WorldWideScience

Sample records for a2-1310 resonances

  1. 21 CFR 1310.05 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports. 1310.05 Section 1310.05 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES § 1310.05 Reports. (a) Each regulated person shall report to the Special Agent in Charge...

  2. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as the...

  3. 45 CFR 1310.23 - Coordinated transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coordinated transportation. 1310.23 Section 1310... START PROGRAM HEAD START TRANSPORTATION Special Requirements § 1310.23 Coordinated transportation. (a) Each agency providing transportation services must make reasonable efforts to coordinate transportation...

  4. 45 CFR 1310.21 - Safety education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety education. 1310.21 Section 1310.21 Public... PROGRAM HEAD START TRANSPORTATION Special Requirements § 1310.21 Safety education. (a) Each agency must... children. The required transportation and pedestrian safety education of children and parents, except for...

  5. 5 CFR 1310.1 - Policy guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Policy guidelines. 1310.1 Section 1310.1 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.1 Policy guidelines. In carrying out its responsibilities, the Office of Management and Budget issues policy guidelines to...

  6. 45 CFR 1310.22 - Children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with disabilities must be transported in the same vehicles used to transport other children enrolled in... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Children with disabilities. 1310.22 Section 1310... START PROGRAM HEAD START TRANSPORTATION Special Requirements § 1310.22 Children with disabilities. (a...

  7. Silicon rich nitride ring resonators for rare - earth doped telecommunications-band amplifiers pumped at the O-band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, P; Chen, G F R; Zhao, X; Ng, D K T; Tan, M C; Tan, D T H

    2017-08-22

    Ring resonators on silicon rich nitride for potential use as rare-earth doped amplifiers pumped at 1310 nm with amplification at telecommunications-band are designed and characterized. The ring resonators are fabricated on 300 nm and 400 nm silicon rich nitride films and characterized at both 1310 nm and 1550 nm. We demonstrate ring resonators exhibiting similar quality factors exceeding 10,000 simultaneously at 1310 nm and 1550 nm. A Dysprosium-Erbium material system exhibiting photoluminescence at 1510 nm when pumped at 1310 nm is experimentally demonstrated. When used together with Dy-Er co-doped particles, these resonators with similar quality factors at 1310 nm and 1550 nm may be used for O-band pumped amplifiers for the telecommunications-band.

  8. 5 CFR 1310.5 - List of current circulars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false List of current circulars. 1310.5 Section 1310.5 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.5... and Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and in Conformity Assessment Activities” A-122—“Cost...

  9. 6 CFR 13.10 - Default upon failure to answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Default upon failure to answer. 13.10 Section 13.10 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.10 Default upon failure to answer. (a) If the Defendant does not answer within the time...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1310 - Nuclear tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear tomography system. 892.1310 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1310 Nuclear tomography system. (a) Identification. A nuclear tomography system is a device intended to detect nuclear radiation in the body and...

  11. 21 CFR 1310.08 - Excluded transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded transactions. 1310.08 Section 1310.08 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED...) Colombia (6) Ecuador (7) French Guiana (8) Guyana (9) Panama (10) Paraguay (11) Peru (12) Suriname (13...

  12. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely...

  13. 21 CFR 13.10 - Members of a Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... BEFORE A PUBLIC BOARD OF INQUIRY General Provisions § 13.10 Members of a Board. (a) All members of a... to be free from bias or prejudice concerning the issues involved. A member of a Board may be a full...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for use so long as the present approval is maintained. (e) Electric detonators shall be compatible... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310...

  15. 21 CFR 1310.06 - Content of records and reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Content of records and reports. 1310.06 Section 1310.06 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF... (company truck, picked up by customer, etc.). (5) The type of identification used by the purchaser and any...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1310 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1310 ref|YP_442494.1| acyltransferase family protein [Burkholderia thailand...ensis E264] gb|ABC38658.1| acyltransferase family protein [Burkholderia thailandensis E264] YP_442494.1 2e-52 44% ...

  17. 14 CFR 1310.11 - Regulations of the Office of Management and Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Budget. (a) The regulations in this part supplement the regulations of the Office of Management and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulations of the Office of Management and Budget. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Aeronautics and Space AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM STABILIZATION AIR...

  18. Design of Polymer Wavelength Splitter 1310 nm/1550 nm Based on Multimode Interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report about design of 1x2 1310/1550 nm optical wavelength division multiplexer based on polymer waveguides. The polymer splitter was designed by using RSoft software based on beam propagation method. Epoxy novolak resin polymer was used as core waveguides layer, silicon substrate with silica layer was used as buffer layer and polymethylmethacrylate was used as protection cover layer. The simulation shows that the output energy for the fundamental mode is 67.1 % for 1310 nm and 67.8 % for 1550 nm wavelength.

  19. New design of a triplexer using ring resonator integrated with directional coupler based on photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaw-Dong; Shih, Tien-Tsorng; Lee, Jian-Jang

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we proposed the design of directional coupler integrated with ring resonator based on two-dimensional photonic crystals (2D PCs) to develop a triplexer filter. It can be widely used as the fiber access network element for multiplexer-demultiplexer wavelength selective in fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) communication systems. The directional coupler is chosen to separate the wavelengths of 1490nm and 1310nm. The ring resonator separates the wavelength of 1550nm. The transmission efficiency is larger than 90%. Besides, the total size of propose triplexer is only 19μm×12μm. We present simulation results using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the proposed structure.

  20. Preliminary hazard classification for buildings 1310-N and 1314-N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.L.; Smith, R.I.

    1997-01-01

    This document establishes the preliminary hazard classification (PHC) for the 100-N Area facility segment comprised of the 1310-N ''silo'' building and the 1314-N Liquid Waste Disposal Building. To establish the PHC, the inventories of radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials present within the segment are identified and then compared to the corresponding threshold quantity values in DOE-STD-1027-92 and reportable quantity values in 40 CFR 302.4. In this evaluation, no credit is taken for the form, location, and dispersibility of the materials; for their interaction with available energy sources; or for safety features that could prevent or mitigate a radiological release. The result of the PHC determined that the 1310-N and 1314-N building segments are classified as radiological

  1. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Procedures Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 § 1.1310 Radiofrequency radiation... exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b), except in the case of portable...

  2. 21 CFR 1310.21 - Sale by Federal departments or agencies of chemicals which could be used to manufacture...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... chemicals which could be used to manufacture controlled substances. 1310.21 Section 1310.21 Food and Drugs... manufacture controlled substances. (a) A Federal department or agency may not sell from the stocks of the... Administration, could be used in the manufacture of a controlled substance, unless the Administrator certifies in...

  3. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  4. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The Administrator...

  5. High frequency of the recurrent c.1310_1313delAAGA BRCA2 mutation in the North-East of Morocco and implication for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarabi, Fatima-Zahra; Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Mezzouar, Loubna; Doubaj, Yassamine; Bouguenouch, Laila; Ouldim, Karim; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2017-06-02

    To date, a limited number of BRCA1/2 germline mutations have been reported in hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in the Moroccan population. Less than 20 different mutations of these two genes have been identified in Moroccan patients, and recently we reported a further BRCA2 mutation (c.1310_1313delAAGA; p.Lys437IlefsX22) in three unrelated patients, all from the North-East of the country. We aimed in this study to evaluate the frequency and geographic distribution of this BRCA2 frameshift mutation, in order to access its use as the first-line BRCA genetic testing strategy for Moroccan patients. We enrolled in this study 122 patients from different regions of Morocco, with suggestive inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancers. All subjects gave written informed consent to BRCA1/2 genetic testing. According to available resources of our lab and enrolled families, 51 patients were analyzed by the conventional individual exon-by-exon Sanger sequencing, 23 patients were able to benefit from a BRCA next generation sequencing and a target screening for exon 10 of BRCA2 gene was performed in 48 patients. Overall, and among the 122 patients analyzed for at least the exon 10 of the BRCA2 gene, the c.1310_1313delAAGA frameshift mutation was found in 14 patients. Genealogic investigation revealed that all carriers of this mutation shared the same geographic origin and were descendants of the North-East of Morocco. In this study, we highlighted that c.1310_1313delAAGA mutation of BRCA2 gene is recurrent with high frequency in patients from the North-East region of Morocco. Therefore, we propose to use, in public health strategies, the detection of this mutation as the first-line screening tests in patients with breast and ovarian cancer originated from this region.

  6. Auditable safety analysis and final hazard classification for Buildings 1310-N and 1314-N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.L.

    1997-05-01

    This document is a graded auditable safety analysis (ASA) of the deactivation activities planned for the 100-N facility segment comprised of the Building 1310-N pump silo (part of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility) and 1314-N Building (Liquid Waste Disposal Building).The ASA describes the hazards within the facility and evaluates the adequacy of the measures taken to reduce, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. This document also serves as the Final Hazard Classification (FHC) for the 1310-N pump silo and 1314-N Building segment. The FHC is radiological based on the Preliminary Hazard Classification and the total inventory of radioactive and hazardous materials in the segment

  7. Performance of Differential-Phase-Shift Keying Protocol Applying 1310 nm Up-Conversion Single-Photon Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen-Xu, Feng; Rong-Zhen, Jiao; Wen-Han, Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The performance of the differential-phase-shift keying (DPSK) protocol applying a 1310 nm up-conversion single-photon detector is analysed. The error rate and the communication rate as a function of distance for three quantum key distribution protocols, the Bennett–Brassard 1984, the Bennett–Brassard–Mermin 1992, and the DPSK, are presented. Then we compare the performance of these three protocols using the 1310nm up-conversion detector. We draw the conclusion that the DPSK protocol applying the detector has significant advantage over the other two protocols. Longer transmission distance and lower error rate can be achieved. (general)

  8. High bit rate germanium single photon detectors for 1310nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2008-04-01

    There is increasing interest in development of high speed, low noise and readily fieldable near infrared (NIR) single photon detectors. InGaAs/InP Avalanche photodiodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode (GM) are a leading choice for NIR due to their preeminence in optical networking. After-pulsing is, however, a primary challenge to operating InGaAs/InP single photon detectors at high frequencies1. After-pulsing is the effect of charge being released from traps that trigger false ("dark") counts. To overcome this problem, hold-off times between detection windows are used to allow the traps to discharge to suppress after-pulsing. The hold-off time represents, however, an upper limit on detection frequency that shows degradation beginning at frequencies of ~100 kHz in InGaAs/InP. Alternatively, germanium (Ge) single photon avalanche photodiodes (SPAD) have been reported to have more than an order of magnitude smaller charge trap densities than InGaAs/InP SPADs2, which allowed them to be successfully operated with passive quenching2 (i.e., no gated hold off times necessary), which is not possible with InGaAs/InP SPADs, indicating a much weaker dark count dependence on hold-off time consistent with fewer charge traps. Despite these encouraging results suggesting a possible higher operating frequency limit for Ge SPADs, little has been reported on Ge SPAD performance at high frequencies presumably because previous work with Ge SPADs has been discouraged by a strong demand to work at 1550 nm. NIR SPADs require cooling, which in the case of Ge SPADs dramatically reduces the quantum efficiency of the Ge at 1550 nm. Recently, however, advantages to working at 1310 nm have been suggested which combined with a need to increase quantum bit rates for quantum key distribution (QKD) motivates examination of Ge detectors performance at very high detection rates where InGaAs/InP does not perform as well. Presented in this paper are measurements of a commercially available Ge APD

  9. 78 FR 50419 - Privacy Act of 1974; CMS Computer Match No. 2013-10; HHS Computer Match No. 1310

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... 1974; CMS Computer Match No. 2013-10; HHS Computer Match No. 1310 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice of Computer Matching... notice announces the establishment of a CMP that CMS plans to conduct with the Department of Homeland...

  10. InP-based monolithically integrated 1310/1550nm diplexer/triplexer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfvenius, C.; Swillo, M.; Claesson, J.; Forsberg, E.; Akram, N.; Chacinski, M.; Thylén, L.

    2008-11-01

    Multiple streams of high definition television (HDTV) and improved home-working infrastructure are currently driving forces for potential fiber to the home (FTTH) customers [1]. There is an interest to reduce the cost and physical size of the FTTH equipment. The current fabrication methods have reached a cost minimum. We have addressed the costchallenge by developing 1310/(1490)/1550nm bidirectional diplexers, by monolithic seamless integration of lasers, photodiodes and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) couplers into one single InP-based device. A 250nm wide optical gain profile covers the spectrum from 1310 to 1550nm and is the principal building block. The device fabrication is basically based on the established configuration of using split-contacts on continuos waveguides. Optical and electrical cross-talks are further addressed by using a Y-configuration to physically separate the components from each other and avoid inline configurations such as when the incoming signal travels through the laser component or vice versa. By the eliminated butt-joint interfaces which can reflect light between components or be a current leakage path and by leaving optically absorbing (unpumped active) material to surround the components to absorb spontaneous emission and nonintentional reflections the devices are optically and electrically isolated from each other. Ridge waveguides (RWG) form the waveguides and which also maintain the absorbing material between them. The WDM functionality is designed for a large optical bandwidth complying with the wide spectral range in FTTH applications and also reducing the polarization dependence of the WDM-coupler. Lasing is achieved by forming facet-free, λ/4-shifted, DFB (distributed feedback laser) lasers emitting directly into the waveguide. The photodiodes are waveguide photo-diodes (WGPD). Our seamless technology is also able to array the single channel diplexers to 4 to 12 channel diplexer arrays with 250μm fiber port

  11. A 2:1 MUX Based on Multiple MEMS Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al

    2017-01-09

    Micro/nano-electromechanical resonator based mechanical computing has recently attracted significant attention. This paper reports a realization of a 2:1 MUX, a concatenable digital logic element, based on electrothermal frequency tuning of electrically connected multiple arch resonators. Toward this, shallow arch shaped microresonators are electrically connected and their resonance frequencies are tuned based on an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. This study demonstrates that by reconfiguring the same basic building block, the arch microresonator, complex logic circuits can be realized.

  12. A 2:1 MUX Based on Multiple MEMS Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Kosuru, Lakshmoji; Younis, Mohammad I.; Fariborzi, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Micro/nano-electromechanical resonator based mechanical computing has recently attracted significant attention. This paper reports a realization of a 2:1 MUX, a concatenable digital logic element, based on electrothermal frequency tuning of electrically connected multiple arch resonators. Toward this, shallow arch shaped microresonators are electrically connected and their resonance frequencies are tuned based on an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. This study demonstrates that by reconfiguring the same basic building block, the arch microresonator, complex logic circuits can be realized.

  13. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  14. Cost-effective up to 40 Gbit/s transmission performance of 1310 nm directly modulated lasers for short to medium range distances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiszoon, B.; Jonker, R.J.W.; Bennekom, van P.K.; Khoe, G.D.; Waardt, de H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents successful 20 and 40 Gb/s potentially low-cost transmission experiments using 1310 nm directly modulated distributed feedback lasers (DMLs) in the very-short- to medium-range distances. This paper will recommend operating conditions for error-free transmission at these bit rates

  15. Spin-3/2 Pentaquark Resonance Signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Lasscock; John Hedditch; Derek Leinweber; Anthony Williams; Waseem Kamleh; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; Ross Young; James Zanotti

    2005-01-01

    We search for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction between the resonance constituents which leads to a bound state at quark masses near the physical regime. We study a variety of spin-1/2 interpolators and for the first time, interpolators providing access to spin-3/2 pentaquark states. In looking for evidence of binding, a precise determination of the mass splitting between the pentaquark state and its lowest-lying decay channel is performed by constructing the effective mass splitting from the various two-point correlation functions. While the binding of the pentaquark state is not a requirement, the observation of such binding would provide compelling evidence for the existence of the theta+ pentaquark resonance. Evidence of binding is observed in the isoscalar spin-3/2 positive parity channel, making it an interesting state for further research

  16. Experimental Investigation of 2:1 and 3:1 Internal Resonances in Nonlinear MEMS Arch Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah; Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally internal resonances in MEMS resonators. The investigation is conducted on in-plane MEMS arch resonators fabricated with a highly doped silicon. The resonators are actuated electrostatically and their stiffness are tuned by electrothermal loading by passing an electrical current though the microstructures. We show that through this tuning, the ratio of the various resonance frequencies can be varied and set at certain ratios. Particularly, we adjust the resonance frequencies of two different vibrational modes to 2:1 and 3:1. Finally, we validate the internal resonances at these ratios through frequency-response curves and FFTs.

  17. Experimental Investigation of 2:1 and 3:1 Internal Resonances in Nonlinear MEMS Arch Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah

    2016-12-05

    We demonstrate experimentally internal resonances in MEMS resonators. The investigation is conducted on in-plane MEMS arch resonators fabricated with a highly doped silicon. The resonators are actuated electrostatically and their stiffness are tuned by electrothermal loading by passing an electrical current though the microstructures. We show that through this tuning, the ratio of the various resonance frequencies can be varied and set at certain ratios. Particularly, we adjust the resonance frequencies of two different vibrational modes to 2:1 and 3:1. Finally, we validate the internal resonances at these ratios through frequency-response curves and FFTs.

  18. Orbital resonances of Taiwan's FORMOSAT-2 remote sensing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Fa; Hwang, Cheinway

    2018-06-01

    Unlike a typical remote sensing satellite that has a global coverage and non-integral orbital revolutions per day, Taiwan's FORMOSAT-2 (FS-2) satellite has a non-global coverage due to the mission requirements of one-day repeat cycle and daily visit around Taiwan. These orbital characteristics result in an integer number of revolutions a day and orbital resonances caused by certain components of the Earth's gravity field. Orbital flight data indicated amplified variations in the amplitudes of FS-2's Keplerian elements. We use twelve years of orbital observations and maneuver data to analyze the cause of the resonances and explain the differences between the simulated (at the pre-launch stage) and real orbits of FS-2. The differences are quantified using orbital perturbation theories that describe secular and long-period orbital evolutions caused by resonances. The resonance-induced orbital rising rate of FS-2 reaches +1.425 m/day, due to the combined (modeled) effect of resonances and atmospheric drags (the relative modeling errors remote sensing mission similar to FS-2, especially in the early mission design and planning phase.

  19. Nd:YAG (2 omega) pumped dye laser using self-filtering unstable resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Rahimian, K; Hariri, H

    2002-01-01

    A self-filtering unstable resonator with a magnification of M=-3 in a Nd:YAG (2 omega) dye laser has been studied. The dye solution is Rhodamine 6 G in alcohol with the concentration of 5*10 sub - 3 Mol/lit. The spatial intensity distribution of the resonator has been compared has been compared with that of a plane-parallel resonator of equal length. The output energy in both configurations are comparable (20 mu J ,and 26 mu J ,respectively). A significant difference between these two resonators is the laser beam divergence, where beam divergences of 0.77 mrad for the self-filtering unstable resonator and 1.6 mrad for the plane-parallel resonator have been measured. The brightness corresponding to these two resonators are 1.5* 10 sub 1 1 and 2.2* 10 sub 1 0W.cm sub - 2.Sr sub - 1, and the pulse widths are 7 and 17 ns, respectively. These figures show clearly that laser resonator based on the self-filtering unstable resonator design an increase the laser brightness a factor of 10, with a beam divergence of a f...

  20. A partial-wave analysis of the 3 pi system in the reaction K/sup -/p to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ Lambda at 42 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Cerrada, M; Chaloupka, V; Foster, B; Heinen, P M; Hemingway, R J; Holmgren, S O; Kittel, E W; Losty, Michael J; Massaro, G G G; Metzger, W J; Vergeest, J S M; Wagner, F; Wells, J; Wolters, G F

    1977-01-01

    A partial-wave analysis of the (3 pi )/sup 0/ system produced peripherally in the reaction K/sup -/p to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ Lambda at 4.2 GeV/c is presented. The observation of the weak Lambda decay allows a determination of all the transverse production amplitudes except for two phases. The production of known resonances having decay modes other than 3 pi is used to test the isobar model ansatz. Significant omega (783), phi (1020) and A/sub 2/(1310) production is observed. The spin parity of the omega *(1675) is established as 3/sup -/. No evidence for production of other resonances, such as axial vector-mesons, is found. (23 refs).

  1. Three-body resonance generated by a separable potential which describes a 2s1/2 single-particle state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, K.

    1988-12-01

    It is shown that a separable potential previously used to describe a 2s 1/2 single-particle state gives rise not only to a bound state but also to a resonance of the core-plus-two-nucleons three-body system. (author) [pt

  2. An Investigation on the He−(1s2s2 2S Resonance in Debye Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Ghoshal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Debye plasma on the 1 s 2 s 2 2 S resonance states in the scattering of electron from helium atom has been investigated within the framework of the stabilization method. The interactions among the charged particles in Debye plasma have been modelled by Debye–Huckel potential. The 1 s 2 s excited state of the helium atom has been treated as consisting of a H e + ionic core plus an electron moving around. The interaction between the core and the electron has then been modelled by a model potential. It has been found that the background plasma environment significantly affects the resonance states. To the best of our knowledge, such an investigation of 1 s 2 s 2 2 S resonance states of the electron–helium system embedded in Debye plasma environment is the first reported in the literature.

  3. Double time-of-flight fast neutron spectrometry and study of the reaction Be{sup 9}(n,2n); Spectrometrie de neutrons rapides a double temps de vol et etude de la reaction Be{sup 9}(n,2n)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondrand, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-10-01

    The interaction between 14,5 MeV neutrons and Be{sup 9} was studied by a double time-of-flight method. The energy E{sub 1} and E{sub 2} of the (n,2n) reaction was measured (over all resolution 2 ns, flight path 1,50 m), the two neutrons being in the same plane with incident neutron and the scattering angle 30 degrees (angular resolution 3 degrees): 310 (n,2n) events were identified by electronic method (with photographic control) and by the kinematics (430 'back-ground' events, 1.3*10{sup 11} incident neutrons, one (n,2n) event per hour) corresponding principally (> 90 per cent) to the formation of resonant states between 4 particles (2 {alpha} and 2 neutrons) of the final state: Be{sup 8}(0) {sigma} {approx_equal} 170 mb, Be{sup 8*} (2,9 MeV) {sigma} {approx_equal} 165 mb, Be{sup 9*} (6,76 MeV) Be{sup 8}(0) {sigma} {approx_equal} 95 mb. (author) [French] La reaction Be{sup 9}(n,2n) a ete etudiee avec des neutrons de 14,5 MeV. On a mesure simultanement l'energie E{sub 1} et E{sub 2} par deux temps-de-vol (base-de-vol 1,50 m, resolution totale 2 ns), les deux neutrons etant dans le meme plan de diffusion et a 30 degres du neutron incident (resolution angulaire 3): 310 evenements (n,2n) ont ete identifies a l'aide de criteres electroniques (controles par methode photographique) et de criteres cinematiques (430 evenements parasites et fortuits, 1,3.10{sup 11} neutrons incidents, un evenement reel par heure) et sont principalement (> 90 pour cent) groupes en amas dans un diagramme type Dalitz (plan E{sub 1} E{sub 2}) correspondant aux etats resonnants: Be{sup 8}(0) {sigma} {approx_equal} 170 mb, Be{sup 8*} (2,9 MeV) {sigma} {approx_equal} 165 mb, Be{sup 9*} (6,76 MeV) Be{sup 8}(0) {sigma} {approx_equal} 95 mb.

  4. Doubly excited 2s2p 1,3Po resonance states of helium in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Ho, Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    We have made an investigation on the 2s2p 1,3 P o resonance states of helium embedded in dense plasma environments. A screened Coulomb potential obtained from the Debye model is used to represent the interaction between the charge particles. A correlated wave function consisting of a generalized exponential expansion has been used to represent the correlation effect. Resonance energies and widths for the doubly excited He embedded in plasmas with various Debye lengths are determined using the stabilization method by calculating the density of resonance states. The resonance energies and widths for various Debye parameters ranging from infinity to a small value for the lowest 1,3 P o resonance states are reported

  5. 1s2p resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in a-Fe2O3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caliebe, W.A.; Kao, C.-C.; Hastings, J.B.; Taguchi, M.; Kotani, A.; Uozumi, T.; Groot, F.M.F. de

    1998-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical results on the Fe K edge x-ray absorption spectrum and 1s2p resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra in a-Fe2O3 . The results are interpreted using an FeO6^9- cluster model with intra-atomic multiplet coupling and interatomic covalency

  6. Control of emitted light polarization in a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser subject to circularly polarized optical injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alharthi, S. S., E-mail: ssmalh@essex.ac.uk; Hurtado, A.; Al Seyab, R. K.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M. [Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC), Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-11-03

    We experimentally demonstrate the control of the light polarization emitted by a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) at room temperature. This is achieved by means of a combination of polarized optical pumping and polarized optical injection. Without external injection, the polarization of the optical pump controls that of the spin-VCSEL. However, the addition of the externally injected signal polarized with either left- (LCP) or right-circular polarization (RCP) is able to control the polarization of the spin-VCSEL switching it at will to left- or right-circular polarization. A numerical model has been developed showing a very high degree of agreement with the experimental findings.

  7. Decay of giant resonance E2 isoscalar in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdade, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    In this work, it is made a study of the giant resonance E2 isoscalar, in heavy nuclei. Fission probabilities for this resonance were determined by various authors, in different experiments, for 238 U. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  8. Nonlinear Forced Vibration of a Viscoelastic Buckled Beam with 2 : 1 Internal Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu-Yang Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dynamics of a viscoelastic buckled beam subjected to primary resonance in the presence of internal resonance is investigated for the first time. For appropriate choice of system parameters, the natural frequency of the second mode is approximately twice that of the first providing the condition for 2 : 1 internal resonance. The ordinary differential equations of the two mode shapes are established using the Galerkin method. The problem is replaced by two coupled second-order differential equations with quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. The multiple scales method is applied to derive the modulation-phase equations. Steady-state solutions of the system as well as their stability are examined. The frequency-amplitude curves exhibit the steady-state response in the directly excited and indirectly excited modes due to modal interaction. The double-jump, the saturation phenomenon, and the nonperiodic region phenomena are observed illustrating the influence of internal resonance. The validity range of the analytical approximations is assessed by comparing the analytical approximate results with a numerical solution by the Runge-Kutta method. The unstable regions in the internal resonance are explored via numerical simulations.

  9. Photoproduction of the f{sub 2}(1270) resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ju-Jun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Institute of Modern Physics of CAS and Lanzhou University, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Oset, E. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    We have performed a calculation of the γp → π {sup +} π {sup -} p reaction, where the two pions have been separated in D-wave producing the f{sub 2}(1270) resonance. We use elements of the local hidden gauge approach that provides the interaction of vector mesons in which the f{sub 2}(1270) resonance appears as a ρ-ρ molecular state in L = 0 and spin 2. The vector meson dominance, incorporated in the local hidden gauge approach converts a photon into a ρ {sup 0} meson and the other meson connects the photon with the proton. The picture is simple and has no free parameters, since the parameters of the theory have been constrained in the previous study of the vector-vector states. In a second step we introduce new elements, not present in the local hidden gauge approach, adapting the ρN N propagator to Regge phenomenology and introducing the ρ tensor coupling. We find that both the differential cross section as well as the t dependence of the cross section are in good agreement with the experimental results and provide support for the molecular picture of the f{sub 2}(1270) resonance in the first baryonic reaction where it has been tested. (orig.)

  10. OSSOS. IV. Discovery of a Dwarf Planet Candidate in the 9:2 Resonance with Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Michele T.; Alexandersen, Mike; Benecchi, Susan; Chen, Ying-Tung; Delsanti, Audrey; Fraser, Wesley C.; Gladman, Brett; Granvik, Mikael; Grundy, Will M.; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and orbit of a new dwarf planet candidate, 2015 RR245, by the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS). The orbit of 2015 RR245 is eccentric (e 0.586), with a semimajor axis near 82 au, yielding a perihelion distance of 34 au. 2015 RR245 has g - r 0.59 +/- 0.11 and absolute magnitude Hr 3.6 +/- 0.1; for an assumed albedo of pV 12, the object has a diameter of approximately 670 km. Based on astrometric measurements from OSSOS and Pan-STARRS1, we find that 2015 RR245 is securely trapped on ten-megayear timescales in the 9:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune. It is the first trans-Neptunian object (TNO) identied in this resonance. On hundred-megayear timescales, particles in 2015 RR245-like orbits depart and sometimes return to the resonance, indicating that 2015 RR245 likely forms part of the long-lived metastable population of distant TNOs that drift between resonance sticking and actively scattering via gravitational encounters with Neptune. The discovery of a 9:2 TNO stresses the role of resonances in the long-term evolution of objects in the scattering disk and reinforces the view that distant resonances are heavily populated in the current solar system. This object further motivates detailed modeling of the transient sticking population.

  11. Sobre el fragment dels Catasterismes d'Eratòstenes del manuscrit Parisinus Graecus 1310: el nom dels planetes Saturn i Júpiter

    OpenAIRE

    Pàmias i Massana, Jordi

    1998-01-01

    El ms. Parisinus Graecus 1310 inclou un breu fragment de l'Epítom dels Catasterismes, obra atribuïda a Eratòstenes. A banda d'alguna variant respecte del textus receptus, presenta un capítol (43) del tot reelaborat, en què l'excepcional irregularitat de l'Epítom dels Catasterismes, pel que fa a les correspondències divines dels dos primers planetes de la nòmina de cinc, ha estat corregida per tal d'adequar els noms dels planetes Faiuou i Faethou a Saturn i a Júpiter respectivament. The man...

  12. Phase-conjugate resonant holographic interferometry applied to NH concentration measurements in a 2D diffusion flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzannis, A P; Beaud, P; Frey, H M; Gerber, T; Mischler, B; Radi, P P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Resonant Holographic Interferometry is a method based on the anomalous dispersion of light having a frequency close to an electronic transition of a molecule. We propose a novel single-laser, two-colour setup for recording resonant holograms and apply it to 2D species concentration measurements. The second colour is generated by optical phase-conjugation from Stimulated Brillouin scattering in a cell. Phase-Conjugate Resonant Holographic Interferometry (PCRHI) is demonstrated in a 2D NH{sub 3}/O{sub 2} flame yielding interferograms that contain information on the NH radical distribution in the flame. Experimental results are quantified by applying a numerical computation of the Voigt profiles. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  13. Q2 dependence of the spin structure function in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Li, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin-dependent sum rules in deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry A 1 (x,Q 2 ) approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone cannot determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral ∫ 0 1 {A 1 (x,Q 2 )F 2 (x,Q 2 )/2x[1+R(x,Q 2 )]}dx is estimated from Q 2 =0--2.5 GeV 2 . The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important; thus it provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin-dependent sum rule

  14. Neptune's 5:2 mean motion resonance in the Kuiper Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lei; Malhotra, Renu

    2018-04-01

    Recent observations of distant Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) in Neptune's 5:2 mean motion resonance (MMR) present two dynamical puzzles: this third order MMR, located at a semi-major axis of about 55 AU, hosts a surprisingly large population, comparable to the well-known and prominent populations of Plutinos and Twotinos in the 3:2 and the 2:1 MMRs, respectively; secondly, the eccentricities of these resonant KBOs are concentrated near ∼0.4. To shed light on these puzzles, we investigate the phase space structure near this resonance with use of Poincaré sections of the circular planar restricted three body model, for the full range of eccentricities, (0—1). With this non-perturbative numerical analysis, we find that the resonance width in semi-major axis is narrow for very small eccentricities, but widens dramatically for eccentricities ≥ 0.2. The resonance width reaches a maximum near eccentricity 0.4, where it is similar to the maximum widths of the 2:1 and 3:2 MMRs. We confirm these results with numerical simulations of the three dimensional N-body problem of KBOs in the gravitational field of the Sun and the four giant planets; our simulations include a wide range of orbital inclinations of the KBOs relative to the solar system’s invariable plane. From these simulations, we find that the boundaries of the stable zone of the 5:2 MMR in the semimajor axis—eccentricity plane are very similar to those found with the simplified circular planar restricted three body model of the Sun-Neptune-KBO, with the caveat that orbits of eccentricity above ~0.55 are long term unstable; such orbits, which have perihelion distance less than ~25 AU, are phase-protected from close encounters with Neptune but not from destabilizing encounters with Uranus. Additionally, the numerical simulations show that the long term stability of KBOs in Neptune’s 5:2 MMR is only mildly sensitive to KBO inclination. We conclude that the two dynamical puzzles presented by the observations

  15. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance in paramagnetic CoCl2.6H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oravcova, J.; Murin, J.; Rakos, M.; Olcak, D.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is studied of protons of the crystal water of paramagnetic CoCl 2 .6H 2 O. The measurements were carried out on powdered samples at room temperature, for values of the external magnetic field ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 T. The NMR signals of protons of the crystal water exhibit asymmetric shape which changes with the applied external magnetic field. We found that the second moment of the resonance line shows a linear dependence on the square of the induction of the externally applied magnetic field. The cause of the asymmetry of the NMR line of protons of the crystal water and the dependence of the second moment of the resonance line on the induction of external magnetic field are interpreted. (author)

  16. Production of A/sub 2//sup 0/ and omega * (1675) in the reaction pi /sup -/p to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/n at 12 and 15 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Corden, M J; Bellamy, E H; Corbett, I F; Dagan, S; Dowell, John D; Esterling, R J; Garvey, J; Gnat, Y; Green, M G; Harnew, N; Jobes, M; Kenyon, I R; Lipman, Norman H; Lister, J B; Lister, J R; Litchfield, P J; March, P V; Mawson, J; McMahon, T; Robertson, A W; Stacey, B J; Strong, J A; Sumorok, K; Thomas, D H

    1978-01-01

    Data on the reaction pi /sup -/p to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/n have been taken at 12 and 15 GeV/c with the CERN Omega multiparticle spectrometer. In a 3-pion partial-wave analysis strong production of A /sub 2//sup 0/ (1310) and omega * (1675) is observed. Total and differential cross sections are determined and density matrix elements presented as a function of t in the t- and s-channel frames. The energy dependence of A/sub 2//sup 0/ production is studied, and a comparison of omega (780), A/sub 2//sup 0/ (1310) and omega * (1675) production is made. (15 refs).

  17. Double-wall carbon nanotubes doped with different Br2 doping levels: a resonance Raman study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Gustavo M; Hou, Taige; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Akuzawa, Noboru; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the effects of different Br2 doping levels on the radial breathing modes of "double-wall carbon nanotube (DWNT) buckypaper". The resonance Raman profile of the Br2 bands are shown for different DWNT configurations with different Br2 doping levels. Near the maximum intensity of the resonance Raman profile, mainly the Br2 molecules adsorbed on the DWNT surface contribute strongly to the observed omega(Br-Br) Raman signal.

  18. Electron scattering from H2+: Resonances in the Σ and Π symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.; Lynch, D.L.; Noble, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    We present results of calculations for e - +H 2 + scattering in the energy regime below the first excited state for resonance symmetries Σ and Π. We employ three distinct and independent methods: close-coupling linear algebraic, effective optical potential linear algebraic, and R matrix. We report extended calculations on the 1 Π g resonance, important to dissociative recombination. We show binding of the 1 Σ g state resonance between 2.6 and 2.7 bohrs. Our 1 Σ u state results agree very well with previous calculations and reside a factor of 2 below a recent experiment

  19. Resonant photoacoustic detection of NO2 traces with a Q-switched green laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Verónica; Codnia, Jorge; Peuriot, Alejandro L.; Santiago, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    Resonant photoacoustic detection of NO2 traces by means of a high repetition pulsed green laser is presented. The resonator is a cylindrical Pyrex glass cell with a measured Q factor 380 for the first radial mode in air at atmospheric pressure. The system is calibrated with known mixtures in dry air and a minimum detectable volume concentration of 50 parts in 109 is obtained (S/N=1). Its sensitivity allows one to detect and quantify NO2 traces in the exhaust gases of cars. Previously, the analysis of gas adsorption and desorption on the walls and of changes in the sample composition is carried out in order to minimize errors in the determination of NO2 content upon application of the extractive method. The efficiency of catalytic converters of several models of automobiles is studied and the NO2 concentration in samples from exhausts of different types of engine (gasoline, diesel, and methane gas) at idling operation are measured.

  20. Mercury's capture into the 3/2 spin-orbit resonance as a result of its chaotic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Alexandre C M; Laskar, Jacques

    2004-06-24

    Mercury is locked into a 3/2 spin-orbit resonance where it rotates three times on its axis for every two orbits around the sun. The stability of this equilibrium state is well established, but our understanding of how this state initially arose remains unsatisfactory. Unless one uses an unrealistic tidal model with constant torques (which cannot account for the observed damping of the libration of the planet) the computed probability of capture into 3/2 resonance is very low (about 7 per cent). This led to the proposal that core-mantle friction may have increased the capture probability, but such a process requires very specific values of the core viscosity. Here we show that the chaotic evolution of Mercury's orbit can drive its eccentricity beyond 0.325 during the planet's history, which very efficiently leads to its capture into the 3/2 resonance. In our numerical integrations of 1,000 orbits of Mercury over 4 Gyr, capture into the 3/2 spin-orbit resonant state was the most probable final outcome of the planet's evolution, occurring 55.4 per cent of the time.

  1. Novel Feshbach resonances in a ^40K spin-mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, J. T. M.; Ludewig, A.; Tiecke, T. G.

    2010-03-01

    We present experimental results on novel s-wave Feshbach resonances in ^40K spin-mixtures. Using an extended version of the Asymptotic Bound-state Model (ABM) [1] we predict Feshbach resonances with more promising characteristics than the commonly used resonances in the (|F,mF>) |9/2,-9/2>+|9/2,-7/2> and |9/2,-9/2>+|9/2,-5/2> spin mixtures. We report on an s-wave resonance in the |9/2,-5/2>+|9/2,-3/2> mixture. We have experimentally observed the corresponding loss-feature at B0˜178 G with a width of ˜10G. This resonance is promising due to its large predicted width and the absence of an overlapping p-wave resonance. We present our recent results on measurements of the resonance width and the stability of the system around this and other observed s-wave and p-wave resonances. [4pt] [1] T.G. Tiecke, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 053202 (2010).

  2. Heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory and the spin 3/2 delta resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kambor, J.

    1996-12-31

    Heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is briefly reviewed, paying particular attention to the role of the spin 3/2 delta resonances. The concept of resonance saturation for the baryonic sector is critically discussed. Starting from a relativistic formulation of the pion-nucleon-delta system, the heavy baryon chiral Lagrangian including spin 3/2 resonances is constructed by means of a 1/m-expansion. The effective theory obtained admits a systematic expansion in terms of soft momenta, the pion mass M{sub {pi}} and the delta-nucleon mass difference {Delta}. (author). 22 refs.

  3. Resonant Raman scattering in ion-beam-synthesized Mg2Si in a silicon matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleva, M.; Zlateva, G.; Atanassov, A.; Abrashev, M.; Goranova, E.

    2005-01-01

    Resonant Raman scattering by ion beam synthesized in silicon matrix Mg 2 Si phase is studied. The samples are prepared with the implantation of 24 Mg + ions with dose 4x10 17 cm -2 and with two different energies 40 and 60 keV into (100)Si substrates. The far infrared spectra are used as criteria for the formation of the Mg 2 Si phase. The Raman spectra are excited with different lines of Ar + laser, with energies of the lines lying in the interval from 2.40 to 2.75 eV. The resonant scattering can be investigated using these laser lines, as far as according to the Mg 2 Si band structure, there are direct gaps with energies in the same region. The energy dependences of the scattered intensities in the case of the scattering by the allowed F 2g and the forbidden LO-type modes are experimentally obtained and theoretically interpreted. On the base of the investigation energies of the interband transitions in the Mg 2 Si are determined. It is found also that the resonant Raman scattering appears to be a powerful tool for characterization of a material with inclusions in it. In the particular case it is concluded that the Mg 2 Si phase is present in the form of a surface layer in the sample, prepared with implantation energy 40 keV and as low-dimensional precipitates, embedded in the silicon matrix, in the sample, prepared with the higher implantation energy

  4. Resonance dielectric dispersion of TEA-CoCl2Br2 nanocrystals incorporated into the PMMA matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustianyk, V.; Shchur, Ya; Kityk, I.; Rudyk, V.; Lach, G.; Laskowski, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Swiatek, J.; Davydov, V.

    2008-09-01

    The dielectric properties of TEA-CoCl2Br2 nanocrystals incorporated into the polymethylmethacrylate matrix within the frequency range of 3 × 105-2.6 × 109 Hz in the temperature region of 90-300 K were investigated. The considerable difference in the dielectric spectra of the nanocomposite compared to those of the bulk crystal and the pure polymer matrix was observed. The dielectric dispersion of the composite material reveals a resonance type (resonance frequency was found to be near 1.3 GHz) and may be qualitatively explained as the result of piezoelectric resonance on the nanocrystals. The model interpretation of this phenomenon based on the forced-dumped oscillator is presented.

  5. 2H{ 19F} REDOR for distance measurements in biological solids using a double resonance spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grage, Stephan L.; Watts, Jude A.; Watts, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    A new approach for distance measurements in biological solids employing 2H{ 19F} rotational echo double resonance was developed and validated on 2H, 19F- D-alanine and an imidazopyridine based inhibitor of the gastric H +/K +-ATPase. The 2H- 19F double resonance experiments presented here were performed without 1H decoupling using a double resonance NMR spectrometer. In this way, it was possible to benefit from the relatively longer distance range of fluorine without the need of specialized fluorine equipment. A distance of 2.5 ± 0.3 Å was measured in the alanine derivative, indicating a gauche conformation of the two labels. In the case of the imidazopyridine compound a lower distance limit of 5.2 Å was determined and is in agreement with an extended conformation of the inhibitor. Several REDOR variants were compared, and their advantages and limitations discussed. Composite fluorine dephasing pulses were found to enhance the frequency bandwidth significantly, and to reduce the dependence of the performance of the experiment on the exact choice of the transmitter frequency.

  6. Resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip; Resonator-Quantenelektrodynamik auf einem Mikrofallenchip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmetz, Tilo

    2008-04-29

    In the present dissertation experiments on resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip are described. Thereby for the first time single atoms catched in a chip trap could be detected. For this in the framework of this thesis a novel optical microresonator was developed, which can because of its miniaturization be combined with the microtrap technique introduced in our working group for the manipulation of ultracold atoms. For this resonator glass-fiber ends are used as mirror substrates, between which a standing light wave is formed. With such a fiber Fabry-Perot resonator we obtain a finess of up to {approx}37,000. Because of the small mode volumina in spite of moderate resonator quality the coherent interaction between an atom and a photon can be made so large that the regime of the strong atom-resonator coupling is reached. For the one-atom-one-photon coupling rate and the one-atom-one-photon cooperativity thereby record values of g{sub 0}=2{pi}.300 MHz respectively C{sub 0}=210 are reached. Just so for the first time the strong coupling regime between a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and the field of a high-quality resonator could be reached. The BEC was thereby by means of the magnetic microtrap potentials deterministically brought to a position within the resonator and totally transformed in a well defined antinode of an additionally optical standing-wave trap. The spectrum of the coupled atom-resonator system was measured for different atomic numbers and atom-resonator detunings, whereby a collective vacuum Rabi splitting of more than 20 GHz could be reached. [German] In der vorliegenden Dissertation werden Experimente zur Resonator-Quantenelektrodynamik auf einem Mikrofallenchip beschrieben. Dabei konnte u. a. erstmals einzelne, in einer Chipfalle gefangene Atome detektiert werden. Hier fuer wurde im Rahmen dieser Arbeit ein neuartiger optischer Mikroresonator entwickelt, der sich dank seiner Miniaturisierung mit der in unserer Arbeitsgruppe

  7. Threshold states in /sup 26/Al. Pt. 2. Extraction of resonance strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, A E; Howard, A J; Parker, P D [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Wright Nuclear Structure Lab.

    1983-06-20

    The total width of the Esub(c.m.)=376 keV resonance in the /sup 25/Mg+p system has been measured using the /sup 25/Mg(p,..gamma..)/sup 26/Al reaction and is found to be 460+-70 eV. From this information, a resonance strength ..omega gamma..=5.7x10/sup 16/ eV is obtained for the astrophysically important 37.2 keV resonance in /sup 26/Al through an R-matrix parameterization of the relative energy dependence of the resonance width. In a similar manner, an upper limit ..omega gamma..<=1.0x10/sup -11/ eV is deduced for a possible resonance at Esub(c.m.)=94.0 keV.

  8. Magnetic resonance, a phenomenon with a great potential in medicine, but with a complex physical background – Part 2: The basics of magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Božič

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a very complex diagnostic technique. Therefore, both practical experiences and theoretical understanding is needed for effective diagnostics. It is therefore important that physicians are sufficiently familiar with the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance. In the interpretation of physical concepts, we will rely both on the classical as well as on the quantum-mechanical view of the signal formation in magnetic resonance, which are to some extent complementary. The signal appearance in magnetic resonance imaging will be discussed. A special emphasis will be put on the role of the resonance frequency and the pulse sequences. Furthermore, the spin echo as one of the most used classical signal sequences in diagnostic investigations will be described.

  9. Giant Cu 2p Resonances in CuO Valence-Band Photoemission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjeng, L.H.; Chen, C.T.; Ghijsen, J.; Rudolf, P.; Sette, F.

    1991-01-01

    We report the observation of a giant resonance in the Cu 2p resonant-photoemission spectra of CuO. The study allows the unambiguous identification of the local Cu 3d8 configuration in the valence-band photoemission spectrum, providing conclusive evidence for the charge-transfer nature of the

  10. Dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited H2 molecules involving the 2Σg+ resonant Rydberg electronic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R.K.; Wadehra, J.M.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections as a function of the incident electron energy and for the initial vibration levels v i = 0–5, 10 of the H 2 molecule. Highlights: ► We calculated electron–hydrogen dissociative attachment cross sections and rates coefficients. ► Collision processes occurring through a resonant Rydberg state are considered. ► Cross sections and rates were obtained for vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules. ► The cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. ► A comparison with the process involving the electron–hydrogen resonant ground state is discussed. - Abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections (DEA) on vibrationally excited H 2 molecule taking place via the 2 Σ g + Rydberg-excited resonant state are studied using the local complex potential (LCP) model for resonant collisions. The cross sections are calculated for all initial vibrational levels (v i = 0–14) of the neutral molecule. In contrast to the previously noted dramatic increase in the DEA cross sections with increasing v i , when the process proceeds via the X 2 Σ u + shape resonance of H 2 , for the 2 Σ g + Rydberg resonance the cross sections increase only gradually up to v i = 3 and then decrease. Moreover, the cross sections for v i ⩾ 6 exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. A discussion of the origin of the observed behavior of calculated cross sections is given. The DEA rate coefficients for all v i levels are also calculated in the 0.5–1000 eV temperature range.

  11. A SECOND GIANT PLANET IN 3:2 MEAN-MOTION RESONANCE IN THE HD 204313 SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Caldwell, Caroline; Horner, J.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Simon, Attila E.

    2012-01-01

    We present eight years of high-precision radial velocity (RV) data for HD 204313 from the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The star is known to have a giant planet (Msin i = 3.5 M J ) on a ∼1900 day orbit, and a Neptune-mass planet at 0.2 AU. Using our own data in combination with the published CORALIE RVs of Ségransan et al., we discover an outer Jovian (Msin i = 1.6 M J ) planet with P ∼ 2800 days. Our orbital fit suggests that the planets are in a 3:2 mean motion resonance, which would potentially affect their stability. We perform a detailed stability analysis and verify that the planets must be in resonance.

