WorldWideScience

Sample records for a2 test parcel

  1. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, LOT project. Final report on the A2 test parcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Birgersson, Martin; Nilsson, Ulf; Hernan-Haakansson, Tania (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden); Goeteborg Univ., Dept. of Cell and Molecular Biology, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Nilsson, Sara; Eriksen, Trygve E. (School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear chemistry, Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosborg, Bo (Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2009-11-15

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, are expected to result in minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) are focused on identifying and quantifying such mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks with a diameter of 30 cm, and gauges for temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity. Electrical heaters placed inside the copper tube are used to simulate the power from the decaying spent fuel. Three parcels are exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and four parcels to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below approx140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (>5 years) and long term tests (>10 years). The present report concerns the A2 test parcel, which was a medium term test exposed to adverse conditions. Cu-coupons, 60Co tracers, bacteria and specific chemical substances were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses performed by nine different laboratories in five countries. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses may be summarized in the following items: - physical

  2. Parcels

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — Durham Land Development Office: Parcels Land Development Office(LDO) is an effort by the City and County of Durham to streamline development and permitting...

  3. Hydraulic Hybrid Parcel Delivery Truck Deployment, Testing & Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Jean-Baptiste [Calstart Incorporated, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-03-07

    Although hydraulic hybrid systems have shown promise over the last few years, commercial deployment of these systems has primarily been limited to Class 8 refuse trucks. In 2005, the Hybrid Truck Users Forum initiated the Parcel Delivery Working Group including the largest parcel delivery fleets in North America. The goal of the working group was to evaluate and accelerate commercialization of hydraulic hybrid technology for parcel delivery vehicles. FedEx Ground, Purolator and United Parcel Service (UPS) took delivery of the world’s first commercially available hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery trucks in early 2012. The vehicle chassis includes a Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid drive system, integrated and assembled by Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp., with a body installed by Morgan Olson. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, CALSTART and its project partners assessed the performance, reliability, maintainability and fleet acceptance of three pre-production Class 6 hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery vehicles using information and data from in-use data collection and on-road testing. This document reports on the deployment of these vehicles operated by FedEx Ground, Purolator and UPS. The results presented provide a comprehensive overview of the performance of commercial hydraulic hybrid vehicles in parcel delivery applications. This project also informs fleets and manufacturers on the overall performance of hydraulic hybrid vehicles, provides insights on how the technology can be both improved and more effectively used. The key findings and recommendations of this project fall into four major categories: -Performance, -Fleet deployment, -Maintenance, -Business case. Hydraulic hybrid technology is relatively new to the market, as commercial vehicles have been introduced only in the past few years in refuse and parcel delivery applications. Successful demonstration could pave the way for additional purchases of hydraulic hybrid vehicles throughout the

  4. Long term test of buffer material. Final Report on the pilot parcels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Sanden, Torbjoern; Johannesson, Lars-Erik [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Eriksen, Trygve E; Jansson, Mats; Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Pedersen, Karsten; Motamedi, Mehrdad [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Rosborg, Bo [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The 'Long Term Test of Buffer Material' (LOT) series at the Aespoe HRL aims at checking models and hypotheses for a bentonite buffer material under conditions similar to those in a KBS3 repository. The test series comprises seven test parcels, which are exposed to repository conditions for 1, 5 and 20 years. This report concerns the two completed pilot tests (1-year tests) with respect to construction, field data and laboratory results. Four research groups were engaged in this part of the project working on physical properties - mineralogy, cation diffusion, bacteria and copper corrosion, respectively. The experimental layout was to place parcels containing heater, central copper tube, pre-compacted bentonite blocks and instruments in vertical boreholes in crystalline rock. The heaters were used for simulating the decay power from spent nuclear fuel at standard KBS3 conditions (S1 parcel, 90 deg C) and to give adverse conditions (A1 parcel, 130 deg C). The latter was used in order to accelerate possible processes. Temperature, total pressure, water pressure and water content were measured during the heating period. The two pilot tests were terminated after approximately 12 months of heating, and the parcels were extracted by overlapping core drilling outside the original borehole. The entire 4.5 m long S1-parcel with approximately 20 cm rock cover was successfully lifted in one piece from the rock, whereas the central part of the A1 parcel was lost during drilling. The upper and lower parts were however retrieved. Reference and exposed bentonite material were analysed with respect to physical properties (triaxial, beam and oedometer tests), and to mineralogical properties (XRD, CEC, ICP-AES and SEM analyses) according to a defined test program. Some precipitation, mainly gypsum, was found in the warmest part of the parcels, and the only unpredicted change was minor uptake of Cu into the clay matrix. An overarching conclusion is that no degrading

  5. A note on using alpha and stratified alpha to estimate the reliability of a test composed of item parcels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Gordon

    2008-11-01

    Several authors have suggested that prior to conducting a confirmatory factor analysis it may be useful to group items into a smaller number of item 'parcels' or 'testlets'. The present paper mathematically shows that coefficient alpha based on these parcel scores will only exceed alpha based on the entire set of items if W, the ratio of the average covariance of items between parcels to the average covariance of items within parcels, is greater than unity. If W is less than unity, however, and errors of measurement are uncorrelated, then stratified alpha will be a better lower bound to the reliability of a measure than the other two coefficients. Stratified alpha are also equal to the true reliability of a test when items within parcels are essentially tau-equivalent if one assumes that errors of measurement are not correlated.

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcels, parcel numbers, parcel dimensions, parcel annotation, Published in unknown, Grinnell College.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'Parcels, parcel numbers, parcel dimensions, parcel annotation'. Data by this publisher are...

  7. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe HRL, LOT project. Final report on the A0 test parcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern; Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Jansson, Mats; Eriksen, Trygve E.; Svaerdstroem, Kjell (KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosborg, Bo (Studsvik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Muurinen, Arto (VTT, Espoo (Finland))

    2011-02-15

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, could be expected to produce minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory are focused on identifying and quantifying any mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks to a total diameter of 30 cm as well as temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity sensors. In each test parcel, an electrical heater placed inside the copper tube is used to simulate the heat generation from the decaying spent fuel. Three test parcels (S1 to S3) have been exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and three parcels (A1 to A3) to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below approx140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (> 5 years) and long term tests (> 10 years). The present report concerns an additional short term test, thereby the designation A0, which was exposed to adverse conditions for approximately 1.5 years. Cu-coupons, 134Cs and 57Co tracers and specific chemical agents were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at the test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses

  8. Lost parcel

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    A parcel containing 20 boxes of DECAdry business cards, weighing about 5.5 kg, has been lost. It had been placed on the red file shelves in the Library. Anyone finding this parcel is urgently requested to call 16 06 02. Thank you for your assistance. FP Department

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcels, parcel numbers, Published in Not Provided, Benton County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Not Provided information as of Not Provided. It is described as 'Parcels, parcel numbers'....

  10. Allegheny County Parcel Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains parcel boundaries attributed with county block and lot number. Use the Property Information Extractor for more control downloading a filtered...

  11. EnergiParcel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen

    Denne rapport beskriver status for de foreløbige resultater fra målingerne af energiforbrug og indeklima i EnergiParcel-projektet. Rapporten er skrevet i forbindelse med afslutningen af selve renoveringsprojektet i husene. En endelig rapport for måleprojektet tilknyttet EnergiParcel vil foreligge...... foretages før der forelægger et års data efter færdiggørelsen af renoveringen – dvs i januar 2011. Måleprogrammet gennemføres af Aalborg Universitet over en tre-årig periode med opstart medio november 2008....

  12. Integrated Testing, Simulation and Analysis of Electric Drive Options for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.

