeutic target in this disease. Ironically, both nonsteroidal agonists and antagonists for the AR are undergoing clinical trials, making AR a complicated target to understand in breast cancer. This review provides a detailed account of AR's therapeutic role in breast cancer.

  16. Synthesis of an important intermediate of antagonists of the human A2A adenosine receptor%A 2A腺苷受体拮抗剂中间体与抗结剂合成方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屠美玲; 俞卫平; 冯涛; 贾继宁; 张云; 张建庭

    2016-01-01

    基于官能化的三唑并[4,5‐d]嘧啶类拮抗剂对人体内 A2A腺苷受体拮抗作用的干预治疗,能有效缓解帕金森综合征的临床症状.该类拮抗剂可以提高多巴胺神经元对纹状体多巴胺的敏感度.重点研究了三唑并[4,5‐d ]嘧啶类拮抗剂合成所需的重要中间体4‐氯‐1H‐[1,2,3]三唑并[d]嘧啶‐6‐胺的合成、表征及应用.并对该中间体进行活性拼接,制备了含呋喃基的三唑并[4,5‐d]嘧啶类拮抗剂8.%Antagonism of the human A2A receptor has been implicated as a point of therapeutic intervention in the alleviation of the symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease .That is to say ,at least in part ,this kind of antago‐nists can improve the sensitivity of the dopaminergic neurons to the residual ,and deplete levels of striatal dopamine . Herein ,we reported a novel synthesis strategy of an important intermediate (4‐chloro‐1H‐benzo[d][1 ,2 ,3]triazol‐6‐amine) of antagonists of the human A2A adenosine receptor .Additionally ,we had also prepared the adenosine receptor 8 .

  17. The role of 5-arylalkylamino- and 5-piperazino- moieties on the 7-aminopyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine core in affecting adenosine A1 and A2A receptor affinity and selectivity profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squarcialupi, Lucia; Betti, Marco; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Falsini, Matteo; Ravani, Annalisa; Pasquini, Silvia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Salmaso, Veronica; Sturlese, Mattia; Varani, Katia; Moro, Stefano; Colotta, Vittoria

    2017-12-01

    New 7-amino-2-phenylpyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives, substituted at the 5-position with aryl(alkyl)amino- and 4-substituted-piperazin-1-yl- moieties, were synthesized with the aim of targeting human (h) adenosine A1 and/or A2A receptor subtypes. On the whole, the novel derivatives 1-24 shared scarce or no affinities for the off-target hA2B and hA3 ARs. The 5-(4-hydroxyphenethylamino)- derivative 12 showed both good affinity (Ki = 150 nM) and the best selectivity for the hA2A AR while the 5-benzylamino-substituted 5 displayed the best combined hA2A (Ki = 123 nM) and A1 AR affinity (Ki = 25 nM). The 5-phenethylamino moiety (compound 6) achieved nanomolar affinity (Ki = 11 nM) and good selectivity for the hA1 AR. The 5-(N(4)-substituted-piperazin-1-yl) derivatives 15-24 bind the hA1 AR subtype with affinities falling in the high nanomolar range. A structure-based molecular modeling study was conducted to rationalize the experimental binding data from a molecular point of view using both molecular docking studies and Interaction Energy Fingerprints (IEFs) analysis.[Formula: see text].

  18. Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emes Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity Results The vertebrate NMDA receptor was found to have subunits with C-terminal domains up to 500 amino acids longer than invertebrates. This extension was specific to the NR2 subunit and occurred before the duplication and subsequent divergence of NR2 in the vertebrate lineage. The shorter invertebrate C-terminus lacked vertebrate protein interaction motifs involved with forming a signaling complex although the terminal PDZ interaction domain was conserved. The vertebrate NR2 C-terminal domain was predicted to be intrinsically disordered but with a conserved secondary structure. Conclusion We highlight an evolutionary adaptation specific to vertebrate NMDA receptor NR2 subunits. Using in silico methods we find that evolution has shaped the NMDA receptor C-terminus into an unstructured but modular intracellular domain that parallels the expansion in complexity of an NMDA receptor signalling complex in the vertebrate lineage. We propose the NR2 C-terminus has evolved to be a natively unstructured yet flexible hub organising postsynaptic signalling. The evolution of

  19. Kir3 channel signaling complexes: Focus on opioid receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim eNagi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are among the most effective drugs to treat severe pain. They produce their analgesic actions by specifically activating opioid receptors located along the pain perception pathway where they inhibit the flow of nociceptive information. This inhibition is partly accomplished by activation of hyperpolarizing G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium (GIRK or Kir3 channels. Kir3 channels control cellular excitability in the central nervous system and in the heart and, because of their ubiquitous distribution, they mediate the effects of a large range of hormones and neurotransmitters which, upon activation of corresponding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs lead to channel opening. Here we analyze GPCR signaling via these effectors in reference to precoupling and collision models. Existing knowledge on signaling bias is discussed in relation to these models as a means of developing strategies to produce novel opioid analgesics with an improved side effects profile.

  20. Open-channel blockers of the NMDA receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albensi, Benedict C; Ilkanich, Erin

    2004-11-01

    A variety of compounds have been shown to limit or prevent excitotoxicity by blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated neurotransmission. However, many first-generation NMDA antagonists did not live up to clinical expectations in trials of acute brain injury because of the manifestation of multiple side effects. In spite of this, development of NMDA antagonists continues, where some of the newer agents block excitotoxicity through alternative mechanisms. For example, blockers selective to the NR2B subunit or agents that block metabotropic glutamate receptors or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors are currently under investigation. Several years ago, the arylalkylamine spider toxins were demonstrated to function as open-channel blockers similar to memantine, which was very recently approved by the U.S. FDA for use in patients with Alzheimer's dementia. With this said, programs focusing on NMDA antagonism via alternative mechanisms may still hold promise for treating acute injury and even chronic forms of dementia.

  1. Structural features of the Nogo receptor signaling complexes at the neuron/myelin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Nayanendu; Kolev, Momchil; Nikolov, Dimitar B

    2014-10-01

    Upon spinal cord injury, the central nervous system axons are unable to regenerate, partially due to the repulsive action of myelin inhibitors, such as the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Nogo-A and the oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp). These inhibitors bind and signal through a single receptor/co-receptor complex that comprises of NgR1/LINGO-1 and either p75 or TROY, triggering intracellular downstream signaling that impedes the re-growth of axons. Structure-function analysis of myelin inhibitors and their neuronal receptors, particularly the NgRs, have provided novel information regarding the molecular details of the inhibitor/receptor/co-receptor interactions. Structural and biochemical studies have revealed the architecture of many of these proteins and identified the molecular regions important for assembly of the inhibitory signaling complexes. It was also recently shown that gangliosides, such as GT1b, mediate receptor/co-receptor binding. In this review, we highlight these studies and summarize our current understanding of the multi-protein cell-surface complexes mediating inhibitory signaling events at the neuron/myelin interface.

  2. Dietary magnesium restriction reduces amygdala-hypothalamic GluN1 receptor complex levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafari, Maryam; Whittle, Nigel; Miklósi, András G; Kotlowski, Caroline; Kotlowsky, Caroline; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Berger, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Singewald, Nicolas; Lubec, Gert

    2015-07-01

    Reduced daily intake of magnesium (Mg(2+)) is suggested to contribute to depression. Indeed, preclinical studies show dietary magnesium restriction (MgR) elicits enhanced depression-like behaviour establishing a causal relationship. Amongst other mechanisms, Mg(2+) gates the activity of N-methyl-D-asparte (NMDA) receptors; however, it is not known whether reduced dietary Mg(2+) intake can indeed affect brain NMDA receptor complexes. Thus, the aim of the current study was to reveal whether MgR induces changes in brain NMDA receptor subunit composition that would indicate altered NMDA receptor regulation. The results revealed that enhanced depression-like behaviour elicited by MgR was associated with reduced amygdala-hypothalamic protein levels of GluN1-containing NMDA complexes. No change in GluN1 mRNA levels was observed indicating posttranslational changes were induced by dietary Mg(2+) restriction. To reveal possible protein interaction partners, GluN1 immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays were carried out revealing the expected GluN1 subunit association with GluN2A, GluN2B, but also novel interactions with GluA1, GluA2 in addition to known downstream signalling proteins. Chronic paroxetine treatment in MgR mice normalized enhanced depression-like behaviour, but did not alter protein levels of GluN1-containing NMDA receptors, indicating targets downstream of the NMDA receptor. Collectively, present data demonstrate that dietary MgR alters brain levels of GluN1-containing NMDA receptor complexes, containing GluN2A, GluN2B, AMPA receptors GluA1, GluA2 and several protein kinases. These data indicate that the modulation of dietary Mg(2+) intake may alter the function and signalling of this receptor complex indicating its involvement in the enhanced depression-like behaviour elicited by MgR.

  3. 腺苷A2A受体拮抗剂改善帕金森病运动并发症%Adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 8-( 3-Chlorostyryl) caffeine improves motor complication in Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋璐; 马雅萍; 刘振国; 巴茂文

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨腺苷A2A受体拮抗剂8-(3-Chlorostyryl)caffeine(CSC)对左旋多巴诱发的运动并发症的行为学与细胞学影响.方法 通过6-羟基多巴(6-OHDA)立体定向注射至大鼠前脑内侧束建立帕金森病(PD)动物模型.模型成功大鼠接受每日2次左旋多巴甲酯(50 mg/kg加12.5mg/kg苄丝肼)腹腔注射,持续22 d.在第23天,运动并发症模型组大鼠(n=8)继续接受如上用药,用药组(n=8)在左旋多巴注射前注射腺苷A2A受体拮抗剂CSC,均用药至第29天.同时设假手术组(n=8)和PD对照组(n=8).评估旋转时间,并采用免疫组织化学法和蛋白印迹法观察和检测纹状体区腺苷A2A受体的表达情况.结果 左旋多巴长期用药诱发PD大鼠模型旋转反应时间缩短,同时模型组损伤侧纹状体区腺苷A2A受体的表达升高[阳性细胞指数(IOD),(11.55±2.75)×104>],较假手术组[IOD,(6.02±1.29)×10±]和PD组[IOD,(5.60±1.83)×10±]有统计学意义(F=33.31,P]也下调至对照组和PD组水平.结论 腺苷A2A受体参与了左旋多巴诱发的运动并发症的发生,腺苷A2A受体拮抗剂可能是治疗PD运动并发症有前景的药物.%Objective To investigate cellular and behavioral effects of adenosine A2A receptor antagonist in a rat model of levodopa-induced motor complications.Methods The hemi-parkinsonian rat model was produced by stereotaxically injecting 6-OHDA to right medial forebmin bundle(MFB).Animals were intraperitoneally treated with levodopa 50 mg/kg plus benserazide 12.5 mg/kg twice a day for 22 days levodopa + vehicle.Rotational duration was estimated.After they were sacrificed,the expression of adenosine A2A receptor was observed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot.Results CSC,reversing the shortened rotational duration induced by levodopa,prolonged the rotational duration.This effect was maintained fil the end of the treatment.The chronic levedopa treatment induced an upregulation of adenosine A2A receptor expression in the

  4. Identification of a preassembled TRH receptor-G(q/11) protein complex in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions define specificity in signal transduction and these interactions are central to transmembrane signaling by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). It is not quite clear, however, whether GPCRs and the regulatory trimeric G-proteins behave as freely and independently diffusible molecules in the plasma membrane or whether they form some preassociated complexes. Here we used clear-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (CN-PAGE) to investigate the presumed coupling between thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor and its cognate G(q/11) protein in HEK293 cells expressing high levels of these proteins. Under different solubilization conditions, the TRH receptor (TRH-R) was identified to form a putative pentameric complex composed of TRH-R homodimer and G(q/11) protein. The presumed association of TRH-R with G(q/11)α or Gβ proteins in plasma membranes was verified by RNAi experiments. After 10- or 30-min hormone treatment, TRH-R signaling complexes gradually dissociated with a concomitant release of receptor homodimers. These observations support the model in which GPCRs can be coupled to trimeric G-proteins in preassembled signaling complexes, which might be dynamically regulated upon receptor activation. The precoupling of receptors with their cognate G-proteins can contribute to faster G-protein activation and subsequent signal transfer into the cell interior.

  5. Molecular and biochemical analysis of symbiotic plant receptor kinase complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Douglas R; Riely, Brendan K

    2010-09-01

    DE-FG02-01ER15200 was a 36-month project, initiated on Sept 1, 2005 and extended with a one-year no cost extension to August 31, 2009. During the project period we published seven manuscripts (2 in review). Including the prior project period (2002-2005) we published 12 manuscripts in journals that include Science, PNAS, The Plant Cell, Plant Journal, Plant Physiology, and MPMI. The primary focus of this work was to further elucidate the function of the Nod factor signaling pathway that is involved in initiation of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis and in particular to explore the relationship between receptor kinase-like proteins and downstream effectors of symbiotic development. During the project period we have map-base cloned two additional players in symbiotic development, including an ERF transcription factor and an ethylene pathway gene (EIN2) that negatively regulates symbiotic signaling; we have also further characterized the subcellular distribution and function of a nuclear-localized symbiosis-specific ion channel, DMI1. The major outcome of the work has been the development of systems for exploring and validating protein-protein interactions that connect symbiotic receptor-like proteins to downstream responses. In this regard, we have developed both homologous (i.e., in planta) and heterologous (i.e., in yeast) systems to test protein interactions. Using yeast 2-hybrid screens we isolated the only known interactor of the nuclear-localized calcium-responsive kinase DMI3. We have also used yeast 2-hybrid methodology to identify interactions between symbiotic signaling proteins and certain RopGTPase/RopGEF proteins that regulate root hair polar growth. More important to the long-term goals of our work, we have established a TAP tagging system that identifies in planta interactions based on co-immuno precipitation and mass spectrometry. The validity of this approach has been shown using known interactors that either co-iummnoprecipate (i.e., remorin) or co

  6. A complex pattern of chemokine receptor expression is seen in osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Luettichau, Irene; Segerer, Stephan; Wechselberger, Alexandra; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nathrath, Michaela; Kremer, Markus; Henger, Anna; Djafarzadeh, Roghieh; Burdach, Stefan; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor in childhood and adolescence. Patients with primary metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. It is therefore important to better characterize the biology of this tumor to define new prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for tailored therapy. Chemokines and their receptors have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of malignant tumors. They are thought to be active participants in the biology of osteosarcoma. The function of specific chemokines and their receptors is strongly associated with the biological context and microenvironment of their expression. In this report we characterized the expression of a series of chemokine receptors in the complex environment that defines osteosarcoma. Methods The overall level of chemokine receptor mRNA expression was determined using TaqMan RT-PCR of microdissected archival patient biopsy samples. Expression was then verified at the protein level by immunohistochemistry using a series of receptor specific antibody reagents to elucidate the cellular association of expression. Results Expression at the RNA level was found for most of the tested receptors. CCR1 expression was found on infiltrating mononuclear and polynuclear giant cells in the tumor. Cells associated with the lining of intratumoral vessels were shown to express CCR4. Infiltrating mononuclear cells and tumor cells both showed expression of the receptor CCR5, while CCR7 was predominantly expressed by the mononuclear infiltrate. CCR10 was only very rarely detected in few scattered infiltrating cells. Conclusion Our data elucidate for the first time the cellular context of chemokine receptor expression in osteosarcoma. This is an important issue for better understanding potential chemokine/chemokine receptor function in the complex biologic processes that underlie the development and progression of osteosarcoma. Our data support the suggested involvement of chemokines and their

  7. A complex pattern of chemokine receptor expression is seen in osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathrath Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor in childhood and adolescence. Patients with primary metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. It is therefore important to better characterize the biology of this tumor to define new prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for tailored therapy. Chemokines and their receptors have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of malignant tumors. They are thought to be active participants in the biology of osteosarcoma. The function of specific chemokines and their receptors is strongly associated with the biological context and microenvironment of their expression. In this report we characterized the expression of a series of chemokine receptors in the complex environment that defines osteosarcoma. Methods The overall level of chemokine receptor mRNA expression was determined using TaqMan RT-PCR of microdissected archival patient biopsy samples. Expression was then verified at the protein level by immunohistochemistry using a series of receptor specific antibody reagents to elucidate the cellular association of expression. Results Expression at the RNA level was found for most of the tested receptors. CCR1 expression was found on infiltrating mononuclear and polynuclear giant cells in the tumor. Cells associated with the lining of intratumoral vessels were shown to express CCR4. Infiltrating mononuclear cells and tumor cells both showed expression of the receptor CCR5, while CCR7 was predominantly expressed by the mononuclear infiltrate. CCR10 was only very rarely detected in few scattered infiltrating cells. Conclusion Our data elucidate for the first time the cellular context of chemokine receptor expression in osteosarcoma. This is an important issue for better understanding potential chemokine/chemokine receptor function in the complex biologic processes that underlie the development and progression of osteosarcoma. Our data support the suggested involvement of

  8. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  9. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  10. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes:understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kjell Fuxe; Dasiel O Borroto-Escuela

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neu-rons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular lfuid and the cerebral spinal lfuid through diffusion and lfow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume trans-mission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  11. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Fuxe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  12. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    , Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...... complex suggesting that its biological actions can be regulated at different levels including the transcription, translation, posttranslational processing, receptor binding and intracellular signalling....

  14. Receptor-like kinase complexes in plant innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeff, Michael Christiaan; Roux, Milena Edna; Mundy, John

    2012-01-01

    , the aforementioned RLKs activate generic immune responses termed pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). RLKs can form complexes with other family members and engage a variety of intracellular signaling components and regulatory pathways upon stimulation. This review focuses on interesting new data about how...

  15. Noncanonical GPCR signaling arising from a PTH receptor-arrestin-Gβγ complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbi, Vanessa L; Stevenson, Hilary P; Feinstein, Timothy N; Calero, Guillermo; Romero, Guillermo; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-22

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) participate in ubiquitous transmembrane signal transduction processes by activating heterotrimeric G proteins. In the current "canonical" model of GPCR signaling, arrestins terminate receptor signaling by impairing receptor-G-protein coupling and promoting receptor internalization. However, parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR), an essential GPCR involved in bone and mineral metabolism, does not follow this conventional desensitization paradigm. β-Arrestins prolong G protein (G(S))-mediated cAMP generation triggered by PTH, a process that correlates with the persistence of arrestin-PTHR complexes on endosomes and which is thought to be associated with prolonged physiological calcemic and phosphate responses. This presents an inescapable paradox for the current model of arrestin-mediated receptor-G-protein decoupling. Here we show that PTHR forms a ternary complex that includes arrestin and the Gβγ dimer in response to PTH stimulation, which in turn causes an accelerated rate of G(S) activation and increases the steady-state levels of activated G(S), leading to prolonged generation of cAMP. This work provides the mechanistic basis for an alternative model of GPCR signaling in which arrestins contribute to sustaining the effect of an agonist hormone on the receptor.

  16. Assembly Stoichiometry of the GluK2/GluK5 Kainate Receptor Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Reiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionotropic glutamate receptors assemble as homo- or heterotetramers. One well-studied heteromeric complex is formed by the kainate receptor subunits GluK2 and GluK5. Retention motifs prevent trafficking of GluK5 homomers to the plasma membrane, but coassembly with GluK2 yields functional heteromeric receptors. Additional control over GluK2/GluK5 assembly seems to be exerted by the amino-terminal domains, which preferentially assemble into heterodimers as isolated domains. However, the stoichiometry of the full-length GluK2/GluK5 receptor complex has yet to be determined, as is the case for all non-NMDA glutamate receptors. Here, we address this question, using a single-molecule imaging technique that enables direct counting of the number of each GluK subunit type in homomeric and heteromeric receptors in the plasma membranes of live cells. We show that GluK2 and GluK5 assemble with 2:2 stoichiometry. This is an important step toward understanding the assembly mechanism, architecture, and functional consequences of heteromer formation in ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  17. CD163: a signal receptor scavenging haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes from plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Madsen, Mette; Moestrup, Søren K

    2002-01-01

    CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage membrane protein belonging to the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domain family. The CD163 expression is induced by interleukin-6, interleukin-10 and glucocorticoids. Its function has remained unknown until recently when CD163 was identified...... hemolysis. Besides having a detoxificating effect by removing Hb from plasma, the CD163-mediated endocytosis of the Hp-Hb complex may represent a major pathway for uptake of iron in the tissue macrophages. The novel functional linkage of CD163 and Hp, which both are induced during inflammation, also reveal...... as the endocytic receptor binding hemoglobin (Hb) in complex with the plasma protein haptoglobin (Hp). This specific receptor-ligand interaction leading to removal from plasma of the Hp-Hb complex-but not free Hp or Hb-now explains the depletion of circulating Hp in individuals with increased intravascular...

  18. Novel TPR-containing subunit of TOM complex functions as cytosolic receptor for Entamoeba mitosomal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makiuchi, Takashi; Mi-ichi, Fumika; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Under anaerobic environments, the mitochondria have undergone remarkable reduction and transformation into highly reduced structures, referred as mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), which include mitosomes and hydrogenosomes. In agreement with the concept of reductive evolution, mitosomes of Entamoeba histolytica lack most of the components of the TOM (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane) complex, which is required for the targeting and membrane translocation of preproteins into the canonical aerobic mitochondria. Here we showed, in E. histolytica mitosomes, the presence of a 600-kDa TOM complex composed of Tom40, a conserved pore-forming subunit, and Tom60, a novel lineage-specific receptor protein. Tom60, containing multiple tetratricopeptide repeats, is localized to the mitosomal outer membrane and the cytosol, and serves as a receptor of both mitosomal matrix and membrane preproteins. Our data indicate that Entamoeba has invented a novel lineage-specific shuttle receptor of the TOM complex as a consequence of adaptation to an anaerobic environment.

  19. Structure and function of florigen and the receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Ken-ichiro; Ohki, Izuru; Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Chojiro; Shimamoto, Ko

    2013-05-01

    In the 1930s, the flowering hormone, florigen, was proposed to be synthesized in leaves under inductive day length and transported to the shoot apex, where it induces flowering. More recently, generated genetic and biochemical data suggest that florigen is a protein encoded by the gene, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). A rice (Oryza sativa) FT homolog, Hd3a, interacts with the rice FD homolog, OsFD1, via a 14-3-3 protein. Formation of this tri-protein complex is essential for flowering promotion by Hd3a in rice. In addition, the multifunctionality of FT homologs, other than for flowering promotion, is an emerging concept. Here we review the structural and biochemical features of the florigen protein complex and discuss the molecular basis for the multifunctionality of FT proteins.

  20. Antidepressants and seizure-interactions at the GABA-receptor chloride-ionophore complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malatynska, E.; Knapp, R.J.; Ikeda, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    Convulsive seizures are a potential side effect of antidepressant drug treatment and can be produced by all classes of antidepressants. It is also know that some convulsant and anticonvulsant drug actions are mediated by the GABA-receptor chloride-ionophore complex. Drugs acting at this complex appear to induce convulsions by inhibiting chloride conductance through the associated chloride channel. Using the method of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl-uptake by rat cerebral cortical vesicles, we show that some antidepressant drugs can inhibit the GABA-receptor chloride uptake, and that the degree of chloride channel inhibition by these drugs correlates with the frequency of convulsive seizures induced by them.

  1. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. (School of Biological and Molecular Sciences, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford (England))

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  2. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  3. Active-state models of ternary GPCR complexes: determinants of selective receptor-G-protein coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf C Kling

    Full Text Available Based on the recently described crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor--Gs-protein complex, we report the first molecular-dynamics simulations of ternary GPCR complexes designed to identify the selectivity determinants for receptor-G-protein binding. Long-term molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-bound β2AR-Gαs and D2R-Gαi complexes embedded in a hydrated bilayer environment and computational alanine-scanning mutagenesis identified distinct residues of the N-terminal region of intracellular loop 3 to be crucial for coupling selectivity. Within the G-protein, specific amino acids of the α5-helix, the C-terminus of the Gα-subunit and the regions around αN-β1 and α4-β6 were found to determine receptor recognition. Knowledge of these determinants of receptor-G-protein binding selectivity is essential for designing drugs that target specific receptor/G-protein combinations.

  4. Increased striatal adenosine A2A receptor levels is an early event in Parkinson's disease-related pathology and it is potentially regulated by miR-34b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Porta, Sílvia; Buira, Sandra P; Pereira-Veiga, Thais; Díaz-Sánchez, Sara; Albasanz, José Luis; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín, Mairena; Barrachina, Marta

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity. In the brain, A2ARs are found highly enriched in striatal GABAergic medium spiny neurons, related to the control of voluntary movement. Pharmacological modulation of A2ARs is particularly useful in Parkinson's disease (PD) due to their property of antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor activity. Increases in A2AR levels have been described in PD patients showing an important loss of dopaminergic denervation markers, but no data have been reported about A2AR levels in incidental PD brains. In the present report, we show that increased A2ARs protein levels were also detected in the putamen of incidental PD cases (Braak PD stages 1-2) with respect to age-matched controls. By contrast, A2ARs mRNA levels remained unchanged, suggesting that posttranslational mechanisms could be involved in the regulation of A2ARs. It has been described how miR-34b/c downregulation is an early event in PD cases. We found that miR-34b levels are also significantly reduced in the putamen of incidental PD cases and along disease progression. Given that 3'UTR of A2AR contains a predicted target site for miR-34b, the potential role of this miRNA in protein A2AR levels was assessed. In vitro studies revealed that endogenous A2AR protein levels increased when miR-34b function was blocked using a specific anti-miR-34b. Moreover, using a luciferase reporter assay with point mutations in a miR-34b predicted binding site within the 3'UTR region of A2AR mRNA abolished the effect of the miRNA using a miR-34b mimic. In addition, we showed a reduced percentage of DNA methylation in the 5'UTR region of ADORA2A in advanced PD cases. Overall, these findings reveal that increased A2AR protein levels occur in asymptomatic PD patients and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying A2AR expression levels along the progression of this neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Molecular assembly of the ternary granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Barbara J; Hercus, Timothy R; Cambareri, Bronwyn A; Woodcock, Joanna M; Bagley, Christopher J; Howlett, Geoff J; Lopez, Angel F

    2003-02-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine that stimulates the production and functional activity of granulocytes and macrophages, properties that have encouraged its clinical use in bone marrow transplantation and in certain infectious diseases. Despite the importance of GM-CSF in regulating myeloid cell numbers and function, little is known about the exact composition and mechanism of assembly of the GM-CSF receptor complex. We have now produced soluble forms of the GM-CSF receptor alpha chain (sGMRalpha) and beta chain (sbetac) and utilized GM-CSF, the GM-CSF antagonist E21R (Glu21Arg), and the betac-blocking monoclonal antibody BION-1 to define the molecular assembly of the GM-CSF receptor complex. We found that GM-CSF and E21R were able to form low-affinity, binary complexes with sGMRalpha, each having a stoichiometry of 1:1. Importantly, GM-CSF but not E21R formed a ternary complex with sGMRalpha and sbetac, and this complex could be disrupted by E21R. Significantly, size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, and radioactive tracer experiments indicated that the ternary complex is composed of one sbetac dimer with a single molecule each of sGMRalpha and of GM-CSF. In addition, a hitherto unrecognized direct interaction between betac and GM-CSF was detected that was absent with E21R and was abolished by BION-1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism of cytokine receptor assembly likely to apply also to interleukin-3 (IL-3) and IL-5 and have implications for our molecular understanding and potential manipulation of GM-CSF activation of its receptor.

  6. Expression, purification and crystallization of the ancestral androgen receptor-DHT complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Jennifer K; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-09-01

    Steroid receptors (SRs) are a closely related family of ligand-dependent nuclear receptors that mediate the transcription of genes critical for development, reproduction and immunity. SR dysregulation has been implicated in cancer, inflammatory diseases and metabolic disorders. SRs bind their cognate hormone ligand with exquisite specificity, offering a unique system to study the evolution of molecular recognition. The SR family evolved from an estrogen-sensitive ancestor and diverged to become sensitive to progestagens, corticoids and, most recently, androgens. To understand the structural mechanisms driving the evolution of androgen responsiveness, the ancestral androgen receptor (ancAR1) was crystallized in complex with 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and a fragment of the transcriptional mediator/intermediary factor 2 (Tif2). Crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and the resulting structure will permit a direct comparison with its progestagen-sensitive ancestor, ancestral steroid receptor 2 (AncSR2).

  7. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  8. Structure and antagonism of the receptor complex mediated by human TSLP in allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Peelman, Frank; Braun, Harald; Lopez, Juan; Van Rompaey, Dries; Dansercoer, Ann; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Pauwels, Kris; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida; De Winter, Hans; Beyaert, Rudi; Lippens, Guy; Savvides, Savvas N

    2017-04-03

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is pivotal to the pathophysiology of widespread allergic diseases mediated by type 2 helper T cell (Th2) responses, including asthma and atopic dermatitis. The emergence of human TSLP as a clinical target against asthma calls for maximally harnessing its therapeutic potential via structural and mechanistic considerations. Here we employ an integrative experimental approach focusing on productive and antagonized TSLP complexes and free cytokine. We reveal how cognate receptor TSLPR allosterically activates TSLP to potentiate the recruitment of the shared interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα) by leveraging the flexibility, conformational heterogeneity and electrostatics of the cytokine. We further show that the monoclonal antibody Tezepelumab partly exploits these principles to neutralize TSLP activity. Finally, we introduce a fusion protein comprising a tandem of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα extracellular domains, which harnesses the mechanistic intricacies of the TSLP-driven receptor complex to manifest high antagonistic potency.

  9. Recognition and sensing of low-epitope targets via ternary complexes with oligonucleotides and synthetic receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyung-Ae; Barbu, Mihaela; Halim, Marlin; Pallavi, Payal; Kim, Benjamin; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M.; Pecic, Stevan; Taylor, Steven; Worgall, Tilla S.; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2014-11-01

    Oligonucleotide-based receptors or aptamers can interact with small molecules, but the ability to achieve high-affinity and specificity of these interactions depends strongly on functional groups or epitopes displayed by the binding targets. Some classes of targets are particularly challenging: for example, monosaccharides have scarce functionalities and no aptamers have been reported to recognize, let alone distinguish from each other, glucose and other hexoses. Here we report aptamers that differentiate low-epitope targets such as glucose, fructose or galactose by forming ternary complexes with high-epitope organic receptors for monosaccharides. In a follow-up example, we expand this method to isolate high-affinity oligonucleotides against aromatic amino acids complexed in situ with a nonspecific organometallic receptor. The method is general and enables broad clinical use of aptamers for the detection of small molecules in mix-and-measure assays, as demonstrated by monitoring postprandial waves of phenylalanine in human subjects.

  10. Caffeine inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells induced by acetaldehyde via adenosine A2A receptor mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK signal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cell (HSC activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR. Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine's inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway.Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III.

  11. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  12. The Pafah1b complex interacts with the reelin receptor VLDLR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangcheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Reelin is an extracellular protein that directs the organization of cortical structures of the brain through the activation of two receptors, the very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR and the apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2, and the phosphorylation of Disabled-1 (Dab1. Lis1, the product of the Pafah1b1 gene, is a component of the brain platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase 1b (Pafah1b complex, and binds to phosphorylated Dab1 in response to Reelin. Here we investigated the involvement of the whole Pafah1b complex in Reelin signaling and cortical layer formation and found that catalytic subunits of the Pafah1b complex, Pafah1b2 and Pafah1b3, specifically bind to the NPxYL sequence of VLDLR, but not to ApoER2. Compound Pafah1b1(+/-;Apoer2(-/- mutant mice exhibit a reeler-like phenotype in the forebrain consisting of the inversion of cortical layers and hippocampal disorganization, whereas double Pafah1b1(+/-;Vldlr(-/- mutants do not. These results suggest that a cross-talk between the Pafah1b complex and Reelin occurs downstream of the VLDLR receptor.

  13. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of benzofuran-acetamides as "antineophobic" mitochondrial DBI receptor complex ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Y; Kozikowski, AP; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    1998-01-01

    A series of novel benzofuran analogues of N,N-di-n-hexyl-2-phenylindole-3-acetamide (5, FGIN-1-27), a potent and highly specific mitochondrial DBI receptor complex ligand, were synthesized by a modified Fischer method and found in vitro and in vivo to be equally potent and selective as FGIN-1-27. (C

  14. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling : how complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodkin, Alexey N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Plant, Nick; Mone, Martijn J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Campbell, Moray J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Carlberg, Carsten; Snoep, Jacky L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2010-01-01

    The topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of 'design' aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic models of

  15. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  16. Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) exhibit co-expression and complex, but largely unknown, functional interactions in a sub-population of primary sensory neurons (PSN). We report that PSN co-expressing CB1 receptor and TRPV1 form two distinct sub-populations based on their pharmacological properties, which could be due to the distribution pattern of the two receptors. Pharmacologically, neurons respond either only to capsaicin (COR neurons) or to both cap...

  17. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (U. of Texas-SMED); (UNC)

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  18. Model of the complex of Parathyroid hormone-2 receptor and Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aim to propose interactions between the parathyroid hormone-2 receptor (PTH2R and its ligand the tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39 by constructing a homology model of their complex. The two related peptides parathyroid hormone (PTH and parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP are compared with the complex to examine their interactions. Findings In the model, the hydrophobic N-terminus of TIP39 is buried in a hydrophobic part of the central cavity between helices 3 and 7. Comparison of the peptide sequences indicates that the main discriminator between the agonistic peptides TIP39 and PTH and the inactive PTHrP is a tryptophan-phenylalanine replacement. The model indicates that the smaller phenylalanine in PTHrP does not completely occupy the binding site of the larger tryptophan residue in the other peptides. As only TIP39 causes internalisation of the receptor and the primary difference being an aspartic acid in position 7 of TIP39 that interacts with histidine 396 in the receptor, versus isoleucine/histidine residues in the related hormones, this might be a trigger interaction for the events that cause internalisation. Conclusions A model is constructed for the complex and a trigger interaction for full agonistic activation between aspartic acid 7 of TIP39 and histidine 396 in the receptor is proposed.