  12. Sonochemical synthesis and resonance light scattering effect of Zn(II)bis(1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol) nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Hongcheng; Liang Fupei; Mao Changjie; Zhu Junjie

    2007-01-01

    Zn(II)bis(1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol) (Zn(PAN) 2 ) complex nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a facile sonochemical method. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the products had a rod-like morphology with a diameter of about 20-70 nm and a length of about 100-300 nm. The Zn(PAN) 2 nanorods exhibit an intense resonance light-scattering (RLS) effect, displaying a very strong RLS peak at 622 nm, a moderate peak at 361 nm and several broad bands ranged from 400 to 550 nm. The effect of ultrasonic irradiation and the mechanism of aggregation growth and resonance-enhanced light scattering were also discussed. Exciton coupling among neighbour Zn(PAN) 2 complex monomers in the nanorods were found to produce resonance-enhanced light scattering. The red-shifted absorption bands and depolarized RLS data can be explained in terms of a J-aggregate geometry of Zn(PAN) 2

  13. A detailed analysis of the HD 73526 2:1 resonant planetary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C. G.; Salter, G. S.; Bailey, J.; Wright, D. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Tan, Xianyu; Lee, Man Hoi [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Butler, R. P.; Arriagada, P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States); Carter, B. D. [Faculty of Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Jones, H. R. A. [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, College Lane, AL10 9AB, Hatfield (United Kingdom); O' Toole, S. J. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Crane, J. D.; Schectman, S. A.; Thompson, I. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Minniti, D.; Diaz, M., E-mail: rob@phys.unsw.edu.au [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

    2014-01-10

    We present six years of new radial velocity data from the Anglo-Australian and Magellan Telescopes on the HD 73526 2:1 resonant planetary system. We investigate both Keplerian and dynamical (interacting) fits to these data, yielding four possible configurations for the system. The new data now show that both resonance angles are librating, with amplitudes of 40° and 60°, respectively. We then perform long-term dynamical stability tests to differentiate these solutions, which only differ significantly in the masses of the planets. We show that while there is no clearly preferred system inclination, the dynamical fit with i = 90° provides the best combination of goodness-of-fit and long-term dynamical stability.

  14. Resonance and nuclear relaxation in GdCo2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barata, A.C.

    1988-04-01

    A study of the 59 Co nuclear magnetic resonance and relaxation was made on the intermetallic compound GdCo 2 from 4,2 k to 330 k using the spin echo technique. An oscillatory behaviour of the primary echo was observed in the whole range of temperatures studied. This is due to the electronic quadrupole interaction of the 59 Co nuclei. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  15. Calculation of a CO sub 2 gasdynamic laser with selective thermal excitation and an unstable resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuz' min, A.I.; Lavrov, A.V.; Chernysheva, N.V. (Leningradskii Gosudarstvennyi Universitet, Leningrad (USSR))

    1989-03-01

    The problem of calculating an unstable telescopic resonator for a CO{sub 2} gasdynamic laser with selective thermal excitation is studied. Parabolized Navier-Stokes equations and equations of field propagation in the resonator are used to describe the GDL in the geometric optic approximation. The efficiency is studied as a function of the magnification factor and of the distance between the mirrors. 19 refs.

  16. Resonance Analysis of High-Frequency Electrohydraulic Exciter Controlled by 2D Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The resonant characteristic of hydraulic system has not been described yet because it is necessarily restricted by linear assumptions in classical fluid theory. A way of the resonance analysis is presented for an electrohydraulic exciter controlled by 2D valve. The block diagram of this excitation system is established by extracting nonlinear parts from the traditional linearization analysis; as a result the resonant frequency is obtained. According to input energy from oil source which is equal to the reverse energy to oil source, load pressure and load flow are solved analytically as the working frequency reaches the natural frequency. The analytical expression of resonant peak is also derived without damping. Finally, the experimental system is built to verify the theoretical analysis. The initial research on resonant characteristic will lay theoretical foundation and make useful complement for resonance phenomena of classical fluid theory in hydraulic system.

  17. Photoelectron imaging spectroscopy for (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of atomic bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Shin; Jung, Young Jae; Kang, Wee Kyung; Jung, Kyung Hoon

    2002-01-01

    Two-photon resonant third photon ionization of atomic bromine (4p 5 2 P 3/2 and 2 P 1/2 ) has been studied using a photoelectron imaging spectroscopy in the wavelength region 250-278 nm. The technique has yielded simultaneously both relative branching ratios to the three levels of Br + ( 3 P 2 , 3 P 0,1 and 1 D 2 ) with 4p 4 configuration and the angular distributions of outgoing photoelectrons. The product branching ratios reveal a strong propensity to populate particular levels in many cases. Several pathways have been documented for selective formation of Br + ( 3 P 2 ) and Br + ( 3 P 0,1 ) ions. In general, the final ion level distributions are dominated by the preservation of the ion core configuration of a resonant excited state. Some deviations from this simple picture are discussed in terms of the configuration interaction of resonant states and the autoionization in the continuum. The photoelectron angular distributions are qualitatively similar for all transitions, with a positive A 2 anisotropy coefficient of 1.0 - 2.0 and negligible A 4 in most cases, which suggests that the angular distribution is mainly determined by the single-photon ionization process of a resonant excited state induced from the third photon absorption

  18. Search for new heavy resonances decaying into a Z boson and a massive vector boson in the $2\\ell2$q final state at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a search for new heavy diboson resonances decaying to the $2\\ell2\\text{q}$ final state, with two charged leptons ($\\ell=e,\\mu$) produced by the decay of a $\\text{Z}$ boson, and two quarks produced by the hadronic decay of a $\\text{W}$ or $\\text{Z}$ boson. The search is performed for resonance masses from $400$ to $4500~\\text{GeV}$. Two categories are defined based on the merged or resolved reconstruction of the hadronically decaying vector boson, optimized for high- and low-mass resonances respectively. The search is based on data collected during 2016 by the CMS experiment at the LHC in proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\text{TeV}$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\text{fb}^{-1}$. Upper limits on the production cross section of heavy spin-1 and spin-2 resonances are derived as a function of the resonance mass, and exclusion limits of $\\text{W'}$ and bulk graviton particles are produced in the framework of the heavy vector triplet mod...

  19. Vacuum Gap Microstrip Microwave Resonators for 2.5-D Integration in Quantum Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Rupert M.; Henry, Michael David; Schroeder, Katlin

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate vacuum gap λ/2 microwave resonators as a route toward higher integration in superconducting qubit circuits. The resonators are fabricated from pieces on two silicon chips bonded together with an In-Sb bond. Measurements of the devices yield resonant frequencies in good agreement with simulations. Furthermore, we discuss creating low loss circuits in this geometry.

  20. Resonant dissociation in N2 by electron impact: a source of heating in the thermosphere and auroras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, D.; Burrow, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    An electron impact resonant dissociation process, leading to superthermal atom production in molecular nitrogen is described. The maximum cross section for this process is found to be 2.5 x 10 -18 cm 2 at 10 eV. Measurements of scattered electrons indicate a value of -65 to -90 MeV for the electron affinity of N. The possible role of resonant dissociation as a source of heating in the thermosphere and in auroras is discussed

  1. Vibrational structures in electron-CO2 scattering below the 2Πu shape resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Structures of vibrational origin were discovered in vibrationally inelastic electron-CO 2 cross sections in the energy range 0.4-0.9 eV, well below the 2 Π u shape resonance. They appear in the excitation of higher vibrational levels, in particular the highest members of the Fermi polyads of the type (n, 2m, 0) with n+m=2-4. The lowest two structures, at 0.445 and 0.525 eV, are narrow; higher-lying structures are broader and boomerang-like. The structures are absent when the antisymmetric stretch is co-excited. The structures are interpreted in terms of a wavepacket of the nuclei reflected from a potential surface of the CO 2 - anion in a bent and stretched geometry. A state emerging from the virtual state upon bending and stretching and the state resulting from bending the 2 Π u shape resonance are discussed as possibly being responsible for the structures. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  2. Equivalent-circuit model for the thickness-shear mode resonator with a viscoelastic film near film resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S J; Bandey, H L; Cernosek, R W; Hillman, A R; Brown, M J

    2000-01-01

    We derive a lumped-element, equivalent-circuit model for the thickness-shear mode (TSM) resonator with a viscoelastic film. This modified Butterworth-Van Dyke model includes in the motional branch a series LCR resonator, representing the quartz resonance, and a parallel LCR resonator, representing the film resonance. This model is valid in the vicinity of film resonance, which occurs when the acoustic phase shift across the film is an odd multiple of pi/2 rad. For low-loss films, this model accurately predicts the frequency changes and damping that arise at resonance and is a reasonable approximation away from resonance. Elements of the parallel LCR resonator are explicitly related to film properties and can be interpreted in terms of elastic energy storage and viscous power dissipation. The model leads to a simple graphical interpretation of the coupling between the quartz and film resonances and facilitates understanding of the resulting responses. These responses are compared with predictions from the transmission-line and Sauerbrey models.

  3. Experimental Determination of Bending Resonances of Millimeter Size PVF2 Cantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Thompson

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The polymer piezoelectric polvinylidene fluoride has found widespread use in sensors and actuators. The bending mode of piezoelectricity offers very high sensitivities and low mechanical input impedance, but has not been studied in as much detail for sensor applications. We report the dynamic electromechanical properties of millimeter size cantilevers made from electroded films of PVF2. All devices tested had a single polymer layer. Several resonances are found below 1 kHz and the experimentally observed resonance frequency dependence on cantilever thickness and length are seen to agree well with published models which take the properties of the electrodes into account. It is found that bending resonances are also modulated by the width of the cantilever. Therefore, though the length and thickness control the resonance frequency most strongly, the actual realized value can be fine-tuned by changing cantilever width and the electrode material and its thickness. Further, all resonances display high piezoelectric coupling coefficients (keff, ranging between 0.2 - 0.35. The data presented here will be extremely useful in the design of sensors and actuators for a number of applications, since the combination of millimeter size scales and high piezoelectric sensitivities in the low audio range can be realized with this marriage of polymeric materials and cantilever geometries. Such an array of sensors can be used in cochlear implant applications, and when integrated with a resonance interrogation circuit can be used for the detection of low frequency vibrations of large structures. If appropriate mass/elasticity sensitive layers are coated on the electrodes, such a sensor can be used for the detection of a wide range of chemicals and biochemicals.

  4. The participant Coster-Kronig preceded Auger transition in the resonant L2,3-M2,3V Auger electron spectrum of Ti metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    The L 2,3 -M 2,3 V resonant Auger electron spectroscopy (RAES) spectrum of Ti metal measured by Le Fevre et al. [P. Le Fevre, J. Danger, H. Magnan, D. Chandesris, J. Jupille, S. Bourgeois, M.-A. Arrio, R. Gotter, A. Verdini, A. Morgante, Phys. Rev. B69 (2004) 155421] is analyzed in the light of relaxation and decay of the resonantly excited L 2,3 -hole states. The relaxation time of the resonantly excited L 2,3 -hole state to the fully relaxed (screened) one is much shorter than the L 2,3 -hole Auger decay time, whereas the participant Coster-Kronig (CK) decay time of the resonantly excited L 2 -hole state to the fully relaxed L 3 -hole state at the L 2 resonance is as short as the relaxation time of the resonantly excited L 2 -hole state to the fully relaxed one. The excited electron is predominantly either rapidly decoupled from the L 2,3 -hole decay or annihilated by the participant CK decay. Thus, near the L 2,3 edges the L 2,3 -M 2,3 V RAES spectral peak appears at constant kinetic energy. The L 2,3 -M 2,3 V RAES spectrum shows a normal L 2,3 -M 2,3 V Auger decay profile not modulated by the density of empty d states probed by the resonant excitation. Not only the relaxation time but also the participant CK decay time depends on photon energy because they depend on the density of empty d states probed by the resonant excitation. As a result, the L 2,3 X-ray absorption spectroscopy spectral line broadening depends on photon energy

  5. Q^2 Dependence of the S_{11}(1535) Photocoupling and Evidence for a P-wave resonance in eta electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haluk Denizli; James Mueller; Steven Dytman; M.L. Leber; R.D. Levine; J. Miles; Kui Kim; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Catalina Cetina; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Laurent Farhi; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Tony Forest; Valera Frolov; Herbert Funsten; Sally Gaff; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Pascal Girard; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; David Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Jingliang Hu; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; J.H. Kelley; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; K. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; K. Lukashin; Marion MacCormick; Joseph Manak; Nikolai Markov; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; Valeria Muccifora; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Steve Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O' Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Gerald Peterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Ermanno Polli; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Konstantin Sabourov; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; Jeremiah Shaw; Nikolay Shvedunov; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Kebin Wang; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Junho Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction $ep \\to e'\\eta p$ are reported for total center of mass energy $W$=1.5--2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer $Q^2$=0.13--3.3 GeV$^2$. This large kinematic range allows extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and $\\eta N$ coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at $W\\sim$ 1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a $P$-wave resonance that persists to high $Q^2$. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the $S_{11}$(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expands the $Q^2$ range covered and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parameterization is provided.

  6. Seismic response of the geologic structure underlying the Roman Colosseum and a 2-D resonance of a sediment valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Labak

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The seismic response of the geologic structure beneath the Colosseum is investigated using a two-dimensional modeling for a vertically incident plane SH wave. Computations indicate that the southern part of the Colosseum may be exposed to a seismic ground motion with significantly larger amplitudes, differential motion and longer duration than the northern part. because the southern part of the Colosseum is underlain by a sedimentfilled valley created by sedimentary filling of the former tributary of the River Tiber. A 2-D resonance may develop in the valley. Unlike the previous theoretical studies on 2-D resonance in sediment-filled valleys, an effect of heterogeneous valley surroundings on the resonance is partly investigated. A very small sensitivity of the maximum spectral amplifications connected with the fundamental and first higher modes to the presence of a horizontal surface layer (with an intermediate velocity in the valley surroundings is observed in the studied models.

  7. Electron spin resonance in YbRh2Si2: local-moment, unlike-spin and quasiparticle descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, D L

    2012-06-06

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) in the Kondo lattice compound YbRh(2)Si(2) has stimulated discussion as to whether the low-field resonance outside the Fermi liquid regime in this material is more appropriately characterized as a local-moment phenomenon or one that requires a Landau quasiparticle interpretation. In earlier work, we outlined a collective mode approach to the ESR that involves only the local 4f moments. In this paper, we extend the collective mode approach to a situation where there are two subsystems of unlike spins: the pseudospins of the ground multiplet of the Yb ions and the spins of the itinerant conduction electrons. We assume a weakly anisotropic exchange interaction between the two subsystems. With suitable approximations our expression for the g-factor also reproduces that found in recent unlike-spin quasiparticle calculations. It is pointed out that the success of the local-moment approach in describing the resonance is due to the fact that the susceptibility of the Yb subsystem dominates that of the conduction electrons with the consequence that the relative shift in the resonance frequency predicted by the unlike-spin models (and absent in the local-moment models) is ≪ 1. The connection with theoretical studies of a two-component model with like spins is also discussed.

  8. Electron spin resonance study of a-Cr2O3 and Cr2O3·nH2O quasi-spherical nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khamlich, S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The quasi-spherical nanoparticles of hydrated Cr2O3 · nH2O, and crystalline -Cr2O3, have been synthesized by reduction of the first row (3d) transition metal complex of K2Cr2O7. The temperaturedependence of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum...

  9. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A. C.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5×1010 spins/GHz1/2 despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  10. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  11. Strongly driven electron spins using a Ku band stripline electron paramagnetic resonance resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Yung Szen; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2013-07-01

    This article details our work to obtain strong excitation for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments by improving the resonator's efficiency. The advantages and application of strong excitation are discussed. Two 17 GHz transmission-type, stripline resonators were designed, simulated and fabricated. Scattering parameter measurements were carried out and quality factor were measured to be around 160 and 85. Simulation results of the microwave's magnetic field distribution are also presented. To determine the excitation field at the sample, nutation experiments were carried out and power dependence were measured using two organic samples at room temperature. The highest recorded Rabi frequency was rated at 210 MHz with an input power of about 1 W, which corresponds to a π/2 pulse of about 1.2 ns.

  12. Hadronic atoms and ticklish nuclei: the E2 nuclear resonance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, M.

    1975-06-01

    The E2 nuclear resonance effect in hadronic atoms offers a way to increase the hadronic information that can be obtained from hadronic x-ray experiments. The effect occurs when an atomic deexcitation energy closely matches a nuclear excitation energy, so that some configuration mixing occurs. It shows up as an attenuation of some of the hadronic x-ray lines from a resonant versus a normal isotope target. The effect was observed very clearly in pionic cadmium in a recent LAMPF experiment. A planned LAMPF experiment will use the nuclear resonance effect to determine whether the p-wave π-nucleus interaction does indeed become repulsive for Z greater than or equal to 35 as predicted. The effect also appears in the kaonic molybdenum data taken at LBL because several of the stable molybdenum isotopes are resonant. A number of promising cases for π - , K - , anti p, and Σ - atoms are discussed and a spectacular and potentially very informative experiment on anti p- 100 Mo is proposed. (9 figures, 9 tables) (U.S.)

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Patellofemoral Chondromalacia: Is There a Role for T2 Mapping?

    OpenAIRE

    van Eck, Carola F.; Kingston, R. Scott; Crues, John V.; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral pain is common, and treatment is guided by the presence and grade of chondromalacia. Purpose: To evaluate and compare the sensitivity and specificity in detecting and grading chondral abnormalities of the patella between proton density fat suppression (PDFS) and T2 mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 25 patients who underwent MRI of the knee with both a PDFS sequence and T2 mapping and subse...

  14. Design of a β=0.175 2-gap spoke resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Chan, K.C.D.; Garnett, R.; Gentzlinger, R.; LaFave, R.P.; Kelley, J.P.; Schrage, D.L.; Tajima, T.; Roybal, P.L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present the electromagnetic and structural design of a low-β superconducting spoke resonator for a beam-test in the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA). This test is part of the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) project. Recently, the sole use of superconducting resonators from 6.7 MeV on has been approved for this project. The beam test will use the lowest-β resonator from this accelerator design. The choices of the cavity dimensions are driven by its use immediately after the LEDA Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). The frequency is 350 MHz, the length corresponds to a geometric β (β g ) of 0.175. Our design approach has been to carry out an integrated RF and mechanical design from the start. The final cavity is well understood in terms of RF and mechanical properties. The RF properties, like Q, R/Q, peak surface fields and acceleration efficiency are very reasonable for such a low-β structure. The design also includes power coupler, vacuum and pick-up ports and their influences. The mechanical design added tuning sensitivities, tuning forces, stiffening schemes and the understanding of stresses under various load conditions. This presentation reflects changes in the coupling port and the beam aperture compared to a previously presented design [1]. (author)

  15. Optimization of Silicon MZM Fabrication Parameters for High Speed Short Reach Interconnects at 1310 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Abraham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical modulators are key components to realize photonic circuits, and Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZM are often used for high speed short reach interconnects. In order to maximize the tolerable path loss of a transmission link at a given bitrate, the MZM needs to be optimized. However, the optimization can be complex since the overall link performance depends on various parameters, and, for the MZM in particular, implies several trade-offs between efficiency, losses, and bandwidth. In this work, we propose a general and rigorous method to optimize silicon MZM. We first describe the optical link, and the numerical method used for this study. Then we present the results associated to the active region for 1310 nm applications. An analytical model is generated, and allows us to quickly optimize the p-n junction depending of the targeted performances for the MZM. Taking into account the required optical link parameters, the maximum tolerable path losses for different length of MZM is determined. By applying this method, simulations show that the optimum MZM length for 25 Gbps applications is 4 mm with an efficiency of 1.87 V·cm, 0.52 dB/mm of losses. A tolerable path loss of more than 25 dB is obtained.

  16. Slice profile and B1 corrections in 2D magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Coppo, Simone; Chen, Yong; McGivney, Debra F; Jiang, Yun; Pahwa, Shivani; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2017-11-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize and improve the accuracy of 2D magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) scans in the presence of slice profile (SP) and B 1 imperfections, which are two main factors that affect quantitative results in MRF. The SP and B 1 imperfections are characterized and corrected separately. The SP effect is corrected by simulating the radiofrequency pulse in the dictionary, and the B 1 is corrected by acquiring a B 1 map using the Bloch-Siegert method before each scan. The accuracy, precision, and repeatability of the proposed method are evaluated in phantom studies. The effects of both SP and B 1 imperfections are also illustrated and corrected in the in vivo studies. The SP and B 1 corrections improve the accuracy of the T 1 and T 2 values, independent of the shape of the radiofrequency pulse. The T 1 and T 2 values obtained from different excitation patterns become more consistent after corrections, which leads to an improvement of the robustness of the MRF design. This study demonstrates that MRF is sensitive to both SP and B 1 effects, and that corrections can be made to improve the accuracy of MRF with only a 2-s increase in acquisition time. Magn Reson Med 78:1781-1789, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Decay of giant resonance E2 isoscalar in heavy nuclei. Decaimento da ressonancia gigante E2 isoescalar em nucleos pesados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdade, S B [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1980-01-01

    In this work, it is made a study of the giant resonance E2 isoscalar, in heavy nuclei. Fission probabilities for this resonance were determined by various authors, in different experiments, for {sup 238}U. (A.C.A.S.).

  18. A Novel Method for Measurements of the Penetration Depth of MgB2 Superconductor Films by Using Sapphire Resonators with Short-Circuited Parallel Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ho Sang; Lee, J. H.; Cho, Y. H.; Lee, Sang Young; Seong, W. K.; Lee, N. H.; Kang, W. N.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a measurement method that enables to measure the penetration depth(λ) of superconductor films by using a short-ended parallel plate sapphire resonator. Variations in the (λof MgB 2 films could be measured down to the lowest temperature using a sapphire resonator with a YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x film at the bottom. A model equation of λλ 0 [1-(T/T c ) τ ] -1/2 for MgB 2 films appeared to describe the observed variations of the resonant frequency of the sapphire resonator with temperature, with λ 0 , τ and T c used as the fitting parameters.

  19. Analysis of dual-mode lasing characteristics in a 1310-nm optically injected quantum dot distributed feedback laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, R.; Olinger, J.; Hurtado, A.; Grillot, F.; Kovanis, V.; Lester, L. F.

    2015-03-01

    Recent work has shown the Quantum Dot (QD) material system to be well-suited to support dual-mode lasing. In particular, optical injection from a master laser (ML) into the residual Fabry-Perot (FP) modes of a 1310 nm Quantum Dot Distributed Feedback (QD-DFB) laser has been recently demonstrated to offer a highly reliable platform for stable dual-mode lasing operation. External controls on the ML, such as operating temperature and bias current, can be used to precisely adjust the spacing between the two lasing modes. This tunability of modeseparation is very promising for a range of applications requiring the generation of microwave, millimeter wave and terahertz signals. Considering the versatility and utility of such a scheme, it is imperative to acquire a deeper understanding of the factors that influence the dual-mode lasing process, in order to optimize performance. Toward this end, this paper seeks to further our understanding of the optically-injected dual-mode lasing mechanism. For fixed values of optical power injected into each FP residual mode and wavelength detuning, the dual-mode lasing characteristics are analyzed with regard to important system parameters such as the position and the intensity of the injected residual mode (relative to the Bragg and the other residual FP modes of the device) for two similarly-fabricated QD-DFBs. Results indicate that for dual mode lasing spaced less than 5 nm apart, the relative intensity of the injected FP mode and intracavity noise levels are critical factors in determining dual mode lasing behavior. Insight into the dual-mode lasing characteristics could provide an important design guideline for the master and QD-DFB slave laser cavities.

  20. Erbium-doped fiber ring resonator for resonant fiber optical gyro applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunming; Zhao, Rui; Tang, Jun; Xia, Meijing; Guo, Huiting; Xie, Chengfeng; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jun

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports a fiber ring resonator with erbium-doped fiber (EDF) for resonant fiber optical gyro (RFOG). To analyze compensation mechanism of the EDF on resonator, a mathematical model of the erbium-doped fiber ring resonator (EDFRR) is established based on Jones matrix to be followed by the design and fabrication of a tunable EDFRR. The performances of the fabricated EDFRR were measured and the experimental Q-factor of 2 . 47 × 108 and resonant depth of 109% were acquired separately. Compared with the resonator without the EDF, the resonant depth and Q-factor of the proposed device are increased by 2.5 times and 14 times, respectively. A potential optimum shot noise limited resolution of 0 . 042∘ / h can be obtained for the RFOG, which is promising for low-cost and high precise detection.

  1. A cyclotron resonance laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangle, P.; Tang, C.M.; Vlahos, L.

    1983-01-01

    A laser acceleration mechanism which utilizes a strong static, almost uniform, magnetic field together with an intense laser pulse is analyzed. The interaction and acceleration mechanism relies on a self resonance effect. Since the laser field is assumed to be diffraction limited, the magnetic field must be spatially varied to maintain resonance. The effective accelerating gradient is shown to scale like 1/√E /SUB b/ , where E /SUB b/ is the electron energy. For a numerical illustration the authors consider a 1 x 10 13 W/cm 2 , CO 2 laser and show that electrons can be accelerated to more than 500 MeV in a distance of 15 m (approximately two Rayleigh lengths)

  2. Observation of pseudoscalar and tensor resonances in J/psi -> gamma phi phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Tiemens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on a sample of (1310.6 +/- 10.5) x 10(6) J/psi events collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring, a partial wave analysis of the decay J/psi -> gamma phi phi is performed in order to study the intermediate states. Results of the partial wave analysis show that the

  3. Patel, Prof. Chandra Kumar Naranbhai

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1995 Honorary. Patel, Prof. Chandra Kumar Naranbhai. Date of birth: 2 July 1938. Address: President & CEO, Pranalytica Inc., 1101, Colorado Avenue, Santa Monica, CA 90401, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-310) 458 0808. Residence: (+1-310) 471 6505. Fax: (+1-310) 458 0171. Email: patel@pranalytica.com.

  4. Platybasia in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Is Not Correlated with Speech Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E Spruijt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background An abnormally obtuse cranial base angle, also known as platybasia, is a common finding in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS. Platybasia increases the depth of the velopharynx and is therefore postulated to contribute to velopharyngeal dysfunction. Our objective was to determine the clinical significance of platybasia in 22q11DS by exploring the relationship between cranial base angles and speech resonance. Methods In this retrospective chart review at a tertiary hospital, 24 children (age, 4.0-13.1 years with 22q11.2DS underwent speech assessments and lateral cephalograms, which allowed for the measurement of the cranial base angles. Results One patient (4% had hyponasal resonance, 8 (33% had normal resonance, 10 (42% had hypernasal resonance on vowels only, and 5 (21% had hypernasal resonance on both vowels and consonants. The mean cranial base angle was 136.5° (standard deviation, 5.3°; range, 122.3-144.8°. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant relationship between the resonance ratings and cranial base angles (P=0.242. Cranial base angles and speech ratings were not correlated (Spearman correlation=0.321, P=0.126. The group with hypernasal resonance had a significantly more obtuse mean cranial base angle (138° vs. 134°, P=0.049 but did not have a greater prevalence of platybasia (73% vs. 56%, P=0.412. Conclusions In this retrospective chart review of patients with 22q11DS, cranial base angles were not correlated with speech resonance. The clinical significance of platybasia remains unknown.

  5. Efficient H2 production over Au/graphene/TiO2 induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Hongtao; Wang, Hua; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation were used for H 2 production. • Au/Gr/TiO 2 composite photocatalyst was synthesized. • Au/Gr/TiO 2 exhibited enhancement of light absorption and charge separation. • H 2 production rate of Au/Gr/TiO 2 was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO 2 . - Abstract: H 2 production over Au/Gr/TiO 2 composite photocatalyst induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO 2 using graphene (Gr) as an electron acceptor has been investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance study indicated that, in this composite, Gr collected electrons not only from Au with surface plasmon resonance but also from TiO 2 with band-gap excitation. Surface photovoltage and UV–vis absorption measurements revealed that compared with Au/TiO 2 , Au/Gr/TiO 2 displayed more effective photogenerated charge separation and higher optical absorption. Benefiting from these advantages, the H 2 production rate of Au/Gr/TiO 2 composite with Gr content of 1.0 wt% and Au content of 2.0 wt% was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO 2 . This work represents an important step toward the efficient application of both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation on the way to converting solar light into chemical energy

  6. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of (TMTSF) 2PF 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrierty, V. J.; Douglass, D. C.; Wudl, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inverse linewidths and spin-lattice relaxation times of fluorine and proton magnetic resonance spectra are used to examine molecular motion in the organic superconductor (TMTSF) 2PF 6. The results clearly show that rotation of the PF 6- anion is the principal agent for the observed relaxation of fluorine contrary to some suggestions in the current literature. This interpretation is based upon qualitative comparison with relaxation in plastic crystals, where molecular rotation is well characterized, and upon the quantitative agreement between the calculated and observed linewidth change near 90K and the maximum spin-lattice relaxation rate at 140K. There is also motional evidence, supported by X-ray structure measurements, that a phase transition occurs in the vicinity of 160K.

  7. Modeling and control of Type-2 wind turbines for sub-synchronous resonance damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancilla-David, Fernando; Domínguez-García, José Luis; De Prada, Mikel; Gomis-Bellmunt, Oriol; Singh, Mohit; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic modeling of Type-2 wind turbines for sub-synchronous resonance studies. • Systematic design of a power system stabilizer for Type-2 wind turbines. • Assessment of Type-2 wind turbines to suppress sub-synchronous resonance events. - Abstract: The rapid increase of wind power penetration into power systems around the world has led transmission system operators to enforce stringent grid codes requiring novel functionalities from renewable energy-based power generation. For this reason, there exists a need to asses whether wind turbines (WTs) will comply with such functionalities to ensure power system stability. This paper demonstrates that Type-2 WTs may induce sub-synchronous resonance (SSR) events when connected to a series-compensated transmission line, and with proper control, they may also suppress such events. The paper presents a complete dynamic model tailored to study, via eigenanalysis, SSR events in the presence of Type-2 WTs, and a systematic procedure to design a power system stabilizer using only local and measurable signals. Results are validated through a case study based on the IEEE first benchmark model for SSR studies, as well as with transient computer simulations

  8. Studies of the Effective Total and Resonance Absorption Cross Sections for Zircaloy 2 and Zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrand, E; Lindahl, G; Lundgren, G

    1961-06-15

    Using pile oscillator technique, the total absorption cross section for zircaloy 2 plates has been determined in the neutron spectrum of the reactor R1. The plate thickness was varied in six steps from 0. 2 mm to 6. 4 mm. The thermal cross section for the alloy was calculated from cross section data and the known composition of the alloy. By subtracting this value from the measured cross sections and dividing by the factor {alpha}=2/{radical}({pi}) x r x {radical}(T/T{sub 0}) the effective resonance integrals were obtained. After subtraction of a constant amount for resonance contributions from hafnium, tin etc., effective resonance integrals for zirconium could be evaluated. An extrapolated value of 0.85 {+-} 0.15 b was obtained for the infinitely dilute integral (l/v part excluded). The ratio of the resonance integral at plate thicknesses 0.2 and 6.4 mm came out as 1.65 {+-} 0.25.

  9. Is the A1 a resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, D.

    1975-06-01

    Data on diffractive and charge exchange 3π production in the Jsup(P) = 1 + state are shown to favour a resonance interpretation, although with a somewhat higher mass than the conventional A 1 bump. Data are fitted using a two-component model for the production amplitude. The first component comprises the Deck (Born) contribution and its re-scattering corrections; the second represents the so-called 'direct-production' term. The conventional isobar approximation to unitarity is demanded; this forbids the intrusion of additional phases in the Born term, such as arise from projecting a Reggeized Deck amplitude. As a consequence, the phase of the 1 + S 3π production amplitude is predicted to execute a standard resonant variation with Msup(3π). This carries a striking implication for the interfering 'background' waves, 1 + P, 2 - P, 0 - S, relative to which the 1 + S amplitude fails to register any appreciable phase variation in phenomenological analyses. There is no obvious objection to ascribing resonance status to these three channels, of which only one, the 0 - , demands a new (π ') resonance. A running theme, which recurs whenever the results of phenomenological 3-body phase shift analyses are appealed to, is that dynamical features are best viewed in terms of effective matrix elements rather than partial cross-sections. (author)

  10. Acoustic resonator providing fixed points of temperature between 0.1 and 2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmela, Anssi; Tuoriniemi, Juha; Pentti, Elias; Sebedash, Alexander; Rysti, Juho

    2009-01-01

    Below 2 K the speed of second sound in mixtures of liquid 3 He and 4 He first increases to a maximum of 30-40 m/s at about 1 K and then decreases again at lower temperatures to values below 15 m/s. The exact values depend on the concentration and pressure of the mixture. This can be exploited to provide fixed points in temperature by utilizing a resonator with appropriate dimensions and frequency to excite standing waves in the resonator cavity filled with helium mixture. We demonstrate that commercially mass produced quartz tuning forks can be used for this purpose. They are meant for frequency standards operating at 32 kHz. Their dimensions are typically of order 1 mm matching the wavelength of the second sound in helium mixtures at certain values of temperature. Due to the complicated geometry, we observe some 20 sharp acoustic resonances in the range 0.1l 2 K having temperature resolution of order 1 μK. The quartz resonators are cheap, compact, simple to implement, easy to measure with great accuracy, and, above all, they are not sensitive to magnetic field, which is a great advantage compared to fixed point devices based on superconductivity transitions. The reproducibility of the resonance pattern upon thermal cycling remains to be verified.

  11. Patel, Prof. Chandra Kumar Naranbhai

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patel, Prof. Chandra Kumar Naranbhai. Date of birth: 2 July 1938. Address: President & CEO, Pranalytica Inc., 1101, Colorado Avenue, Santa Monica, CA 90401, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-310) 458 0808. Residence: (+1-310) 471 6505. Fax: (+1-310) 458 0171. Email: patel@pranalytica.com. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook ...

  12. EPR dating CO2- sites in tooth enamel apatites by ENDOR and triple resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vugman, N.V.; Rigby, S.E.J.

    1995-01-01

    In this work we combine electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), high-resolution electron nucleus double resonance (ENDOR) and general triple resonance (GTR) spectroscopies, to study the local environment of the CO 2 - groups created by ionizing radiation in fossil tooth enamel. We demonstrate that the CO 2 - groups occupy slightly modified phosphate sites in the hydroxyapatite lattice. In quaternary shark enamel we found these groups to be interacting with water molecules in the apatite channels. The absence of water molecules as first neighbours in mammalian samples indicate, however, that these molecules are not significantly responsible for the stabilization of CO 2 - dating centers in enamel. (author)

  13. Parametric methods for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 2): T2 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea Palazón, R J; Solé Arqués, M; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Ortiz Pérez, J T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the reference technique for characterizing myocardial tissue; for example, T2-weighted sequences make it possible to evaluate areas of edema or myocardial inflammation. However, traditional sequences have many limitations and provide only qualitative information. Moreover, traditional sequences depend on the reference to remote myocardium or skeletal muscle, which limits their ability to detect and quantify diffuse myocardial damage. Recently developed magnetic resonance myocardial mapping techniques enable quantitative assessment of parameters indicative of edema. These techniques have proven better than traditional sequences both in acute cardiomyopathy and in acute ischemic heart disease. This article synthesizes current developments in T2 mapping as well as their clinical applications and limitations. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. 996 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

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  15. A 2-in-1 single-element coil design for transcranial magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai; Wang, Shumin

    2018-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of turning transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil for MRI signal reception. A critically coupled network was formed by using a resonated turn of TMS coil as the secondary and a regular radiofrequency (RF) coil as the primary. A third coil was positioned between the two coils for detuning during RF transmission. Bench measurement, numerical simulation, and MRI experiment were performed for validation. The signal-to-noise ratio of the proposed 2-in-1 coil is 35% higher in its field of view, compared with a MRI-only reference coil of the same size, made by the same material, and backed up by an untuned TMS coil, but lower than a RF surface coil of the same size without any TMS coil nearby. Spin-echo images of the human brain further validated its performance. The proposed method can transform TMS coil for MRI signal acquisition with virtually no modifications on the TMS side. It not only enables flexible and close positioning of TMS coil inside MRI scanner, but also improves the signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional implementations. It can be applied as a building block for developing advanced concurrent TMS/MRI hardware. Magn Reson Med 79:582-587, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Atomic layer MoS2-graphene van der Waals heterostructure nanomechanical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fan; Lee, Jaesung; Feng, Philip X-L

    2017-11-30

    Heterostructures play significant roles in modern semiconductor devices and micro/nanosystems in a plethora of applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and transducers. While state-of-the-art heterostructures often involve stacks of crystalline epi-layers each down to a few nanometers thick, the intriguing limit would be hetero-atomic-layer structures. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of freestanding van der Waals heterostructures and their functional nanomechanical devices. By stacking single-layer (1L) MoS 2 on top of suspended single-, bi-, tri- and four-layer (1L to 4L) graphene sheets, we realize an array of MoS 2 -graphene heterostructures with varying thickness and size. These heterostructures all exhibit robust nanomechanical resonances in the very high frequency (VHF) band (up to ∼100 MHz). We observe that fundamental-mode resonance frequencies of the heterostructure devices fall between the values of graphene and MoS 2 devices. Quality (Q) factors of heterostructure resonators are lower than those of graphene but comparable to those of MoS 2 devices, suggesting interface damping related to interlayer interactions in the van der Waals heterostructures. This study validates suspended atomic layer heterostructures as an effective device platform and provides opportunities for exploiting mechanically coupled effects and interlayer interactions in such devices.

  17. Resonances and anti-resonances in the material parameters of 2-D dielectric ENG, MNG, and DNG materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yunqiu; Arslanagic, Samel

    The resonant/anti-resonant behavior of parameters extracted by the S-parameter method for two-dimensional epsilon-, mu- and double-negative (ENG, MNG, DNG) materials is investigated. The unit cells consist of infinite dielectric cylinders supporting electric dipole, magnetic dipole, or both....... It is shown that the extraction procedure yields one resonant material parameter, and one anti-resonant material parameter in MNG and ENG configurations. However, both parameters display an over-all resonant response in DNG configurations where electric and magnetic dipole modes are excited simultaneously....

  18. Experimental study of isospin mixing in 12C + n → 13C(T = 3/2) and 16O + n → 17O(T = 3/2) resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierjacks, S.; Schmalz, G.; Hinterberger, F.; Rossen, P. v.

    1981-12-01

    Narrow resonances of 13 C and 17 O have been studied by a measurement of the total neutron cross sections of carbon and oxygen between 3 and 30 MeV. Employing the improved time-of-flight spectrometer at the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron and precise calibration methods, resonance cross sections were measured with an energy resolution of 1:2100 at 10 MeV and energy accuracies between 10 -4 and 10 -5 . Resonance analysis of the measured data provided parameters for numerous narrow states of both isospins, T = 1/2 and T = 3/2. These data in conjunction with information from broad T = 1/2 resonances provided a good means to experimentally determine isospin mixing matrix elements. Results were obtained for the first five T = 3/2 resonances in 17 O and the first T = 3/2 resonance in 13 C. The obtained mixing matrix elements are compared with previous experimental results and shell-modell predictions of this quantity. (orig.) [de

  19. Experimental determination of resonance absorption cross sections for Zircaloy-2 and zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocic, A; Markovic, V [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1968-05-15

    The integral absorption cross section for the neutron spectrum and the thermal absorption cross section for zircaloy-2 have been determined using the pile oscillator technique. Using both values and a measured ratio of the epithermal to the thermal flux, the effective resonance integrals were obtained. After subtraction of the contributions for alloy and impurity elements, the effective resonance integrals for zirconium were evaluated. An extrapolated value of 0.91{+-}0.10 was obtained for the dilute integral. (author)

  20. Properties of the Λ(1670) (1/2)- resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, D.M.; Olmsted, J.; Abaev, V.V.; Bekrenev, V.; Kulbardis, A.A.; Kozlenko, N.G.; Kruglov, S.; Lopatin, I.V.; Allgower, C.E.; Spinka, H.; Briscoe, W.J.; Shafi, A.; Strakovsky, I.I.; Clajus, M.; Marusic, A.; McDonald, S.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Prakhov, S.; Price, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    Recently the Crystal Ball Collaboration measured precise new data for the near-threshold reaction K - p→ηΛ , which is dominated by formation of the Λ(1670)(1/ 2) - . In this Letter, we present results of a unitary, multichannel analysis that incorporates the new Crystal Ball data. For our preferred fit, we obtain mass M=1673±2 MeV , width Γ=23±6 MeV , and elasticity x=0.37±0.07 . This elasticity is significantly larger than previously recognized. Resonance parameters of our preferred fit are in striking agreement with the quark-model predictions of Koniuk and Isgur

  1. Evaluation of the SLAP lesion using a low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Soo; Back, Chang Hee; Lee, Kyung Rae; Shin, Yun Hack

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of the low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance (MR) system in the detection of the superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. One hundred fifty patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder over a 7-month period. Forty-six patients underwent arthroscopic surgery, and the surgical results were correlated with the findings of the MR imaging. Arthroscopic procedures were performed within a mean of 8 days after MR imaging. MR imaging of the shoulder was conducted as follows: shoulder coil; T1-weighted spin echo, coronal-oblique images; T2-weighted gradient echo, coronal-oblique and axial images; and T2-weighted spin echo, coronal oblique and sagittal-oblique images. Prospectively, one radiologist interpreted the MR images. The results of surgery were as follow: SLAP II in 26 shoulders, SLAP III in 1 shoulder, SLAP IV in 1 shoulder, normal labrum in 6 shoulder. For SLAP lesions with a higher grade than type 2, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the low-field MRI were 85.7%, 55.5%. 75%, 71%, and 74%, respectively. There was relatively good agreement for the comparison of the MR results obtained using a low-field MR system with the surgical findings for identifying SLAP lesions

  2. 817 RESONANCE September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    817. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 2. 818. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 3. 819. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 4. 820. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 5. 821. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 6. 822. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 7. 823. RESONANCE ⎜ September ...

  3. 369 RESONANCE April 2016

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    369. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 2. 370. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 3. 371. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 4. 372. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 5. 373. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 6. 374. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 7. 375. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016.

  4. Resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmetz, Tilo

    2008-01-01

    In the present dissertation experiments on resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip are described. Thereby for the first time single atoms catched in a chip trap could be detected. For this in the framework of this thesis a novel optical microresonator was developed, which can because of its miniaturization be combined with the microtrap technique introduced in our working group for the manipulation of ultracold atoms. For this resonator glass-fiber ends are used as mirror substrates, between which a standing light wave is formed. With such a fiber Fabry-Perot resonator we obtain a finess of up to ∼37,000. Because of the small mode volumina in spite of moderate resonator quality the coherent interaction between an atom and a photon can be made so large that the regime of the strong atom-resonator coupling is reached. For the one-atom-one-photon coupling rate and the one-atom-one-photon cooperativity thereby record values of g 0 =2π.300 MHz respectively C 0 =210 are reached. Just so for the first time the strong coupling regime between a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and the field of a high-quality resonator could be reached. The BEC was thereby by means of the magnetic microtrap potentials deterministically brought to a position within the resonator and totally transformed in a well defined antinode of an additionally optical standing-wave trap. The spectrum of the coupled atom-resonator system was measured for different atomic numbers and atom-resonator detunings, whereby a collective vacuum Rabi splitting of more than 20 GHz could be reached. [de

  5. Resonant activation in 2D and 3D systems driven by multi-variate Lévy noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczepaniec, Krzysztof; Dybiec, Bartłomiej

    2014-01-01

    Resonant activation is one of the classical effects demonstrating the constructive role of noise. In resonant activation, the cooperative action of a barrier modulation process and noise lead to the optimal escape kinetics as measured by the mean first passage time. Resonant activation has been observed in versatile systems for various types of barrier modulation process and noise type. Here, we show that resonant activation is also observed in 2D and 3D systems driven by bi-variate and tri-variate α-stable noise. The strength of resonant activation is sensitive to the exact value of the noise parameters. In particular, the decrease in the stability index α results in the disappearance of the resonant activation. (paper)

  6. RESONANCE CARS IN BR2 MOLECULES AND BR-ATOMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, I.; Levelt, P.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Hogervorst, W.

    1991-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced CARS processes were studied in molecular bromine. On the basis of the known spectroscopic constants of the two electronic states involved, the features in the spectra could be identified. CARS signals from Br-atoms produced from dissociation of Br2 were obtained by tuning (omega-1

  7. Resonant Magnon-Phonon Polaritons in a Ferrimagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-29

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO 11604 TITLE: Resonant Magnon -Phonon Polaritons in a Ferrimagnet...part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP011588 thru ADP011680 UNCLASSIFIED 75 Resonant Magnon -Phonon Polaritons in a Ferrimagnet I. E...susceptibilities X"aa and X’m << X’m appear, where 77 xem - DPx igEo0 i_ Xxy - hy- C1 (0)2 _ 00t2) 4= -7• 4 3. Phonon and magnon polaritons We solve the

  8. Intricate Resonant Raman Response in Anisotropic ReS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, Amber; Simpson, Jeffrey R; Wang, Yuanxi; Rhodes, Daniel; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Balicas, Luis; Dubey, Madan; Crespi, Vincent H; Terrones, Mauricio; Hight Walker, Angela R

    2017-10-11

    The strong in-plane anisotropy of rhenium disulfide (ReS 2 ) offers an additional physical parameter that can be tuned for advanced applications such as logic circuits, thin-film polarizers, and polarization-sensitive photodetectors. ReS 2 also presents advantages for optoelectronics, as it is both a direct-gap semiconductor for few-layer thicknesses (unlike MoS 2 or WS 2 ) and stable in air (unlike black phosphorus). Raman spectroscopy is one of the most powerful characterization techniques to nondestructively and sensitively probe the fundamental photophysics of a 2D material. Here, we perform a thorough study of the resonant Raman response of the 18 first-order phonons in ReS 2 at various layer thicknesses and crystal orientations. Remarkably, we discover that, as opposed to a general increase in intensity of all of the Raman modes at excitonic transitions, each of the 18 modes behave differently relative to each other as a function of laser excitation, layer thickness, and orientation in a manner that highlights the importance of electron-phonon coupling in ReS 2 . In addition, we correct an unrecognized error in the calculation of the optical interference enhancement of the Raman signal of transition metal dichalcogenides on SiO 2 /Si substrates that has propagated through various reports. For ReS 2 , this correction is critical to properly assessing the resonant Raman behavior. We also implemented a perturbation approach to calculate frequency-dependent Raman intensities based on first-principles and demonstrate that, despite the neglect of excitonic effects, useful trends in the Raman intensities of monolayer and bulk ReS 2 at different laser energies can be accurately captured. Finally, the phonon dispersion calculated from first-principles is used to address the possible origins of unexplained peaks observed in the Raman spectra, such as infrared-active modes, defects, and second-order processes.

  9. Bonding wood-saxon potential and the mechanism of resonance states in the ''1''2C+''1''2C system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G.; Khaydarov, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    In present work the ''1''2C+''1''2C system are investigated in the realistic Woods--Saxon potential with Coulomb interaction. The comparison of the calculated states with the experimental data has shown, that the observed (identified) resonances may be explained by the single-channel description, i.e., as potential resonances. The quadrupole moments and transition probabilities for low-laying states have been calculated

  10. Depolarization due to the resonance tail during a fast resonance jump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of depolarization due to a fast resonance jump is studied. The dominant effect for cases of interest is not dependent on the rate of passage through resonance, but rather on the size of the resonance jump as compared to the width, epsilon, of the resonance. The results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  11. Development of a surface plasmon resonance biosensing approach for the rapid detection of porcine circovirus type2 in sample solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Hu

    Full Text Available A sensitive and label-free analytical approach for the detection of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 instead of PCV2 antibody in serum sample was systematically investigated in this research based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR with an establishment of special molecular identification membrane. The experimental device for constructing the biosensing analyzer is composed of an integrated biosensor, a home-made microfluidic module, and an electrical control circuit incorporated with a photoelectric converter. In order to detect the PCV2 using the surface plasmon resonance immunoassay, the mercaptopropionic acid has been used to bind the Au film in advance through the known form of the strong S-Au covalent bonds formed by the chemical radical of the mercaptopropionic acid and the Au film. PCV2 antibodies were bonded with the mercaptopropionic acid by covalent -CO-NH- amide bonding. For the purpose of evaluating the performance of this approach, the known concentrations of PCV2 Cap protein of 10 µg/mL, 7.5 µg/mL, 5 µg/mL, 2.5 µg/mL, 1 µg/mL, and 0.5 µg/mL were prepared by diluting with PBS successively and then the delta response units (ΔRUs were measured individually. Using the data collected from the linear CCD array, the ΔRUs gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of standard known concentrations of PCV2 Cap protein with the R-Squared value of 0.99625. The theoretical limit of detection was calculated to be 0.04 µg/mL for the surface plasmon resonance biosensing approach. Correspondingly, the recovery rate ranged from 81.0% to 89.3% was obtained. In contrast to the PCV2 detection kits, this surface plasmon resonance biosensing system was validated through linearity, precision and recovery, which demonstrated that the surface plasmon resonance immunoassay is reliable and robust. It was concluded that the detection method which is associated with biomembrane properties is expected to contribute much to determine the PCV2

  12. An introduction to magnetic resonance in medicine. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinck, P.A.; Muller, R.N.; Petersen, S.B.