    2012-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory verified diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reduction and cost implications of plug-in hybrid gasoline and diesel variants. These variants are run on a field-data-derived design matrix to analyze the effects of drive cycle, distance, battery replacements, battery capacity, and motor power on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. Two cost scenarios using fuel prices corresponding to forecasted highs for 2011 and 2030 and battery costs per kilowatt-hour representing current and long-term targets compare plug-in hybrid lifetime costs with diesel conventional lifetime costs. Under a future cost scenario of $100/kWh battery energy and $5/gal fuel, plug-in hybrids are cost effective. Assuming a current cost of $700/kWh and $3/gal fuel, they rarely recoup the additional motor and battery cost. The results highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle, daily driving distance, and kinetic intensity. For instances in the current-cost scenario where the additional plug-in hybrid cost is regained in fuel savings, the combination of kinetic intensity and daily distance travelled does not coincide with the usage patterns observed in the field data. If the usage patterns were adjusted, the hybrids could become cost effective.

  13. VT Parcels from Towns and RPCs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) CadastralParcels_VTPARCELS includes parcel data for cities/towns/villages/gores in Vermont. The dataset is a compilation of parcel shapefiles...

  14. Brain parcellation based on information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati, Ester; Bardera, Anton; Boada, Imma

    2017-11-01

    In computational neuroimaging, brain parcellation methods subdivide the brain into individual regions that can be used to build a network to study its structure and function. Using anatomical or functional connectivity, hierarchical clustering methods aim to offer a meaningful parcellation of the brain at each level of granularity. However, some of these methods have been only applied to small regions and strongly depend on the similarity measure used to merge regions. The aim of this work is to present a robust whole-brain hierarchical parcellation that preserves the global structure of the network. Brain regions are modeled as a random walk on the connectome. From this model, a Markov process is derived, where the different nodes represent brain regions and in which the structure can be quantified. Functional or anatomical brain regions are clustered by using an agglomerative information bottleneck method that minimizes the overall loss of information of the structure by using mutual information as a similarity measure. The method is tested with synthetic models, structural and functional human connectomes and is compared with the classic k-means. Results show that the parcellated networks preserve the main properties and are consistent across subjects. This work provides a new framework to study the human connectome using functional or anatomical connectivity at different levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Cadastral lines, parcels, parcel points, Published in Not Provided, Calhoun County Assessor's Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Not Provided information as of Not Provided. It is described as 'Cadastral lines, parcels,...

  16. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  17. Cortex Parcellation Associated Whole White Matter Parcellation in Individual Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Schiffler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of specific white matter areas is a growing field in neurological research and is typically achieved through the use of atlases. However, the definition of anatomically based regions remains challenging for the white matter and thus hinders region-specific analysis in individual subjects. In this article, we focus on creating a whole white matter parcellation method for individual subjects where these areas can be associated to cortex regions. This is done by combining cortex parcellation and fiber tracking data. By tracking fibers out of each cortex region and labeling the fibers according to their origin, we populate a candidate image. We then derive the white matter parcellation by classifying each white matter voxel according to the distribution of labels in the corresponding voxel from the candidate image. The parcellation of the white matter with the presented method is highly reliable and is not as dependent on registration as with white matter atlases. This method allows for the parcellation of the whole white matter into individual cortex region associated areas and, therefore, associates white matter alterations to cortex regions. In addition, we compare the results from the presented method to existing atlases. The areas generated by the presented method are not as sharply defined as the areas in most existing atlases; however, they are computed directly in the DWI space of the subject and, therefore, do not suffer from distortion caused by registration. The presented approach might be a promising tool for clinical and basic research to investigate modalities or system specific micro structural alterations of white matter areas in a quantitative manner.

  18. US Forest Service Surface Ownership Parcels, detailed

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting ownership parcels of the surface estate. Each surface ownership parcel is tied to a particular legal transaction. The same...

  19. Structural parcellation of the thalamus using shortest-path tractography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasenburg, Niklas; Darkner, Sune; Hahn, Ute;

    2016-01-01

    that parcellation of the thalamus results in p-value maps that are spatially coherent across subjects. Comparing to the state-of-the-art parcellation of Behrens et al. [1], we observe some agreement, but the soft segmentation exhibits better stability for voxels connected to multiple target regions....... to each cortical target region. Calculation of these statistical measures is derived from a rank-based test on the histogram of tract-based scores from all the shortest paths found between the source voxel and each voxel within the target region. Using data from the Human Connectome Project, we show...

  20. United Parcel Service Evaluates Hybrid Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-02-01

    This fact sheet describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fleet Test and Evaluation team evaluated the 12-month, in-service performance of six Class 4 hybrid electric delivery vans - fueled by regular diesel - and six comparable conventional diesel vans operated by the United Parcel Service.

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcel Boundaries, Published in unknown, Trempealeau County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown. It is described as 'Parcel Boundaries'....

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcels2007, Published in 2007, Millard County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Parcels2007'. Data by this publisher are...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcels, subparcels, Published in 2009, Central College.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Not Provided information as of 2009. It is described as 'Parcels, subparcels'. Data by this...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Tax Parcels, Published in unknown, Wilson County GIS/Mapping.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown. It is described as 'Tax Parcels'. This...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, ParcelNumb for linking , Published in 2011, Gunnison County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. It is described as 'ParcelNumb for linking '. The extent of these data is generally Gunnison County, CO. This...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, parcel boundaries with attributes, Published in Not Provided, City of Aurora.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of Not Provided. It is described as 'parcel boundaries with...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Tax Parcels, Published in 2006, Mohave County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'Tax Parcels'. This...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, CountyOwnedParcels0405, Published in 2005, Carbon County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'CountyOwnedParcels0405'. Data by this...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcels and Ownership, Published in 2009, Norton County Appraisal Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2009. It is described as 'Parcels and Ownership'. This data...

  10. Robust brain parcellation using sparse representation on resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Caspers, Svenja; Fan, Lingzhong; Fan, Yong; Song, Ming; Liu, Cirong; Mo, Yin; Roski, Christian; Eickhoff, Simon; Amunts, Katrin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-11-01

    Resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) has been widely used to segregate the brain into individual modules based on the presence of distinct connectivity patterns. Many parcellation methods have been proposed for brain parcellation using rs-fMRI, but their results have been somewhat inconsistent, potentially due to various types of noise. In this study, we provide a robust parcellation method for rs-fMRI-based brain parcellation, which constructs a sparse similarity graph based on the sparse representation coefficients of each seed voxel and then uses spectral clustering to identify distinct modules. Both the local time-varying BOLD signals and whole-brain connectivity patterns may be used as features and yield similar parcellation results. The robustness of our method was tested on both simulated and real rs-fMRI datasets. In particular, on simulated rs-fMRI data, sparse representation achieved good performance across different noise levels, including high accuracy of parcellation and high robustness to noise. On real rs-fMRI data, stable parcellation of the medial frontal cortex (MFC) and parietal operculum (OP) were achieved on three different datasets, with high reproducibility within each dataset and high consistency across these results. Besides, the parcellation of MFC was little influenced by the degrees of spatial smoothing. Furthermore, the consistent parcellation of OP was also well corresponding to cytoarchitectonic subdivisions and known somatotopic organizations. Our results demonstrate a new promising approach to robust brain parcellation using resting-state fMRI by sparse representation.