  19. Formation of a Ternary Complex among NHERF1, β-Arrestin, and Parathyroid Hormone Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Christoph; Vetter, Thorsten; Zürn, Alexander; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Friedman, Peter A.; Wang, Bin; Lohse, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    β-Arrestins are crucial regulators of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, desensitization, and internalization. Despite the long-standing paradigm that agonist-promoted receptor phosphorylation is required for β-arrestin2 recruitment, emerging evidence suggests that phosphorylation-independent mechanisms play a role in β-arrestin2 recruitment by GPCRs. Several PDZ proteins are known to interact with GPCRs and serve as cytosolic adaptors to modulate receptor signaling and trafficking. Na+/H+ exchange regulatory factors (NHERFs) exert a major role in GPCR signaling. By combining imaging and biochemical and biophysical methods we investigated the interplay among NHERF1, β-arrestin2, and the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR). We show that NHERF1 and β-arrestin2 can independently bind to the PTHR and form a ternary complex in cultured human embryonic kidney cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Although NHERF1 interacts constitutively with the PTHR, β-arrestin2 binding is promoted by receptor activation. NHERF1 interacts directly with β-arrestin2 without using the PTHR as an interface. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies revealed that the kinetics of PTHR and β-arrestin2 interactions were modulated by NHERF1. These findings suggest a model in which NHERF1 may serve as an adaptor, bringing β-arrestin2 into close proximity to the PTHR, thereby facilitating β-arrestin2 recruitment after receptor activation. PMID:20656684

  20. Formation of a ternary complex among NHERF1, beta-arrestin, and parathyroid hormone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Christoph; Vetter, Thorsten; Zürn, Alexander; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Friedman, Peter A; Wang, Bin; Lohse, Martin J

    2010-09-24

    β-Arrestins are crucial regulators of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, desensitization, and internalization. Despite the long-standing paradigm that agonist-promoted receptor phosphorylation is required for β-arrestin2 recruitment, emerging evidence suggests that phosphorylation-independent mechanisms play a role in β-arrestin2 recruitment by GPCRs. Several PDZ proteins are known to interact with GPCRs and serve as cytosolic adaptors to modulate receptor signaling and trafficking. Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factors (NHERFs) exert a major role in GPCR signaling. By combining imaging and biochemical and biophysical methods we investigated the interplay among NHERF1, β-arrestin2, and the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR). We show that NHERF1 and β-arrestin2 can independently bind to the PTHR and form a ternary complex in cultured human embryonic kidney cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Although NHERF1 interacts constitutively with the PTHR, β-arrestin2 binding is promoted by receptor activation. NHERF1 interacts directly with β-arrestin2 without using the PTHR as an interface. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies revealed that the kinetics of PTHR and β-arrestin2 interactions were modulated by NHERF1. These findings suggest a model in which NHERF1 may serve as an adaptor, bringing β-arrestin2 into close proximity to the PTHR, thereby facilitating β-arrestin2 recruitment after receptor activation.

  1. [Participation of GABA--benzodiazepine receptor complex in the anxiolytic effect of piracetam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldavkin, G M; Voronina, T A; Neznamov, G G; Maletova, O K; Eliava, N V

    2006-01-01

    It is established that bicuculline, picrotoxin, and flumazenil (agents blocking different sites of GABA receptor) decrease the anxiolytic effect of piracetam as manifested in the conflict situation test. The most pronounced interaction was observed between piracetam and flumazenyl. On the background of antagonist action, piracetam inhibited the effects of flumazenil (but not those of bicuculline and picrotoxin). Based on these data, it is assumed that the anxiolytic effect of piracetam is mediated to some extent by benzodiazepine site of the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex.

  2. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili [Scripps; (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  3. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäntti, Maria H., E-mail: maria.jantti@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mandrika, Ilona, E-mail: ilona@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites Str. 1, Riga LV 1067 (Latvia); Kukkonen, Jyrki P., E-mail: jyrki.kukkonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  4. LINGO-1 is a component of the Nogo-66 receptor/p75 signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Sha; Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Thill, Greg; Ji, Benxiu; Relton, Jane; Levesque, Melissa; Allaire, Norm; Perrin, Steve; Sands, Bryan; Crowell, Thomas; Cate, Richard L; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake

    2004-03-01

    Axon regeneration in the adult CNS is prevented by inhibitors in myelin. These inhibitors seem to modulate RhoA activity by binding to a receptor complex comprising a ligand-binding subunit (the Nogo-66 receptor NgR1) and a signal transducing subunit (the neurotrophin receptor p75). However, in reconstituted non-neuronal systems, NgR1 and p75 together are unable to activate RhoA, suggesting that additional components of the receptor may exist. Here we describe LINGO-1, a nervous system-specific transmembrane protein that binds NgR1 and p75 and that is an additional functional component of the NgR1/p75 signaling complex. In non-neuronal cells, coexpression of human NgR1, p75 and LINGO-1 conferred responsiveness to oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein, as measured by RhoA activation. A dominant-negative human LINGO-1 construct attenuated myelin inhibition in transfected primary neuronal cultures. This effect on neurons was mimicked using an exogenously added human LINGO-1-Fc fusion protein. Together these observations suggest that LINGO-1 has an important role in CNS biology.

  5. Benzodiazepine/GABA receptor complex during severe ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmingsen, R.; Braestrup, C.; Nielsen, M.; Barry, D.I. (Dept. of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, St. Hans Mental Hospital, Roskilde, and Ferrosan Research Laboratory, Soeborg, Denmark)

    1982-01-01

    The benzodiazepine/GABA (gammaaminobutyric acid) receptor complex was investigated during severe ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in the rat. The intragastric intubation technique was used to establish physical ethanol dependence in the animals. Cerebral cortex from male Wistar rats was studied 1) after 31/2 days of severe ethanol intoxication, 2) during the ethanol withdrawal reaction and 3) in a control group. The effect of GABA-ergic activation by muscimol and THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazole(5,4-c)pyridin-3-01) on /sup 3/H-diazepam binding was unchanged during ethanol intoxication and withdrawal, as was the affinity constant (Ksub(D)) and the maximal number of binding sites (Bsub(max)) for /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam. In conclusion, the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor complex is unlikely to play any causual part in physical ethanol dependence.

  6. Communication: Free energy of ligand-receptor systems forming multimeric complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Bachmann, Stephan J.; Parolini, Lucia; Mognetti, Bortolo M.

    2016-04-01

    Ligand-receptor interactions are ubiquitous in biology and have become popular in materials in view of their applications to programmable self-assembly. Although complex functionalities often emerge from the simultaneous interaction of more than just two linker molecules, state of the art theoretical frameworks enable the calculation of the free energy only in systems featuring one-to-one ligand/receptor binding. In this Communication, we derive a general formula to calculate the free energy of systems featuring simultaneous direct interaction between an arbitrary number of linkers. To exemplify the potential and generality of our approach, we apply it to the systems recently introduced by Parolini et al. [ACS Nano 10, 2392 (2016)] and Halverson and Tkachenko [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 094903 (2016)], both featuring functionalized Brownian particles interacting via three-linker complexes.

  7. Structure of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor in complex with a peptide mimetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wu, Huixian; Vardy, Eyal; Huang, Xi-Ping; Trapella, Claudio; Guerrini, Remo; Calo, Girolamo; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Ferrara); (Scripps); (UNC)

    2012-07-11

    Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, {delta}, {kappa} and {mu} ({delta}-OR, {kappa}-OR and {mu}-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ({approx}60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors {kappa} (ref. 5) and {mu} (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.

  8. Shared receptor components but distinct complexes for alpha and beta interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewerenz, M; Mogensen, K E; Uzé, G

    1998-09-25

    The type I interferon family includes 13 alpha, one omega and one beta subtypes recognized by a complex containing the receptor subunits ifnar1 and ifnar2 and their associated Janus tyrosine kinases, Tyk2 and Jak1. To investigate the reported differences in the way that alpha and beta interferons signal through the receptor, we introduced alanine-substitutions in the ifnar2 extracellular domain, and expressed the mutants in U5A cells, lacking endogenous ifnar2. A selection, designed to recover mutants that responded preferentially to alpha or beta interferon yielded three groups: I, neutral; II, sensitive to alpha interferon, partially resistant to beta interferon; III, resistant to alpha interferon, partially sensitive to beta interferon. A mutant clone, TMK, fully resistant to alpha interferon with good sensitivity to beta interferon, was characterized in detail and compared with U5A cells complemented with wild-type ifnar2 and also with Tyk2-deficient 11.1 cells, which exhibit a similar alpha-unresponsive phenotype with a partial beta interferon response. Using anti-receptor antibodies and mutant forms of beta interferon, three distinct modes of ligand interaction could be discerned: (i) alpha interferon with ifnar1 and ifnar2; (ii) beta interferon with ifnar1 and ifnar2; (iii) beta interferon with ifnar2 alone. We conclude that alpha and beta interferons signal differently through their receptors because the two ligand subtypes interact with the receptor subunits ifnar 1 and ifnar2 in entirely different ways.

  9. CLiBE: a database of computed ligand binding energy for ligand-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Ji, Z L; Zhi, D G; Chen, Y Z

    2002-11-01

    Consideration of binding competitiveness of a drug candidate against natural ligands and other drugs that bind to the same receptor site may facilitate the rational development of a candidate into a potent drug. A strategy that can be applied to computer-aided drug design is to evaluate ligand-receptor interaction energy or other scoring functions of a designed drug with that of the relevant ligands known to bind to the same binding site. As a tool to facilitate such a strategy, a database of ligand-receptor interaction energy is developed from known ligand-receptor 3D structural entries in the Protein Databank (PDB). The Energy is computed based on a molecular mechanics force field that has been used in the prediction of therapeutic and toxicity targets of drugs. This database also contains information about ligand function and other properties and it can be accessed at http://xin.cz3.nus.edu.sg/group/CLiBE.asp. The computed energy components may facilitate the probing of the mode of action and other profiles of binding. A number of computed energies of some PDB ligand-receptor complexes in this database are studied and compared to experimental binding affinity. A certain degree of correlation between the computed energy and experimental binding affinity is found, which suggests that the computed energy may be useful in facilitating a qualitative analysis of drug binding competitiveness.

  10. Studies decode crystal structure of a neurotrophic factor and the p75 neurotrophin receptor complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ CAS biophysicists have made new discoveries about the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR).Under the guidance of Prof.JIANG Tao of the CAS Institute of Biophysics (IBP),Dr.GONG Yong and Dr.CAO Peng revealed crystal structure of a symmetrical complex of the neurotrophin-3 and p75NTR,bringing to light the mode of their interaction and their structural basis.The work was published by the ioumal Nature on 7 August.

  11. On bio-diversity, complexity of M-CSF and its receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    With the development of science, the methods and the views of scientific research changed from analyses to syntheses. Recently, more attention has been paid to bio-diversity and complexity. According to the study on M-CSF and its receptor for years, the author suggests that, the multi-level of bio-diversity also appears at the bio-macromolecular level. Probability of bio-diversity is one of the bases for bio-complexity. Cellular sociology and topobiology are important aspects in bio-complexity, and should be developed. If taking Chinese traditional medicine together with the advantage from Reductionism, joining the study on complexity, Chinese scientist would make a chair in the international scientific society.

  12. Disulfide Trapping for Modeling and Structure Determination of Receptor:Chemokine Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zheng, Yi; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent breakthrough advances in GPCR crystallography, structure determination of protein-protein complexes involving chemokine receptors and their endogenous chemokine ligands remains challenging. Here we describe disulfide trapping, a methodology for generating irreversible covalent binary protein complexes from unbound protein partners by introducing two cysteine residues, one per interaction partner, at selected positions within their interaction interface. Disulfide trapping can serve at least two distinct purposes: (i) stabilization of the complex to assist structural studies, and/or (ii) determination of pairwise residue proximities to guide molecular modeling. Methods for characterization of disulfide-trapped complexes are described and evaluated in terms of throughput, sensitivity, and specificity towards the most energetically favorable cross-links. Due to abundance of native disulfide bonds at receptor:chemokine interfaces, disulfide trapping of their complexes can be associated with intramolecular disulfide shuffling and result in misfolding of the component proteins; because of this, evidence from several experiments is typically needed to firmly establish a positive disulfide crosslink. An optimal pipeline that maximizes throughput and minimizes time and costs by early triage of unsuccessful candidate constructs is proposed. PMID:26921956

  13. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra;

    2016-01-01

    of the TNF-RSC The predicted PUB domain in the N-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with the USP domain of CYLD, whereas the C-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with HOIP SPATA2 is required for recruitment of CYLD to the TNF-RSC Downregulation of SPATA2 augments transcriptional activation of NF-κB and inhibits TNF......TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry...... to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component...

  14. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits A2A adenosine receptor agonist induced β-amyloid production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells via a cAMP dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Vijay Nagpure

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading cause of senile dementia in today's society. Its debilitating symptoms are manifested by disturbances in many important brain functions, which are influenced by adenosine. Hence, adenosinergic system is considered as a potential therapeutic target in AD treatment. In the present study, we found that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor, 100 µM attenuated HENECA (a selective A2A receptor agonist, 10-200 nM induced β-amyloid (1-42 (Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y cells. NaHS also interfered with HENECA-stimulated production and post-translational modification of amyloid precursor protein (APP by inhibiting its maturation. Measurement of the C-terminal APP fragments generated from its enzymatic cleavage by β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 showed that NaHS did not have any significant effect on β-secretase activity. However, the direct measurements of HENECA-elevated γ-secretase activity and mRNA expressions of presenilins suggested that the suppression of Aβ42 production in NaHS pretreated cells was mediated by inhibiting γ-secretase. NaHS induced reductions were accompanied by similar decreases in intracellular cAMP levels and phosphorylation of cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB. NaHS significantly reduced the elevated cAMP and Aβ42 production caused by forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase, AC agonist alone or forskolin in combination with IBMX (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but had no effect on those caused by IBMX alone. Moreover, pretreatment with NaHS significantly attenuated HENECA-elevated AC activity and mRNA expressions of various AC isoforms. These data suggest that NaHS may preferentially suppress AC activity when it was stimulated. In conclusion, H2S attenuated HENECA induced Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells through inhibiting γ-secretase via a cAMP dependent pathway.

  15. Cripto forms a complex with activin and type II activin receptors and can block activin signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter C.; Harrison, Craig A.; Vale, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Activin, nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and signal via the activin type II (ActRII/IIB) and type I (ALK4) serine/threonine kinase receptors. Unlike activins, however, signaling by nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 requires a coreceptor from the epidermal growth factor-Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic protein family such as Cripto. Cripto has important roles during development and oncogenesis and binds nodal or related ligands and ALK4 to facilitate assembly of type I and type II receptor signaling complexes. Because Cripto mediates signaling via activin receptors and binds directly to ALK4, we tested whether transfection with Cripto would affect the ability of activin to signal and/or interact with its receptors. Here we show that Cripto can form a complex with activin and ActRII/IIB. We were unable to detect activin binding to Cripto in the absence of ActRII/IIB, indicating that unlike nodal, activin requires type II receptors to bind Cripto. If cotransfected with ActRII/IIB and ALK4, Cripto inhibited crosslinking of activin to ALK4 and the association of ALK4 with ActRII/IIB. In addition, Cripto blocked activin signaling when transfected into either HepG2 cells or 293T cells. We have also shown that under conditions in which Cripto facilitates nodal signaling, it antagonizes activin. Inhibition of activin signaling provides an additional example of a Cripto effect on the regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-β superfamily members. Because activin is a potent inhibitor of cell growth in multiple cell types, these results provide a mechanism that may partially explain the oncogenic action of Cripto. PMID:12682303

  16. Urea/thiourea derivatives and Zn(II)-DPA complex as receptors for anionic recognition—A brief account

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyadip Das; Prasenjit Mahato; Amrita Ghosh; Amal K Mandal; Tanmay Banerjee; Sukdeb Saha; Amitava Das

    2011-03-01

    This review covers few examples of anion complexation chemistry, with a special focus on urea/thiourea-based receptors and Zn(II)-dipicolyl amine-based receptors. This article specially focuses on structural aspects of the receptors and the anions for obtaining the desire specificity along with an efficient receptor-anion interaction. Two types of receptors have been described in this brief account; first one being the strong hydrogen bond donor urea/thiourea derivatives, which binds the anionic analytes through hydrogen bonded interactions; while, the second type of receptors are coordination complexes, where the coordination of the anion to the metal centre. In both the cases the anion binding modulate the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and thereby the spectroscopic response. Appropriate choice of the signalling unit may allow probing the anion binding phenomena through visual detection.

  17. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A complex by carbohydrate receptor mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna-Magdalena; Mahrhold, Stefan; Perry, Kay; Cheng, Luisa W; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes for botulism. BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and is subsequently transported through the intestinal epithelium into the general circulation. Several hemagglutinin proteins form a multi-protein complex (HA complex) that recognizes host glycans on the intestinal epithelial cell surface to facilitate BoNT absorption. Blocking carbohydrate binding to the HA complex could significantly inhibit the oral toxicity of BoNT. Here, we identify lactulose, a galactose-containing non-digestible sugar commonly used to treat constipation, as a prototype inhibitor against oral BoNT/A intoxication. As revealed by a crystal structure, lactulose binds to the HA complex at the same site where the host galactose-containing carbohydrate receptors bind. In vitro assays using intestinal Caco-2 cells demonstrated that lactulose inhibits HA from compromising the integrity of the epithelial cell monolayers and blocks the internalization of HA. Furthermore, co-administration of lactulose significantly protected mice against BoNT/A oral intoxication in vivo. Taken together, these data encourage the development of carbohydrate receptor mimics as a therapeutic intervention to prevent BoNT oral intoxication.

  18. Constitutive and functional association of the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI-Fc receptor gamma-chain complex with membrane rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Yasuharu; Kodama, Kumi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Takayama, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    The platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein (GP) VI-Fc receptor gamma-chain (FcRgamma) complex transduces signals in an immunoreceptorlike manner. We examined a role for the Triton X-100-insoluble membrane rafts in GPVI-FcRgamma complex signaling. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD)-induced disruption of the membrane rafts inhibited not only platelet aggregation and secretion but also tyrosine phosphorylation of signaling molecules on stimulation through the GPVI-FcRgamma complex. The GPVI-FcRgamma complex was constitutively associated with membrane rafts wherein the Src family kinases and LAT were also present. Their association was not affected by the complex engagement but was highly sensitive to MbetaCD treatment. Thus, we provide the first evidence that the GPVI-FcRgamma complex is constitutively and functionally associated with membrane rafts.

  19. Special aspects of interleukin-33 and the IL-33 receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael U

    2013-12-15

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an unconventional member of the IL-1 family: it is a dual function cytokine. Many different cell types, tissue cells and leukocytes, produce IL-33 either constitutively or after stimulation and release it by a poorly defined molecular mechanism. Free IL-33 acts as a classical cytokine by binding to target cells expressing receptors for IL-33 minimally consisting of ST2 and IL-1RAcP. Depending on the target cell type IL-33 will stimulate cell-type specific signal transduction mechanisms and thereby change the biosynthetic profile of the respective cell. In addition, it is stored in the nucleus of cells and may be released after cell stress, death by injury or necrosis, acting as an alarmin by orchestrating a sterile inflammation. Furthermore, IL-33 has intracrine functions in the cell producing it, which are independent of IL-33 receptors. Intracellular IL-33 is predominantly found in the nucleus associated to the chromatin and may exert gene regulatory function by yet poorly defined mechanisms. It is the aim of this review to address two basic biological aspects of the IL-33/IL-33 receptor system. First, to summarize the current understanding of the fate and function of intracellular IL-33, and second, to discuss recent advances in the knowledge of the molecular composition, function and regulation of the IL-33 receptor complex, including initial signaling mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of receptor-associated protein complex assembly in interleukin (IL)-2- and IL-15-activated T-cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osinalde, Nerea; Sánchez-Quiles, Virginia; Akimov, Vyacheslav

    2017-01-01

    to their functional dichotomy. In this study, we aimed to decipher the receptor complex assembly in IL-2- and IL-15-activated T-lymphocytes that is highly orchestrated by site-specific phosphorylation events. Comparing the cytokine-induced interactome of the interleukin receptor beta and gamma subunits shared...

  1. Cellular uptake of proMMP-2:TIMP-2 complexes by the endocytic receptor megalin/LRP-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johanns, Manuel; Lemoine, Pascale; Janssens, Virginie

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are regulated at multiple transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, among which receptor-mediated endocytic clearance. We previously showed that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) mediates the clearance of a complex between the zymogen...

  2. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role...ivation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. Pub...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role

  3. Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Varga, Angelika; Selvarajah, Srikumaran; Jenes, Agnes; Dienes, Beatrix; Sousa-Valente, Joao; Kulik, Akos; Veress, Gabor; Brain, Susan D.; Baker, David; Urban, Laszlo; Mackie, Ken; Nagy, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) exhibit co-expression and complex, but largely unknown, functional interactions in a sub-population of primary sensory neurons (PSN). We report that PSN co-expressing CB1 receptor and TRPV1 form two distinct sub-populations based on their pharmacological properties, which could be due to the distribution pattern of the two receptors. Pharmacologically, neurons respond either only to capsaicin (COR neurons) or to both capsaicin and the endogenous TRPV1 and CB1 receptor ligand anandamide (ACR neurons). Blocking or deleting the CB1 receptor only reduces both anandamide- and capsaicin-evoked responses in ACR neurons. Deleting the CB1 receptor also reduces the proportion of ACR neurons without any effect on the overall number of capsaicin-responding cells. Regarding the distribution pattern of the two receptors, neurons express CB1 and TRPV1 receptors either isolated in low densities or in close proximity with medium/high densities. We suggest that spatial distribution of the CB1 receptor and TRPV1 contributes to the complexity of their functional interaction. PMID:27653550

  4. Structure of TonB in complex with FhuA, E. coli outer membrane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelek, Peter D; Croteau, Nathalie; Ng-Thow-Hing, Christopher; Khursigara, Cezar M; Moiseeva, Natalia; Allaire, Marc; Coulton, James W

    2006-06-02

    The cytoplasmic membrane protein TonB spans the periplasm of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope, contacts cognate outer membrane receptors, and facilitates siderophore transport. The outer membrane receptor FhuA from Escherichia coli mediates TonB-dependent import of ferrichrome. We report the 3.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the TonB carboxyl-terminal domain in complex with FhuA. TonB contacts stabilize FhuA's amino-terminal residues, including those of the consensus Ton box sequence that form an interprotein beta sheet with TonB through strand exchange. The highly conserved TonB residue arginine-166 is oriented to form multiple contacts with the FhuA cork, the globular domain enclosed by the beta barrel.

  5. Structure of TonB in Complex with FhuA, E. Coli Outer Membrane Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawelek,P.; Croteau, N.; Ng-Thow-Hing, C.; Khursigara, C.; Moiseeva, N.; Allaire, M.; Coulton, J.

    2006-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane protein TonB spans the periplasm of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope, contacts cognate outer membrane receptors, and facilitates siderophore transport. The outer membrane receptor FhuA from Escherichia coli mediates TonB-dependent import of ferrichrome. We report the 3.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the TonB carboxyl-terminal domain in complex with FhuA. TonB contacts stabilize FhuA's amino-terminal residues, including those of the consensus Ton box sequence that form an interprotein {beta} sheet with TonB through strand exchange. The highly conserved TonB residue arginine-166 is oriented to form multiple contacts with the FhuA cork, the globular domain enclosed by the {beta} barrel.

  6. Stabilization of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 Receptor Complex through Targeted Interchain Disulfide Exchange*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Nichole; Mendelow, Barry V.; Napier, Grant B.; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; Killick, Mark; Khati, Makobetsa; Stevens, Wendy; Capovilla, Alexio

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 enters cells via interaction between the trimeric envelope (Env) glycoprotein gp120/gp41 and the host cell surface receptor molecule CD4. The requirement of CD4 for viral entry has rationalized the development of recombinant CD4-based proteins as competitive viral attachment inhibitors and immunotherapeutic agents. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant CD4 protein designed to bind gp120 through a targeted disulfide-exchange mechanism. According to structural models of the gp120-CD4 receptor complex, substitution of Ser60 on the CD4 domain 1 α-helix with Cys positions a thiol in proximity of the gp120 V1/V2 loop disulfide (Cys126–Cys196), satisfying the stereochemical and geometric conditions for redox exchange between CD4 Cys60 and gp120 Cys126, and the consequent formation of an interchain disulfide bond. In this study, we provide experimental evidence for this effect by describing the expression, purification, refolding, receptor binding and antiviral activity analysis of a recombinant two-domain CD4 variant containing the S60C mutation (2dCD4-S60C). We show that 2dCD4-S60C binds HIV-1 gp120 with a significantly higher affinity than wild-type protein under conditions that facilitate disulfide exchange and that this translates into a corresponding increase in the efficacy of CD4-mediated viral entry inhibition. We propose that targeted redox exchange between conserved gp120 disulfides and nucleophilic moieties positioned strategically on CD4 (or CD4-like scaffolds) conceptualizes a new strategy in the development of high affinity HIV-1 Env ligands, with important implications for therapy and vaccine development. More generally, this chalcogen substitution approach provides a general means of stabilizing receptor-ligand complexes where the structural and biophysical conditions for disulfide exchange are satisfied. PMID:20538591

  7. Stabilization of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 receptor complex through targeted interchain disulfide exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Nichole; Mendelow, Barry V; Napier, Grant B; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A; Killick, Mark; Khati, Makobetsa; Stevens, Wendy; Capovilla, Alexio

    2010-08-13

    HIV-1 enters cells via interaction between the trimeric envelope (Env) glycoprotein gp120/gp41 and the host cell surface receptor molecule CD4. The requirement of CD4 for viral entry has rationalized the development of recombinant CD4-based proteins as competitive viral attachment inhibitors and immunotherapeutic agents. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant CD4 protein designed to bind gp120 through a targeted disulfide-exchange mechanism. According to structural models of the gp120-CD4 receptor complex, substitution of Ser(60) on the CD4 domain 1 alpha-helix with Cys positions a thiol in proximity of the gp120 V1/V2 loop disulfide (Cys(126)-Cys(196)), satisfying the stereochemical and geometric conditions for redox exchange between CD4 Cys(60) and gp120 Cys(126), and the consequent formation of an interchain disulfide bond. In this study, we provide experimental evidence for this effect by describing the expression, purification, refolding, receptor binding and antiviral activity analysis of a recombinant two-domain CD4 variant containing the S60C mutation (2dCD4-S60C). We show that 2dCD4-S60C binds HIV-1 gp120 with a significantly higher affinity than wild-type protein under conditions that facilitate disulfide exchange and that this translates into a corresponding increase in the efficacy of CD4-mediated viral entry inhibition. We propose that targeted redox exchange between conserved gp120 disulfides and nucleophilic moieties positioned strategically on CD4 (or CD4-like scaffolds) conceptualizes a new strategy in the development of high affinity HIV-1 Env ligands, with important implications for therapy and vaccine development. More generally, this chalcogen substitution approach provides a general means of stabilizing receptor-ligand complexes where the structural and biophysical conditions for disulfide exchange are satisfied.

  8. Computational analysis of the CB1 carboxyl-terminus in the receptor-G protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Khurana, Leepakshi; Kendall, Debra A

    2016-04-01

    Despite the important role of the carboxyl-terminus (Ct) of the activated brain cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) in the regulation of G protein signaling, a structural understanding of interactions with G proteins is lacking. This is largely due to the highly flexible nature of the CB1 Ct that dynamically adapts its conformation to the presence of G proteins. In the present study, we explored how the CB1 Ct can interact with the G protein by building on our prior modeling of the CB1-Gi complex (Shim, Ahn, and Kendall, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 2013;288:32449-32465) to incorporate a complete CB1 Ct (Glu416(Ct)-Leu472(Ct)). Based on the structural constraints from NMR studies, we employed ROSETTA to predict tertiary folds, ZDOCK to predict docking orientation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain two distinct plausible models of CB1 Ct in the CB1-Gi complex. The resulting models were consistent with the NMR-determined helical structure (H9) in the middle region of the CB1 Ct. The CB1 Ct directly interacted with both Gα and Gβ and stabilized the receptor at the Gi interface. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of Glu416(Ct), Asp423(Ct), Asp428(Ct), and Arg444(Ct) of CB1 Ct suggested that the CB1 Ct can influence receptor-G protein coupling by stabilizing the receptor at the Gi interface. This research provided, for the first time, models of the CB1 Ct in contact with the G protein.

  9. Unfolding of the RAP-D3 helical bundle facilitates dissociation of RAP-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Kristine; Fisher, Carl; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2008-02-12

    The receptor-associated protein (RAP) functions as an escort protein for receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family by preventing premature intracellular binding of ligands and assisting with delivery of mature receptors to the cell surface. The modulation of affinity by pH is believed to play an important role in the escort function of RAP, because RAP binds tightly to proteins of the LDLR family at near-neutral pH early in the secretory pathway where its high affinity precludes premature binding of ligands but then dissociates from bound receptors at the lower pH of the Golgi compartment. The third domain of RAP (RAP-D3), which forms a three-helix bundle, is sufficient to reconstitute the escort activity. Here, we test the hypothesis that low-pH induced unfolding of the RAP-D3 helical bundle facilitates dissociation of RAP-receptor complexes. First, variants of RAP-D3 resistant to low pH-induced unfolding were constructed by replacing interior histidine residues with phenylalanines. In contrast to native RAP-D3, which exhibits an unfolding pKa of 6.3 and a Tm of 42 degrees C, the most hyperstable variant of RAP-D3, in which four histidine residues are replaced with phenylalanine, has an unfolding pKa of 4.8, and a Tm of 58 degrees C. The phenylalanine substitutions in RAP-D3 confer increased stability to pH-induced dissociation of complexes formed between RAP-D3 and a two-repeat fragment of the LDLR (LA3-4). When introduced into full-length RAP, the four mutations that confer hyperstability on RAP-D3 interfere with transport of endogenous LRP-1 to the cell surface in a dominant negative fashion under conditions where expression of normal RAP has no effect on LRP-1 transport. Our studies support a model in which low pH-dependent unfolding of RAP-D3 facilitates dissociation of RAP from the LA repeats of LDLR family proteins in the mildly acidic pH of the Golgi.

  10. Actin-Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27)-Retromer Complex Mediates Rapid Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Jennifer C; Xiao, Kunhong; Bowman, Shanna L; Mamonova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qiangmin; Bisello, Alessandro; Sneddon, W Bruce; Ardura, Juan A; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A; Friedman, Peter A

    2016-05-20

    The G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) regulates mineral-ion homeostasis and bone remodeling. Upon parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulation, the PTHR internalizes into early endosomes and subsequently traffics to the retromer complex, a sorting platform on early endosomes that promotes recycling of surface receptors. The C terminus of the PTHR contains a type I PDZ ligand that binds PDZ domain-containing proteins. Mass spectrometry identified sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) in isolated endosomes as a PTHR binding partner. PTH treatment enriched endosomal PTHR. SNX27 contains a PDZ domain and serves as a cargo selector for the retromer complex. VPS26, VPS29, and VPS35 retromer subunits were isolated with PTHR in endosomes from cells stimulated with PTH. Molecular dynamics and protein binding studies establish that PTHR and SNX27 interactions depend on the PDZ recognition motif in PTHR and the PDZ domain of SNX27. Depletion of either SNX27 or VPS35 or actin depolymerization decreased the rate of PTHR recycling following agonist stimulation. Mutating the PDZ ligand of PTHR abolished the interaction with SNX27 but did not affect the overall rate of recycling, suggesting that PTHR may directly engage the retromer complex. Coimmunoprecipitation and overlay experiments show that both intact and mutated PTHR bind retromer through the VPS26 protomer and sequentially assemble a ternary complex with PTHR and SNX27. SNX27-independent recycling may involve N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, which binds both PDZ intact and mutant PTHRs. We conclude that PTHR recycles rapidly through at least two pathways, one involving the ASRT complex of actin, SNX27, and retromer and another possibly involving N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor.

  11. Actin-Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27)-Retromer Complex Mediates Rapid Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Recycling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Xiao, Kunhong; Bowman, Shanna L.; Mamonova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qiangmin; Bisello, Alessandro; Sneddon, W. Bruce; Ardura, Juan A.; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Friedman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) regulates mineral-ion homeostasis and bone remodeling. Upon parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulation, the PTHR internalizes into early endosomes and subsequently traffics to the retromer complex, a sorting platform on early endosomes that promotes recycling of surface receptors. The C terminus of the PTHR contains a type I PDZ ligand that binds PDZ domain-containing proteins. Mass spectrometry identified sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) in isolated endosomes as a PTHR binding partner. PTH treatment enriched endosomal PTHR. SNX27 contains a PDZ domain and serves as a cargo selector for the retromer complex. VPS26, VPS29, and VPS35 retromer subunits were isolated with PTHR in endosomes from cells stimulated with PTH. Molecular dynamics and protein binding studies establish that PTHR and SNX27 interactions depend on the PDZ recognition motif in PTHR and the PDZ domain of SNX27. Depletion of either SNX27 or VPS35 or actin depolymerization decreased the rate of PTHR recycling following agonist stimulation. Mutating the PDZ ligand of PTHR abolished the interaction with SNX27 but did not affect the overall rate of recycling, suggesting that PTHR may directly engage the retromer complex. Coimmunoprecipitation and overlay experiments show that both intact and mutated PTHR bind retromer through the VPS26 protomer and sequentially assemble a ternary complex with PTHR and SNX27. SNX27-independent recycling may involve N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, which binds both PDZ intact and mutant PTHRs. We conclude that PTHR recycles rapidly through at least two pathways, one involving the ASRT complex of actin, SNX27, and retromer and another possibly involving N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. PMID:27008860

  12. Characterization of Receptor-Associated Protein Complex Assembly in Interleukin (IL)-2- and IL-15-Activated T-Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinalde, Nerea; Sanchez-Quiles, Virginia; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Aloria, Kerman; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Blagoev, Blagoy; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2017-01-06

    It remains a paradox that IL-2 and IL-15 can differentially modulate the immune response using the same signaling receptors. We have previously dissected the phosphotyrosine-driven signaling cascades triggered by both cytokines in Kit225 T-cells, unveiling subtle differences that may contribute to their functional dichotomy. In this study, we aimed to decipher the receptor complex assembly in IL-2- and IL-15-activated T-lymphocytes that is highly orchestrated by site-specific phosphorylation events. Comparing the cytokine-induced interactome of the interleukin receptor beta and gamma subunits shared by the two cytokines, we defined the components of the early IL-2 and IL-15 receptor-associated complex discovering novel constituents. Additionally, phosphopeptide-directed analysis allowed us to detect several cytokine-dependent and -independent phosphorylation events within the activated receptor complex including novel phosphorylated sites located in the cytoplasmic region of IL-2 receptor β subunit (IL-2Rβ). We proved that the distinct phosphorylations induced by the cytokines serve for recruiting different types of effectors to the initial receptor/ligand complex. Overall, our study sheds new light into the initial molecular events triggered by IL-2 and IL-15 and constitutes a further step toward a better understanding of the early signaling aspects of the two closely related cytokines in T-lymphocytes.