    1990-01-01

    The second edition of this introduction to magnetic resonance in medicine is published five years after the first. During these years, magnetic resonance has established itself as a leading diagnostic modality in medicine. With the introduction of fast imaging methods and contrast agents, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become even more complicated and complex than before. The purpose of this introduction to biomedical MRI and MRS is to give the readers a basic knowledge that will make it possible for them to pursue studies of their own and to cope with some of the most common problems such as image artifacts or patient questions concerning possible hazards of magnetic resonance. (orig./MG) With 99 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in organic chemistry. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschunke, A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are discussed only briefly. The emphasis is laid on developing reader's ability to evaluate resonance spectra. The following topics are covered: principles of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; chemical shift and indirect nuclear spin coupling constants and their relation to the molecular structure; analysis of spectra; and uses for structural analysis and solution of kinetic problems, mainly with regard to organic compounds. Of interest to chemists and graduate students who want to make themselves acquainted with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  14. Calculation of self-absorption coefficients of calcium resonance lines in the case of a CaCl2-water plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannachi, R.; Cressault, Y.; Teulet, Ph.; Gleizes, A.; Lakhdar, Z. Ben

    2008-01-01

    The resonance escape factors for the lines emitted by a neutral calcium atom Ca I at 4226.73 A and of ionic calcium Ca II at 3933.66 A and at 3968.47 A are calculated assuming a Voigt profile and in the case of CaCl 2 -water plasma. The dependence of the escape factor on the optical thickness f 0 from the line center which itself depends on the two main spectral line shape broadening mechanisms (pressure and Doppler effects) are considered. The variation of the resonance escape factors with the temperature, the CaCl 2 molar proportion and the size of the plasma are also investigated. This calculation is useful for the application of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in the quantitative analysis of elemental composition. Its application allows us to reduce the non-linearities in the relation between resonance lines intensities of calcium in our case and its concentration

  15. Elastic I=3 /2 p -wave nucleon-pion scattering amplitude and the Δ (1232) resonance from Nf=2+1 lattice QCD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Walther; Bulava, John; Hörz, Ben

    2018-01-01

    We present the first direct determination of meson-baryon resonance parameters from a scattering amplitude calculated using lattice QCD. In particular, we calculate the elastic I=3/2, p-wave nucleon-pion amplitude on a single ensemble of Nf=2+1 Wilson-clover fermions with mπ=280 MeV and mK=460 Me......V. At these quark masses, the Δ(1232) resonance pole is found close to the N-π threshold and a Breit-Wigner fit to the amplitude gives gΔNπBW=19.0(4.7) in agreement with phenomenological determinations.......We present the first direct determination of meson-baryon resonance parameters from a scattering amplitude calculated using lattice QCD. In particular, we calculate the elastic I=3/2, p-wave nucleon-pion amplitude on a single ensemble of Nf=2+1 Wilson-clover fermions with mπ=280 MeV and mK=460 Me...

  16. Evidence for an exotic S= -2, Q= -2 baryon resonance in proton-proton collisions at the CERN SPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, C; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Białkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncić, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Filip, P; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gaździcki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gładysz, E; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, P; Litov, L; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczyński, St; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Perl, K; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R; Retyk, W; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczyński, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitar, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranić, D; Wetzler, A; Włodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2004-01-30

    Results of resonance searches in the Xi(-)pi(-), Xi(-)pi(+), Xi;(+)pi(-), and Xi;(+)pi(+) invariant mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s]=17.2 GeV are presented. Evidence is shown for the existence of a narrow Xi(-)pi(-) baryon resonance with mass of 1.862+/-0.002 GeV/c(2) and width below the detector resolution of about 0.018 GeV/c(2). The significance is estimated to be above 4.2sigma. This state is a candidate for the hypothetical exotic Xi(--)(3/2) baryon with S=-2, I=3 / 2, and a quark content of (dsdsū). At the same mass, a peak is observed in the Xi(-)pi(+) spectrum which is a candidate for the Xi(0)(3/2) member of this isospin quartet with a quark content of (dsus[-]d). The corresponding antibaryon spectra also show enhancements at the same invariant mass.

  17. 1004 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    1004. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 2. 1005. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 3. 1006. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 4. 1007. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 5. 1008. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 6. 1009. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 7. 1010. RESONANCE ...

  18. Resonant microsphere gyroscope based on a double Faraday rotator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chengfeng; Tang, Jun; Cui, Danfeng; Wu, Dajin; Zhang, Chengfei; Li, Chunming; Zhen, Yongqiu; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun

    2016-10-15

    The resonant microsphere gyroscope is proposed based on a double Faraday rotator system for the resonant microsphere gyroscope (RMSG) that is characterized by low insertion losses and does not destroy the reciprocity of the gyroscope system. Use of the echo suppression structure and the orthogonal polarization method can effectively inhibit both the backscattering noise and the polarization error, and reduce them below the system sensitivity limit. The resonance asymmetry rate dropped from 34.2% to 2.9% after optimization of the backscattering noise and the polarization noise, which greatly improved the bias stability and the scale factor linearity of the proposed system. Additionally, based on the optimum parameters for the double Faraday rotator system, a bias stability of 0.04°/s has been established for an integration time of 10 s in 1000 s in a resonator microsphere gyroscope using a microsphere resonator with a diameter of 1 mm and a Q of 7.2×106.

  19. Three-body hadronic structure of low-lying 1/2+ Σ and Λ resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.P.; Oset, E.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the dynamical generation of some low-lying 1/2 + Σ's and Λ's in two-meson one-baryon systems. These systems have been constructed by adding a pion in the S-wave to the anti KN pair and its coupled channels, where the 1/2 - Λ(1405)-resonance gets dynamically generated. We solve Faddeev equations in the coupled-channel approach to calculate the T-matrix for these systems as a function of the total energy and the invariant mass of one of the meson-baryon pairs. This squared T-matrix shows peaks at the energies very close to the masses of the strangeness -1,1/2 + resonances listed in the particle data book. (orig.)

  20. Follow-up of regional myocardial T2 relaxation times in patients with myocardial infarction evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, X.H.; Wall, E. van der; Laarse, A. van der; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Doornbos, J.; Roos, A. de; Voorthuisen, A.E. van

    1990-01-01

    Multi-echo spin-echo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies (echo times 30, 60, 90 and 120 ms) were performed in 19 patients with a 7-14-day (mean 10) old myocardial infarction and were repeated in 13 patients 4-7 months (mean 6) later. Also, 10 normal subjects were studied with magnetic resonance imaging. T2 relaxation times of certain left ventricular segments were calculated from the signal intensities at echo times of 30 and 90 ms. Compared to normal individuals, the mean T2 values on the early magnetic resonance images of the patients with inferior infarction showed significantly prolonged T2 times in the inferiorly localized segments, while on the follow-up magnetic resonance images the T2 times had almost returned to the normal range. Also the patients with anterior infarction showed significantly prolonged T2 times in the anteriorly localized segments on the early nuclear magnetic resonance images, but the T2 times remained prolonged at the follow-up magnetic resonance images. For every patient a myocardial damage score was determined, which was defined as the sum of the segmental T2 values in the patients minus the upper limit of normal T2 values obtained from the normal volunteers (= mean normal+2SD). The damage score on both the early and late magnetic resonance imaging study correlated well with the infarction size determined by myocardial enzyme release. Only the patients with an inferior infarction showed a significant decrease in damage score at follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that the regional T2 relaxation times are increased in infarcted myocardial regions and may remain prolonged for at least up to 7 months after the acute event, particularly in patients with an anterior infarction. These findings demonstrate the clinical potential of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies for detecting myocardial infarction, and estimating infarct size for an extended period after acute myocardial infarction. (author). 29 refs

  1. Photoabsorption and S 2p photoionization of the SF6 molecule: resonances in the excitation energy range of 200-280 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stener, M; Bolognesi, P; Coreno, M; O'Keeffe, P; Feyer, V; Fronzoni, G; Decleva, P; Avaldi, L; Kivimäki, A

    2011-05-07

    Photoabsorption and S 2p photoionization of the SF(6) molecule have been studied experimentally and theoretically in the excitation energy range up to 100 eV above the S 2p ionization potentials. In addition to the well-known 2t(2g) and 4e(g) shape resonances, the spin-orbit-resolved S 2p photoionization cross sections display two weak resonances between 200 and 210 eV, a wide resonance around 217 eV, a Fano-type resonance around 240 eV, and a second wide resonance around 260 eV. Calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory allow us to assign the 217-eV and 260-eV features to the shape resonances in S 2p photoionization. The Fano resonance is caused by the interference between the direct S 2p photoionization channel and the resonant channel that results from the participator decay of the S 2s(-1)6t(1u) excited state. The weak resonances below 210-eV photon energy, not predicted by theory, are tentatively suggested to originate from the coupling between S 2p shake-up photoionization and S 2p single-hole photoionization. The experimental and calculated angular anisotropy parameters for S 2p photoionization are in good agreement.

  2. Does the Σ(1580)((3)/(2))- resonance exist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmsted, J.; Prakhov, S.; Manley, D.M.; Allgower, C.E.; Bekrenev, V.S.; Briscoe, W.J.; Clajus, M.; Comfort, J.R.; Craig, K.; Grosnick, D.; Isenhower, D.; Knecht, N.; Koetke, D.D.; Kozlenko, N.G.; Kruglov, S.; Kulbardis, A.A.; Lolos, G.; Lopatin, I.V.; Manweiler, R.; Marusic, A.; McDonald, S.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Papandreou, Z.; Peaslee, D.C.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Price, J.W.; Ramirez, A.F.; Sadler, M.; Shafi, A.; Spinka, H.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Starostin, A.; Staudenmaier, H.M.; Strakovsky, I.I.; Supek, I.; Tippens, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Precise new data for the reaction K - p→π 0 Λ are presented in the c.m. energy range 1565 to 1600 MeV. Our analysis of these data sheds new light on claims for the Σ(1580)((3)/(2)) - resonance, which (if it exists with the specified quantum numbers) must be an exotic baryon because of its very low mass. Our results show no evidence for this state

  3. Study on 2D arbitrary geometry coupling resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Lei; Wu Hongchun; Cao Liangzhi

    2014-01-01

    The paper firstly proposes a coupling resonance method in which subgroup method is employed in the serried peak energy region, and wavelet expansion method is employed in single peak energy region. The original subgroup model and wavelet expansion model are improved and coupled through the calculation of scattering source from subgroup to wavelet expansion, so that the self-shielding cross section in the whole energy region can be calculated accurately. To verify these theories and to prove the improvements, a PWR cell benchmark problem is calculated. It is demonstrated that, compared with other traditional multi-group resonance methods and continuous energy resonance method, this coupling resonance method has the ability to accurately calculate the whole energy region's self-shielding cross section while Keeping enough efficiency and finally has an ability to offer the accurate self-shielding parameters for latter transport, calculation. (authors)

  4. Tests of beta = 0.1 and development of beta = 0.2 lead plated quarter wave resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, D.W.; Goliak, T.; Seamster, A.G.; Brennan, J.M.; Coughlin, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype lead plated copper quarter wave resonator has been built for the University of Washington Superconducting Booster. The design of this resonator followed that of Brennan and Ben-Zvi. The drift tubes were built in Israel, and are identical to those built for the Weizmann Institute quarter wave resonators. The other dimensions of the resonator were similar to those of the Weizmann Institute unit, except the radius of the outer conductor was increased by one cm and the resonator was made slightly longer to reduce the frequency from about 160 to 150 MHz. This extra one cm in radius was used to increase the gap between the center and side drift tubes, so that the UW resonator had 5 cm gaps while both the design discussed by Brennan and Ben-Zvi and the resonators they built had 4 cm gaps. Both our resonator and the one they built had side drift tubes extending 2 cm radially inward, while the one discussed in Ref. 1 had 3 cm drift tubes. We anticipated that this increased gap would reduce the surface field at the center drift tube; however upon further consideration, it seems unlikely that it had much effect. The larger gap does decrease the gap transit time factor (by only about 2%) and increases the optimum velocity by about 17%. In addition, the larger diameter gives a larger stored energy but also, for the same average field, 12.5% more energy gain

  5. Measurements of the effective total and resonance absorption cross sections for zircaloy-2 and zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocic, A; Markovic, V [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1967-04-15

    Zirconium and zircaloy-2 alloy, as constructive materials, have found wide application in reactor technology, especially in heavy water systems for two reasons: a) low neutron absorption cross section, b) good mechanical properties. The thickness of the zirconium and zircaloy-2 for different applications varies from several tenths of a millimeter to about ten millimeters. Therefore, to calculate reactor systems it is desirable to know the effective neutron absorption cross section for the range of thicknesses mention above. The thermal neutron cross sections for these materials are low and no appreciable variation of the effective neutron cross section occurs even for the largest thicknesses. However, this is not true for effective resonance absorption. On the other hand, due to the lack of detailed knowledge of the zirconium resonances, calculations of the effective resonance integrals cannot be performed. Therefore it is necessary to measure the effective total and resonance absorption cross section for zirconium (author)

  6. Electron scattering from CO in the 2Pi resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.J.; Lohmann, B.

    1986-01-01

    The total cross section for electron scattering from CO in the energy range 0.5--5 eV has been measured with use of a time-of-flight spectrometer. This energy region encompasses the 2 π shape resonance, and a comparison is made with other experimental and theoretical results with regard to the magnitude and position of this structure

  7. A Single MEMS Resonator for Reconfigurable Multifunctional Logic Gates

    KAUST Repository

    Tella, Sherif Adekunle

    2018-04-30

    Despite recent efforts toward true electromechanical resonator-based computing, achieving complex logics functions through cascading micro resonators has been deterred by challenges involved in their interconnections and the large required array of resonators. In this work we present a single micro electromechanical resonator with two outputs that enables the realization of multifunctional logic gates as well as other complex logic operations. As examples, we demonstrate the realization of the fundamental 2-bit logic gates of OR, XOR, AND, NOR, and a half adder. The device is based on a compound resonator consisting of a clamped-guided electrostatically actuated arch beam that is attached to another resonant beam from the side, which serves as an additional actuation electrode for the arch. The structure is also provided with an additional electrothermal tuning capability. The logic operations are based on the linear frequency modulations of the arch resonator and side microbeam. The device is compatible with CMOS fabrication process and works at room temperature

  8. A Single MEMS Resonator for Reconfigurable Multifunctional Logic Gates

    KAUST Repository

    Tella, Sherif Adekunle; Alcheikh, Nouha; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2018-01-01

    Despite recent efforts toward true electromechanical resonator-based computing, achieving complex logics functions through cascading micro resonators has been deterred by challenges involved in their interconnections and the large required array of resonators. In this work we present a single micro electromechanical resonator with two outputs that enables the realization of multifunctional logic gates as well as other complex logic operations. As examples, we demonstrate the realization of the fundamental 2-bit logic gates of OR, XOR, AND, NOR, and a half adder. The device is based on a compound resonator consisting of a clamped-guided electrostatically actuated arch beam that is attached to another resonant beam from the side, which serves as an additional actuation electrode for the arch. The structure is also provided with an additional electrothermal tuning capability. The logic operations are based on the linear frequency modulations of the arch resonator and side microbeam. The device is compatible with CMOS fabrication process and works at room temperature

  9. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: kminaif@uol.com.br; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis. Unit of Abdomen; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology. Sector of Videlaparoscopy; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology

    2008-11-15

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  10. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  11. A new mass relation among the hadron vector resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhov, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    We show that the hadron vector resonances are described by fields transforming according to different inequivalent representations of the Lorentz group: (1/2,1/2) and (1,0)+(0,1). The vector representation (1/2,1/2) is well studied and corresponds to the gauge fields. On the other hand, the chiral representations (1,0) and (0,1) are described by the second rank antisymmetric tensor fields, for which interaction theory has not yet been constructed. In the framework of the phenomenological Nambu - Jona-Lasinio approach we have introduced and used all these fields for a description of the vector resonances. A new mass relation between low-lying hadron vector and axial-vector resonances is obtained. This relation is in agreement with the present experimental data.

  12. Observation of the M1 giant resonance by resonance averaging in 106Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of capture of 2 keV and 24 keV neutrons in a 105 Pd target resulted in resonance-averaged intensities of primary gamma rays with energies between 5.2 and 9.5 MeV. From these intensities the gamma ray strength functions have been evaluated for E1, M1 and E2 radiation and compared with predictions of the giant resonance theory. The inclusion of an energy dependent spreading width for the E1 giant resonance is necessary. The energy distribution of M1 reduced strength is consistent with an interpretation of a broad resonance around 8.8 MeV. E2 data agrees satisfactorily with the giant extrapolation. (orig.)

  13. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  14. Observation of overlapping spin-1 and spin-3 D0K- resonances at mass 2.86 GeV/c2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, Rf; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-17

    The resonant substructure of B(s)(0) → D(0)K(-)π(+) decays is studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb detector. An excess at m(D(0)K(-))≈ 2.86 GeV/c(2) is found to be an admixture of spin-1 and spin-3 resonances. Therefore, the D(sJ)*(2860)(-) state previously observed in inclusive e(+)e(-) → D(0)K(-)X and pp → D(0)K(-)X processes consists of at least two particles. This is the first observation of a heavy flavored spin-3 resonance, and the first time that any spin-3 particle has been seen to be produced in B decays. The masses and widths of the new states and of the D(s2)*(2573)(-) meson are measured, giving the most precise determinations to date.

  15. Harvesting energy from airflow with a michromachined piezoelectric harvester inside a Helmholtz resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matova, S P; Elfrink, R; Vullers, R J M; Van Schaijk, R

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report an airflow energy harvester that combines a piezoelectric energy harvester with a Helmholtz resonator. The resonator converts airflow energy to air oscillations which in turn are converted into electrical energy by a piezoelectric harvester. Two Helmholtz resonators with adjustable resonance frequencies have been designed—one with a solid bottom and one with membrane on the bottom. The resonance frequencies of the resonators were matched to the complementing piezoelectric harvesters during harvesting. The aim of the presented work is a feasibility study on using packaged piezoelectric energy harvesters with Helmholtz resonators for airflow energy harvesting. The maximum energy we were able to obtain was 42.2 µW at 20 m s −1

  16. Narrow dibaryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdalov, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data on np interactions indicating to existence of narrow resonances in pp-system are discussed. Possible theoretical interpretations of these resonances are given. Experimental characteristics of the dibaryon resonances with isospin I=2 are considered

  17. Resonance Raman Spectra of the Transient Cl2 and Br2 Radical Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, Niels-Henrik; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectra of the short-lived radical anions ClImage 2− and BrImage − in aqueous solution are reported. The observed wavenumbers of 279 cm−1 for ClImage − and 177 cm−1 for BrImage − are about 10% higher than those published for the corresponding species isolated in solid argon ma...

  18. Resonant photoelectron spectroscopy at the Mo 4p→4d absorption edge in MoS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lince, J.R.; Didziulis, S.V.; Yarmoff, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic study has been conducted of the resonant behavior of the valence-band photoelectron spectrum of MoS 2 for hν=26--70 eV, spanning the Mo 4p→4d transition region. A broad Fano-like resonance appears at ∼42 eV in the constant-initial-state (CIS) intensity plot of the d z 2 peak near the valence-band maximum [∼2 eV binding energy (BE)], confirming its predominantly Mo 4d character. A second shoulder on the higher-hν side of the maximum in the d z 2 CIS intensity plot is suggested to result from transitions to unoccupied states in the 5sp band ∼10 eV above E F , by comparison with a partial-yield spectrum and previous inverse-photoemission data. The region of the valence band in the range 3--4.5-eV BE also exhibits resonant behavior, indicating Mo 4d character, although somewhat less than for the d z 2 peak. The 5--7-eV BE range does not exhibit resonance behavior at the Mo 4p edge and, therefore, contains negligible Mo 4d character. A feature at ∼30 eV in the CIS intensity plot for the 5--7-eV BE range could not be definitively assigned in this study, but may be due to a resonance between direct photoemission and a process involving absorption and autoionization of electronic states that contain Mo 5s and 5p character

  19. Lateral acoustic wave resonator comprising a suspended membrane of low damping resonator material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady; , Ihab F.; Ziaei-Moayyed, Maryam; Branch; , Darren W.; Su; Mehmet F.,; Reinke; Charles M.,

    2013-09-03

    A very high-Q, low insertion loss resonator can be achieved by storing many overtone cycles of a lateral acoustic wave (i.e., Lamb wave) in a lithographically defined suspended membrane comprising a low damping resonator material, such as silicon carbide. The high-Q resonator can sets up a Fabry-Perot cavity in a low-damping resonator material using high-reflectivity acoustic end mirrors, which can comprise phononic crystals. The lateral overtone acoustic wave resonator can be electrically transduced by piezoelectric couplers. The resonator Q can be increased without increasing the impedance or insertion loss by storing many cycles or wavelengths in the high-Q resonator material, with much lower damping than the piezoelectric transducer material.

  20. Multiquark resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The invariant mass spectra of forty nine hadronic systems with hypercharge, strangeness and baryon number, varied in wide limits have been studied. Resonance peaks have been found in the invariant mass spectra of Y 2 and #betta#pπ 2495 MeV/c 2 resonant states. Three more candidates for anti qq 4 states were found #bettaπ# + π + : 1705, 2072, 2605 MeV/c 2 . The masses of all these candidates are in good agreement with Bag Model predictions. A hypercharge selection rule is suggested: ''The hypercharge of hadronic resonances in weak gravitational fields cannot exceed one Y <= 1

  1. Coupling effects of resonant and discretized non-resonant continuum states in 4He+6Li scattering at 10 MeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, T.; Kanungo, R.; Samanta, C.; Ghosh, S.; Basu, P.; Rebel, H.

    1996-01-01

    Alpha- particle scattering from the resonant (3 + 1 ) and non-resonant continuum states of 6 Li is studied at incident energy 10 MeV/A. The α+d breakup continuum part within the excitation energy E ex = 1.475-2.475 MeV is discretized in two energy bins. Unlike the results at higher incident energies, here the coupled-channel calculations show significant breakup continuum coupling effects on the elastic and inelastic scattering. It is shown that even when the continuum-continuum coupling effects are strong, the experimental data of the ground state and the resonant as well as discretized non-resonant continuum states impose stringent constraint on the coupling strengths of the non-resonant continuum states. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Resonance-induced deviations of β from 2.0 for rare gas s-subshell photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, S B; Wehlitz, R; Varma, H R; Banerjee, T; Deshmukh, P C; Manson, S T

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the case of resonance-induced deviations of the angular distribution anisotropy parameter, β, from its nominal value of 2.0 for the Kr 4s-subshell at the 3d → mp(m ≥ 5) excitations and the Xe 5s-subshell in the region of the 4d → mp(m ≥ 6) excitations. We observe small but unmistakable variations of β from 2.0 at these resonances. In the case of Kr the largest deviation from 2.0 is a mere -0.030(6), β 4s = 1.970(6), while in Xe it is definitively larger at -0.080(6), β 5s 1.920(6). To understand these results in more detail, we have carried out relativistic random phase and relativistic multi-channel quantum defect calculations. Our theoretical results clearly indicate deviations of β from 2.0 for these photolines in these resonance regions, although the degree of variation is predicted to be larger than what is observed. (letter to the editor)

  3. Nonlinear resonance and dynamical chaos in a diatomic molecule driven by a resonant ir field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G.P.; Bulgakov, E.N.; Holm, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the transition from regular motion to dynamical chaos in a classical model of a diatomic molecule which is driven by a circularly polarized resonant ir field. Under the conditions of a nearly two-dimensional case, the Hamiltonian reduces to that for the nonintegrable motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic wave [A. J. Lichtenberg and M. A. Lieberman, Regular and Stochastic Motion (Springer-Verlag, City, 1983)]. In the general case, the transition to chaos is connected with the overlapping of vibrational-rotational nonlinear resonances and appears even at rather low radiation field intensity, S approx-gt 1 GW/cm 2 . We also discuss the possibility of experimentally observing this transition

  4. High resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla using PROPELLER-EPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Martin; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group

    2014-09-01

    We report the application of PROPELLER-EPI for high resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging with sub-millimeter in-plane resolution on a clinical 3 Tesla scanner. Periodically rotated blades of a long-axis PROPELLER-EPI sequence were acquired with fast gradient echo readout and acquisition matrix of 320 x 50 per blade. Images were reconstructed by using 2D-gridding, phase and geometric distortion correction and compensation of resonance frequency drifts that occurred during extended measurements. To characterize these resonance frequency offsets, short FID calibration measurements were added to the PROPELLER-EPI sequence. Functional PROPELLER-EPI was performed with volunteers using a simple block design of right handed finger tapping. Results indicate that PROPELLER-EPI can be employed for fast, high resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging provided geometric distortions and possible resonance frequency drifts are properly corrected. Even small resonance frequency drifts below 10 Hz as well as non-corrected geometric distortions degraded image quality substantially. In the initial fMRI experiment image quality and signal-to-noise ratio was sufficient for obtaining high resolution functional activation maps. (orig.)

  5. Structure and resonances of the e+–He(1s2s 3Se) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhenzhong; Han Huili; Shi Tingyun; Mitroy, J

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the geometry and resonances of the e + He( 3 S e ) system in the framework of hyperspherical coordinates. A model potential proposed by us is used to describe the interaction between the out electron with the He + ionic core. The calculated binding energy and expectation distance of the system are in agreement with other calculations. In addition, two resonances below the e + –He(1s3s 3 S e ) threshold and one resonance below the Ps(n=2)–He + threshold are identified. (paper)

  6. Technology of discharge and laser resonators for high power CO2 lasers. Koshutsuryoku CO2 laser ni tsukawareru hoden reiki laser kyoshinki gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Y.; Kuzumoto, M. (Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-20

    This paper describes discharge excitation technology and resonator technology as basic technologies for high power CO2 lasers. As a result of progress in high-frequency power element techniques, the discharge excitation technology now generally uses laser excitation using AC discharge of capacity coupling type. Its representative example is silent discharge (SD) excitation. This is a system to excite laser by applying high voltages with as high frequency as 100 kHz to 1 MHz across a pair of electrodes covered with a dielectric material. The system maintains stability in discharge even if power supply voltage amplitude is modulated, and easily provides pulse outputs. Discharge excitation for diffusion cooled type CO2 laser generates a discharge in a gap with a gap length of about 2 mm, and can perform gas cooling by means of thermal conduction of gas, whereas a compact resonator can be fabricated. A resonator for the diffusion cooled type CO2 laser eliminates gas circulation and cooling systems, hence the device can be made more compact. A report has been given that several of these compact resonators were combined, from which a laser output of 85W was obtained by using RF discharge of 2kW. 43 refs., 21 figs.

  7. The Co59 nuclear magnetic resonances in (Ysub(1-x)Gdsub(x))2Co17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Hiroyuki; Yoshie, Hiroshi; Unate, Takao; Tsujimura, Akira; Deportes, J.

    1976-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonances of Co 59 in (Ysub(1-x)Gdsub(x)) 2 Co 17 have been observed at 77 K as a function of x (0 2 Co 17 and Gd 2 Co 17 is at most 7 kOe in magnitude, which is comparable to that obtained in GdCo 5 . The sign of the obtained difference depends on the Co sites. The difference is qualitatively explained as the contribution of 4f electrons of Gd atoms to the hyperfine field. The temperature dependence of the resonance frequencies in Gd 2 Co 17 has also been measured. (auth.)

  8. Dust grain resonant capture: A statistical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzari, F.; Vanzani, V.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical approach, based on a large number of simultaneous numerical integrations, is adopted to study the capture in external mean motion resonances with the Earth of micron size dust grains perturbed by solar radiation and wind forces. We explore the dependence of the resonant capture phenomenon on the initial eccentricity e(sub 0) and perihelion argument w(sub 0) of the dust particle orbit. The intensity of both the resonant and dissipative (Poynting-Robertson and wind drag) perturbations strongly depends on the eccentricity of the particle while the perihelion argument determines, for low inclination, the mutual geometrical configuration of the particle's orbit with respect to the Earth's orbit. We present results for three j:j+1 commensurabilities (2:3, 4:5 and 6:7) and also for particle sizes s = 15, 30 microns. This study extends our previous work on the long term orbital evolution of single dust particles trapped into resonances with the Earth.

  9. Resonance studies of H atoms adsorbed on frozen H2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crampton, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Observations are reported of the ground state hyperfine resonance of hydrogen atoms stored in a 5 cm. diameter bottle coated with frozen molecular hydrogen. Dephasing of the hyperfine resonance while the atoms are adsorbed produces frequency shifts which vary by a factor of two over the temperature range 3.7 K to 4.6 K and radiative decay rates which vary by a factor of five over this range. The magnitudes and temperature dependences of the frequency shifts and decay rates are consistent with a non-uniform distribution of surface adsorption energies with mean about 38(8) K, in agreement with theoretical estimates for a smooth surface. Extrapolation of the 30 nanosec. mean adsorption times at 4.2 K predicts very long adsorption times for H on H 2 below 1 K. Studies of level population recovery rates provide evidence for surface electron spin exchange collisions between adsorbed atoms with collision duration long compared to the hyperfine period, suggesting that the atoms are partially mobile on the surface. The lowest rates observed for level population recovery set a lower limit of about 500 atom-surface collisions at 4.2 K without recombination

  10. Sample-size resonance, ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO3/paraffin composites at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Jia; An, Taiyu; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance can be observed in appropriate microwave frequencies at room temperature for multiferroic nano-BiFeO 3 /paraffin composite sample with an appropriate sample-thickness (such as 2 mm). Ferromagnetic resonance originates from the room-temperature weak ferromagnetism of nano-BiFeO 3 . The observed magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO 3 is connected with the dynamic magnetoelectric coupling through Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM) magnetoelectric interaction or the combination of magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects. In addition, we experimentally observed the resonance of negative imaginary permeability for nano BiFeO 3 /paraffin toroidal samples with longer sample thicknesses D=3.7 and 4.9 mm. Such resonance of negative imaginary permeability belongs to sample-size resonance. - Highlights: • Nano-BiFeO 3 /paraffin composite shows a ferromagnetic resonance. • Nano-BiFeO 3 /paraffin composite shows a magneto-permittivity resonance. • Resonance of negative imaginary permeability in BiFeO 3 is a sample-size resonance. • Nano-BiFeO 3 /paraffin composite with large thickness shows a sample-size resonance.

  11. Resonant dynamics of gravitationally bound pair of binaries: the case of 1:1 resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, Slawomir; Vokrouhlický, David

    2018-04-01

    The work presents a study of the 1:1 resonance case in a hierarchical quadruple stellar system of the 2+2 type. The resonance appears if orbital periods of both binaries are approximately equal. It is assumed that both periods are significantly shorter than the period of principal orbit of one binary with respect to the other. In these circumstances, the problem can be treated as three independent Kepler problems perturbed by mutual gravitational interactions. By means of canonical perturbation methods, the planar problem is reduced to a secular system with 1 degree of freedom involving a resonance angle (the difference of mean longitudes of the binaries) and its conjugate momentum (involving the ratio of orbital period in one binary to the period of principal orbit). The resonant model is supplemented with short periodic perturbations expressions, and verified by the comparison with numerical integration of the original equations of motion. Estimates of the binaries periods variations indicate that the effect is rather weak, but possibly detectible if it occurs in a moderately compact system. However, the analysis of resonance capture scenarios implies that the 1:1 resonance should be exceptional amongst the 2+2 quadruples.

  12. Braking due to non-resonant magnetic perturbations and comparison with neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Sun, Y.; Fridström, R.; Menmuir, S.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Khan, M. W. M.; Liang, Y.; Drake, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    The non-resonant magnetic perturbation (MP) braking is studied in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (RFP) and the experimental braking torque is compared with the torque expected by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory. The EXTRAP T2R active coils can apply magnetic perturbations with a single harmonic, either resonant or non-resonant. The non-resonant MP produces velocity braking with an experimental torque that affects a large part of the core region. The experimental torque is clearly related to the plasma displacement, consistent with a quadratic dependence as expected by the NTV theory. The work show a good qualitative agreement between the experimental torque in a RFP machine and NTV torque concerning both the torque density radial profile and the dependence on the non-resonant MP harmonic.

  13. Radiative decays of the upsilon (2S) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, J.

    1984-04-01

    The Crystal Ball Detector at DORIS II was used to study radiative decays of the upsilon (2S) resonance with more than twice the previously available data. The inclusive photon spectrum of hadronic upsilon (2S) decays and the exclusive channel upsilon (2S) → γγ upsilon (1S) → γγ l + l - were analyzed. In the inclusive spectrum three significant photon lines at energies of Eγ 1 = (108.2 +- 0.7 +- 4) MeV, Eγ 1 = (127.1 +- 0.8 +- 4) MeV and Eγ 3 = (160.0 +- 2.4 +- 4) MeV with branching fractions of (6.0 +- 0.7 +- 0.9)%, (6.6 +- 0.8 +- 1.0)%, (2.6 +- 0.7 +- 0.8)% respectively were measured. The lines are consistent with being transitions from the upsilon (2S) to the 3 P 2 , 3 P 1 and 3 P 0 states. In addition a line at Eγ approx. 427 MeV was observed which is interpreted as transitions from the 3 P 2 1 states to the upsilon (1S). 17 references

  14. Ferromagnetic resonance in a Ni-Mo superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechan, M.J.; Salamon, M.B.; Schuller, I.K.

    1985-01-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements, at room temperature and at 4.2 K, have been made on a layered Ni (249 A)-Mo(83 A) superlattice. We have examined the resonance position as a function of the angle between the film normal and the applied field. The measured g value agrees with that of bulk Ni, but the magnetization is lower than that obtained for bulk Ni and also for this sample using both light scattering and direct measurement techniques. This low magnetization contrasts with FMR measurements on compositionally modulated Ni-Cu samples, where the magnetization was reported to be greater than that of bulk Ni. We show that a reduced value of the magnetization is consistent with perpendicular uniaxial anisotropy. When the applied field is less than 20 0 from the surface normal, additional lines appear that move to higher fields than the main resonance. These lines are consistent with the existence of nonuniform regions of distinct magnetization. An observed resonance, which is suggestive of a spin-wave mode, is discussed

  15. A new theoretical approach to resonant dtμ formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E.A.G.

    1996-01-01

    A key process in the muon-catalysed fusion cycle is a low-energy collision of Tμ with a D 2 molecule which leads, at appropriate incident energies, to the formation of a resonant complex containing DTμ. In this paper the result is described of a formal derivation of the partial wave cross section for resonant DTμ formation, which makes use of elements of Feshbach's treatment of resonances. The expression obtained is similar to the Breit-Wigner formula. Full details of the calculation will be published elsewhere. (orig.)

  16. Optimized coplanar waveguide resonators for a superconductor–atom interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, M. A., E-mail: mabeck2@wisc.edu; Isaacs, J. A.; Booth, D.; Pritchard, J. D.; Saffman, M.; McDermott, R. [Department of Physics, University Of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-29

    We describe the design and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities tailored to facilitate strong coupling between superconducting quantum circuits and single trapped Rydberg atoms. For initial superconductor–atom experiments at 4.2 K, we show that resonator quality factors above 10{sup 4} can be readily achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the incorporation of thick-film copper electrodes at a voltage antinode of the resonator provides a route to enhance the zero-point electric fields of the resonator in a trapping region that is 40 μm above the chip surface, thereby minimizing chip heating from scattered trap light. The combination of high resonator quality factor and strong electric dipole coupling between the resonator and the atom should make it possible to achieve the strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics with this system.

  17. A Compact Multiband BPF Using Step-impedance Resonators with Interdigital Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Meesomklin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A compact multiband band-pass filter design for applications of GSM, Wi-MAX and WLAN systems is presented. The design is based on the resonant characteristics of step-impedance and interdigital capacitor resonators with overlap cross coupling structure. The fabricated filter has been operated at the fundamental, first and second harmonic resonant frequencies of 1.8 GHz, 3.7 GHz, and 5.2 GHz, respectively. The experimental results of the fabricated filter agree very well with the simulation expectations using IE3D package. The proposed filter has good performances, while the resonator size can be reduced from λ/2 to λ/8, resulting in the most compact multiband band-pass filter compared with the others using transmission line resonators .

  18. Resonant enhancement of band-to-band tunneling in in-plane MoS2/WS2 heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tatsuya; Mori, Nobuya

    2018-04-01

    The band-to-band (BTB) tunneling current J through in-plane MoS2/WS2 heterojunctions is calculated by the nonequilibrium Green function method combined with tight-binding approximation. Types A and B of band configurations are considered. For type-A (type-B) heterojunctions, a potential notch exists (or is absent) at the heterointerface. Both type-A and type-B MoS2/WS2 heterojunctions can support a higher BTB current than MoS2 and WS2 homojunctions. For type-A heterojunctions, the resonant enhancement of J occurs resulting in a significantly higher BTB tunneling current.

  19. A resonant dc-dc power converter assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a resonant DC-DC power converter assembly comprising a first resonant DC-DC power converter and a second resonant DC-DC power converter having identical circuit topologies. A first inductor of the first resonant DC-DC power converter and a second inductor of the s......The present invention relates to a resonant DC-DC power converter assembly comprising a first resonant DC-DC power converter and a second resonant DC-DC power converter having identical circuit topologies. A first inductor of the first resonant DC-DC power converter and a second inductor...... of the second resonant DC-DC power converter are configured for magnetically coupling the first and second resonant DC-DC power converters to each other to forcing substantially 180 degrees phase shift, or forcing substantially 0 degree phase shift, between corresponding resonant voltage waveforms of the first...

  20. Sample-size resonance, ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composites at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Jia; An, Taiyu; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan, E-mail: hujf@sdu.edu.cn

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance can be observed in appropriate microwave frequencies at room temperature for multiferroic nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composite sample with an appropriate sample-thickness (such as 2 mm). Ferromagnetic resonance originates from the room-temperature weak ferromagnetism of nano-BiFeO{sub 3}. The observed magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO{sub 3} is connected with the dynamic magnetoelectric coupling through Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM) magnetoelectric interaction or the combination of magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects. In addition, we experimentally observed the resonance of negative imaginary permeability for nano BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin toroidal samples with longer sample thicknesses D=3.7 and 4.9 mm. Such resonance of negative imaginary permeability belongs to sample-size resonance. - Highlights: • Nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composite shows a ferromagnetic resonance. • Nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composite shows a magneto-permittivity resonance. • Resonance of negative imaginary permeability in BiFeO{sub 3} is a sample-size resonance. • Nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composite with large thickness shows a sample-size resonance.

  1. Doubly-resonant coherent excitation of HCI planar channeled in a Si crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Y; Masugi, S; Muranaka, T; Azuma, T; Kondo, C; Hatakeyama, A; Komaki, K; Yamazaki, Y; Takada, E; Murakami, T

    2007-01-01

    We investigated resonant coherent excitation of H-like Ar 17+ and He-like Ar 16+ ions planar channeled in a Si crystal under the V-type and ladder-type double resonance conditions. In both cases, we observed distinct enhancement in the ionized fraction of the transmitted ions when the double resonance conditions were satisfied. In the ladder-type configuration, the enhancement indicates that the doubly-excited 2p 2 state of He-like Ar 16+ was produced through doubly-resonant coherent excitation

  2. Collaborative resonant writing and musical improvisation to explore the concept of resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvang, Charlotte; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    2018-01-01

    phenomenon consisting of physical vibrations and acoustic sounding that offers a clear logic, and (2) a metaphorical conceptualization used to describe and understand complex psychological processes of human relationships. The process of collaborative writing led to the discovery or development of a ninestep......Resonance is often used to characterize relationships, but it is a complex concept that explains quite different physical, physiological and psychological processes. With the aim of gaining deeper insight into the concept of resonance, a group of ten music therapy researchers, all colleagues...... procedure including different collaborative resonant writing procedures and musical improvisation, as well as of a series of metaphors to explain therapeutic interaction, resonant learning and ways of resonant exploration....

  3. Membrane metamaterial resonators with a sharp resonance: A comprehensive study towards practical terahertz filters and sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyao Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the resonant properties of high quality-factor membrane-based metamaterial resonators functioning in the terahertz regime. A number of factors, including the resonator geometry, dielectric loss, and most importantly the membrane thickness are found to extensively influence the resonance strength and quality factor of the sharp resonance. Further studies on the membrane thickness-dependent-sensitivity for sensing applications reveal that high quality-factor membrane metamaterials with a moderate thickness ranging from 10 to 50 μm are the most promising option towards developing realistic integrated terahertz filters and sensors.

  4. Josephson soliton oscillators in a superconducting thin film resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, J.; Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1993-01-01

    Josephson soliton oscillators integrated in a resonator consisting of two closely spaced coplanar superconducting microstrips have been investigated experimentally. Pairs of long 1-D Josephson junctions with a current density of about 1000 A/cm2 were made using the Nb-AlOx-Nb trilayer technique....... Different modes of half-wave resonances in the thin-film structure impose different magnetic field configurations at the boundaries of the junctions. The DC I-V characteristic shows zero-field steps with a number of resonator-induced steps. These structures are compared to RF-induced steps generated...

  5. Electron Dynamics in the Core-Excited CS 2 Molecule Revealed through Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Marchenko , T; Carniato , S; Journel , L; Guillemin , R; Kawerk , E; Žitnik , M; Kavčič , M; Bučar , K; Bohinc , R; Petric , M; Vaz Da Cruz , V; Gel 'mukhanov , F; Simon , Marielle

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We present an experimental and theoretical study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in the carbon disulphide CS 2 molecule near the sulfur K-absorption edge. We observe a strong evolution of the RIXS spectral profile with the excitation energy tuned below the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) absorption resonance. The reason for this is twofold. Reducing the photon energy in the vicinity of the LUMO absorption resonance leads to a relative suppressi...

  6. Progressive and resonant wave helices application to electron paramagnetic resonance; Helices a ondes progressives et resonnantes application a la resonance paramagnetique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volino, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    We show that helices can be used as resonant systems. Their properties are theoretically and experimentally studied. We describe resonant helices for electron paramagnetic resonance in X-band and develop a comparison between their sensitivity and the sensitivity of a normal resonant cavity. For cylindrical samples less than 3 mm diameter, the helix is more sensitive and can produce more intense microwave magnetic fields. (author) [French] Il est montre que les helices peuvent etre utilisees comme systeme resonnant. Leurs proprietes sont discutees theoriquement et experimentalement. Des helices resonnantes en bande X pour la resonance paramagnetique electronique sont decrites et leur sensibilite est comparee a celle des cavites resonnantes. Pour des echantillons cylindriques de moins de 3 mm de diametre, l'helice est plus sensible et peut produire des champs magnetiques hyper fins plus intenses. (auteur)

  7. A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on parametric resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surappa, Sushruta; Satir, Sarp; Levent Degertekin, F.

    2017-07-01

    A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on a parametric resonator structure is described and experimentally demonstrated. The transducer structure, which we call capacitive parametric ultrasonic transducer (CPUT), uses a parallel plate capacitor with a movable membrane as part of a degenerate parametric series RLC resonator circuit with a resonance frequency of fo. When the capacitor plate is driven with an incident harmonic ultrasonic wave at the pump frequency of 2fo with sufficient amplitude, the RLC circuit becomes unstable and ultrasonic energy can be efficiently converted to an electrical signal at fo frequency in the RLC circuit. An important characteristic of the CPUT is that unlike other electrostatic transducers, it does not require DC bias or permanent charging to be used as a receiver. We describe the operation of the CPUT using an analytical model and numerical simulations, which shows drive amplitude dependent operation regimes including parametric resonance when a certain threshold is exceeded. We verify these predictions by experiments with a micromachined membrane based capacitor structure in immersion where ultrasonic waves incident at 4.28 MHz parametrically drive a signal with significant amplitude in the 2.14 MHz RLC circuit. With its unique features, the CPUT can be particularly advantageous for applications such as wireless power transfer for biomedical implants and acoustic sensing.

  8. The ferro-resonance, a phenomenon sometimes chaotic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, P; Kieny, J C; Riouai, M [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France)

    1996-04-01

    The ferro-resonance is a resonance phenomenon involving the saturation of the magnetic core in transformers; in particular, it is generated by the energization of that equipment during a power system restoration. It exhibits classical periodic regimes, but also more complex ones, as harmonic, pseudo-periodic, even chaotic, which have been measured on site or during laboratory tests. The mathematical analysis of this phenomenon belongs to the theory of bifurcations; the use of a program solving non linear systems may lead to a better understanding of the observed overvoltages. (authors). 14 figs., 2 photos.

  9. Effect of resonant tunneling on electroluminescence in nc-Si/SiO2 multilayers-based p-i-n structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.Y.; Wang, Y.Y.; Sun, Y.; He, Y.J.; Zhang, G.

    2015-01-01

    P-i-n structures with SiO 2 /nc-Si/SiO 2 multilayers as intrinsic layer were prepared in conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. Their carrier transport and electroluminescence properties were investigated. Two resonant tunneling related current peaks with current dropping gradually under forward bias were observed in the current voltage curve. Non-uniformity of the interfaces might be responsible for the gradual dropping of the current. Electroluminescence intensity of the device under bias of 7 V which is near the resonant tunneling peak voltage of 7.2 V was weaker than that under 6.5 V. According to the Gaussian fitting results of the spectra, the intensity of the sub-peak of 650 nm originating from recombination of injected electrons and holes was decreased the most. When resonant tunneling conditions are met, it might be that most of the injected electrons participate in resonant tunneling and fewer in Pool–Frenkel tunneling, which is the main carrier transport mechanism, to contribute to electroluminescence intensity. - Highlights: • Two resonant tunneling peaks with current dropping gradually were observed. • The EL intensity of the structure under resonant tunneling peak voltage is weakened. • P–F tunneling is the main transport mechanism besides resonant tunneling

  10. A Search for ttbar Resonances with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Livermore, SSA

    2012-01-01

    A search for resonant production of ttbar pairs with data collected in 2011 by ATLAS. The analyses presented here concentrate on the lepton + jets and fully leptonic final states, with datasets corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 2.05 and 1.04 fb-1 respectively. Limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio to top quark pairs of resonances predicted by key benchmark models. Prospects are also presented for an analysis tailored to the search for high mass resonances which decay to pairs of "boosted" top quarks with large transverse momenta.