  11. A flexible graphical model for multi-modal parcellation of the cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisot, Sarah; Glocker, Ben; Ktena, Sofia Ira; Arslan, Salim; Schirmer, Markus D; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-09-06

    Advances in neuroimaging have provided a tremendous amount of in-vivo information on the brain's organisation. Its anatomy and cortical organisation can be investigated from the point of view of several imaging modalities, many of which have been studied for mapping functionally specialised cortical areas. There is strong evidence that a single modality is not sufficient to fully identify the brain's cortical organisation. Combining multiple modalities in the same parcellation task has the potential to provide more accurate and robust subdivisions of the cortex. Nonetheless, existing brain parcellation methods are typically developed and tested on single modalities using a specific type of information. In this paper, we propose Graph-based Multi-modal Parcellation (GraMPa), an iterative framework designed to handle the large variety of available input modalities to tackle the multi-modal parcellation task. At each iteration, we compute a set of parcellations from different modalities and fuse them based on their local reliabilities. The fused parcellation is used to initialise the next iteration, forcing the parcellations to converge towards a set of mutually informed modality specific parcellations, where correspondences are established. We explore two different multi-modal configurations for group-wise parcellation using resting-state fMRI, diffusion MRI tractography, myelin maps and task fMRI. Quantitative and qualitative results on the Human Connectome Project database show that integrating multi-modal information yields a stronger agreement with well established atlases and more robust connectivity networks that provide a better representation of the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. US Forest Service Surface Ownership Parcels

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting areas as surface ownership parcels dissolved on the same ownership classification. This map service was prepared to describe...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership - Montana Cadastral Framework

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Montana Cadastral Database is comprised of taxable parcels (fee land) and public land (exempt property). It is not broken down into individual lots, for instance...

  14. US Forest Service Surface Ownership Parcels (Generalized)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting areas as surface ownership parcels dissolved on the same ownership classification. This map service was prepared to describe...

  15. Parcellation of left parietal tool representations by functional connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcea, Frank E.; Z. Mahon, Bradford

    2014-01-01

    Manipulating a tool according to its function requires the integration of visual, conceptual, and motor information, a process subserved in part by left parietal cortex. How these different types of information are integrated and how their integration is reflected in neural responses in the parietal lobule remains an open question. Here, participants viewed images of tools and animals during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). K-means clustering over time series data was used to parcellate left parietal cortex into subregions based on functional connectivity to a whole brain network of regions involved in tool processing. One cluster, in the inferior parietal cortex, expressed privileged functional connectivity to the left ventral premotor cortex. A second cluster, in the vicinity of the anterior intraparietal sulcus, expressed privileged functional connectivity with the left medial fusiform gyrus. A third cluster in the superior parietal lobe expressed privileged functional connectivity with dorsal occipital cortex. Control analyses using Monte Carlo style permutation tests demonstrated that the clustering solutions were outside the range of what would be observed based on chance ‘lumpiness’ in random data, or mere anatomical proximity. Finally, hierarchical clustering analyses were used to formally relate the resulting parcellation scheme of left parietal tool representations to previous work that has parcellated the left parietal lobule on purely anatomical grounds. These findings demonstrate significant heterogeneity in the functional organization of manipulable object representations in left parietal cortex, and outline a framework that generates novel predictions about the causes of some forms of upper limb apraxia. PMID:24892224

  16. Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, M. P.; Burton, J.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P100H hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations. The NY Composite cycle, the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle cycle, and the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) cycle as well as a custom Baltimore parcel delivery cycle were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory. Fuel consumption was measured and analyzed for all three vehicles. Vehicle laboratory results are compared on the basis of fuel economy. The hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery van demonstrated 19%-52% better fuel economy than the conventional diesel parcel delivery van and 30%-56% better fuel economy than the conventional gasoline parcel delivery van on cycles other than the highway-oriented HHDDT cycle.

  17. A parcel formulation for Hamiltonian layer models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, O.; Oliver, M.

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the three-dimensional hydrostatic primitive equations, we derive Hamiltonian N-layer models with isentropic tropospheric and isentropic or isothermal stratospheric layers. Our construction employs a new parcel Hamiltonian formulation which describes the fluid as a continuum of Hamilton

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, COGO and parcel map digitizing, primary attribute is APN, Published in 2000, Eureka County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2000. It is described as 'COGO and parcel map digitizing, primary...

  19. Why item parcels are (almost) never appropriate: two wrongs do not make a right--camouflaging misspecification with item parcels in CFA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W; Lüdtke, Oliver; Nagengast, Benjamin; Morin, Alexandre J S; Von Davier, Matthias

    2013-09-01

    The present investigation has a dual focus: to evaluate problematic practice in the use of item parcels and to suggest exploratory structural equation models (ESEMs) as a viable alternative to the traditional independent clusters confirmatory factor analysis (ICM-CFA) model (with no cross-loadings, subsidiary factors, or correlated uniquenesses). Typically, it is ill-advised to (a) use item parcels when ICM-CFA models do not fit the data, and (b) retain ICM-CFA models when items cross-load on multiple factors. However, the combined use of (a) and (b) is widespread and often provides such misleadingly good fit indexes that applied researchers might believe that misspecification problems are resolved--that 2 wrongs really do make a right. Taking a pragmatist perspective, in 4 studies we demonstrate with responses to the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory (Rosenberg, 1965), Big Five personality factors, and simulated data that even small cross-loadings seriously distort relations among ICM-CFA constructs or even decisions on the number of factors; although obvious in item-level analyses, this is camouflaged by the use of parcels. ESEMs provide a viable alternative to ICM-CFAs and a test for the appropriateness of parcels. The use of parcels with an ICM-CFA model is most justifiable when the fit of both ICM-CFA and ESEM models is acceptable and equally good, and when substantively important interpretations are similar. However, if the ESEM model fits the data better than the ICM-CFA model, then the use of parcels with an ICM-CFA model typically is ill-advised--particularly in studies that are also interested in scale development, latent means, and measurement invariance.

  20. Towards a Faster Randomized Parcellation Based Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos-Idrobo, Andrés; Varoquaux, Gaël; Thirion, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In neuroimaging, multi-subject statistical analysis is an essential step, as it makes it possible to draw conclusions for the population under study. However, the lack of power in neuroimaging studies combined with the lack of stability and sensitivity of voxel-based methods may lead to non-reproducible results. A method designed to tackle this problem is Randomized Parcellation-Based Inference (RPBI), which has shown good empirical performance. Nevertheless, the use o...

  1. A2 noradrenergic neurons regulate forced swim test immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyungwoo; Kerman, Ilan A

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is a widely used animal model of depression, which is characterized by dysregulation of noradrenergic signaling. We previously demonstrated that WKY rats show a unique behavioral profile on the forced swim test (FST), characterized by high levels of immobility upon initial exposure and a greater learning-like response by further increasing immobility upon re-exposure than the genetically related Wistar rats. In the current study we aimed to determine whether altered activation of brainstem noradrenergic cell groups contributes to this behavioral profile. We exposed WKY and Wistar rats, to either 5min of forced swim or to the standard two-day FST (i.e. 15min forced swim on Day 1, followed by 5min on Day 2). We then stained their brains for FOS/tyrosine hydroxylase double-immunocytochemistry to determine potential differences in the activation of the brainstem noradrenergic cell groups. We detected a relative hyperactivation in the locus coeruleus of WKY rats when compared to Wistars in response to both one- and two-day forced swim. In contrast, within the A2 noradrenergic cell group, WKY rats exhibited diminished levels of FOS across both days of the FST, suggesting their lesser activation. We followed up these observations by selectively lesioning the A2 neurons, using anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase-conjugated saporin, in Wistar rats, which resulted in increased FST immobility on both days of the test. Together these data indicate that the A2 noradrenergic cell group regulates FST behavior, and that its hypoactivation may contribute to the unique behavioral phenotype of WKY rats.