  13. Structures of Receptor Complexes of a North American H7N2 Influenza Hemagglutinin with a Loop Deletion in the Receptor Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Carney, Paul J.; Donis, Ruben O.; Stevens, James (CDC)

    2012-02-21

    Human infections with subtype H7 avian influenza viruses have been reported as early as 1979. In 1996, a genetically stable 24-nucleotide deletion emerged in North American H7 influenza virus hemagglutinins, resulting in an eight amino acid deletion in the receptor-binding site. The continuous circulation of these viruses in live bird markets, as well as its documented ability to infect humans, raises the question of how these viruses achieve structural stability and functionality. Here we report a detailed molecular analysis of the receptor binding site of the North American lineage subtype H7N2 virus A/New York/107/2003 (NY107), including complexes with an avian receptor analog (3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 3'SLN) and two human receptor analogs (6'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 6'SLN; sialyllacto-N-tetraose b, LSTb). Structural results suggest a novel mechanism by which residues Arg220 and Arg229 (H3 numbering) are used to compensate for the deletion of the 220-loop and form interactions with the receptor analogs. Glycan microarray results reveal that NY107 maintains an avian-type ({alpha}2-3) receptor binding profile, with only moderate binding to human-type ({alpha}2-6) receptor. Thus despite its dramatically altered receptor binding site, this HA maintains functionality and confirms a need for continued influenza virus surveillance of avian and other animal reservoirs to define their zoonotic potential.

  14. Mice lacking TR4 nuclear receptor develop mitochondrial myopathy with deficiency in complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Lee, Yi-Fen; Chou, Samuel; Uno, Hideo; Li, Gonghui; Brookes, Paul; Massett, Michael P; Wu, Qiao; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang

    2011-08-01

    The estimated incidence of mitochondrial diseases in humans is approximately 1:5000 to 1:10,000, whereas the molecular mechanisms for more than 50% of human mitochondrial disease cases still remain unclear. Here we report that mice lacking testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4(-/-)) suffered mitochondrial myopathy, and histological examination of TR4(-/-) soleus muscle revealed abnormal mitochondrial accumulation. In addition, increased serum lactate levels, decreased mitochondrial ATP production, and decreased electron transport chain complex I activity were found in TR4(-/-) mice. Restoration of TR4 into TR4(-/-) myoblasts rescued mitochondrial ATP generation capacity and complex I activity. Further real-time PCR quantification and promoter studies found TR4 could modulate complex I activity via transcriptionally regulating the complex I assembly factor NDUFAF1, and restoration of NDUFAF1 level in TR4(-/-) myoblasts increased mitochondrial ATP generation capacity and complex I activity. Together, these results suggest that TR4 plays vital roles in mitochondrial function, which may help us to better understand the pathogenesis of mitochondrial myopathy, and targeting TR4 via its ligands/activators may allow us to develop better therapeutic approaches.

  15. Cucurbit[7]uril host-guest complexes of the histamine H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruibing; Macartney, Donal H

    2008-06-07

    The macrocyclic host cucurbit[7]uril forms very stable complexes with the diprotonated (K(CB[7])(1) = 1.8 x 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1)), monoprotonated (K(CB[7])(2) = 1.0 x 10(7) dm(3) mol(-1)), and neutral (K(CB[7])(3) = 1.2 x 10(3) dm(3) mol(-1)) forms of the histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist ranitidine in aqueous solution. The complexation behaviour was investigated using (1)H NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy as a function of pH and the pK(a) values of the guest were observed to increase (DeltapK(a1) = 1.5 and DeltapK(a2) = 1.6) upon host-guest complex formation. The energy-minimized structures of the host-guest complexes with the cationic guests were determined and provide agreement with the NMR results indicating the location of the CB[7] over the central portion of the guest. The inclusion of the monoprotonated form of ranitidine slows the normally rapid (E)-(Z) exchange process and generates a preference for the (Z) isomer. The formation of the CB[7] host-guest complex greatly increases the thermal stability of ranitidine in acidic aqueous solution at 50 degrees C, but has no effect on its photochemical reactivity.

  16. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2016-09-01

    TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component of the TNF-RSC The predicted PUB domain in the N-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with the USP domain of CYLD, whereas the C-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with HOIP SPATA2 is required for recruitment of CYLD to the TNF-RSC Downregulation of SPATA2 augments transcriptional activation of NF-κB and inhibits TNF-α-induced necroptosis, pointing to an important function of SPATA2 in modulating the outcomes of TNF-α signaling. Taken together, our study draws a detailed map of TNF-α signaling, identifies SPATA2 as a novel component of TNF-α signaling, and provides a rich resource for further functional investigations.

  17. An ER-resident membrane protein complex regulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit composition at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almedom, Ruta B; Liewald, Jana F; Hernando, Guillermina; Schultheis, Christian; Rayes, Diego; Pan, Jie; Schedletzky, Thorsten; Hutter, Harald; Bouzat, Cecilia; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediating excitatory neurotransmission and muscle activation. Regulation of nAChR subunit assembly and transfer of correctly assembled pentamers to the cell surface is only partially understood. Here, we characterize an ER transmembrane (TM) protein complex that influences nAChR cell-surface expression and functional properties in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. Loss of either type I TM protein, NRA-2 or NRA-4 (nicotinic receptor associated), affects two different types of muscle nAChRs and causes in vivo resistance to cholinergic agonists. Sensitivity to subtype-specific agonists of these nAChRs is altered differently, as demonstrated by whole-cell voltage-clamp of dissected adult muscle, when applying exogenous agonists or after photo-evoked, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) mediated acetylcholine (ACh) release, as well as in single-channel recordings in cultured embryonic muscle. These data suggest that nAChRs desensitize faster in nra-2 mutants. Cell-surface expression of different subunits of the ‘levamisole-sensitive' nAChR (L-AChR) is differentially affected in the absence of NRA-2 or NRA-4, suggesting that they control nAChR subunit composition or allow only certain receptor assemblies to leave the ER. PMID:19609303

  18. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K [Brussels; (Trinity); (Michigan); (Stanford-MED); (Michigan-Med); (UW)

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  19. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating.

  20. Equilibrium and kinetic analysis of human interleukin-13 and IL-13 receptor alpha-2 complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Eilyn R

    2012-03-01

    Interleukin 13 (IL-13) is a pleiotropic cytokine secreted by activated T cells. Both IL-13 and its polymorphic variant (IL-13-R110Q) have been shown to be associated with multiple diseases such as asthma and allergy. Two IL-13 receptors have been identified, IL-13R alpha-1 receptor (IL-13Rα1) and IL-13R alpha-2 receptor (IL-13Rα2). It has been well established that IL-13 binds to IL-13Rα1 alone with low nM affinity while binding to the IL-13Rα1/IL-4R receptor complex is significantly tighter (pM). The affinity between IL-13 and IL-13Rα2, however, remains elusive. Several values have been reported in the literature varying from 20 pM to 2.5 nM. The affinities previously reported were obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or Scatchard analysis of (125) I-IL-13 binding data. This report presents the results for the kinetics and equilibrium binding analysis studies performed using label-free kinetic exclusion assay (KEA) for the interaction of human IL-13 and IL-13Rα2. KEA equilibrium analysis showed that the affinities of IL-13Rα2 are 107 and 56 pM for IL-13 and its variant (IL-13-R110Q), respectively. KEA kinetic analysis showed that a tight and very stable complex is formed between IL-13Rα2 and IL-13, as shown by calculated dissociation rate constants slower than 5 × 10(-5) per second. Kinetic analysis also showed significant differences in the kinetic behavior of wild type (wt) versus IL-13-R110Q. IL-13-R110Q not only associates to IL-13Rα2 slower than wt human IL-13 (wt-IL-13), as previously reported, but IL-13-R110Q also dissociates slower than wt-IL-13. These results show that IL-13Rα2 is a high affinity receptor and provide a new perspective on kinetic behavior that could have significant implications in the understanding of the role of IL-13-R110Q in the disease state.

  1. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  2. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide-MHC c...

  3. Toll-Like Receptor-Dependent Immune Complex Activation of B Cells and Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Krishna L; Uccellini, Melissa B; Avalos, Ana M; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Viglianti, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    High titers of autoantibodies reactive with DNA/RNA molecular complexes are characteristic of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In vitro and in vivo studies have implicated the endosomal Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) in the activation of the corresponding autoantibody producing B cells. Importantly, TLR9/TLR7-deficiency results in the inability of autoreactive B cells to proliferate in response to DNA/RNA-associated autoantigens in vitro, and in marked changes in the autoantibody repertoire of autoimmune-prone mice. Uptake of DNA/RNA-associated autoantigen immune complexes (ICs) also leads to activation of dendritic cells (DCs) through TLR9 and TLR7. The initial studies from our lab involved ICs formed by a mixture of autoantibodies and cell debris released from dying cells in culture. To better understand the nature of the mammalian ligands that can effectively activate TLR7 and TLR9, we have developed a methodology for preparing ICs containing defined DNA fragments that recapitulate the immunostimulatory activity of the previous "black box" ICs. As the endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 function optimally from intracellular acidic compartments, we developed a facile methodology to monitor the trafficking of defined DNA ICs by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. These reagents reveal an important role for nucleic acid sequence, even when the ligand is mammalian DNA and will help illuminate the role of IC trafficking in the response.

  4. Conformational Plasticity in the Transsynaptic Neurexin-Cerebellin-Glutamate Receptor Adhesion Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shouqiang; Seven, Alpay B.; Wang, Jing; Skiniotis, Georgios; Özkan, Engin (UC); (Michigan)

    2016-12-01

    Synaptic specificity is a defining property of neural networks. In the cerebellum, synapses between parallel fiber neurons and Purkinje cells are specified by the simultaneous interactions of secreted protein cerebellin with pre-synaptic neurexin and post-synaptic delta-type glutamate receptors (GluD). Here, we determined the crystal structures of the trimeric C1q-like domain of rat cerebellin-1, and the first complete ectodomain of a GluD, rat GluD2. Cerebellin binds to the LNS6 domain of α- and β-neurexin-1 through a high-affinity interaction that involves its highly flexible N-terminal domain. In contrast, we show that the interaction of cerebellin with isolated GluD2 ectodomain is low affinity, which is not simply an outcome of lost avidity when compared with binding with a tetrameric full-length receptor. Rather, high-affinity capture of cerebellin by post-synaptic terminals is likely controlled by long-distance regulation within this transsynaptic complex. Altogether, our results suggest unusual conformational flexibility within all components of the complex.

  5. Visualising a viral RNA genome poised for release from its receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Katerina; Stockley, Peter G; Ranson, Neil A

    2011-05-06

    We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structure of bacteriophage MS2 bound to its receptor, the bacterial F-pilus. The virus contacts the pilus at a capsid 5-fold vertex, thus locating the surface-accessible portion of the single copy of the pilin-binding maturation protein present in virions. This arrangement allows a 5-fold averaged map to be calculated, showing for the first time in any virus-receptor complex the nonuniform distribution of RNA within the capsid. Strikingly, at the vertex that contacts the pilus, a rod of density that may include contributions from both genome and maturation protein sits above a channel that goes through the capsid to the outside. This density is reminiscent of the DNA density observed in the exit channel of double-stranded DNA phages, suggesting that the RNA-maturation protein complex is poised to leave the capsid as the first step of the infection process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel antagonists for the human adenosine A2A and A3 receptor via purine nitration: synthesis and biological evaluation of C2-substituted 6-trifluoromethylpurines and 1-deazapurines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M.

    2011-01-01

    Melle Koch onderzocht diverse syntheseroutes om purinemoleculen zó te veranderen dat ze selectief werken op één receptor in het lichaam, de adenosinereceptor. De onderzochte stoffen hebben hoge activiteit op de adenosinereceptor en kunnen worden gebruikt in geneesmiddelonderzoek. Koch ontwikkelde

  7. Growth inhibition signalled through the interleukin-4/interleukin-13 receptor complex is associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, B; Lahm, H; Woerly, G; Odartchenko, N; Ryffel, B; Car, B D

    1996-05-01

    Induction of growth inhibition in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines by interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 was associated with the neophosphorylation of a 170 kDa cellular protein, identified as insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) by immunoprecipitation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-I was also induced by insulin and insulin-like growth factor I. Sublines of colorectal carcinoma cells unresponsive to growth modulation by IL-4, IL-13 or insulin-like growth factor I-induced growth did not phosphorylate IRS-1. A functional, multimeric IL-4 receptor complex was present on all carcinoma cell lines with a subunit composition of 65 kDa, 75 kDa and the previously characterized 130 kDa band as demonstrated by affinity cross-link with 126I labelled IL-4. The 65 kDa subunit is novel whereas the 75 kDa band represents the common IL-2 receptor gama-chain the novel 65 kDa receptor was present as a double band and bound primarily 125I-labelled IL-13. The present study demonstrates the involvement of a novel chain other than the gama-chain in the receptor complexes of IL-4 and IL-13 and and post-receptor tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1. The association of IRS-1 with growth inhibitory signals in carcinoma cells suggests a novel mechanism of tumour growth control.

  8. Adenosine A2 receptor activation ameliorates mitochondrial oxidative stress upon reperfusion through the posttranslational modification of NDUFV2 subunit of complex I in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingman; Bian, Xiyun; Liu, Yuan; Hong, Lan; Teng, Tianming; Sun, Yuemin; Xu, Zhelong

    2017-02-20

    While it is well known that adenosine receptor activation protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury, the precise mitochondrial mechanism responsible for the action remains unknown. This study probed the mitochondrial events associated with the cardioprotective effect of 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido) adenosine (NECA), an adenosine A2 receptor agonist. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 30min ischemia followed by 10min of reperfusion, whereas H9c2 cells experienced 20min ischemia and 10min reperfusion. NECA prevented mitochondrial structural damage, decreases in respiratory control ratio (RCR), and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Both the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 and A2B receptor antagonist MRS1706 inhibited the action of NECA. NECA reduced mitochondrial proteins carbonylation, H2O2, and superoxide generation at reperfusion, but did not change superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In support, the protective effects of NECA and Peg-SOD on ΔΨm upon reperfusion were additive, implying that NECA's protection is attributable to the reduced superoxide generation but not to the enhancement of the superoxide-scavenging capacity. NECA increased the mitochondrial Src tyrosine kinase activity and suppressed complex I activity at reperfusion in a Src-dependent manner. NECA also reduced mitochondrial superoxide through Src tyrosine kinase. Studies with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (LC-MS) identified Tyr118 of the NDUFV2 subunit of complex 1 as a likely site of the tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, the complex I activity of cells transfected with the Y118F mutant was increased, suggesting that this site might be a negative regulator of complex I activity. In support, NECA failed to suppress complex I activity at reperfusion in cells transfected with the Y118F mutant of NDUFV2. In conclusion, NECA prevents mitochondrial oxidative stress by decreasing mitochondrial superoxide generation through inhibition of complex I

  9. GTP synthases. Proton pumping and phosphorylation in ligand-receptor-G alpha-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederkoorn, P H; Timmerman, H; Donné-Op Den Kelder, G M; Timms, D; Wilkinson, A J; Kelly, D R; Broadley, K J; Davies, R H

    1996-01-01

    A structural model for a ligand-receptor-Gs alpha-protein complex to function as a GTP synthase is presented. The mechanism which is dependent on the movement and rotation of the G alpha-protein alpha 2-helix is seen to involve the delivery of, at least, one proton to the phosphorylation site in the rotation of this helix. The cycle is driven by a ligand-mediated proton pump through the alpha-helices of the receptor, attachment of the conserved Tyr-Arg-Tyr receptor proton shuttle being made to an aspartate group on the Gs alpha-protein terminal sidechain, which is itself linked to the Asn-Gln interaction known to control movement and rotation of the alpha 2-helix between .GDP and .GTP structures. The energetics of proton transfer through the shuttle mechanism and delivery of a proton to the aspartate group are shown to be sufficient to rupture this controlling interaction and its associated backbone bond. The complex leads to full spatial and energetic definition of the receptor proton shuttle mechanism, while there is a striking association of further Tyrosine and Arginine residues in the vicinity of the Gs alpha-protein Asn-Gln interaction. Calculations at the HF 6-31G** level confirm that a critical balance between ion pair and neutral forms of Tyr-Arg interactions under multiply hydrogen bonded conditions in a hydrophobic environment controls proton transfer and recovery mechanisms. The intrinsic preference of the neutral Tyr-Arg form over the ion-pair is 14.0 kcal/mol. Activation of the Tyrosine oxygen atom in the neutral form by single-NH or -OH groups reduces this difference by some 6.4-8.6 kcal/mol but the dominance of the neutral form is maintained. The expected slight overestimates are consistent with the maximum activation enthalpy of 11.0-12.0 kcal/ mol required to initiate proton transfer through the shuttle. The extended form of the shuttle with the Arginine acting competitively between the two Tyrosine residues allows interpretation of observed

  10. Low Resolution Structure and Dynamics of a Colicin-Receptor Complex Determined by Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Luke A [ORNL; Johnson, Christopher L [ORNL; Solovyova, Alexandra [University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Callow, Phil [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Weiss, Kevin L [ORNL; Ridley, Helen [University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Le Brun, Anton P [ORNL; Kinane, Christian [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Webster, John [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Holt, Stephen A [ORNL; Lakey, Jeremy H [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that translocate across cell membranes need to overcome a significant hydrophobic barrier. This is usually accomplished via specialized protein complexes, which provide a polar transmembrane pore. Exceptions to this include bacterial toxins, which insert into and cross the lipid bilayer itself. We are studying the mechanism by which large antibacterial proteins enter Escherichia coli via specific outer membrane proteins. Here we describe the use of neutron scattering to investigate the interaction of colicin N with its outer membrane receptor protein OmpF. The positions of lipids, colicin N, and OmpF were separately resolved within complex structures by the use of selective deuteration. Neutron reflectivity showed, in real time, that OmpF mediates the insertion of colicin N into lipid monolayers. This data were complemented by Brewster Angle Microscopy images, which showed a lateral association of OmpF in the presence of colicin N. Small angle neutron scattering experiments then defined the three-dimensional structure of the colicin N-OmpF complex. This revealed that colicin N unfolds and binds to the OmpF-lipid interface. The implications of this unfolding step for colicin translocation across membranes are discussed.

  11. The IDOL–UBE2D complex mediates sterol-dependent degradation of the LDL receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Goult, Benjamin T.; Calkin, Anna C.; Hong, Cynthia; Millard, Christopher J.; Tontonoz, Peter; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL as a sterol-dependent regulator of the LDL receptor (LDLR). The molecular pathway underlying IDOL action, however, remains to be determined. Here we report the identification and biochemical and structural characterization of an E2–E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for LDLR degradation. We identified the UBE2D family (UBE2D1–4) as E2 partners for IDOL that support both autoubiquitination and IDOL-dependent ubiquitination of the LDLR in a cell-free system. NMR chemical shift mapping and a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the IDOL RING domain–UBE2D1 complex revealed key interactions between the dimeric IDOL protein and the E2 enzyme. Analysis of the IDOL–UBE2D1 interface also defined the stereochemical basis for the selectivity of IDOL for UBE2Ds over other E2 ligases. Structure-based mutations that inhibit IDOL dimerization or IDOL–UBE2D interaction block IDOL-dependent LDLR ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, expression of a dominant-negative UBE2D enzyme inhibits the ability of IDOL to degrade the LDLR in cells. These results identify the IDOL–UBE2D complex as an important determinant of LDLR activity, and provide insight into molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cholesterol uptake. PMID:21685362

  12. Stoichiometry and geometry of the CXC chemokine receptor 4 complex with CXC ligand 12: Molecular modeling and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Stephens, Bryan S.; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zhao, Chunxia; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Abagyan, Ruben; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors regulate cell migration during development, immune system function, and in inflammatory diseases, making them important therapeutic targets. Nevertheless, the structural basis of receptor:chemokine interaction is poorly understood. Adding to the complexity of the problem is the persistently dimeric behavior of receptors observed in cell-based studies, which in combination with structural and mutagenesis data, suggest several possibilities for receptor:chemokine complex stoichiometry. In this study, a combination of computational, functional, and biophysical approaches was used to elucidate the stoichiometry and geometry of the interaction between the CXC-type chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand CXCL12. First, relevance and feasibility of a 2:1 stoichiometry hypothesis was probed using functional complementation experiments with multiple pairs of complementary nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. Next, the importance of dimers of WT CXCR4 was explored using the strategy of dimer dilution, where WT receptor dimerization is disrupted by increasing expression of nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. The results of these experiments were supportive of a 1:1 stoichiometry, although the latter could not simultaneously reconcile existing structural and mutagenesis data. To resolve the contradiction, cysteine trapping experiments were used to derive residue proximity constraints that enabled construction of a validated 1:1 receptor:chemokine model, consistent with the paradigmatic two-site hypothesis of receptor activation. The observation of a 1:1 stoichiometry is in line with accumulating evidence supporting monomers as minimal functional units of G protein-coupled receptors, and suggests transmission of conformational changes across the dimer interface as the most probable mechanism of altered signaling by receptor heterodimers. PMID:25468967

  13. Modeling Interactions among Individual P2 Receptors to Explain Complex Response Patterns over a Wide Range of ATP Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shu; Grol, Matthew W; Grutter, Peter H; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular ATP acts on the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels and several members of the P2Y family of G protein-coupled receptors to mediate intercellular communication among many cell types including bone-forming osteoblasts. It is known that multiple P2 receptors are expressed on osteoblasts (P2X2,5,6,7 and P2Y1,2,4,6). In the current study, we investigated complex interactions within the P2 receptor network using mathematical modeling. To characterize individual P2 receptors, we extracted data from published studies of overexpressed human and rodent (rat and mouse) receptors and fit their dependencies on ATP concentration using the Hill equation. Next, we examined responses induced by an ensemble of endogenously expressed P2 receptors. Murine osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 cells) were loaded with fluo-4 and stimulated with varying concentrations of extracellular ATP. Elevations in the concentration of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) were monitored by confocal microscopy. Dependence of the calcium response on ATP concentration exhibited a complex pattern that was not explained by the simple addition of individual receptor responses. Fitting the experimental data with a combination of Hill equations from individual receptors revealed that P2Y1 and P2X7 mediated the rise in [Ca(2+)]i at very low and high ATP concentrations, respectively. Interestingly, to describe responses at intermediate ATP concentrations, we had to assume that a receptor with a K 1∕2 in that range (e.g. P2Y4 or P2X5) exerts an inhibitory effect. This study provides new insights into the interactions among individual P2 receptors in producing an ensemble response to extracellular ATP.

  14. Stoichiometry and geometry of the CXC chemokine receptor 4 complex with CXC ligand 12: molecular modeling and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Stephens, Bryan S; Holden, Lauren G; Qin, Ling; Zhao, Chunxia; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Abagyan, Ruben; Handel, Tracy M

    2014-12-16

    Chemokines and their receptors regulate cell migration during development, immune system function, and in inflammatory diseases, making them important therapeutic targets. Nevertheless, the structural basis of receptor:chemokine interaction is poorly understood. Adding to the complexity of the problem is the persistently dimeric behavior of receptors observed in cell-based studies, which in combination with structural and mutagenesis data, suggest several possibilities for receptor:chemokine complex stoichiometry. In this study, a combination of computational, functional, and biophysical approaches was used to elucidate the stoichiometry and geometry of the interaction between the CXC-type chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand CXCL12. First, relevance and feasibility of a 2:1 stoichiometry hypothesis was probed using functional complementation experiments with multiple pairs of complementary nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. Next, the importance of dimers of WT CXCR4 was explored using the strategy of dimer dilution, where WT receptor dimerization is disrupted by increasing expression of nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. The results of these experiments were supportive of a 1:1 stoichiometry, although the latter could not simultaneously reconcile existing structural and mutagenesis data. To resolve the contradiction, cysteine trapping experiments were used to derive residue proximity constraints that enabled construction of a validated 1:1 receptor:chemokine model, consistent with the paradigmatic two-site hypothesis of receptor activation. The observation of a 1:1 stoichiometry is in line with accumulating evidence supporting monomers as minimal functional units of G protein-coupled receptors, and suggests transmission of conformational changes across the dimer interface as the most probable mechanism of altered signaling by receptor heterodimers.

  15. Modeling interactions among individual P2 receptors to explain complex response patterns over a wide range of ATP concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Xing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available EExtracellular ATP acts on the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels and several members of the P2Y family of G protein-coupled receptors to mediate intercellular communication among many cell types including bone-forming osteoblasts. It is known that multiple P2 receptors are expressed on osteoblasts (P2X2,5,6,7 and P2Y1,2,4,6. In the current study, we investigated complex interactions within the P2 receptor network using mathematical modeling. To characterize individual P2 receptors, we extracted data from published studies of overexpressed human and rodent (rat and mouse receptors and fit their dependencies on ATP concentration using the Hill equation. Next, we examined responses induced by an ensemble of endogenously expressed P2 receptors. Murine osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 cells were loaded with fluo-4 and stimulated with varying concentrations of extracellular ATP. Elevations in the concentration of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i were monitored by confocal microscopy. Dependence of the calcium response on ATP concentration exhibited a complex pattern that was not explained by the simple addition of individual receptor responses. Fitting the experimental data with a combination of Hill equations from individual receptors revealed that P2Y1 and P2X7 mediated the rise in [Ca2+]i at very low and high ATP concentrations, respectively. Interestingly, to describe responses at intermediate ATP concentrations, we had to assume that a receptor with a K1/2 in that range (e.g. P2Y4 or P2X5 exerts an inhibitory effect. This study provides new insights into the interactions among individual P2 receptors in producing an ensemble response to extracellular ATP.

  16. The complex role of multivalency in nanoparticles targeting the transferrin receptor for cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Tian, Shaomin; Petros, Robby A; Napier, Mary E; Desimone, Joseph M

    2010-08-18

    Transferrin receptor (TfR, CD71) has long been a therapeutic target due to its overexpression in many malignant tissues. In this study, PRINT() nanoparticles were conjugated with TfR ligands for targeted drug delivery. Cylindrical poly(ethylene glycol)-based PRINT nanoparticles (diameter (d) = 200 nm, height (h) = 200 nm) labeled with transferrin receptor antibody (NP-OKT9) or human transferrin (NP-hTf) showed highly specific TfR-mediated uptake by all human tumor cell lines tested, relative to negative controls (IgG1 for OKT9 or bovine transferrin (bTf) for hTf). The targeting efficiency was dependent on particle concentration, ligand density, dosing time, and cell surface receptor expression level. Interestingly, NP-OKT9 or NP-hTf showed little cytotoxicity on all solid tumor cell lines tested but were very toxic to Ramos B-cell lymphoma, whereas free OKT9 or hTf was not toxic. There was a strong correlation between TfR ligand density on the particle surface and cell viability and particle uptake. NP-OKT9 and NP-hTf were internalized into acidic intracellular compartments but were not localized in EEA1-enriched early endosomes or lysosomes. Elevated caspase 3/7 activity indicates activation of apoptosis pathways upon particle treatment. Supplementation of iron suppressed the toxicity of NP-OKT9 but not NP-hTf, suggesting different mechanisms by which NP-hTf and NP-OKT9 exerts cytotoxicity on Ramos cells. On the basis of such an observation, the complex role of multivalency in nanoparticles is discussed. In addition, our data clearly reveal that one must be careful in making claims of "lack of toxicity" when a targeting molecule is used on nanoparticles and also raise concerns for unanticipated off-target effects when one is designing targeted chemotherapy nanodelivery agents.

  17. HRas signal transduction promotes hepatitis C virus cell entry by triggering assembly of the host tetraspanin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zona, Laetitia; Lupberger, Joachim; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Thumann, Christine; Harris, Helen J; Barnes, Amy; Florentin, Jonathan; Tawar, Rajiv G; Xiao, Fei; Turek, Marine; Durand, Sarah C; Duong, François H T; Heim, Markus H; Cosset, François-Loïc; Hirsch, Ivan; Samuel, Didier; Brino, Laurent; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Le Naour, François; McKeating, Jane A; Baumert, Thomas F

    2013-03-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry is dependent on coreceptor complex formation between the tetraspanin superfamily member CD81 and the tight junction protein claudin-1 (CLDN1) on the host cell membrane. The receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR acts as a cofactor for HCV entry by promoting CD81-CLDN1 complex formation via unknown mechanisms. We identify the GTPase HRas, activated downstream of EGFR signaling, as a key host signal transducer for EGFR-mediated HCV entry. Proteomic analysis revealed that HRas associates with tetraspanin CD81, CLDN1, and the previously unrecognized HCV entry cofactors integrin β1 and Ras-related protein Rap2B in hepatocyte membranes. HRas signaling is required for lateral membrane diffusion of CD81, which enables tetraspanin receptor complex assembly. HRas was also found to be relevant for entry of other viruses, including influenza. Our data demonstrate that viruses exploit HRas signaling for cellular entry by compartmentalization of entry factors and receptor trafficking.

  18. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  19. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (VCU); (Scripps); (UNC); (Res. Tri. Inst.)

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  20. Structural basis for integration of GluD receptors within synaptic organizer complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elegheert, Jonathan; Kakegawa, Wataru; Clay, Jordan E; Shanks, Natalie F; Behiels, Ester; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Miura, Eriko; Rossmann, Maxim; Mitakidis, Nikolaos; Motohashi, Junko; Chang, Veronica T; Siebold, Christian; Greger, Ingo H; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Aricescu, A Radu

    2016-07-15

    Ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) family members are integrated into supramolecular complexes that modulate their location and function at excitatory synapses. However, a lack of structural information beyond isolated receptors or fragments thereof currently limits the mechanistic understanding of physiological iGluR signaling. Here, we report structural and functional analyses of the prototypical molecular bridge linking postsynaptic iGluR δ2 (GluD2) and presynaptic β-neurexin 1 (β-NRX1) via Cbln1, a C1q-like synaptic organizer. We show how Cbln1 hexamers "anchor" GluD2 amino-terminal domain dimers to monomeric β-NRX1. This arrangement promotes synaptogenesis and is essential for D: -serine-dependent GluD2 signaling in vivo, which underlies long-term depression of cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses and motor coordination in developing mice. These results lead to a model where protein and small-molecule ligands synergistically control synaptic iGluR function.

  1. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures.

  2. How a Cytokine Is Chaperoned through the Secretory Pathway by Complexing with Its Own Receptor: Lessons from Interleukin-15 (IL-15)/IL-15 Receptor α▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duitman, Erwin H.; Orinska, Zane; Bulanova, Elena; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    While it is well appreciated that receptors for secreted cytokines transmit ligand-induced signals, little is known about additional roles for cytokine receptor components in the control of ligand transport and secretion. Here, we show that interleukin-15 (IL-15) translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum occurs independently of the presence of IL-15 receptor α (IL-15Rα). Subsequently, however, IL-15 is transported through the Golgi apparatus only in association with IL-15Rα and then is secreted. This intracellular IL-15/IL-15Rα complex already is formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and, thus, enables the further trafficking of complexed IL-15 through the secretory pathway. Just transfecting IL-15Rα in cells, which transcribe but normally do not secrete IL-15, suffices to induce IL-15 secretion. Thus, we provide the first evidence of how a cytokine is chaperoned through the secretory pathway by complexing with its own high-affinity receptor and show that IL-15/IL-15Rα offers an excellent model system for the further exploration of this novel mechanism for the control of cytokine secretion. PMID:18505820

  3. How a cytokine is chaperoned through the secretory pathway by complexing with its own receptor: lessons from interleukin-15 (IL-15)/IL-15 receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duitman, Erwin H; Orinska, Zane; Bulanova, Elena; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2008-08-01

    While it is well appreciated that receptors for secreted cytokines transmit ligand-induced signals, little is known about additional roles for cytokine receptor components in the control of ligand transport and secretion. Here, we show that interleukin-15 (IL-15) translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum occurs independently of the presence of IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15R alpha). Subsequently, however, IL-15 is transported through the Golgi apparatus only in association with IL-15R alpha and then is secreted. This intracellular IL-15/IL-15R alpha complex already is formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and, thus, enables the further trafficking of complexed IL-15 through the secretory pathway. Just transfecting IL-15R alpha in cells, which transcribe but normally do not secrete IL-15, suffices to induce IL-15 secretion. Thus, we provide the first evidence of how a cytokine is chaperoned through the secretory pathway by complexing with its own high-affinity receptor and show that IL-15/IL-15R alpha offers an excellent model system for the further exploration of this novel mechanism for the control of cytokine secretion.

  4. Rational design of an auxin antagonist of the SCF(TIR1) auxin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Neve, Joshua; Hirose, Masakazu; Kuboki, Atsuhito; Shimada, Yukihisa; Kepinski, Stefan; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2012-03-16

    The plant hormone auxin is a master regulator of plant growth and development. By regulating rates of cell division and elongation and triggering specific patterning events, indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) regulates almost every aspect of plant development. The perception of auxin involves the formation of a ternary complex consisting of an F-box protein of the TIR1/AFB family of auxin receptors, the auxin molecule, and a member the Aux/IAA family of co-repressor proteins. In this study, we identified a potent auxin antagonist, α-(phenylethyl-2-oxo)-IAA, as a lead compound for TIR1/AFB receptors by in silico virtual screening. This molecule was used as the basis for the development of a more potent TIR1 antagonist, auxinole (α-[2,4-dimethylphenylethyl-2-oxo]-IAA), using a structure-based drug design approach. Auxinole binds TIR1 to block the formation of the TIR1-IAA-Aux/IAA complex and so inhibits auxin-responsive gene expression. Molecular docking analysis indicates that the phenyl ring in auxinole would strongly interact with Phe82 of TIR1, a residue that is crucial for Aux/IAA recognition. Consistent with this predicted mode of action, auxinole competitively inhibits various auxin responses in planta. Additionally, auxinole blocks auxin responses of the moss Physcomitrella patens, suggesting activity over a broad range of species. Our works not only substantiates the utility of chemical tools for plant biology but also demonstrates a new class of small molecule inhibitor of protein-protein interactions common to mechanisms of perception of other plant hormones, such as jasmonate, gibberellin, and abscisic acid.