  11. BIS-2 spectrometer for search and investigation of narrow resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleev, A.N.; Aref'ev, V.A.; Balandin, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    The configuration and main characteristics of the BIS-2 spectrometer are described. The spectrometer was intended to search for and to investigate charmed particles and narrow resonances produced in neutron-nucleus interactions. It was placed on a neutron beam of the Serpukhov accelerator. The Monte-Carlo simulated and experimentally measured characteristics of individual elements and the spectrometer as a whole are described. A brief review of the principal results based on the analysis of more than 10 7 neutron-nucleus interactions registered by means of the BIS-2 spectrometer is given. 34 refs.; 8 figs.; 5 tabs

  12. Polarization of nuclear spins by a cold nanoscale resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Mark C.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    A cold nanoscale resonator coupled to a system of nuclear spins can induce spin relaxation. In the low-temperature limit where spin-lattice interactions are ''frozen out,'' spontaneous emission by nuclear spins into a resonant mechanical mode can become the dominant mechanism for cooling the spins to thermal equilibrium with their environment. We provide a theoretical framework for the study of resonator-induced cooling of nuclear spins in this low-temperature regime. Relaxation equations are derived from first principles, in the limit where energy donated by the spins to the resonator is quickly dissipated into the cold bath that damps it. A physical interpretation of the processes contributing to spin polarization is given. For a system of spins that have identical couplings to the resonator, the interaction Hamiltonian conserves spin angular momentum, and the resonator cannot relax the spins to thermal equilibrium unless this symmetry is broken by the spin Hamiltonian. The mechanism by which such a spin system becomes ''trapped'' away from thermal equilibrium can be visualized using a semiclassical model, which shows how an indirect spin-spin interaction arises from the coupling of multiple spins to one resonator. The internal spin Hamiltonian can affect the polarization process in two ways: (1) By modifying the structure of the spin-spin correlations in the energy eigenstates, and (2) by splitting the degeneracy within a manifold of energy eigenstates, so that zero-frequency off-diagonal terms in the density matrix are converted to oscillating coherences. Shifting the frequencies of these coherences sufficiently far from zero suppresses the development of resonator-induced correlations within the manifold during polarization from a totally disordered state. Modification of the spin-spin correlations by means of either mechanism affects the strength of the fluctuating spin dipole that drives the resonator. In the case where product states can be chosen as energy

  13. Progressive and resonant wave helices application to electron paramagnetic resonance; Helices a ondes progressives et resonnantes application a la resonance paramagnetique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volino, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    We show that helices can be used as resonant systems. Their properties are theoretically and experimentally studied. We describe resonant helices for electron paramagnetic resonance in X-band and develop a comparison between their sensitivity and the sensitivity of a normal resonant cavity. For cylindrical samples less than 3 mm diameter, the helix is more sensitive and can produce more intense microwave magnetic fields. (author) [French] Il est montre que les helices peuvent etre utilisees comme systeme resonnant. Leurs proprietes sont discutees theoriquement et experimentalement. Des helices resonnantes en bande X pour la resonance paramagnetique electronique sont decrites et leur sensibilite est comparee a celle des cavites resonnantes. Pour des echantillons cylindriques de moins de 3 mm de diametre, l'helice est plus sensible et peut produire des champs magnetiques hyper fins plus intenses. (auteur)

  14. Non-monotonic resonance in a spatially forced Lengyel-Epstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haim, Lev [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Department of Oncology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva 84101 (Israel); Hagberg, Aric [Center for Nonlinear Studies, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Meron, Ehud [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus, Midreshet Ben-Gurion 84990 (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    We study resonant spatially periodic solutions of the Lengyel-Epstein model modified to describe the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction under spatially periodic illumination. Using multiple-scale analysis and numerical simulations, we obtain the stability ranges of 2:1 resonant solutions, i.e., solutions with wavenumbers that are exactly half of the forcing wavenumber. We show that the width of resonant wavenumber response is a non-monotonic function of the forcing strength, and diminishes to zero at sufficiently strong forcing. We further show that strong forcing may result in a π/2 phase shift of the resonant solutions, and argue that the nonequilibrium Ising-Bloch front bifurcation can be reversed. We attribute these behaviors to an inherent property of forcing by periodic illumination, namely, the increase of the mean spatial illumination as the forcing amplitude is increased.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics and Bifurcation Behavior of a 2-DOF Spring Resonator with End Stopper for Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Aroudi A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the model of a two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF spring resonator with end stopper for an energy harvesting application is presented. Then we characterize its nonlinear dynamical behavior by numerical simulations when some suitable parameters are varied. The system is formed by two resonators subject to external vibrational excitation and with an end stopper. We present the continuous time dynamical model of the system in the form of a switched fourth order differential equation. Harmonic vibrations are considered as the main ambient energy source for the system and its frequency response representing the RMS value of the displacement is first computed. The dynamical behavior is unveiled by computing state-space trajectories, timedomain series and FFT spectra and frequency response as the excitation amplitude is varied.

  16. Does the {sigma}(1580)((3)/(2)){sup -} resonance exist?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmsted, J.; Prakhov, S.; Manley, D.M.; Allgower, C.E.; Bekrenev, V.S.; Briscoe, W.J.; Clajus, M.; Comfort, J.R.; Craig, K.; Grosnick, D.; Isenhower, D.; Knecht, N.; Koetke, D.D.; Kozlenko, N.G.; Kruglov, S.; Kulbardis, A.A.; Lolos, G.; Lopatin, I.V.; Manweiler, R.; Marusic, A.; McDonald, S.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Papandreou, Z.; Peaslee, D.C.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Price, J.W.; Ramirez, A.F.; Sadler, M.; Shafi, A.; Spinka, H.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Starostin, A.; Staudenmaier, H.M.; Strakovsky, I.I.; Supek, I.; Tippens, W.B

    2004-05-20

    Precise new data for the reaction K{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{lambda} are presented in the c.m. energy range 1565 to 1600 MeV. Our analysis of these data sheds new light on claims for the {sigma}(1580)((3)/(2)){sup -} resonance, which (if it exists with the specified quantum numbers) must be an exotic baryon because of its very low mass. Our results show no evidence for this state.

  17. A few words about resonances in the electroweak effective Lagrangian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosell, Ignasi [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Matemáticas y de la Computación, Universidad CEU Cardenal Herrera, c/ Sant Bartomeu 55, 46115 Alfara del Patriarca, València (Spain); Pich, Antonio; Santos, Joaquín [Departament de Física Teòrica, IFIC, Universitat de València – CSIC, Apt. Correus 22085, 46071 València (Spain); Sanz-Cillero, Juan José [Departamento de Física Teórica and Instituto Física Teórica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-22

    Contrary to a widely spread believe, we have demonstrated that strongly coupled electroweak models including both a light Higgs-like boson and massive spin-1 resonances are not in conflict with experimental constraints on the oblique S and T parameters. We use an effective Lagrangian implementing the chiral symmetry breaking SU (2){sub L} ⊗ SU (2){sub R} → SU (2){sub L+R} that contains the Standard Model gauge bosons coupled to the electroweak Goldstones, one Higgs-like scalar state h with mass m{sub h} = 126 GeV and the lightest vector and axial-vector resonance multiplets V and A. We have considered the one-loop calculation of S and T in order to study the viability of these strongly-coupled scenarios, being short-distance constraints and dispersive relations the main ingredients of the calculation. Once we have constrained the resonance parameters, we do a first approach to the determination of the low energy constants of the electroweak effective theory at low energies (without resonances). We show this determination in the case of the purely Higgsless bosonic Lagrangian.

  18. Reflection effect of localized absorptive potential on non-resonant and resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, A.; Kumar, N.

    1992-06-01

    The reflection due to absorptive potential (-iV i ) for resonant and non-resonant tunneling has been considered. We show that the effect of reflection leads to a non-monotonic dependence of absorption on the strength V i with a maximum absorption of typically 0.5. This has implications for the operation of resonant tunneling devices. General conceptual aspects of absorptive potentials are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs

  19. Energy and polarization dependence of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering in Nd2CuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.P.; Kao, C.C.; Haemaelaeinen, K.

    1998-01-01

    The authors report the energy and polarization dependence of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering from Nd 2 CuO 4 . An energy loss feature at ∼6 eV is observed in the vicinity of the Cu K-edge. Numerical calculations based on the Anderson impurity model identify this as a charge transfer excitation to the anti-bonding state. The incident polarization is shown to select the intermediate states participating in the resonance process. Resonances are observed at 8,990 eV and 9,000 eV with the incident polarization perpendicular and parallel to the CuO planes, respectively. In contrast to the single-site model calculations, no resonances are observed associated with the 1s3d 10 L intermediate states, suggesting non-local effects play a role

  20. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidabras, Jason W; Varanasi, Shiv K; Mett, Richard R; Swarts, Steven G; Swartz, Harold M; Hyde, James S

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg(2+) doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  1. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  2. New light on the Kr-(4p55s2) Feshbach resonances: high-resolution electron scattering experiments and B-spline R-matrix calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, T H; Ruf, M-W; Hotop, H; Zatsarinny, O; Bartschat, K; Allan, M

    2010-01-01

    In a joint experimental and theoretical effort, we carried out a detailed study of electron scattering from Kr atoms in the energy range of the low-lying Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 ) Feshbach resonances. Absolute angle-differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering were measured over the energy range 9.3-10.3 eV with an energy width of about 13 meV at scattering angles between 10 deg. and 180 deg. Using several sets of elastic scattering phase shifts, a detailed analysis of the sharp Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 2 P 3/2 ) resonance was carried out, resulting in a resonance width of Γ 3/2 3.6(2) meV. By direct comparison with the position of the Ar - (3p 5 4s 2 2 P 3/2 ) resonance, the energy for the Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 2 P 3/2 ) resonance was determined as E 3/2 = 9.489(3) eV. A Fano-type fit of the higher lying Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 2 P 1/2 ) resonance yielded the resonance parameters Γ 1/2 = 33(5) meV and E 1/2 = 10.126(4) eV. In order to obtain additional insights, B-spline R-matrix calculations were performed for both the elastic and the inelastic cross sections above the threshold for 4p 5 5s excitation. They provide the total and angle-differential cross sections for excitation of long-lived and short-lived levels of the 4p 5 5s configuration in Kr and branching ratios for the decay of the Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 2 P 1/2 ) resonance into the three available exit channels. The results are compared with selected experimental data.

  3. Multimachine subsynchronous resonance: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahoud, M.A.; Harley, R.G.; Levy, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical investigation into the subsynchronous resonance (SSR) behaviour of a power system containing synchronous generators, induction motors and series capacitors. By applying eigenvalue techniques, attention is paid to the effect of replacing the induction motor by an equivalent fixed resistor-inductor (R-L) load. Nonlinear transient simulations and their Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT's) are also used to investigate the effects of the complexity of the mechanical model of the generator on the SSR predictions. The results show that the model used for the induction motor has a significant effect on the SSR behaviour of a multimachine system

  4. The thermal neutron absorption cross-sections, resonance integrals and resonance parameters of silicon and its stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Story, J.S.

    1969-09-01

    The data available up to the end of November 1968 on the thermal neutron absorption cross-sections, resonance absorption integrals, and resonance parameters of silicon and its stable isotopes are collected and discussed. Estimates are given of the mean spacing of the energy levels of the compound nuclei near the neutron binding energy. It is concluded that the thermal neutron absorption cross-section and resonance absorption integral of natural silicon are not well established. The data on these two parameters are somewhat correlated, and three different assessments of the resonance integral are presented which differ over-all by a factor of 230. Many resonances have been detected by charged particle reactions which have not yet been observed in neutron cross-section measurements. One of these resonances of Si 2 8, at E n = 4 ± 5 keV might account for the large resonance integral which is derived, very uncertainly, from integral data. The principal source of the measured resonance integral of Si 3 0 has not yet been located. The thermal neutron absorption cross-section of Si 2 8 appears to result mainly from a negative energy resonance, possibly the resonance at E n = - 59 ± 5 keV detected by the Si 2 8 (d,p) reaction. (author)

  5. E2 nuclear resonance effects in pionic and kaonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.; Biagi, S.F.; Blecher, M.

    1977-09-01

    The attenuation due to the E2 nuclear resonance effect has been measured in hadronic atoms using pions with 111 Cd and 112 Cd, and for kaons with 122 Sn. Energies of the relevant X-ray and γ-ray transitions and of the X-ray cascade intensities have also been measured so as to give a self-consistent set of information. The results are found to be in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. (author)

  6. The resonance Bremsstrahlung of a fast charged particle in a medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshtoev, Kh.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Bremsstrahlung of the fast charged particle in the medium with dielectric permittivity ε at velocities υ ≥ c/n (n 2 =Reε) is considered. The Bremsstrahlung has singularity at β = 1/ncosθ (β = υ/c, θ is an angle of the Bremsstrahlung). This Bremsstrahlung is interpreted as resonance Bremsstrahlung with the width characterized by Imε=ε 2 , and the less ε 2 is, the higher the peak of this resonance rises. The angular distribution of the Bremsstrahlung is determined by cos θ=1/nβ and this angle coincides with the angle of the Cherenkov radiation. At β=1/n this resonance Bremsstrahlung goes in the forward direction and depends on frequency ω (ε=ε (ω))

  7. 1H NMR spectra of vertebrate [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. Hyperfine resonances suggest different electron delocalization patterns from plant ferredoxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjeldal, L.; Markley, J.L.; Coghlan, V.M.; Vickery, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the observation of paramagnetically shifted (hyperfine) proton resonances from vertebrate mitochondrial [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The hyperfine signals of human, bovine, and chick [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins are described and compared with those of Anabena 7120 vegetative ferredoxin, a plant-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin studied previously. The hyperfine resonances of the three vertebrate ferredoxins were very similar to one another both in the oxidized state and in the reduced state, and slow (on the NMR scale) electron self-exchange was observed in partially reduced samples. For the oxidized vertebrate ferredoxins, hyperfine signals were observed downfield of the diamagnetic envelope from +13 to +50 ppm, and the general pattern of peaks and their anti-Curie temperature dependence are similar to those observed for the oxidized plant-type ferredoxins. For the reduced vertebrate ferredoxins, hyperfine signals were observed for the oxidized plant-type ferredoxins. For the reduced vertebrate ferredoxins, hyperfine signals were observed both upfield (-2 to -18 ppm) and downfield (+15 to +45 ppm), and all were found to exhibit Curie-type temperature dependence. These results indicate that the contact-shifted resonances in the reduced vertebrate ferredoxins detect different spin magnetization from those in the reduced plant ferredoxins and suggest that plant and vertebrate ferredoxins have fundamentally different patterns of electron delocalization in the reduced [2Fe-2S] center

  8. Ultrafast electrical control of a resonantly driven single photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.; Bennett, A. J.; Ellis, D. J. P.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate generation of a pulsed stream of electrically triggered single photons in resonance fluorescence, by applying high frequency electrical pulses to a single quantum dot in a p-i-n diode under resonant laser excitation. Single photon emission was verified, with the probability of multiple photon emission reduced to 2.8%. We show that despite the presence of charge noise in the emission spectrum of the dot, resonant excitation acts as a “filter” to generate narrow bandwidth photons

  9. The yields of 1P and 1D resonances in the He(e,2e)He+ reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhagva, O.; Badamdamdin, R.; Strakhova, S.I.; Hehnmedeh, L.

    1991-01-01

    In the first Born approximation the dependence of the yields of the 1 P and 1 D resonances in the He(e,2e)He + reaction on the momentum transfer in the recoil peak region at incident energies E 0 =1000 eV is studied. It is shown that in a certain range of the ejection angle and for the large momentum transfer the yield of the 1 D resonance dominates over the 1 P resonance one. 12 refs.; 4 figs

  10. Formation and coupling of band gaps in a locally resonant elastic system comprising a string with attached resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yong; Mace, Brian R.; Wen Jihong; Wen Xisen

    2011-01-01

    A uniform string with periodically attached spring-mass resonators represents a simple locally resonant continuous elastic system whose band gap mechanisms are basic to more general and complicated problems. In this Letter, analytical models with explicit formulations are provided to understand the band gap mechanisms of such a system. Some interesting phenomena are demonstrated and discussed, such as asymmetric/symmetric attenuation behavior within a resonance gap, and the realization of a super-wide gap due to exact coupling between Bragg and resonance gaps. In addition, some approximate formulas for the evaluation of low frequency resonance gaps are derived using an approach different from existing investigations. - Research highlights: → We examine band gaps in a special one-dimensional locally resonant system. → Bragg and resonance gaps co-exist. → Explicit formulas for locating band edges are derived. → Exact physical models are used to clarify the band gap formation mechanisms. → Coupling between Bragg and resonance gaps leads to a super-wide gap.

  11. A resonant dc-dc power converter assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a resonant DC-DC power converter assembly comprising a first resonant DC-DC power converter and a second resonant DC-DC power converter having identical circuit topologies. A first inductor of the first resonant DC-DC power converter and a second inductor of the second resonant DC-DC power converter are configured for magnetically coupling the first and second resonant DC-DC power converters to each other to forcing substantially 180 degrees phase shift, or fo...

  12. Study of the giant multipole resonances, especially the isoscalar giant E2 resonance in 208Pb by inelastic electron scattering with medium and high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehner, E.G.F.

    1982-01-01

    In the nucleus 208 Pb giant multipole resonances were looked for by inelastic electron scattering up to excitation energies of Esub(x) = 35 MeV. Twelve spectra were taken up at incident energies of Esub(o) = 45-65 MeV under scattering angles from upsilon = 93 0 to 165 0 . The cross sections extracted from this were analyzed by means of DWBA calculations using RPA amplitudes from a model with separable residual interaction. Basing on this analysis for the first time it could be shown that the maximum in the electron scattering cross section at Esub(x) approx.= 14 MeV can be consistently described as a superposition of the Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 1 with a Jsup(π) = 0 + , ΔT = 0 giant resonance. Furthermore the spectra under backward scattering angles indicate the existence of a magnetic excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 15 MeV which is interpreted as Jsup(π) = 3 + giant resonance. Besides under forwards angles a further weak excitation appears at Esub(x) approx.= 14.6 MeV which is very well compatible with Jsup(π) = 2 + . At Esub(x) = 17.5 MeV a Jsup(π) = 3 - resonance was found which recently is also observed in (α,α') scattering experiments and therefore gets a ΔT = 0 assignment. A further resonance at Esub(x) approx.= 21 MeV has also Jsup(π) = 3 - character but has partly to be assigned to a Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 0 excitation. At Esub(x) = 23.8 MeV a Jsup(π) = 2 + excitation was found which gels because of model predictions a ΔT = 1 assignment. (orig./HSI) [de

  13. Study of the giant multipole resonances especially of the isoscalar giant E2 resonance in 208Pb by medium and high energy resolution inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehner, G.

    1982-01-01

    In the nucleus 208 Pb giant multipole resonances up to excitation energies of Esub(x) = 35 MeV were looked for by medium resolution inelastic electron scattering. Twelve spectra were taken up at incident energies of E 0 = 45-65 MeV under scattering angles from upsilon = 93 0 to 165 0 . The cross sections extracted from this were analyzed by means of DWBA calculations using RPA amplitudes from a model with separable residual interaction. On the base of this analysis for the first time it could be shown that the maximum in the electron scattering cross section at Esub(x) approx.= 14 MeV can be consistently described as superposition of the Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 1 with a Jsup(π) = 0 + , ΔT = 0 giant resonance. Furthermore the spectra under backward scattering angles indicate the existence of a magnetic excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 15 MeV which is interpreted as Jsup(π) = 3 + giant resonance. Besides under forward angles a further weak excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 14.6 MeV appears which is very well compatible with Jsup(π) = 2 + . At Esub(x) = 17.5 MeV a Jsup(π) = 3 - resonance was found which recently is observed also in (α, α') experiments and therefore gets a ΔT = 0 assignment. A further resonance at Esub(x) approx.= 21 MeV has also a Jsup(π) = 3 - character but has to be partly assigned to a Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 0 excitation. At Esub(x) = 23.8 MeV a Jsup(π) = 2 + excitation was found which gets because of model predictions a ΔT = 1 assignment. (orig./HSI) [de

  14. A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on parametric resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surappa, Sushruta; Satir, Sarp; Levent Degertekin, F

    2017-07-24

    A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on a parametric resonator structure is described and experimentally demonstrated. The transducer structure, which we call capacitive parametric ultrasonic transducer (CPUT), uses a parallel plate capacitor with a movable membrane as part of a degenerate parametric series RLC resonator circuit with a resonance frequency of f o . When the capacitor plate is driven with an incident harmonic ultrasonic wave at the pump frequency of 2f o with sufficient amplitude, the RLC circuit becomes unstable and ultrasonic energy can be efficiently converted to an electrical signal at f o frequency in the RLC circuit. An important characteristic of the CPUT is that unlike other electrostatic transducers, it does not require DC bias or permanent charging to be used as a receiver. We describe the operation of the CPUT using an analytical model and numerical simulations, which shows drive amplitude dependent operation regimes including parametric resonance when a certain threshold is exceeded. We verify these predictions by experiments with a micromachined membrane based capacitor structure in immersion where ultrasonic waves incident at 4.28 MHz parametrically drive a signal with significant amplitude in the 2.14 MHz RLC circuit. With its unique features, the CPUT can be particularly advantageous for applications such as wireless power transfer for biomedical implants and acoustic sensing.

  15. Evaluation of covariances for resolved resonance parameters of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu in JENDL-3.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Shibata, Keiichi

    2003-02-01

    Evaluation of covariances for resolved resonance parameters of 235 U, 238 U, and 239 Pu was carried out. Although a large number of resolved resonances are observed for major actinides, uncertainties in averaged cross sections are more important than those in resonance parameters in reactor calculations. We developed a simple method which derives a covariance matrix for the resolved resonance parameters from uncertainties in the averaged cross sections. The method was adopted to evaluate the covariance data for some important actinides, and the results were compiled in the JENDL-3.2 covariance file. (author)

  16. Numerical simulation of a short RFQ resonator using the MAFIA codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Jain, A.; Paul, P.; Lombardi, A.

    1991-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of a short (2βλ=0.4 m) resonator with large modulation (m=4) have been studied using the three dimensional codes, MAFIA. The complete resonator, including the modulated electrodes and a complex support structure, has been simulated using ∼ 350,000 mesh points. Important characteristics studied include the resonant frequency, electric and magnetic fields distributions, quality factor and stored energy. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with the measurements of an actual resonator and analytical approximations. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Search for narrow resonances in e+e- annihilation in the mass region 3.2 to 5.9 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.

    1975-01-01

    The mass region 3.2 to 5.9 GeV was searched for evidence of narrow resonances in e + e - /sub f/ → hadron. No evidence was found for any such resonances other than the psi (3695) in this region with a sensitivity ranging from about 12 to 45 percent of the integrated cross section of the psi (3695). The more stringent bounds apply to resonances of a few MeV width, while the looser bounds apply to resonances of up to 20 MeV width. (U.S.)

  18. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectra are obtained of benzyl radicals created by laser flash photolysis of benzylchloride and diphenylacetone in solution. The spectra are obtained in resonance with the intense 2 2A2-1 B-2(2) transition of benzyl. The strong Raman bands are assigned to totally...... symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences...

  19. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik - Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik - Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology,” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2016-08-15

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  20. Resonance probe; La sonde a resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepechinsky, D; Messiaen, A; Rolland, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    After a brief review of papers recently published on the resonance probe as a tool for plasma diagnostics, the main features of the theory proposed by one of us are recalled. In this theory the geometry of the resonator formed by the probe, the ion sheath and the plasma is explicitly taken into account with the quasi-static and cold plasma approximations. Some new results emerging from this theory are indicated and a comparison with experimental data obtained with a spherical probe placed in a quiescent mercury-vapour plasma is made. A good quantitative agreement has been observed, indicating that the theory is satisfactory and justifying the assumptions involved. Nevertheless it appears that in some cases experimental results can only be interpreted when non collisional damping phenomena are taken into consideration. (author) [French] Apres un apercu des etudes recemment publiees sur la sonde a resonance pour le diagnostic des plasmas, on rappelle l'essentiel de la theorie proposee par l'un de nous ou il est tenu compte explicitement de la geometrie du resonateur forme par le systeme sonde-gaine ionique-plasma dans l'approximation quasi-statique et du plasma froid. On indique quelques resultats nouveaux pouvant etre tires de cette theorie et on la confronte avec les donnees experimentales obtenues pour une sonde spherique placee dans un plasma de mercure en equilibre. Un tres bon accord quantitatif a ete constate, indiquant que la theorie est satisfaisante et justifiant les approximations faites dans celle-ci. Il apparait toutefois que certains resultats experimentaux ne peuvent etre interpretes qu'en tenant compte des phenomenes d'amortissement non collisionnels. (auteur)

  1. Parametric resonances in the amplitude-modulated probe-field absorption spectrum of a two-level atom driven by a resonance amplitude- and phase-modulated pumping field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushilov, N.V.; Kholodkevich, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the polarization induced by a weak probe field with periodically modulated amplitude in a two-level medium saturated by a strong amplitude-and phase-modulated resonance field. It is shown that the absorption spectrum of the probe field includes parametric resonances, the maxima corresponding to the condition δ= 2nΓ-Ω w and the minima to that of δ= (2n + 1)Γ- w , where δ is the probe-field detuning front the resonance frequency, Ω w is the modulation frequency of the probe-field amplitude, and Γ is the transition line width, n = 1, 2, 3, hor-ellipsis. At the specific modulation parameters, a substantial region of negative values (i.e., the region of amplification without the population inversion) exists in the absorption spectrum of the probe field

  2. Quantum Proximity Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that at long wavelengths λ an s-wave scatterer can have a scattering cross section σ on the order of λ 2 , much larger than its physical size, as measured by the range of its potential. Very interesting phenomena can arise when two or more identical scatterers are placed close together, well within one wavelength. We show that, for a pair of identical scatterers, an extremely narrow p-wave open-quote open-quote proximity close-quote close-quote resonance develops from a broader s-wave resonance of the individual scatterers. A new s-wave resonance of the pair also appears. The relation of these proximity resonances (so called because they appear when the scatterers are close together) to the Thomas and Efimov effects is discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Two active states of the narrow-line gamma-ray-loud AGN GB 1310+487

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovsky, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Previously unremarkable, the extragalactic radio source GB1310+487 showed a γ-ray flare on 2009 November 18, reaching a daily flux of ~ 10"-"6 photons cm"-"2 s"-"1 at energies E > 100MeV and became one of the brightest GeV sources for about two weeks. Its optical spectrum shows strong forbidden-line emission while lacking broad permitted lines, which is not typical for a blazar. Instead, the spectrum resembles those of narrow emission-line galaxies. Aims. We investigate changes in the object’s radio-to-GeV spectral energy distribution (SED) during and after the prominent γ-ray flare with the aim of determining the nature of the object and of constraining the origin of the variable high-energy emission. Methods. The data collected by the Fermi and AGILE satellites at γ-ray energies; Swift at X-ray and ultraviolet (UV); the Kanata, NOT, and Keck telescopes at optical; OAGH andWISE at infrared (IR); and IRAM30m, OVRO 40m, Effelsberg 100m, RATAN-600, and VLBA at radio are analyzed together to trace the SED evolution on timescales of months. Results. The γ-ray/radio-loud narrow-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) is located at redshift z = 0.638. It shines through an unrelated foreground galaxy at z = 0.500. The AGN light is probably amplified by gravitational lensing. The AGN SED shows a two-humped structure typical of blazars and γ-ray-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies, with the high-energy (inverse-Compton) emission dominating by more than an order of magnitude over the low-energy (synchrotron) emission during γ-ray flares. The difference between the two SED humps is smaller during the low-activity state. Fermi observations reveal a strong correlation between the γ-ray flux and spectral index, with the hardest spectrum observed during the brightest γ-ray state. The γ-ray flares occurred before and during a slow rising trend in the radio, but no direct association between γ-ray and radio flares could be established. Conclusions. If the

  4. {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance study of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirer, K.R., E-mail: krshirer@ucdavis.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Dioguardi, A.P.; Bush, B.T.; Crocker, J.; Lin, C.H.; Klavins, P. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Cooley, J.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maple, M.B. [Department of Physics and Institute for Pure and Applied Physical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0319 (United States); Chang, K.B.; Poeppelmeier, K.R. [Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Curro, N.J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We report {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of single crystals and aligned powders of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} under pressure in the hidden order and paramagnetic phases. We find that the Knight shift decreases with applied pressure, consistent with previous measurements of the static magnetic susceptibility. Previous measurements of the spin lattice relaxation time revealed a partial suppression of the density of states below 30 K. This suppression persists under pressure, and the onset temperature is mildly enhanced.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance study of the neutral copper acceptor in ZnGeP sub 2 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, K T; Setzler, S D; Schünemann, P G; Pollak, T M

    2003-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance have been used to characterize the neutral copper acceptor in ZnGeP sub 2 crystals. The copper substitutes for zinc and behaves as a conventional acceptor (i.e. the 3d electrons do not play a dominant role). Because of a high degree of compensation from native donors, the copper acceptors in our samples were initially in the nonparamagnetic singly ionized state (Cu sub Z sub n sup -). The paramagnetic neutral state (Cu sub Z sub n sup 0) was observed when the crystals were exposed to 632.8 nm or 1064 nm laser light while being held at a temperature below 50 K. The g matrix of the neutral copper acceptor is axial g sub p sub a sub r = 2.049 and g sub p sub e sub r sub p = 2.030), with the unique principal direction parallel to the tetragonal c axis of the crystal. The hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole matrices also exhibit c-axis symmetry (A sub p sub a sub r = 87.6 MHz, A sub p sub e sub r sub p = 34.8 MHz and P = 0.87 MHz for sup 6 su...

  6. Positron mobility in thermally grown SiO2 measured by Doppler broadening technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Y.; Leung, T.C.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    The positron mobility in thermally grown SiO 2 is deduced from Doppler broadening lineshape data on a metal-oxide-semiconductor sample for positrons implanted into the oxide layer. The fitted mobility is ∼13(10)x10 -3 cm 2 /s V. This value is between that of the electron and hole mobilities in the same system and is two orders of magnitude smaller than the previous estimate from positron measurements

  7. A Study on Measurement Variations in Resonant Characteristics of Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Iqbal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonators require fast, accurate, and cost-effective testing for mass production. Among the different test methods, frequency domain analysis is one of the easiest and fastest. This paper presents the measurement uncertainties in electrostatically actuated MEMS resonators, using frequency domain analysis. The influence of the applied driving force was studied to evaluate the measurement variations in resonant characteristics, such as the natural frequency and the quality factor of the resonator. To quantify the measurement results, measurement system analysis (MSA was performed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA method. The results demonstrate that the resonant frequency ( f r is mostly affected by systematic error. However, the quality (Q factor strongly depends on the applied driving force. To reduce the measurement variations in Q factor, experiments were carried out to study the influence of DC and/or AC driving voltages on the resonator. The results reveal that measurement uncertainties in the quality factor were high for a small electrostatic force.

  8. Millimeter-wave sensor based on a λ/2-line resonator for identification and dielectric characterization of non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, H; Kim, A A; Jeffries, G D M; Vukusic, J; Jesorka, A; Stake, J

    2016-01-20

    Studies of biological and artificial membrane systems, such as niosomes, currently rely on the use of fluorescent tags, which can influence the system under investigation. For this reason, the development of label-free, non-invasive detection techniques is of great interest. We demonstrate an open-volume label-free millimeter-wave sensing platform based on a coplanar waveguide, developed for identification and characterization of niosome constituents. A design based on a λ/2-line resonator was used and on-wafer measurements of transmission and reflection parameters were performed up to 110 GHz. Our sensor was able to clearly distinguish between common niosome constituents, non-ionic surfactants Tween 20 and Span 80, measuring a resonance shift of 3 GHz between them. The complex permittivities of the molecular compounds have been extracted. Our results indicate insignificant frequency dependence in the investigated frequency range (3 GHz - 110 GHz). Values of permittivity around 3.0 + 0.7i and 2.2 + 0.4i were obtained for Tween 20 and Span 80, respectively.

  9. Tables of Shore and Fano parameters for the helium resonances 2s/sup 2/ /sup 1/S, 2p/sup 2/ /sup 1/D, and 2s 2p /sup 1/P excited in p-He collisions E/sub p/ = 33 to 150 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.; Merchez, H.

    1976-02-01

    Absolute values of Shore and Fano parameters are tabulated for the helium atom 2s/sup 2/ /sup 1/S, 2p/sup 2/ /sup 1/D, and 2s 2p /sup 1/P resonances produced by a proton beam. Observations were made on the spectra of ejected electrons. The important variation of the shape of the resonances with ejection angle is illustrated for E/sub p/ = 100 keV; the variation with proton energy is shown at 30/sup 0/.

  10. The magnetic order of GdMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} studied by neutron diffraction and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, S A [M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 GSP-1 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kreyssig, A; Canfield, P C [Ames Laboratory USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Doerr, M; Loewenhaupt, M [TU Dresden, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, D-01062, Dresden (Germany); Ritter, C [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dudzik, E; Feyerherm, R, E-mail: ser@plms.r [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, BESSY, D-12489, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-06-09

    The magnetic structure of GdMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (tetragonal I4/mmm) has been studied by hot neutron powder diffraction and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering techniques. These measurements, along with the results of bulk experiments, confirm the collinear ferrimagnetic structure with moment direction parallel to the c-axis below T{sub C} = 96 K and the collinear antiferromagnetic phase in the temperature region T{sub C} < T < T{sub N} = 365 K. In the antiferromagnetic phase, x-ray resonant magnetic scattering has been detected at Mn K and Gd L{sub 2} absorption edges. The Gd contribution is a result of an induced Gd 5d electron polarization caused by the antiferromagnetic order of Mn-moments.

  11. Resonantly scattering crystals and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.; Mahon, P.J.

    1990-12-01

    We examine coherence effects from forming a crystal of resonant scatterers by generalising the Fano model for autoionising resonances in electron scattering from atoms to a lattice of such scatterers. (We have in mind the case of neutron scattering from nuclei.) We solve this problem to yield two branches to the dispersion relation for the neutron in general and three when the resonance coincides with a Brillouin Zone boundary. The 'width' of the resonance is enhanced over the isolated nucleus, the best candidate for observation being the 2eV 185 Re resonance near the Bragg condition. We use these results to calculate the reflection coefficient from a surface, revealing total external reflection near resonance. We discuss experimental feasibility in both the neutron and electron cases. (author)

  12. A reduced graphene oxide-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for highly sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Gaina; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence nanoprobe (reduced nano-graphene oxide [nrGO]/fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peptide [Pep-FITC]) for ultrasensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) has been developed by engineering the Pep-FITC comprising the specific MMP2 substrate domain (PLGVR) onto the surface of nrGO particles through non-covalent linkage. The nrGO was obtained by water bathing nano-graphene oxide under 90°C for 4 hours. After mixing the nrGO and Pep-FITC for 30 seconds, the fluorescence from Pep-FITC was almost completely quenched due to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and nrGO. Upon cleavage of the amide bond between Leu and Gly in the Pep-FITC by protease-MMP2, the FITC bound to nrGO was separated from nrGO surface, disrupting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer process and resulting in fluorescence recovery of FITC. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery of nrGO/Pep-FITC was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of MMP2 within 0.02-0.1 nM. The detection limit of the nrGO/Pep-FITC was determined to be 3 pM, which is approximately tenfold lower than that of the unreduced carboxylated nano-graphene oxide/Pep-FITC probe.

  13. Single and multiple vibrational resonance in a quintic oscillator with monostable potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumari, S; Chinnathambi, V; Rajasekar, S; Sanjuan, M A F

    2009-10-01

    We analyze the occurrence of vibrational resonance in a damped quintic oscillator with three cases of single well of the potential V(x)=1/2omega(0)(2)x(2)+1/4betax(4)+1/6gammax(6) driven by both low-frequency force f cos omegat and high-frequency force g cos Omegat with Omega > omega. We restrict our analysis to the parametric choices (i) omega(0)(2), beta, gamma > 0 (single well), (ii) omega(0)(2), gamma > 0, beta 0, beta arbitrary, gamma choice (i) at most one resonance occur while for the other two choices (ii) and (iii) multiple resonance occur. Further, g(VR) is found to be independent of the damping strength d while omega(VR) depends on d. The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical result. We illustrate that the vibrational resonance can be characterized in terms of width of the orbit also.

  14. Effect resonance radiation transfer of excitation porous silicon to I sub 2 molecules sorbed in pores

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharchenko, K V; Kuznetsov, M B; Chistyakov, A A; Karavanskij, V A

    2001-01-01

    One studies the effect of resonance radiation-free transfer of electronic excitation between silicon nanocrystals and iodine molecules sorbed in pores. The experiment procedure includes laser-induced luminescence and laser desorption mass spectrometry. One analyzes photoluminescence spectra prior to and upon iodine sorption. Excitation of iodine through the mechanism of resonance transfer is determined to result in desorption of the iodine sorbed molecules with relatively high kinetic energies (3-1 eV). One evaluated the peculiar distance of resonance transfer the approximate value of which was equal to 2 nm

  15. Odd-parity light baryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamermann, D.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Salcedo, L. L.; Nieves, J.

    2011-01-01

    We use a consistent SU(6) extension of the meson-baryon chiral Lagrangian within a coupled channel unitary approach in order to calculate the T matrix for meson-baryon scattering in the s wave. The building blocks of the scheme are the π and N octets, the ρ nonet and the Δ decuplet. We identify poles in this unitary T matrix and interpret them as resonances. We study here the nonexotic sectors with strangeness S=0, -1, -2, -3 and spin J=(1/2), (3/2) and (5/2). Many of the poles generated can be associated with known N, Δ, Σ, Λ, Ξ and Ω resonances with negative parity. We show that most of the low-lying three and four star odd-parity baryon resonances with spin (1/2) and (3/2) can be related to multiplets of the spin-flavor symmetry group SU(6). This study allows us to predict the spin-parity of the Ξ(1620), Ξ(1690), Ξ(1950), Ξ(2250), Ω(2250) and Ω(2380) resonances, which have not been determined experimentally yet.

  16. Superconducting tests of beta = 0.1 and beta = 0.2 resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, D.W.; Amsbaugh, J.F.; Corcoran, D.T.; Howe, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Several low beta (0.10) and two high beta (0.21) lead plated copper quarter wave resonators were cooled down, multipactor conditioned, tested, helium conditioned, and retested. The choice of the quarter wave resonator and of the lead plated copper technology is discussed. The fabrication is described and techniques for conditioning the resonators are presented. Performances are presented. 5 refs., 4 figs

  17. The evolving clinical picture of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS): A look at 1310 patients over 16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, R Christopher; Tripp, Dean A; Tolls, Victoria; Nickel, J Curtis

    2018-06-01

    Two decades of increasing understanding of etiopathogenesis and clinical phenotyping produces an impression the clinical face of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is changing. We sought to retrospectively analyze trends in CP/CPPS patients presenting to our clinic for evaluation over a 16-year period. Patients with CP/CPPS presenting to a tertiary clinic were evaluated prospectively from 1998-2014 with Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI) and UPOINT (urinary, psychosocial, organ-specific, infection, neurogenic, and tenderness) categorization. Patients were stratified in four cohorts, based on year of presentation, and we retrospectively analyzed variations in symptom scores and patterns, UPOINT categorization, and treatment modalities amongst cohorts. Mean age of the 1310 CP/CPPS patients was 44.7 years, while mean CPSI pain, urination, and total scores were 10.6, 4.8, and 23.3, respectively. The most prevalent UPOINT domain, urinary (U) (71.8%) was associated with a higher CPSI urination score (6.3), more frequent penile tip pain (37%), dysuria (48%), and more treatment with alpha-blockers (70%). Increase in UPOINT domains was associated with higher CPSI pain, quality of life (QoL), and total scores. Trends over time included increased prevalence of psychosocial (P), organ (O), and tenderness (T) domains, as well as increased use of alpha-blockers, neuromodulation, and phytotherapy as treatment modalities. There was little variation in age, CPSI scores, and pain locations over time. The changing clinical face of CP/CPPS reflects the increased recognition of psychosocial (P domain) and pelvic floor pain (T domain), along with the concomitant use of associated therapies. There was little variation of pain/urinary symptom patterns and QoL.

  18. Observation of ferromagnetic resonance in a microscopic sample using magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P.C.; Wigen, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    We report the observation of a ferromagnetic resonance signal arising from a microscopic (∼20μmx40μm) particle of thin (3μm) yttrium iron garnet film using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The large signal intensity in the resonance spectra suggests that MRFM could become a powerful microscopic ferromagnetic resonance technique with a micron or sub-micron resolution. We also observe a very strong nonresonance signal which occurs in the field regime where the sample magnetization readily reorients in response to the modulation of the magnetic field. This signal will be the main noise source in applications where a magnet is mounted on the cantilever. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. Strong nonlinear harmonic generation in a PZT/Aluminum resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parenthoine, D; Haumesser, L; Meulen, F Vander; Tran-Huu-Hue, L-P, E-mail: parenthoine@univ-tours.f [University Francois Rabelais of Tours, U 930 Imagerie et Cerveau, CNRS 2448, ENIVL, rue de la Chocolaterie, BP 3410, 41034 Blois (France)

    2009-11-01

    In this work, the extentional vibration mode of a coupled PZT/ Aluminum rod resonator is studied experimentally. Geometrical characteristics of the PZT are its 27 mm length and its 4x4 mm{sup 2} cross section area. The excitation voltage consists in sinusoidal bursts in the frequency range (20-80 kHz). Velocity measurements are performed at both ends of this system, using a laser probe. Strong harmonic distortions in the mechanical response (up to -20 dB with respect to the primary wave amplitude) have been observed. The corresponding input levels are far lower than those which are necessary to observe quadratic second harmonic generation in a free PZT resonator. The strong nonlinear effect can be explained as a super-harmonic resonance of the system due to a specific ratio between the eigen frequencies of the two parts of the resonator. Evolution of fundamental and harmonic responses are observed as a function of input levels, highlighting hysteretic behavior.

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral study of [Mn(acs){sub 2}(2–pic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocakoç, Mehpeyker, E-mail: mkocakoc@cu.edu.tr [Çukurova University (Turkey); Tapramaz, Recep, E-mail: recept@omu.edu.tr [Ondokuz Mayıs University (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    Acesulfame potassium salt is a synthetic and non-caloric sweetener. It is also important chemically for its capability of being ligand in coordination compounds, because it can bind over Nitrogen and Oxygen atoms of carbonyl and sulfonyl groups and ring oxygen. Some acesulfame containing transition metal ion complexes with mixed ligands exhibit solvato and thermo chromic properties and these properties make them physically important. In this work single crystals of Mn{sup +2} ion complex with mixed ligand, [Mn(acs){sub 2}(2-pic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}], was studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR parameters were determined. Zero field splitting parameters indicated that the complex was highly symmetric. Variable temperature studies showed no detectable chance in spectra.

  1. Design of a dielectric resonator receive array at 7 Tesla using detunable ceramic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruytenberg, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2017-11-01

    Ceramic-based dielectric resonators can be used for high frequency magnetic resonance imaging and microscopy. When used as elements in a transmit array, the intrinsically low inter-element coupling allows flexibility in designing different geometric arrangements for different regions-of-interest. However, without being able to detune such resonators, they cannot be used as elements in a receive-only array. Here, we propose and implement a method, based on mode-disruption, for detuning ceramic-based dielectric resonators to enable them to be used as receive-only elements.

  2. Effect of a high-frequency magnetic field on the resonant behavior displayed by a spin-1/2 particle under the influence of a rotating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado-Pascual, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, we investigate the role of a high-frequency magnetic field in the resonant behavior displayed by a spin-1/2 particle under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. We propose two alternative methods for analyzing the system dynamics, namely, the averaging method and the multiple scale method. - Abstract: In this paper, we investigate the role of a high-frequency magnetic field in the resonant behavior displayed by a spin-1/2 particle under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. We propose two alternative methods for analyzing the system dynamics, namely, the averaging method and the multiple scale method. The analytical results achieved by applying these two methods are compared with those obtained from the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation. This comparison leads to the conclusion that the multiple scale method provides a better understanding of the system dynamics than the averaging method. In particular, the averaging method predicts the complete destruction of the resonant behavior by an appropriate choice of the parameter values of the high-frequency magnetic field. This conclusion is disproved both by the numerical results, and also by the results obtained from the multiple scale method.

  3. Fluctuation Reduction in a Si Micromechanical Resonator Tuned to Nonlinear Internal Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, B. Scott; Czaplewski, David; Chen, Changyao; Dykman, Mark; Lopez, Daniel; Shaw, Steven

    2015-03-01

    We describe experimental and theoretical results on an unusual behavior of fluctuations when the system exhibits internal resonance. We study the fundamental flexural mode (FFM) of a Si microbeam. The FFM is electrically actuated and detected. It is resonantly nonlinearly coupled to another mode, which is not directly accessible and has a frequency nearly three times the FFM frequency. Both the FFM and the passive mode have long lifetimes. We find that the passive mode can be a ``sink'' for fluctuations of the FFM. This explains the recently observed dramatic decrease of these fluctuations at nonlinear resonance. The re-distribution of the vibration amplitudes and the fluctuations is reminiscent of what happens at level anti-crossing in quantum mechanics. However, here it is different because of interplay of the dependence of the vibration frequency of the FFM on its amplitude due to internal nonlinearity and the nonlinear resonance with the passive mode. We study both the response of the system to external resonant driving and also the behavior of the system in the presence of a feedback loop. The experimental and theoretical results are in good agreement.

  4. The discovery of resonances in multibaryon systems. Pt. 3. Λ p-resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, B.A.; Temnikov, P.P.; Timonina, A.A.; Rozhdestvenskij, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    Dibaryon Λ p resonance of 2256 MeV/c 2 mass, GITA 2 (depending on the spin Jsub(Λp)) width, and Jsup(p) > O + spin-parity assignments is discovered. The statistical significance of the corresponding peak in Λ p effective mass spectra is defined by more than five standard deviations. Its production effective cross section in n 12 C collisions at =7.0 GeV/c is estimated to be sigmasub(pr) (2256)=(85.3+-20.0)μb, whereas the formation effective cross section in Λ p → Λ p interactions is sigmasub(f) (2256) = 5.3(2Jsub(Λp)+1) mb. The Λp effective mass spectra which have been investigated in this experiment reveal, apart the well known approximately(Msub(Λ+Msub(p)) MeV/c 2 and 2128 MeV/c 2 peaks, enhancements including 2256 MeV/c 2 peak near the most of the resonance mass values predicted by MIT Bag Model. Possible mechanisms of multibaryon resonance formation are discussed. According to the hypercharge selection rule Y <= 1 multibaryon resonances are shown to be ultra-high density superstrange objects

  5. A design procedure for the phase-controlled parallel-loaded resonant inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Roger J.

    1989-01-01

    High-frequency-link power conversion and distribution based on a resonant inverter (RI) has been recently proposed. The design of several topologies is reviewed, and a simple approximate design procedure is developed for the phase-controlled parallel-loaded RI. This design procedure seeks to ensure the benefits of resonant conversion and is verified by data from a laboratory 2.5 kVA, 20-kHz converter. A simple phasor analysis is introduced as a useful approximation for design purposes. The load is considered to be a linear impedance (or an ac current sink). The design procedure is verified using a 2.5-kVA 20-kHz RI. Also obtained are predictable worst-case ratings for each component of the resonant tank circuit and the inverter switches. For a given load VA requirement, below-resonance operation is found to result in a significantly lower tank VA requirement. Under transient conditions such as load short-circuit, a reversal of the expected commutation sequence is possible.

  6. A surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for detecting a dioxin precursor using a gold binding polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, N; Tokuda, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2003-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensor was developed for monitoring 2,4-dichlorophenol, a known dioxin precursor, using an indirect competitive immunoassay. The SPR sensor was fabricated by immobilizing a gold-thin layer on the surface of an SPR sensor chip with an anti-(2,4-dichloroph......A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensor was developed for monitoring 2,4-dichlorophenol, a known dioxin precursor, using an indirect competitive immunoassay. The SPR sensor was fabricated by immobilizing a gold-thin layer on the surface of an SPR sensor chip with an anti-(2...

  7. A resonant absorption measurement in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leun, C. van der; Burhoven Jaspers, N.C.

    1966-01-01

    A resonant absorption measurement at the 1966 keV proton resonance in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al leads to an absolute determination of the resonance strength, (2J+1)ΓpΓγ/Γ, of 5.6±1.8 eV. Normalization of previously published strengths of 120 resonances in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al, reduces these

  8. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M.E.; Greene, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    POLIDENT (Point Libraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  9. Fano resonances in a high-Q terahertz whispering-gallery mode resonator coupled to a multi-mode waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2017-11-01

    We report on Fano resonances in a high-quality (Q) whispering-gallery mode (WGM) spherical resonator coupled to a multi-mode waveguide in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. The asymmetric line shape and phase of the Fano resonances detected with coherent continuous-wave (CW) THz spectroscopy measurements are in excellent agreement with the analytical model. A very high Q factor of 1600, and a finesse of 22 at critical coupling is observed around 0.35 THz. To the best of our knowledge this is the highest Q factor ever reported for a THz WGM resonator.