  2. Effects of Parceling on Model Selection: Parcel-Allocation Variability in Model Ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterba, Sonya K; Rights, Jason D

    2016-01-25

    Research interest often lies in comparing structural model specifications implying different relationships among latent factors. In this context parceling is commonly accepted, assuming the item-level measurement structure is well known and, conservatively, assuming items are unidimensional in the population. Under these assumptions, researchers compare competing structural models, each specified using the same parcel-level measurement model. However, little is known about consequences of parceling for model selection in this context-including whether and when model ranking could vary across alternative item-to-parcel allocations within-sample. This article first provides a theoretical framework that predicts the occurrence of parcel-allocation variability (PAV) in model selection index values and its consequences for PAV in ranking of competing structural models. These predictions are then investigated via simulation. We show that conditions known to manifest PAV in absolute fit of a single model may or may not manifest PAV in model ranking. Thus, one cannot assume that low PAV in absolute fit implies a lack of PAV in ranking, and vice versa. PAV in ranking is shown to occur under a variety of conditions, including large samples. To provide an empirically supported strategy for selecting a model when PAV in ranking exists, we draw on relationships between structural model rankings in parcel- versus item-solutions. This strategy employs the across-allocation modal ranking. We developed software tools for implementing this strategy in practice, and illustrate them with an example. Even if a researcher has substantive reason to prefer one particular allocation, investigating PAV in ranking within-sample still provides an informative sensitivity analysis.

  3. Evaluation of LLTR Series II test A-2 results. [Large Leak Test Rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whipple, J C; Shoopak, B F; Chen, K; Fan, C K; Odegaard, T K

    1980-07-01

    Series II Test A-2 employed a double-ended (DEG) tube rupture 122'' above the lower end of the LLTI shroud under typical evaporator startup conditions. The leak site was located 2'' below Spacer No. 4 at the same location as Test A-lb which employed nitrogen as the inert non-reactive injection fluid. The test yielded peak pressures of 375 psig in the leak site region and 485 psig at the upper tubesheet approximately 10 ms and 12 ms, respectively, after tube rupture. Higher peak temperatures (approx. 2200/sup 0/F) were measured in this test than during Series I sodium-water reaction testing (peak temperatures measured during Series were about 1900/sup 0/F maximum). These high peak temperatures occurred in Test A-2 long after the tube rupture (approx. 8 seconds) and did not contribute to the acoustic peak pressures produced in the first few milliseconds.

  4. A revised view of sensory cortical parcellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark T.; Ramachandran, Ramnarayan; Stein, Barry E.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional cortical parcellation schemes have emphasized the presence of sharply defined visual, auditory, and somatosensory domains populated exclusively by modality-specific neurons (i.e., neurons responsive to sensory stimuli from a single sensory modality). However, the modality-exclusivity of this scheme has recently been challenged. Observations in a variety of species suggest that each of these domains is subject to influences from other senses. Using the cerebral cortex of the rat as a model, the present study systematically examined the capability of individual neurons in visual, auditory, and somatosensory cortex to be activated by stimuli from other senses. Within the major modality-specific domains, the incidence of inappropriate (i.e., nonmatching) and/or multisensory neurons was very low. However, at the borders between each of these domains a concentration of multisensory neurons was found whose modality profile matched the representations in neighboring cortices and that were able to integrate their cross-modal inputs to give rise to enhanced and/or depressed responses. The results of these studies are consistent with some features of both the traditional and challenging views of cortical organization, and they suggest a parcellation scheme in which modality-specific cortical domains are separated from one another by transitional multisensory zones. PMID:14766982

  5. 75 FR 52378 - Transfer of Commercial Standard Mail Parcels to Competitive Product List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... Commission to transfer commercial Standard Mail Parcels from the Mail Classification Schedule's Market... to transfer commercial Standard Mail Parcels from the Mail Classification Schedule's Market Dominant... Commercial Standard Mail Parcels to Competitive Product List AGENCY: Postal Service. TM ACTION:...

  6. Fast, Sequence Adaptive Parcellation of Brain MR Using Parametric Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2013-01-01

    -of-the-art segmentation performance in both cortical and subcortical structures, while retaining all the benefits of generative parametric models, including high computational speed, automatic adaptiveness to changes in image contrast when different scanner platforms and pulse sequences are used, and the ability......In this paper we propose a method for whole brain parcellation using the type of generative parametric models typically used in tissue classification. Compared to the non-parametric, multi-atlas segmentation techniques that have become popular in recent years, our method obtains state...... to handle multi-contrast (vector-valued intensities) MR data. We have validated our method by comparing its segmentations to manual delineations both within and across scanner platforms and pulse sequences, and show preliminary results on multi-contrast test-retest scans, demonstrating the feasibility...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcels with Parcel Number and Acres, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Washington County 911/Communications.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2010. It is described as...

  8. Automated MRI parcellation of the frontal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranta, Marin E; Chen, Min; Crocetti, Deana; Prince, Jerry L; Subramaniam, Krish; Fischl, Bruce; Kaufmann, Walter E; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2014-05-01

    Examination of associations between specific disorders and physical properties of functionally relevant frontal lobe sub-regions is a fundamental goal in neuropsychiatry. Here, we present and evaluate automated methods of frontal lobe parcellation with the programs FreeSurfer(FS) and TOADS-CRUISE(T-C), based on the manual method described in Ranta et al. [2009]: Psychiatry Res 172:147-154 in which sulcal-gyral landmarks were used to manually delimit functionally relevant regions within the frontal lobe: i.e., primary motor cortex, anterior cingulate, deep white matter, premotor cortex regions (supplementary motor complex, frontal eye field, and lateral premotor cortex) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions (medial PFC, dorsolateral PFC, inferior PFC, lateral orbitofrontal cortex [OFC] and medial OFC). Dice's coefficient, a measure of overlap, and percent volume difference were used to measure the reliability between manual and automated delineations for each frontal lobe region. For FS, mean Dice's coefficient for all regions was 0.75 and percent volume difference was 21.2%. For T-C the mean Dice's coefficient was 0.77 and the mean percent volume difference for all regions was 20.2%. These results, along with a high degree of agreement between the two automated methods (mean Dice's coefficient = 0.81, percent volume difference = 12.4%) and a proof-of-principle group difference analysis that highlights the consistency and sensitivity of the automated methods, indicate that the automated methods are valid techniques for parcellation of the frontal lobe into functionally relevant sub-regions. Thus, the methodology has the potential to increase efficiency, statistical power and reproducibility for population analyses of neuropsychiatric disorders with hypothesized frontal lobe contributions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. PARCELLATION OF THE CINGULATE CORTEX AT REST AND DURING TASKS: A META-ANALYTIC CLUSTERING AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M.E. Torta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical, morphological and histological data have consistently shown that the cingulate cortex can be divided into four main regions. However, less is known about parcellations of the cingulate cortex when involved in active tasks. Here, we aimed at comparing how the pattern of clusterization of the cingulate cortex changes across different levels of task complexity. We parcellated the cingulate cortex using the results of a meta-analytic study and of three experimental studies. The experimental studies, which included two active tasks and a resting state protocol, were used to control the results obtained with the meta-analytic parcellation. We explored the meta-analytic parcellation by applying a meta-analytic clustering (MaC to papers retrieved from the BrainMap database. The MaC is a meta-analytic connectivity driven parcellation technique recently developed by our group which allowed us to parcellate the cingulate cortex on the basis of its pattern of co-activations during active tasks. The MaC results indicated that the cingulate cortex can be parcellated into three clusters. These clusters covered different percentages of the cingulate parenchyma and had a different density of foci, with the first cluster being more densely connected. The control experiments showed different clusterization results, suggesting that the co-activations of the cingulate cortex are highly dependent on the task that is tested. Our results highlight the importance of the cingulate cortex as a hub, which modifies its pattern of co-activations depending on the task requests and on the level of task complexity. The neurobiological meaning of these results is discussed.