  5. Involvement of serotoninergic 5-HT1A/2A, alpha-adrenergic and dopaminergic D1 receptors in St. John's wort-induced prepulse inhibition deficit: a possible role of hyperforin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Mariane G; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Youssef, Amal M; Sabry, Gilane M; Sabry, Nagwa A; Khalifa, Amani E

    2009-05-16

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle response is a valuable paradigm for sensorimotor gating processes. Previous research showed that acute administration of St. John's wort extract (500 mg/kg, p.o.) to rats caused significant disruption of PPI while elevating monoamines levels in some brain areas. The cause-effect relationship between extract-induced PPI disruption and augmented monoaminergic transmission was studied using different serotoninergic, adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists. The effects of hypericin and hyperforin, as the main active constituents of the extract, on PPI response were also tested. PPI disruption was prevented after blocking the serotoninergic 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A, alpha-adrenergic and dopaminergic D1 receptors. Results also demonstrated a significant PPI deficit after acute treatment of rats with hyperforin, and not hypericin. In some conditions manifesting disrupted PPI response, apoptosis coexists. Electrophoresis of DNA isolated from brains of hyperforin-treated animals revealed absence of any abnormal DNA fragmentation patterns. It is concluded that serotoninergic 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A, alpha-adrenergic and dopaminergic D1 receptors are involved in the disruptive effect of St. John's wort extract on PPI response in rats. We can also conclude that hyperforin, and not hypericin, is one of the active ingredients responsible for St. John's wort-induced PPI disruption with no relation to apoptotic processes.

  6. Big Roles of Small Kinases:The Complex Functions of Receptor-Like Cytoplasmic Kinases in Plant Immunity and Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenwei Lin; Xiyu Ma; Libo Shan; Ping He

    2013-01-01

    Plants have evolved a large number of receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases (RLCKs) that often functionally and physically associate with receptor-like kinases (RLKs) to modulate plant growth, development and immune responses. Without any apparent extracellular domain, RLCKs relay intracellular signaling often via RLK complex-mediated transphosphorylation events. Recent advances have suggested essential roles of diverse RLCKs in concert with RLKs in regulating various cellular and physiological responses. We summarize here the complex roles of RLCKs in mediating plant immune responses and growth regulation, and discuss specific and overlapping functions of RLCKs in transducing diverse signaling pathways.

  7. Structure of MERS-CoV spike receptor-binding domain complexed with human receptor DPP4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nianshuang Wang; Xuanling Shi; Liwei Jiang; Senyan Zhang; Dongli Wang; Pei Tong; Dongxing Guo

    2013-01-01

    The spike glycoprotein (S) of recently identified Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) targets the cellular receptor,dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4).Sequence comparison and modeling analysis have revealed a putative receptor-binding domain (RBD) on the viral spike,which mediates this interaction.We report the 3.0 (A)resolution crystal structure of MERS-CoV RBD bound to the extracellular domain of human DPP4.Our results show that MERS-CoV RBD consists of a core and a receptor-binding subdomain.The receptor-binding subdomain interacts with DPP4 p-propeller but not its intrinsic hydrolase domain.MERS-CoV RBD and related SARS-CoV RBD share a high degree of structural similarity in their core subdomains,but are notably divergent in the receptorbinding subdomain.Mutagenesis studies have identified several key residues in the receptor-binding subdomain that are critical for viral binding to DPP4 and entry into the target cell.The atomic details at the interface between MERS-CoV RBD and DPP4 provide structural understanding of the virus and receptor interaction,which can guide development of therapeutics and vaccines against MERS-CoV infection.

  8. Difference in extractability of estradiol- and tamoxifen-receptor complex in the nuclei from MCF-7 cells with Nonidet P-40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Omukai, Y; Hosokawa, K; Senoo, T

    1984-05-01

    The extraction of [3H]estradiol- and [3H]tamoxifen-receptor complex in the nuclei from MCF-7 cells with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 has been studied. We found that there is a striking difference in the extractability of estradiol- and tamoxifen-receptor complex from nuclei with 0.5% Nonidet P-40. The nuclear bound estradiol-receptor complex is scarcely extractable with Nonidet P-40. In contrast, almost all of the nuclear bound tamoxifen-receptor complex is extractable. The nuclear [3H]tamoxifen-receptor complex extracted in the presence of Nonidet P-40 sediments in two peaks at 7 S and 5 S. The latter sedimentation rate is the same with that of the nuclear [3H]tamoxifen-receptor complex extracted with 0.4 M KCl. The nuclear [3H]estradiol-receptor complex extracted with 0.4 M KCl sediments at 4 S. The results suggest that interaction of tamoxifen-receptor complex with chromatin is different from that of estradiol-receptor complex.

  9. Ion-Pair Complexation with Dibenzo[21]Crown-7 and Dibenzo[24]Crown-8 bis-Urea Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Toni; Kiesilä, Anniina; Kalenius, Elina; Rissanen, Kari

    2016-09-26

    Synthesis and ion-pair complexation properties of novel ditopic bis-urea receptors based on dibenzo[21]crown-7 (R(1) ) and dibenzo[24]crown-8 (R(2) ) scaffolds have been studied in the solid state, solution, and gas phase. In a 4:1 CDCl3 /[D6 ]DMSO solution, both receptors clearly show positive heterotropic cooperativity toward halide anions when complexed with Rb(+) or Cs(+) , with the halide affinity increasing in order I(-) complexes of both receptors have higher halide affinities compared to the caesium complexes. However, Rb(+) and Cs(+) complexes of R(2) show stronger affinities toward all the studied anions compared to the corresponding cationic complexes of R(1) . Similar selectivity of the receptors toward the studied ion pairs was also observed also in the gas phase by competition experiments with mass spectrometry. A total of eight crystal structures with different rubidium and caesium halides and oxyanions were obtained in addition to the crystal structure of R(2) ⋅BaCl2 . The selectivity observed in solution and in the gas phase is explainable by the conformational differences observed in the crystal structures of ion-pair complexes with R(1) and R(2) . In the solid state, R(1) has an open conformation due to the asymmetric crown-ether scaffold, whereas R(2) has a compact, folded conformation. Computational studies of the ion-pair complexes of R(2) show that the interaction energies of the complexes increase in the order CsI

  10. Diversity and bias through receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteroreceptor complexes. Focus on examples from dopamine D2 receptor heteromerization

    OpenAIRE

    Kjell eFuxe; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Wilber eRomero-Fernández; Luca eFerraro; Sergio eTanganelli; Małgorzata eFilip; Luigi Francesco Agnati; Pere eGarriga; Zaida eDiaz Cabiale; Dasiel Oscar Borroto-Escuela

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980ies and 1990ies it was shown that neurotensin through selective antagonistic NTR-D2likeR interactions incre...

  11. 腺苷A2A受体基因敲除对小鼠的空间参考记忆和工作记忆的影响%Effect of adenosine A2A receptors gene knock-out on spatial working memory and reference memory in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周赛君; 何金彩; 陈江帆; 舒丹; 朱美娥

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects and mechanism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2A R)on spatial memory in mice. Methods Mice with adenosine A2A receptors gene knocked out (A2A RKO, n = 13) were compared to their wild type littermates ( WT, n = 15 ). Eight-arm radial maze and Morris water maze were used to measure their spatial reference memory and spatial working memory. Results Compared to the WT littermates,A2A RKO mice displayed significantly improved working memory in both MWM and radial maze performance. However there was no significant difference in spatial reference memory in MWM test between the A2A RKO mice and WT littermate. Conclusion Genetic inactivation of A2A receptors significantly enhances spatial memory in both MWM and radial maze tests, indicating the important role of adenosine A2A receptors in learning spatial memory in mice. This enhancement of spatial memory is particularly evident for spatial working memory by A2A receptor inactivation.%目的 观察腺苷A2A受体基因敲除对小鼠空间学习记忆过程的影响,探讨腺苷A2A受体与空间学习记忆的关系及可能的调节机制.方法 选用腺苷A2A受体基因敲除小鼠模型(A2ARKO组,n=13)和同窝野生型小鼠(WT组,n=15).采用Morris水迷宫和八臂迷宫两种实验方法分别检测其空间参考记忆和工作记忆能力.结果 腺苷A2A受体基因敲除小鼠在八臂迷宫训练中工作记忆错误数显著少于野生型(RANOVA组间效应:F=146.11,P<0.01);在Morris水迷宫重复获得试验中工作记忆成绩显著优于野生型(trial4/trial1指数组间效应:F=6.17,P=0.026),而八臂迷宫训练空间参考记忆错误数(组间效应:F=0.083,P=0.777)及Morris水迷宫定位航行(组间效应:F=2.552,P=0.132)和空间探索试验成绩(A2ARKO:4.50±2.27;WT:2.50±1.93;t=1.901,P=0.078),2组差异无显著性.结论 腺苷A2A受体基因敲除小鼠表现为空间工作记忆增强,可见脑内腺苷A2A受体参与空间学习记忆的调节,它对

  12. Nuclear pyruvate kinase M2 complex serves as a transcriptional coactivator of arylhydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shun; Adachi, Jun; Ihara, Masaru; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Kakizuka, Akira; Ikura, Masae; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2016-01-29

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) regulate production of acetyl-CoA, which functions as an acetyl donor in diverse enzymatic reactions, including histone acetylation. However, the mechanism by which the acetyl-CoA required for histone acetylation is ensured in a gene context-dependent manner is not clear. Here we show that PKM2, the E2 subunit of PDC and histone acetyltransferase p300 constitute a complex on chromatin with arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor associated with xenobiotic metabolism. All of these factors are recruited to the enhancer of AhR-target genes, in an AhR-dependent manner. PKM2 contributes to enhancement of transcription of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), an AhR-target gene, acetylation at lysine 9 of histone H3 at the CYP1A1 enhancer. Site-directed mutagenesis of PKM2 indicates that this enhancement of histone acetylation requires the pyruvate kinase activity of the enzyme. Furthermore, we reveal that PDC activity is present in nuclei. Based on these findings, we propose a local acetyl-CoA production system in which PKM2 and PDC locally supply acetyl-CoA to p300 from abundant PEP for histone acetylation at the gene enhancer, and our data suggest that PKM2 sensitizes AhR-mediated detoxification in actively proliferating cells such as cancer and fetal cells.

  13. Genetic recombination within the human T-cell receptor. cap alpha. -chain gene complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, M.A.; Kindt, T.J.

    1987-12-01

    Genetic analyses of the human T-cell receptor (TCR) ..cap alpha..-chain genes indicate that recombination events may occur frequently within this gene complex. Examination of the inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) detected by using probes for constant or variable region gene segments made it possible to assign TCR..cap alpha.. haplotypes to the 16 parents and 43 offspring of eight families studied. A total of six RFLP, three for the constant region and three for variable region segments, were examined in the present studies. Most enzyme and probe combinations tested revealed no polymorphism and those finally selected for the study showed limited polymorphism in that only two or, in one case, three allelic forms of the gene were seen. In spite of limited variability at this level, extensive heterogeneity was observed for the combinations of markers present in haplotypes, suggesting that frequent recombination events have occurred. Most strikingly, multiple combinations of RFLP occurring in close proximity of the TCR..cap alpha.. constant region gene were observed in this study. A high recombination frequency for the TCR..cap alpha.. gene complex is further supported by the observation that two children, one in each of two families, inherited recombinant TCR..cap alpha.. haplotypes.

  14. A major prolactin-binding complex on human milk fat globule membranes contains cyclophilins A and B: the complex is not the prolactin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, Mary Y; Ueda, Eric K; Chen, KuanHui E; Walker, Ameae M

    2012-03-01

    Prolactin (PRL) in milk influences maturation of gastrointestinal epithelium and development of both the hypothalamo-pituitary and immune systems of offspring. Here, we demonstrate that most PRL in human milk is part of a novel, high-affinity, multicomponent binding complex found on the milk fat globule membrane and not in whey. To examine properties of the complex, a sensitive ELISA was developed such that human PRL (hPRL) binding to the complex was measured by loss of hPRL detectability; thus, as much as 50 ng of hPRL was undetectable in the presence of 10 μl of human milk. Using the same methodology, no comparable complex formation was observed with human serum or amniotic fluid. hPRL complexation in milk was rapid, time dependent, and cooperative. Antibodies to or competitors of the hPRL receptor (placental lactogen and growth hormone) showed the hPRL receptor was not involved in the complex. However, hPRL complexation was antagonized by cyclosporine A and anti-cyclophilins. The complex was very stable, resisting dissociation in SDS, urea, and dithiothreitol. Western analysis revealed an ∼75-kDa complex that included hPRL, cyclophilins A and B, and a 16-kDa cyclophilin A. Compared with noncomplexed hPRL, complexed hPRL in whole milk showed similar activation of STAT5 but markedly delayed activation of ERK. Alteration of signaling suggests that complex formation may alter hPRL biological activity. This is the first report of a unique, multicomponent, high-capacity milk fat reservoir of hPRL; all other analyses of milk PRL have utilized defatted milk.

  15. CD163 Binding to Haptoglobin-Hemoglobin Complexes Involves a Dual-point Electrostatic Receptor-Ligand Pairing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2013-01-01

    Formation of the haptoglobin (Hp)-hemoglobin (Hb) complex in human plasma leads to a high affinity recognition by the endocytic macrophage receptor CD163. A fast segregation of Hp-Hb from CD163 occurs at endosomal conditions (pH CD163 has previously been shown to involve the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain 3. This domain and the adjacent SRCR domain 2 of CD163 contain a consensus motif for a calcium-coordinated acidic amino acid triad cluster as originally identified in the SRCR domain of the scavenger receptor MARCO. Here we show that site-directed mutagenesis in each of these acidic triads of SRCR domains 2 and 3 abrogates the high affinity binding of recombinant CD163 to Hp-Hb. In the ligand, Hp Arg-252 and Lys-262, both present in a previously identified CD163 binding loop of Hp, were revealed as essential residues for the high affinity receptor binding. These findings are in accordance with pairing of the calcium-coordinated acidic clusters in SRCR domains 2 and 3 with the two basic Arg/Lys residues in the Hp loop. Such a two-point electrostatic pairing is mechanistically similar to the pH-sensitive pairings disclosed in crystal structures of ligands in complex with tandem LDL receptor repeats or tandem CUB domains in other endocytic receptors. PMID:23671278

  16. 腺苷A2A受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕胶原亚型的变化%Detection of collagens in hypertrophic scars of adenosine receptor A2A knockout mice by picrosirius polarization method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖虎; 李少华; 王德昌; 霍然; 王一兵; 冯永强; 李强

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent study shows that the adenosine receptor agonists can promote the collagen synthesis, and the adenosine receptor antagonists can inhibit the collagen synthesis and reduce the proliferation of skin collagen fiber. The expression of transforming growth factorβ (TGF-β) in hypertrophic scar of adenosine A2A knockout mice models is decreased. OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of collagens in hypertrophic scars of adenosine receptor A2A knockout mice and its mechanism by picric acid-sirius red polarization method. METHODS: The models of hypertrophic scars were made by adenosine A2A knockout mice and wild-type mice. The character and the distribution of the collagen in the hypertrophic scars were observed by picric acid-sirius red polarization method, and the type of the collagen, distribution, arrangement and content was confirmed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A large amount of eosinophilic collagen protein fibers were observed under polarizing microscope in the hypertrophic scars of wild-type control group. Type collagen fibers were in red and compact bunchiness and Ⅰexhibited strong double refraction, the hypertrophic scars of adenosine A2A knockout mice were lack of thick collagen bundles and was in sparse bunchiness, and the collage bundles were well-arranged and well-distributed. Compared with the wild-type control group, adenosine A2A knockout mice showed significantly lower typecollagen fibers levⅠel (P < 0.01), as well as the hypertrophic scars. It indicated that adenosine A2A receptors played an active role in the proliferation of scars and could prevent the proliferation of scars.%背景:作者前期研究发现腺苷受体激动剂可以刺激胶原合成,腺苷受体拮抗剂可以抑制胶原合成,并且可以减轻皮肤胶原纤维增生.腺苷A2A 受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕转化生长因子β表达降低.目的:利用苦味酸-天狼星红偏振光法观察腺苷A2A 受体基因敲除小鼠瘢痕胶原亚型的变化并

  17. Structural snapshots of full-length Jak1, a transmembrane gp130/IL-6/IL-6Rα cytokine receptor complex, and the receptor-Jak1 holocomplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupardus, Patrick J.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Rice, Amanda J.; Thomas, Christoph; Fischer, Suzanne; Walz, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Summary The shared cytokine receptor gp130 signals as a homodimer or heterodimer through activation of Janus kinases (Jaks) associated with the receptor intracellular domains. Here we reconstitute, in parts and whole, the full-length gp130 homodimer in complex with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), its alpha receptor (IL-6Rα) and Jak1, for electron microscopy imaging. We find that the full-length gp130 homodimer complex has intimate interactions between the trans- and juxtamembrane segments of the two receptors, appearing to rigidify the connection between the extra- and intracellular regions. 2D averages and 3D reconstructions of full-length Jak1 reveal a three-lobed structure comprised of FERM-SH2, pseudokinase and kinase modules possessing extensive inter-segmental flexibility that likely facilitates allosteric activation. Single-particle imaging of the gp130/IL-6/IL-6Rα/Jak1 holocomplex shows Jak1 associated with the membrane proximal intracellular regions of gp130, abutting the would-be inner leaflet of the cell membrane. Jak1 association with gp130 is enhanced by the presence of a membrane environment. PMID:21220115

  18. Leishmania pifanoi proteoglycolipid complex P8 induces macrophage cytokine production through Toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Shanta M; Colmenares, Maria; Pestana, Karen Goldsmith; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2008-05-01

    The P8 proteoglycolipid complex (P8 PGLC) is a glyconjugate expressed by Leishmania mexicana complex parasites. We previously have shown that vaccination with P8 PGLC provides protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in susceptible BALB/c mice. However, the biological importance of this complex remains unknown. Here we show that P8 PGLC localizes to the surface of Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes and that upon exposure to macrophages, P8 PGLC binds and induces inflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNAs such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and RANTES early after stimulation. Our studies indicate that cytokine and chemokine induction is dependent upon Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Interestingly, key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (such as interleukin-6 [IL-6], macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta, and beta interferon [IFN-beta]) that can be induced through TLR4 activation were not induced or only slightly upregulated by P8 PGLC. Activation by P8 PGLC does not occur in the presence of TLR4 alone and requires both CD14 and myeloid differentiation protein 2 for signaling; this requirement may be responsible for the limited TLR4 response. This is the first characterization of a TLR4 ligand for Leishmania. In vitro experiments indicate that L. pifanoi amastigotes induce lower levels of cytokines in macrophages in the absence of TLR4; however, notably higher IL-10/IFN-gamma ratios were found for TLR4-deficient mice than for BALB/c mice. Further, increased levels of parasites persist in BALB/c mice deficient in TLR4. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR4 recognition of Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes is important for the control of infection and that this is mediated, in part, through the P8 PGLC.

  19. Radiation inactivation (target size analysis) of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: evidence for a high molecular weight complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conn, P.M.; Venter, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    In the present study we used radiation inactivation (target size analysis) to measure the functional mol wt of the GnRH receptor while it is still a component of the plasma membrane. This technique is based on the observation that an inverse relationship exists between the dose-dependent inactivation of a macromolecule by ionizing radiation and the size of that macromolecule. This method demonstrates a mol wt of 136,346 +/- 8120 for the GnRH receptor. This estimate is approximately twice that obtained (60,000) by photoaffinity labeling with a radioactive GnRH analog followed by electrophoresis under denaturing conditions and, accordingly, presents the possibility that the functional receptor consists of a high mol wt complex in its native state. The present studies indicate that the GnRH receptor is either a single weight class of protein or several closely related weight classes, such as might occur due to protein glycosylation.

  20. Extracellular interactome of the FGF receptor-ligand system: complexities and the relative simplicity of the worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanska, Urszula M; Fernig, David G; Kinnunen, Tarja

    2009-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) regulate a multitude of biological functions in embryonic development and in adult. A major question is how does one family of growth factors and their receptors control such a variety of functions? Classically, specificity was thought to be imparted by alternative splicing of the FGFRs, resulting in isoforms that bind specifically to a subset of the FGFs, and by different saccharide sequences in the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor. A growing number of noncanonical co-receptors such as integrins and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) are now recognized as imparting additional complexity to classic FGFR signaling. This review will discuss the noncanonical FGFR ligands and speculate on the possibility that they provide additional and alternative means to determining the functional specificity of FGFR signaling. We will also discuss how invertebrate models such as C. elegans may advance our understanding of noncanonical FGFR signaling.

  1. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  2. The SOCS2 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates growth hormone receptor levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Vesterlund

    Full Text Available Growth Hormone is essential for the regulation of growth and the homeostatic control of intermediary metabolism. GH actions are mediated by the Growth Hormone Receptor; a member of the cytokine receptor super family that signals chiefly through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway. Target tissue responsiveness to GH is under regulatory control to avoid excessive and off-target effects upon GHR activation. The suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (SOCS is a key regulator of GHR sensitivity. This is clearly shown in mice where the SOCS2 gene has been inactivated, which show 30-40% increase in body length, a phenotype that is dependent on endogenous GH secretion. SOCS2 is a GH-stimulated, STAT5b-regulated gene that acts in a negative feedback loop to downregulate GHR signalling. Since the biochemical basis for these actions is poorly understood, we studied the molecular function of SOCS2. We demonstrated that SOCS2 is part of a multimeric complex with intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutational analysis shows that the interaction with Elongin B/C controls SOCS2 protein turnover and affects its molecular activity. Increased GHR levels were observed in livers from SOCS2⁻/⁻ mice and in the absence of SOCS2 in in vitro experiments. We showed that SOCS2 regulates cellular GHR levels through direct ubiquitination and in a proteasomally dependent manner. We also confirmed the importance of the SOCS-box for the proper function of SOCS2. Finally, we identified two phosphotyrosine residues in the GHR to be responsible for the interaction with SOCS2, but only Y487 to account for the effects of SOCS2. The demonstration that SOCS2 is an ubiquitin ligase for the GHR unveils the molecular basis for its physiological actions.

  3. Complex positive selection pressures drive the evolution of HIV-1 with different co-receptor tropisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 co-receptor tropism is central for understanding the transmission and pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. We performed a genome-wide comparison between the adaptive evolution of R5 and X4 variants from HIV-1 subtypes B and C. The results showed that R5 and X4 variants experienced differential evolutionary patterns and different HIV-1 genes encountered various positive selection pressures, suggesting that complex selection pressures are driving HIV-1 evolution. Compared with other hypervariable regions of Gp120, significantly more positively selected sites were detected in the V3 region of subtype B X4 variants, V2 region of subtype B R5 variants, and V1 and V4 regions of subtype C X4 variants, indicating an association of positive selection with co-receptor recognition/binding. Intriguingly, a significantly higher proportion (33.3% and 55.6%, P<0.05) of positively selected sites were identified in the C3 region than other conserved regions of Gp120 in all the analyzed HIV-1 variants, indicating that the C3 region might be more important to HIV-1 adaptation than previously thought. Approximately half of the positively selected sites identified in the env gene were identical between R5 and X4 variants. There were three common positively selected sites (96, 113 and 281) identified in Gp41 of all X4 and R5 variants from subtypes B and C. These sites might not only suggest a functional importance in viral survival and adaptation, but also imply a potential cross-immunogenicity between HIV-1 R5 and X4 variants, which has important implications for AIDS vaccine development.

  4. Physical and functional association of the Src family kinases Fyn and Lyn with the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI-Fc receptor gamma chain complex on human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Shindoh, K; Tsuji, M; Takayama, H

    1998-07-20

    We have previously shown that uncharacterized glycoprotein VI (GPVI), which is constitutively associated and coexpressed with Fc receptor gamma chain (FcRgamma) in human platelets, is essential for collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of FcRgamma, Syk, and phospholipase Cgamma2 (PLCgamma2), leading to platelet activation. Here we investigated involvement of the Src family in the proximal signals through the GPVI-FcRgamma complex, using the snake venom convulxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus, which specifically recognizes GPVI and activates platelets through cross-linking GPVI. Convulxin-coupled beads precipitated the GPVI-FcRgamma complex from platelet lysates. Collagen and convulxin induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FcRgamma, Syk, and PLCgamma2 and recruited tyrosine-phosphorylated Syk to the GPVI-FcRgamma complex. Using coprecipitation methods with convulxin-coupled beads and antibodies against FcRgamma and the Src family, we showed that Fyn and Lyn, but not Yes, Src, Fgr, Hck, and Lck, were physically associated with the GPVI-FcRgamma complex irrespective of stimulation. Furthermore, Fyn was rapidly activated by collagen or cross-linking GPVI. The Src family-specific inhibitor PP1 dose-dependently inhibited collagen- or convulxin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins including FcRgamma, Syk, and PLCgamma2, accompanied by a loss of aggregation and ATP release reaction. These results indicate that the Src family plays a critical role in platelet activation via the collagen receptor GPVI-FcRgamma complex.

  5. Physical and Functional Association of the Src Family Kinases Fyn and Lyn with the Collagen Receptor Glycoprotein VI-Fc Receptor γ Chain Complex on Human Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Yasuharu; Shindoh, Keisuke; Tsuji, Masaaki; Takayama, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that uncharacterized glycoprotein VI (GPVI), which is constitutively associated and coexpressed with Fc receptor γ chain (FcRγ) in human platelets, is essential for collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of FcRγ, Syk, and phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), leading to platelet activation. Here we investigated involvement of the Src family in the proximal signals through the GPVI–FcRγ complex, using the snake venom convulxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus, which specifically recognizes GPVI and activates platelets through cross-linking GPVI. Convulxin-coupled beads precipitated the GPVI–FcRγ complex from platelet lysates. Collagen and convulxin induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FcRγ, Syk, and PLCγ2 and recruited tyrosine-phosphorylated Syk to the GPVI–FcRγ complex. Using coprecipitation methods with convulxin-coupled beads and antibodies against FcRγ and the Src family, we showed that Fyn and Lyn, but not Yes, Src, Fgr, Hck, and Lck, were physically associated with the GPVI–FcRγ complex irrespective of stimulation. Furthermore, Fyn was rapidly activated by collagen or cross-linking GPVI. The Src family–specific inhibitor PP1 dose-dependently inhibited collagen- or convulxin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins including FcRγ, Syk, and PLCγ2, accompanied by a loss of aggregation and ATP release reaction. These results indicate that the Src family plays a critical role in platelet activation via the collagen receptor GPVI–FcRγ complex. PMID:9670039

  6. Identification and profiling of CXCR3-CXCR4 chemokine receptor heteromer complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, A. O.; van Lipzig, M. M. H.; Jaeger, W. C.; Seeber, R. M.; van Zwam, M.; Vinet, J.; van der Lee, M. M. C.; Siderius, M.; Zaman, G. J. R.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Smit, M. J.; Pfleger, K. D. G.; Leurs, R.; Vischer, H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The C-X-C chemokine receptors 3 (CXCR3) and C-X-C chemokine receptors 4 (CXCR4) are involved in various autoimmune diseases and cancers. Small antagonists have previously been shown to cross-inhibit chemokine binding to CXCR4, CC chemokine receptors 2 (CCR2) and 5 (CCR5) heter

  7. The transcriptional coactivator DRIP/mediator complex is involved in vitamin D receptor function and regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yuko; Chalkley, Robert J; Burlingame, Alma L; Bikle, Daniel D

    2010-10-01

    Mediator is a multisubunit coactivator complex that facilitates transcription of nuclear receptors. We investigated the role of the mediator complex as a coactivator for vitamin D receptor (VDR) in keratinocytes. Using VDR affinity beads, the vitamin D receptor interacting protein (DRIP)/mediator complex was purified from primary keratinocytes, and its subunit composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The complex included core subunits, such as DRIP205/MED1 (MED1), that directly binds to VDR. Additional subunits were identified that are components of the RNA polymerase II complex. The functions of different mediator components were investigated by silencing its subunits. The core subunit MED1 facilitates VDR activity and regulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. A newly described subunit MED21 also has a role in promoting keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, whereas MED10 has an inhibitory role. Blocking MED1/MED21 expression caused hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 and/or glioma-associated oncogene homolog. Blocking MED1 or MED21 expression also resulted in defects in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation, as indicated by decreased expression of differentiation markers and decreased translocation of E-cadherin to the membrane. These results show that keratinocytes use the transcriptional coactivator mediator to regulate VDR functions and control keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  8. Dab2, megalin, cubilin and amnionless receptor complex might mediate intestinal endocytosis in the suckling rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Carretero, María D; Palomo, Marta; García-Miranda, Pablo; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Peral, María J; Calonge, María L; Ilundain, Anunciación A

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed that Dab2 participates in the endocytosis of milk macromolecules in rat small intestine. Here we investigate the receptors that may mediate this endocytosis by studying the effects of age and diet on megalin, VLDLR, and ApoER2 expression, and that of age on the expression of cubilin and amnionless. Of megalin, VLDLR and ApoER2, only the megalin expression pattern resembles that of Dab2 previously reported. Thus the mRNA and protein levels of megalin and Dab2 are high in the intestine of the suckling rat, down-regulated by age and up-regulated by milk diet, mainly in the ileum. Neither age nor diet affect ApoER2 mRNA levels. The effect of age on VLDLR mRNA levels depends on the epithelial cell tested but they are down-regulated by milk diet. In the suckling rat, the intestinal expressions of both cubilin and amnionless are similar to that of megalin and megalin, cubilin, amnionless and Dab2 co-localize at the microvilli and in the apical endocytic apparatus. Co-localization of Dab2 with ApoER2 and VLDLR at the microvilli and in the apical endocytic apparatus is also observed. This is the first report showing intestinal co-localization of: megalin/cubilin/amnionless/Dab2, VLDLR/Dab2 and ApoER2/Dab2. We conclude that the megalin/cubilin/amnionless/Dab2 complex/es participate in intestinal processes, mainly during the lactation period and that Dab2 may act as an adaptor in intestinal processes mediated by ApoER2 and VLDLR.

  9. New estradiol based {sup 111}In complex towards the estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vultos, Filipe; Cunha, Susana; Fernandes, Celia; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Marques, Fernanda; Santos, Isabel; Gano, Lurdes [Universidade de Lisboa, Bobadela (Portugal). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares C2TN; Botelho, Maria Filomena [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Inst. de Biofisica/Biomatematica

    2015-07-01

    The oestrogen receptor (ER) is an important tumour target for molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy due to its overexpression in many malignant cells as compared to normal cells. Aiming to find new functional molecular imaging/therapeutic agents for ER positive tumours, we have synthesized a new estradiol derivative substituted at the 16-α position with a diethylene triamine tetraacetic acid (DTTA)-like chelating ligand through a four-carbon spacer. The new bioconjugate (H{sub 4}L), was used to synthesize the corresponding indium complexes (InL/[{sup 111}In]L). The radioactive complex [{sup 111}In]L was prepared in high yield (>98%) at final concentrations of 1 x 10{sup -4} M and its chemical identity was ascertained by comparing its HPLC gamma-chromatogram to the HPLC UV-vis-chromatogram of the InL analogue. [{sup 111}In]L is hydrophilic and kinetically stable in the presence of an excess of apo-transferrin and in human blood serum. Cellular studies in breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-431) suggest that [{sup 111}In]L uptake may be mediated by an ER dependent mechanism. Biodistribution studies were performed in mice indicating a rapid clearance from most organs and a slow total excretion that occurs mainly by hepatobiliar pathway. High in vivo stability of [{sup 111}In]L was confirmed by HPLC analysis of urine and blood samples. Nevertheless, the hydrophilicity, the low ER affinity and the biodistribution of [{sup 111}In]L indicate that structural modifications are required to improve its behaviour for ER targeting in vivo.

  10. Synthesis of inositol phosphate ligands of plant hormone-receptor complexes: pathways of inositol hexakisphosphate turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, David E; Parmar, Paroo N; Caddick, Samuel E K; Green, Porntip; Brearley, Charles A

    2012-06-15

    Reduction of phytate is a major goal of plant breeding programs to improve the nutritional quality of crops. Remarkably, except for the storage organs of crops such as barley, maize and soybean, we know little of the stereoisomeric composition of inositol phosphates in plant tissues. To investigate the metabolic origins of higher inositol phosphates in photosynthetic tissues, we have radiolabelled leaf tissue of Solanum tuberosum with myo-[2-3H]inositol, undertaken a detailed analysis of inositol phosphate stereoisomerism and permeabilized mesophyll protoplasts in media containing inositol phosphates. We describe the inositol phosphate composition of leaf tissue and identify pathways of inositol phosphate metabolism that we reveal to be common to other kingdoms. Our results identify the metabolic origins of a number of higher inositol phosphates including ones that are precursors of cofactors, or cofactors of plant hormone-receptor complexes. The present study affords alternative explanations of the effects of disruption of inositol phosphate metabolism reported in other species, and identifies different inositol phosphates from that described in photosynthetic tissue of the monocot Spirodela polyrhiza. We define the pathways of inositol hexakisphosphate turnover and shed light on the occurrence of a number of inositol phosphates identified in animals, for which metabolic origins have not been defined.

  11. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R.; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.

  12. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits.