  10. Calculating many-body effects in resonant [(dtμ)d2e] formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, M.

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed for calculating the effect of neighboring molecules on the resonant molecular formation reaction tμ + D 2 → [(dtμ)d2e]*, avoiding any expansion in powers of the density. Using a simplified model, the role of collisional broadening, motional narrowing, and the interference of different formation amplitudes is examined. This model is used to generate molecular formation rates as functions of density for fixed temperature. The generalization which will allow comparison with experimental data is discussed

  11. First Observation of a Snake Depolarizing Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, R.; Anferov, V.; Blinov, B.; Crandell, D.; Koutin, S.; Krisch, A.; Liu, T.; Ratner, L.; Wong, V.; Chu, C.; Lee, S.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E.; von Przewoski, B.; Sato, H.

    1997-01-01

    Using a 104MeV stored polarized proton beam and a full Siberian snake, we recently found evidence for a so-called open-quotes snakeclose quotes depolarizing resonance. A full Siberian snake forces the spin tune ν s to be a half integer. Thus, if the vertical betatron tune ν y is set near a quarter integer, then the ν s =n±2ν y second-order snake resonance can depolarize the beam. Indeed, with a full Siberian snake, we found a deep depolarization dip when ν y was equal to 4.756; moreover, when ν y was changed to 4.781, the deep dip disappeared and the polarization was preserved. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  12. Fast 3D magnetic resonance fingerprinting for a whole-brain coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Chen, Yong; McGivney, Debra; Mehta, Bhairav; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to accelerate the acquisition and reconstruction time of 3D magnetic resonance fingerprinting scans. A 3D magnetic resonance fingerprinting scan was accelerated by using a single-shot spiral trajectory with an undersampling factor of 48 in the x-y plane, and an interleaved sampling pattern with an undersampling factor of 3 through plane. Further acceleration came from reducing the waiting time between neighboring partitions. The reconstruction time was accelerated by applying singular value decomposition compression in k-space. Finally, a 3D premeasured B 1 map was used to correct for the B 1 inhomogeneity. The T 1 and T 2 values of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine/National Institute of Standards and Technology MRI phantom showed a good agreement with the standard values, with an average concordance correlation coefficient of 0.99, and coefficient of variation of 7% in the repeatability scans. The results from in vivo scans also showed high image quality in both transverse and coronal views. This study applied a fast acquisition scheme for a fully quantitative 3D magnetic resonance fingerprinting scan with a total acceleration factor of 144 as compared with the Nyquist rate, such that 3D T 1 , T 2 , and proton density maps can be acquired with whole-brain coverage at clinical resolution in less than 5 min. Magn Reson Med 79:2190-2197, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Tables of Shore and Fano parameters for the helium resonances 2s21S, 2p21D, and 2s 2p 1P excited in p-He collisions E/sub p/ = 33 to 150 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.; Merchez, H.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute values of Shore and Fano parameters are tabulated for the helium atom 2s 2 1 S, 2p 2 1 D, and 2s 2p 1 P resonances produced by a proton beam. Observations were made on the spectra of ejected electrons. The important variation of the shape of the resonances with ejection angle is illustrated for E/sub p/ = 100 keV; the variation with proton energy is shown at 30 0

  14. Resonant cell of a double nuclear electron resonance spectrometer for performance in a 120-350 Gs magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, V.I.; Stepanov, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Spectrometer double-frequency resonance cell construction of a double nuclear electron resonance for operation in 120-350 Gs magnetic fields is described. The cell has been developed from a special decimeter resonator with a concentrated capacitance. The electric and magnetic components of a high frequency field are efficiently divided in the separator. Therefore, the insertion of a measuring coil and a sample in the maximum of the magnetic component of the field does not practically affect the distribution and parameters of the high-frequency field. The double-frequency resonance cell proposed provides for a higher accuracy of measuring amplifications of the nuclear magnetic resonance signals when there is the overhauzer effect for 120-350 Gs magnetic fields

  15. High-resolution mapping of 1D and 2D dose distributions using X-band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbun, N.; Lund, E.; Adolfsson, E.; Gustafsson, H.

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) was performed to visualise 2D dose distributions of homogeneously irradiated potassium dithionate tablets and to demonstrate determination of 1D dose profiles along the height of the tablets. Mathematical correction was applied for each relative dose profile in order to take into account the inhomogeneous response of the resonator using X-band EPRI. The dose profiles are presented with the spatial resolution of 0.6 mm from the acquired 2D images; this value is limited by pixel size, and 1D dose profiles from 1D imaging with spatial resolution of 0.3 mm limited by the intrinsic line-width of potassium dithionate. In this paper, dose profiles from 2D reconstructed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) images using the Xepr software package by Bruker are focussed. The conclusion is that using potassium dithionate, the resolution 0.3 mm is sufficient for mapping steep dose gradients if the dosemeters are covering only ±2 mm around the centre of the resonator. (authors)

  16. Surface plasmon resonance thermodynamic and kinetic analysis as a strategic tool in drug design. Distinct ways for phosphopeptides to plug into Src- and Grb2 SH2 domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, Nico J; Dekker, Frank J; Broutin, Isabel; Fischer, Marcel J E; Liskamp, Rob M J; Dekker, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of biomolecular interactions give insight into specificity of molecular recognition processes and advance rational drug design. Binding of phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing peptides to Src- and Grb2-SH2 domains was investigated using a surface plasmon resonance

  17. Dynamic T2-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate ( 2 , since T 2 increases linearly in fat during heating. T 2 -mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T 2 . Calibration of T 2 -based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T 2 and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T 2 temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/°C was observed. Dynamic T 2 -mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  19. Low field magnetic resonance experiments in superfluid 3He--A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gully, W.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and transverse nuclear magnetic resonance signals have been made on the A phase of liquid 3 He. They were performed on a sample of 3 He self-cooled by the Pomeranchuk effect to the critical temperature of the superfluid at 2.7 m 0 K. The longitudinal resonance is a magnetic mode of the liquid excited by radio frequency magnetic fields applied in the direction of the static magnetic field. Frequency profiles of this resonance were indirectly obtained by contour techniques from signals recorded by sweeping the temperature. Its frequency is found to be related to the frequency shift of the transverse resonance in agreement with theoretical predictions for the ABM pairing state. Its linewidth also agrees with theoretical predictions based upon dissipative phenomena peculiar to the superfluid phase. An analysis of the linewidth of the longitudinal resonance yields a value for the quasiparticle collision time. Transverse NMR lines were also studied. In low magnetic fields (20 Oersted) these lines were found to become extremely broad. This is shown to be a manifestation of the same collisional processes that broaden the longitudinal resonance lines. Also, the effects of various textures on the resonance lines are discussed, including the results of an attempt to create a single domain of 3 He with crossed electric and magnetic fields

  20. Correlations between resonances in a statistical scattering model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorin, T.; Rotter, I.

    1997-01-01

    The distortion of the regular motion in a quantum system by its coupling to the continuum of decay channels is investigated. The regular motion is described by means of a Poissonian ensemble. We focus on the case of only few channels K 2 K distribution in the GOE case. 2. Due to the coupling to the continuum, correlations are induced not only between the positions of the resonances but also between positions and widths. These correlations remain even in the strong coupling limit. In order to explain these results, an asymptotic expression for the width distribution is derived for the one channel case. It relates the width of a trapped resonance state to the distance between its two neighboring levels. (orig.)

  1. Determination of the electromagnetic field in a high-Tc linear superconducting resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotel, A.; Sautrot, S.; Pyee, M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the electromagnetic field configuration in a linear SHTC resonator is described. Two areas are considered: 1) the superconducting strip, 2) the dielectric around the strip. The calculation is based on the current density given by Bowers for an infinite superconducting line. The current density in the resonator is defined by these relations and the resonance conditions. (orig.)

  2. Orbital Resonances in the Vinti Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, L. D.

    As space becomes more congested, contested, and competitive, high-accuracy orbital predictions become critical for space operations. Current orbit propagators use the two-body solution with perturbations added, which have significant error growth when numerically integrated for long time periods. The Vinti Solution is a more accurate model than the two-body problem because it also accounts for the equatorial bulge of the Earth. Unfortunately, the Vinti solution contains small divisors near orbital resonances in the perturbative terms of the Hamiltonian, which lead to inaccurate orbital predictions. One approach to avoid the small divisors is to apply transformation theory, which is presented in this research. The methodology of this research is to identify the perturbative terms of the Vinti Solution, perform a coordinate transformation, and derive the new equations of motion for the Vinti system near orbital resonances. An analysis of these equations of motion offers insight into the dynamics found near orbital resonances. The analysis in this research focuses on the 2:1 resonance, which includes the Global Positioning System. The phase portrait of a nominal Global Positioning System satellite orbit is found to contain a libration region and a chaotic region. Further analysis shows that the dynamics of the 2:1 resonance affects orbits with semi-major axes ranging from -5.0 to +5.4 kilometers from an exactly 2:1 resonant orbit. Truth orbits of seven Global Positioning System satellites are produced for 10 years. Two of the satellites are found to be outside of the resonance region and three are found to be influenced by the libration dynamics of the resonance. The final satellite is found to be influenced by the chaotic dynamics of the resonance. This research provides a method of avoiding the small divisors found in the perturbative terms of the Vinti Solution near orbital resonances.

  3. Resonance Spectrum Characteristics of Effective Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient of High-Overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-overtone bulk acoustic resonator (HBAR consisting of a piezoelectric film with two electrodes on a substrate exhibits a high quality factor (Q and multi-mode resonance spectrum. By analyzing the influences of each layer’s material and structure (thickness parameters on the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient (Keff2, the resonance spectrum characteristics of Keff2 have been investigated systematically, and the optimal design of HBAR has been provided. Besides, a device, corresponding to one of the theoretical cases studied, is fabricated and evaluated. The experimental results are basically consistent with the theoretical results. Finally, the effects of Keff2 on the function of the crystal oscillators constructed with HBARs are proposed. The crystal oscillators can operate in more modes and have a larger frequency hopping bandwidth by using the HBARs with a larger Keff2·Q.

  4. Transit time for resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Calderon, G.; Rubio, A.

    1990-09-01

    This work considers properties of the partial widths in one dimensional elastic resonant tunneling in order to propose a transit-time τ tr = (h/2π)/Γ n T res ) where Γ n is the elastic width and T res the transmission coefficient at resonance energy. This time is interpreted as an average over the resonance energy width. It is shown that the tunneling current density integrated across a sharp resonance is inversely proportional to τ tr . This transit time may be much larger than the values predicted by other definitions. (author). 20 refs

  5. Resonances in photoionization. Cross section for vibrationally excited H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, J.Zs.; Jungen, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Diatomic molecular Hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in interstellar molecular clouds. The modeling of these environments relies on accurate cross sections for the various relevant processes. Among them, the photoionization plays a major role in the kinetics and in the energy exchanges involving H 2 . The recent discovery of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in extragalactic environments revealed the need for accurate evaluation of the corresponding photoionization cross sections. In the present work we report theoretical photoionization cross sections for excitation from excited vibrational levels of the ground state, dealing with the Q(N = 1) (ΔN = 0, where N is the total angular momentum of the molecule) transitions which account for roughly one third of the total photoabsorption cross section. We will focus on the v' = 1 excited level of the ground electronic state. Our calculations are based on Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT), which allows us to take into account of the full manifold of Rydberg states and their interactions with the electronic continuum. We have carried out two types of MQDT calculations. First, we omitted all open channels and calculated energy levels, wave functions and spontaneous emission Einstein coefficients, making use of the theoretical method presented in [2]. In a second set of calculations we included the open ionization channels in the computations getting the continuum phase shifts, channel mixing coefficients and channel dipole moments and finally the photoabsorption/ photoionization cross section. The cross section is dominated by the presence of resonance structures corresponding to excitation of various vibrational levels of bound electronic states which lie above the ionization threshold. In order to assess the importance of the resonances we have calculated for each vibrational interval (the energy interval between two consecutive ionization thresholds) the

  6. Search for a narrow, spin-2 resonance decaying to a pair of Z bosons in the $q\\bar{q}^{l^+ l^-}$ final state

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Mazza, Giovanni; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Stoye, Markus; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Ricci-tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Traczyk, Piotr; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Krajczar, Krisztian; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Safdi, Ben; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Brownson, Eric; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-01-29

    Results are presented from a search for a narrow, spin-2 resonance decaying into a pair of Z bosons, with one Z-boson decaying into leptons (e+e- or mu+mu-) and the other into jets. An example of such a resonance is the Kaluza--Klein graviton, G[KK], predicted in Randall--Sundrum models. The analysis is based on a 4.9 inverse femtobarn sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Kinematic and topological properties, including decay angular distributions as a novel feature of the analysis, are used to discriminate between signal and background. No evidence for a resonance is observed, and upper limits on the production cross sections times branching fractions are set. In two models that predict Z-boson spin correlations in graviton decays, graviton masses are excluded lower than a value which varies between 610 and 945 GeV, depending on the model and the strength of the graviton couplings.

  7. Scattering resonances in bimolecular collisions between NO radicals and H2 challenge the theoretical gold standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogels, Sjoerd N.; Karman, Tijs; Kłos, Jacek; Besemer, Matthieu; Onvlee, Jolijn; van der Avoird, Ad; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.

    2018-02-01

    Over the last 25 years, the formalism known as coupled-cluster (CC) theory has emerged as the method of choice for the ab initio calculation of intermolecular interaction potentials. The implementation known as CCSD(T) is often referred to as the gold standard in quantum chemistry. It gives excellent agreement with experimental observations for a variety of energy-transfer processes in molecular collisions, and it is used to calibrate density functional theory. Here, we present measurements of low-energy collisions between NO radicals and H2 molecules with a resolution that challenges the most sophisticated quantum chemistry calculations at the CCSD(T) level. Using hitherto-unexplored anti-seeding techniques to reduce the collision energy in a crossed-beam inelastic-scattering experiment, a resonance structure near 14 cm-1 is clearly resolved in the state-to-state integral cross-section, and a unique resonance fingerprint is observed in the corresponding differential cross-section. This resonance structure discriminates between two NO-H2 potentials calculated at the CCSD(T) level and pushes the required accuracy beyond the gold standard.

  8. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS): ARS300 operations manual, software version 2.01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-25

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a nondestructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ARS technique is a fast, safe, and nonintrusive technique that is particularly useful when a large number of objects need to be tested. Any physical object, whether solid, hollow, or fluid filled, has many modes of vibration. These modes of vibration, commonly referred to as the natural resonant modes or resonant frequencies, are determined by the object`s shape, size, and physical properties, such as elastic moduli, speed of sound, and density. If the object is mechanically excited at frequencies corresponding to its characteristic natural vibrational modes, a resonance effect can be observed when small excitation energies produce large amplitude vibrations in the object. At other excitation frequencies, i.e., vibrational response of the object is minimal.

  9. Lamb shift of Rydberg atoms in a resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.A.; Lozovik, Yu.E.; Pokrovsky, V.L.

    1988-08-01

    The Lamb shift of a Rydberg atom in a cavity is shown to be enhanced with the resonance interaction of a virtual atomic transition and cavity modes. The dependence of the Lamb shift on quantum numbers and atomic number changes drastically. Shifting cavity walls and scanning the atomic beam one can vary the Lamb shift. The value of the Lamb shift in a cavity may exceed a typical magnitude of the fine structure energy. For a rough resonance tuning the Coulumb multiplet occurs to be strongly mixed and a novel classification is necessary. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  10. Neutron flux calculations for criticality safety analysis using the narrow resonance approximations. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, A M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, NC-NSRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The narrow resonance approximation is applicable for all low-energy resonances and the heaviest nuclides. It is of great importance in neutron calculations, hence, fertile isotopes do not undergo fission at resonance energies. The effect of overestimating the self shielded group averaged cross-section data for a given resonance nuclide can be fairly serious. In the present work, a detailed study, and derivation of the problem of self-shielding are carried-out through the information of Hansen-roach library which is used for criticality safety analysis. The intermediate neutron flux spectrum is analyzed, using the narrow resonance approximation. The resonance self-shielded values of various cross-sections are determined. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance; Dosages quantitatifs par resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, I [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D{sub 2}O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10{sup -5} on the D{sub 2}O concentration. (author) [French] La determination du titre absolu d'une eau lourde etalon de teneur approximative de 99,8 pour cent de D{sub 2}O a pu etre effectuee par une methode originale de resonance magnetique ('Methode de passage rapide adiabatique') a une precision de 5.10{sup -5} sur le titre de D{sub 2}O. (auteur)

  12. Brain magnetic resonance imaging correlates of impaired cognition in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manschot, S.M.; Brands, A.M.; Grond, J. van der; Kessels, R.P.C.; Algra, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Biessels, G.J.

    2006-01-01

    The structural correlates of impaired cognition in type 2 diabetes are unclear. The present study compared cognition and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects and assessed the relationship between cognition and MRI findings and blood

  13. Hollow density profile on electron cyclotron resonance heating JFT-2M plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Kawashima, Hisato; Ogawa, Toshihide; Kawakami, Tomohide; Shiina, Tomio; Ishige, Youichi

    1998-01-01

    The first hollow electron density profile in the central region on the JAERI Fusion Torus-2M (JFT-2M) is measured during electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with a TV Thomson scattering system (TVTS). The peripheral region is not hollow but is accumulated due to pump-out from the central region. The hollowness increases with time but is saturated at ∼40 ms and maintains a constant hollow ratio. The hollowness is strongly related to the steep temperature gradient of the heated zone. (author)

  14. Quasibound levels and shape resonances of 39K2(B 1Pi/sub u/) crossed laser-molecular beam studies and analytical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinze, J.; Kowalczyk, P.; Engelke, F.

    1988-01-01

    Quasibound levels and shape resonances in the (B 1 Pi/sub u/ -X 1 Σ + /sub g/) band system of 39 K 2 have been recorded by crossed laser-molecular beam techniques. Using optical--optical double resonance, individual rovibrational levels (v'' = 15--18, J'' = 3--25) of the K 2 state are prepared by Franck--Condon pumping (FCP) in a supersonic nozzle beam. Excitation into quasibound levels below and above the (B 1 Pi/sub u/) state barrier is detected as molecular and atomic (K4 2 P 3 /sub // 2 →4 2 S 1 /sub // 2 only) fluorescence. The resonance transition frequencies and shapes are measured and the results are used (a) to determine the scattering resonance energies, widths, and lifetimes; (b) to compare them with values obtained by a ''maximum internal amplitude'' approach [R. J. LeRoy and R. B. Bernstein, J. Chem. Phys. 54, 5114 (1971)]; and (c) to check the agreement with exact calculations of the B state potential using the ''inverted perturbation approach (IPA).'' The bound and quasibound part of the B 1 Pi/sub u/ state including the locus (R = 8.08 +- 0.05 A) of the barrier maximum (298 +- 8 cm -1 above the adiabatic dissociation limit) is found in excellent agreement with previous results. The shape resonances are not highly sensitive to the long-range interatomic forces, here the repulsive dipole--dipole resonance interaction

  15. Induced Proton Polarization for pi0 Electroproduction at Q2 = 0.126 GeV2/c2 Around the Delta(1232) Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen Warren; Ricardo Alarcon; Christopher Armstrong; Burin Asavapibhop; David Barkhuff; William Bertozzi; Volker Burkert; Chen, J.; Jian-Ping Chen; Joseph Comfort; Daniel Dale; George Dodson; Dolfini, S.; Dow, K.; Martin Epstein; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; John Finn; Shalev Gilad; Ralf Gothe; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Karabarbounis, A.; James Kelly; Stanley Kowalski; Kunz, C.; Liu, D.; Lourie, R.W.; Richard Madey; Demetrius Margaziotis; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; Mertz, C.; Brian Milbrath; Rory Miskimen; Joseph Mitchell; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Costas Papanicolas; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Liming Qin; Paul Rutt; Adam Sarty; Jeffrey Shaw; Soong, S.B.; Tieger, D.; Christoph Tschalaer; William Turchinetz; Paul Ulmer; Scott Van Verst; Vellidis, C.; Lawrence Weinstein; Steven Williamson; Rhett Woo; Alaen Young

    1998-01-01

    We present a measurement of the induced proton polarization P n in π 0 electroproduction on the proton around the Δ resonance. The measurement was made at a central invariant mass and a squared four-momentum transfer of W = 1231 MeV and Q 2 = 0.126 GeV 2 /c 2 , respectively. We measured a large induced polarization, P n = -0.397 ± 0.055 ± 0.009. The data suggest that the scalar background is larger than expected from a recent effective Hamiltonian model

  16. Electron dynamics in the core-excited CS2 molecule revealed through resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, T; Carniato, S; Journel, L; Guillemin, R; Kawerk, E; Simon, M; Žitnik, M; Kavčič, M; Bučar, K; Bohinc, R; Petric, M; Da Cruz, V Vaz; Gel'mukhanov, F

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in the CS 2 molecule near the S 1s edge. We show that localization of the S 1s core-hole occurs in CS 2 during the RIXS process due to the orientational dephasing of interference between the waves scattering on the two sulfur atoms. Strong evolution of the RIXS profile with the excitation energy far below the first absorption resonance reflects the onset of electron dynamics triggered by a coherent excitation of multiple electronic states. (paper)

  17. A silicon micromachined resonant pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhangyang; Fan Shangchun; Cai Chenguang

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and test of a silicon micromachined resonant pressure sensor. A square membrane and a doubly clamped resonant beam constitute a compound structure. The former senses the pressure directly, while the latter changes its resonant frequency according to deformation of the membrane. The final output relation between the resonant frequency and the applied pressure is deducted according to the structure mechanical properties. Sensors are fabricated by micromachining technology, and then sealed in vaccum. These sensors are tested by open-loop and close-loop system designed on purpose. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor has a sensitivity of 49.8Hz/kPa and repeatability of 0.08%.

  18. Near Infrared Characterization of Hetero-Core Optical Fiber SPR Sensors Coated with Ta2O5 Film and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Watanabe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the characteristics of optical fiber sensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR at 1,310 nm in which the scattering loss of silica optical fiber is low. SPR operation in the infrared wavelength range is achieved by coating a thin tantalum pentaoxide (Ta2O5 film. The novelty of this paper lies in the verification of how the hetero-core scheme could be operated as a commercial base candidate in the sense of easy fabrication, sufficient mechanical strength, and significant sensitivity as a liquid detector under the basis of a low loss transmission network in the near infrared wavelength region. The effect of Ta2O5 layer thickness has been experimentally revealed in the wavelength region extending to 1,800 nm by using the hetero-core structured optical fiber. SPR characterizations have been made in the wavelength region 1,000–1,300 nm, showing the feasible operation at the near infrared wavelength and the possible practical applications. In addition, the technique developed in this work has been interestingly applied to a multi-point water-detection and a water-level gauge in which tandem-connected SPR sensors system using hetero-core structured fibers were incorporated. The detailed performance characteristics are also shown on these applications.

  19. Baryon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Ramos, A.; Gonzalez, P.; Vijande, J.; Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the Λ(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2 + baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the γp→K + Λ reaction.

  20. KOI-142, the king of transit variations, is a pair of planets near the 2:1 resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesvorný, David; Kipping, David; Terrell, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used as a diagnostic of gravitational interactions between planets in a multi-planet system. Many Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) exhibit significant TTVs, but KOI-142.01 stands out among them with an unrivaled ≃12 hr TTV amplitude. Here we report...... mass inferred from the transit variations is consistent with the measured transit depth, suggesting a Neptune-class planet (KOI-142b). The orbital period ratio P /P = 2.03 indicates that the two planets are just wide of the 2:1 resonance. The present dynamics of this system, characterized here...

  1. Coherent control through near-resonant Raman transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Xingcan; Lerch, Eliza-Beth W.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The phase of an electronic wave function is shown to play an important role in coherent control experiments. By using a pulse shaping system with a femtosecond laser, we explore the phase relationships among resonant and off-resonant Raman transitions in Li 2 by measuring the phases of the resulting wave packets, or quantum beats. Specific pixels in a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator are used to isolate the resonant and off-resonant portions of the Raman transitions in Li 2 . The off-resonant Raman transitions have an approximately 90 degree sign phase shift with respect to the resonant Raman transition, and there is an approximately 180 degree sign phase shift between the blue-detuned and the red-detuned off-resonant Raman transitions. Calculations using second-order time-dependent perturbation theory for the electronic transitions agree with the experimental results for the laser pulse intensities used here. Interferences between the off-resonant Raman transitions as a function of detuning are used to demonstrate coherent control of the Raman quantum wave packet

  2. Towards measuring the off-resonant thermal noise of a pendulum mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Leonhardt, V; Kloevekorn, P; Willke, B; Lück, H B; Danzmann, K

    2002-01-01

    Thermal noise is one of the dominant noise sources in interferometric length measurements and can limit the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors. Our goal is to analyse the off-resonant thermal noise of a high Q pendulum. Therefore we interferometrically detect the length changes of a 2.3 cm long optical resonator, which for good seismic isolation consists of two multiple stage pendulums. We are able to lock the length of this optical resonator to a frequency-stabilized laser beam and as a result get the spectral density of the differential mirror movement.

  3. Degenerate four-wave mixing in a resonant homogeneously broadened system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, R.C.; Steel, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Detailed measurements have been made of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) in a resonant homogeneously broadened gas. The measurements were performed in SF 6 using a CO 2 laser operated on the 10.4-μm branch. The experimental results were compared to a two-level theory for a resonant saturable absorber developed by Abrams and Lind. The measured value of 7% reflectivity on the P(20) line was in excellent agreement with Abrams and Lind when corrected for thermal motion. A peak reflectivity of 38% was observed for off-resonant operation on the P(8) line. In addition to the usual two-level nonlinear response, discussion and measurement of the coherent three-level nonlinearity is also presented. A two-photon contribution in SF 6 using the P(16) line of CO 2 equals the one-photon response. Initial observations of coherent propagation effects are also presented

  4. Wideband Bandpass Filter with High Selectivity and an Adjustable Notched-band Adopting a Multi-mode Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xing-Bing; Jiang, Ting

    2018-04-01

    A wideband bandpass filter (BPF) with an adjustable notched-band and high selectivity is proposed. The proposed BPF consists of a multi-mode resonator (MMR), two λ/2 resonators, and I/O feed lines with 50 ohm characteristic impedance. The MMR, connected as a whole by a wide stub, is composed of one I-shaped resonator and two open-loop resonators. Tightly coupling is built between MMR and λ/2 resonators. I/O feed lines are directly connected with two λ/2 resonators, respectively. Due to the use of tapped-line coupling, one transmission zero (TZ) is formed near low-edge of aim passband. High-edge of passband with one attendant TZ can be tuned to desired location by adjusting bottom-side position of used wide stub or bottom-side length of I-shaped resonator in MMR. The top-side length of I-shaped resonator is applied to improve upper stopband performance and shift undesired resonant mode of MMR near high-edge of aim passband to proper frequency point. The notched-band in aim passband is dominated by top-side position of wide stub in MMR. Good agreement is observed between simulated and measured results.

  5. Electron Spin Resonance in CuSO45H2O down to 100 mK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Kazuo; Chiba, Yoshiaki; Kindo, Koichi; Date, Muneyuki

    1988-12-01

    Copper sulfate pentahydrate CuSO45H2O is investigated by ESR at 9, 17, 24, 35 and 50 GHz regions down to about 100 mK using a combined cryostat of 3He and adiabatic demagnetization. The temperature dependent exchange interaction JAB between inequivalent site spins A and B is found. It is about 0.11 K at room temperature and increases with decreasing temperature up to 0.24 K. Temperature dependent resonance shifts are attributed to the exchange shift coming from non-resonant dissimilar spins. Partial order effect below 1 K is discussed.

  6. A fluid density sensor based on a resonant tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yong; Dao, Dzung Viet; Woodfield, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A fluid density sensor based on resonance frequency change of a metallic tube is presented. The sensor has been developed without using a complex micro-fabrication process. The sensor is able to identify fluid types/contaminations and improve the performance by reducing testing time, decreasing complexity of testing equipment and reducing sample sizes. The sensor can measure the resonance frequency of its own structure and determine the change in resonance frequency due to the subsequent sample inside the tube. Numerical modelling, analytical modelling and physical testing of a prototype sensor showed comparable results for both the magnitude and resonance frequency shift. The modelling results yielded a resonance frequency shift of 200 Hz from 9.87 kHz to 9.67 kHz after the water was filled into the tube. The actual testing illustrated a resonance frequency change of 280 Hz from 9.11 kHz to 8.83 kHz. The ultimate aim of the work is to determine resonance frequencies of desired samples at a level that could detect genetic disease on a cellular level. (paper)

  7. Pulse-bandwidth dependence of coherent phase control of resonance-mediated (2+1) three-photon absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandman, Andrey; Chuntonov, Lev; Rybak, Leonid; Amitay, Zohar

    2007-01-01

    We study in detail coherent phase control of femtosecond resonance-mediated (2+1) three-photon absorption and its dependence on the spectral bandwidth of the excitation pulse. The regime is the weak-field regime of third perturbative order. The corresponding interference mechanism involves a group of three-photon excitation pathways that are on resonance with the intermediate state and a group of three-photon excitation pathways that are near resonant with it. The model system of the study is atomic sodium (Na), for which experimental and numerical-theoretical results are obtained. Prominent among the results is our finding that with simple proper pulse shaping an increase in the excitation bandwidth leads to a corresponding increase in the enhancement of the three-photon absorption over the absorption induced by the (unshaped) transform-limited pulse. For example, here, a 40 nm bandwidth leads to an order-of-magnitude enhancement over the transform-limited absorption

  8. Resonances, resonance functions and spectral deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balslev, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper is aimed at an analysis of resonances and resonance states from a mathematical point of view. Resonances are characterized as singular points of the analytically continued Lippman-Schwinger equation, as complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian with a purely outgoing, exponentially growing eigenfunction, and as poles of the S-matrix. (orig./HSI)

  9. Excitation-energy dependence of the resonant Auger transitions to the 4p4(1D)np (n=5,6) states across the 3d3/2-15p and 3d5/2-16p resonances in Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankari, A.; Alitalo, S.; Nikkinen, J.; Kivimaeki, A.; Aksela, S.; Aksela, H.; Fritzsche, S.

    2007-01-01

    The energy dependencies of the intensities and angular distribution parameters β of the resonant Auger final states 4p 4 ( 1 D)np (n=5,6) of Kr were determined experimentally in the excitation-energy region of the overlapping 3d 3/2 -1 5p and 3d 5/2 -1 6p resonances. The experimental results were compared with the outcome of multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. Combining experimental and calculated results allowed us to study interference effects between the direct and several resonant channels that populate the 4p 4 ( 1 D)np states. The inclusion of the direct channel was crucial in order to reproduce the observed energy behavior of the angular distribution parameters. It was also important to take into account experimentally observed shake transitions

  10. Resonance Raman Spectrum of the Transient (SCN)2 Free Radical Anion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1979-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the transient species (λmax = 475 nm, τ½ = 1.6 μs) formed by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of thiocyanate, SCN2−, is reported. The spectrum is discussed in terms of the previous assignment of this transient to the radical anion, (SCN)−2. The observed...... vibrational frequencies of the radical anion are consistent with substantial weakening of the S---S and the Ctriple bond; length as m-dashN bonds are compared with neutral thiocyanogen....

  11. Morphology-dependent resonances of a microsphere-optical fiber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffel, Giora; Arnold, Stephen; Taskent, Dogan; Serpengüzel, Ali; Connolly, John; Morris, Nancy

    1996-05-01

    Morphology-dependent resonances of microspheres sitting upon an index-matched single-mode fiber half-coupler are excited by a tunable 753-nm distributed-feedback laser. Resonance peaks in the scattering spectra and associated dips in the transmission spectra for the TE and TM modes are observed. We present a new model that describes this interaction in terms of the fiber-sphere coupling coefficient and the microsphere's intrinsic quality factor Q0 . This model enables us to obtain expressions for the finesse and the Q factor of the composite particle-fiber system, the resonance width, and the depth of the dips measured in the transmission spectra. Our model shows that index matching improves the coupling efficiency by more than a factor of 2 compared with that of a non-index-matched system.

  12. Electron Dynamics in the Core-Excited CS_{2} Molecule Revealed through Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marchenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental and theoretical study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS in the carbon disulphide CS_{2} molecule near the sulfur K-absorption edge. We observe a strong evolution of the RIXS spectral profile with the excitation energy tuned below the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO absorption resonance. The reason for this is twofold. Reducing the photon energy in the vicinity of the LUMO absorption resonance leads to a relative suppression of the LUMO contribution with respect to the emission signal from the higher unoccupied molecular orbitals, which results in the modulation of the total RIXS profile. At even larger negative photon-energy detuning from the resonance, the excitation-energy dependence of the RIXS profile is dominated by the onset of electron dynamics triggered by a coherent excitation of multiple electronic states. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that in the hard x-ray regime, localization of the S 1s core hole occurs in CS_{2} during the RIXS process because of the orientational dephasing of interference between the waves scattering on the two sulfur atoms. Core-hole localization leads to violation of the symmetry selection rules for the electron transitions observed in the spectra.

  13. 1s2p Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering Magnetic Circular Dichroism as a probe for the local and non-local orbitals in CrO 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, Patric; Bouldi, Nadejda; Hunault, Myrtille O.j.y.; Sikora, Marcin; Ablett, James M.; Rueff, Jean Pascal; Lebert, Blair; Sainctavit, Philippe; De Groot, Frank M.f.; Juhin, Amélie

    2018-01-01

    We have determined the magnetic ground state of the half-metal CrO2 based on 1s2p Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering Magnetic Circular Dichroism (RIXS-MCD) experiments. The two-dimensional RIXS-MCD map displays the 1s X-ray absorption spectrum combined with the 1s2p X-ray emission decay, where

  14. Complete genome sequence and phylogenetic analyses of an aquabirnavirus isolated from a diseased marbled eel culture in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chiu-Ming

    2017-08-01

    An aquabirnavirus was isolated from diseased marbled eels (Anguilla marmorata; MEIPNV1310) with gill haemorrhages and associated mortality. Its genome segment sequences were obtained through next-generation sequencing and compared with published aquabirnavirus sequences. The results indicated that the genome sequence of MEIPNV1310 contains segment A (3099 nucleotides) and segment B (2789 nucleotides). Phylogenetic analysis showed that MEIPNV1310 is closely related to the infectious pancreatic necrosis Ab strain within genogroup II. This genome sequence is beneficial for studying the geographic distribution and evolution of aquabirnaviruses.

  15. Observation of double resonant laser induced transitions in the $v = n - l - 1 = 2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic helium-4 atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S; Tamura, H; Torii, H A; Hori, Masaki; Maas, F E; Morita, N; Kumakura, M; Sugai, I; Hartmann, F J; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Ketzer, B; Pohl, R; Horváth, D; Eades, John; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T

    1997-01-01

    A new laser-induced resonant transition in the $v=n-l-1=2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic $^4$He atoms has been found by using a double resonance technique. This was done by setting the first laser to the already known 470.724 nm resonance ($(n,l)=(37,34)\\rightarrow (36,33)$), while the $(38,35)\\rightarrow (37,34)$ transition was searched for with the second laser. The resonant transition was found at wavelength of 529.622$\\pm$0.003 nm, showing excellent agreement with a recent prediction of Korobov.

  16. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Patellofemoral Chondromalacia: Is There a Role for T2 Mapping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eck, Carola F; Kingston, R Scott; Crues, John V; Kharrazi, F Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Patellofemoral pain is common, and treatment is guided by the presence and grade of chondromalacia. To evaluate and compare the sensitivity and specificity in detecting and grading chondral abnormalities of the patella between proton density fat suppression (PDFS) and T2 mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 25 patients who underwent MRI of the knee with both a PDFS sequence and T2 mapping and subsequently underwent arthroscopic knee surgery were included. The cartilage surface of the patella was graded on both MRI sequences by 2 independent, blinded radiologists. Cartilage was then graded during arthroscopic surgery by a sports medicine fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon. Reliability, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined for both MRI methods. The findings during arthroscopic surgery were considered the gold standard. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement for both PDFS (98.5% and 89.4%, respectively) and T2 mapping (99.4% and 91.3%, respectively) MRI were excellent. For T2 mapping, the sensitivity (61%) and specificity (64%) were comparable, whereas for PDFS there was a lower sensitivity (37%) but higher specificity (81%) in identifying cartilage abnormalities. This resulted in a similar accuracy for PDFS (59%) and T2 mapping (62%). Both PDFS and T2 mapping MRI were reliable but only moderately accurate in predicting patellar chondromalacia found during knee arthroscopic surgery.

  18. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance; Dosages quantitatifs par resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, I. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D{sub 2}O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10{sup -5} on the D{sub 2}O concentration. (author) [French] La determination du titre absolu d'une eau lourde etalon de teneur approximative de 99,8 pour cent de D{sub 2}O a pu etre effectuee par une methode originale de resonance magnetique ('Methode de passage rapide adiabatique') a une precision de 5.10{sup -5} sur le titre de D{sub 2}O. (auteur)

  19. Efimov resonances in atomic three-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, J. Zs.; Papp, Z.

    2006-01-01

    In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 143201 (2005)], we reported an accumulation of three-body resonant states attached to n=2 and higher two-body thresholds. A more careful investigation revealed that there are resonances of the same kind above the n=1 threshold as well. This suggests that the resonances attached to the thresholds are Efimov resonances

  20. Experimental (e, 2e) study of exchange interferences in the resonant Auger decay of Ar induced by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paripás, Béla; Palásthy, Béla; Žitnik, Matjaz

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The interference of autoionizing resonances with a common final ionic state is measured. •We have developed a method to experimentally verify for the exchange interference effect. •The sum of kinetic energies of the two detected electrons is kept constant. •Mainly the interference effects of [2p 3/2 ]4p and [2p 1/2 ]4p resonances in argon are studied. •The results possibly indicate small exchange interference effects. -- Abstract: Any two autoionizing resonances with a common final ionic state can be made to interfere by an appropriate selection of electron impact energy. To reveal the exchange interference effects a selective detection of electron pairs related to the selected final state is desired. We have performed a constant ionic state (e, 2e) experiment (CIS) isolating the final state by keeping the sum of transmission energies of two independent electron spectrometers constant. In the focus of this work are the exchange interference effects of 2p 3/2 −1 4p and 2p 1/2 −1 4p resonances in argon decaying to the 3p −2 ( 1 D)4p 2 P, 2 D final ionic state with energy E F = 37.3 ± 0.2 eV. We have developed a method to experimentally verify for the exchange interference effect. It is based on a comparison of the CIS spectrum recorded at the critical primary electron energy that activates the interferences, and the constructed, interference-free CIS spectrum that is build up from the CIS spectrum measured at primary electron energy away from the critical value. The results possibly indicate small exchange interference effects that may have been considerably smeared out at present experimental energy resolution

  1. A method for generating subgroup parameters from resonance tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devan, K.; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    1993-01-01

    A method for generating subgroup or band parameters from resonance tables is described. A computer code SPART was written using this method. This code generates the subgroup parameters for any number of bands within the specified broad groups at different temperatures by reading the required input data from the binary cross section library in the Cadarache format. The results obtained with SPART code for two bands were compared with that obtained from GROUPIE code and a good agreement was obtained. Results of the generation of subgroup parameters in four bands for sample case of 239 Pu from resonance tables of Cadarache Ver.2 library is also presented. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs

  2. A New Look at an Old Activity: Resonance Tubes Used to Teach Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Jane

    2017-01-01

    There are several variations of resonance laboratory activities used to determine the speed of sound. This is "not" one of them. This activity uses the resonance tube idea to teach "resonance," not to verify the speed of sound. Prior to this activity, the speed of sound has already been measured using computer sound-sensors and…

  3. Value of black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter John Paul

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess whether black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance is superior to conventional white blood imaging of cardiac iron in patients with thalassaemia major (TM. Materials and methods We performed both conventional white blood and black blood T2* CMR sequences in 100 TM patients to determine intra and inter-observer variability and presence of artefacts. In 23 patients, 2 separate studies of both techniques were performed to assess interstudy reproducibility. Results Cardiac T2* values ranged from 4.5 to 43.8 ms. The mean T2* values were not different between black blood and white blood acquisitions (20.5 vs 21.6 ms, p = 0.26. Compared with the conventional white blood diastolic acquisition, the coefficient of variance of the black blood CMR technique was superior for intra-observer reproducibility (1.47% vs 4.23%, p Conclusions Black blood T2* CMR has superior reproducibility and reduced imaging artefacts for the assessment of cardiac iron, in comparison with the conventional white blood technique, which make it the preferred technique for clinical practice.

  4. Charmonium resonances in the 3.9 GeV/c2 energy region and the X(3915)/X(3930) puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Pablo G.; Segovia, Jorge; Entem, David R.; Fernández, Francisco

    2018-03-01

    An interesting controversy has emerged challenging the widely accepted nature of the X (3915) and the X (3930) resonances, which had initially been assigned to the χc0 (2 P) and χc2 (2 P) c c bar states, respectively. To unveil their inner structure, the properties of the JPC =0++ and JPC =2++ charmonium states in the energy region of these resonances are analyzed in the framework of a constituent quark model. Together with the bare q q bar states, threshold effects due to the opening of nearby meson-meson channels are included in a coupled-channels scheme calculation. We find that the structure of both states is dominantly molecular with a probability of bare q q bar states lower than 45%. Our results favor the hypothesis that X (3915) and X (3930) resonances arise as different decay mechanisms of the same JPC =2++ state. Moreover we find an explanation for the recently discovered M = 3860MeV /c2 as a JPC =0++ 2P state and rediscover the lost Y (3940) as an additional state in the JPC =0++ family.

  5. NOESY-WaterControl: a new NOESY sequence for the observation of under-water protein resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Allan M.; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S.

    2017-01-01

    Highly selective and efficient water signal suppression is indispensable in biomolecular 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. However, the application of conventional water suppression schemes can cause a significant or complete loss of the biomolecular resonances at and around the water chemical shift (ω 2 ). In this study, a new sequence, NOESY-WaterControl, was developed to address this issue. The new sequence was tested on lysozyme and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), demonstrating its efficiency in both water suppression and, more excitingly, preserving water-proximate biomolecular resonances in ω 2 . The 2D NOESY maps obtained using the new sequence thus provide more information than the maps obtained with conventional water suppression, thereby lessening the number of experiments needed to complete resonance assignments of biomolecules. The 2D NOESY-WaterControl map of BPTI showed strong bound water and exchangeable proton signals in ω 1 but these signals were absent in ω 2 , indicating the possibility of using the new sequence to discriminate bound water and exchangeable proton resonances from non-labile proton resonances with similar chemical shifts to water.

  6. Combined radiation damage, annealing, and ageing studies of InGaAsP /InP 1310 nm lasers for the CMS tracker optical links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    2002-01-01

    A summary is presented of the combined effects of radiation damage, accelerated annealing and accelerated ageing in 1310 nm InGaAsP/InP multi-quantum-well lasers, the type chosen for use in the CMS Tracker optical links. The radiation damage effects are compared for a variety of radiation sources: /sup 60/Co-gamma, 0.8 MeV (average energy) neutrons, 20 MeV (average energy) neutrons and 300 MeV/c pions that represent important parts of the spectrum of particles that will be encountered in the CMS Tracker. The relative damage factors of the various sources are calculated by comparing the laser threshold current increase due to radiation damage giving approximately=0 : 0.12 : 0.53 : 1 for /sup 60/Co-gamma, approximately =0.8 MeV neutrons, approximately=20 MeV neutrons with respect to 300 MeV/c pions. The effects of bias current and temperature on the annealing were measured and, in all cases, the annealing is proportional to log(annealing time). A bias current of 60 mA increases the annealing, in terms of the ti...

  7. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting using echo-planar imaging: Joint quantification of T1 and T2∗ relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Benedikt; Zimmer, Fabian; Zapp, Jascha; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2017-11-01

    To develop an implementation of the magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) paradigm for quantitative imaging using echo-planar imaging (EPI) for simultaneous assessment of T 1 and T2∗. The proposed MRF method (MRF-EPI) is based on the acquisition of 160 gradient-spoiled EPI images with rapid, parallel-imaging accelerated, Cartesian readout and a measurement time of 10 s per slice. Contrast variation is induced using an initial inversion pulse, and varying the flip angles, echo times, and repetition times throughout the sequence. Joint quantification of T 1 and T2∗ is performed using dictionary matching with integrated B1+ correction. The quantification accuracy of the method was validated in phantom scans and in vivo in 6 healthy subjects. Joint T 1 and T2∗ parameter maps acquired with MRF-EPI in phantoms are in good agreement with reference measurements, showing deviations under 5% and 4% for T 1 and T2∗, respectively. In vivo baseline images were visually free of artifacts. In vivo relaxation times are in good agreement with gold-standard techniques (deviation T 1 : 4 ± 2%, T2∗: 4 ± 5%). The visual quality was comparable to the in vivo gold standard, despite substantially shortened scan times. The proposed MRF-EPI method provides fast and accurate T 1 and T2∗ quantification. This approach offers a rapid supplement to the non-Cartesian MRF portfolio, with potentially increased usability and robustness. Magn Reson Med 78:1724-1733, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Correlated ground state and E2 giant resonance built on it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru

    1995-01-01

    Taking 16 O as an example of realistic nuclei, we demonstrate that a correlated ground state can be obtained as a long time solution of a time-dependent density-matrix formalism (TDDM) when the residual interaction is adiabatically treated. We also study in TDDM the E2 giant resonance of 16 O built on the correlated ground state and compare it with that built on the Hartree-Fock ground state. It is found that a spurious mixing of low frequency components seen in the latter is eliminated by using the correlated ground state. (author)

  9. The effects of 3:1 resonances in stellar pulsations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalik, P.; Buchler, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a 3:1 resonance are studied and compared to those of a 2:1 resonance. When the growth rate of the higher frequency mode is negative it is shown that a 3:1 resonance affects the pulsation in a very similar fashion to a 2:1 resonance. In fact, it may be very difficult to discriminate in observational data between these two types of coupling. On the other hand, when the higher frequency mode is linearly unstable a 3:1 resonance, contrary to a 2:1 case, is unable to saturate the instability in the absence of nonresonant coupling terms. Astrophysical applications are discussed. 19 refs

  10. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D printing and two-dimensional (2D printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  11. Myometrial invasion and overall staging of endometrial carcinoma: assessment using fusion of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu Guo,1,2 Ping Wang,2 Penghui Wang,2 Wei Gao,1 Fenge Li,3 Xueling Yang,1 Hongyan Ni,2 Wen Shen,2 Zhi Guo1 1Department of Interventional Therapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin, Tianjin’s Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin, 2Department of Radiology, Tianjin First Center Hospital, The First Central Clinical College of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 3Department of Gynecology, Tianjin First Center Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Background: The age of onset of endometrial carcinoma has been decreasing in recent years. In endometrial carcinoma, it is important to accurately assess invasion depth and preoperative staging. Fusion of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2WI and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI may contribute to the improvement of anatomical localization of lesions.Materials and methods: In our study, a total of 58 endometrial carcinoma cases were included. Based on the revised 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system, a fusion of T2WI and DWI was utilized for the evaluation of invasion depth and determination of the overall stage. Postoperative pathologic assessment was considered as the reference standard. The consistency of T2WI image staging and pathologic staging, and the consistency of fused T2WI and DWI and pathologic staging were all analyzed using Kappa statistics.Results: Compared with the T2WI group, a significantly higher diagnostic accuracy was observed for myometrial invasion with fusion of T2WI and DWI (77.6% for T2WI; 94.8% for T2WI-DWI. For the identification of deep invasion, we calculated values for diagnostic sensitivity (69.2% for T2WI; 92.3% for T2WI-DWI, specificity (80% for T2WI; 95.6% for T2WI-DWI, positive predictive value (50% for T2WI; 85.7% for T2WI-DWI, and negative predictive value (90% for

  12. Resonance in a Cone-Topped Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Cheng-Huan Chia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between ratio of the upper opening diameter of a cone-topped cylinder to the cylinder diameter,and the ratio of the length of the air column to resonant period was examined. Plastic cones with upper openings ranging from 1.3 cm to 3.6 cm and tuning forks with frequencies ranging from 261.6 Hz to 523.3 Hz were used. The transition from a standing wave in a cylindrical column to a Helmholtz-type resonance in a resonant cavity with a narrow opening was observed.