  10. Subdivision of Polygon Parcel in Land-Use Data Generalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Al Tinghua

    2003-01-01

    In land-use data generalization, the removal of insignificant parcel with small size is the most frequently used operator. Traditionally for the generalization method, the small parcel is assigned completely to one of its neighbors. This study tries to improve the generalization by separating the insignificant parcel into parts around the weighted skeleton and assigning these parts to different neighbors. The distribution of the weighted skeleton depends on the compatibility between the removed object and its neighbor, which considers not only topological relationship but also distance relationship and semantic similarity. This process is based on the Delaunay triangulation model. This paper gives the detailed geometric algorithms for this operation.

  11. Impact of the resolution of brain parcels on connectome-wide association studies in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellec, Pierre; Benhajali, Yassine; Carbonell, Felix; Dansereau, Christian; Albouy, Geneviève; Pelland, Maxime; Craddock, Cameron; Collignon, Oliver; Doyon, Julien; Stip, Emmanuel; Orban, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    A recent trend in functional magnetic resonance imaging is to test for association of clinical disorders with every possible connection between selected brain parcels. We investigated the impact of the resolution of functional brain parcels, ranging from large-scale networks to local regions, on a mass univariate general linear model (GLM) of connectomes. For each resolution taken independently, the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure controlled the false-discovery rate (FDR) at nominal level on realistic simulations. However, the FDR for tests pooled across all resolutions could be inflated compared to the FDR within resolution. This inflation was severe in the presence of no or weak effects, but became negligible for strong effects. We thus developed an omnibus test to establish the overall presence of true discoveries across all resolutions. Although not a guarantee to control the FDR across resolutions, the omnibus test may be used for descriptive analysis of the impact of resolution on a GLM analysis, in complement to a primary analysis at a predefined single resolution. On three real datasets with significant omnibus test (schizophrenia, congenital blindness, motor practice), markedly higher rate of discovery were obtained at low resolutions, below 50, in line with simulations showing increase in sensitivity at such resolutions. This increase in discovery rate came at the cost of a lower ability to localize effects, as low resolution parcels merged many different brain regions together. However, with 30 or more parcels, the statistical effect maps were biologically plausible and very consistent across resolutions. These results show that resolution is a key parameter for GLM-connectome analysis with FDR control, and that a functional brain parcellation with 30 to 50 parcels may lead to an accurate summary of full connectome effects with good sensitivity in many situations.

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, reported in previous surveys to have parcel GIS capability; however no website or evidence found of digital parcels/availability, Published in 2008, Luce County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'reported in previous surveys to have parcel GIS capability; however no website or evidence...

  13. A Study of the Development of the World Postal Parcel Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-fen; WU Hong-bin; YANG Wen-xiu

    2003-01-01

    The paper makes an analysis of the market demands, market competition, collaboration and the current development of the postal parcel service, and discusses some factors counteracting the development of the postal parcel service. Furthermore, this paper gives an orientation to the future development of the postal parcel service through a comprehensive research on the developing trend of the postal parcel service in some countries.

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Smith County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Smith County, TN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Kenosha County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Kenosha County, WI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Loving County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Lucas County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Loving County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Lowndes County, MS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Loving County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Loving County, TX. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Love County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Love County, OK. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Klickitat County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Klickitat County, WA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Hoke County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Hoke County, NC. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Ritchie County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Ritchie County, WV. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Sampson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sampson County, NC. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Kent County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Kent County, TX. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Kent County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Kent County, MI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Armstrong County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Armstrong County, PA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Coles County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Coles County, IL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Cole County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Cole County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Macon County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Macon County, IL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Tangipahoa Parish Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Tangipahoa Parish County, LA. This metadata was auto-generated through the...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Wayne County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Wayne County, PA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Wayne County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Wayne County, OH. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Pitkin County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Pitkin County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Jasper County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Jasper County, GA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Harper County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Harper County, KS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Newton County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Newton County, IN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Benson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Benson County, ND. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Conejos County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Conejos County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Phelps County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Phelps County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Phelps County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Phelps County, NE. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Colbert County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Colbert County, AL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Walker County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Walker County, TX. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Butler County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Butler County, AL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2007, Churchill County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2007. The extent of these data is generally Churchill County, NV. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Dolores County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Dolores County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Cerro Gordo County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2008. This data set includes internal links to...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Lamar County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Lamar County, MS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Campbell County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Campbell County, KY. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Campbell County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Campbell County, TN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Wheeler County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Wheeler County, OR. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, OBrien County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally O'brien County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Butler County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Butler County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Hancock County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Hancock County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Montgomery County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Montgomery County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Lee County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Lee County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Greene County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Greene County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Carroll County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Carroll County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Calhoun County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Calhoun County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Warren County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Warren County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Honolulu County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Honolulu County, HI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Kauai County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Kauai County, HI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Maui County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Maui County, HI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Butler County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Butler County, KS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Hernando County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Hernando County, FL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Crawford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Crawford County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Shelby County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Shelby County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Pocahontas County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Pocahontas County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Scott County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Scott County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Jefferson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Jefferson County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Madison County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Madison County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Ida County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Ida County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Johnson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Johnson County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Poweshiek County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Poweshiek County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Henry County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Henry County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Story County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Story County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Gilpin County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Gilpin County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Sheridan County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Sheridan County, WY. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Sheridan County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sheridan County, ND. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Sherburne County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sheridan County, KS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Itawamba County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Izard County, AR. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Knott County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Knott County, KY. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Pasco County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Pasco County, FL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Pasco County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Pasquotank County, NC. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Manatee County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Manatee County, FL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Christian County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Christian County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Christian County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Christian County, KY. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Esmeralda City Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Esmeralda County, NV. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Rice County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Rice County, KS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Rice County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Rice County, MN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Codington County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Coffee County, GA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Dolores County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Dolores County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Slop County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Smith County, MS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Smith County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Smith County, TX. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Howell County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Howell County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Cameron County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Cameron County, TX. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Cameron County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Cameron County, PA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Cameron County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Cameron Parish County, LA. This metadata was auto-generated through the...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Mecosta County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Mecosta County, MI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Wayne County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Wayne County, MI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Saginaw County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Saginaw County, MI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Murray County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Murray County, OK. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Murray County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Murray County, GA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Winnebago County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Winnebago County, WI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Madison County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Madison County, NE. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Becker County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Becker County, MN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Limestone County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Limestone County, AL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Limstone County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Limestone County, TX. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Gentry County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally George County, MS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Gentry County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Gentry County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  10. US Forest Service Survey parcels described by metes and bounds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting survey parcels described by a metes and bounds description. Examples include: land lots, housing subdivision lots, mineral...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Huntington County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Huntington County, IN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Sabine Parish Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sabine Parish County, LA. This metadata was auto-generated through the...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Sabine County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sabine County, TX. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Turner County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Turner County, SD. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Turner County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Turner County, GA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Porter County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Porter County, IN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Taos County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Tate County, MS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Weld County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Weld County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Webster County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Weld County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Schuyler County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Schuyler County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Phillips County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Phillips County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Humboldt County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Humphreys County, MS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Prowers County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Prowers County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Steele County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Steele County, ND. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Steele County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Steele County, MN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Buffalo County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Buffalo County, WI. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Rutherford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Rutherford County, TN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2007, Mineral County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2007. The extent of these data is generally Mineral County, NV. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Mineral County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Mineral County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Evans County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Evans County, GA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Pulaski County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Pulaski County, IN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Sanpete County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Sanpete County, UT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Madison County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of unknown. This data set includes internal links to Building...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Darke County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Darke County, OH. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Garfield County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Garfield County, UT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Parke County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Parke County, IN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Otoe County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Otoe County, NE. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Andrew County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Andrew County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Washington County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Washington County, OK. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Texas County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Texas County, OK. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Jefferson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Jefferson County, OK. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Greer County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Greer County, OK. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Norton County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Norton County, KS. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Norton City Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Norton City County, VA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Conway County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Conway County, AR. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  6. A GIS-based shape index for land parcels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriou, Demetris; Stillwell, John; See, Linda