  13. Antibody fragments for stabilization and crystallization of G protein-coupled receptors and their signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun K; Gupta, Charu; Srivastava, Ashish; Jaiman, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the key players in extracellular signal recognition and their subsequent communications with cellular signaling machinery. Crystallization and high-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been one of the major advances in the area of GPCR biology over the last 7-8 years. There have primarily been three approaches to GPCR crystallization till date. These are fusion protein strategy, thermostabilization, and antibody fragment-mediated crystallization. Of these, antibody fragment-mediated crystallization has not only provided the first breakthrough in structure determination of a non-rhodopsin GPCR but it has also assisted in obtaining structures of fully active conformations of GPCRs. Antibody fragment approach has also been crucial in obtaining structural information on GPCR signaling complexes. Here, we highlight the specific examples of GPCR crystal structures that have utilized antibody fragments for promoting crystallogenesis and structure solution. We also discuss emerging powerful technologies such as the nanobody technology and the synthetic phage display libraries in the context of GPCR crystallization and underline how these tools are likely to propel key GPCR structural studies in future.

  14. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Xiao-qin; Li, He; Liang, Kai-ni [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Miner, Jeffrey N.; Hong, Mei; Kallel, E. Adam; Oeveren, Arjan van; Zhi, Lin [Discovery Research, Ligand Pharmaceuticals Inc., 10275 Science Center Drive, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: x-ray@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2006-11-01

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents.

  15. The binding of [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex to hypothalamic chromatin of male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Burgos, J; Ventanas, J

    1985-01-01

    Histones and masking acidic proteins were removed from hypothalamic chromatin in order to evaluate/measure the number of available acceptor sites for the [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex. This number increases after dehistonizing and unmasking and is lower than published values for comparable preparations. No sex-related difference in [3H]oestradiol-receptor binding to hypothalamic chromatin in vitro was observed. Failure to observe such a difference suggests that sexual differentiation and steroid sensitivity cannot be attributed to marked differences in the degree of chromatin masking.

  16. Molecular modelling of the ORL1 receptor and its complex with nociceptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, C M; Moulédous, L; Poda, G; Maigret, B; Meunier, J C

    1998-12-01

    The opioid receptor like (ORL1) receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and regulates a plethora of neurophysiological functions. The structural requirements for receptor activation by its endogenous agonist, nociceptin (FGGFTGARKSARKLANQ), differ markedly from those of the kappa-opioid receptor and its putative peptide agonist, dynorphin A (YGGFLRRIRPKLKWDNQ). In order to probe the functional architecture of the ORL1 receptor, a molecular model of the receptor has been built, including the TM domain and the extra- and intracellular loops. An extended binding site able to accommodate nociceptin-(1-13), the shortest fully active analogue of nociceptin, has been characterized. The N-terminal FGGF tetrapeptide is proposed to bind in a highly conserved region, comprising two distinct hydrophobic pockets in a cavity formed by TM helices 3, 5, 6 and 7, capped by the acidic second extracellular (EL2) loop controlling access to the TM elements of the peptide binding site. The nociceptin conformation provides for the selective preference of the ORL1 receptor for nociceptin over dynorphin A, conferred by residue positions 5 and 6 (TG versus LR), and the favourable interaction of its highly positively charged core (residues 8-13) with the EL2 loop, thought to mediate receptor activation. The functional roles of the EL2 loop and the conserved N-terminal tetrapeptide opioid 'message' binding site are discussed in the context of the different structural requirements of the ORL1 and kappa-opioid receptors for activation.

  17. Synthesis and structural investigation of some pyrimido[5,4-c]quinolin-4(3H)-one derivatives with a long-chain arylpiperazine moiety as potent 5-HT(1A/2A) and 5-HT(7) receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewgowd, Wieslawa; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Szczesio, Malgorzata; Olczak, Andrzej; Glowka, Marek L; Mordalski, Stefan; Stanczak, Andrzej

    2011-08-01

    A series of new pyrimido[5,4-c]quinolin-4(3H)-ones with variable length of the spacer between amide and 4-arylpiperazine moiety were prepared to further explore the role of a terminal portion in the serotonergic activity. The majority of compounds demonstrated high in vitro affinity for 5-HT(1A) receptor, and moderate-to-low affinity for 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(7) receptors. X-ray analysis, two-dimensional NMR, conformational studies and docking into the 5-HT(1A) receptor model were conducted to investigate conformational preferences of selected 5-HT(1A) receptor ligands in different environments. The extended conformation of tetramethylene derivatives was found in a solid state, in DMSO (for a protonated form) and as a global energy minimum during conformational analysis in simulated water environment. Ligand geometry in top-scored complexes, obtained by docking to a set of 100 receptor models, were either fully extended or with central spacer torsion in synclinal conformation.

  18. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. EXPERIMENTAL: FINDINGS: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas that express AR. CONCLUSION: This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines

  19. Structure of the murine constitutive androstane receptor complexed to androstenol: a molecular basis for inverse agonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, L.; Vincent, J.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Dussault, I.; Lin, M.; Ianculescu, I.; Sherman, M.A.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E. (Tennesse)

    2010-03-08

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a 'reverse' paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligand binding pocket, but unlike many nuclear receptor ligands, it makes no contacts with helix H12/AF2. The transition from constitutive to basal activity (androstenol bound) appears to be associated with a ligand-induced kink between helices H10 and H11. This disrupts the previously predicted salt bridge that locks H12 in the transcriptionally active conformation. This mechanism of inverse agonism is distinct from traditional nuclear receptor antagonists thereby offering a new approach to receptor modulation.

  20. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial TOM complex: Mim1 promotes insertion and assembly of signal-anchored receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thomas; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Stojanovski, Diana; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Kutik, Stephan; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils

    2008-01-04

    The translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) is the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. All Tom proteins are also encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized as precursors in the cytosol. The channel-forming beta-barrel protein Tom40 is targeted to mitochondria via Tom receptors and inserted into the outer membrane by the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). A further outer membrane protein, Mim1, plays a less defined role in assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. The three receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 are anchored in the outer membrane by a single transmembrane alpha-helix, located at the N terminus in the case of Tom20 and Tom70 (signal-anchored) or in the C-terminal portion in the case of Tom22 (tail-anchored). Insertion of the precursor of Tom22 into the outer membrane requires pre-existing Tom receptors while the import pathway of the precursors of Tom20 and Tom70 is only poorly understood. We report that Mim1 is required for efficient membrane insertion and assembly of Tom20 and Tom70, but not Tom22. We show that Mim1 associates with SAM(core) components to a large SAM complex, explaining its role in late steps of the assembly pathway of Tom40. We conclude that Mim1 is not only required for biogenesis of the beta-barrel protein Tom40 but also for membrane insertion and assembly of signal-anchored Tom receptors. Thus, Mim1 plays an important role in the efficient assembly of the mitochondrial TOM complex.

  1. Symmetric signaling by an asymmetric 1 erythropoietin: 2 erythropoietin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingxin L; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Tidor, Bruce; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-01-30

    Via sites 1 and 2, erythropoietin binds asymmetrically to two identical receptor monomers, although it is unclear how asymmetry affects receptor activation and signaling. Here we report the design and validation of two mutant erythropoietin receptors that probe the role of individual members of the receptor dimer by selectively binding either site 1 or site 2 on erythropoietin. Ba/F3 cells expressing either mutant receptor do not respond to erythropoietin, but cells co-expressing both receptors respond to erythropoietin by proliferation and activation of the JAK2-Stat5 pathway. A truncated receptor with only one cytosolic tyrosine (Y343) is sufficient for signaling in response to erythropoietin, regardless of the monomer on which it is located. Similarly, only one receptor in the dimer needs a juxtamembrane hydrophobic L253 or W258 residue, essential for JAK2 activation. We conclude that despite asymmetry in the ligand-receptor interaction, both sides are competent for signaling, and appear to signal equally.

  2. ELISA for complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor in lung cancer tissue extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Witte, H; Pappot, H; Brünner, N

    1997-01-01

    A sandwich-type ELISA has been developed for the assessment of complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) in extracts of squamous cell lung carcinomas. The assay is based on a combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-uPA antibodies and a biotinylated mouse a......PA:uPAR complexes in lung tumor tissue as well as other types of cancer.......A sandwich-type ELISA has been developed for the assessment of complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) in extracts of squamous cell lung carcinomas. The assay is based on a combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-uPA antibodies and a biotinylated mouse...... indicate that de novo complex formation is a major factor to consider and that complexes analyzed in the presence of this antagonist represent original uPA:uPAR complexes present prior to tumor tissue processing. The present ELISA appears suitable for studying the potential prognostic impact of u...

  3. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Cornell); (Scripps); (NIDA); (Columbia); (UCSD); (Receptos)

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  4. Investigation of the receptor-mediated endocytosis of transcobalamin/intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm, Rasmus; Grissom, Charles B.; Fedosov, Sergey N.

    receptor structure. This receptor is suggested to be regulated by the vitamin B12 level in the cells, which is interesting in relation to cancer growth. The cellular endocytosis of TC- B12 complex by this unknown receptor is being investigated, using confocal microscopy. Fluorescently labeled B12 molecules...... (Oregon green linked to B12) have been synthesized to determine the B12 uptake level in normal and various tumour-derived cells (e.g. Hela cells from cervix epithelioid carcinoma and BN- cells from rat yolk sac sarcoma). Costaining of the B12 binders has been performed using fluorescently labelled...... secondary antibodies recognising primary antibodies against IF and TC. The data show a cell growth-regulated uptake of free fluorescent B12 but a strong inducement of uptake by TC and IF. After uptake the B12 fluorochrome colocalizes with the B12 binders. ...

  5. Structures of a platelet-derived growth factor/propeptide complex and a platelet-derived growth factor/receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Lin, P. Charles; He, Xiaolin (Vanderbilt); (NWU)

    2010-07-13

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their receptors (PDGFRs) are prototypic growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases which have critical functions in development. We show that PDGFs share a conserved region in their prodomain sequences which can remain noncovalently associated with the mature cystine-knot growth factor domain after processing. The structure of the PDGF-A/propeptide complex reveals this conserved, hydrophobic association mode. We also present the structure of the complex between PDGF-B and the first three Ig domains of PDGFR{beta}, showing that two PDGF-B protomers clamp PDGFR{beta} at their dimerization seam. The PDGF-B:PDGFR{beta} interface is predominantly hydrophobic, and PDGFRs and the PDGF propeptides occupy overlapping positions on mature PDGFs, rationalizing the need of propeptides by PDGFs to cover functionally important hydrophobic surfaces during secretion. A large-scale structural organization and rearrangement is observed for PDGF-B upon receptor binding, in which the PDGF-B L1 loop, disordered in the structure of the free form, adopts a highly specific conformation to form hydrophobic interactions with the third Ig domain of PDGFR{beta}. Calorimetric data also shows that the membrane-proximal homotypic PDGFR{alpha} interaction, albeit required for activation, contributes negatively to ligand binding. The structural and biochemical data together offer insights into PDGF-PDGFR signaling, as well as strategies for PDGF-antagonism.

  6. Cellular localization of GDNF and its GFRalpha1/RET receptor complex in the developing pancreas of cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, C; Maruccio, L; Facello, B; Cocchia, N; Tortora, G; Castaldo, L

    2008-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts through RET receptor tyrosine kinase and its co-receptor GFRalpha1. In an effort to better understand the possible biological contribution of the GDNF and GFRalpha1/RET complex in pancreatic development, in this study we report the cellular localization of these proteins in the pancreas of domestic cat embryos and fetuses by immunocytochemical methods. In early embryos, GDNF, GFRalpha and RET immunoreactivity (IR) was localized in closely intermingled cells. GDNF and RET immunoreactive cells displayed chromogranin (an endocrine marker) and PGP 9.5 (a neuronal marker) IR, respectively. GFRalpha IR was present in both a few GDNF/chromogranin and RET/PGP 9.5 immunoreactive cells. In elderly fetuses, GDNF and GFRalpha IR were co-localized in glucagon cells and RET IR was detected in few neurons and never co-localized with GFRalpha or GDNF IR. In early embryos, the presence of GDNF IR in chromogranin immunoreactive cells and GFRalpha1/RET complex IR in PGP9.5 immunoreactive cells seems to suggest a paracrine action of GDNF contained in endocrine cell precursors on neuronal cell precursors expressing its receptor complex. The presence in different cell populations of RET and its co-receptor GFRalpha1 IR could be due to independent signaling of GRFalpha1. Thus, the co-presence of GDNF and GFRalpha1 in chromogranin and glucagon cells could lead to the hypothesis that GDNF can act in an autocrinal manner. In fetuses, RET IR was detected only in intrapancreatic ganglia. Because of the lack of GFRalpha1 IR in pancreatic innervation, RET receptor could be activated by other GFR alphas and ligands of GDNF family. In conclusion, these findings suggest that in differently aged embryos and fetuses the GDNF signal is differently mediated by RET and GFRalpha1. PMID:19014364

  7. Complexity and dynamics of HIV-1 chemokine receptor usage in a multidrug-resistant adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavarelli, Mariangela; Mainetti, Lara; Pignataro, Angela Rosa; Bigoloni, Alba; Tolazzi, Monica; Galli, Andrea; Nozza, Silvia; Castagna, Antonella; Sampaolo, Michela; Boeri, Enzo; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2014-12-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is licensed in clinical practice for patients with R5 virus and virological failure; however, in anecdotal reports, dual/mixed viruses were also inhibited. We retrospectively evaluated the evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of an infected adolescent with a CCR5/CXCR4 Trofile profile who experienced an important but temporary immunological and virological response during a 16-month period of MVC-based therapy. Coreceptor usage of biological viral clones isolated from PBMCs was investigated in U87.CD4 cells expressing wild-type or chimeric CCR5 and CXCR4. Plasma and PBMC-derived viral clones were sequenced to predict coreceptor tropism using the geno2pheno algorithm from the V3 envelope sequence and pol gene-resistant mutations. From start to 8.5 months of MVC treatment only R5X4 viral clones were observed, whereas at 16 months the phenotype enlarged to also include R5 and X4 clones. Chimeric receptor usage suggested the preferential usage of the CXCR4 coreceptor by the R5X4 biological clones. According to phenotypic data, R5 viruses were susceptible, whereas R5X4 and X4 viruses were resistant to RANTES and MVC in vitro. Clones at 16 months, but not at baseline, showed an amino acidic resistance pattern in protease and reverse transcription genes, which, however, did not drive their tropisms. The geno2pheno algorithm predicted at baseline R5 viruses in plasma, and from 5.5 months throughout follow-up only CXCR4-using viruses. An extended methodological approach is needed to unravel the complexity of the phenotype and variation of viruses resident in the different compartments of an infected individual. The accurate evaluation of the proportion of residual R5 viruses may guide therapeutic intervention in highly experienced patients with limited therapeutic options.

  8. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in Medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It wa

  9. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It wa

  10. Structural Studies of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Tetramer in Complex with Its Receptor, Sialyllactose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ping; Thompson, Thomas B.; Wurzburg, Beth A.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) functions in virus attachment to cells, cleavage of sialic acid from oligosaccharides, and stimulating membrane fusion during virus entry into cells. The structural basis for these diverse functions remains to be fully understood. We report the crystal structures of the parainfluenza virus 5 (SV5) HN and its complexes with sialic acid, the inhibitor DANA, and the receptor sialyllactose. SV5 HN shares common structural features with HN of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and human parainfluenza 3 (HPIV3), but unlike the previously determined HN structures, the SV5 HN forms a tetramer in solution, which is thought to be the physiological oligomer. The sialyllactose complex reveals intact receptor within the active site, but no major conformational changes in the protein. The SV5 HN structures do not support previously proposed models for HN action in membrane fusion and suggest alternative mechanisms by which HN may promote virus entry into cells.

  11. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  12. Insulin/receptor binding: the last piece of the puzzle? What recent progress on the structure of the insulin/receptor complex tells us (or not) about negative cooperativity and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyts, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Progress in solving the structure of insulin bound to its receptor has been slow and stepwise, but a milestone has now been reached with a refined structure of a complex of insulin with a "microreceptor" that contains the primary binding site. The insulin receptor is a dimeric allosteric enzyme that belongs to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The insulin binding process is complex and exhibits negative cooperativity. Biochemical evidence suggested that insulin, through two distinct binding sites, crosslinks two receptor sites located on each α subunit. The structure of the unliganded receptor ectodomain showed a symmetrical folded-over conformation with an antiparallel disposition. Further work resolved the detailed structure of receptor site 1, both without and with insulin. Recently, a missing piece in the puzzle was added: the C-terminal portion of insulin's B-chain known to be critical for binding and negative cooperativity. Here I discuss these findings and their implications.

  13. Structural basis of G protein-coupled receptor-Gi protein interaction: formation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor-Gi protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnpotra, Jagjeet S; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Cai, Jian; Lynch, Diane L; Grossfield, Alan; Leioatts, Nicholas; Hurst, Dow P; Pitman, Michael C; Song, Zhao-Hui; Reggio, Patricia H

    2014-07-18

    In this study, we applied a comprehensive G protein-coupled receptor-Gαi protein chemical cross-linking strategy to map the cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2)-Gαi interface and then used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the dynamics of complex formation. Three cross-link sites were identified using LC-MS/MS and electrospray ionization-MS/MS as follows: 1) a sulfhydryl cross-link between C3.53(134) in TMH3 and the Gαi C-terminal i-3 residue Cys-351; 2) a lysine cross-link between K6.35(245) in TMH6 and the Gαi C-terminal i-5 residue, Lys-349; and 3) a lysine cross-link between K5.64(215) in TMH5 and the Gαi α4β6 loop residue, Lys-317. To investigate the dynamics and nature of the conformational changes involved in CB2·Gi complex formation, we carried out microsecond-time scale molecular dynamics simulations of the CB2 R*·Gαi1β1γ2 complex embedded in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer, using cross-linking information as validation. Our results show that although molecular dynamics simulations started with the G protein orientation in the β2-AR*·Gαsβ1γ2 complex crystal structure, the Gαi1β1γ2 protein reoriented itself within 300 ns. Two major changes occurred as follows. 1) The Gαi1 α5 helix tilt changed due to the outward movement of TMH5 in CB2 R*. 2) A 25° clockwise rotation of Gαi1β1γ2 underneath CB2 R* occurred, with rotation ceasing when Pro-139 (IC-2 loop) anchors in a hydrophobic pocket on Gαi1 (Val-34, Leu-194, Phe-196, Phe-336, Thr-340, Ile-343, and Ile-344). In this complex, all three experimentally identified cross-links can occur. These findings should be relevant for other class A G protein-coupled receptors that couple to Gi proteins. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Regulatory effects of adenosine A2A receptors on psychomotor ability and mood behavior of mice%腺苷A2A受体对小鼠精神运动和情绪行为的调控作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜莉; 冉鸿; 段炜; 郑健

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨腺苷A2A受体基因敲除、A2A受体激动剂干预或A2A受体抑制剂干预对小鼠运动活性、焦虑和抑郁样行为的影响.方法 取腺苷A2A受体基因敲除(A2AKO)的雄性小鼠(A2AKO组)及同窝野生型(WT)C57BL/6小鼠(WT组)待用.另取雄性清洁级C57BL/6小鼠,随机分为SCH58261组、CGS21680组和对照组,分别给予腺苷A2A受体特异性拮抗剂SCH58261(2mg/kg)、腺苷A2A受体特异性激动剂CGS21680(0.5mg/kg)和同体积(0.25ml)载体溶液(二甲基亚砜+生理盐水)腹膜腔注射,10min后待用.前述各组别小鼠均进行旷场、高架十字迷宫和强迫游泳实验,测定各组小鼠的运动活性、焦虑和抑郁样行为.结果 与WT组比较,A2AKO组旷场总运动路程缩短(P<0.001),周边区域的滞留时间延长(P<0.05),进入高架十字迷宫开臂的次数及在开臂滞留时间减少(P<0.05),强迫游泳的累计不动时间无显著差异(P>0.05),而CGS21680组旷场总运动路程缩短(P<0.01),周边区域滞留时间延长(P<0.01),进入高架十字迷宫开臂的次数及在开臂的滞留时间减少(P<0.01),强迫游泳的累计不动时间延长(P<0.001),而SCH58261组旷场总运动路程和中心区域活动路程延长(P<0.001),强迫游泳的累计不动时间缩短(P<0.01),高架十字迷宫试验各项指标无显著差异(P>0.05).结论 腺苷A2A受体激动剂可减少小鼠的自发和探索行为,加重焦虑和抑郁情绪,该效应与腺苷A2A受体基因敲除引发的效应相似,与腺苷A2A受体拮抗剂引发效应相反.%Objective To explore the effects of gene knock-out, agonist or inhibitor of adenosine A2A receptor on the locomotor activity, and anxiety- or depression-like behavior of mice. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice, comprising those underwent gene knock-out of adenosine AjA receptor (AjaKO) and their wild-type (WT) littermates, were assigned into A2A KO group and WT group. Another batch of male C57BL/6, specific

  15. Targeting Androgen Receptor/Src Complex Impairs the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Fibrosarcoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriella Castoria; Pia Giovannelli; Marzia Di Donato; Ryo Hayashi; Claudio Arra; Ettore Appella; Ferdinando Auricchio; Antimo Migliaccio

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EXPERIMENTAL: FINDINGS: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the...

  16. Crystal structure of R-spondin 2 in complex with the ectodomains of its receptors LGR5 and ZNRF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebisch, Matthias; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-08-01

    The four secreted R-spondin (Rspo1-4) proteins of vertebrates function as stem cell growth factors and potentiate canonical Wnt signalling. Rspo proteins act by cross-linking members of two cell surface receptor families, complexing the stem cell markers LGR4-6 with the Frizzled-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases ZNRF3/RNF43. The consequent internalisation of the ternary LGR-Rspo-E3 complex removes the E3 ligase activity, which otherwise targets the Wnt receptor Frizzled for degradation, and thus enhances Wnt signalling. Multiple combinations of LGR4-6, Rspo1-4 and ZNRF3/RNF43 are possible, implying the existence of generic interaction determinants, but also of specific differences in complex architecture and activity. We present here a high resolution crystal structure of an ectodomain variant of human LGR5 (hLGR5ecto) complexed with a signalling competent fragment of mouse Rspo2 (mRspo2Fu1-Fu2). The structure shows that the particularly potent Rspo2 ligand engages LGR5 in a fashion almost identical to that reported for hRSPO1. Comparison of our hLGR5ecto structure with previously published structures highlights a surprising plasticity of the LGR ectodomains, characterised by a nearly 9° or larger rotation of the N-terminal half of the horseshoe-like fold relative to the C-terminal half. We also report a low resolution hLGR5-mRspo2Fu1-Fu2-mZNRF3ecto ternary complex structure. This crystal structure confirms our previously suggested hypothesis, showing that Rspo proteins cross-link LGRs and ZNRF3 into a 2:2:2 complex, whereas a 1:1:1 complex is formed with RNF43.

  17. Distribution of interleukin-1 receptor complex at the synaptic membrane driven by interleukin-1β and NMDA stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardoni, Fabrizio; Boraso, Mariaserena; Zianni, Elisa; Corsini, Emanuela; Galli, Corrado L; Cattabeni, Flaminio; Marinovich, Marina; Di Luca, Monica; Viviani, Barbara

    2011-02-11

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that contributes to neuronal injury in various degenerative diseases, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. It exerts its biological effect by activating the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) and recruiting a signalling core complex consisting of the myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) and the IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP). This pathway has been clearly described in the peripheral immune system, but only scattered information is available concerning the molecular composition and distribution of its members in neuronal cells. The findings of this study show that IL-1RI and its accessory proteins MyD88 and IL-1RAcP are differently distributed in the hippocampus and in the subcellular compartments of primary hippocampal neurons. In particular, only IL-1RI is enriched at synaptic sites, where it co-localises with, and binds to the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors. Furthermore, treatment with NMDA increases IL-1RI interaction with NMDA receptors, as well as the surface expression and localization of IL-1RI at synaptic membranes. IL-1β also increases IL-1RI levels at synaptic sites, without affecting the total amount of the receptor in the plasma membrane. Our results reveal for the first time the existence of a dynamic and functional interaction between NMDA receptor and IL-1RI systems that could provide a molecular basis for IL-1β as a neuromodulator in physiological and pathological events relying on NMDA receptor activation.

  18. Distribution of interleukin-1 receptor complex at the synaptic membrane driven by interleukin-1β and NMDA stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinovich Marina

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interleukin-1β (IL-1β is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that contributes to neuronal injury in various degenerative diseases, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. It exerts its biological effect by activating the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI and recruiting a signalling core complex consisting of the myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88 and the IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP. This pathway has been clearly described in the peripheral immune system, but only scattered information is available concerning the molecular composition and distribution of its members in neuronal cells. The findings of this study show that IL-1RI and its accessory proteins MyD88 and IL-1RAcP are differently distributed in the hippocampus and in the subcellular compartments of primary hippocampal neurons. In particular, only IL-1RI is enriched at synaptic sites, where it co-localises with, and binds to the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors. Furthermore, treatment with NMDA increases IL-1RI interaction with NMDA receptors, as well as the surface expression and localization of IL-1RI at synaptic membranes. IL-1β also increases IL-1RI levels at synaptic sites, without affecting the total amount of the receptor in the plasma membrane. Our results reveal for the first time the existence of a dynamic and functional interaction between NMDA receptor and IL-1RI systems that could provide a molecular basis for IL-1β as a neuromodulator in physiological and pathological events relying on NMDA receptor activation.

  19. Anion complexation with cyanobenzoyl substituted first and second generation tripodal amide receptors: crystal structure and solution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Md Najbul; Gogoi, Abhijit; Das, Gopal

    2015-09-14

    Anion complexation properties of two new tripodal amide receptors have been extensively studied here. Two tripodal receptors have been synthesized from the reaction of cyanobenzoyl acid chloride with two tri-amine building blocks such as (i) tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and (ii) tris(2-(4-aminophenoxy)ethyl)amine, which resulted in the first (L1) and second (L2) generation tripodal amides respectively. A detailed comparison of their coordination behavior with anions is also described by crystallographic and solution state experiments. The crystal structure demonstrates various types of spatial orientations of tripodal arms in two receptors and concomitantly interacts with anions distinctively. Intramolecular H-bonding between amide N–H and CO prevents opening of the receptor cavity in the crystal, which leads to a locked conformation of L1 having C(3v) symmetry and makes amide hydrogen unavailable for the anion which results in side cleft anion binding. However, in L2 we conveniently shift the anion binding sites to a distant position which increases cavity size as well as rules out any intramolecular H-bonding between amide N–H and CO. The crystal structure shows a different orientation of the arms in L2; it adopts a quasi-planar arrangement with C(2v) symmetry. In the crystal structure two arms are pointed in the same direction and while extending the contact the third arm is H-bonded with the apical N-atom through a –CN group, making a pseudo capsular cavity where the anion interacts. Most importantly spatial reorientation of the receptor L2 from a C(2v) symmetry to a folded conformation with a C(3v) symmetry was observed only in the presence of an octahedral SiF6(2-) anion and forms a sandwich type complex. Receptors L1 and L2 are explored for their solution state anion binding abilities. The substantial changes in chemical shifts were observed for the amide (-NH) and aromatic hydrogen (-CH) (especially for F(-)), indicating the role of these hydrogens in

  20. Theoretical study of the human bradykinin-bradykinin B2 receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieldon, Artur; Lopez, Jakob J; Glaubitz, Clemens; Schwalbe, Harald

    2008-10-13

    The interaction of bradykinin (BK) with the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) was analyzed by using molecular modeling (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A homology model for B2R has been generated and the recently determined receptor-bound solid-state NMR spectroscopic structure of BK (Lopez et al., Angew. Chem. 2008, 120, 1692-1695; Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2008, 47, 1668-1671) has been modeled into the binding pocket of the receptor to probe the putative ligand-receptor interface. The experimental hormone structure fitted well into the binding pocket of the receptor model and remained stable during the MD simulation. We propose a parallel orientation of the side chains for Arg1 and Arg9 in BK that is bound to B2R. The MD simulation study also allows the conformational changes that lead to the activated form of B2R to be analyzed. The hydrogen bond between N140 (3.35) and W283 (6.48) is the key interaction that keeps the receptor in its inactive form. This hydrogen bond is broken during the MD simulation due to rotation of transmembrane helix 3 (TM3) and is replaced by a new hydrogen bond between W283 (6.48) and N324 (7.45). We propose that this interaction is specific for the activated form of the bradykinin B2 receptor. Additionally, we compared and discussed our putative model in the context of the structural model of the partially activated rhodopsin (Rh*) and with the known biochemical and structural data.

  1. Multivalent structure of galectin-1-nanogold complex serves as potential therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis by enhancing receptor clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y-J Huang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular behaviour is controlled by numerous processes, including intracellular signalling pathways that are triggered by the binding of ligands with cell surface receptors. Multivalent ligands have multiple copies of a recognition element that binds to receptors and influences downstream signals. Nanoparticle-ligand complexes may form multivalent structures to crosslink receptors with high avidity and specificity. After conjugation onto gold nanoparticles, galectin-1 (Au-Gal1 bound with higher affinity to Jurkat cells to promote CD45 clustering and inhibition of its phosphatase activity, resulting in enhancement of apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathways. Au-Gal1 injected intra-articularly into rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA promoted apoptosis of CD4+ T cells and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the ankle joints as well as ameliorated clinical symptoms of arthritis. These observed therapeutic effects indicate that the multivalent structure of nanoparticle-ligands can regulate the distribution of cell surface receptors and subsequent intracellular signalling, and this may provide new insights into nanoparticle applications.

  2. The complex role of NOTCH receptors and their ligands in the development of hepatoblastoma, cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-García, Borja; Baladrón, Victoriano

    2016-02-01

    The NOTCH signalling pathway is one of the key molecular pathways of embryonic development and adult tissues homeostasis in mammals. Mammals have four NOTCH receptors and various ligands that modulate their activity. Many cell disorders, whose genesis involves the NOTCH signalling pathway, have been discovered, including cancer. The mechanisms by which these receptors and their ligands affect liver cell transformation are not yet well understood, and they seem to behave as both oncogenes and tumour-suppressor proteins. In this review, we discuss the published data regarding the role of these proteins in the development of hepatoblastoma, cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma malignancies. The alteration of the NOTCH signalling pathway may be one of the main drivers of hepatic neoplastic growth. However, this signalling pathway might also modulate the development of specific liver tumour features. The complexity of the function of NOTCH receptors and their ligands may be due to their interactions with many other cell signalling pathways. Furthermore, the different levels of expression and activation of these receptors could be a reason for their distinct and sometimes contradictory effects.

  3. Recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of xenobiotics and complex mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharewski, T. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology

    1995-12-31

    Exposure to naturally occurring or synthetic substances that possess sex steroid and/or dioxin-like activity may have long range effects on human health, reproductive fitness and environmental quality. Results from recent epidemiological studies have suggested that xenobiotics with sex steroid activity may contribute to the development of hormone-dependent cancers and disorders in the male reproductive tract as well as attenuate sperm production. However, most of these compounds, which are referred to as endocrine disruptors, are structurally dissimilar to sex steroids. Yet, based upon ambiguous assays, it has been conceded that the effects of these compounds are mediated by receptors. The authors have taken advantage of the mechanism of action of these compounds to develop recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for environmental estrogens and dioxin-like compounds. The assays use an easily measurable enzyme activity (i.e. firefly luciferase), exhibit improved sensitivity and selectivity and are amenable to automation. Data will be presented demonstrating that phytoestrogens (e.g. genistein) and xenobiotics such as pesticides (e.g. DDT, Kepone), nonionic surfactants (e.g. p-nonylphenol), and precursors used in the manufacture of plastics (e.g. Bisphenol A) exhibit estrogenic activity. In addition, the assays have been used to detect estrogenic and dioxin-like activity in complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent. These results demonstrate the utility of recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for identifying substances or complex mixtures with estrogenic and/or dioxin-like activity.

  4. Mutations in Two Genes Encoding Different Subunits of a Receptor Signaling Complex Result in an Identical Disease Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloneva, Juha; Manninen, Tuula; Christman, Grant; Hovanes, Karine; Mandelin, Jami; Adolfsson, Rolf; Bianchin, Marino; Bird, Thomas; Miranda, Roxana; Salmaggi, Andrea; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Konttinen, Yrjö; Peltonen, Leena

    2002-01-01

    Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL), also known as “Nasu-Hakola disease,” is a globally distributed recessively inherited disease leading to death during the 5th decade of life and is characterized by early-onset progressive dementia and bone cysts. Elsewhere, we have identified PLOSL mutations in TYROBP (DAP12), which codes for a membrane receptor component in natural-killer and myeloid cells, and also have identified genetic heterogeneity in PLOSL, with some patients carrying no mutations in TYROBP. Here we complete the molecular pathology of PLOSL by identifying TREM2 as the second PLOSL gene. TREM2 forms a receptor signaling complex with TYROBP and triggers activation of the immune responses in macrophages and dendritic cells. Patients with PLOSL have no defects in cell-mediated immunity, suggesting a remarkable capacity of the human immune system to compensate for the inactive TYROBP-mediated activation pathway. Our data imply that the TYROBP-mediated signaling pathway plays a significant role in human brain and bone tissue and provide an interesting example of how mutations in two different subunits of a multisubunit receptor complex result in an identical human disease phenotype. PMID:12080485

  5. Crystal structure of human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing antibody reveals insights into receptor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Lammens

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a multifunctional cytokine playing a key role in tissue regeneration and remodeling. Dysregulation of TWEAK signaling is involved in various pathological processes like autoimmune diseases and cancer. The unique interaction with its cognate receptor Fn14 makes both ligand and receptor promising targets for novel therapeutics. To gain insights into this important signaling pathway, we determined the structure of soluble human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of an antibody selected for inhibition of receptor binding. In the crystallized complex TWEAK is bound by three Fab fragments of the neutralizing antibody. Homology modeling shows that Fab binding overlaps with the putative Fn14 binding site of TWEAK. Docking of the Fn14 cysteine rich domain (CRD to that site generates a highly complementary interface with perfectly opposing charged and hydrophobic residues. Taken together the presented structure provides new insights into the biology of TWEAK and the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway, which will help to optimize the therapeutic strategy for treatment of related cancer types and autoimmune diseases.