  13. Acoustic anomalies in the resonant ultrasound spectra of La2-x SrxCuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrao, J.L.; Lei, M.; Migliori, A.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is a novel technique for the simultaneous determination of a solid's elastic moduli. Measurements of the resonant ultrasound spectra of single crystals of La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 for several values of x are reported. Anomalies associated with the nonstoichiometric (x>0) doped superconductor have been observed. These anomalies indicate that the absence of short-wavelength translational invariance at the Brillouin-zone edge is being coupled into the zone center. Measurements of the stoichiometric (x=0) insulator will also be discussed. [This work was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Iron overload in a teenager with xerocytosis: the importance of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Reijâne Alves de; Kassab, Carolina; Seguro, Fernanda Salles; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Silveira, Paulo Augusto Achucarro; Wood, John; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    To report a case of iron overload secondary to xerocytosis, a rare disease in a teenager, diagnosed, by T2* magnetic resonance imaging. We report the case of a symptomatic patient with xerocytosis, a ferritin level of 350ng/mL and a significant cardiac iron overload. She was diagnosed by T2* magnetic resonance imaging and received chelation therapy Ektacytometric analysis confirmed the diagnosis of hereditary xerocytosis. Subsequent T2* magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete resolution of the iron overload in various organs, as a new echocardiography revealed a complete resolution of previous cardiac alterations. The patient remains in chelation therapy. Xerocytosis is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by dehydrated stomatocytosis. The patient may present with intense fatigue and iron overload. We suggest the regular use of T2* magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis and control of the response to iron chelation in xerocytosis, and we believe it can be used also in other hemolytic anemia requiring transfusions

  15. Iron overload in a teenager with xerocytosis: the importance of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, Reijâne Alves de; Kassab, Carolina; Seguro, Fernanda Salles [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Costa, Fernando Ferreira [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Silveira, Paulo Augusto Achucarro [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Wood, John [University of Southern California, California (United States); Hamerschlak, Nelson [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To report a case of iron overload secondary to xerocytosis, a rare disease in a teenager, diagnosed, by T2* magnetic resonance imaging. We report the case of a symptomatic patient with xerocytosis, a ferritin level of 350ng/mL and a significant cardiac iron overload. She was diagnosed by T2* magnetic resonance imaging and received chelation therapy Ektacytometric analysis confirmed the diagnosis of hereditary xerocytosis. Subsequent T2* magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete resolution of the iron overload in various organs, as a new echocardiography revealed a complete resolution of previous cardiac alterations. The patient remains in chelation therapy. Xerocytosis is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by dehydrated stomatocytosis. The patient may present with intense fatigue and iron overload. We suggest the regular use of T2* magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis and control of the response to iron chelation in xerocytosis, and we believe it can be used also in other hemolytic anemia requiring transfusions.

  16. Iron overload in a teenager with xerocytosis: the importance of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Reijâne Alves de; Kassab, Carolina; Seguro, Fernanda Salles; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Silveira, Paulo Augusto Achucarro; Wood, John; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2013-12-01

    To report a case of iron overload secondary to xerocytosis, a rare disease in a teenager, diagnosed, by T2* magnetic resonance imaging. We report the case of a symptomatic patient with xerocytosis, a ferritin level of 350ng/mL and a significant cardiac iron overload. She was diagnosed by T2* magnetic resonance imaging and received chelation therapy Ektacytometric analysis confirmed the diagnosis of hereditary xerocytosis. Subsequent T2* magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete resolution of the iron overload in various organs, as a new echocardiography revealed a complete resolution of previous cardiac alterations. The patient remains in chelation therapy. Xerocytosis is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by dehydrated stomatocytosis. The patient may present with intense fatigue and iron overload. We suggest the regular use of T2* magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis and control of the response to iron chelation in xerocytosis, and we believe it can be used also in other hemolytic anemia requiring transfusions.

  17. ESR spectrometer with a loop-gap resonator for cw and time resolved studies in a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ferenc; Murányi, Ferenc

    2005-04-01

    The design and performance of an electron spin resonance spectrometer operating at 3 and 9 GHz microwave frequencies combined with a 9-T superconducting magnet are described. The probehead contains a compact two-loop, one gap resonator, and is inside the variable temperature insert of the magnet enabling measurements in the 0-9T magnetic field and 1.5-400 K temperature range. The spectrometer allows studies on systems where resonance occurs at fields far above the g approximately 2 paramagnetic condition such as in antiferromagnets. The low quality factor of the resonator allows time resolved experiments such as, e.g., longitudinally detected ESR. We demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer on the NaNiO2 antiferromagnet, the MgB2 superconductor, and the RbC60 conducting alkaline fulleride polymer.

  18. Resonant tunneling with high peak to valley current ratio in SiO2/nc-Si/SiO2 multi-layers at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D. Y.; Sun, Y.; He, Y. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated carrier transport in SiO 2 /nc-Si/SiO 2 multi-layers by room temperature current-voltage measurements. Resonant tunneling signatures accompanied by current peaks are observed. Carrier transport in the multi-layers were analyzed by plots of ln(I/V 2 ) as a function of 1/V and ln(I) as a function of V 1/2 . Results suggest that besides films quality, nc-Si and barrier sub-layer thicknesses are important parameters that restrict carrier transport. When thicknesses are both small, direct tunneling dominates carrier transport, resonant tunneling occurs only at certain voltages and multi-resonant tunneling related current peaks can be observed but with peak to valley current ratio (PVCR) values smaller than 1.5. When barrier thickness is increased, trap-related and even high field related tunneling is excited, causing that multi-current peaks cannot be observed clearly, only one current peak with higher PVCR value of 7.7 can be observed. While if the thickness of nc-Si is large enough, quantum confinement is not so strong, a broad current peak with PVCR value as high as 60 can be measured, which may be due to small energy difference between the splitting energy levels in the quantum dots of nc-Si. Size distribution in a wide range may cause un-controllability of the peak voltages

  19. Study of luminescence and optical resonances in Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} micro- and nanotriangles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebriano, Teresa; Mendez, Bianchi, E-mail: bianchi@fis.ucm.es; Piqueras, Javier [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Luminescence of micro- and nanotriangles of cubic antimony oxide, Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) in scanning electron microscope and by photoluminescence (PL) in a laser confocal microscope. The triangles were grown by a thermal evaporation-deposition process with pure antimony powders as precursor, and present a self assembled arrangement covering extended areas of the samples. CL spectra of the triangles show bands at 2-2.5 and 3.1 eV, the latter is not observed in the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} initial powder. PL excited by 325 nm laser shows a band at 2.4 eV with a shoulder at 2.75 eV, as well as resonance modes suggesting optical cavity behavior of the triangles. The separation between resonant peaks from different triangles has been correlated with the triangle side length and possible optical paths were obtained according to the Fabry-Perot relationship. These results along with the optical images suggest that not only Fabry-Perot cavity modes, but also whispering gallery modes may occur inside the micro- and nanotriangle structures.

  20. Line shapes of atomic-candle-type Rabi resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffer, J.G.; Camparo, J.C.; Sickmiller, B.; Presser, A.

    2002-01-01

    When atoms interact with a phase-modulated field, the probability of finding the atom in the excited-state oscillates at the second harmonic of the modulation frequency, 2ω m . The amplitude of this oscillating probability is a resonant function of the Rabi frequency Ω, and this is termed a β Rabi resonance. In this work, we examine the line shape of the β Rabi resonance both theoretically and experimentally. We find that a small-signal theory of the β-Rabi-resonance condition captures much of the line shape's character, and, in particular, that the resonance's 'line Q' (i.e., 2δΩ 1/2 /Ω) is proportional to the modulation frequency. This result can be applied to the atomic candle, where β Rabi resonances are employed to stabilize field strength. Considering our results in the context of developing an optical atomic candle, we find that a free-running diode laser's intensity noise could be improved by orders of magnitude using the atomic candle concept

  1. Biofouling Removal and Protein Detection Using a Hypersonic Resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuting; Zhang, Hongxiang; Liu, Wenpeng; Wang, Yanyan; Pang, Wei; Duan, Xuexin

    2017-08-25

    Nonspecific binding (NSB) is a general issue for surface based biosensors. Various approaches have been developed to prevent or remove the NSBs. However, these approaches either increased the background signals of the sensors or limited to specific transducers interface. In this work, we developed a hydrodynamic approach to selectively remove the NSBs using a microfabricated hypersonic resonator with 2.5 gigahertz (GHz) resonant frequency. The high frequency device facilitates generation of multiple controlled microvortexes which then create cleaning forces at the solid-liquid interfaces. The competitive adhesive and cleaning forces have been investigated using the finite element method (FEM) simulation, identifying the feasibility of the vortex-induced NSB removal. NSB proteins have been selectively removed experimentally both on the surface of the resonator and on other substrates which contact the vortexes. Thus, the developed hydrodynamic approach is believed to be a simple and versatile tool for NSB removal and compatible to many sensor systems. The unique feature of the hypersonic resonator is that it can be used as a gravimetric sensor as well; thus a combined NSB removal and protein detection dual functional biosensor system is developed.

  2. Ionic rotational branching ratios in resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization of NO via the A 2Σ+(3sσ) and D 2Σ+(3pσ) states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, H.; Dixit, S.N.; McKoy, V.; Huo, W.M.

    1988-01-01

    We present the results of ab initio calculations of the ionic rotational branching ratios in NO for a (1+1) REMPI (resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization) via the A 2 Σ + (3sσ) state and a (2+1) REMPI via the D 2 Σ + (3pσ) state. Despite the atomic-like character of the bound 3sσ and 3pσ orbitals in these resonant states, the photoelectron continuum exhibits strong l mixing. The selection rule ΔN+l = odd (ΔNequivalentN/sub +/-N/sub i/) implies that the peaks in the photoelectron spectrum corresponding to ΔN = odd ( +- 1, +- 3) are sensitive to even partial waves while those corresponding to even ΔN probe the odd partial waves in the photoelectron continuum. Recent experimental high resolution photoelectron studies have shown a strong ΔN = 0 peak for ionization via the A 2 Σ + and the D 2 Σ + states, indicating a dominance of odd-l partial waves. While this seems natural for ionization out of the 3sσ orbital, it is quite anomalous for 3pσ ionization. Based on extensive bound calculations, Viswanathan et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 90, 5078 (1986)] attribute this anomaly to a strong l mixing in the electronic continuum caused by the nonspherical molecular potential

  3. Coherent enhancement of resonance-mediated multiphoton absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shian; Zhang, Hui; Jia, Tianqing; Wang, Zugeng; Sun, Zhenrong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the coherent enhancement of resonance-mediated (2+2) four-photon absorption. It is found that by shaping the spectral phase with a π phase step, the resonance-mediated (2+2) four-photon transition probability can be enhanced. Furthermore, the coherent enhancement dependences on the detuning between the two two-photon absorptions, laser spectral bandwidth and laser centre frequency are explicitly discussed and analysed. We believe these theoretical results may play an important role in enhancing more complex resonance-mediated multiphoton absorption processes.

  4. Direct Imaging of Transient Fano Resonances in N_{2} Using Time-, Energy-, and Angular-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Martin; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Vrakking, Marc J J; Kornilov, Oleg

    2016-04-22

    Autoionizing Rydberg states of molecular N_{2} are studied using time-, energy-, and angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse with a photon energy of 17.5 eV excites the resonance and a subsequent IR pulse ionizes the molecule before the autoionization takes place. The angular-resolved photoelectron spectra depend on pump-probe time delay and allow for the distinguishing of two electronic states contributing to the resonance. The lifetime of one of the contributions is determined to be 14±1  fs, while the lifetime of the other appears to be significantly shorter than the time resolution of the experiment. These observations suggest that the Rydberg states in this energy region are influenced by the effect of interference stabilization and merge into a complex resonance.

  5. CO2-laser-microwave double-resonance spectroscopy of D2CO: precise measurement of the dipole moment in the ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Nakahara, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tanaka, T.

    1987-01-01

    The method of CO 2 -laser-microwave double resonance (LMDR) with an intense electric field was used to measure Stark shifts of ground-state microwave transitions of D 2 CO. Thirty LMDR signals originating from 15 K-doublet transitions were observed, associated with the infrared transitions of the ν 4 and ν 6 bands. Least-squares analysis of the observed LMDR signals yields precise values of the coefficients in the dipole-moment expansion, μ 0 +μ/sub J/ J(J+1)+μ/sub K/ K 2 : μ 0 , 2.347 134(8) D; μ/sub j/, -4.76(10) x 10 -6 D; μ/sub K/, -28.7(18) x 10 -6 D; where one-standard-deviation uncertainties are given in parentheses. The infrared--infrared double-resonance signals of PH 3 , which were calibrated against the OCS dipole moment, were used for the electric-field calibration, allowing us to determine the dipole moment with a precision of 10 parts in 10 6 (ppm). However, the absolute accuracy of the dipole moment obtained is 50 ppm, as limited by the uncertainty of the OCS dipole moment. The effective dipole moment for the 1/sub 1.0/ reverse arrow 1/sub 1.1/ transition measured in the present study agrees well with the effective dipole moment for the 1/sub 1.0/ rotational level from a molecular-beam electric resonance experiment. The μ/sub J/ and μ/sub K/ coefficients calculated from Watson's θ/sub γ//sup α//sup β/ constants agree well with the experimental values

  6. A warning on fission resonance intergrals: Caveat utor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1988-01-01

    A common error is made in defining the resonance integral in most tabulations and handbooks. Although it has a minor effect on the capture resonance integral and on the fission resonance integral for the fissile nuclides, it leads to gross errors in the fission resonance integral for the fertile nuclides. The errors in the fission resonance integral for fertile nuclides of the elements from thorium through curium in the ENDF/B-V library will be presented. Let the user beware

  7. Experiments on shear Alfven resonance in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prager, S.C.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Kieras, C.E.; Kortbawi, D.; Sprott, J.C.; Tataronis, J.A.

    1983-02-01

    Detailed observations have been made of the spatial structure of the wave magnetic field. Measurements of the resonance properties such as radial location, wave polarization, resonance width and risetime are all consistent with shear Alfven resonance theory, although several measurements require improvement in resolution. The resonance location agrees with prediction of a fully two-dimensional ideal MHD theory for the Tokapole II device. To complete the identification a frequency scan and careful comparison of the observed resonance with antenna loading will be undertaken

  8. Electron dynamics in the core-excited CS 2 molecule revealed through resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Marchenko , T; Carniato , S; Journel , L; Guillemin , R; Kawerk , E; Žitnik , M; Kavčič , M; Bučar , K; Bohinc , R; Petric , M; da Cruz , V Vaz; Gel'mukhanov , F; Simon , Marielle

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We present an experimental and theoretical study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in the CS2 molecule near the S 1s edge. We show that localization of the S 1s core-hole occurs in CS2 during the RIXS process due to the orientational dephasing of interference between the waves scattering on the two sulfur atoms. Strong evolution of the RIXS profile with the excitation energy far below the first absorption resonance reflects the onset of electron dynamics tr...

  9. Development of two U.H.F. band resonators for application to CO2 laser electro-optical modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, M.G.; Blanc, P.; Sexton, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the design and testing of two U.H.F. band resonators destined for use in the linear electro-optical modulator of the CO 2 Laser Rapid Interferometer diagnostic at present under development for the WEGA Tokamak. The resonators take the form of a re-entrant coaxial line cavity and an interdigital line filter, both of which possess the regions of high electric field necessary to activate the linear electro-optical effect

  10. Resonance Raman assignment and evidence for noncoupling of individual 2- and 4-vinyl vibrational modes in a monomeric cyanomethemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersonde, K.; Yu, N.T.; Lin, S.H.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the resonance Raman spectra of monomeric insect cyanomethemoglobins (CTT III and CTT IV) reconstituted with (1) protohemes IX selectively deuterated at the 4-vinyl as well as the 2,4-divinyls, (2) monovinyl-truncated hemes such as pemptoheme (2-hydrogen, 4-vinyl) and isopemptoheme (2-vinyl, 4-hydrogen), (3) symmetric hemes such as protoheme III (with 2- and 3-vinyls) and protoheme XIII (with 1- and 4-vinyls), and (4) hemes without 2- and 4-vinyls such as mesoheme IX, deuteroheme IX, 2,4-dimethyldeuteroheme IX, and 2,4-dibromodeuteroheme IX. Evidence is presented that the highly localized vinyl C = C stretching vibrations at the 2- and 4-positions of the heme in these cyanomet CTT hemoglobins are noncoupled and inequivalent; i.e., the 1631- and 1624-cm-1 lines have been assigned to 2-vinyl and 4-vinyl, respectively. The elimination of the 2-vinyl (in pemptoheme) or the 4-vinyl (in isopemptoheme) does not affect the C = C stretching frequency of the remaining vinyl. Furthermore, two low-frequency vinyl bending modes at 412 and 591 cm-1 exhibit greatly different resonance Raman intensities between 2-vinyl and 4-vinyl. The observed intensity at 412 cm-1 is primarily derived from 4-vinyl, whereas the 591-cm-1 line results exclusively from the 2-vinyl. Again, there is no significant coupling between 2-vinyl and 4-vinyl for these two bending modes

  11. Resonance modulation, annihilation and generation of anti-resonance and anti-phasonance in 3D neuronal systems: interplay of resonant and amplifying currents with slow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Horacio G

    2017-08-01

    Subthreshold (membrane potential) resonance and phasonance (preferred amplitude and zero-phase responses to oscillatory inputs) in single neurons arise from the interaction between positive and negative feedback effects provided by relatively fast amplifying currents and slower resonant currents. In 2D neuronal systems, amplifying currents are required to be slave to voltage (instantaneously fast) for these phenomena to occur. In higher dimensional systems, additional currents operating at various effective time scales may modulate and annihilate existing resonances and generate antiresonance (minimum amplitude response) and antiphasonance (zero-phase response with phase monotonic properties opposite to phasonance). We use mathematical modeling, numerical simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms underlying these phenomena in 3D linear models, which are obtained as the linearization of biophysical (conductance-based) models. We characterize the parameter regimes for which the system exhibits the various types of behavior mentioned above in the rather general case in which the underlying 2D system exhibits resonance. We consider two cases: (i) the interplay of two resonant gating variables, and (ii) the interplay of one resonant and one amplifying gating variables. Increasing levels of an amplifying current cause (i) a response amplification if the amplifying current is faster than the resonant current, (ii) resonance and phasonance attenuation and annihilation if the amplifying and resonant currents have identical dynamics, and (iii) antiresonance and antiphasonance if the amplifying current is slower than the resonant current. We investigate the underlying mechanisms by extending the envelope-plane diagram approach developed in previous work (for 2D systems) to three dimensions to include the additional gating variable, and constructing the corresponding envelope curves in these envelope-space diagrams. We find that antiresonance and

  12. Resonances for Obstacles in Hyperbolic Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Peter; Zworski, Maciej

    2017-12-01

    We consider scattering by star-shaped obstacles in hyperbolic space and show that resonances satisfy a universal bound { Im λ ≤ - 1/2 } , which is optimal in dimension 2. In odd dimensions we also show that { Im λ ≤ - μ/ρ } for a universal constant {μ} , where { ρ } is the radius of a ball containing the obstacle; this gives an improvement for small obstacles. In dimensions 3 and higher the proofs follow the classical vector field approach of Morawetz, while in dimension 2 we obtain our bound by working with spaces coming from general relativity. We also show that in odd dimensions resonances of small obstacles are close, in a suitable sense, to Euclidean resonances.

  13. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A M; Shames, A I; Sergeev, N A; Olszewski, M; McDonough, J K; Mochalin, V N; Gogotsi, Y

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1 H, 13 C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp 2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  14. RESONANCE TRAPPING IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. COPLANAR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Aaron T.; Thommes, Edward W.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2009-01-01

    Mean-motion resonances (MMRs) are likely to play an important role both during and after the lifetime of a protostellar gas disk. We study the dynamical evolution and stability of planetary systems containing two giant planets on circular orbits near a 2:1 resonance and closer. We find that by having the outer planet migrate inward, the two planets can capture into either the 2:1, 5:3, or 3:2 MMR. We use direct numerical integrations of ∼1000 systems in which the planets are initially locked into one of these resonances and allowed to evolve for up to ∼10 7 yr. We find that the final eccentricity distribution in systems which ultimately become unstable gives a good fit to observed exoplanets. Next, we integrate ∼500 two-planet systems in which the outer planet is driven to continuously migrate inward, resonantly capturing the inner planet; the systems are evolved until either instability sets in or the planets reach the star. We find that although the 5:3 resonance rapidly becomes unstable under migration, the 2:1 and 3:2 are very stable. Thus the lack of observed exoplanets in resonances closer than 2:1, if it continues to hold up, may be a primordial signature of the planet formation process.

  15. Optical Properties of Plasmon Resonances with Ag/SiO2/Ag Multi-Layer Composite Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye-Wan, Ma; Li-Hua, Zhang; Zhao-Wang, Wu; Jie, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Optical properties of plasmon resonance with Ag/SiO 2 /Ag multi-layer nanoparticles are studied by numerical simulation based on Green's function theory. The results show that compared with single-layer Ag nanoparticles, the multi-layer nanoparticles exhibit several distinctive optical properties, e.g. with increasing the numbers of the multi-layer nanoparticles, the scattering efficiency red shifts, and the intensity of scattering enhances accordingly. It is interesting to find out that slicing an Ag-layer into multi-layers leads to stronger scattering intensity and more 'hot spots' or regions of stronger field enhancement. This property of plasmon resonance of surface Raman scattering has greatly broadened the application scope of Raman spectroscopy. The study of metal surface plasmon resonance characteristics is critical to the further understanding of surface enhanced Raman scattering as well as its applications. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  16. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance T2-STIR Imaging is Unable to Discriminate Between Intramyocardial Haemorrhage and Microvascular Obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Pedersen, Steen Fjord; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have used cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) imaging to detect intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) as a measure of ischemic/reperfusion injury. We investigated the ability of T2-STIR to differentiate between microvascular...

  17. THE COLOR DIFFERENCES OF KUIPER BELT OBJECTS IN RESONANCE WITH NEPTUNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, Scott S.

    2012-01-01

    The optical colors of 58 objects in mean motion resonance with Neptune were obtained. The various Neptune resonant populations were found to have significantly different surface color distributions. The 5:3 and 7:4 resonances have semimajor axes near the middle of the main Kuiper Belt and both are dominated by ultra-red material (spectral gradient: S ∼> 25). The 5:3 and 7:4 resonances have statistically the same color distribution as the low-inclination 'cold' classical belt. The inner 4:3 and distant 5:2 resonances have objects with mostly moderately red colors (S ∼ 15), similar to the scattered and detached disk populations. The 2:1 resonance, which is near the outer edge of the main Kuiper Belt, has a large range of colors with similar numbers of moderately red and ultra-red objects at all inclinations. The 2:1 resonance was also found to have a very rare neutral colored object showing that the 2:1 resonance is really a mix of all object types. The inner 3:2 resonance, like the outer 2:1, has a large range of objects from neutral to ultra-red. The Neptune Trojans (1:1 resonance) are only slightly red (S ∼ 9), similar to the Jupiter Trojans. The inner 5:4 resonance only has four objects with measured colors but shows equal numbers of ultra-red and moderately red objects. The 9:5, 12:5, 7:3, 3:1, and 11:3 resonances do not have reliable color distribution statistics since few objects have been observed in these resonances, though it appears noteworthy that all three of the measured 3:1 objects have only moderately red colors, similar to the 4:3 and 5:2 resonances. The different color distributions of objects in mean motion resonance with Neptune are likely a result from the disruption of the primordial Kuiper Belt from the scattering and migration of the giant planets. The few low-inclination objects known in the outer 2:1 and 5:2 resonances are mostly only moderately red. This suggests if the 2:1 and 5:2 have a cold low-inclination component, the objects

  18. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} microwave resonators for strong collective coupling with spin ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirri, A., E-mail: alberto.ghirri@nano.cnr.it [Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Bonizzoni, C.; Affronte, M. [Dipartimento Fisica, Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia and Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Gerace, D.; Sanna, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Cassinese, A. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, 80138 Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-04

    Coplanar microwave resonators made of 330 nm-thick superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} have been realized and characterized in a wide temperature (T, 2–100 K) and magnetic field (B, 0–7 T) range. The quality factor (Q{sub L}) exceeds 10{sup 4} below 55 K and it slightly decreases for increasing fields, remaining 90% of Q{sub L}(B=0) for B = 7 T and T = 2 K. These features allow the coherent coupling of resonant photons with a spin ensemble at finite temperature and magnetic field. To demonstrate this, collective strong coupling was achieved by using di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium organic radical placed at the magnetic antinode of the fundamental mode: the in-plane magnetic field is used to tune the spin frequency gap splitting across the single-mode cavity resonance at 7.75 GHz, where clear anticrossings are observed with a splitting as large as ∼82 MHz at T = 2 K. The spin-cavity collective coupling rate is shown to scale as the square root of the number of active spins in the ensemble.

  19. A computational analysis of the carbon-nanotube-based resonant-circuit sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grujicic, M.; Cao, G.; Roy, W.N.

    2004-01-01

    Available values for the molecular polarizability and the dipole moment and the computed adsorption energies to single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for a couple of polar (NH 3 and CO) and several non-polar (He, Ar, N 2 and O 2 ) gases are used to help establish a correlation between the adsorbed gas-induced changes in the dielectric constant of the SWCNTs (the sensing material) and the resulting reduction in the resonant frequency of the resonant circuit-based chemical gas sensors. It is found that simple weighting methods which neglect the effect of changes in the electronic structure of the carbon nanotubes during adsorption are generally incapable of predicting correctly the changes in the effective dielectric constant of the carbon nanotubes. Conversely, the use of adsorption-induced changes in the band gap of the carbon nanotubes and a relationship between the band gap and the dielectric constant is found to be a promising approach for assessing the adsorption-induced changes in the effective dielectric constant of the carbon nanotubes and for establishment of their effect on the resonant frequency of resonator-based chemical gas sensors

  20. Resonant diphoton phenomenology simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panico, Giuliano; Vecchi, Luca; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results. We also perform an assessment of which properties of the resonance could be inferred, after discovery, by a careful experimental study of the diphoton distributions. These include the spin J of the new particle and its dominant production mode. Partial information on its CP-parity can also be obtained, but only for J≥2. The complete determination of the resonance CP properties requires studying the pattern of the initial state radiation that accompanies the resonant diphoton production.

  1. Characterization and Analysis of Integrated Silicon Photonic Detectors for High-Speed Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    15 Ti Titanium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 TiN Titanium Nitride...evanescent coupling of an InP laser is used to stimulate emission in the Si waveguide at 1310 nm. The 1310- nm wavelength is the other common...electrical connection. The final step is the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of the 2.5-µm SiO2 optical cladding . This creates the

  2. The direct l-type resonance spectrum of CF3CCH in the vibrational state ν 10 = 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woetzel, Ulf; Maeder, Heinrich; Harder, Hauke; Pracna, Petr; Sarka, Kamil

    2005-01-01

    The direct l-type resonance spectrum of CF 3 CCH in the vibrational state ν 10 = 2 has been measured by means of waveguide microwave Fourier transform spectroscopy in the range 8-26 GHz. Two types of direct l-type resonance transitions induced by the (Δk = ±2, Δl = ±2) interaction could be observed: 262 transitions following the ΔJ = 0, Δk = Δl = 2 selection rule covering values of J = 17-64 and G vertical bar k - l vertical bar from 2 to 15, and 75 transitions following the ΔJ = 0, Δk = Δl = 4 selection rule covering values of J = 44-70 and G up to 3. The strong (2, 2) resonance furthermore allowed the observation of A 1 -A 2 splittings of the k = l = ±2 states from J = 63-70. The transitions with G = 3 showed splittings due to the (4, -2) and (0, 6) interactions. The corresponding energy level systems and part of the Hamiltonian matrix are discussed. Strong perturbations due to Δ(k - l) = 3 interactions coupling the states k = ±1, l = ±2 and k = ±4, l ±2 made possible the observation of perturbation-allowed transitions with selection rule k = ±1, l =± 2 ↔ k = 0, l = ±2. Additionally, the J = 2-1 and 3-2 rotational transitions have been measured. A multiple fitting analysis has been performed in which the experimental data have been fitted using five reduced forms of the effective Hamiltonian as proposed by Sarka and Harder [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197 (1999) 254]. Parameters up to sixth order have been determined including the axial rotational constant A for both values of vertical bar l vertical bar and the unitary equivalence of the determined parameter sets has been demonstrated

  3. NOESY-WaterControl: a new NOESY sequence for the observation of under-water protein resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Allan M.; Zheng, Gang, E-mail: g.zheng@westernsydney.edu.au; Price, William S. [Western Sydney University, Nanoscale Organisation and Dynamics Group, School of Science and Health (Australia)

    2017-03-15

    Highly selective and efficient water signal suppression is indispensable in biomolecular 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. However, the application of conventional water suppression schemes can cause a significant or complete loss of the biomolecular resonances at and around the water chemical shift (ω{sub 2}). In this study, a new sequence, NOESY-WaterControl, was developed to address this issue. The new sequence was tested on lysozyme and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), demonstrating its efficiency in both water suppression and, more excitingly, preserving water-proximate biomolecular resonances in ω{sub 2}. The 2D NOESY maps obtained using the new sequence thus provide more information than the maps obtained with conventional water suppression, thereby lessening the number of experiments needed to complete resonance assignments of biomolecules. The 2D NOESY-WaterControl map of BPTI showed strong bound water and exchangeable proton signals in ω{sub 1} but these signals were absent in ω{sub 2}, indicating the possibility of using the new sequence to discriminate bound water and exchangeable proton resonances from non-labile proton resonances with similar chemical shifts to water.

  4. Upper Hybrid Resonance of Microwaves with a Large Magnetized Plasma Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Wenqing; Guo Shijie; Ding Liang; Xu Yuemin

    2013-01-01

    A large magnetized plasma sheet with size of 60 cm × 60 cm × 2 cm was generated by a linear hollow cathode discharge under the confinement of a uniform magnetic field generated by a Helmholtz Coil. The microwave transmission characteristic of the plasma sheet was measured for different incident frequencies, in cases with the electric field polarization of the incident microwave either perpendicular or parallel to the magnetic field. In this measurement, parameters of the plasma sheet were changed by varying the discharge current and magnetic field intensity. In the experiment, upper hybrid resonance phenomena were observed when the electric field polarization of the incident wave was perpendicular to the magnetic field. These resonance phenomena cannot be found in the case of parallel polarization incidence. This result is consistent with theoretical consideration. According to the resonance condition, the electron density values at the resonance points are calculated under various experimental conditions. This kind of resonance phenomena can be used to develop a specific method to diagnose the electron density of this magnetized plasma sheet apparatus. Moreover, it is pointed out that the operating parameters of the large plasma sheet in practical applications should be selected to keep away from the upper hybrid resonance point to prevent signals from polarization distortion

  5. Nucleon structure functions, resonance form factors, and duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovsky, V.V.; Struminsky, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nucleon structure functions in the resonance region is explored. For form factors that describe resonance production, expressions are obtained that are dependent on the photon virtuality Q 2 , which have a correct threshold behavior, and which take into account available experimental data on resonance decay. Resonance contributions to nucleon structure functions are calculated. The resulting expressions are used to investigate quark-hadron duality in electron-nucleon scattering by taking the example of the structure function F 2

  6. Silicon Mie resonators for highly directional light emission from monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, Ahmet Fatih; Curto, Alberto G.; Raza, Søren; Kik, Pieter G.; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2018-05-01

    Controlling light emission from quantum emitters has important applications, ranging from solid-state lighting and displays to nanoscale single-photon sources. Optical antennas have emerged as promising tools to achieve such control right at the location of the emitter, without the need for bulky, external optics. Semiconductor nanoantennas are particularly practical for this purpose because simple geometries such as wires and spheres support multiple, degenerate optical resonances. Here, we start by modifying Mie scattering theory developed for plane wave illumination to describe scattering of dipole emission. We then use this theory and experiments to demonstrate several pathways to achieve control over the directionality, polarization state and spectral emission that rely on a coherent coupling of an emitting dipole to optical resonances of a silicon nanowire. A forward-to-backward ratio of 20 was demonstrated for the electric dipole emission at 680 nm from a monolayer MoS2 by optically coupling it to a silicon nanowire.

  7. Al-doped MgB_2 materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB_2) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB_2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB_2. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB_2 disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance induced reduction of high quality Ag/graphene composite at water/toluene phase for reduction of H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fengjun; Zhang Kehua; Xie Fazhi; Liu Jin; Dong Hongfei; Zhao Wei; Meng Zeda

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The Ag/graphene composites have been successfully synthesized in two-phase solvent. ► The surface plasmon resonance of Ag can reduce GO with high deoxygenation and low defect. ► The Ag particles were uniformly distributed on graphene surface. ► The Ag/graphene composites obtained show high superior electrical properties for reduction of H 2 O 2 . - Abstract: Surface plasmon resonance induced synthesis of Ag/graphene composites from Ag/graphene oxide (Ag/GO) in a two-phase (water–toluene) solvent was reported. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the Ag nanoparticles with size of 5–8 nm were trimly distributed on reduced graphene oxide sheets. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have demonstrated low defect density and high deoxygenation degree of graphene in Ag/graphene composite. The excellent structure and morphology of Ag/graphene composites contributed to superior electrical properties for reduction of H 2 O 2 .

  9. Electron impact ionization of B-like ion N2+. Resonance enhancement of the single-channel cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guohe; Qian Xingzhong; Pan Soufu

    1998-01-01

    The electron impact ionization cross sections of B-like ion N 2+ are calculated in the Coulomb-Born no exchange approximation by using R-matrix method, and the single differential cross section is given. The calculated results exhibit the Rydberg series of resonances. The resonance enhancement of the single-channel cross section is significantly greater than direct ionization cross section. It is agreement with that of Chidichimo

  10. Efficient primary and parametric resonance excitation of bistable resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah

    2016-09-12

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient approach to excite primary and parametric (up to the 4th) resonance of Microelectromechanical system MEMS arch resonators with large vibrational amplitudes. A single crystal silicon in-plane arch microbeam is fabricated such that it can be excited axially from one of its ends by a parallel-plate electrode. Its micro/nano scale vibrations are transduced using a high speed camera. Through the parallel-plate electrode, a time varying electrostatic force is applied, which is converted into a time varying axial force that modulates dynamically the stiffness of the arch resonator. Due to the initial curvature of the structure, not only parametric excitation is induced, but also primary resonance. Experimental investigation is conducted comparing the response of the arch near primary resonance using the axial excitation to that of a classical parallel-plate actuation where the arch itself forms an electrode. The results show that the axial excitation can be more efficient and requires less power for primary resonance excitation. Moreover, unlike the classical method where the structure is vulnerable to the dynamic pull-in instability, the axial excitation technique can provide large amplitude motion while protecting the structure from pull-in. In addition to primary resonance, parametrical resonances are demonstrated at twice, one-half, and two-thirds the primary resonance frequency. The ability to actuate primary and/or parametric resonances can serve various applications, such as for resonator based logic and memory devices. (C) 2016 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license

  11. D-wave resonances in positronium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. A 65, 032721 (2002)] we reexamined a model describing the structure of the low-energy Ps-H resonances as being due to quasibound states of the positron in the perturbed Coulomb potential of the H - ion appearing in the closed, rearranged channel. In particular, we wished to understand why the lowest p-state resonance was so far away from the lowest quasibound (2p) state. We found that the lowest resonance actually corresponds to the first-excited [3p] state, while the lowest state is not recognizable as a resonance. In the present work we repeat our analysis, but this time for the lowest d state. We find that the lowest [3d] state does correspond to a resonance shifted moderately

  12. Surface acoustic load sensing using a face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2012-11-01

    Pb(In(0.5)Nb(0.5))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) resonators for surface acoustic load sensing are presented in this paper. Different acoustic loads are applied to thickness mode, thickness-shear mode, and face-shear mode resonators, and the electrical impedances at resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are recorded. More than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity (ratio of electrical impedance change to surface acoustic impedance change) at the resonance is achieved for the face-shear-mode resonator compared with other resonators with the same dimensions. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Matthaei (KLM) model is used to verify the surface acoustic loading effect on the electrical impedance spectrum of face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonators. The demonstrated high sensitivity of face-shear mode resonators to surface loads is promising for a broad range of applications, including artificial skin, biological and chemical sensors, touch screens, and other touch-based sensors.

  13. Interactions among resonances in the unresolved region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz Bogado Leite, S. de.

    1982-11-01

    The theory on resonance absorption in the unresolved region is reviewed and a subroutine is presented, optional to UNRES in MC 2 code. Comparisons with the isolated resonance model suggest the necessity, in some cases, of considering interference and overlapping effects among resonances of the system. (Author) [pt

  14. Effect of annealing induced residual stress on the resonance frequency of SiO2 microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Prabakar, K.; Tripura Sundari, S.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, effect of residual stress, induced due to annealing of SiO2 microcantilevers (MCs) on their resonance frequency is studied. SiO2MCs of various dimensions were fabricated using direct laser writer & wet chemical etching method and were annealed at 800 °C in oxygen environment, post release. The residual stress was estimated from the deflection profile of the MCs measured using 3D optical microscope, before and after annealing. Resonance frequency of the MCs was measured using nano-vibration analyzer and was found to change after annealing. Further the frequency shift was found to depend on the MC dimensions. This is attributed to the large stress gradients induced by annealing and associated stiffness changes.

  15. Spin-Orbital Excitations in Ca2RuO4 Revealed by Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, L.; Forte, F.; Fittipaldi, R.

    2018-01-01

    The strongly correlated insulator Ca2RuO4 is considered as a paradigmatic realization of both spin-orbital physics and a band-Mott insulating phase, characterized by orbitally selective coexistence of a band and a Mott gap. We present a high resolution oxygen K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scatt......-Mott scenario. The high-energy excitations correspond to intra-atomic singlet-triplet transitions at an energy scale set by Hund's coupling. Our findings give a unifying picture of the spin and orbital excitations in the band-Mott insulator Ca2RuO4.......The strongly correlated insulator Ca2RuO4 is considered as a paradigmatic realization of both spin-orbital physics and a band-Mott insulating phase, characterized by orbitally selective coexistence of a band and a Mott gap. We present a high resolution oxygen K-edge resonant inelastic x......-ray scattering study of the antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state of Ca2RuO4. A set of low-energy (about 80 and 400 meV) and high-energy (about 1.3 and 2.2 eV) excitations are reported, which show strong incident light polarization dependence. Our results strongly support a spin-orbit coupled band...

  16. Development of the 1.2 T~1.5 T Permanent Magnetic Resonance Imaging Device and Its Application for Mouse Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By improving the main magnet, gradient, and RF coils design technology, manufacturing methods, and inventing new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI special alloy, a cost-effective and small animal specific permanent magnet-type three-dimensional magnetic resonance imager was developed. The main magnetic field strength of magnetic resonance imager with independent intellectual property rights is 1.2~1.5 T. To demonstrate its effectiveness and validate the mouse imaging experiments in different directions, we compared the images obtained by small animal specific permanent magnet-type three-dimensional magnetic resonance imager with that obtained by using superconductor magnetic resonance imager for clinical diagnosis.

  17. Fabrication of poly-crystalline Si-based Mie resonators via amorphous Si on SiO2 dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naffouti, Meher; David, Thomas; Benkouider, Abdelmalek; Favre, Luc; Ronda, Antoine; Berbezier, Isabelle; Bidault, Sebastien; Bonod, Nicolas; Abbarchi, Marco

    2016-02-07

    We report the fabrication of Si-based dielectric Mie resonators via a low cost process based on solid-state dewetting of ultra-thin amorphous Si on SiO2. We investigate the dewetting dynamics of a few nanometer sized layers annealed at high temperature to form submicrometric Si-particles. Morphological and structural characterization reveal the polycrystalline nature of the semiconductor matrix as well as rather irregular morphologies of the dewetted islands. Optical dark field imaging and spectroscopy measurements of the single islands reveal pronounced resonant scattering at visible frequencies. The linewidth of the low-order modes can be ∼20 nm in full width at half maximum, leading to a quality factor Q exceeding 25. These values reach the state-of-the-art ones obtained for monocrystalline Mie resonators. The simplicity of the dewetting process and its cost-effectiveness opens the route to exploiting it over large scales for applications in silicon-based photonics.

  18. Isolated resonator gyroscope with a drive and sense plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention discloses a resonator gyroscope comprising a vibrationally isolated resonator including a proof mass, a counterbalancing plate having an extensive planar region, and one or more flexures interconnecting the proof mass and counterbalancing plate. A baseplate is affixed to the resonator by the one or more flexures and sense and drive electrodes are affixed to the baseplate proximate to the extensive planar region of the counterbalancing plate for exciting the resonator and sensing movement of the gyroscope. The isolated resonator transfers substantially no net momentum to the baseplate when the resonator is excited.

  19. A dual resonant rectilinear-to-rotary oscillation converter for low frequency broadband electromagnetic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Wang, Ya

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports a dual resonant rectilinear-to-rotary oscillation converter (RROC) for low frequency broadband electromagnetic energy harvesting from ambient vibrations. An approximate theoretical model has been established to integrate the electromechanical coupling into a comprehensive electromagnetic-dynamic model of the dual resonant RROC. Numerical simulation has proved the nature of dual resonances by revealing that both the rectilinear resonance and the rotary resonance could be achieved when the stand-alone rectilinear oscillator (RLO) and the stand-alone rotary oscillator (RTO) were excited independently. Simulation on the magnetically coupled RROC has also shown that the rectilinear resonance and the rotary resonance could be obtained simultaneously in the low-frequency region (2-14 Hz) with well-defined restoring torque (M r ) and the initial rotation angle of the RLO (ψ). The magnetic interaction patterns between the rectilinear and the RTOs have been categorized based on aforementioned simulation results. Both simulation and experimental results have demonstrated broadband output attributing from the dual resonances. Experimental results have also indicated that the RROC could have wide bandwidth in a much lower frequency region (2-8 Hz) even without the rotary resonance as long as the system parameters are carefully tuned. Parameter analysis on different values of M r and ψ are experimentally carried out to provide a quantitative guidance of designing the RROC to achieve an optimal power density.

  20. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  1. Study of the vortex matter in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ using the Josephson plasma resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, S.

    2003-10-01

    The Josephson plasma resonance (JPR) is a tool of choice to measure the inter-plane phase coherence in the layered superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ (BSCCO). It enables us to evaluate the wandering length r w , defined as the thermal average of the relative thermal excursions of two pancake vortices belonging to the same flux line and localized in two consecutive superconducting layers. In this work, using two experimental techniques to probe the JPR (the resonant cavity perturbation technique and the bolometric method), we have measured r w in the vortex solid in pristine or heavy-ion irradiated (dose n d = 5 x 10 10 ions.cm -2 , i.e. B φ n-dΦ 0 = 1 T) under-doped BSCCO single crystals. In the pristine samples, at low magnetic fields, the temperature dependence of r w and its increase with the applied field can only be accounted for by the dominant role of the line tension (due to Josephson coupling) and its renormalization due to thermal fluctuations. The latter are responsible for the softening of the line tension for the large-wave vector modes, which eventually leads to the first order phase transition between the vortex solid and the vortex liquid. The field and temperature dependence of r w in the irradiated crystals for B φ , is the same as observed in the pristine samples. This observation is a validation for a description in term of 'discrete superconductor' of the material. (author)

  2. Cardiac Involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2 Patients With Preserved Ejection Fraction: Detection by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmacht, Luisa; Traber, Julius; Grieben, Ulrike; Utz, Wolfgang; Dieringer, Matthias A; Kellman, Peter; Blaszczyk, Edyta; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Spuler, Simone; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a genetic disorder characterized by skeletal muscle symptoms, metabolic changes, and cardiac involvement. Histopathologic alterations of the skeletal muscle include fibrosis and fatty infiltration. The aim of this study was to investigate whether subclinical cardiac involvement in DM2 is already detectable in preserved left ventricular function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Twenty-seven patients (mean age, 54±10 years; 20 females) with a genetically confirmed diagnosis of DM2 were compared with 17 healthy age- and sex-matched controls using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. For myocardial tissue differentiation, T1 and T2 mapping, fat/water-separated imaging, focal fibrosis imaging (late gadolinium enhancement [LGE]), and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed. Extracellular volume fraction was calculated. Conduction abnormalities were diagnosed based on Groh criteria. LGE located subepicardial basal inferolateral was detectable in 22% of the patients. Extracellular volume was increased in this region and in the adjacent medial inferolateral segment (P=0.03 compared with healthy controls). In 21% of patients with DM2, fat deposits were detectable (all women). The control group showed no abnormalities. Myocardial triglycerides were not different in LGE-positive and LGE-negative subjects (P=0.47). Six patients had indicators for conduction disease (60% of LGE-positive patients and 12.5% of LGE-negative patients). In DM2, subclinical myocardial injury was already detectable in preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Extracellular volume was also increased in regions with no focal fibrosis. Myocardial fibrosis was related to conduction abnormalities. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Distinguishing between deep trapping transients of electrons and holes in TiO2 nanotube arrays using planar microwave resonator sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarifi, Mohammad H; Wiltshire, Benjamin Daniel; Mahdi, Najia; Shankar, Karthik; Daneshmand, Mojgan

    2018-05-16

    A large signal DC bias and a small signal microwave bias were simultaneously applied to TiO2 nanotube membranes mounted on a planar microwave resonator. The DC bias modulated the electron concentration in the TiO2 nanotubes, and was varied between 0 and 120 V in this study. Transients immediately following the application and removal of DC bias were measured by monitoring the S-parameters of the resonator as a function of time. The DC bias stimulated Poole-Frenkel type trap-mediated electrical injection of excess carriers into TiO2 nanotubes which resulted in a near constant resonant frequency but a pronounced decrease in the microwave amplitude due to free electron absorption. When ultraviolet illumination and DC bias were both present and then step-wise removed, the resonant frequency shifted due to trapping -mediated change in the dielectric constant of the nanotube membranes. Characteristic lifetimes of 60-80 s, 300-800 s and ~3000 s were present regardless of whether light or bias was applied and are also observed in the presence of a hole scavenger, which we attribute to oxygen adsorption and deep electron traps while another characteristic lifetime > 9000 s was only present when illumination was applied, and is attributed to the presence of hole traps.

  4. Angular distribution of W boson pairs at a heavy Z-resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, S.; Rizzo, T.G.