    2013-08-01

    Shape analysis is of interest in many fields of spatial science and planning including land management in rural areas. In particular, evaluating the shape of existing land parcels is critical when implementing rural development schemes such as land consolidation. However, existing land parcel shape indices have major deficiencies: completely different shapes of parcels may have the same index value or similar parcel shapes may have different index scores. Thus, there is a clear requirement for a more accurate and reliable measurement method. This paper therefore presents a new parcel shape index (PSI) which integrates a geographical information system (GIS) with a multi-attribute decision-making (MADM) method. It involves the amalgamated outcome of six geometric measures represented by value functions involving a mathematical representation of judgements by experts that compare each geometric measure with that of an optimum parcel shape defined for land consolidation projects. The optimum shape has a PSI value of 1 while the worst shape has a value close to 0. The shape measures used in the model include length of sides, acute angles, reflex angles, boundary points, compactness and regularity. The paper uses data for two case study areas in Cyprus to demonstrate the superiority of the new PSI over three existing shape indices employed in other studies. The methodology utilized here can be implemented in other disciplines dealing with the assessment of objects that can be compared to an optimum.

  7. Parcels versus pixels: modeling agricultural land use across broad geographic regions using parcel-based field boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohl, Terry L.; Dornbierer, Jordan; Wika, Steve; Sayler, Kristi L.; Quenzer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Land use and land cover (LULC) change occurs at a local level within contiguous ownership and management units (parcels), yet LULC models primarily use pixel-based spatial frameworks. The few parcel-based models being used overwhelmingly focus on small geographic areas, limiting the ability to assess LULC change impacts at regional to national scales. We developed a modified version of the Forecasting Scenarios of land use change model to project parcel-based agricultural change across a large region in the United States Great Plains. A scenario representing an agricultural biofuel scenario was modeled from 2012 to 2030, using real parcel boundaries based on contiguous ownership and land management units. The resulting LULC projection provides a vastly improved representation of landscape pattern over existing pixel-based models, while simultaneously providing an unprecedented combination of thematic detail and broad geographic extent. The conceptual approach is practical and scalable, with potential use for national-scale projections.

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Dunn County Parcel Layer, Published in 1999, Not Applicable scale, Dunn County, WI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at Not Applicable scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 1999. It is described as 'Dunn...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, parcels, Published in 1997, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, County of Ashe.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 1997. It...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Smith County Parcels, Published in 2007, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Smith County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2007. It is described...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, County parcels 07, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, County parcels, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, recorder parcels, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, parcels 2002, Published in 2002, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is described as...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, parcels 2004, Published in 2004, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2004. It is described as...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, parcels 2009, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, parcels 2006, Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2006. It is described as...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, GIS parcels, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Cedar west parcels, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, parowan parcels, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, No evidence on County website of digital GIS parcel data. Surveys indicate GIS initiative cancelled, Published in 2008, Iron County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'No evidence on County website of digital GIS parcel data. Surveys indicate GIS initiative...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, no evidence in prior surveys or on website of digital parcel data, Published in 2008, Missaukee County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'no evidence in prior surveys or on website of digital parcel data'. The extent of these data...

  3. A parcellation scheme for human left lateral parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Steven M; Cohen, Alexander L; Power, Jonathan D; Wig, Gagan S; Miezin, Francis M; Wheeler, Mark E; Velanova, Katerina; Donaldson, David I; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Petersen, Steven E

    2010-07-15

    The parietal lobe has long been viewed as a collection of architectonic and functional subdivisions. Though much parietal research has focused on mechanisms of visuospatial attention and control-related processes, more recent functional neuroimaging studies of memory retrieval have reported greater activity in left lateral parietal cortex (LLPC) when items are correctly identified as previously studied ("old") versus unstudied ("new"). These studies have suggested functional divisions within LLPC that may provide distinct contributions toward recognition memory judgments. Here, we define regions within LLPC by developing a parcellation scheme that integrates data from resting-state functional connectivity MRI and functional MRI. This combined approach results in a 6-fold parcellation of LLPC based on the presence (or absence) of memory-retrieval-related activity, dissociations in the profile of task-evoked time courses, and membership in large-scale brain networks. This parcellation should serve as a roadmap for future investigations aimed at understanding LLPC function.

  4. A multi-modal parcellation of human cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Matthew F; Coalson, Timothy S; Robinson, Emma C; Hacker, Carl D; Harwell, John; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Andersson, Jesper; Beckmann, Christian F; Jenkinson, Mark; Smith, Stephen M; Van Essen, David C

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the amazingly complex human cerebral cortex requires a map (or parcellation) of its major subdivisions, known as cortical areas. Making an accurate areal map has been a century-old objective in neuroscience. Using multi-modal magnetic resonance images from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) and an objective semi-automated neuroanatomical approach, we delineated 180 areas per hemisphere bounded by sharp changes in cortical architecture, function, connectivity, and/or topography in a precisely aligned group average of 210 healthy young adults. We characterized 97 new areas and 83 areas previously reported using post-mortem microscopy or other specialized study-specific approaches. To enable automated delineation and identification of these areas in new HCP subjects and in future studies, we trained a machine-learning classifier to recognize the multi-modal 'fingerprint' of each cortical area. This classifier detected the presence of 96.6% of the cortical areas in new subjects, replicated the group parcellation, and could correctly locate areas in individuals with atypical parcellations. The freely available parcellation and classifier will enable substantially improved neuroanatomical precision for studies of the structural and functional organization of human cerebral cortex and its variation across individuals and in development, aging, and disease.

  5. 7 CFR 1955.140 - Sale in parcels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., inventory for small business enterprises, buildings, facilities, and similar items may be permitted if a... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Disposal of Inventory Property General § 1955.140 Sale in parcels...

  6. 76 FR 23749 - Intelligent Mail Package Barcode (IMpb) Implementation for Commercial Parcels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ... only to nonpresorted BPM machinable parcels (401.1.5.1) that bear a unique Intelligent Mail package... must be part of a nonpresorted mailing of 50 or more BPM parcels. * * * * * 4.0 Price Eligibility for... applies only to nonpresorted BPM machinable parcels (see 401.1.5) that bear a unique Intelligent Mail...

  7. 76 FR 14284 - Domestic Shipping Services Product Launch of Parcel Select Regional Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... 111 Domestic Shipping Services Product Launch of Parcel Select Regional Ground AGENCY: Postal Service... describes pricing, product features, and mailing standards for Parcel Select Regional Ground. Parcel Select... destined for USPS zones local, 1, 2, and 3. This competitive, nonpresort product is a category of...

  8. 76 FR 13000 - Transfer of Commercial First-Class Mail Parcels to Competitive Product List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... Commission to transfer commercial First-Class Mail Parcels from the Mail Classification Schedule's Market... to transfer commercial First-Class Mail Parcels from the Mail Classification Schedule's Market... place in two steps: First, commercial First-Class Mail Parcels would be removed from the...