  6. Sleep Disturbance Induced by Cocaine Abstinence Involving in A2A Receptor over-Expression in Rat Hypothalamus%可卡因戒断致大鼠睡眠结构失调涉及下丘脑腺苷A2A受体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪芬芳; 刘晓军; 贺长生; 杨树龙

    2012-01-01

    本实验于大鼠体内植入无线发射器,在可卡因用药前、停药第1(急性戒断)、第8(亚急性戒断)和第14 d(亚慢性戒断)记录自由活动大鼠脑电活动24 h.Western blot法检测腺苷受体在下丘脑和小脑组织表达水平,初步探索可卡因戒断致睡眠失调与腺苷受体之间的关系.结果发现可卡因停药第8d夜晚和白天,非快眼动(NREM)睡眠增加(P<0.05),快眼动(REM)睡眠下降(P<0.01);停药第14 d,NREM睡眠夜晚显著增加(P<0.01)而白天仅略加强,但白天和夜间REM睡眠均明显下降(P<0.01).可卡因戒断第8d和第14d下丘脑腺苷A2A受体表达明显增高(P<0.05),而腺苷A1受体在可卡因戒断仅第14 d降低(P<0.05),停药第1、第8和第14d腺苷A2B亚基表达变化不明显(P>0.05).而小脑腺苷A1、A2A和A2B受体表达均未见明显改变.这些证据提示亚急性和亚慢性可卡因戒断导致睡眠失调可能部分涉及大鼠下丘脑腺苷A2A受体过表达.%Adult rats were implanted with sleep-wake recording electrodes in our experiments. Polygraphic signs of undisturbed sleep-wake activities were recorded for 24 h before cocaine administration, cocaine withdrawal day 1 (a-cute), day 8 (subacute), and day 14 (subchronic). Western blot method was performed to examine the expression levels of adenosine receptor subtypes in hypothalamus and cerebellum. Non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was significantly increased during nighttime (P<0. 01) and daytime (P<0. 05) on withdrawal day 8. The increase of NREM sleep was significant during nighttime (P<0. 01) and slight during daytime on withdrawal day 14, whereas both daytime and nighttime rapid eye movement (REM) sleeps were reduced markedly (P<0. 01) on withdrawal day 8 and 14. In addition, A2A receptor level was significantly enhanced on cocaine withdrawal day 8 and day 14 (P< 0. 05), whereas A1 receptor level reduced markedly on withdrawal day 14 (P<0. 05). However, compared with that in the

  7. Frizzled7: A Promising Achilles’ Heel for Targeting the Wnt Receptor Complex to Treat Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Phesse

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Frizzled7 is arguably the most studied member of the Frizzled family, which are the cognate Wnt receptors. Frizzled7 is highly conserved through evolution, from Hydra through to humans, and is expressed in diverse organisms, tissues and human disease contexts. Frizzled receptors can homo- or hetero-polymerise and associate with several co-receptors to transmit Wnt signalling. Notably, Frizzled7 can transmit signalling via multiple Wnt transduction pathways and bind to several different Wnt ligands, Frizzled receptors and co-receptors. These promiscuous binding and functional properties are thought to underlie the pivotal role Frizzled7 plays in embryonic developmental and stem cell function. Recent studies have identified that Frizzled7 is upregulated in diverse human cancers, and promotes proliferation, progression and invasion, and orchestrates cellular transitions that underscore cancer metastasis. Importantly, Frizzled7 is able to regulate Wnt signalling activity even in cancer cells which have mutations to down-stream signal transducers. In this review we discuss the various aspects of Frizzled7 signalling and function, and the implications these have for therapeutic targeting of Frizzled7 in cancer.

  8. Structures of receptor complexes formed by hemagglutinins from the Asian Influenza pandemic of 1957

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Junfeng; Stevens, David J.; Lesley F Haire; Walker, Philip A.; Coombs, Peter J.; Russell, Rupert J.; Gamblin, Steven J.; John J Skehel

    2009-01-01

    The viruses that caused the three influenza pandemics of the twentieth century in 1918, 1957, and 1968 had distinct hemagglutinin receptor binding glycoproteins that had evolved the capacity to recognize human cell receptors. We have determined the structure of the H2 hemagglutinin from the second pandemic, the “Asian Influenza” of 1957. We compare it with the 1918 “Spanish Influenza” hemagglutinin, H1, and the 1968 “Hong Kong Influenza” hemagglutinin, H3, and show that despite its close over...

  9. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stisova, Viktorie [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire CNRS, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Davidkova, Marie, E-mail: davidkova@ujf.cas.c [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERalpha, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with gamma rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  10. Structural basis for receptor recognition of vitamin-B(12)-intrinsic factor complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Madsen, Mette; Storm, Tina;

    2010-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B(12)) is a bacterial organic compound and an essential coenzyme in mammals, which take it up from the diet. This occurs by the combined action of the gastric intrinsic factor (IF) and the ileal endocytic cubam receptor formed by the 460-kilodalton (kDa) protein cubilin...

  11. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong;

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist...

  12. Age-associated alterations in hepatic. beta. -adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, S.M.; Herring, P.A.; Arinze, I.J.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of age on catecholamine regulation of hepatic glycogenolysis and on hepatic adenylate cyclase was studied in male rats up to 24 mo of age. Epinephrine and norepinephrine stimulated glycogenolysis in isolated hepatocytes at all age groups studied. Isoproterenol, however, stimulated glycogenolysis only at 24 mo. In isolated liver membranes, usual activators of adenylate cyclase increased the activity of the enzyme considerably more in membranes from 24-mo-old rats than in membranes from either 3- or 22-mo-old rats. The Mn/sup 2 +/-dependent activity of the cyclase was increased by 2.9-fold in 3-mo-old animals and approx. 5.7-fold in 24-mo-old rats, indicating a substantial age-dependent increase in the intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit. The density of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor, as measured by the binding of (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol to plasma membranes, was 5-8 fmol/mg protein in rats aged 3-12 mo but increased to 19 fmol/mg protein in 24-mo-old rats. Computer-aided analysis of isoproterenol competition of the binding indicated a small age-dependent increase in the proportion of ..beta..-receptors in the high-affinity state. These observations suggest that ..beta..-receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis in the aged rat is predicated upon increases in the density of ..beta..-receptors as well as increased intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  13. Resolution of complex fluorescence spectra of lipids and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by multivariate analysis reveals protein-mediated effects on the receptor's immediate lipid microenvironment

    CERN Document Server

    Wenz, Jorge J; 10.1186/1757-5036-1-6

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of fluorescent spectra from complex biological systems containing various fluorescent probes with overlapping emission bands is a challenging task. Valuable information can be extracted from the full spectra, however, by using multivariate analysis (MA) of measurements at different wavelengths. We applied MA to spectral data of purified Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) protein reconstituted into liposomes made up of dioleoylphosphatidic acid (DOPA) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) doped with two extrinsic fluorescent probes (NBD-cholesterol/pyrene-PC). Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was observed between the protein and pyrene-PC and between pyrene-PC and NBD-cholesterol, leading to overlapping emission bands. Partial least squares analysis was applied to ...

  14. Mitochondria and the insect steroid hormone receptor (EcR): A complex relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafopoulou, Xanthe; Steel, Colin G H

    2016-10-01

    The actions of the insect steroid molting hormones, ecdysteroids, on the genome of target cells has been well studied, but little is known of their extranuclear actions. We previously showed in Rhodnius prolixus that much of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) resides in the cytoplasm of various cell types and undergoes shuttling between nucleus and cytoplasm with circadian periodicity, possibly using microtubules as tracks for translocation to the nucleus. Here we report that cytoplasmic EcR appears to be also involved in extranuclear actions of ecdysteroids by association with the mitochondria. Western blots of subcellular fractions of brain lysates revealed that EcR is localized in the mitochondrial fraction, indicating an intimate association of EcR with mitochondria. Confocal laser microscopy and immunohistochemistry using anti-EcR revealed abundant co-localization of EcR with mitochondria in brain neurons and their axons, especially intense in the subplasmalemmal region, raising the possibility of EcR involvement in mitochondrial functions in subplasmalemmal microdomains. When mitochondria are dispersed by disruption of microtubules with colchicine, EcR remains associated with mitochondria showing strong receptor association with mitochondria. Treatment in vitro with ecdysteroids of brains of developmentally arrested R. prolixus (containing neither ecdysteroids nor EcR) induces EcR and abundant co-localization with mitochondria in neurons, concurrently with a sharp increase of the mitochondrial protein COX 1, suggesting involvement of EcR in mitochondrial function. These findings align EcR with various vertebrate steroid receptors, where actions of steroid receptors on mitochondria are widely known and suggest that steroid receptors across distant phyla share similar functional attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Distribution of interleukin-1 receptor complex at the synaptic membrane driven by interleukin-1β and NMDA stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Marinovich Marina; Cattabeni Flaminio; Galli Corrado L; Corsini Emanuela; Zianni Elisa; Boraso Mariaserena; Gardoni Fabrizio; Di Luca Monica; Viviani Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that contributes to neuronal injury in various degenerative diseases, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. It exerts its biological effect by activating the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) and recruiting a signalling core complex consisting of the myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) and the IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP). This pathway has been clearly described in the peripheral immun...

  16. Structure and stability of complexes of agmatine with some functional receptor residues of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Remková, Anna; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2017-04-01

    The paper reports the results of a theoretical study of the conformational behavior and basicity of biogenic amine agmatine. The complexes modelling of agmatine - protein interaction are also under scrutiny of our investigation using the Becke3LYP and B97D levels of the density functional theory. The relative stabilities (Gibbs energies) of individual complexes are by both DFT methods described equally. Hydration has a dramatic effect on the hydrogen bonded complexes studied. The pairing acidic carboxylate group with different agmatine species resulted in charged hydrogen bond complexes containing negatively charged acetate species acting as proton acceptors.

  17. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  18. Increased hsp70 of glucocorticoid receptor complex induced by scald and heat stress and its possible effect on the affinity of glucocorticoid receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hui; TANG Hong-tai; LU Jian; XIA Zhao-fan

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid (GC) insensitivity/GC resistance is an important etiological and prognostic factor in multiple diseases and pathophysiological processes such as scald, shock and asthma. The function of GC was mediated by glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Scald not only decreased the expression of GR but also reduced the affinity of GR, which played an important role in GC resistance in scalded rats. Whereas the molecular mechanism responsible for the decrease of GR affinity resulted from scald remains unclear. Recent studies showed that the changes of heat shock proteins (hsp) especially hsp90 and hsp70 of GR heterocomplex were associated with GR low affinity in vitro. Methods The affinity of GR in hepatic cytosols and in the cytosols of SMMC-7721 cells were determined by radioligand binding assay and scatchard plot. GR heterocomplex in cytosols were captured by coimmunoprecipation and the levels of hsp90 and hsp70 of GR complex were detected by quantitative Western blotting.Results Similar with that of hepatic cytosol of scalded rats, a remarkable decrease of GR affinity was also found in the cytosol of heat stressed SMMC-7721 cells. The level of hsp70 of GR complex in hepatic cytosol of scalded rats (30% total body surface area immersion scald) and in cytosol of heat stressed human hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 were both increased by 1.5 fold, whereas no change of hsp90 in GR heterocomplex was found. According to the correlation analysis, there may be a positive relationship between increased hsp70 of GR complex and decreased GR affinity in the cytosols.Conclusions The primary results indicated that the level of hsp70 of GR heterocomplex was increased in the hepatic cytosol of scalded rats and the cytosol of heat stressed SMMC-7721 cells. The increase of hsp70 of GR complex might be associated with the decrease of GR affinity.

  19. Effect of Sinomenine on Expression of Purinergic Receptors A2A and P2X7 in Mouse Model and In-vitro Macrophages Stimulated by Lipopolysaccharide%青藤碱对细菌内毒素刺激的小鼠及巨噬细胞嘌呤受体A2A、 P2X7表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景; 吴阳阳; 周海松; 朱瑞丽; 易浪; 董燕; 王培训

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of sinomenine on the purinergic receptors A2A and P2X7 in endotoxemia mouse model and RAW264.7 macrophage model stimulated by lipopolysaccharide(LPS). Methods BALB/c mice were randomly divided into blank control group, model group and sinomenine group. Thirty minutes after the rats of sinomenine group were pretreated with intraperitoneal injection of sinomenine (40, 80, 160 mg/kg), the mice were given intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg LPS to induce endotoxemia model. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α) and interleukin-6(IL-6) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression levels of purinergic receptor A2A and P2X7 in the liver and spleen were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). RAW264.7 macrophages were divided into blank control group, LPS group and sinomenine group. Sinomenine group was firstly treated with sinomenine(300μmol/L) for 2 h, and then LPS group and sinomenine group were treated with LPS (100 ng/mL) for another 8 hours. TNF-α in the cell supernatant was measured by ELISA, and the expression levels of A2A and P2X7 in RAW264.7 cells were detected by RT-PCR. Results Stimulation with LPS could induce the increase of the mouse serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 as well as the expression of A2A and P2X7 in mouse liver and spleen, and sinomenine had a counteraction on the above indexes(P<0.05) . In-vitro stimulation with LPS could induce the increase of the content of TNF-α and the expression of A2A and P2X7 in RAW264.7 cells , and sinomenine decreased TNF-α content and P2X7 expression (P<0.05) , but had an effect on enhancing A2A expression. Conclusion Sinomenine suppresses the expression of purinergic receptor P2X7 in mouse spleen and liver as well as in RAW264.7 macrophages, but its effect on the expression of A2A in various tissues and cells varies, whose related mechanism is needed further study.%【

  20. The chromatin-remodeling complex WINAC targets a nuclear receptor to promoters and is impaired in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Hirochika; Fujiki, Ryoji; Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Uematsu, Yoshikatsu; Matsui, Daisuke; Ogawa, Satoko; Unno, Kiyoe; Okubo, Mataichi; Tokita, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Takeya; Ito, Takashi; Ishimi, Yukio; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Toshio; Yanagisawa, Junn; Kato, Shigeaki

    2003-06-27

    We identified a human multiprotein complex (WINAC) that directly interacts with the vitamin D receptor (VDR) through the Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF). WINAC has ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling activity and contains both SWI/SNF components and DNA replication-related factors. The latter might explain a WINAC requirement for normal S phase progression. WINAC mediates the recruitment of unliganded VDR to VDR target sites in promoters, while subsequent binding of coregulators requires ligand binding. This recruitment order exemplifies that an interaction of a sequence-specific regulator with a chromatin-remodeling complex can organize nucleosomal arrays at specific local sites in order to make promoters accessible for coregulators. Furthermore, overexpression of WSTF could restore the impaired recruitment of VDR to vitamin D regulated promoters in fibroblasts from Williams syndrome patients. This suggests that WINAC dysfunction contributes to Williams syndrome, which could therefore be considered, at least in part, a chromatin-remodeling factor disease.

  1. Higher-order assemblies of oligomeric cargo receptor complexes form the membrane scaffold of the Cvt vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertipaglia, Chiara; Schneider, Sarah; Jakobi, Arjen J; Tarafder, Abul K; Bykov, Yury S; Picco, Andrea; Kukulski, Wanda; Kosinski, Jan; Hagen, Wim Jh; Ravichandran, Arvind C; Wilmanns, Matthias; Kaksonen, Marko; Briggs, John Ag; Sachse, Carsten

    2016-07-01

    Selective autophagy is the mechanism by which large cargos are specifically sequestered for degradation. The structural details of cargo and receptor assembly giving rise to autophagic vesicles remain to be elucidated. We utilize the yeast cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, a prototype of selective autophagy, together with a multi-scale analysis approach to study the molecular structure of Cvt vesicles. We report the oligomeric nature of the major Cvt cargo Ape1 with a combined 2.8 Å X-ray and negative stain EM structure, as well as the secondary cargo Ams1 with a 6.3 Å cryo-EM structure. We show that the major dodecameric cargo prApe1 exhibits a tendency to form higher-order chain structures that are broken upon interaction with the receptor Atg19 in vitro The stoichiometry of these cargo-receptor complexes is key to maintaining the size of the Cvt aggregate in vivo Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we further visualize key stages of Cvt vesicle biogenesis. Our findings suggest that Atg19 interaction limits Ape1 aggregate size while serving as a vehicle for vacuolar delivery of tetrameric Ams1.

  2. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  3. Emerging complexity and new roles for the RIG-I-like receptors in innate antiviral immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; S.Errett; Michael; Gale; Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is critical for the control of virus infection and operates to restrict viral susceptibility and direct antiviral immunity for protection from acute or chronic viral-associated diseases including cancer. RIG-I like receptors(RLRs) are cytosolic RNA helicases that function as pathogen recognition receptors to detect RNA pathogen associated molecular patterns(PAMPs) of virus infection. The RLRs include RIG-I, MDA5, and LGP2. They function to recognize and bind to PAMP motifs within viral RNA in a process that directs the RLR to trigger downstream signaling cascades that induce innate immunity that controls viral replication and spread. Products of RLR signaling also serve to modulate the adaptive immune response to infection. Recent studies have additionally connected RLRs to signaling cascades that impart inflammatory and apoptotic responses to virus infection. Viral evasion of RLR signaling supports viral outgrowth and pathogenesis, including the onset of viral-associated cancer.

  4. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology.

  5. Dissociation kinetics of the thyrotropin-receptor complex. Characterization of a slowly dissociable component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Jones, C H; Saltiel, A R; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1981-11-01

    The kinetics of the dissociation of thyrotropin (TSH) from human thyroid plasma membranes were studied in an attempt to further understand the molecular dynamics of the TSH--receptor interaction. Dissociation of bound [125I]TSH from thyroid plasma membranes was a biphasic process consisting of rapidly and slowly dissociable components, RDC and SDC, respectively. The dilution induced dissociation of bound [125I]TSH was enhanced by the addition of excess TSH (DEC). DEC was proportional to the dose of unlabeled TSH and its magnitude increased linearly with temperature. These results are in contrast to those reported for the kinetics of [125I]insulin dissociation. The functional significance of DEC remains largely unexplained. It was found that the fraction of SDC was dependent upon time of association in a temperature-dependent and apparently saturable process. It could not be attributed to alterations in the electrophoretic, immunologic or binding properties of [125I]TSH. Furthermore, no correlation was observed between generation of SDC and change in the Scatchard profile of TSH binding, in contrast to studies on growth hormone. These data suggest that, like some other polypeptide hormones, binding of TSH to its receptor does not proceed according to laws describing simple, rapidly reversible, bimolecular reactions. Furthermore, bound TSH undergoes a receptor-mediated conversion from a rapidly to a slowly dissociable state with time of incubation.

  6. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L; James, Ho C S; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-11-12

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ''protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ''receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death.

  7. Simulations of transferred NOE in a ternary peptide-receptor-lipid complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplicki, J.; Milon, A.

    1998-02-01

    Analyses of neuropeptides interacting with their receptors in presence of lipid membranes require the use of spin systems including several molecules (peptide, membrane, receptor) in at least three states (free, membrane-bound and receptor-bound ligand). Moreover, the exchange rates can be arbitrary. We have developed a program, based on the generalized relaxation matrix method, capable of treating all direct and indirect spin interactions. The program allows a simulation of homonuclear NOE and ROE experiments in case of arbitrary exchange rates, for systems with internal mobility and groups of equivalent spins. We present here some simulations for a system of three states, such as the free, membrane-bound and receptor-bound ligand, aiming at defining more precisely the limits of the transferred NOE experiments for the determination of the receptor-bound conformation of a neuropeptide. Dans le cas d'étude des interactions entre les neuropeptides et leurs récepteurs membranaires on travaille avec un système de plusieurs spins, dans au moins trois états (libre, intermédiaire et lié), qui peuvent appartenir à des molécules différentes (ligand, membrane et récepteur). De plus, les constantes d'échange parmi ces états sont arbitraires. Nous avons développé un logiciel, basé sur la méthode des matrices de relaxation, qui décrit tous les effets d'interactions (directes et indirectes) entre les spins. Ce logiciel permet de simuler les expériences homonucléaires NOE et ROE dans les cas d'échange arbitraire, pour les systèmes possédant une mobilité interne et des groupes de spins équivalents. Nous présentons le résultat de simulations obtenues dans un système à trois états du type peptide libre, peptide lié au lipide, peptide lié au récepteur, dont le but est de préciser les limites d'utilisation des NOEs transférés en vue de déterminer la conformation de neuropeptides liés à leur récepteur.

  8. A Trematode Parasite Derived Growth Factor Binds and Exerts Influences on Host Immune Functions via Host Cytokine Receptor Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Azad A.; Zolnierczyk, Katarzyna; Japa, Ornampai; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Hodgkinson, Jane E.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    effector response targeting juvenile parasites which we demonstrate extends to an abrogation of the ADCC response. Thus suggesting that FhTLM is a stage specific evasion molecule that utilises host cytokine receptors. These findings are the first to clearly demonstrate the interaction of a helminth cytokine with a host receptor complex resulting in immune modifications that facilitate the non-protective chronic immune response which is characteristic of F. hepatica infection. PMID:27806135

  9. A Trematode Parasite Derived Growth Factor Binds and Exerts Influences on Host Immune Functions via Host Cytokine Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad A Sulaiman

    2016-11-01

    for a reduced effector response targeting juvenile parasites which we demonstrate extends to an abrogation of the ADCC response. Thus suggesting that FhTLM is a stage specific evasion molecule that utilises host cytokine receptors. These findings are the first to clearly demonstrate the interaction of a helminth cytokine with a host receptor complex resulting in immune modifications that facilitate the non-protective chronic immune response which is characteristic of F. hepatica infection.

  10. Crystal structure of an affinity-matured prolactin complexed to its dimerized receptor reveals the topology of hormone binding site 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broutin, Isabelle; Jomain, Jean-Baptiste; Tallet, Estelle;

    2010-01-01

    We report the first crystal structure of a 1:2 hormone.receptor complex that involves prolactin (PRL) as the ligand, at 3.8-A resolution. Stable ternary complexes were obtained by generating affinity-matured PRL variants harboring an N-terminal tail from ovine placental lactogen, a closely relate...

  11. Structure and Dynamics of the Liver Receptor Homolog 1–PGC1 α Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, Suzanne G.; Okafor, C. Denise; Tuntland, Micheal L.; Whitby, Richard J.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Stec, Józef; Griffin, Patrick R.; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2017-03-31

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC1α) regulates energy metabolism by directly interacting with transcription factors to modulate gene expression. Among the PGC1α binding partners is liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2), an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that controls lipid and glucose homeostasis. Although PGC1α is known to bind and activate LRH-1, mechanisms through which PGC1α changes LRH-1 conformation to drive transcription are unknown. Here, we used biochemical and structural methods to interrogate the LRH-1–PGC1α complex. Purified, full-length LRH-1, as well as isolated ligand binding domain, bound to PGC1α with higher affinity than to the coactivator, nuclear receptor coactivator-2 (Tif2), in coregulator peptide recruitment assays. We present the first crystal structure of the LRH-1–PGC1α complex, which depicts several hydrophobic contacts and a strong charge clamp at the interface between these partners. In molecular dynamics simulations, PGC1α induced correlated atomic motion throughout the entire LRH-1 activation function surface, which was dependent on charge-clamp formation. In contrast, Tif2 induced weaker signaling at the activation function surface than PGC1α but promoted allosteric signaling from the helix 6/β-sheet region of LRH-1 to the activation function surface. These studies are the first to probe mechanisms underlying the LRH-1–PGC1α interaction and may illuminate strategies for selective therapeutic targeting of PGC1α-dependent LRH-1 signaling pathways.

  12. ELISA for complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor in lung cancer tissue extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Witte, H; Pappot, H; Brünner, N;

    1997-01-01

    A sandwich-type ELISA has been developed for the assessment of complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) in extracts of squamous cell lung carcinomas. The assay is based on a combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-uPA antibodies and a biotinylated mouse...... extraction of uPAR yields the highest amounts of uPA:uPAR complexes. Absorption of tumor extracts with anti-uPA or anti-uPAR MAbs results in a complete disappearance of the ELISA signal, demonstrating the specificity of the ELISA. The recovery of chemically cross-linked uPA:uPAR complexes added to tumor...... extracts varies between 80% and 105%. The intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients are 5.3% and 9.8%, respectively. Furthermore, a peptide antagonist for uPAR was employed to evaluate de novo uPA:uPAR complex formation during tumor tissue extraction and the immunoassay procedure. Our results strongly...

  13. Crystal structure of a complete ternary complex of T-cell receptor, peptide-MHC, and CD4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yiyuan; Wang, Xin Xiang; Mariuzza, Roy A [Maryland

    2012-07-11

    Adaptive immunity depends on specific recognition by a T-cell receptor (TCR) of an antigenic peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecule on an antigen-presenting cell (APC). In addition, T-cell activation generally requires binding of this same pMHC to a CD4 or CD8 coreceptor. Here, we report the structure of a complete TCR-pMHC-CD4 ternary complex involving a human autoimmune TCR, a myelin-derived self-peptide bound to HLA-DR4, and CD4. The complex resembles a pointed arch in which TCR and CD4 are each tilted ~65° relative to the T-cell membrane. By precluding direct contacts between TCR and CD4, the structure explains how TCR and CD4 on the T cell can simultaneously, yet independently, engage the same pMHC on the APC. The structure, in conjunction with previous mutagenesis data, places TCR-associated CD3εγ and CD3εδ subunits, which transmit activation signals to the T cell, inside the TCR-pMHC-CD4 arch, facing CD4. By establishing anchor points for TCR and CD4 on the T-cell membrane, the complex provides a basis for understanding how the CD4 coreceptor focuses TCR on MHC to guide TCR docking on pMHC during thymic T-cell selection.

  14. Forced homo- and heterodimerization of all gp130-type receptor complexes leads to constitutive ligand-independent signaling and cytokine-independent growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthaus, Jan; Tillmann, Anna; Lorenzen, Inken; Bulanova, Elena; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2010-08-01

    Naturally ligand independent constitutively active gp130 variants were described to be responsible for inflammatory hepatocellular adenomas. Recently, we genetically engineered a ligand-independent constitutively active gp130 variant based on homodimerization of Jun leucine zippers. Because also heterodimeric complexes within the gp130 family may have tumorigenic potential, we seek to generate ligand-independent constitutively active heterodimers for all known gp130-receptor complexes based on IL-15/IL-15R alpha-sushi fusion proteins. Ligand-independent heterodimerization of gp130 with WSX-1, LIFR, and OSMR and of OSMR with GPL led to constitutive, ligand-independent STAT1 and/or STAT3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, these receptor combinations induced transcription of the STAT3 target genes c-myc and Pim-1 and factor-independent growth of stably transduced Ba/F3-gp130 cells. Here, we establish the IL-15/IL-15R alpha-sushi system as a new system to mimic constitutive and ligand-independent activation of homo- and heterodimeric receptor complexes, which might be applicable to other heterodimeric receptor families. A mutated IL-15 protein, which was still able to bind the IL-15R alpha-sushi domain, but not to beta- and gamma-receptor chains, in combination with the 2A peptide technology may be used to translate our in vitro data into the in vivo situation to assess the tumorigenic potential of gp130-heterodimeric receptor complexes.

  15. The evolutionary origin of auditory receptors in Tettigonioidea: the complex tibial organ of Schizodactylidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Audition in insects is of polyphyletic origin. Tympanal ears derived from proprioceptive or vibratory receptor organs, but many questions of the evolution of insect auditory systems are still open. Despite the rather typical bauplan of the insect body, e.g., with a fixed number of segments, tympanal ears evolved at very different places, but only ensiferans have ears at the foreleg tibia, located in the tibial organ. The homology and monophyly of ensiferan ears is controversial, and no precursor organ was unambiguously identified for auditory receptors. The latter can only be identified by comparative study of recent atympanate taxa. These atympanate taxa are poorly investigated. In this paper, we report the neuroanatomy of the tibial organ of Comicus calcaris (Irish 1986), an atympanate Schizodactylid (splay-footed cricket). This representative of a Gondwana relict group has a tripartite sensory organ, homologous to tettigoniid ears. A comparison with morphology-based cladistic phylogeny indicates that the tripartite neuronal organization present in the majority of Tettigonioidea presumably preceded evolution of a hearing sense in the Tettigonioidea. Furthermore, the absence of a tripartite organ in Grylloidea argues against a monophyletic origin and homology of the cricket and katydid ears. The tracheal attachment of sensory neurons typical for ears of Tettigonioidea is present in C. calcaris and may have facilitated cooption for auditory function. The functional auditory organ was presumably formed in evolution by successive non-neural modifications of trachea and tympana. This first investigation of the neuroanatomy of Schizodactylidae suggests a non-auditory chordotonal organ as the precursor for auditory receptors of related tympanate taxa and adds evidence for the phylogenetic position of the group.

  16. [Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and plasmatic level of melatonin in simple and complex endometrial hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dznelashvili, N O; Kasradze, D G; Tavartkiladze, A G; Mariamidze, A G; Dzhinchveladze, D N

    2013-10-01

    The goal of our research was to find the prognostic significance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the hyperplastic endometrium. Immunohistochemical study of morphological material (endometrial scrap) was conducted in order to reveal the EGFR expression (in 35 patients). The study of consistence of melatonin (universal antiproliferative and anticancerogenic hormone) in patients' blood serum was performed as well (using ELISA method). The numeric data of investigation were processed statistically using the SPSS-12 program and IBM SPSS Statistics, 20. According to received results, the more complicated the type of endometrial hyperplasia is, the stronger EGFR expression is and the more melatonin consistence is reduced in blood plasma. However, sometimes much lower level of melatonin not only in case of complex hyperplasia (with atypia), but also in case of simple hyperplasia (without atypia) was observed. In addition, melatonin consistence is in norm not only in case of simple hyperplasia, but also in case of complex hyperplasia. Also, unimportant reduction of melatonin level is seen in plasma in case of both types of endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia): if, for example, in simple hyperplasia, this slight reduction of melatonin level in plasma is seen in condition of sharp EGFR expression, the same amount reduction of plasmatic melatonin in complex hyperplasia is seen in condition of weak EGFR expression. To sum up: in case of simple endometrial hyperplasia without atypia, reduction of plasma melatonin level should be a bad prognostic indicator and this condition can be followed by transformation of hyperplasia into atypical form; the normal plasmatic level of melatonin in complex endometrial hyperplasia without atypia (in condition of weak EGFR expression) should be a good prognostic indicator; unimportant reduction of plasma melatonin level and in addition, EGFR sharp expression in simple hyperplasia, is probably the sign, that hyperplasia can

  17. Mouse hippocampal GABAB1 but not GABAB2 subunit-containing receptor complex levels are paralleling retrieval in the multiple-T-maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil eKeihan Falsafi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors known to be involved in learning and memory. Although a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive processes is evident, there is no information on hippocampal GABAB receptor complexes in a multiple T maze (MTM task, a robust paradigm for evaluation of spatial learning.Trained or untrained (yoked control C57BL/6J male mice (n=10/group were subjected to the MTM task and sacrificed 6 hours following their performance. Hippocampi were taken, membrane proteins extracted and run on blue native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies against GABAB1, GABAB1a and GABAB2. Immunoprecipitation with subsequent mass spectrometric identification of co-precipitates was carried out to show if GABAB1 and GABAB2 as well as other interacting proteins co-precipitate. An antibody shift assay (ASA and a proximity ligation assay (PLA were also used to see if the two GABAB subunits are present in the receptor complex.Single bands were observed on Western blots, each representing GABAB1, GABAB1a or GABAB2 at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 100 kDa. Subsequently, densitometric analysis revealed that levels of GABAB1 and GABAB1a but not GABAB2- containing receptor complexes were significantly higher in trained than untrained groups. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric studies confirmed the presence of GABAB1, GABAB2, calcium calmodulin kinases I and II, GluA1 and GluA2 as constituents of the complex. ASA and PLA also showed the presence of the two subunits of GABAB receptor within the complex. It is shown that increased levels of GABAB1 subunit-containing complexes are paralleling performance in a land maze.

  18. A hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine alpha 7-containing receptor complex is linked to memory retrieval in the multiple-T-maze in C57BL/6j mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Heo, Seok; Patil, Sudarshan; Li, Lin; Hoger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2014-08-15

    The link between the cholinergic and serotonergic system in cognitive function is well-documented. There is, however, limited information on spatial memory and this formed the rationale to carry out a study with the aim to show a specific link between nicotinic and serotonergic receptor complexes rather than the corresponding subunits, to spatial memory retrieval in a land maze. A total of 46 mice were used and divided into two groups, trained and untrained (yoked) in the multiple-T-Maze (MTM) and following training during the first four days, probe trials for memory retrieval were performed on days 8, 16 and 30. Six hours following scarification, hippocampi were taken for the analysis of native receptor complex levels using blue-native gels followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies. 5-HT1A-, 5-HT7-, nAChα4- and nACh-α7-containing receptor complexes were observed and were paralleling memory retrievals and receptor complex levels were shown to be significantly different between trained and yoked animals. Only levels of a nicotinic acetylcholine α7 receptor-containing complex at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 480kDa were shown to be linked to memory retrieval on day 8 but not to retrievals on days 16 and 30 when memory extinction has taken place. Correlation between nAChα4-, 5-HT1A- and 5-HT7-containing receptors and latencies on day 16 may point to a probable link in extinction mechanisms. A series of the abovementioned receptor complexes were correlating among each other probably indicating a serotonergic/cholinergic network paralleling spatial memory formation.