    1987-05-01

    In theories with an extra U(1) gauge boson (Z 2 ) at low energies. W boson pairs may be produced copiously by the process e + e - → Z 2 → W + W - at the Z 2 -resonance. We show that the angular distribution of the W pairs (produced at the Z 2 -resonance) is very different from that in the standard model, at the same center of mass energy, where it is dominated by t-channel neutrino exchange. These distributions will also be useful in distinguishing among the various models containing an extra Z-boson

  5. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qalandar, K. R., E-mail: kamala@engineering.ucsb.edu; Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Turner, K. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Strachan, B. S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Shaw, S. W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2{sup N}. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2{sup j} at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  6. Numerical investigation of a tunable band-pass plasmonic filter with a hollow-core ring resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setayesh, Amir; Mirnaziry, S Reza; Abrishamian, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a compact nanoscale plasmonic filter which consists of two metal–insulator–metal (MIM) waveguides coupled to each other by a rectangular ring resonator is presented and investigated numerically. The propagating modes of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are studied in this structure. By replacing a portion of the ring core with air, while the outer dimensions of the structure are kept constant, we illustrate the possibility of the redshift of resonant wavelengths in order to tune the resonance modes. This feature is useful for integrated circuits in which we have limitations on the outer dimensions of the filter structure and it is not possible to enlarge the dimension of the ring resonator to reach longer resonant wavelengths. The corresponding results are illustrated by the 2D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The proposed structure has potential applications in plasmonic integrated circuits and can be simply fabricated

  7. Numerical investigation of a tunable band-pass plasmonic filter with a hollow-core ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setayesh, Amir; Mirnaziry, S. Reza; Sadegh Abrishamian, Mohammad

    2011-03-01

    In this study, a compact nanoscale plasmonic filter which consists of two metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides coupled to each other by a rectangular ring resonator is presented and investigated numerically. The propagating modes of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are studied in this structure. By replacing a portion of the ring core with air, while the outer dimensions of the structure are kept constant, we illustrate the possibility of the redshift of resonant wavelengths in order to tune the resonance modes. This feature is useful for integrated circuits in which we have limitations on the outer dimensions of the filter structure and it is not possible to enlarge the dimension of the ring resonator to reach longer resonant wavelengths. The corresponding results are illustrated by the 2D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The proposed structure has potential applications in plasmonic integrated circuits and can be simply fabricated.

  8. Damping Resonant Current in a Spark-Gap Trigger Circuit to Reduce Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    DAMPING RESONANT CURRENT IN A SPARK- GAP TRIGGER CIRCUIT TO REDUCE NOISE E. L. Ruden Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate, AFRL...REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Damping Resonant Current In A Spark- Gap Trigger Circuit To Reduce Noise 5a...thereby triggering 2 after delay 0, is 1. Each of the two rail- gaps (represented by 2) is trig- gered to close after the spark- gap (1) in the

  9. Random search for a dark resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Alexander Holm; Mølmer, Klaus

    A pair of resonant laser fields can drive a three-level system into a dark state where it ceases to absorb and emit radiation due to destructive interference. We propose a scheme to search for this resonance by randomly changing the frequency of one of the fields each time a fluorescence photon...

  10. A new design of dielectric elastomer membrane resonator with tunable resonant frequencies and mode shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Oh, Inkyu; Chen, Jiehao; Hu, Yuhang

    2018-06-01

    Conventional membrane resonators are bulky, and once the geometries and materials are fixed in the fabricated device, the resonators’ characteristics are fixed. In this work, we introduce the active membrane, dielectric elastomer (DE), into the resonator design. Attaching a stiffer passive membrane onto the active DE membrane forms a two-layer system, which generates an out-of-plane deformation when the DE is actuated through a DC voltage applied across the thickness of the DE membrane. When an AC voltage is applied, the two-layer system can generate an out-of-plane oscillation which enables its use as membrane resonators. Both experiments and simulations are carried out to study the dynamic characteristics of the system. The resonant frequencies and mode shapes of the resonator can be tuned through the passive layer properties such as the modulus, thickness, density, and size. The effective stiffness of the DE film changes as the magnitude of the voltage applied on the film changes, which provides an active way to tune the dynamic characteristics of the two-layer resonator even after the device is set. The system is also light weight, low cost, and easy to fabricate, and has great potential in many engineering applications.

  11. Why is the neutrino oscillation formula expanded in Δm_2_1"2/Δm_3_1"2 still accurate near the solar resonance in matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The conventional approximate formula for neutrino oscillation in matter which is obtained from the expansion in terms of the ratio of mass square differences α=Δm_2_1"2/Δm_3_1"2≈0.03, first proposed by Cervera, et al. and Freund, turns out to be an accurate formula for accelerator neutrino experiments. Originally it required the neutrino energy to be well above the solar resonance to validate the expansion but it is found to be still very accurate when the formula is extrapolated to the resonance, which is practically important for the T2K experiment. This paper shows that the accuracy is guaranteed by cancellations of branch cut singularities and also, for the first time, analytically computes the actual error of the formula. The actual error implies that the original requirement can be safely removed in current experiments.

  12. TiO2 brookite nanostructured thin layer on magneto-optical surface plasmon resonance transductor for gas sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manera, M. G.; Colombelli, A.; Rella, R.; Caricato, A.; Cozzoli, P. D.; Martino, M.; Vasanelli, L.

    2012-09-01

    The sensing performance comparisons presented in this work were carried out by exploiting a suitable magneto-plasmonic sensor in both the traditional surface plasmon resonance configuration and the innovative magneto-optic surface plasmon resonance one. The particular multilayer transducer was functionalized with TiO2 Brookite nanorods layers deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation, and its sensing capabilities were monitored in a controlled atmosphere towards different concentrations of volatile organic compounds mixed in dry air.

  13. Lineshape Engineering in an All-Pass Ring Resonator with Backreflection Coupled to a Symmetrical Fabry-Perot Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Melnikov, Vasily

    2012-11-10

    We derive transfer functions for an all-pass ring resonator with internal backreflection coupled to a symmetrical Fabry-Perot resonator and demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency-like and Fano-like lineshapes tunable by backreflection in the ring resonator.

  14. Lineshape Engineering in an All-Pass Ring Resonator with Backreflection Coupled to a Symmetrical Fabry-Perot Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Melnikov, Vasily; Roqan, Iman S.

    2012-01-01

    We derive transfer functions for an all-pass ring resonator with internal backreflection coupled to a symmetrical Fabry-Perot resonator and demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency-like and Fano-like lineshapes tunable by backreflection in the ring resonator.

  15. Studied Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Effects of Au Nanoparticles on TiO2 by FDTD Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Ying Yao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR plays a significant role in the fields of photocatalysis and solar cells. It can not only broaden the spectral response range of materials, but also improve the separation probability of photo-generated electron-hole pairs through local field enhancement or hot electron injection. In this article, the LSPR effects of Au/TiO2 composite photocatalyst, with different sizes and shapes, have been simulated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD method. The variation tendency of the resonance-absorption peaks and the intensity of enhanced local enhanced electric field were systematically compared and emphasized. When the location of Au nanosphere is gradually immersed into the TiO2 substrate, the local enhanced electric field of the boundary is gradually enhanced. When Au nanoshperes are covered by TiO2 at 100 nm depths, the local enhanced electric field intensities reach the maximum value. However, when Au nanorods are loaded on the surface of the TiO2 substrate, the intensity of the corresponding enhanced local enhanced electric field is the maximum. Au nanospheres produce two strong absorption peaks in the visible light region, which are induced by the LSPR effect and interband transitions between Au nanoparticles and the TiO2 substrate. For the LSPR resonance-absorption peaks, the corresponding position is red-shifted by about 100 nm, as the location of Au nanospheres are gradually immersed into the TiO2 substrate. On the other hand, the size change of the Au nanorods do not lead to a similar variation of the LSPR resonance-absorption peaks, except to change the length-diameter ratio. Meanwhile, the LSPR effects are obviously interfered with by the interband transitions between the Au nanorods and TiO2 substrate. At the end of this article, three photo-generated carrier separation mechanisms are proposed. Among them, the existence of direct electron transfer between Au nanoparticles and the TiO2

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensing device based on a piezoelectric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Abbi; Masamune, Ken; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Lamperth, Michael; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a widely used medical technique, one of the drawbacks of which is the loss of direct sense of touch during the operation. Palpation is the use of fingertips to explore and make fast assessments of tissue morphology. Although technologies are developed to equip minimally invasive surgery tools with haptic feedback capabilities, the majority focus on tissue stiffness profiling and tool-tissue interaction force measurement. For greatly increased diagnostic capability, a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensor design is proposed, which allows minimally invasive surgery to be performed under image guidance, combining the strong capability of magnetic resonance imaging soft tissue and intuitive palpation. The sensing unit is based on a piezoelectric sensor methodology, which conforms to the stringent mechanical and electrical design requirements imposed by the magnetic resonance environment The sensor mechanical design and the device integration to a 0.2 Tesla open magnetic resonance imaging scanner are described, together with the device's magnetic resonance compatibility testing. Its design limitations and potential future improvements are also discussed. A tactile sensing unit based on a piezoelectric sensor principle is proposed, which is designed for magnetic resonance imaging guided interventions.

  17. Jet-associated resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, Christoph [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ferretti, Gabriele [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Physics, Goeteborg (Sweden); Spannowsky, Michael [Durham University, Department of Physics, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2017-12-15

    We present a model-independent study aimed at characterising the nature of possible resonances in the jet-photon or jet-Z final state at hadron colliders. Such resonances are expected in many models of compositeness and would be a clear indication of new physics. At leading order, in the narrow width approximation, the matrix elements are parameterised by just a few constants describing the coupling of the various helicities to the resonance. We present the full structure of such amplitudes up to spin 2 and use them to simulate relevant kinematic distributions that could serve to constrain the coupling structure. This also generalises the signal generation strategy that is currently pursued by ATLAS and CMS to the most general case in the considered channels. While the determination of the P/CP properties of the interaction seems to be out of reach within this framework, there is a wealth of information to be gained about the spin of the resonance and the relative couplings of the helicities. (orig.)

  18. Jet-associated resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Christoph; Ferretti, Gabriele; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We present a model-independent study aimed at characterising the nature of possible resonances in the jet-photon or jet- Z final state at hadron colliders. Such resonances are expected in many models of compositeness and would be a clear indication of new physics. At leading order, in the narrow width approximation, the matrix elements are parameterised by just a few constants describing the coupling of the various helicities to the resonance. We present the full structure of such amplitudes up to spin 2 and use them to simulate relevant kinematic distributions that could serve to constrain the coupling structure. This also generalises the signal generation strategy that is currently pursued by ATLAS and CMS to the most general case in the considered channels. While the determination of the P/CP properties of the interaction seems to be out of reach within this framework, there is a wealth of information to be gained about the spin of the resonance and the relative couplings of the helicities.

  19. Vector resonances at LHC Run II in composite 2HDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiara, Stefano Di [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Heikinheimo, Matti; Tuominen, Kimmo [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-000140, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-000140, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-03-02

    We consider a model where the electroweak symmetry breaking is driven by strong dynamics, resulting in an electroweak doublet scalar condensate, and transmitted to the standard model matter fields via another electroweak doublet scalar. At low energies the effective theory therefore shares features with a type-I two Higgs doublet model. However, important differences arise due to the rich composite spectrum expected to contain new vector resonances accessible at the LHC. We carry out a systematic analysis of the vector resonance signals at LHC and find that the model remains viable, but will be tightly constrained by direct searches as the projected integrated luminosity, around 200 fb{sup −1}, of the current run becomes available.

  20. Projection operator treatment of single particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, A.; Beres, W.P.

    1976-01-01

    A projection operator method is used to obtain the energy and width of a single particle resonance. The resonance energy is found without scanning. An example of the first g/sub 9/2/ neutron resonance in 40 Ca is given and compared with the traditional phase shift method. The results of both approaches are quite similar. 4 figures

  1. Geography of resonances and Arnold diffusion in a priori unstable Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delshams, Amadeu; Huguet, Gemma

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider the case of a general C r+2 perturbation, for r large enough, of an a priori unstable Hamiltonian system of 2 + 1/2 degrees of freedom, and we provide explicit conditions on it, which turn out to be C 2 generic and are verifiable in concrete examples, which guarantee the existence of Arnold diffusion. This is a generalization of the result in Delshams et al (2006 Mem. Am. Math. Soc.) where the case of a perturbation with a finite number of harmonics in the angular variables was considered. The method of proof is based on a careful analysis of the geography of resonances created by a generic perturbation and it contains a deep quantitative description of the invariant objects generated by the resonances therein. The scattering map is used as an essential tool to construct transition chains of objects of different topology. The combination of quantitative expressions for both the geography of resonances and the scattering map provides, in a natural way, explicit computable conditions for instability

  2. Helicity amplitudes and electromagnetic decays of hyperon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauteren, T. van; Ryckebusch, J.; Metsch, B.; Petry, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    We present results for the helicity amplitudes of the lowest-lying hyperon resonances Y * , computed within the framework of the Bonn Constituent-Quark model, which is based on the Bethe-Salpeter approach. The seven parameters entering the model were fitted to the best-known baryon masses. Accordingly, the results for the helicity amplitudes are genuine predictions. Some hyperon resonances are seen to couple more strongly to a virtual photon with finite Q 2 than to a real photon. Other Y * 's, such as the S 01 (1670) Λ-resonance or the S 11 (1620) Σ-resonance, couple very strongly to real photons. We present a qualitative argument for predicting the behaviour of the helicity asymmetries of baryon resonances at high Q 2 . (orig.)

  3. On resonance processes in near threshold excitation of resonance lines of Zn+ ion at electron-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, A.I.; Gomonaj, A.N.; Vukstich, V.S.; Nemet, A.N.

    1998-01-01

    The results of spectroscopic investigation of resonances in excitation of near threshold region of separate components of resonance doublet 4p 2 P 1/2,3/2 0 of Zn + ion by electron impact are given in the present work. The physical basis of their production nature is suggested

  4. /sup 14/N nuclear quadrupole resonance in ferroelectric sodium nitrite NaNO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S; Singh, K [Defence Science Lab., Delhi (India)

    1974-06-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance has been studied in ferroelectric sodium nitrite (NaNO/sub 2/) from 77 K to its phase transition point 437 K. The three rotational frequencies ..omega../sub c/ = 190 cm/sup -1/, ..omega../sub b/ = 120 cm/sup -1/ and ..omega../sub c/ = 227 cm/sup -1/ and their temperature variation when fitted in the Bayer-Kushida theory predict the temperature dependence of nqr frequencies reasonably well. A second order phase transition is found to occur at 180 K which is in confirmity with the one found earlier from thermal expansion and dielectric studies. The shift in resonance frequencies is seen to occur mainly by rotation around the 'c' axis and hence it is inferred that the mechanism of polarization reversal is intimately connected with orientational motion about 'c' axis. (auth)

  5. Nonlinear narrow Doppler-free resonances for optical transitions and annihilation radiation of a positronium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letokhov, V.S.; Minogin, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    The possibilities of obtaining narrow resonances without the Doppler broadening for transition between the fine structure levels of the ground and first excited states of a positronium atom are considered. An analysis is carried out of the conditions required for observation of the narrow resonances of saturation of single quantum absorption in the 1S-2P transitions and observation of narrow two-photon absorption resonances in the 1S-2S transitions. It is shown that narrow 2γ annihilation radiation lines of a positronium atom may be obtained with a width much smaller than the Doppler one

  6. Ultrawide Band Gap β-Ga2O3 Nanomechanical Resonators with Spatially Visualized Multimode Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu-Qian; Lee, Jaesung; Rafique, Subrina; Han, Lu; Zorman, Christian A; Zhao, Hongping; Feng, Philip X-L

    2017-12-13

    Beta gallium oxide (β-Ga 2 O 3 ) is an emerging ultrawide band gap (4.5 eV-4.9 eV) semiconductor with attractive properties for future power electronics, optoelectronics, and sensors for detecting gases and ultraviolet radiation. β-Ga 2 O 3 thin films made by various methods are being actively studied toward such devices. Here, we report on the experimental demonstration of single-crystal β-Ga 2 O 3 nanomechanical resonators using β-Ga 2 O 3 nanoflakes grown via low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). By investigating β-Ga 2 O 3 circular drumhead structures, we demonstrate multimode nanoresonators up to the sixth mode in high and very high frequency (HF/VHF) bands, and also realize spatial mapping and visualization of the multimode motion. These measurements reveal a Young's modulus of E Y = 261 GPa and anisotropic biaxial built-in tension of 37.5 MPa and 107.5 MPa. We find that thermal annealing can considerably improve the resonance characteristics, including ∼40% upshift in frequency and ∼90% enhancement in quality (Q) factor. This study lays a foundation for future exploration and development of mechanically coupled and tunable β-Ga 2 O 3 electronic, optoelectronic, and physical sensing devices.

  7. A Family of Resonant Vibration Control Formats

    OpenAIRE

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2012-01-01

    Resonant control makes use of a controller with a resonance frequency and an equivalent damping ratio.A simple explicit calibration procedure is presented for a family of resonant controllers in which the frequencyis tuned to the natural frequency of the targeted mode in such a way that the two resulting modes exhibit identicaldamping ratio. This tuning is independent of the imposed controller damping. The controller damping is thenselected as an optimal compromise between too small damping, ...

  8. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Δ Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villano, Anthony [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The electroproduction of baryon resonances at high Q2 is examined. Analysis focuses on the Δ(1232) resonance via exclusive pseudoscalar meson production of π0 particles. Differential cross sections are extracted for exclusive π0 electroproduction. In the central invariant mass (W) region the cross sections are used to extract resonant multipole amplitudes. In particular, the ratio of the electric quadrupole to magnetic dipole amplitudes (E2/M1) will be discussed for the Δ(1232) resonance. The transition to pQCD is discussed in terms of E2/M1 and other multipoles. The helicity amplitude A3/2 can be used as a baryon helicity conservation meter in this context and will be discussed. The fast shrinking of the resonant contribution in the Δ region is observed at this high momentum transfer. Apart from the observables related to pQCD scaling, the transition form factor G$*\\atop{M}$ is extracted along with the scalar to magnetic dipole ratio C2/M1.

  9. A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy study of the phase transitions in Na0.75CoO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppens, Veerle; Sergienko, Ivan; Jin, Rongying

    2005-03-01

    The layered transition metal oxides NaxCoO2 have attracted much interest in the past few years. Crystals with the x˜0.75 composition undergo an order-disorder transition near 340 K, a spin-density-wave transition near 22 K and other subtle transitions at intermediate temperatures. These phase transitions, likely related to a rearrangement of the Na atoms among the available sites, have been mapped out using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. The results are modeled within the Landau theory for second order phase transitions. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725

  10. 7 CFR 1755.404 - Fiber optic cable telecommunications plant measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... performed on each optical fiber within the cable. (2) Method of measurement. For single mode fibers, the end-to-end attenuation measurements of each optical fiber at 1310 and/or 1550 nanometers in each...-end attenuation of each single mode optical fiber at 1310 and/or 1550 nanometers shall not exceed the...

  11. Jet activity as a probe of high-mass resonance production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harland-Lang, L.A. [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Khoze, V.A. [Durham University, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); NRC Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ryskin, M.G. [NRC Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Spannowsky, M. [Durham University, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    We explore the method of using the measured jet activity associated with a high-mass resonance state to determine the corresponding production modes. To demonstrate the potential of the approach, we consider the case of a resonance of mass M{sub R} decaying to a diphoton final state. We perform a Monte Carlo study, considering three mass points M{sub R} = 0.75, 1.5, 2.5 TeV, and show that the γγ, WW, gg and light and heavy q anti q initiated cases lead to distinct predictions for the jet multiplicity distributions. As an example, we apply this result to the ATLAS search for resonances in diphoton events, using the 2015 data set of 3.2 fb{sup -1} at √(s) = 13 TeV. Taking the spin-0 selection, we demonstrate that a dominantly gg-initiated signal hypothesis is mildly disfavoured, while the γγ and light quark cases give good descriptions within the limited statistics, and a dominantly WW-initiated hypothesis is found to be in strong tension with the data. We also comment on the b anti b initial state, which can already be constrained by the measured b-jet multiplicity. Finally, we present expected exclusion limits with integrated luminosity, and demonstrate that with just a few 10s of fb{sup -1} we can expect to constrain the production modes of such a resonance. (orig.)

  12. A review of magnetic resonance imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.J.; Khangure, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    One hundred and ninety-five magnetic resonance (MR) images of 167 patients with neurological impairment following spinal trauma were reviewed. Acute cord injury produces central haemorrhagic necrosis that extends transversely and longitudinally with time and increased injury severity. Oedema appears more homogeneous, extensive and dominant in minimal lesions. Magnetic resonance appearances correlate with neurological status and outcome. Patients with MR evidence of cord blood had severe clinical lesions and failed to show useful clinical improvement. Patients with homogeneous 'oedema' improved to useful function. Lesion signal inhomogeneity relates to a worse prognosis. The clinical level correlates closely with cord blood or signal in homogeneity but imprecisely with homogeneous oedema. Disc herniations require differentiation from epidural blood and venous engorgement, which are prominent with bone displacement. Magnetic resonance is recommended in incomplete cord syndromes and in cord injuries with no apparent fracture, particularly of clinically deteriorating. 18 ref., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.; Regeta, K.; Gorfinkiel, J.D.; Masin, Z.; Grimme, S.; Bannwarth, C.

    2016-01-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: 1) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, 2) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and 3) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds. (authors)

  14. A parametrization of σT(γ*p) above the resonance region for Q2 ≥ 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Maor, U.

    1991-06-01

    A smooth description of the total γ*p cross section from the deep inelastic scattering region to the real photoproduction limit is obtained with a parametrization based on a Regge type approach. The parametrization is obtained from a fit to the structure function data of BCDMS, SLAC and NA28 and the available total photoproduction cross section measurements above the resonance region, W>1.75 GeV. The fit give a reliable description of the data and provides a smooth transition from photoproduction to the deep inelastic region. Together with an earlier parametrization of the resonance region, it can be used to estimate radiative corrections over the full kinematical range. (orig.)

  15. Pitchfork bifurcation and vibrational resonance in a fractional-order ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fractional-order damping mainly determines the pattern of the vibrational resonance. There is a bifurcation point of the fractional order which, in the case of double-well potential, transforms vibrational resonance pattern from a single resonance to a double resonance, while in the case of single-well potential, transforms ...

  16. Higgs-photon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kearney, John [Fermilab, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-10-15

    We study models that produce a Higgs boson plus photon (h{sup 0}γ) resonance at the LHC. When the resonance is a Z{sup '} boson, decays to h{sup 0}γ occur at one loop. If the Z{sup '} boson couples at tree level to quarks, then the h{sup 0}γ branching fraction is typically of order 10{sup -5} or smaller. Nevertheless, there are models that would allow the observation of Z{sup '} → h{sup 0}γ at √(s) = 13 TeV with a cross section times branching fraction larger than 1 fb for a Z{sup '} mass in the 200-450 GeV range, and larger than 0.1 fb for a mass up to 800 GeV. The one-loop decay of the Z{sup '} into lepton pairs competes with h{sup 0}γ, even if the Z{sup '} couplings to leptons vanish at tree level. We also present a model in which a Z{sup '} boson decays into a Higgs boson and a pair of collimated photons, mimicking an h{sup 0}γ resonance. In this model, the h{sup 0}γ resonance search would be the discovery mode for a Z{sup '} as heavy as 2 TeV. When the resonance is a scalar, although decay to h{sup 0}γ is forbidden by angular momentum conservation, the h{sup 0} plus collimated photons channel is allowed. We comment on prospects of observing an h{sup 0}γ resonance through different Higgs decays, on constraints from related searches, and on models where h{sup 0} is replaced by a nonstandard Higgs boson. (orig.)

  17. Behavior of partial cross sections and branching ratios in the neighborhood of a resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starace, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    Starting from the treatment of Fano for the behavior of the total cross section in a photoionization (or electron-ion scattering) experiment in the vicinity of a resonance, we present a theoretical formula for the behavior of an individual final-state channel in the neighborhood of a resonance. This result is then used to derive another theoretical formula for the behavior of the ratio of two partial cross sections (i.e., the branching ratio) in the vicinity of a resonance. This branching-ratio formula depends on the profile parameters q, GAMMA, and rho 2 for the resonance, on the branching ratio outside the resonance, and on two new parameters which are explicitly related to scattering-matrix elements and phase shifts

  18. The discovery of resonances in multibaryon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, B.A.; Temnikov, P.P.; Timonina, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The ΛΛ and ΛΛp effective mass spectra are studied with a propane bubble chamber irradiated by π - mesons at 4.0 GeV/c and neutrons with mean momentum 7.0 GeV/c. Multibaryon resonances ΛΛ and ΛΛp with masses and widths Msub(ΛΛ)=(2365,3+-9,6) MeV/csup(2), GITAsub(ΛΛ)=(47,2+-15,1) MeV/csup(2) and Msub(ΛΛp)=3568,3 MeV/csup(2), GITAsub(ΛΛp) < 60 MeV/csup(2) are found. The production effective cross sections are equal σsub(ΛΛ) (2365)=(24,2+-7.0)μb and σsub(ΛΛp) (3568)=16.1 +- 5.2)μb. Possible mechanisms of multibaryon resonance production have been discussed. According to the Y<--1 hypercharge selection rule multibaryon resonances are shown to be superdense superstrange objects. The ΛΛ and ΛΛp effective mass spectra reveal peculiarities near the masses of the most of two- and three- baryon resonances

  19. Atom loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2013-07-12

    Atom loss resonances in ultracold trapped atoms have been observed at scattering lengths near atom-dimer resonances, at which Efimov trimers cross the atom-dimer threshold, and near two-dimer resonances, at which universal tetramers cross the dimer-dimer threshold. We propose a new mechanism for these loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms. As the scattering length is ramped to the large final value at which the atom loss rate is measured, the time-dependent scattering length generates a small condensate of shallow dimers coherently from the atom condensate. The coexisting atom and dimer condensates can be described by a low-energy effective field theory with universal coefficients that are determined by matching exact results from few-body physics. The classical field equations for the atom and dimer condensates predict narrow enhancements in the atom loss rate near atom-dimer resonances and near two-dimer resonances due to inelastic dimer collisions.

  20. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  1. Disc pathology after whiplash injury. A prospective magnetic resonance imaging and clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, K; Hildingsson, C; Toolanen, G; Fagerlund, M; Björnebrink, J

    1997-02-01

    This study was used to evaluate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical findings after whiplash injury. To identify initial soft-tissue damage after whiplash injury, the development of disc pathology, and the relationship of disc pathology to clinical findings. Although a few studies have reported pathological magnetic resonance imaging findings after whiplash injuries, there is no prospective study published to our knowledge. Thirty-nine patients, 20 women and 19 men with a mean age of 32 years, were treated for whiplash injury. Magnetic resonance imaging and clinical examination were performed in a blinded manner at a mean of 11 days after trauma. The procedure was repeated at a 2-year follow-up visit. Two patients could not be examined with the second magnetic resonance imaging because of claustrophobia and pregnancy, respectively. The authors found 13 patients (33%) with disc herniations with medullary (six cases) or dura (seven cases) impingement over the 2-year follow-up period. At the follow-up examination all patients with medullary impingement had persistent or increased symptoms, and three of 27 patients (11%) with no or slight changes on magnetic resonance imaging had persistent symptoms. No ligament injuries were diagnosed. Although disc pathology seems to be one contributing factor in the development of chronic symptoms after whiplash injury, it may be unnecessary to examine these patients in the acute phase with magnetic resonance imaging; correlating initial symptoms and signs to magnetic resonance imaging findings is difficult because of the relatively high proportion of false-positive results. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated later in the course of treatment in patients with persistent arm pain, neurologic deficits or clinical signs of nerve root compression to diagnose disc herniations requiring surgery.

  2. Improving the Optical Quality Factor of the WGM Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Resonators usually are characterized with two partially dependent values: finesse (F) and quality factor (Q). The finesse of an empty Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator is defined solely by the quality of its mirrors and is calculated as F=piR(exp 1/2)/(1-R). The maximum up-to-date value of reflectivity R approximately equal to 1 - 1.6 x 10(exp -6) is achieved with dielectric mirrors. An FP resonator made with the mirrors has finesse F=1.9 x 10(exp 6). Further practical increase of the finesse of FP resonators is problematic because of the absorption and the scattering of light in the mirror material through fundamental limit on the reflection losses given by the internal material losses and by thermodynamic density fluctuations on the order of parts in 109. The quality factor of a resonator depends on both its finesse and its geometrical size. A one-dimensional FP resonator has Q=2 F L/lambda, where L is the distance between the mirrors and lambda is the wavelength. It is easy to see that the quality factor of the resonator is unlimited because L is unlimited. F and Q are equally important. In some cases, finesse is technically more valuable than the quality factor. For instance, buildup of the optical power inside the resonator, as well as the Purcell factor, is proportional to finesse. Sometimes, however, the quality factor is more valuable. For example, inverse threshold power of intracavity hyperparametric oscillation is proportional to Q(exp 2) and efficiency of parametric frequency mixing is proportional to Q(exp 3). Therefore, it is important to know both the maximally achievable finesse and quality factor values of a resonator. Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are capable of achieving larger finesse compared to FP resonators. For instance, fused silica resonators with finesse 2.3 x 10(exp 6) and 2.8 x 10(exp 6) have been demonstrated. Crystalline WGM resonators reveal even larger finesse values, F=6.3 x 10(exp 6), because of low attenuation of light in the

  3. Analysis of statistical distributions of partial γ-widths of 98Mo neutron 3 2-resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knat'ko, V.A.; Rudak, Eh.A.; Shimanovich, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    Width distributions for E1 γ-transitions from the 98 Mo neutron 3/2 resonances to the 99 Mo low-lying levels with 1/2 + , 3/2 2 and 5/2 + spins are desribed. Considered are sets of widths corresponding to γ-transitions to the levels with 3/2 spin and positioned in the energy range from 12 to 5268 eV. On the basis of the results obtained a conclusion has been drawn that the width distribution of γ-transitions to the 3/2 + level differs from the Porter-Thomas distribution

  4. Advanced resonance self-shielding method for gray resonance treatment in lattice physics code GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Hiroki; Yamaji, Kazuya; Kirimura, Kazuki; Sato, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Hideki; Yamamoto, Akio

    2012-01-01

    A new resonance self-shielding method based on the equivalence theory is developed for general application to the lattice physics calculations. The present scope includes commercial light water reactor (LWR) design applications which require both calculation accuracy and calculation speed. In order to develop the new method, all the calculation processes from cross-section library preparation to effective cross-section generation are reviewed and reframed by adopting the current enhanced methodologies for lattice calculations. The new method is composed of the following four key methods: (1) cross-section library generation method with a polynomial hyperbolic tangent formulation, (2) resonance self-shielding method based on the multi-term rational approximation for general lattice geometry and gray resonance absorbers, (3) spatially dependent gray resonance self-shielding method for generation of intra-pellet power profile and (4) integrated reaction rate preservation method between the multi-group and the ultra-fine-group calculations. From the various verifications and validations, applicability of the present resonance treatment is totally confirmed. As a result, the new resonance self-shielding method is established, not only by extension of a past concentrated effort in the reactor physics research field, but also by unification of newly developed unique and challenging techniques for practical application to the lattice physics calculations. (author)

  5. NNΔ resonance and pd → 3He πo reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, T.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the I = 1, JP = 2+ resonant NΔ interaction (the pp 1D2 dibaryon), one argues that in NNΔ system a three-body resonance is generated. With a clustering binding energy of a few 10 MeV between the N and the Δ making the dibaryon and another binding energy of about 10 MeV between the NΔ cluster and the spectator N due to the attractive interaction of the Δ exchange between the cluster and spectator, the NNΔ system is bound about 40 - 60 MeV below the NNΔ threshold. Because of the Δ decay width the NNΔ bound state is actually a resonant state. The case where the spins of all the particles align in the same direction is most favorable to be bound, since the driving term is largest here. Assigning the zero orbital angular momenta, the spin-parity of the NNΔ resonance is JP = (5/2)+ . The resonance couples with NNN system through NN(1D2)-NΔ(5S2). Thus the total spin of the NNN system which couples easily with the NNΔ resonance is 1/2. Namely the spin doublet pd channel creates the NNΔ resonance. Similar argument applies to NΔΔ system. Then one summarize: NNΔ resonance : M = 3.07 GeV, JP = (5/2)+. NΔΔ resonance : M = 3.36 GeV, JP = (7/2)+. Both are easy to couple with the spin-doublet pd channel. Assuming the NNΔ and NΔΔ resonance terms, combined with the background ones which are mild in the energy dependence, one analyses the differential cross section and the deuteron tensor polarization of pd → 3 He π o at deuteron incident energy 410 ∼ 2200 MeV at θ = 0 and π. The remarkable energy-dependent structure of the tensor polarization is fairly explained by the existence of the NNΔ and NΔΔ resonances. (author)

  6. Deuteron magnetic resonance in KD3(SeO3)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Masaru

    1978-01-01

    Quadrupole coupling constant and the direction of the principal axes of EFG tensor of deuterons in KD 3 (SeO 3 ) 2 are obtained from 40 to -106 0 C. It is confirmed that there exist two symmetrically inequivalent deuterons D(1) and D(2), and D(1) is ordered in the disordered phase. Deuterons D(2) are found to be dynamically disordered in the disordered phase. In the ordered phase, D(1) sites are divided into two inequivalent groups while the number of D(2) sites remains unchanged. The splitting of the resonance line of D(1) in the ordered phase depends on temperature as (T sub(tr)-T)sup(β), where T sub(tr) is 24.9 0 C and β is about 0.52 +- 0.08 in the temperature from 24.4 to 22 0 C and 0.46+-0.01 from 22 to 3 0 C. The relation between the splitting and the order parameter is discussed. (auth.)

  7. Observations of Snake Resonance in RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lin, Fanglei; MacKay, William; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Siberian snakes now become essential in the polarized proton acceleration. With proper configuration of Siberian snakes, the spin precession tune of the beam becomes $\\frac{1}{2}$ which avoids all the spin depolarizing resonance. However, the enhancement of the perturbations on the spin motion can still occur when the betatron tune is near some low order fractional numbers, called snake resonances, and the beam can be depolarized when passing through the resonance. The snake resonances have been confirmed in the spin tracking calculations, and observed in RHIC with polarized proton beam. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, RHIC provides us a perfect facility for snake resonance studies. This paper presents latest experimental results. New insights are also discussed.

  8. Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie; Manfreda, Allison; Mansour, Kamjou; Lin, Ying; Ksendzov, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Chemical sensors based on optical ring resonators are undergoing development. A ring resonator according to this concept is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, is a made of a polymer that (1) has an index of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core and (2) absorbs chemicals from the surrounding air. The index of refraction of the polymer changes with the concentration of absorbed chemical( s). The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong evanescent-wave coupling between the outer polymer layer and the electromagnetic field propagating along the waveguide core. By virtue of this coupling, the chemically induced change in index of refraction of the polymer causes a measurable shift in the resonance peaks of the ring. In a prototype that has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of this sensor concept, the ring resonator is a dielectric optical waveguide laid out along a closed path resembling a racetrack (see Figure 1). The prototype was fabricated on a silicon substrate by use of standard techniques of thermal oxidation, chemical vapor deposition, photolithography, etching, and spin coating. The prototype resonator waveguide features an inner cladding of SiO2, a core of SixNy, and a chemical-sensing outer cladding of ethyl cellulose. In addition to the ring Chemical sensors based on optical ring resonators are undergoing development. A ring resonator according to this concept is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, is a made of a polymer that (1) has an index of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core and (2) absorbs chemicals from the surrounding air. The index of refraction of the polymer changes with the concentration of absorbed chemical( s). The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong

  9. Confinement-induced resonances in anharmonic waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Shiguo [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia); Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D. [Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    We develop the theory of anharmonic confinement-induced resonances (ACIRs). These are caused by anharmonic excitation of the transverse motion of the center of mass (c.m.) of two bound atoms in a waveguide. As the transverse confinement becomes anisotropic, we find that the c.m. resonant solutions split for a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) system, in agreement with recent experiments. This is not found in harmonic confinement theories. A new resonance appears for repulsive couplings (a{sub 3D}>0) for a quasi-two-dimensional (2D) system, which is also not seen with harmonic confinement. After inclusion of anharmonic energy corrections within perturbation theory, we find that these ACIRs agree extremely well with anomalous 1D and 2D confinement-induced resonance positions observed in recent experiments. Multiple even- and odd-order transverse ACIRs are identified in experimental data, including up to N=4 transverse c.m. quantum numbers.

  10. Measurements of gamma rays from keV-neutron resonance capture by odd-Z nuclei in the 2s-1d shell region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igashira, Masayuki; Lee, Sam Yol; Mizuno, Satoshi; Hori, Jun-ichi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Kitazawa, Hideo

    1998-03-01

    Measurements of gamma rays from keV-neutron resonance capture by {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, and {sup 27}Al, which are odd-Z nuclei in the 2s-1d shell region, were performed, using an anti-Compton HPGe spectrometer and a pulsed neutron source by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Capture gamma rays from the 27-, 49-, and 97-keV resonances of {sup 19}F, the 35- and 53-keV resonances of {sup 23}Na, and the 35-keV resonance of {sup 27}Al were observed. Some results are presented. (author)

  11. Resonant tunneling and persistent current of a non-interacting and weakly interacting one-dimensional electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Sandstroem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The persistent current for a one-dimensional ring with two tunneling barriers is considered in the limit of weakly interacting electrons. In addition to small off-resonance current, there are two kinds of resonant behaviour; (i) a current independent of the barrier transparency (true resonance) and (ii) a current analogous to the one for a ring with only single barrier (''semi''-resonance). For a given barrier transparency the realization of this or that type of resonant behaviour depends both on the geometrical factor (the ratio of interbarrier distance to a ring circumference) and on the strength of electron-electron interaction. It is shown that repulsive interaction favours the ''semi''-resonance behaviour. For a small barrier transparency the ''semi''-resonance peaks are easily washed out by temperature whereas the true resonance peaks survive. (author). 22 refs, 2 figs

  12. Repeatability of magnetic resonance fingerprinting T1 and T2 estimates assessed using the ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Keenan, Kathryn E; Stupic, Karl F; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate accuracy and repeatability of T 1 and T 2 estimates of a MR fingerprinting (MRF) method using the ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom. The ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom contains multiple compartments with standardized T 1 , T 2 , and proton density values. Conventional inversion-recovery spin echo and spin echo methods were used to characterize the T 1 and T 2 values in the phantom. The phantom was scanned using the MRF-FISP method over 34 consecutive days. The mean T 1 and T 2 values were compared with the values from the spin echo methods. The repeatability was characterized as the coefficient of variation of the measurements over 34 days. T 1 and T 2 values from MRF-FISP over 34 days showed a strong linear correlation with the measurements from the spin echo methods (R 2  = 0.999 for T 1 ; R 2  = 0.996 for T 2 ). The MRF estimates over the wide ranges of T 1 and T 2 values have less than 5% variation, except for the shortest T 2 relaxation times where the method still maintains less than 8% variation. MRF measurements of T 1 and T 2 are highly repeatable over time and across wide ranges of T 1 and T 2 values. Magn Reson Med 78:1452-1457, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Space charge in nanostructure resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Peter J.

    1996-10-01

    In quantum ballistic propagation of electrons through a variety of nanostructures, resonance in the energy-dependent transmission and reflection probabilities generically is associated with (1) a quasi-level with a decay lifetime, and (2) a bulge in electron density within the structure. It can be shown that, to a good approximation, a simple formula in all cases connects the density of states for the latter to the energy dependence of the phase angles of the eigen values of the S-matrix governing the propagation. For both the Lorentzian resonances (normal or inverted) and for the Fano-type resonances, as a consequence of this eigen value formula, the space charge due to filled states over the energy range of a resonance is just equal (for each spin state) to one electron charge. The Coulomb interaction within this space charge is known to 'distort' the electrical characteristics of resonant nanostructures. In these systems, however, the exchange effect should effectively cancel the interaction between states with parallel spins, leaving only the anti-parallel spin contribution.

  14. Resonance absorption of ICRF wave in edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Ryo; Yamanaka, Kaoru.

    1987-07-01

    An edge plasma is shown to significantly absorb ICRF wave when a resonant triplet, a cutoff-resonance-cutoff triplet, is constructed in the evanescent region. Two-ion-component plasmas in a torus are considered though the plasmas are modeled by a slab in which the density changes linearly along the x-axis. The resonance is a perpendicular-ion-cyclotron resonance, i.e., an Alfven resonance, and is formed when the applied frequency ω is smaller than the local cyclotron frequency, at the edge of the antenna side, of the lighter species of ions. Roughly the absorption rate A b is given by M 2 for M 2 >> S 2 and S 4 for S 2 >> M 2 where M = k y l and S ≅ k z l and l is a scale length of the order of the plasma minor radius and k y and k z are the perpendicular and the parallel components of the wave vector. It is noted that the both quantities, M and S, readily become of the order of unity. Since A b is not very sensitive to the density ratio of the two ion species, a few percent of impurities may cause a significant absorption. As the mass ratio of the two ion species comes close to unity the triplet forms readily. Therefore a D-T plasma seems to suffer more easily this kind of resonance absorption than a D-H plasma. (author)

  15. On the interpretation and rotational assignment of degenerate four-wave mixing spectra: Four-photon line strengths for crossover resonances in NO A 2Σ+--X 2Π

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman-Hill, E.J.; Rahn, L.A.; Farrow, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    We present here a set of equations specifically adapted to simulation of fully resonant, high-resolution, phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) in molecular gases. Signal-intensity dependence on molecular wave functions, lifetimes, and laser beam polarizations is explicitly included in these equations. The emphasis of the presentation is on both physically intuitive interpretation and a practical, ''cookbook'' approach to spectral simulation. We present experimental verification of our calculations drawn from the spectrum of dilute NO in N 2 at low pressures. Both degenerate two-level and three-level (crossover) resonances were observed. The experimental spectral intensities are accurately reproduced by the expressions presented here. We point out some of the subtleties of DFWM spectra that could be used as aids to interpretation, especially the use of laser polarization as a probe for spectral line assignments

  16. DEEBAR - A BASIC interactive computer programme for estimating mean resonance spacings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, M.; Pope, A.L.; Smith, R.W.; Story, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    DEEBAR is a BASIC interactive programme, which uses the theories of Dyson and of Dyson and Mehta, to compute estimates of the mean resonance spacings and associated uncertainty statistics from an input file of neutron resonance energies. In applying these theories the broad scale energy dependence of D-bar, as predicted by the ordinary theory of level densities, is taken into account. The mean spacing D-bar ± δD-bar, referred to zero energy of the incident neutrons, is computed from the energies of the first k resonances, for k = 2,3...K in turn and as if no resonances are missing. The user is asked to survey this set of D-bar and δD-bar values and to form a judgement - up to what value of k is the set of resonances complete and what value, in consequence, does the user adopt as the preferred value of D-bar? When the preferred values for k and D-bar have been input, the programme calculates revised values for the level density parameters, consistent with this value for D-bar and with other input information. Two short tables are printed, illustrating the energy variation and spin dependence of D-bar. Dyson's formula based on his Coulomb gas analogy is used for estimating the most likely energies of the topmost bound levels. Finally the quasi-crystalline character of a single level series is exploited by means of a table in which the resonance energies are set alongside an energy ladder whose rungs are regularly spaced with spacing D-bar(E); this comparative table expedites the search for gaps where resonances may have been missed experimentally. Used in conjunction with the program LJPROB, which calculates neutron strengths and compares them against the expected Porter Thomas distribution, estimates of the statistical parameters for use in the unresolved resonance region may be derived. (author)

  17. Local moment formation and magnetic coupling of Mn dopants in Bi2Se3: A low-temperature ferromagnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, D.; Tarasenko, R.; Vališka, M.; Kopeček, J.; Fekete, L.; Carva, K.; Holý, V.; Springholz, G.; Sechovský, V.; Honolka, J.

    2018-05-01

    We compare the magnetic and electronic configuration of single Mn atoms in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Bi2Se3 thin films, focusing on electron paramagnetic (ferromagnetic) resonance (EPR and FMR, respectively) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) reveal the expected increase of disorder with increasing concentration of magnetic guest atoms, however, Kikuchi patterns show that disorder consists majorly of μm-scale 60° twin domains in the hexagonal Bi2Se3 structure, which are promoted by the presence of single unclustered Mn impurities. Ferromagnetism below TC (5.4±0.3) K can be well described by critical scaling laws M (T) (1 - T /TC) β with a critical exponent β = (0.34 ± 0.2) , suggesting 3D Heisenberg class magnetism instead of e.g. 2D-type coupling between Mn-spins in van der Waals gap sites. From EPR hyperfine structure data we determine a Mn2+ (d5, S = 5/2) electronic configuration with a g-factor of 2.002 for -1/2 → +1/2 transitions. In addition, from the strong dependence of the low temperature FMR fields and linewidth on the field strength and orientation with respect to the Bi2Se3 (0001) plane, we derive magnetic anisotropy energies of up to K1 = -3720 erg/cm3 in MBE-grown Mn-doped Bi2Se3, reflecting the first order magneto-crystalline anisotropy of an in-plane magnetic easy plane in a hexagonal (0001) crystal symmetry. We observe an increase of K1 with increasing Mn concentration, which we interpret to be correlated to a Mn-induced in-plane lattice contraction. Across the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition the FMR intensity is suppressed and resonance fields converge the paramagnetic limit of Mn2+ (d5, S = 5/2).

  18. Two qubits in pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, G.B.; Goren, S.D.; Meerovich, V.M.; Sokolovsky, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that by the use of two radio-frequency fields of the same resonance frequency but with the different phases and directions the degeneracy of the energy spectrum of a spin system with I=3/2 is removed. This leads to four non-degenerate spin states which can be used as a platform for quantum computing. The feasibility of quantum computing based on a pure (without DC magnetic fields) nuclear quadrupole resonance technique is investigated in detail. Various quantum logic gates can be constructed by using different excitation techniques allowing different manipulations with the spin system states. Three realizations of quantum logic gates are considered: the application of an additional magnetic field with the resonance frequency, the amplitude modulation of one of the applied RF fields by the resonance frequency field, and the level-crossing method. It is shown that the probabilities of the resonance transitions depend on the method of excitation and on the direction of the excitation field. Feasibility of quantum computing is demonstrated with the examples of constructing a controlled-NOT logic gate using the resonance excitation technique and SWAP and NOT2 logic gates using the level-crossing method. (author)

  19. Evidence of a spin resonance mode in the iron-based superconductor Ba(0.6)K(0.4)Fe2As2 from scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lei; Gong, Jing; Wang, Yong-Lei; Shen, Bing; Hou, Xingyuan; Ren, Cong; Li, Chunhong; Yang, Huan; Wen, Hai-Hu; Li, Shiliang; Dai, Pengcheng

    2012-06-01

    We used high-resolution scanning tunneling spectroscopy to study the hole-doped iron pnictide superconductor Ba(0.6)K(0.4)Fe(2)As(2) (T(c)=38 K). Features of a bosonic excitation (mode) are observed in the measured quasiparticle density of states. The bosonic features are intimately associated with the superconducting order parameter and have a mode energy of ~14 meV, similar to the spin resonance measured by inelastic neutron scattering. These results indicate a strong electron-spin excitation coupling in iron pnictide superconductors, similar to that in high-T(c) copper oxide superconductors.

  20. The K2-138 System: A Near-resonant Chain of Five Sub-Neptune Planets Discovered by Citizen Scientists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jessie L.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Barentsen, Geert

    2018-01-01

    K2-138 is a moderately bright (V = 12.2, K = 10.3) main-sequence K star observed in Campaign 12 of the NASA K2 mission. It hosts five small (1.6-3.3 R⊕) transiting planets in a compact architecture. The periods of the five planets are 2.35, 3.56, 5.40, 8.26, and 12.76 days, forming an unbroken...... chain of near 3:2 resonances. Although we do not detect the predicted 2-5 minute transit timing variations (TTVs) with the K2 timing precision, they may be observable by higher-cadence observations with, for example, Spitzer or CHEOPS. The planets are amenable to mass measurement by precision radial...... velocity measurements, and therefore K2-138 could represent a new benchmark system for comparing radial velocity and TTV masses. K2-138 is the first exoplanet discovery by citizen scientists participating in the Exoplanet Explorers project on the Zooniverse platform....

  1. Coupled superconducting resonant cavities for a heavy ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A [Nuclear Science Center, New Delhi (India)

    1992-11-01

    A design for a superconducting niobium slow-wave accelerating structure has been explored that may have performance and cost advantages over existing technology. The option considered is an array of pairs of quarter-wave coaxial-line resonant cavities, the two elements of each pair strongly coupled through a short superconducting transmission line. In the linac formed by such an array, each paired structure is independently phased. A disadvantage of two-gap slow wave structures is that each cavity is relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased elements is required for a linac. Increasing the number of drift tubes per cavity reduces the number of independently-phased elements but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original, single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss in velocity acceptance. (Author) 2 figs., 8 refs.