  9. Use of Item Parceling in Structural Equation Modeling with Missing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcan, Fatih

    2013-01-01

    Parceling is referred to as a procedure for computing sums or average scores across multiple items. Parcels instead of individual items are then used as indicators of latent factors in the structural equation modeling analysis (Bandalos 2002, 2008; Little et al., 2002; Yang, Nay, & Hoyle, 2010). Item parceling may be applied to alleviate some…

  10. Midwest Logging Firm Perspectives: Harvesting on Increasingly Parcelized Forestlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shorna Allred

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Loggers play a critical role in the sustainable production of wood and paper products, and harvesting activities contribute to economic health and viability of many Upper Midwest communities in the United States. If the logging sector is unable to procure wood efficiently and economically from an increasingly parcelized land base, the competitive ability of the forest industry could be jeopardized. Little is known about the functions of the logging sector related to the forest resource land base on which they depend, and it is imperative to improve our understanding of this important part of the forest industry. The purpose of this study was to determine prospective attitudes about the future of the logging industry and how trends in forestland parcelization and harvesting mechanization are impacting the logging industry, especially as it relates to smaller tracts of land.

  11. Functional connectivity based parcellation of the human medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Fang; Ritchey, Maureen; Libby, Laura A; Ranganath, Charan

    2016-10-01

    Regional differences in large-scale connectivity have been proposed to underlie functional specialization along the anterior-posterior axis of the medial temporal lobe (MTL), including the hippocampus (HC) and the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG). However, it is unknown whether functional connectivity (FC) can be used reliably to parcellate the human MTL. The current study aimed to differentiate subregions of the HC and the PHG based on patterns of whole-brain intrinsic FC. FC maps were calculated for each slice along the longitudinal axis of the PHG and the HC. A hierarchical clustering algorithm was then applied to these data in order to group slices according to the similarity of their connectivity patterns. Surprisingly, three discrete clusters were identified in the PHG. Two clusters corresponded to the parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and the perirhinal cortex (PRC), and these regions showed preferential connectivity with previously described posterior-medial and anterior-temporal networks, respectively. The third cluster corresponded to an anterior PRC region previously described as area 36d, and this region exhibited preferential connectivity with auditory cortical areas and with a network involved in visceral processing. The three PHG clusters showed different profiles of activation during a memory-encoding task, demonstrating that the FC-based parcellation identified functionally dissociable sub-regions of the PHG. In the hippocampus, no sub-regions were identified via the parcellation procedure. These results indicate that connectivity-based methods can be used to parcellate functional regions within the MTL, and they suggest that studies of memory and high-level cognition need to differentiate between PHC, posterior PRC, and anterior PRC.

  12. Which fMRI clustering gives good brain parcellations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand eThirion

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis and interpretation of neuroimaging data often require one to divide the brain into a number of regions, or parcels, with homogeneous characteristics, be these regions defined in the brain volume or on on the cortical surface. While predefined brain atlases do not adapt to the signal in the individual subjects images, parcellation approaches use brain activity (e.g. found in some functional contrasts of interest and clustering techniques to define regions with some degree of signal homogeneity. In this work, we address the question of which clustering technique is appropriate and how to optimize the corresponding model. We use two principled criteria: goodness of fit (accuracy, and reproducibility of the parcellation across bootstrap samples. We study these criteria on both simulated and two task-based functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging datasets for the Ward, spectral and K-means clustering algorithms. We show that in general Ward’s clustering performs better than alternative methods with regards to reproducibility and accuracy and that the two criteria diverge regarding the preferred models (reproducibility leading to more conservative solutions, thus deferring the practical decision to a higher level alternative, namely the choice of a trade-off between accuracy and stability.

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Juab County Parcels "Database containing parcel boundary, parcel identifier, parcel address, owner type, and county recorder contact information" - HB113., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Millard County Parcels "Database containing parcel boundary, parcel identifier, parcel address, owner type, and county recorder contact information" - HB113., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Box Elder Co Parcels "Database containing parcel boundary, parcel identifier, parcel address, owner type, and county recorder contact information" - HB113., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Cache County Parcels "Database containing parcel boundary, parcel identifier, parcel address, owner type, and county recorder contact information" - HB113., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007....

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Sanpete County Parcels "Database containing parcel boundary, parcel identifier, parcel address, owner type, and county recorder contact information" - HB113., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  18. Test-retest reliability of lifting and carrying in a 2-day functional capacity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneman, M F; Dijkstra, P U; Westmaas, M; Göeken, L N H

    2002-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish test-retest reliability of lifting and carrying of a functional capacity evaluation (FCE) on two consecutive days and to verify the need for a 2-day protocol. A cohort of 50 patients (39 men, 11 women) with nonspecific low back pain were evaluated using a 2-day FCE protocol. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for weight lifted and carried. Predictive relationships between test and retest were explored by means of a regression analysis. The results of ICC were lifting low 0.87, lifting overhead 0.87, and carrying 0.77. Performances on day 2 were on an average 6-9% higher. Other than the amount of weight handled on day 1, no variable was found to predict performance on day 2. It was concluded that test-retest reliability of lifting and carrying was good, and the need for a 2-day protocol could not be confirmed.

  19. Evaluating the Characteristics of Social Vulnerability to Wildfire: Demographics, Perceptions, and Parcel Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveglio, Travis B; Prato, Tony; Edgeley, Catrin; Nalle, Darek

    2016-09-01

    A large body of research focuses on identifying patterns of human populations most at risk from hazards and the factors that help explain performance of mitigations that can help reduce that risk. One common concept in such studies is social vulnerability-human populations' potential exposure to, sensitivity from and ability to reduce negative impacts from a hazard. While there is growing interest in social vulnerability for wildfire, few studies have critically evaluated the characteristics that scholars often indicate influence social vulnerability to that hazard. This research utilizes surveys, wildfire simulations, and GIS data to test the relationships between select demographic, perceptual and parcel characteristics of property owners against empirically simulated metrics for wildfire exposure or wildfire-related damages and their performance of mitigation actions. Our results from Flathead County, MT, USA, suggest that parcel characteristics such as property value, building value, and the year structures were built explaining a significant amount of the variance in elements of social vulnerability. Demographic characteristics commonly used in social vulnerability analysis did not have significant relationships with measures of wildfire exposure or vulnerability. Part-time or full-time residency, age, perceived property risk, and year of development were among the few significant determinants of residents' performance of fuel reduction mitigations, although the significance of these factors varied across the levels of fuel reduction performed by homeowners. We use these and other results to argue for a renewed focus on the finer-scale characteristics that expose some populations to wildfire risk more than others.

  20. Evaluating the Characteristics of Social Vulnerability to Wildfire: Demographics, Perceptions, and Parcel Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveglio, Travis B.; Prato, Tony; Edgeley, Catrin; Nalle, Darek

    2016-09-01

    A large body of research focuses on identifying patterns of human populations most at risk from hazards and the factors that help explain performance of mitigations that can help reduce that risk. One common concept in such studies is social vulnerability—human populations' potential exposure to, sensitivity from and ability to reduce negative impacts from a hazard. While there is growing interest in social vulnerability for wildfire, few studies have critically evaluated the characteristics that scholars often indicate influence social vulnerability to that hazard. This research utilizes surveys, wildfire simulations, and GIS data to test the relationships between select demographic, perceptual and parcel characteristics of property owners against empirically simulated metrics for wildfire exposure or wildfire-related damages and their performance of mitigation actions. Our results from Flathead County, MT, USA, suggest that parcel characteristics such as property value, building value, and the year structures were built explaining a significant amount of the variance in elements of social vulnerability. Demographic characteristics commonly used in social vulnerability analysis did not have significant relationships with measures of wildfire exposure or vulnerability. Part-time or full-time residency, age, perceived property risk, and year of development were among the few significant determinants of residents' performance of fuel reduction mitigations, although the significance of these factors varied across the levels of fuel reduction performed by homeowners. We use these and other results to argue for a renewed focus on the finer-scale characteristics that expose some populations to wildfire risk more than others.