  19. Clustered coding variants in the glutamate receptor complexes of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, René A W; McRae, Allan F; Pocklington, Andrew J; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Navarro, Pau; Croning, Mike D R; Komiyama, Noboru H; Bradley, Sophie J; Challiss, R A John; Armstrong, J Douglas; Finn, Robert D; Malloy, Mary P; MacLean, Alan W; Harris, Sarah E; Starr, John M; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Howard, Eleanor K; Hunt, Sarah E; Coffey, Alison J; Ranganath, Venkatesh; Deloukas, Panos; Rogers, Jane; Muir, Walter J; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H; Visscher, Peter M; Grant, Seth G N

    2011-04-29

    Current models of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder implicate multiple genes, however their biological relationships remain elusive. To test the genetic role of glutamate receptors and their interacting scaffold proteins, the exons of ten glutamatergic 'hub' genes in 1304 individuals were re-sequenced in case and control samples. No significant difference in the overall number of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) was observed between cases and controls. However, cluster analysis of nsSNPs identified two exons encoding the cysteine-rich domain and first transmembrane helix of GRM1 as a risk locus with five mutations highly enriched within these domains. A new splice variant lacking the transmembrane GPCR domain of GRM1 was discovered in the human brain and the GRM1 mutation cluster could perturb the regulation of this variant. The predicted effect on individuals harbouring multiple mutations distributed in their ten hub genes was also examined. Diseased individuals possessed an increased load of deleteriousness from multiple concurrent rare and common coding variants. Together, these data suggest a disease model in which the interplay of compound genetic coding variants, distributed among glutamate receptors and their interacting proteins, contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

  20. Clustered coding variants in the glutamate receptor complexes of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René A W Frank

    Full Text Available Current models of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder implicate multiple genes, however their biological relationships remain elusive. To test the genetic role of glutamate receptors and their interacting scaffold proteins, the exons of ten glutamatergic 'hub' genes in 1304 individuals were re-sequenced in case and control samples. No significant difference in the overall number of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs was observed between cases and controls. However, cluster analysis of nsSNPs identified two exons encoding the cysteine-rich domain and first transmembrane helix of GRM1 as a risk locus with five mutations highly enriched within these domains. A new splice variant lacking the transmembrane GPCR domain of GRM1 was discovered in the human brain and the GRM1 mutation cluster could perturb the regulation of this variant. The predicted effect on individuals harbouring multiple mutations distributed in their ten hub genes was also examined. Diseased individuals possessed an increased load of deleteriousness from multiple concurrent rare and common coding variants. Together, these data suggest a disease model in which the interplay of compound genetic coding variants, distributed among glutamate receptors and their interacting proteins, contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

  1. In vivo molecular imaging of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in the aged rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Rojas, Santiago; Herance, Raúl; Pareto, Deborah; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Figueiras, Francisca P; Popota, Foteini; Ruiz, Alba; Flotats, Núria; Fernández, Francisco J; Rocha, Milagros; Rovira, Mariana; Víctor, Víctor M; Gispert, Juan D

    2012-07-01

    The GABA-ergic system, known to regulate neural tissue genesis during cortical development, has been postulated to play a role in cerebral aging processes. Using in vivo molecular imaging and voxel-wise quantification, we aimed to assess the effects of aging on the benzodiazepine (BDZ) recognition site of the GABA(A) receptor. To visualize BDZ site availability, [(11)C]-flumazenil microPET acquisitions were conducted in young and old rats. The data were analyzed and region of interest analyses were applied to validate the voxel-wise approach. We observed decreased [(11)C]-flumazenil binding in the aged rat brains in comparison with the young control group. More specifically, clusters of reduced radioligand uptake were detected in the bilateral hippocampus, cerebellum, midbrain, and bilateral frontal and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results support the pertinence of voxel-wise quantification in the analysis of microPET data. Moreover, these findings indicate that the aging process involves declines in neural BDZ recognition site availability, proposed to reflect alterations in GABA(A) receptor subunit polypeptide expression.

  2. Crystal structure of HIV-1 primary receptor CD4 in complex with a potent antiviral antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Michael M.; Seaman, Michael S; Rits-Volloch, Sophia; Hong, Xinguo; Kao, Chia-Ying; Ho, David D.; Chen, Bing

    2010-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 Å resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121-125) of D2, sitting...

  3. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes and their interaction with complement C3 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ivan; Baatrup, Gunnar; Jepsen, H H;

    1985-01-01

    Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components of the me......Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components...

  4. Structural characterisation of the nuclear import receptor importin alpha in complex with the bipartite NLS of Prp20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Roman

    Full Text Available The translocation of macromolecules into the nucleus is a fundamental eukaryotic process, regulating gene expression, cell division and differentiation, but which is impaired in a range of significant diseases including cancer and viral infection. The import of proteins into the nucleus is generally initiated by a specific, high affinity interaction between nuclear localisation signals (NLSs and nuclear import receptors in the cytoplasm, and terminated through the disassembly of these complexes in the nucleus. For classical NLSs (cNLSs, this import is mediated by the importin-α (IMPα adaptor protein, which in turn binds to IMPβ to mediate translocation of nuclear cargo across the nuclear envelope. The interaction and disassembly of import receptor:cargo complexes is reliant on the differential localisation of nucleotide bound Ran across the envelope, maintained in its low affinity, GDP-bound form in the cytoplasm, and its high affinity, GTP-bound form in the nucleus. This in turn is maintained by the differential localisation of Ran regulating proteins, with RanGAP in the cytoplasm maintaining Ran in its GDP-bound form, and RanGEF (Prp20 in yeast in the nucleus maintaining Ran in its GTP-bound form. Here, we describe the 2.1 Å resolution x-ray crystal structure of IMPα in complex with the NLS of Prp20. We observe 1,091 Å(2 of buried surface area mediated by an extensive array of contacts involving residues on armadillo repeats 2-7, utilising both the major and minor NLS binding sites of IMPα to contact bipartite NLS clusters (17RAKKMSK(23 and (3KR(4, respectively. One notable feature of the major site is the insertion of Prp20NLS Ala(18 between the P0 and P1 NLS sites, noted in only a few classical bipartite NLSs. This study provides a detailed account of the binding mechanism enabling Prp20 interaction with the nuclear import receptor, and additional new information for the interaction between IMPα and cargo.

  5. [Epidermal growth factor receptor expression and epidermal growth factor blood plasma content in simple and complex endometrial hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dznelashvili, N; Kasradze, D; Tavartkiladze, A; Mariamidze, A

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to concurrently determine the prognostic significance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) expression in endometrium and Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) blood content in simple and complex hyperplasia. In order to detect EGFR expression, immunohistochemical examination of endometrial scarp from 35 patients was done along with HPLC (High performance liquid chromatography) method, for measuring EGF blood plasma content. The numerical data obtained were processed statistically using computer program SPSS-12. According to the results: 1. A significant/marked increase in EGF blood plasma level together with pronounced EGFR expression in simple endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) suggests that simple hyperplasia is likely to transform into complex form, while unchanged level of EGF against the background of mild EGFR expression is probably indicative of not very bad prognosis. 2. Normal indices of EGF blood plasma level in simple endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia), accompanied by mild EGFR expression is suggestive of good prognosis. 3. A sharp or extremely sharp increase in EGF blood plasma level with pronounced EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to indicate poor prognosis that may lead to the transformation into atypical form. However, unchanged EGF blood plasma level against the background of mild EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to point to not very bad prognosis. 4. A marked increase in EGF blood plasma level with a pronounced EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to indicate poor prognosis that may lead to the transformation into atypical form. Because it is evident that drastic increase in EGF blood plasma level is not necessary, other factor should be suspected to play the major role, i.e the substance that will (or will not) withstand neoplasia.

  6. Crystallographic Analysis of Murine Constitutive Androstane Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain Complexed with 5[alpha]-androst-16-en-3[alpha]-ol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, J.; Shan, L.; Fan, M.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E.J. (Tennessee-K); (NWU); (CHNMC)

    2010-03-08

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In contrast to classical nuclear receptors, which possess small-molecule ligand-inducible activity, CAR exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity in the apparent absence of ligand. CAR is among the most important transcription factors; it coordinately regulates the expression of microsomal cytochrome P450 genes and other drug-metabolizing enzymes. The murine CAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) was coexpressed with the steroid receptor coactivator protein (SRC-1) receptor-interacting domain (RID) in Escherichia coli. The mCAR LBD subunit was purified away from SRC-1 by affinity, anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography, crystallized with androstenol and the structure of the complex determined by molecular replacement.

  7. Complex Determinants in Specific Members of the Mannose Receptor Family Govern Collagen Endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Johansson, Kristina; Madsen, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    Members of the well-conserved mannose receptor (MR) protein family have been functionally implicated in diverse biological and pathological processes. Importantly, a proposed common function is the internalization of collagen for intracellular degradation occurring during bone development, cancer...... invasion, and fibrosis protection. This functional relationship is suggested by a common endocytic capability and a candidate collagen-binding domain. Here we conducted a comparative investigation of each member's ability to facilitate intracellular collagen degradation. As expected, the family members u......PARAP/Endo180 and MR bound collagens in a purified system and internalized collagens for degradation in cellular settings. In contrast, the remaining family members, PLA2R and DEC-205, showed no collagen binding activity and were unable to mediate collagen internalization. To pinpoint the structural elements...

  8. Untangling dopamine-adenosine receptor-receptor assembly in experimental parkinsonism in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a dopaminergic-related pathology in which functioning of the basal ganglia is altered. It has been postulated that a direct receptor-receptor interaction – i.e. of dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) with adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) (forming D2R-A2AR oligomers) – finely regulates this brain area. Accordingly, elucidating whether the pathology prompts changes to these complexes could provide valuable information for the design of new PD therapies. Here, we first resolved a...

  9. A PTK7/Ror2 Co-Receptor Complex Affects Xenopus Neural Crest Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Podleschny

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are a highly migratory pluripotent cell population that generates a wide array of different cell types and failure in their migration can result in severe birth defects and malformation syndromes. Neural crest migration is controlled by various means including chemotaxis, repellent guidance cues and cell-cell interaction. Non-canonical Wnt PCP (planar cell polarity signaling has previously been shown to control cell-contact mediated neural crest cell guidance. PTK7 (protein tyrosine kinase 7 is a transmembrane pseudokinase and a known regulator of Wnt/PCP signaling, which is expressed in Xenopus neural crest cells and required for their migration. PTK7 functions as a Wnt co-receptor; however, it remains unclear by which means PTK7 affects neural crest migration. Expressing fluorescently labeled proteins in Xenopus neural crest cells we find that PTK7 co-localizes with the Ror2 Wnt-receptor. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that PTK7 interacts with Ror2. The PTK7/Ror2 interaction is likely relevant for neural crest migration, because Ror2 expression can rescue the PTK7 loss of function migration defect. Live cell imaging of explanted neural crest cells shows that PTK7 loss of function affects the formation of cell protrusions as well as cell motility. Co-expression of Ror2 can rescue these defects. In vivo analysis demonstrates that a kinase dead Ror2 mutant cannot rescue PTK7 loss of function. Thus, our data suggest that Ror2 can substitute for PTK7 and that the signaling function of its kinase domain is required for this effect.

  10. Identification of Complete Repertoire of Apis florea Odorant Receptors Reveals Complex Orthologous Relationships with Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpe, Snehal D; Jain, Rikesh; Brockmann, Axel; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-09-26

    We developed a computational pipeline for homology based identification of the complete repertoire of olfactory receptor (OR) genes in the Asian honey bee species, Apis florea Apis florea is phylogenetically the most basal honey bee species and also the most distant sister species to the Western honey bee Apis mellifera, for which all OR genes had been identified before. Using our pipeline, we identified 180 OR genes in A. florea, which is very similar to the number of ORs identified in A. mellifera (177 ORs). Many characteristics of the ORs including gene structure, synteny of tandemly repeated ORs and basic phylogenetic clustering are highly conserved. The composite phylogenetic tree of A. florea and A. mellifera ORs could be divided into 21 clades which are in harmony with the existing Hymenopteran tree. However, we found a few nonorthologous OR relationships between both species as well as independent pseudogenization of ORs suggesting separate evolutionary changes. Particularly, a subgroup of the OR gene clade XI, which had been hypothesized to code cuticular hydrocarbon receptors showed a high number of species-specific ORs RNAseq analysis detected a total number of 145 OR transcripts in male and 162 in female antennae. Most of the OR genes were highly expressed on the female antennae. However, we detected five distinct male-biased OR genes, out of which three genes (AfOr11, AfOr18, AfOr170P) were shown to be male-biased in A. mellifera, too, thus corroborating a behavioral function in sex-pheromone communication.

  11. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin G (SEG) in Complex with a Mouse T-cell Receptor Beta Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M.M.; Robinson, H.; Cho, S.; De Marzi, M. C.; Kerzic, M. C.; Mariuzza, R. A.; Malchiodi, E. L.

    2011-01-14

    Superantigens (SAgs) are bacterial or viral toxins that bind MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules and T-cell receptor (TCR) in a nonconventional manner, inducing T-cell activation that leads to inflammatory cytokine production, which may result in acute toxic shock. In addition, the emerging threat of purpura fulminans and community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emphasizes the importance of a better characterization of SAg binding to their natural ligands that may allow the development of reagents to neutralize their action. The three-dimensional structure of the complex between a mouse TCR {beta} chain (mV{beta}8.2) and staphylococcal enterotoxin G (SEG) at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution revealed a binding site that does not conserve the 'hot spots' present in mV{beta}8.2-SEC2, mV{beta}8.2-SEC3, mV{beta}8.2-SEB, and mV{beta}8.2-SPEA complexes. Analysis of the mV{beta}8.2-SEG interface allowed us to explain the higher affinity of this complex compared with the others, which may account for the early activation of T-cells bearing mV{beta}8.2 by SEG. This mode of interaction between SEG and mV{beta}8.2 could be an adaptive advantage to bestow on the pathogen a faster rate of colonization of the host.

  12. Neuropilin-1 forms complexes with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsaka, Akimichi, E-mail: ohsaka@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Stem Cell Regulation, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Hirota-Komatsu, Satoko; Shibata, Miki [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Stem Cell Regulation, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Komatsu, Norio [Department of Hematology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    We investigated whether the gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR and neuropilin-1 [NRP-1]) could be specifically regulated during the megakaryocytic differentiation of human thrombopoietin (TPO)-dependent UT-7/TPO cells. Undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells expressed a functional VEGFR-2, leading to VEGF binding and VEGF{sub 165}-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis inhibition. The megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells on treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was accompanied by a marked up-regulation of NRP-1 mRNA and protein expression and by an increase in VEGF-binding activity, which was mainly mediated by VEGFR-2. VEGF{sub 165} promoted the formation of complexes containing NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 in undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells in a dose-dependent manner. Unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells, PMA-differentiated UT-7/TPO cells exhibited complex formation between NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 even in the absence of VEGF{sub 165}. These findings suggest that NRP-1-VEGFR-2-complex formation may contribute to effective cellular functions mediated by VEGF{sub 165} in megakaryocytic cells.

  13. Neuropilin-1 forms complexes with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, Akimichi; Hirota-Komatsu, Satoko; Shibata, Miki; Komatsu, Norio

    2009-12-25

    We investigated whether the gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR and neuropilin-1 [NRP-1]) could be specifically regulated during the megakaryocytic differentiation of human thrombopoietin (TPO)-dependent UT-7/TPO cells. Undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells expressed a functional VEGFR-2, leading to VEGF binding and VEGF(165)-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis inhibition. The megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells on treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was accompanied by a marked up-regulation of NRP-1 mRNA and protein expression and by an increase in VEGF-binding activity, which was mainly mediated by VEGFR-2. VEGF(165) promoted the formation of complexes containing NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 in undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells in a dose-dependent manner. Unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells, PMA-differentiated UT-7/TPO cells exhibited complex formation between NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 even in the absence of VEGF(165). These findings suggest that NRP-1-VEGFR-2-complex formation may contribute to effective cellular functions mediated by VEGF(165) in megakaryocytic cells.

  14. Complex control of GABA(A receptor subunit mRNA expression: variation, covariation, and genetic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K Mulligan

    Full Text Available GABA type-A receptors are essential for fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are critical in brain function. Surprisingly, expression of receptor subunits is highly variable among individuals, but the cause and impact of this fluctuation remains unknown. We have studied sources of variation for all 19 receptor subunits using massive expression data sets collected across multiple brain regions and platforms in mice and humans. Expression of Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabrb2, Gabrb3, and Gabrg2 is highly variable and heritable among the large cohort of BXD strains derived from crosses of fully sequenced parents--C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. Genetic control of these subunits is complex and highly dependent on tissue and mRNA region. Remarkably, this high variation is generally not linked to phenotypic differences. The single exception is Gabrb3, a locus that is linked to anxiety. We identified upstream genetic loci that influence subunit expression, including three unlinked regions of chromosome 5 that modulate the expression of nine subunits in hippocampus, and that are also associated with multiple phenotypes. Candidate genes within these loci include, Naaa, Nos1, and Zkscan1. We confirmed a high level of coexpression for subunits comprising the major channel--Gabra1, Gabrb2, and Gabrg2--and identified conserved members of this expression network in mice and humans. Gucy1a3, Gucy1b3, and Lis1 are novel and conserved associates of multiple subunits that are involved in inhibitory signaling. Finally, proximal and distal regions of the 3' UTRs of single subunits have remarkably independent expression patterns in both species. However, corresponding regions of different subunits often show congruent genetic control and coexpression (proximal-to-proximal or distal-to-distal, even in the absence of sequence homology. Our findings identify novel sources of variation that modulate subunit expression and highlight the extraordinary capacity of biological networks to buffer

  15. Drebrin depletion alters neurotransmitter receptor levels in protein complexes, dendritic spine morphogenesis and memory-related synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gangsoo; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cicvaric, Ana; Sase, Sunetra; Gröger, Marion; Höger, Harald; Sialana, Fernando Jayson; Berger, Johannes; Monje, Francisco J; Lubec, Gert

    2015-07-01

    Drebrin an actin-bundling key regulator of dendritic spine genesis and morphology, has been recently proposed as a regulator of hippocampal glutamatergic activity which is critical for memory formation and maintenance. Here, we examined the effects of genetic deletion of drebrin on dendritic spine and on the level of complexes containing major brain receptors. To this end, homozygous and heterozygous drebrin knockout mice generated in our laboratory and related wild-type control animals were studied. Level of protein complexes containing dopamine receptor D1/dopamine receptor D2, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A (5-HT1(A)R), and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 7 (5-HT7R) were significantly reduced in hippocampus of drebrin knockout mice whereas no significant changes were detected for GluR1, 2, and 3 and NR1 as examined by native gel-based immunoblotting. Drebrin depletion also altered dendritic spine formation, morphology, and reduced levels of dopamine receptor D1 in dendritic spines as evaluated using immunohistochemistry/confocal microscopy. Electrophysiological studies further showed significant reduction in memory-related hippocampal synaptic plasticity upon drebrin depletion. These findings provide unprecedented experimental support for a role of drebrin in the regulation of memory-related synaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter receptor signaling, offer relevant information regarding the interpretation of previous studies and help in the design of future studies on dendritic spines. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Genomewide effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in macrophages and dendritic cells--revealing complexity through systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Kiss, Mate; Simandi, Zoltan; Nagy, Laszlo

    2015-09-01

    Systems biology approaches have become indispensable tools in biomedical and basic research. These data integrating bioinformatic methods gained prominence after high-throughput technologies became available to investigate complex cellular processes, such as transcriptional regulation and protein-protein interactions, on a scale that had not been studied before. Immunology is one of the medical fields that systems biology impacted profoundly due to the plasticity of cell types involved and the accessibility of a wide range of experimental models. In this review, we summarize the most important recent genomewide studies exploring the function of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in macrophages and dendritic cells. PPARγ ChIP-seq experiments were performed in adipocytes derived from embryonic stem cells to complement the existing data sets and to provide comparators to macrophage data. Finally, lists of regulated genes generated from such experiments were analysed with bioinformatics and system biology approaches. We show that genomewide studies utilizing high-throughput data acquisition methods made it possible to gain deeper insights into the role of PPARγ in these immune cell types. We also demonstrate that analysis and visualization of data using network-based approaches can be used to identify novel genes and functions regulated by the receptor. The example of PPARγ in macrophages and dendritic cells highlights the crucial importance of systems biology approaches in establishing novel cellular functions for long-known signaling pathways. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  17. Neuronal Fc gamma receptor I as a novel mediator for IgG immune complex-induced peripheral sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lintao Qu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain often accompanies immune-related diseases with an elevated level of IgG immune complex (IgG-IC) in the serum and/or the affected tissues though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), known as the receptors for the Fc domain of immunoglobulin G (IgG), are typically expressed on immune cells. A general consensus is that the activation of FcγRs by IgG-IC in such immune cells induces the release of proinflammatory cytokines from the immune cells, which may contribute to the IgG-IC-mediated peripheral sensitization. In addition to the immune cells, recent studies have revealed that FcγRI, but not FcγRII and FcγRIII, is also expressed in a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, IgG-IC directly excites the primary sensory neurons through neuronal FcγRI. These findings indicate that neuronal FcγRI provides a novel direct linkage between immunoglobulin and primary sensory neurons, which may be a novel target for the treatment of pain in the immune-related disorders. In this review, we summarize the expression pattern, functions, and the associated cellular signaling of FcγRs in the primary sensory neurons.

  18. Pi-Pi complexation of bupivacaine and analogues with aromatic receptors: implications for overdose remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Evon; Lee, Y H; Partch, Richard; Dennis, Donn; Morey, Timothy; Varshney, Manoj

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the important but often overdosed local anesthetic bupivacaine, its structural analogs 2,6-dimethylaniline, and N-methyl-2,6-dimethylacetanilide, and cocaine, with several electron deficient aromatic moieties were studied primarily by proton NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy. In solution, the anesthetic, its analogs and cocaine are electron donors and form pi-pi charge transfer complexes with strong aromatic acceptors, as monitored by the upfield changes induced in the NMR chemical shifts (delta) and red-shifted UV-vis wavelength (lamda max) absorbance of the acceptors. The equilibrium binding constant, K, was determined from the 1H NMR charge transfer induced chemical shift changes and used to calculate the free energy (deltaG) for complex formation of three acceptor-donor pairs. HPLC results indicate that the concentrations of free bupivacaine, its analogs and of cocaine are reduced from solution via binding to aromatic-functionalized silica.

  19. The changing of the guard: the Pto/Prf receptor complex of tomato and pathogen recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoukakis, Vardis; Saur, Isabel M L; Conlan, Brendon; Rathjen, John P

    2014-08-01

    One important model for disease resistance is the Prf recognition complex of tomato, which responds to different bacterial effectors. Prf incorporates a protein kinase called Pto as its recognition domain that mimics effector virulence targets, and activates resistance after interaction with specific effectors. Recent findings show that this complex is oligomeric, and reveal how this impacts mechanism. Oligomerisation brings two or more kinases into proximity, where they can phosphorylate each other after effector perception. Effector attack on one kinase activates another in trans, constituting a molecular trap for the effector. Oligomerisation of plant resistance proteins may be a general concept that broadens pathogen recognition and restricts the ability of pathogens to evolve virulence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Effect of damage integrity rat brain synaptic membranes on the functional activity GABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-)-ionophore complex in the CNC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebrov, I G; Kalinina, M V

    2013-01-01

    Functional activity of the CGABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex was investigated the muscimol-stimulated entry of the radioactive isotope 36Cl(-) in synaptoneurosomes in changing the structure and permeability of neuronal membranes. Integrity of the membranes was damaged by removal of Ca(+2) and Mg(+2) from the incubation medium and by the method of freezing-thawing synaptoneurosomes. In both cases, an increase in basal 36Cl(-) entry into synaptoneurosomes, indicating increased nonspecific permeability of neuronal membranes, and decreased activity the CABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex. The conclusion about the relationship of processes damage neuronal membranes and reducing the inhibitory processes in the epileptic focus.

  1. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  2. Differences in Glycoprotein Complex Receptor Binding Site Accessibility Prompt Poor Cross-Reactivity of Neutralizing Antibodies between Closely Related Arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Rachel B; Phillips, Elisabeth K; Ayithan, Natarajan; Maury, Wendy

    2017-04-01

    The glycoprotein complex (GPC) of arenaviruses, composed of stable signal peptide, GP1, and GP2, is the only antigen correlated with antibody-mediated neutralization. However, despite strong cross-reactivity of convalescent antisera between related arenavirus species, weak or no cross-neutralization occurs. Two closely related clade B viruses, Machupo virus (MACV) and Junín virus (JUNV), have nearly identical overall GPC architecture and share a host receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1). Given structural and functional similarities of the GP1 receptor binding site (RBS) of these viruses and the recent demonstration that the RBS is an important target for neutralizing antibodies, it is not clear how these viruses avoid cross-neutralization. To address this, MACV/JUNV chimeric GPCs were assessed for interaction with a group of α-JUNV GPC monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and mouse antisera against JUNV or MACV GPC. All six MAbs targeted GP1, with those that neutralized JUNV GPC-pseudovirions competing with each other for RBS binding. However, these MAbs were unable to bind to a chimeric GPC composed of JUNV GP1 containing a small disulfide bonded loop (loop 10) unique to MACV GPC, suggesting that this loop may block MAbs interaction with the GP1 RBS. Consistent with this loop causing interference, mouse anti-JUNV GPC antisera that solely neutralized pseudovirions bearing autologous GP1 provided enhanced neutralization of MACV GPC when this loop was removed. Our studies provide evidence that loop 10, which is unique to MACV GP1, is an important impediment to binding of neutralizing antibodies and contributes to the poor cross-neutralization of α-JUNV antisera against MACV.IMPORTANCE Multiple New World arenaviruses can cause severe disease in humans, and some geographic overlap exists among these viruses. A vaccine that protects against a broad range of New World arenaviruses is desirable for purposes of simplicity, cost, and broad protection against multiple National

  3. The SOCS2 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Regulates Growth Hormone Receptor Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterlund, Mattias; Zadjali, Fahad; Persson, Torbjörn

    2011-01-01

    that SOCS2 is part of a multimeric complex with intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutational analysis shows that the interaction with Elongin B/C controls SOCS2 protein turnover and affects its molecular activity. Increased GHR levels were observed in livers from SOCS2(-/-) mice and in the absence...... to be responsible for the interaction with SOCS2, but only Y487 to account for the effects of SOCS2. The demonstration that SOCS2 is an ubiquitin ligase for the GHR unveils the molecular basis for its physiological actions....

  4. Diversity and Bias through Receptor–Receptor Interactions in GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes. Focus on Examples from Dopamine D2 Receptor Heteromerization

    OpenAIRE

    Fuxe, Kjell; Tarakanov, Alexander; Romero Fernandez, Wilber; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Filip, Malgorzata; Agnati, Luigi F.; Garriga, Pere; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor–receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980s and 1990s, it was shown that neurotensin (NT) through selective antagonistic NTR–D2 like receptor interac...

  5. Components of the CCR4-NOT complex function as nuclear hormone receptor coactivators via association with the NRC-interacting Factor NIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapaty, Shivani; Mahajan, Muktar A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2008-03-14

    CCR4-NOT is an evolutionarily conserved, multicomponent complex known to be involved in transcription as well as mRNA degradation. Various subunits (e.g. CNOT1 and CNOT7/CAF1) have been reported to be involved in influencing nuclear hormone receptor activities. Here, we show that CCR4/CNOT6 and RCD1/CNOT9, members of the CCR4-NOT complex, potentiate nuclear receptor activity. RCD1 interacts in vivo and in vitro with NIF-1 (NRC-interacting factor), a previously characterized nuclear receptor cotransducer that activates nuclear receptors via its interaction with NRC. As with NIF-1, RCD1 and CCR4 do not directly associate with nuclear receptors; however, they enhance ligand-dependent transcriptional activation by nuclear hormone receptors. CCR4 mediates its effect through the ligand binding domain of nuclear receptors and small interference RNA-mediated silencing of endogenous CCR4 results in a marked decrease in nuclear receptor activation. Furthermore, knockdown of CCR4 results in an attenuated stimulation of RARalpha target genes (e.g. Sox9 and HoxA1) as shown by quantitative PCR assays. The silencing of endogenous NIF-1 also resulted in a comparable decrease in the RAR-mediated induction of both Sox9 and HoxA1. Furthermore, CCR4 associates in vivo with NIF-1. In addition, the CCR4-enhanced transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors is dependent on NIF-1. The small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of NIF-1 blocks the ligand-dependent potentiating effect of CCR4. Our results suggest that CCR4 plays a role in the regulation of certain endogenous RARalpha target genes and that RCD1 and CCR4 might mediate their function through their interaction with NIF-1.

  6. Crystal Structure of HIV-1 Primary Receptor CD4 i Complex with a Potent Antiviral Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.M.; Hong, X.; Seaman, M.S.; Rits-Vollock, S.p Kao, C.Y.; Ho, D.D.; Chen, B.

    2010-06-18

    Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121125) of D2, sitting on the opposite side of gp120 and MHC-II binding sites. No major conformational change in CD4 accompanies binding to ibalizumab. Both monovalent and bivalent forms of ibalizumab effectively block viral infection, suggesting that it does not need to crosslink CD4 to exert antiviral activity. While gp120-induced structural rearrangements in CD4 are probably minimal, CD4 structural rigidity is dispensable for ibalizumab inhibition. These results could guide CD4-based immunogen design and lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 entry.

  7. Crystal structure of HIV-1 primary receptor CD4 in complex with a potent antiviral antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael M; Seaman, Michael S; Rits-Volloch, Sophia; Hong, Xinguo; Kao, Chia-Ying; Ho, David D; Chen, Bing

    2010-12-08

    Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 Å resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121-125) of D2, sitting on the opposite side of gp120 and MHC-II binding sites. No major conformational change in CD4 accompanies binding to ibalizumab. Both monovalent and bivalent forms of ibalizumab effectively block viral infection, suggesting that it does not need to crosslink CD4 to exert antiviral activity. While gp120-induced structural rearrangements in CD4 are probably minimal, CD4 structural rigidity is dispensable for ibalizumab inhibition. These results could guide CD4-based immunogen design and lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 entry.

  8. IL-7 Induces an Epitope Masking of γc Protein in IL-7 Receptor Signaling Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sik Goh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available IL-7 signaling via IL-7Rα and common γ-chain (γc is necessary for the development and homeostasis of T cells. Although the delicate mechanism in which IL-7Rα downregulation allows the homeostasis of T cell with limited IL-7 has been well known, the exact mechanism behind the interaction between IL-7Rα and γc in the absence or presence of IL-7 remains unclear. Additionally, we are still uncertain as to how only IL-7Rα is separately downregulated by the binding of IL-7 from the IL-7Rα/γc complex. We demonstrate here that 4G3, TUGm2, and 3E12 epitope masking of γc protein are induced in the presence of IL-7, indicating that the epitope alteration is induced by IL-7 binding to the preassembled receptor core. Moreover, the epitope masking of γc protein is inversely correlated with the expression of IL-7Rα upon IL-7 binding, implying that the structural alteration of γc might be involved in the regulation of IL-7Rα expression. The conformational change in γc upon IL-7 binding may contribute not only to forming the functional IL-7 signaling complex but also to optimally regulating the expression of IL-7Rα.

  9. Metabolism of covalent receptor-insulin complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Synthesis and use of photosensitive insulin analogs to study insulin receptor metabolism in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B C

    1983-04-10

    To facilitate labeling cell surface insulin receptors and analyzing their metabolism by 3T3-L1 adipocytes, a characterization of both the interaction of photosensitive insulin analogs with 3T3-L1 adipocytes and the conditions for photocross-linking these derivatives to the insulin receptor are described. The synthesis and purification of two photoaffinity analogs of insulin are presented. Both B29-lysine- and A1-glycine-substituted N-(2-nitro-4-azidophenyl)glycyl insulin compete with 125I-insulin for binding to 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and the B29-derivative retains a biological activity similar to that for native insulin. An apparatus developed for these studies permits photolysis of cells in monolayer culture using the visible region of the lamp emission spectrum. Activation of the photoderivative by this apparatus occurs with a half-life of approximately 15 s and permits rapid photolabeling of a single species of receptor of 300,000 Da. The conditions for photolabeling permit a measurement of the turnover of covalent receptor-insulin complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes in monolayer culture. Degradation of this complex occurs as an apparent first order process with a half-life of 7 h. A comparison with previous studies (Reed, B. C., Ronnett, G. V., Clements, P. R., and Lane, M. D. (1981) J. Biol. Chem 256, 3917-3925; Ronnett, G. V., Knutson, V. P., and Lane, M. D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4285-4291) indicates that in a "down-regulated" state, 3T3-L1 adipocytes degrade covalent receptor-hormone complexes with kinetics similar to those for the degradation of dissociable receptor-hormone complexes.

  10. Structural complexes of the agonist, inverse agonist and antagonist bound C5a receptor: insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-04-26

    The C5a receptor (C5aR) is a pharmacologically important G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that interacts with (h)C5a, by recruiting both the "orthosteric" sites (site1 at the N-terminus and site2 at the ECS, extra cellular surface) on C5aR in a two site-binding model. However, the complex pharmacological landscape and the distinguishing chemistry operating either at the "orthosteric" site1 or at the functionally important "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR are still not clear, which greatly limits the understanding of C5aR pharmacology. One of the major bottlenecks is the lack of an experimental structure or a refined model structure of C5aR with appropriately defined active sites. The study attempts to understand the pharmacology at the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR rationally by generating a highly refined full-blown model structure of C5aR through advanced molecular modeling techniques, and further subjecting it to automated docking and molecular dynamics (MD) studies in the POPC bilayer. The first series of structural complexes of C5aR respectively bound to a linear native peptide agonist ((h)C5a-CT), a small molecule inverse agonist (NDT) and a cyclic peptide antagonist (PMX53) are reported, apparently establishing the unique pharmacological landscape of the "orthosteric" site2, which also illustrates an energetically distinct but coherent competitive chemistry ("cation-π" vs. "π-π" interactions) involved in distinguishing the established ligands known for targeting the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR. Over a total of 1 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the POPC bilayer, it is evidenced that while the agonist prefers a "cation-π" interaction, the inverse agonist prefers a "cogwheel/L-shaped" interaction in contrast to the "edge-to-face/T-shaped" type π-π interactions demonstrated by the antagonist by engaging the F275(7.28) of the C5aR. In the absence of a NMR or crystallographically guided model structure of C5aR, the computational model complexes not only

  11. Receptor component protein (RCP): a member of a multi-protein complex required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Dickerson, I M

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP) is a 148-amino-acid intracellular protein that is required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction at receptors for the neuropeptide CGRP. RCP works in conjunction with two other proteins to constitute a functional CGRP receptor: calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). CRLR has the stereotypical seven-transmembrane topology of a G-protein-coupled receptor; it requires RAMP1 for trafficking to the cell surface and for ligand specificity, and requires RCP for coupling to the cellular signal transduction pathway. We have made cell lines that expressed an antisense construct of RCP and determined that CGRP-mediated signal transduction was reduced, while CGRP binding was unaffected. Furthermore, signalling at two other endogenous G-protein-coupled receptors was unaffected, suggesting that RCP was specific for a limited subset of receptors.