  2. Coupled superconducting resonant cavities for a heavy ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.

    1992-01-01

    A design for a superconducting niobium slow-wave accelerating structure has been explored that may have performance and cost advantages over existing technology. The option considered is an array of pairs of quarter-wave coaxial-line resonant cavities, the two elements of each pair strongly coupled through a short superconducting transmission line. In the linac formed by such an array, each paired structure is independently phased. A disadvantage of two-gap slow wave structures is that each cavity is relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased elements is required for a linac. Increasing the number of drift tubes per cavity reduces the number of independently-phased elements but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original, single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss in velocity acceptance. (Author) 2 figs., 8 refs

  3. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  4. High-quality electromagnetically-induced absorption resonances in a buffer-gas-filled vapour cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhnikov, D. V.; Ignatovich, S. M.; Vishnyakov, V. I.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Andreeva, Ch; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2018-02-01

    Magneto-optical subnatural-linewidth resonances of electromagnetically-induced absorption (EIA) in an alkali vapour cell have been experimentally studied. The observation configuration includes using two counter-propagating pumps and probe light waves with mutually orthogonal linear polarizations, exciting an open optical transition in the 87Rb D 1 line in the presence of argon buffer gas. The EIA signals registered in a probe-wave transmission reach an unprecedented contrast of about 135% with respect to the wide ‘Doppler’ absorption pedestal and 29% with respect to the level of background transmission signal. These contrast values correspond to a relatively small resonance full width at half maximum of about 7.2 mG (5.2 kHz). The width of the narrowest EIA resonance observed is about 2.1 mG (1.5 kHz). To our knowledge, such a large relative contrast at the kHz-width is the record result for EIA resonances. In general, the work has experimentally proved that the magneto-optical scheme used has very good prospects for various quantum technologies (quantum sensors of weak magnetic fields, optical switches and other photonic elements).

  5. Atomic resolution ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope with scan rate breaking the resonant frequency of a quartz tuning fork resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quanfeng; Lu, Qingyou

    2011-05-01

    We present an ultra-fast scanning tunneling microscope with atomic resolution at 26 kHz scan rate which surpasses the resonant frequency of the quartz tuning fork resonator used as the fast scan actuator. The main improvements employed in achieving this new record are (1) fully low voltage design (2) independent scan control and data acquisition, where the tuning fork (carrying a tip) is blindly driven to scan by a function generator with the scan voltage and tunneling current (I(T)) being measured as image data (this is unlike the traditional point-by-point move and measure method where data acquisition and scan control are switched many times).

  6. A study of the high frequency limitations of series resonant converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, T. A.; King, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A transformer induced oscillation in series resonant (SR) converters is studied. It may occur in the discontinuous current mode. The source of the oscillation is an unexpected resonant circuit formed by normal resonance components in series with the magnetizing inductance of the output transformers. The methods for achieving cyclic stability are: to use a half bridge SR converter where q0.5. Q should be as close to 1.0 as possible. If 0.5q1.0, the instability will be avoided if psi2/3q-1/3. The second objective was to investigate a power field effect transistor (FET) version of the SR converter capable of operating at frequencies above 100 KHz, to study component stress and losses at various frequencies.

  7. A contribution to the Bulgarian bryoflora

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Petra; Plášek, V.; Hájek, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2007), s. 141-145 ISSN 1310-7771 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6163303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Calliergon richardsonii * Dicranella staphylina * Gymnocolea inflata Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  8. A dual resonance model for high energy electroweak reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, Jean-Francois

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose an original model for the weak interaction at high energy (about 1 TeV) that is inspired from resonance dual models established for hadron physics. The first chapter details the basis and assumptions of the standard model. The second chapter deals with various scenarios that go beyond the standard model and that involve a strong interaction and a perturbative approach to assess coupling. The third chapter is dedicated to the main teachings of hadron physics concerning resonances, the model of Regge poles and the concept of duality. We present our new model in the fourth chapter, we build a scenario in which standard fermions and the 3 massive gauge bosons would have a sub-structure alike that of hadrons. In order to give non-null values to the width of resonances we use the K matrix method, we describe this method in the last chapter and we apply it for the computation of the width of the Z 0 boson. Our model predicts a large spectra of states particularly with the 143-up-lets of ff-bar states. The K matrix method has allowed us to compute amplitudes for helicity, then to collapse them in amplitudes invariant with SU(2) and to project these amplitudes in partial waves of helicity. For most resonances partial widths are very low compared to their mass

  9. Measurements of the anomalous RF surface resistance of niobium using a dielectric resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, D.; Bolore, M.; Bonin, B.; Jacques, E.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The surface resistance of high and low residual resistance ratio (RRR) niobium plates at 4.2 K and 1.8 K has been measured as a function of many processing and testing parameters. A dielectric resonator was used instead of a resonant cavity. This resonator offered the ability to make many, sensitive measurements with an efficient use of time and helium. It was found that the surface resistance, R s , of RRR = 190 niobium increased noticeably from the theoretical value if the cooling rate was slower than ∼ 10 K/min. (author)

  10. Kinematic signature of a rotating bar near a resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    Recent work based on H I, star count and emission data suggests that the Milky Way has rotating bar-like features. In this paper, I show that such features cause distinctive stellar kinematic signatures near Outer Lindblad Resonance (OLR) and Inner Lindblad Resonance (ILR). The effect of these resonances may be observable far from the peak density of the pattern and relatively nearby the solar position. The details of the kinematic signatures depend on the evolutionary history of the 'bar' and therefore velocity data, both systematic and velocity dispersion, may be used to probe the evolutionary history as well as the present state of Galaxy. Kinematic models for a variety of sample scenarios are presented. Models with evolving pattern speeds show significantly stronger dispersion signatures than those with static pattern speeds, suggesting that useful observational constraints are possible. The models are applied to the proposed rotating spheroid and bar models; we find (1) none of these models chosen to represent the proposed large-scale rotating spheroid are consistent with the stellar kinematics and (2) a Galactic bar with semimajor axis of 3 kpc will cause a large increase in velocity dispersion in the vicinity of OLR (approximately 5 kpc) with little change in the net radial motion and such a signature is suggested by K-giant velocity data. Potential future observations and analyses are discussed.

  11. Resonance free lattices for A.G. machines

    CERN Document Server

    Verdier, A

    1999-01-01

    A part of an alternating gradient circular machine composed of a number of identical cells Nc will not contribute to the excitation of most of the non-linear resonances to first order in multipole strength, if the two phase advances per cell take the values 2*k1/Nc and 2*k2/Nc. k1 and k2 are any integers and k1 AB AF AN AU AUForm AccNum BN CDate CTown ConfName DB Dat Format MainFile Num PR2 RN Records SU SuD SuE SuN TI errors files k2. This property is demonstrated here. Its application to synchrotron light sources and colliders is discussed.

  12. A New Look at an Old Activity: Resonance Tubes Used to Teach Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Jane

    2017-12-01

    There are several variations of resonance laboratory activities used to determine the speed of sound. This is not one of them. This activity uses the resonance tube idea to teach resonance, not to verify the speed of sound. Prior to this activity, the speed of sound has already been measured using computer sound-sensors and timing echoes produced in long tubes like carpet tubes. There are other methods to determine the speed of sound. Some methods are referenced at the end of this article. The students already know the speed of sound when they are confronted with data that contradict their prior knowledge. Here, the mystery is something the students solve with the help of a series of demonstrations by the instructor.

  13. Study of the vortex matter in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} using the Josephson plasma resonance; Etude de la matiere de vortex dans Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} a l'aide de la resonance de plasma Josephson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S

    2003-10-01

    The Josephson plasma resonance (JPR) is a tool of choice to measure the inter-plane phase coherence in the layered superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (BSCCO). It enables us to evaluate the wandering length r{sub w}, defined as the thermal average of the relative thermal excursions of two pancake vortices belonging to the same flux line and localized in two consecutive superconducting layers. In this work, using two experimental techniques to probe the JPR (the resonant cavity perturbation technique and the bolometric method), we have measured r{sub w} in the vortex solid in pristine or heavy-ion irradiated (dose n{sub d} = 5 x 10{sup 10} ions.cm{sup -2}, i.e. B{sub {phi}} n-d{phi}{sub 0} = 1 T) under-doped BSCCO single crystals. In the pristine samples, at low magnetic fields, the temperature dependence of r{sub w} and its increase with the applied field can only be accounted for by the dominant role of the line tension (due to Josephson coupling) and its renormalization due to thermal fluctuations. The latter are responsible for the softening of the line tension for the large-wave vector modes, which eventually leads to the first order phase transition between the vortex solid and the vortex liquid. The field and temperature dependence of r{sub w} in the irradiated crystals for B << B{sub {phi}}, is the same as observed in the pristine samples. This observation is a validation for a description in term of 'discrete superconductor' of the material. (author)

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabonomic profiling using tO2PLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirwan, Gemma M., E-mail: gemma.kirwan@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, City Campus, Vic 3001 (Australia); Bioinformatics Center, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Hancock, Timothy [Bioinformatics Center, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Hassell, Kathryn [Biotechnology and Environmental Biology, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Vic 3083 (Australia); Niere, Julie O. [Department of Chemistry, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, City Campus, Vic 3001 (Australia); Nugegoda, Dayanthi [Biotechnology and Environmental Biology, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Vic 3083 (Australia); Goto, Susumu [Bioinformatics Center, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Adams, Michael J. [Department of Chemistry, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, City Campus, Vic 3001 (Australia)

    2013-06-05

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Transposition of O2PLS input matrix (tO2PLS) to analyze metabonomics data. •tO2PLS specific components describe features that separate and define sample groups. •Application of tO2PLS to a {sup 1}H NMR metabonomics study of black bream fish. -- Abstract: Blood plasma collected from adult fish (black bream, Sparidae) exposed to a dose of 5 mg kg{sup −1} 17β-estradiol underwent metabonomic profiling using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). An extension of the orthogonal 2 projection to latent structure (O2PLS) analysis, tO2PLS, was proposed and utilized to classify changes between the control and experimental metabolic profiles. As a bidirectional modeling tool, O2PLS examines the (variable) commonality between two different data blocks, and extracts the joint correlations as well as the unique variations present within each data block. tO2PLS is a proposed matrix transposition of O2PLS to allow for commonality between experiments (spectral profiles) to be observed, rather than between sample variables. tO2PLS analysis highlighted two potential biomarkers, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and choline, that distinguish between control and 17β-estradiol exposed fish. This study presents an alternative way of examining spectroscopic (metabolite) data, providing a method for the visual assessment of similarities and differences between control and experimental spectral features in large data sets.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabonomic profiling using tO2PLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirwan, Gemma M.; Hancock, Timothy; Hassell, Kathryn; Niere, Julie O.; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Goto, Susumu; Adams, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Transposition of O2PLS input matrix (tO2PLS) to analyze metabonomics data. •tO2PLS specific components describe features that separate and define sample groups. •Application of tO2PLS to a 1 H NMR metabonomics study of black bream fish. -- Abstract: Blood plasma collected from adult fish (black bream, Sparidae) exposed to a dose of 5 mg kg −1 17β-estradiol underwent metabonomic profiling using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). An extension of the orthogonal 2 projection to latent structure (O2PLS) analysis, tO2PLS, was proposed and utilized to classify changes between the control and experimental metabolic profiles. As a bidirectional modeling tool, O2PLS examines the (variable) commonality between two different data blocks, and extracts the joint correlations as well as the unique variations present within each data block. tO2PLS is a proposed matrix transposition of O2PLS to allow for commonality between experiments (spectral profiles) to be observed, rather than between sample variables. tO2PLS analysis highlighted two potential biomarkers, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and choline, that distinguish between control and 17β-estradiol exposed fish. This study presents an alternative way of examining spectroscopic (metabolite) data, providing a method for the visual assessment of similarities and differences between control and experimental spectral features in large data sets

  16. Analysis and design of a coupled coaxial line TEM resonator for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benahmed, Nasreddine; Feham, Mohammed; Khelif, M'Hamed

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we have successfully realized a numerical tool to analyse and to design an n-element unloaded coaxial line transverse electromagnetic (TEM) resonator. This numerical tool allows the determination of the primary parameters, matrices [L], [C] and [R], and simulates the frequency response of S 11 at the RF port of the designed TEM resonator. The frequency response permits evaluation of the unloaded quality factor Q 0 . As an application, we present the analysis and the design of an eight-element unloaded TEM resonator for animal studies at 4.7 T. The simulated performance has a -62.81 dB minimum reflection and a quality factor of 260 around 200 MHz

  17. Switchable and tunable film bulk acoustic resonator fabricated using barium strontium titanate active layer and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} acoustic reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbrockey, N. M., E-mail: sbrockey@structuredmaterials.com; Tompa, G. S. [Structured Materials Industries, Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Kalkur, T. S.; Mansour, A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80933 (United States); Khassaf, H.; Yu, H.; Aindow, M.; Alpay, S. P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    A solidly mounted acoustic resonator was fabricated using a Ba{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}TiO{sub 3} (BST) film deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The device was acoustically isolated from the substrate using a Bragg reflector consisting of three pairs of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} layers deposited by chemical solution deposition. Transmission electron microscopy verified that the Bragg reflector was not affected by the high temperatures and oxidizing conditions necessary to process high quality BST films. Electrical characterization of the resonator demonstrated a quality factor (Q) of 320 and an electromechanical coupling coefficient (K{sub t}{sup 2}) of 7.0% at 11 V.

  18. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, C R; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S; Oldenburg, Amy L

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young's modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa-27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring.

  19. Rapid Evaluation of Platelet Function With T2 Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuker, Adam; Husseinzadeh, Holleh; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Marturano, Joseph E.; Massefski, Walter; Lowery, Thomas J.; Lambert, Michele P.; Abrams, Charles S.; Weisel, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The clinical diagnosis of qualitative platelet disorders (QPDs) based on light transmission aggregometry (LTA) requires significant blood volume, time, and expertise, all of which can be barriers to utilization in some populations and settings. Our objective was to develop a more rapid assay of platelet function by measuring platelet-mediated clot contraction in small volumes (35 µL) of whole blood using T2 magnetic resonance (T2MR). Methods: We established normal ranges for platelet-mediated clot contraction using T2MR, used these ranges to study patients with known platelet dysfunction, and then evaluated agreement between T2MR and LTA with arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor activator peptide. Results: Blood from 21 healthy donors was studied. T2MR showed 100% agreement with LTA with each of the four agonists and their cognate inhibitors tested. T2MR successfully detected abnormalities in each of seven patients with known QPDs, with the exception of one patient with a novel mutation leading to Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. T2MR appeared to detect platelet function at similar or lower platelet counts than LTA. Conclusions: T2MR may provide a clinically useful approach to diagnose QPDs using small volumes of whole blood, while also providing new insight into platelet biology not evident using plasma-based platelet aggregation tests. PMID:28028118

  20. Resonant excitation and the decay of autoionization states in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, A.I.; Kazakov, A.E.; Fedorov, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Photoionization of atoms involving resonant excitation of the auto-ionization state is studied. The evolution of the total ionization probability, its dependence on the frequency of the resonance radiation and also the photoelectron energy spectrum are investigated. It is shown that the energy of the final state of the system may be localized either in the vicinity of E approximately Esub(α), where Esub(α) is the auto-ionization energy, or in the vicinity of E approximately Esub(α)+h/2πω where h/2πω is the quantum energy of the resonance radiation. The photoelectron specturum in the region E approximately Esub(α)+h/2πω as a whole is similar to the electron spectrum on photoionization of atoms involving resonance excitation of the bound state. A strong effect on the photoelectron spectrum in the region E approximately Esub(α) is exerted by interference of various decay channels of the ground state in the resonance field which leads to the appearance in the spectrum of a characteristic structure of the Fano type. Interence also affects the widths of the two spectral curves, the relatve amount of electrons in the two energy ranges and also other characteristics of the ionization process. It is shown that the presence of a noninterfering photoionization channel of the autoionization state ensures the finiteness of the swidths and heights of the spectral curves and the absence of complete ''coherency merging''

  1. X-ray Crystallographic, Multifrequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, and Density Functional Theory Characterization of the Ni(P(Cy)2N(tBu)2)2(n+) Hydrogen Oxidation Catalyst in the Ni(I) Oxidation State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Jens; Westwood, Mark; Mardis, Kristy L; Brown, Tiara L; Pitts-McCoy, Anthony M; Hopkins, Michael D; Poluektov, Oleg G

    2015-07-06

    The Ni(I) hydrogen oxidation catalyst [Ni(P(Cy)2N(tBu)2)2](+) (1(+); P(Cy)2N(tBu)2 = 1,5-di(tert-butyl)-3,7-dicyclohexyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane) has been studied using a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques (X-, Q-, and D-band, electron-nuclear double resonance, hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy), X-ray crystallography, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Crystallographic and DFT studies indicate that the molecular structure of 1(+) is highly symmetrical. EPR spectroscopy has allowed determination of the electronic g tensor and the spin density distribution on the ligands, and revealed that the Ni(I) center does not interact strongly with the potentially coordinating solvents acetonitrile and butyronitrile. The EPR spectra and magnetic parameters of 1(+) are found to be distinctly different from those for the related compound [Ni(P(Ph)2N(Ph)2)2](+) (4(+)). One significant contributor to these differences is that the molecular structure of 4(+) is unsymmetrical, unlike that of 1(+). DFT calculations on derivatives in which the R and R' groups are systematically varied have allowed elucidation of structure/substituent relationships and their corresponding influence on the magnetic resonance parameters.

  2. A New Resonance Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Alan

    2017-12-01

    The measurement of the speed of sound in air with the resonance tube is a popular experiment that often yields accurate results. One approach is to hold a vibrating tuning fork over an air column that is partially immersed in water. The column is raised and lowered in the water until the generated standing wave produces resonance: this occurs at the point where sound is perceived to have maximum loudness, or at the point where the amplitude of the standing wave has maximum value, namely an antinode. An antinode coincides with the position of the tuning fork, beyond the end of the air column, which consequently introduces an end correction. One way to minimize this end correction is to measure the distance between consecutive antinodes.

  3. Al-doped MgB{sub 2} materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Koç University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, Istanbul (Turkey); Erdem, Emre, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, Freiburg (Germany); Weber, Stefan [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, Freiburg (Germany); Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS), Universität Freiburg, Albertstr. 19, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-16

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB{sub 2}. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB{sub 2} disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  4. Magnetostatic wave tunable resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, J.-P.; Hartemann, P.

    1983-06-01

    Theoretical principles and techniques for the implementation of magnetostatic surface wave and volume wave resonators in high frequency oscillators are discussed. Magnetostatic waves are magnetic waves that propagate in materials exposed to a polarized magnetic field. The propagation speed ranges from 3-300 km/sec for wavelengths between 1 micron and 10 mm, in the presence of lags from 10-1000 nsec/ cm. Tunable resonators in the 1-20 GHz frequency range have been manufactured with YIG using liquid phase epitaxy for deposition on gadolinium and gallium substrates. Distributed-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity resonators are described and performance tests results are reported, including losses of 8 dB, a quality coefficient under voltage of 450, and frequency rejection outside of resonance better than 10 dB. However, saturation occurs at low power levels at frequencies lower than 4.2 GHz, a feature overcome with forward volume magnetostatic wave generators, which have a quality factor of 500, an insertion loss of 22 dB, and rejection around 15 dB.

  5. Multi-frequency interpolation in spiral magnetic resonance fingerprinting for correction of off-resonance blurring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenson, Jason; Robison, Ryan K; Zwart, Nicholas R; Welch, E Brian

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) pulse sequences often employ spiral trajectories for data readout. Spiral k-space acquisitions are vulnerable to blurring in the spatial domain in the presence of static field off-resonance. This work describes a blurring correction algorithm for use in spiral MRF and demonstrates its effectiveness in phantom and in vivo experiments. Results show that image quality of T1 and T2 parametric maps is improved by application of this correction. This MRF correction has negligible effect on the concordance correlation coefficient and improves coefficient of variation in regions of off-resonance relative to uncorrected measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Simulation of a resonant-type ring magnet power supply with multiple resonant cells and energy storage chokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.M.S.; Blackmore, E.W.; Reiniger, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    For the TRIUMF KAON Factory Booster Ring, a resonant-type magnet power supply has been proposed for the dipole magnet excitation. The Booster Ring magnet power supply system based on resonant circuits, coupled with distributed energy make-up networks, is a complex system, sensitive to many system parameters. When multiple resonant cells, each with its own energy make-up network, are connected in a ring, it is very difficult to derive closed-form solutions to determine the operating conditions of the power supply system. A meaningful way to understand and analyze such a complex system is to use a simulation tool. This paper presents the analysis of operating conditions of the resonant-type ring magnet power supply with multiple resonant cells, using the circuit simulation tool, SPICE. The focus of the study is on the effect of circuit parameter variations in energy storage chokes

  7. The dielectronic satellites to the 2s-3p Ne-like krypton resonance lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakhalin, S.Ya.; Dyakin, V.M.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Parys, P.; Nilsen, J.; Osterheld, A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of dielectronic satellite spectra of 2p 6 -2s2p 6 3p Ne-like krypton resonance lines. The satellite structure was registered with high (better than λ/Δλ > 3500) spectral resolution in the emission of a laser irradiated gas puff target. We perform an unambiguous identification of satellite lines caused by radiative transitions from autoionizing states of sodium-like krypton ions. A total of about 20 spectral features are identified, most of them for the first time. Very good agreement between the satellite structure calculations and experimental emission spectra is obtained. (orig.)

  8. The dielectronic satellites to the 2s-3p Ne-like krypton resonance lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakhalin, S.Ya. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Dyakin, V.M. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Faenov, A.Ya. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Fiedorowicz, H. (Inst. of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland)); Bartnik, A. (Inst. of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland)); Parys, P. (Inst. of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland)); Nilsen, J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)); Osterheld, A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    We present an analysis of dielectronic satellite spectra of 2p[sup 6]-2s2p[sup 6]3p Ne-like krypton resonance lines. The satellite structure was registered with high (better than [lambda]/[Delta][lambda] > 3500) spectral resolution in the emission of a laser irradiated gas puff target. We perform an unambiguous identification of satellite lines caused by radiative transitions from autoionizing states of sodium-like krypton ions. A total of about 20 spectral features are identified, most of them for the first time. Very good agreement between the satellite structure calculations and experimental emission spectra is obtained. (orig.).

  9. In-Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Mutated Gliomas: A Technical Review for Neuroradiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeonjin; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Hyeong Hun; Heo, Hwon

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic potential of an onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) as a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) detectable biomarker of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutated (IDH-MT) gliomas has drawn attention of neuroradiologists recently. However, due to severe spectral overlap with background signals, quantification of 2HG can be very challenging. In this technical review for neuroradiologists, first, the biochemistry of 2HG and its significance in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas are summarized. Secondly, various 1H-MRS methods used in the previous studies are outlined. Finally, wereview previous in vivo studies, and discuss the current status of 1H-MRS in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas

  10. In-Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Mutated Gliomas: A Technical Review for Neuroradiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeonjin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungjin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyeong Hun; Heo, Hwon [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic potential of an onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) as a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) detectable biomarker of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutated (IDH-MT) gliomas has drawn attention of neuroradiologists recently. However, due to severe spectral overlap with background signals, quantification of 2HG can be very challenging. In this technical review for neuroradiologists, first, the biochemistry of 2HG and its significance in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas are summarized. Secondly, various 1H-MRS methods used in the previous studies are outlined. Finally, wereview previous in vivo studies, and discuss the current status of 1H-MRS in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas.

  11. Schumann Resonances and Their Potential Applications: a Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Fathi Alrais

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Schumann resonances is an important topic gains great interest in research areas which has extensive use of Schumann resonances in a variety of desplines such as biological evolutionary processes, the optimal functioning of the human brain waves and lightning-related studies. Materials and Methods: This dictates the major emphasis on economic, environmental, and engineering applications and hazard assessments in the form of earthquake and volcano monitoring. Results: This review is aimed at the reader generally unfamiliar with the Schumann Resonances. It is our hope that this review will increase the interest in SR among researchers previously unfamiliar with this phenomenon. Discussion and Conclusions: In this review paper, a brief introduction about Schumann resonances is presented. A general description of Earth’s ionosphere is outlined. The electromagnetic waves spectrum from lightning is discussed. The history of Schumann resonances is briefly presented. The connection of man with nature through Schumann resonances is introduced. Present Schumann resonances researches are briefly outlined. Schumann (global electromagnetic resonances in the cavity Earth – ionosphere play a critical role in all biological evolutionary processes. However, there is a great need for independent research into the bio-compatibility between natural and manmade signals. Serious attention must now be paid to the possible biological role of standing waves in the atmosphere. Being a global phenomenon, Schumann resonances have numerous applications in lightning research.

  12. Superconducting high frequency high power resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbis, C.; Vardiman, R.; Weinman, L.

    1974-01-01

    A niobium superconducting quarter-wave helical resonator has been designed and built. The resonator has been electron-beam welded and electropolished to produce a smooth flaw-free surface. This has been followed by an anodization to produce a 1000 A layer of Nb 2 0 5 . At the resonant frequency of approximately 15 MHz the unloaded Q was approximately equal to 4.6x10 6 with minimal dielectric support. With the resonator open to the helium bath to provide cooling, and rigidly supported by a teflon cylinder, 350 V of power were transferred at a doubly loaded Q of 3500. The extrapolation of the results to a Qsub(DL) of 1000 meet the power handling criteria of one kilowatt for the intended application. (author)

  13. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; Vay, J.L.; Grote, D.P.; Ng, J.T.; Pivi, M.F.; Wang, L.F.

    2009-01-01

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l b c , (l b = bunch duration, ω c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ∼ 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed

  14. High-Q microwave resonators with a photonic crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, M.

    2001-08-01

    The localisation of electromagnetic energy at a defect in a photonic crystal is similar to a well known effect employed to construct high-Q microwave resonators: In a whispering gallery (WHG-) mode resonator the high Q-factor is achieved by localisation of the electromagnetic field energy by total reflection inside a disk made of dielectric material. The topic of this work is to demonstrate, that WHG-like modes can exist in an air defect in a photonic crystal that extends over several lattice periods; and that a high-Q microwave resonator can be made, utilizing these resonant modes. In numerical simulations, the transmission properties of a photonic crystal structure with hexagonal lattice symmetry have been investigated with a transfer-matrix-method. The eigenmodes of a defect structure in a photonic crystal have been calculated with a quasi-3d finite element integration technique. Experimental results confirm the simulated transmission properties and show the existence of modes inside the band gap, when a defect is introduced in the crystal. Resonator measurements show that a microwave resonator can be operated with those defect modes. It was found out that the main losses of the resonator were caused by bad microwave properties of the used dielectric material and by metal losses on the top and bottom resonator walls. Furthermore, it turned out that the detection of the photonic crystal defect mode was difficult because of a lack of simulation possibilities and high housing mode density in the resonator. (orig.)

  15. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. The concept of transition state has played a crucial role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Resonances in the transition state region are important in many chemical reactions at reaction energies near the thresholds. Detecting and characterizing isolated reaction resonances, however, have been a major challenge in both experiment and theory. In this Account, we review the most recent developments in the study of reaction resonances in the benchmark F + H 2 --> HF + H reaction. Crossed molecular beam scattering experiments on the F + H 2 reaction have been carried out recently using the high-resolution, highly sensitive H-atom Rydberg tagging technique with HF rovibrational states almost fully resolved. Pronounced forward scattering for the HF (nu' = 2) product has been observed at the collision energy of 0.52 kcal/mol in the F + H 2 (j = 0) reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on two new potential energy surfaces, the Xu-Xie-Zhang (XXZ) surface and the Fu-Xu-Zhang (FXZ) surface, show that the observed forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) in the F + H 2 reaction is caused by two Feshbach resonances (the ground resonance and first excited resonance). More interestingly, the pronounced forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) at 0.52 kcal/mol is enhanced considerably by the constructive interference between the two resonances. In order to probe the resonance potential more accurately, the isotope substituted F + HD --> HF + D reaction has been studied using the D-atom Rydberg tagging technique. A remarkable and fast changing dynamical picture has been mapped out in the collision energy range of 0.3-1.2 kcal/mol for this reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on the XXZ surface suggest that the ground resonance on this potential is too high in comparison with the experimental results of the F + HD reaction. However, quantum scattering calculations on the FXZ surface can reproduce nearly quantitatively the resonance

  16. Strong guided mode resonant local field enhanced visible harmonic generation in an azo-polymer resonant waveguide grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian Hung; Tseng, Chun-Yen; Lee, Ching-Ting; Young, Jeff F; Kan, Hung-Chih; Hsu, Chia Chen

    2014-02-10

    Guided mode resonance (GMR) enhanced second- and third-harmonic generation (SHG and THG) is demonstrated in an azo-polymer resonant waveguide grating (RWG), comprised of a poled azo-polymer layer on top of a textured SU8 substrate with a thin intervening layer of TiO2. Strong SHG and THG outputs are observed by matching either in-coming fundamental- or out-going harmonic-wavelength to the GMR wavelengths of the azo-polymer RWG. Without the azo-polymer coating, pure TiO2 RWGs, do not generate any detectable SHG using a fundamental beam peak intensity of 2 MW/cm(2). Without the textured TiO2 layer, a planar poled azo-polymer layer results in 3650 times less SHG than the full nonlinear RWG structure under identical excitation conditions. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis calculations confirm that this enhancement of the nonlinear conversion is due to strong local electric fields that are generated at the interfaces of the TiO2 and azo-polymer layers when the RWG is excited at resonant wavelengths associated with both SHG and THG conversion processes.

  17. A search for [Formula: see text] resonances with the ATLAS detector in 2.05 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

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Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tua, A; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuggle, J M; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Valente, P; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Poel, E; van der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Vulpen, I; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vari, R; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Virchaux, M; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walch, S; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Weber, M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wellenstein, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Weydert, C; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xu, C; Xu, D; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ybeles Smit, G V; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Young, C J; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zanello, L; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zinonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zimin, N I; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Živković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    A search for top quark pair resonances in final states containing at least one electron or muon has been performed with the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The search uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb -1 , which was recorded in 2011 at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. No evidence for a resonance is found and limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio to [Formula: see text] for narrow and wide resonances. For narrow Z ' bosons, the observed 95 % Bayesian credibility level limits range from 9.3 pb to 0.95 pb for masses in the range of m Z ' =500 GeV to m Z ' =1300 GeV. The corresponding excluded mass region for a leptophobic topcolour Z ' boson (Kaluza-Klein gluon excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model) is m Z ' <880 GeV ([Formula: see text]).

  18. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard. [SO/sub 2/ in gases by fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, L.D.; Bennett, D.W.; Davis, J.F.

    1983-05-09

    (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SI)/sub 2/NH with SO/sub 2/. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/O and a new solid compound (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/). Both (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO and (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO/sub 2/ pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/NH, whereby any SO/sub 2/ present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO/sub 2/ in the original gas sample. The solid product (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, or /sup 29/Si may be used as a reference.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for extravehicular activity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, R.; Lorenz, C.; Peterson, S.; Strauss, A.; Main, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of conducting kinematic studies of the hand for the purpose of EVA capability enhancement. After imaging the subject hand using a magnetic resonance scanner, the resulting 2D slices were reconstructed into a 3D model of the proximal phalanx of the left hand. Using the coordinates of several landmark positions, one is then able to decompose the motion of the rigid body. MRI offers highly accurate measurements due to its tomographic nature without the problems associated with other imaging modalities for in vivo studies.

  20. Calculations of resonances parameters for the ((2s2) 1Se, (2s2p) 1,3P0) and ((3s2) 1Se, (3s3p) 1,3P0) doubly excited states of helium-like ions with Z≤10 using a complex rotation method implemented in Scilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gning, Youssou; Sow, Malick; Traoré, Alassane; Dieng, Matabara; Diakhate, Babacar; Biaye, Mamadi; Wagué, Ahmadou

    2015-01-01

    In the present work a special computational program Scilab (Scientific Laboratory) in the complex rotation method has been used to calculate resonance parameters of ((2s 2 ) 1 S e , (2s2p) 1,3 P 0 ) and ((3s 2 ) 1 S e , (3s3p) 1,3 P 0 ) states of helium-like ions with Z≤10. The purpose of this study required a mathematical development of the Hamiltonian applied to Hylleraas wave function for intrashell states, leading to analytical expressions which are carried out under Scilab computational program. Results are in compliance with recent theoretical calculations. - Highlights: • Resonance energy and widths computed for doubly excited states of helium-like ions. • Well-comparable results to the theoretical literature values up to Z=10. • Satisfactory agreements with theoretical calculations for widths

  1. Search Results | Page 2 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 11 - 20 of 1310 ... China 367 Apply China filter · Indonesia 245 Apply Indonesia filter · Thailand 216 Apply Thailand filter .... Harnessing big data to meet the Sustainable Development Goals – Building capacity in the Global South ... development in sectors such as health, urban development, transportation, and humanit.

  2. Dipole Resonances of 76Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, R. S.; Cooper, N.; Werner, V.; Rusev, G.; Pietralla, N.; Kelly, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Yates, S. W.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E.

    2013-10-01

    Dipole resonances in 76Ge have been studied using the method of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF). The experiment was performed using the Free Electron Laser facility at HI γS/TUNL, which produced linearly polarised quasi-monoenergetic photons in the 4-9 MeV energy range. Photon strength, in particular dipole strength, is an important ingredient in nuclear reaction calculations, and recent interest in its study has been stimulated by observations of a pygmy dipole resonance near the neutron separation energy Sn of certain nuclei. Furthermore, 76Ge is a candidate for 0 ν 2 β -decay. The results are complimentary to a relevant experiment done at TU Darmstadt using Bremsstrahlung beams. Single-resonance parities and a preliminary estimate of the total photo-excitation cross section will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under grant no. DE-FG02-91ER40609.

  3. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  4. Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in candidates for kidney transplantation: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ginnerup-Pedersen, Bodil; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Haislund, Margit; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Detailed knowledge of vessel status in potential candidates for kidney transplantation is essential for the surgeon. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has previously been used intensively for assessing this, but the discovery that use of gadolinium based contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging can cause Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in patients suffering from severe kidney disease has lead to renewed interest in non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The aim of this study was to find a non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography method for preoperative evaluation of the pelvic vessels prior to kidney transplantation, providing a sufficient image quality. Method: In a prospective study we consecutively included 54 patients undergoing examinations prior to kidney transplantation. The patients were examined with the following magnetic resonance angiography sequences: A 2D Time of flight (n = 54), 3D Time of flight (n = 52) patients, 3D Phase Contrast (n = 54), 3D Balanced Steady State Free Precession (n = 52) and a 2D TRiggered Angiography Non-Contrast Enhanced (TRANCE) (a Spin Echo sequence with subtraction) (n = 48). The sequences were evaluated with respect to contrast, diagnostic performance and artefact burden. Results: Evaluating contrast, 3D Phase Contrast was significantly better than 2D Time of flight (p 0.2). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. The artefact score was lowest for the Phase Contrast images and significantly superior to the 2D Time of flight (p < 0.005). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the three other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. Conclusion: Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography offers a safe preoperative examination for assessment of vessel status before kidney transplantation. A combination of 2D Time of flight and 3D Phase Contrast acquisitions is recommended and can be performed within a

  5. 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to investigate host-guest complexation of some antidepressant drugs with natural and modified cyclodextrins. Leila Shafiee Dastjerdi1* and Mojtaba Shamsipur2. 1Faculty of Science, Roudehen Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 2Department of Chemistry, ...

  6. Resonance treatment methodology in DeCART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog; Joo, Han Gyu; Lee, Chung Chan; Chang, Moon Hee

    2003-12-01

    The typical nuclear design procedure consists of two steps which are the transport lattice calculation for the fuel assembly and the nodal diffusion calculation for the reactor core. DeCART (Deterministic Core Analysis based on Ray Tracing) code has been developed to perform the 3-dimensional whole-core transport calculation removing some of the approximations in the 2-step procedure. This code employs the synthesis of 1- and 2-dimensional characteristics methods in the framework of the 3-dimensional CMFD (Coarse Mesh Finite Difference) formulation. The subgroup method is used for the resonance treatment. HELIOS library is used for the multi-group neutron cross section and the resonance data without any modification. This report includes the methodology of the resonance treatment in DeCART. And this report also includes the Monte Carlo resonance treatment under development for the generation of the resonance integral table and the subgroup data. The interpolation method of the equivalence cross section is reviewed for the efficient resonance transport calculation with thermal-hydraulic feedback, and the new method to consider the temperature distribution explicitly in the subgroup method is also introduced.

  7. Chaos and Beyond in a Water Filled Ultrasonic Resonance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazlo, Adler; Yost, W.; Cantrell, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Finite amplitude ultrasonic wave resonances in a one-dimensional liquid-filled cavity, formed by a narrow band transducer and a plane reflector, are reported. The resonances are observed to include not only the expected harmonic and subharmonic signals (1,2) but chaotic signals as well. The generation mechanism requires attaining a threshold value of the driving amplitude that the liquid-filled cavity system becomes sufficiently nonlinear in response. The nonlinear features of the system were recently investigated via the construction of an ultrasonic interferometer having optical precision. The transducers were compressional, undamped quartz and lithium niobate crystals having the frequency range 1-10 MHz, driven by a high power amplifier. Both an optical diffraction system to characterize the diffraction pattern of laser light normally incident to the cavity and a receiving transducer attached to an aligned reflector with lapped flat and parallel surfaces were used to assess the generated resonance response in the cavity. At least 5 regions of excitation are identified.

  8. Amplitude saturation of MEMS resonators explained by autoparametric resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Avoort, C; Bontemps, J J M; Steeneken, P G; Le Phan, K; Van Beek, J T M; Van der Hout, R; Hulshof, J; Fey, R H B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a phenomenon that limits the power handling of MEMS resonators. It is observed that above a certain driving level, the resonance amplitude becomes independent of the driving level. In contrast to previous studies of power handling of MEMS resonators, it is found that this amplitude saturation cannot be explained by nonlinear terms in the spring constant or electrostatic force. Instead we show that the amplitude in our experiments is limited by nonlinear terms in the equation of motion which couple the in-plane length-extensional resonance mode to one or more out-of-plane (OOP) bending modes. We present experimental evidence for the autoparametric excitation of these OOP modes using a vibrometer. The measurements are compared to a model that can be used to predict a power-handling limit for MEMS resonators

  9. Amplitude saturation of MEMS resonators explained by autoparametric resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Avoort, C; Bontemps, J J M; Steeneken, P G; Le Phan, K; Van Beek, J T M [NXP Research, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Van der Hout, R; Hulshof, J [Department of Mathematics, VU University—Faculty of Sciences, De Boelelaan 1081a, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fey, R H B, E-mail: cas.van.der.avoort@nxp.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes a phenomenon that limits the power handling of MEMS resonators. It is observed that above a certain driving level, the resonance amplitude becomes independent of the driving level. In contrast to previous studies of power handling of MEMS resonators, it is found that this amplitude saturation cannot be explained by nonlinear terms in the spring constant or electrostatic force. Instead we show that the amplitude in our experiments is limited by nonlinear terms in the equation of motion which couple the in-plane length-extensional resonance mode to one or more out-of-plane (OOP) bending modes. We present experimental evidence for the autoparametric excitation of these OOP modes using a vibrometer. The measurements are compared to a model that can be used to predict a power-handling limit for MEMS resonators.

  10. A resonance without resonance. Scrutinizing the diphoton excess at 750 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Soo; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Ruiz de Austri, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the recent diphoton excesses reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we suggest that a new heavy spinless particle is produced in gluon fusion at the LHC and decays to a couple of lighter pseudoscalars which then decay to photons. The new resonances could arise from a new strongly interacting sector and couple to Standard Model gauge bosons only via the corresponding Wess-Zumino-Witten anomaly. We present a detailed recast of the newest 13 TeV data from ATLAS and CMS together with the 8 TeV data to scan the consistency of the parameter space for those resonances.

  11. Perturbation of embedded eigenvalue by a near-lying resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, V B; Motovilov, A K

    1997-12-31

    The case of quantum-mechanical system (including electronic molecules) is considered where Hamiltonian allows a separation, in particular by the Faddeev method, of a weakly coupled channel. Width (i.e. the imaginary part) of the resonance generated by a discrete spectrum eigenvalue of the separated channel is studied in the case where main part of the Hamiltonian gives itself another resonance. It is shown that if real parts of these resonances coincide and, at the same time, a coupling between the separated and main channels is sufficiently small then the width of the resonance generated by the separated (molecular) channel is inversely proportional to the width of the main (nuclear) channel resonance. This phenomenon being a kind of universal law, may play an important role increasing the `cold fusion` probability in electronic molecules whose nuclear constituents have narrow pre-threshold resonances. 21 refs.

  12. Strong Coupling Cavity QED with Gate-Defined Double Quantum Dots Enabled by a High Impedance Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stockklauser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED implies the capability of a matterlike quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work, we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-defined GaAs double quantum dot (DQD and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices. In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size 2g/2π=238  MHz at a resonator linewidth κ/2π=12  MHz and a DQD charge qubit decoherence rate of γ_{2}/2π=40  MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit-based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nanostructures.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C36H30Br2OSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C36H30Cl2OSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  15. Optical Control of Mechanical Mode-Coupling within a MoS2 Resonator in the Strong-Coupling Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Hua; Kim, In Soo; Lauhon, Lincoln J

    2015-10-14

    Two-dimensional (2-D) materials including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are an exciting platform for ultrasensitive force and displacement detection in which the strong light-matter coupling is exploited in the optical control of nanomechanical motion. Here we report the optical excitation and displacement detection of a ∼ 3 nm thick MoS2 resonator in the strong-coupling regime, which has not previously been achieved in 2-D materials. Mechanical mode frequencies can be tuned by more than 12% by optical heating, and they exhibit avoided crossings indicative of strong intermode coupling. When the membrane is optically excited at the frequency difference between vibrational modes, normal mode splitting is observed, and the intermode energy exchange rate exceeds the mode decay rate by a factor of 15. Finite element and analytical modeling quantifies the extent of mode softening necessary to control intermode energy exchange in the strong coupling regime.

  16. Fe/Ni thin films temperature investigation with MgO and SiO2 interfaces by ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyubin, A; Orlova, A; Astashonok, A; Kupriyanova, G; Nevolin, V

    2011-01-01

    In this work the temperature study of magnetic – resonance properties of the structures such as Fe/MgO/Ni, Fe/SiO2/Ni differing thickness of spacer and of method of preparation was carried out by FMR. These systems are investigated to estimate their applicability in model creation experiments for a spintronics devices research [1–4]. The special attention was given to the temperature dependence research of three layer films linewidths. The out-of-plane temperature dependences of FMR signal position and line widths have been measured for Fe/Ni samples with MgO and Si/SiO2 interfaces in static position of 0 and 90 degrees rotation angle to the external static magnetic field. The extracted magnetic parameters such as linewidths and resonance field position were studied.

  17. Optimization of electrodynamic characteristics of the buncher-resonator for a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobenin, N.P.; Kalyuzhnyj, V.E.; Kostin, D.V.; Yarygin, S.N.; Zavadtsev, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Selection of geometric sizes of a resonator buncher comprising 1.5 accelerating cells and linking cell is performed. When selecting the inner resonator dimensions the attention is first of all paid to minimization of E r /E z (z, γ) function in the axial region. At the same time the value of the field overstrain coefficient under a high value of effective shunt resistance is also minimized at the expense of changing the drift tube profile. 2 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  18. Resonant non-Gaussianity with equilateral properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwyn, Rhiannon; Rummel, Markus

    2012-11-01

    We discuss the effect of superimposing multiple sources of resonant non-Gaussianity, which arise for instance in models of axion inflation. The resulting sum of oscillating shape contributions can be used to ''Fourier synthesize'' different non-oscillating shapes in the bispectrum. As an example we reproduce an approximately equilateral shape from the superposition of O(10) oscillatory contributions with resonant shape. This implies a possible degeneracy between the equilateral-type non-Gaussianity typical of models with non-canonical kinetic terms, such as DBI inflation, and an equilateral-type shape arising from a superposition of resonant-type contributions in theories with canonical kinetic terms. The absence of oscillations in the 2-point function together with the structure of the resonant N-point functions, imply that detection of equilateral non-Gaussianity at a level greater than the PLANCK sensitivity of f NL ∝O(5) will rule out a resonant origin. We comment on the questions arising from possible embeddings of this idea in a string theory setting.

  19. Resonant optical alignment and orientation of Mn2+ spins in CdMnTe crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, K. A.; Langer, L.; Akimov, I. A.; Korenev, V. L.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Averkiev, N. S.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.

    2015-11-01

    We report on spin orientation and alignment of Mn2 + ions in (Cd,Mn)Te diluted magnetic semiconductor crystals using resonant intracenter excitation with circular- and linear-polarized light. The resulting polarized emission of the magnetic ions is observed at low temperatures when the spin relaxation time of the Mn2 + ions is in the order of 1 ms , which considerably exceeds the photoluminescence decay time of 23 μ s . We demonstrate that the experimental data on optical orientation and alignment of Mn2 + ions can be explained using a phenomenological model that is based on the approximation of isolated centers.

  20. Quantum mechanical resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros S, A.; McIntosh, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of quantum mechanical resonances is presented from the point of view of the spectral theory of operators. In the case of Bohr-Feshbach resonances, graphs are presented to illustrate the theory showing the decay of a doubly excited metastable state and the excitation of the resonance by an incident particle with proper energy. A characterization of resonances is given as well as a procedure to determine widths using the spectral density function. A sufficient condition is given for the validity of the Breit-Wigner formula for Bohr-Feshbach resonances. (author)

  1. Development and testing of a superconducting acceleration resonator using new methods in design and fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steck, M.

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting quarter-wave resonator at 325 MHz was studied for the implementation at the Heidelberg post-accelerator. Using the computer programs SUPERFISH and URMEL the first design derived from analytical approaches was optimized regarding the superconducting operation. The measurements on the model showed good agreement with the calculations. By modification of the standard techniques the fabrication of the resonator body and the preparation of the superconducting surface could be simplified. On the superconducting resonator 1 μm thick superconducting surfaces of pure lead as well as a lead/tin alloy were tested. Thereby with lead a quality of the resonator Q 0 =8.5.10 7 and a maximal electrical acceleration field in the continuous region of epsilonsub(acc)=2.16 MV/m at Q=1.10 7 were reached. The measurements with a surface of lead/tin yielded Q 0 =1.4.10 8 and as maximal acceleration field epsilonsub(acc)=1.93 MV/m at Q=1.10 7 . A further increasing of the maximal electric field by conditioning of the resonator can be expected because of the test results. The excellent mechanical stability not reachable with other resonator types which manifests by a static frequency shift of 4 Hz/(MV/m) 2 and rapid frequency oscillations [de

  2. The appearance of homogeneous antiferromagnetism in URu sub 2 Si sub 2 under high pressure: a sup 2 sup 9 Si nuclear magnetic resonance study

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, K; Kohara, T; Amitsuka, H; Kuwahara, K; Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the low-temperature phase appearing below T sub o = 17.5 K in URu sub 2 Si sub 2 by means of sup 2 sup 9 Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in a pressure range from 0 to 17.5 kbar across the pressure-induced phase transition at P sub c = 15 kbar. At pressures below P sub c , we have observed the sup 2 sup 9 Si NMR lines arising from antiferromagnetic (AF) and paramagnetic (PM) regions in the sample, giving evidence for a phase-separated AF ordering below T sub o. The AF region increases in volume fraction with increasing pressure up to P sub c. In the PM region, the temperature-dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate at Si sites shows a rapid decrease below T sub o , strongly suggesting the occurrence of a phase transition driven by a hidden order parameter. As applied pressure exceeds P sub c , the AF ordering appears uniformly at T sub o throughout the sample. In the pressure range from 0 to 17.5 kbar, the magnitude of the internal field at Si sites in the AF region rema...

  3. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant cir