  12. Identification of CD163 as an antiinflammatory receptor for HMGB1-haptoglobin complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Levine, Yaakov A.; Gunasekaran, Manoj K.; Wang, Yongjun; Addorisio, Meghan; Zhu, Shu; Li, Wei; Li, Jianhua; de Kleijn, Dominique P.V.; Olofsson, Peder S.; Warren, H. Shaw; He, Mingzhu; Al-Abed, Yousef; Roth, Jesse; Antoine, Daniel J.; Chavan, Sangeeta S.; Andersson, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Secreted by activated cells or passively released by damaged cells, extracellular HMGB1 is a prototypical damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) inflammatory mediator. During the course of developing extracorporeal approaches to treating injury and infection, we inadvertently discovered that haptoglobin, the acute phase protein that binds extracellular hemoglobin and targets cellular uptake through CD163, also binds HMGB1. Haptoglobin-HMGB1 complexes elicit the production of antiinflammatory enzymes (heme oxygenase-1) and cytokines (e.g., IL-10) in WT but not in CD163-deficient macrophages. Genetic disruption of haptoglobin or CD163 expression significantly enhances mortality rates in standardized models of intra-abdominal sepsis in mice. Administration of haptoglobin to WT and to haptoglobin gene-deficient animals confers significant protection. These findings reveal a mechanism for haptoglobin modulation of the inflammatory action of HMGB1, with significant implications for developing experimental strategies targeting HMGB1-dependent inflammatory diseases. PMID:27294203

  13. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  14. 抗精神病药对精神分裂症患者血小板腺苷A2a受体基因表达的影响%Effects of antipsychotics on platelet adenosine A2a receptor gene expression in un-medicated patients with schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章杰; 王俊清; 张印南; 洪晓虹; 黄庆军; 吴仁华; 许崇涛

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨未用药精神分裂症患者治疗前后血小板腺苷A2a受体(ADA2aR) mRNA表达量的变化及其与临床症状的相关性.方法 采用实时定量聚合酶链反应技术,对30例未用药精神分裂症患者(患者组)治疗前和治疗6周后进行血小板ADA2aR mRNA表达量测定,并与30名健康志愿者(对照组)进行比较;采用Pearson相关分析对患者组血小板ADA2aR mRNA表达量与精神分裂症临床症状进行相关性分析.结果 (1)治疗前,患者组血小板ADA2aR mRNA表达量(747.6±282.3)与对照组(692.7 ±286.7)比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);治疗第6周末,患者组血小板ADA2aR mRNA表达量(873.2 ±206.2)高于对照组(635.4±263.2)及患者组治疗前,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).(2)患者组治疗前血小板ADA2aR mRNA表达量与病程(r=0.17)、PANSS总分(r=0.08)、阳性症状(r=-0.12)、阴性症状(r=0.08)、一般病理症状(r=0.12)均无统计学相关性(P>0.05);治疗第6周末,患者组血小板ADA2aR mRNA表达量与病程PANSS总分(r=0.09)、阳性症状(r=-0.02)、阴性症状(r=0.26)、一般病理症状(r=-0.08)亦无统计学相关性(P>0.05);患者组治疗前后血小板ADA2aR mRNA表达量差值与PANSS总分减分值(r=-0.31)、阳性症状减分值(r=-0.28)、阴性症状减分值(r=-0.14)、一般病理症状减分值(r=-0.11)均无统计学相关性(P>0.05).结论 抗精神病药治疗可能对精神分裂症患者外周血小板ADA2aR基因表达产生影响,血小板ADA2aR基因表达变化可能与精神分裂症临床症状无明显联系.%Objective To explore the effects of antipsychotics on peripheric platelet mRNA level of adenosine A2a receptor (ADA2aR) in un-medicated patients with schizophrenia.Methods The mRNA level of ADA2aR in 30 un-medicated patients with schizophrenia was evaluated with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at baseline and after six-week antipsychotic treatment,and 30 healthy volunteers were

  15. α7 and β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits Form Heteromeric Receptor Complexes that Are Expressed in the Human Cortex and Display Distinct Pharmacological Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Skøtt Thomsen

    Full Text Available The existence of α7β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs has recently been demonstrated in both the rodent and human brain. Since α7-containing nAChRs are promising drug targets for schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, it is critical to determine whether α7β2 nAChRs are present in the human brain, in which brain areas, and whether they differ functionally from α7 nAChR homomers. We used α-bungarotoxin to affinity purify α7-containing nAChRs from surgically excised human temporal cortex, and found that α7 subunits co-purify with β2 subunits, indicating the presence of α7β2 nAChRs in the human brain. We validated these results by demonstrating co-purification of β2 from wild-type, but not α7 or β2 knock-out mice. The pharmacology and kinetics of human α7β2 nAChRs differed significantly from that of α7 homomers in response to nAChR agonists when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells. Notably, α7β2 heteromers expressed in HEK293 cells display markedly slower rise and decay phases. These results demonstrate that α7 subunits in the human brain form heteromeric complexes with β2 subunits, and that human α7β2 nAChR heteromers respond to nAChR agonists with a unique pharmacology and kinetic profile. α7β2 nAChRs thus represent an alternative mechanism for the reported clinical efficacy of α7 nAChR ligands.

  16. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  17. From Phytocannabinoids to Cannabinoid Receptors and Endocannabinoids: Pleiotropic Physiological and Pathological Roles Through Complex Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    Apart from having been used and misused for at least four millennia for, among others, recreational and medicinal purposes, the cannabis plant and its most peculiar chemical components, the plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), have the merit to have led humanity to discover one of the most intriguing and pleiotropic endogenous signaling systems, the endocannabinoid system (ECS). This review article aims to describe and critically discuss, in the most comprehensive possible manner, the multifaceted aspects of 1) the pharmacology and potential impact on mammalian physiology of all major phytocannabinoids, and not only of the most famous one Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and 2) the adaptive pro-homeostatic physiological, or maladaptive pathological, roles of the ECS in mammalian cells, tissues, and organs. In doing so, we have respected the chronological order of the milestones of the millennial route from medicinal/recreational cannabis to the ECS and beyond, as it is now clear that some of the early steps in this long path, which were originally neglected, are becoming important again. The emerging picture is rather complex, but still supports the belief that more important discoveries on human physiology, and new therapies, might come in the future from new knowledge in this field.

  18. Navigating the complex path between the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and cooperation: an endophenotype approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Brian W; Anderson, Ian W; Smith, Jessica M

    2013-11-28

    Although cooperation represents a core facet of human social behavior there exists considerable variability across people in terms of the tendency to cooperate. One factor that may contribute to individual differences in cooperation is a key gene within the oxytocin (OT) system, the OT reception gene (OXTR). In this article, we aim to bridge the gap between the OXTR gene and cooperation by using an endophenotype approach. We present evidence that the association between the OXTR gene and cooperation may in part be due to how the OXTR gene affects brain systems involved in emotion recognition, empathy/theory of mind, social communication and social reward seeking. There is evidence that the OXTR gene is associated with the functional anatomy of the amygdala, visual cortex (VC), anterior cingulate and superior temporal gyrus (STG). However, it is currently unknown how the OXTR gene may be linked to the functional anatomy of other relevant brain regions that include the fusiform gyrus (FG), superior temporal sulcus (STS), ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc). We conclude by highlighting potential future research directions that may elucidate the path between OXTR and complex behaviors such as cooperation.

  19. Navigating the complex path between the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR and cooperation: an endophenotype approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. Haas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although cooperation represents a core facet of human social behavior there exists considerable variability across people in terms of the tendency to cooperate. One factor that may contribute to individual differences in cooperation is a key gene within the oxytocin system, the oxytocin reception gene (OXTR. In this article, we aim to bridge the gap between the OXTR gene and cooperation by using an endophenotype approach. We present evidence that the association between the OXTR gene and cooperation may in part be due to how the OXTR gene affects brain systems involved in emotion recognition, empathy/theory of mind, social communication and social reward seeking. There is evidence that the OXTR gene may influence the functional anatomy of the amygdala, visual cortex, anterior cingulate and superior temporal gyrus. However, it is currently unknown how the OXTR gene may be linked to the functional anatomy of other relevant brain regions that include the fusiform gyrus, superior temporal sulcus, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, temporoparietal junction and nucleus accumbens. We conclude by highlighting potential future research directions that may elucidate the path between OXTR and complex behaviors such as cooperation.

  20. Disrupted Junctional Membrane Complexes and Hyperactive Ryanodine Receptors Following Acute Junctophilin Knockdown in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oort, Ralph J.; Garbino, Alejandro; Wang, Wei; Dixit, Sayali S.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Gaur, Namit; De Almeida, Angela C.; Skapura, Darlene G.; Rudy, Yoram; Burns, Alan R.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Excitation-contraction coupling in striated muscle requires proper communication of plasmalemmal voltage-activated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ release channels on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) within junctional membrane complexes (JMCs). Whereas previous studies revealed a loss of JMCs and embryonic lethality in germ-line junctophilin-2 (JPH2) knockout mice, it has remained unclear whether JPH2 plays an essential role in JMC formation and the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release process in the heart. Our recent work demonstrated loss-of-function mutations in JPH2 in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results To elucidate the role of JPH2 in the heart, we developed a novel approach to conditionally reduce JPH2 protein levels using RNA interference. Cardiac-specific JPH2 knockdown resulted in impaired cardiac contractility, which caused heart failure and increased mortality. JPH2 deficiency resulted in loss of excitation-contraction coupling gain, precipitated by a reduction in the number of JMCs and increased variability in the plasmalemma-SR distance. Conclusions Loss of JPH2 had profound effects on Ca2+ release channel inactivation, suggesting a novel functional role for JPH2 in regulating intracellular Ca2+ release channels in cardiac myocytes. Thus, our novel approach of cardiac-specific shRNA-mediated knockdown of junctophilin-2 has uncovered a critical role for junctophilin in intracellular Ca2+ release in the heart. PMID:21339484

  1. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-05-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(-) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl-amino)-phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes.

  2. The Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 Interacts with the WAVE1 Complex and Plays a Role in Actin Dynamics and Structural Plasticity in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoo, Christian; Agarwal, Nitin; Lutz, Beat; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    The molecular composition of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor complex beyond the classical G-protein signaling components is not known. Using proteomics on mouse cortex in vivo, we pulled down proteins interacting with CB1 in neurons and show that the CB1 receptor assembles with multiple members of the WAVE1 complex and the RhoGTPase Rac1 and modulates their activity. Activation levels of CB1 receptor directly impacted on actin polymerization and stability via WAVE1 in growth cones of developing neurons, leading to their collapse, as well as in synaptic spines of mature neurons, leading to their retraction. In adult mice, CB1 receptor agonists attenuated activity-dependent remodeling of dendritic spines in spinal cord neurons in vivo and suppressed inflammatory pain by regulating the WAVE1 complex. This study reports novel signaling mechanisms for cannabinoidergic modulation of the nervous system and demonstrates a previously unreported role for the WAVE1 complex in therapeutic applications of cannabinoids.

  3. Oxygen binding and activation by the complexes of PY2- and TPA-appended diphenylglycoluril receptors with copper and other metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprakel, VSI; Feiters, MC; Klaucke, WM; Klopstra, M; Brinksma, J; Feringa, BL; Karlin, KD; Nolte, RJM; Sprakel, Vera S.I.; Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Feringa, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    The copper( I) complexes of diphenylglycoluril basket receptors 1 and 2, appended with bis(2-ethylpyridine) amine (PY2) and tris(2-methylpyridine) amine (TPA), respectively, and their dioxygen adducts were studied with low-temperature UV-vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The copper(I) com

  4. The cell surface expression of SAP-binding receptor CD229 is regulated via its interaction with clathrin-associated adaptor complex 2 (AP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle, Juana M; Engel, Pablo; Martín, Margarita

    2003-05-09

    CD229 (Ly9) is a cell surface receptor selectively expressed on T and B lymphocytes, and it belongs to the CD150 receptor family. Like other receptors of this family, CD229 interacts with SAP/SH2D1a protein, mutation of which is responsible for the fatal X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. Receptors of the CD150 family function as costimulatory molecules, regulating cytokine production and cytotoxicity. Thus, their signaling and regulation in lymphocytes may be critical to an understanding of the pathogenesis of the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. Here we show that CD229 interacts with the mu(2) chain of the AP-2 adaptor complex that links transmembrane proteins to clathrin-coated pits. CD229 was the only member of the CD150 family associated with AP-2. We also show that the mu(2) chain interacts with the Y(470)EKL motif of CD229. The integrity of this site was necessary for CD229 internalization, but it was not involved in SAP recruitment. Moreover, CD229 binds to the AP-2 complex in T and B cell lines, and it is internalized rapidly from the cell surface on T cells after antibody ligation. In contrast, cross-linking of CD229 receptors with intact antibody inhibited CD229 internalization on B cells. However, when F(ab')(2) antibodies were used, CD229 internalization was similar on T and B cells, suggesting that Fcgamma receptors control CD229 cell surface expression. Furthermore, CD229 was regulated by T cell receptor and B cell receptor signaling because coligation with antibodies against anti-CD3 and anti-IgM increased the rate of CD229 endocytosis. These data suggest that CD229 cell surface expression on lymphocytes surface is strongly and differentially regulated within the CD150 family members.

  5. Clobazam and its active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam display significantly greater affinities for α₂- versus α₁-GABA(A-receptor complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Sindal Jensen

    Full Text Available Clobazam (CLB, a 1,5-benzodiazepine (BZD, was FDA-approved in October 2011 for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS in patients 2 years and older. BZDs exert various CNS effects through allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. The structurally distinct, 1,4-BZD clonazepam (CLN is also approved to treat LGS. The precise mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy of both are unknown. Data show that the GABAA α₁-subunit-selective compound zolpidem [ZOL] exhibits hypnotic/sedative effects. Conversely, data from knock-in mice carrying BZD binding site mutations suggest that the α₂ subunit mediates anticonvulsant effects, without sedative actions. Hence, the specific pattern of interactions across the GABAA receptor complexes of BZDs might be reflected in their clinical efficacies and adverse effect profiles. In this study, GABAA-receptor binding affinities of CLB, N-desmethylclobazam (N-CLB, the major metabolite of CLB, CLN, and ZOL were characterized with native receptors from rat-brain homogenates and on cloned receptors from HEK293 cells transfected with combinations of α (α₁, α₂, α₃, or α₅, β₂, and γ₂ subtypes. Our results demonstrate that CLB and N-CLB have significantly greater binding affinities for α₂- vs. α₁-receptor complexes, a difference not observed for CLN, for which no distinction between α₂ and α₁ receptors was observed. Our experiments with ZOL confirmed the high preference for α₁ receptors. These results provide potential clues to a new understanding of the pharmacologic modes of action of CLB and N-CLB.

  6. Clobazam and its active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam display significantly greater affinities for α₂- versus α₁-GABA(A)-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Nichol, Kathryn; Lee, Deborah; Ebert, Bjarke

    2014-01-01

    Clobazam (CLB), a 1,5-benzodiazepine (BZD), was FDA-approved in October 2011 for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in patients 2 years and older. BZDs exert various CNS effects through allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. The structurally distinct, 1,4-BZD clonazepam (CLN) is also approved to treat LGS. The precise mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy of both are unknown. Data show that the GABAA α₁-subunit-selective compound zolpidem [ZOL] exhibits hypnotic/sedative effects. Conversely, data from knock-in mice carrying BZD binding site mutations suggest that the α₂ subunit mediates anticonvulsant effects, without sedative actions. Hence, the specific pattern of interactions across the GABAA receptor complexes of BZDs might be reflected in their clinical efficacies and adverse effect profiles. In this study, GABAA-receptor binding affinities of CLB, N-desmethylclobazam (N-CLB, the major metabolite of CLB), CLN, and ZOL were characterized with native receptors from rat-brain homogenates and on cloned receptors from HEK293 cells transfected with combinations of α (α₁, α₂, α₃, or α₅), β₂, and γ₂ subtypes. Our results demonstrate that CLB and N-CLB have significantly greater binding affinities for α₂- vs. α₁-receptor complexes, a difference not observed for CLN, for which no distinction between α₂ and α₁ receptors was observed. Our experiments with ZOL confirmed the high preference for α₁ receptors. These results provide potential clues to a new understanding of the pharmacologic modes of action of CLB and N-CLB.

  7. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  8. Delineation of the complement receptor type 2-C3d complex by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Craig D; Storek, Michael J; Young, Kendra A; Kovacs, James M; Thurman, Joshua M; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2010-12-10

    The interactions between the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) and the C3 complement fragments C3d, C3dg, and iC3b are essential for the initiation of a normal immune response. A crystal-derived structure of the two N-terminal short consensus repeat (SCR1-2) domains of CR2 in complex with C3d has previously been elucidated. However, a number of biochemical and biophysical studies targeting both CR2 and C3d appear to be in conflict with these structural data. Previous mutagenesis and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy studies directed toward the C3d-binding site on CR2 have indicated that the CR2-C3d cocrystal structure may represent an encounter/intermediate or nonphysiological complex. With regard to the CR2-binding site on C3d, mutagenesis studies by Isenman and coworkers [Isenman, D. E., Leung, E., Mackay, J. D., Bagby, S. & van den Elsen, J. M. H. (2010). Mutational analyses reveal that the staphylococcal immune evasion molecule Sbi and complement receptor 2 (CR2) share overlapping contact residues on C3d: Implications for the controversy regarding the CR2/C3d cocrystal structure. J. Immunol. 184, 1946-1955] have implicated an electronegative "concave" surface on C3d in the binding process. This surface is discrete from the CR2-C3d interface identified in the crystal structure. We generated a total of 18 mutations targeting the two (X-ray crystallographic- and mutagenesis-based) proposed CR2 SCR1-2 binding sites on C3d. Using ELISA analyses, we were able to assess binding of mutant forms of C3d to CR2. Mutations directed toward the concave surface of C3d result in substantially compromised CR2 binding. By contrast, targeting the CR2-C3d interface identified in the cocrystal structure and the surrounding area results in significantly lower levels of disruption in binding. Molecular modeling approaches used to investigate disparities between the biochemical data and the X-ray structure of the CR2-C3d cocrystal result in highest-scoring solutions in which CR2 SCR1-2 is

  9. TWIST Represses Estrogen Receptor-alpha Expression by Recruiting the NuRD Protein Complex in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjiang Fu, Lianmei Zhang, Tao He, Xiuli Xiao, Xiaoyan Liu, Li Wang, Luquan Yang, Manman Yang, Tiandan Zhang, Rui Chen, Jianming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of estrogen receptor α (ERα expression and gain of TWIST (TWIST1 expression in breast tumors correlate with increased disease recurrence and metastasis and poor disease-free survival. However, the molecular and functional regulatory relationship between TWIST and ERα are unclear. In this study, we found TWIST was associated with a chromatin region in intron 7 of the human ESR1 gene coding for ERα. This association of TWIST efficiently recruited the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD repressor complex to this region, which subsequently decreased histone H3K9 acetylation, increased histone H3K9 methylation and repressed ESR1 expression in breast cancer cells. In agreement with these molecular events, TWIST expression was inversely correlated with ERα expression in both breast cancer cell lines and human breast ductal carcinomas. Forced expression of TWIST in TWIST-negative and ERα-positive breast cancer cells such as T47D and MCF-7 cells reduced ERα expression, while knockdown of TWIST in TWIST-positive and ERα-negative breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-435 and 4T1 cells increased ERα expression. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity including the one in NuRD complex significantly increased ERα expression in MDA-MB-435 and 4T1 cells. HDAC inhibition together with TWIST knockdown did not further increase ERα expression in 4T1 and MDA-MB-435 cells. These results demonstrate that TWIST/NuRD represses ERα expression in breast cancer cells. Therefore, TWIST may serve as a potential molecular target for converting ERα-negative breast cancers to ERα-positive breast cancers, allowing these cancers to restore their sensitivity to endocrine therapy with selective ERα antagonists such as tamoxifen and raloxifene.

  10. Nucleotide specificity of DNA binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor:ARNT complex is unaffected by ligand structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) and a wide variety of structurally diverse ligands through its ability to translocate into the nucleus and bind to a specific DNA recognition site (the dioxin-responsive element [DRE]) adjacent to responsive genes. Although the sequence of the DRE is well defined, several reports suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may vary depending on the structure of its bound ligand. Given the potential toxicological significance of this hypothesis, an unbiased DNA-selection-and-PCR-amplification approach was utilized to directly determine whether binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding. Guinea pig hepatic cytosolic AhR activated in vitro by equipotent concentrations of TCDD, 3-methylcholanthrene, β-naphthoflavone, indirubin, L-kynurenine, or YH439 was incubated with a pool of DNA oligonucleotides containing a 15-base pair variable region consisting of all possible nucleotides. The AhR-bound oligonucleotides isolated by immunoprecipitation were PCR amplified and used in subsequent rounds of selection. Sequence analysis of a total of 196 isolated oligonucleotides revealed that each ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complex only bound to DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides; no non-DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides were identified. These results demonstrate that the binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists do not appear to alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding and suggest that stimulation of gene expression mediated by direct DNA binding of ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complexes is DRE dependent.

  11. Distinctive Structure of the EphA3/Ephrin-A5 Complex Reveals a Dual Mode of Eph Receptor Interaction for Ephrin-A5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jason Forse

    Full Text Available The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase/ephrin ligand system regulates a wide spectrum of physiological processes, while its dysregulation has been implicated in cancer progression. The human EphA3 receptor is widely upregulated in the tumor microenvironment and is highly expressed in some types of cancer cells. Furthermore, EphA3 is among the most highly mutated genes in lung cancer and it is also frequently mutated in other cancers. We report the structure of the ligand-binding domain of the EphA3 receptor in complex with its preferred ligand, ephrin-A5. The structure of the complex reveals a pronounced tilt of the ephrin-A5 ligand compared to its orientation when bound to the EphA2 and EphB2 receptors and similar to its orientation when bound to EphA4. This tilt brings an additional area of ephrin-A5 into contact with regions of EphA3 outside the ephrin-binding pocket thereby enlarging the size of the interface, which is consistent with the high binding affinity of ephrin-A5 for EphA3. This large variation in the tilt of ephrin-A5 bound to different Eph receptors has not been previously observed for other ephrins.

  12. Crystal Structure of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Complex with the Extracellular Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Garibay, P.; Knudsen, L.B.;

    2010-01-01

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) is an incretin released from intestinal L-cells in response to food intake. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor potentiates the synthesis and release of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor belongs to class B of the G......-protein-coupled receptors, a subfamily characterized by a large N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. Exendin-4 and GLP-1 are 50% identical, and exendin-4 is a full agonist with similar affinity and potency for the GLP-1 receptor. We recently solved the crystal structure of the GLP-1 receptor extracellular domain...... in complex with the competitive antagonist exendin-4(9-39). Interestingly, the isolated extra-cellular domain binds exendin-4 with much higher affinity than the endogenous agonist GLP-1. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of the extracellular domain in complex with GLP-1 to 2.1 angstrom resolution...

  13. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing....... The generation of knock-out (KO) mice, intended as a means to define the contributions made by individual receptor subtypes, necessarily marks but an approximation. Furthermore, we must now take into account the stunning complexity of receptor co-operation indicated by the observation of receptor homo......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  14. Validated spectroflurimetric determination of some H1 receptor antagonist drugs in pharmaceutical preparations through charge transfer complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Din, Mohie K Sharaf; Ibrahim, Fawzia; Eid, Manal I; Wahba, Mary E K

    2012-01-01

    A validated simple, rapid, and selective spectrofluorimetric method was developed for the determination of some antihistaminic H(1) receptor antagonist drugs namely ebastine (EBS), cetirizine dihydrochloride (CTZ), and fexofenadine hydrochloride (FXD). The method is based on the reaction of the cited drugs with some Π acceptors namely p-chloranilic acid (CLA), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) to give highly fluorescent derivatives. The fluorescence intensity-concentration plots were rectilinear over the concentration ranges of 0.2-3.0, 0.2-2.5 and 0.15-2.0 μg/ml for EBS with CLA, DDQ, and TCNE respectively; 0.5-7.0, 0.5-6.0, and 0.2-4.0 μg/ml for CTZ with the previously mentioned reagents, and 0.2-3.5, 0.5-6.0, and 0.2-3.5 μg/ml for FXD. The factors affecting the formation of the reaction products were carefully studied and optimized. The method was applied for the determination of the studied drugs in their dosage forms. The results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained by the comparison methods. Reactions Stoichiometries of the complexes formed between the studied drugs and Π acceptors were defined by the Job's method of the continuous variation and found in 1:1 in all cases.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Complex of Human FasL and Its Decoy Receptor DcR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weifeng; Ramagopal, Udupi; Cheng, Huiyong; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Toro, Rafael; Bhosle, Rahul; Zhan, Chenyang; Almo, Steven C

    2016-11-01

    The apoptotic effect of FasL:Fas signaling is disrupted by DcR3, a unique secreted member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, which also binds and neutralizes TL1A and LIGHT. DcR3 is highly elevated in patients with various tumors and contributes to mechanisms by which tumor cells to evade host immune surveillance. Here we report the crystal structure of FasL in complex with DcR3. Comparison of FasL:DcR3 structure with our earlier TL1A:DcR3 and LIGHT:DcR3 structures supports a paradigm involving the recognition of invariant main-chain and conserved side-chain functionalities, which is responsible for the recognition of multiple TNF ligands exhibited by DcR3. The FasL:DcR3 structure also provides insight into the FasL:Fas recognition surface. We demonstrate that the ability of recombinant FasL to induce Jurkat cell apoptosis is significantly enhanced by native glycosylation or by structure-inspired mutations, both of which result in reduced tendency to aggregate. All of these activities are efficiently inhibited by recombinant DcR3.

  16. A review of 1α,25(OH)2D3 dependent Pdia3 receptor complex components in Wnt5a non-canonical pathway signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroudi, Maryam; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2015-08-01

    Wnt5a and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1α,25(OH)2D3] regulate endochondral ossification. 1α,25(OH)2D3 initiates its calcium-dependent effects via its membrane-associated receptor, protein disulfide isomerase A3 (Pdia3). 1α,25(OH)2D3 binding to Pdia3 triggers the interaction between Pdia3 and phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-activating protein (PLAA), resulting in downstream activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), PLA2, and protein kinase C (PKC). Wnt5a initiates its calcium-dependent effects via binding its receptors Frizzled2 (FZD2) and Frizzled5 (FZD5) and receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (ROR2), activating intracellular calcium release and stimulating PKC and CaMKII. Recent efforts to determine the inter-relation between Wnt5a and 1α,25(OH)2D3 signaling pathways have demonstrated that Wnt5a signals through a CaMKII/PLA2/PGE2/PKC cascade in chondrocytes and osteoblasts in which the components of the Pdia3 receptor complex were required. Furthermore, ROR2, but not FZD2 or FZD5, was required to mediate the calcium-dependent actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3. This review provides evidence that 1α,25(OH)2D3 and Wnt5a mediate their calcium-dependent pathways via similar receptor components and proposes that these pathways may interact since they are competing for the same receptor complex components.

  17. A receptor for activated C kinase is part of messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes associated with polyA-mRNAs in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angenstein, Frank; Evans, Anne M; Settlage, Robert E; Moran, Stewart T; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Klintsova, Anna Y; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Greenough, William T

    2002-10-15

    Long-lasting changes in synaptic functions after an appropriate stimulus require altered protein expression at the synapse. To restrict changes in protein composition to activated synapses, proteins may be synthesized locally as a result of transmitter receptor-triggered signaling pathways. Second messenger-controlled mechanisms that affect mRNA translation are essentially unknown. Here we report that a receptor for activated C kinase, RACK1, is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes. RACK1 is predominantly associated with polysome-bound, polyA-mRNAs that are being actively translated. We find it to be present in a complex with beta-tubulin and at least two mRNA-binding proteins, polyA-binding protein 1 and a 130 kDa polyA-mRNA binding protein (KIAA0217). Activation of PKCbeta2 in vitro by phosphatidylserine/diacylglycerol or in hippocampal slices by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation increased the amount of RACK1/PKCbeta2 associated with polysome-bound polyA-mRNAs. In vitro, PKCbeta2 can phosphorylate a subset of polyA-mRNA-associated proteins that are also phosphorylated under in vivo conditions. On the basis of these findings plus the somatodendritic localization of RACK1, we hypothesize that metabotropic glutamate receptor-triggered binding of activated PKCbeta2 to mRNP complexes bound to polyA-mRNAs is involved in activity-triggered control of protein synthesis.

  18. Stimuli of sensory-motor nerves terminate arterial contractile effects of endothelin-1 by CGRP and dissociation of ET-1/ET(A-receptor complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlijn J P M T Meens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelin-1 (ET-1, a long-acting paracrine mediator, is implicated in cardiovascular diseases but clinical trials with ET-receptor antagonists were not successful in some areas. We tested whether the quasi-irreversible receptor-binding of ET-1 (i limits reversing effects of the antagonists and (ii can be selectively dissociated by an endogenous counterbalancing mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In isolated rat mesenteric resistance arteries, ET(A-antagonists, endothelium-derived relaxing factors and synthetic vasodilators transiently reduced contractile effects of ET-1 but did not prevent persistent effects of the peptide. Stimuli of peri-vascular vasodilator sensory-motor nerves such as capsaicin not only reduced but also terminated long-lasting effects of ET-1. This was prevented by CGRP-receptor antagonists and was mimicked by exogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP. Using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy in vital intact arteries, capsaicin and CGRP, but not ET(A-antagonism, were observed to promote dissociation of pre-existing ET-1/ET(A-receptor complexes. CONCLUSIONS: Irreversible binding and activation of ET(A-receptors by ET-1 (i occur at an antagonist-insensitive site of the receptor and (ii are selectively terminated by endogenously released CGRP. Hence, natural stimuli of sensory-motor nerves that stimulate release of endogenous CGRP can be considered for therapy of diseases involving ET-1.

  19. Putative model for heat shock protein 70 complexation with receptor of advanced glycation end products through fluorescence proximity assays and normal mode analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Marcelo Sartori; Ligabue-Braun, Rodrigo; Souza, Cristiane Santos; Heimfarth, Luana; Verli, Hugo; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is recognized by receptors on the plasma membrane, such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR2, CD14, and CD40. This leads to activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancement of the phagocytic activity of innate immune cells, and stimulation of antigen-specific responses. However, the specific characteristics of HSP70 binding are still unknown, and all HSP70 receptors have not yet been described. Putative models for HSP70 complexation to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGEs), considering both ADP- and ATP-bound states of HSP70, were obtained through molecular docking and interaction energy calculations. This interaction was detected and visualized by a proximity fluorescence-based assay in A549 cells and further analyzed by normal mode analyses of the docking complexes. The interacting energy of the complexes showed that the most favored docking situation occurs between HSP70 ATP-bound and RAGE in its monomeric state. The fluorescence proximity assay presented a higher number of detected spots in the HSP70 ATP treatment, corroborating with the computational result. Normal-mode analyses showed no conformational deformability in the interacting interface of the complexes. Results were compared with previous findings in which oxidized HSP70 was shown to be responsible for the differential modulation of macrophage activation, which could result from a signaling pathway triggered by RAGE binding. Our data provide important insights into the characteristics of HSP70 binding and receptor interactions, as well as putative models with conserved residues on the interface area, which could be useful for future site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  20. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 signaling pathway regulates transient receptor potential cation channel 6 in podocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangrui Ding

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential cation channel 6 (TRPC6 is a nonselective cation channel, and abnormal expression and gain of function of TRPC6 are involved in the pathogenesis of hereditary and nonhereditary forms of renal disease. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases remain poorly understood, recent investigations revealed that many signaling pathways are involved in regulating TRPC6. We aimed to examine the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex (mTOR complex 1 [mTORC1] or mTOR complex 2 [mTORC2] signaling pathways on TRPC6 in podocytes, which are highly terminally differentiated renal epithelial cells that are critically required for the maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. We applied both pharmacological inhibitors of mTOR and specific siRNAs against mTOR components to explore which mTOR signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of TRPC6 in podocytes. The podocytes were exposed to rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, and ku0063794, a dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2. In addition, specific siRNA-mediated knockdown of the mTORC1 component raptor and the mTORC2 component rictor was employed. The TRPC6 mRNA and protein expression levels were examined via real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. Additionally, fluorescence calcium imaging was performed to evaluate the function of TRPC6 in podocytes. Rapamycin displayed no effect on the TRPC6 mRNA or protein expression levels or TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. However, ku0063794 down-regulated the TRPC6 mRNA and protein levels and suppressed TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. Furthermore, knockdown of raptor did not affect TRPC6 expression or function, whereas rictor knockdown suppressed TRPC6 protein expression and TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. These findings indicate that the mTORC2 signaling pathway regulates TRPC6 in podocytes but that the mTORC1 signaling pathway does not appear

  1. Signaling components of the 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent Pdia3 receptor complex are required for Wnt5a calcium-dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroudi, Maryam; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2014-11-01

    Wnt5a and 1α,25(OH)2D3 are important regulators of endochondral ossification. In osteoblasts and growth plate chondrocytes, 1α,25(OH)2D3 initiates rapid effects via its membrane-associated receptor protein disulfide isomerase A3 (Pdia3) in caveolae, activating phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-activating protein (PLAA), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and PLA2, resulting in protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Wnt5a initiates its calcium-dependent effects via intracellular calcium release, activating PKC and CaMKII. We investigated the requirement for components of the Pdia3 receptor complex in Wnt5a calcium-dependent signaling. We determined that Wnt5a signals through a CaMKII/PLA2/PGE2/PKC cascade. Silencing or blocking Pdia3, PLAA, or vitamin D receptor (VDR), and inhibition of calmodulin (CaM), CaMKII, or PLA2 inhibited Wnt5a-induced PKC activ