  1. Mapping of Agricultural Crops from Single High-Resolution Multispectral Images—Data-Driven Smoothing vs. Parcel-Based Smoothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Ozdarici-Ok

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mapping agricultural crops is an important application of remote sensing. However, in many cases it is based either on hyperspectral imagery or on multitemporal coverage, both of which are difficult to scale up to large-scale deployment at high spatial resolution. In the present paper, we evaluate the possibility of crop classification based on single images from very high-resolution (VHR satellite sensors. The main objective of this work is to expose performance difference between state-of-the-art parcel-based smoothing and purely data-driven conditional random field (CRF smoothing, which is yet unknown. To fulfill this objective, we perform extensive tests with four different classification methods (Support Vector Machines, Random Forest, Gaussian Mixtures, and Maximum Likelihood to compute the pixel-wise data term; and we also test two different definitions of the pairwise smoothness term. We have performed a detailed evaluation on different multispectral VHR images (Ikonos, QuickBird, Kompsat-2. The main finding of this study is that pairwise CRF smoothing comes close to the state-of-the-art parcel-based method that requires parcel boundaries (average difference ≈ 2.5%. Our results indicate that a single multispectral (R, G, B, NIR image is enough to reach satisfactory classification accuracy for six crop classes (corn, pasture, rice, sugar beet, wheat, and tomato in Mediterranean climate. Overall, it appears that crop mapping using only one-shot VHR imagery taken at the right time may be a viable alternative, especially since high-resolution multitemporal or hyperspectral coverage as well as parcel boundaries are in practice often not available.

  2. Aggregating high-priority landscape areas to the parcel level: an easement implementation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strager, Michael P; Rosenberger, Randall S

    2007-01-01

    Landscape characteristics and parcel ownership information are often collected on different spatial scales leading to difficulties in implementing land use plans at the parcel level. This study provides a method for aggregating highly resolute landscape planning information to the parcel level. Our parcel prioritization model directly incorporates a Land Trust's conservation goals in the form of a compromise programming model. We then demonstrate the use of our approach for implementation decisions, including parcel selection under a budget constraint and the estimation of a total conservation budget necessary to meet specific conservation goals. We found that these cost constraints significantly alter the composition of the 'best' parcels for conservation and can also provide guidance for implementation. The model's results were integral to a local Land Trust's ability to further define and achieve their goals.

  3. Predicting Success Using HESI A2 Entrance Tests in an Associate Degree Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A challenge presented to nurse educators is retention of nursing students. This has led nursing faculty to review admission requirements and question how well entrance tests predict success in Associate Degree Nursing Programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the HESI Admission Assessment Exam (HESI A2) and…

  4. Using natural beta emission for detecting concealed tobacco in parcels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Jeremy [Laboratory for Threat Material Detection, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada); Hussein, Esam M.A. [Laboratory for Threat Material Detection, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada)], E-mail: hussein@unb.ca

    2007-10-15

    It is suspected that postal systems are used for the illegal shipment of tobacco products to circumvent taxation and excise payments. This paper demonstrates that beta-particle emission from the potassium-40 contained in tobacco can be used to passively detect its presence in paperboard postal parcels. The same concept can be utilized for the detection of marijuana, whose leaves are also rich in {sup 40}K. The combination of high beta activity and a low weight is a good indicator of the presence of these two contraband materials.

  5. Cerebellar Functional Parcellation Using Sparse Dictionary Learning Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing eWang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The human cerebellum has recently been discovered to contribute to cognition and emotion beyond the planning and execution of movement, suggesting its functional heterogeneity. We aimed to identify the functional parcellation of the cerebellum using information from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI. For this, we introduced a new data-driven decomposition-based functional parcellation algorithm, called Sparse Dictionary Learning Clustering (SDLC. SDLC integrates dictionary learning, sparse representation of rs-fMRI, and k-means clustering into one optimization problem. The dictionary is comprised of an over-complete set of time course signals, with which a sparse representation of rs-fMRI signals can be constructed. Cerebellar functional regions were then identified using k-means clustering based on the sparse representation of rs-fMRI signals. We solved SDLC using a multi-block hybrid proximal alternating method that guarantees strong convergence. We evaluated the reliability of SDLC and benchmarked its classification accuracy against other clustering techniques using simulated data. We then demonstrated that SDLC can identify biologically reasonable functional regions of the cerebellum as estimated by their cerebello-cortical functional connectivity. We further provided new insights into the cerebello-cortical functional organisation in children.

  6. Cerebellar Functional Parcellation Using Sparse Dictionary Learning Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changqing; Kipping, Judy; Bao, Chenglong; Ji, Hui; Qiu, Anqi

    2016-01-01

    The human cerebellum has recently been discovered to contribute to cognition and emotion beyond the planning and execution of movement, suggesting its functional heterogeneity. We aimed to identify the functional parcellation of the cerebellum using information from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). For this, we introduced a new data-driven decomposition-based functional parcellation algorithm, called Sparse Dictionary Learning Clustering (SDLC). SDLC integrates dictionary learning, sparse representation of rs-fMRI, and k-means clustering into one optimization problem. The dictionary is comprised of an over-complete set of time course signals, with which a sparse representation of rs-fMRI signals can be constructed. Cerebellar functional regions were then identified using k-means clustering based on the sparse representation of rs-fMRI signals. We solved SDLC using a multi-block hybrid proximal alternating method that guarantees strong convergence. We evaluated the reliability of SDLC and benchmarked its classification accuracy against other clustering techniques using simulated data. We then demonstrated that SDLC can identify biologically reasonable functional regions of the cerebellum as estimated by their cerebello-cortical functional connectivity. We further provided new insights into the cerebello-cortical functional organization in children.

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Tax Parcel Map Index, Published in unknown, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Columbia County Wisconsin Land Information Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown....

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Cadastral tax parcel boundaries for Iredell County, NC, Published in 2009, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2009. It...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Jasper County, Georgia parcel data set, Published in 2006, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Assessor tax parcel geometry, Published in 2003, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Cochise County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2003. It is...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, Madison County, Georgia parcel data set, Published in 2007, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Buffalo County, WI Parcel Database - approx. 75% complete, Published in 2008, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Buffalo County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2008. It is...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Jackson County, Georgia parcel data set, Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2008. It...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Effingham County Parcel Data, Published in 2010, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2010. It is...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Lafayette County Parcel Map with attached tax roll data, Published in 1997, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 1997. It...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcels for all of Walworth County, Published in 2000, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Walworth County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2000. It...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Lyon County Tax Parcels, Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, City of Emporia/Lyon County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2011. It...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Oconee County, Georgia parcel data set, Published in 2007, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Cedar City Parcel Lines, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcels & tax lots - created from deeds using COGO, Published in unknown, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Eric Herbert.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown....

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcel boundaries for all properties within Phillips County, Published in 2008, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Phillips County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, St James Tax Parcels, Published in 2011, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, St James Parish Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2011....

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Luthersville, Georgia Parcel Shapefile, Published in 2005, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2005. It is...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Turin, Georgia Parcel UTM-NAD 83, Published in 2004, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2004. It is...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Coweta County, Georgia Parcel Base Shapefile, Published in 2006, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2006. It is...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Includes parcel lines, polygons, and annotation., Published in 2013, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Brown County, WI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2013. It is...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Tax Parcels, Dane County (WI), Published in 2013, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Dane County Land Information Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2013. It...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Fulton County parcel fabric, Published in 2010, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Fulton County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2010. It is...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, York County, South Carolina Parcel Database, Published in unknown, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, York County Government, SC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown....

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, County parcels 9-19-08, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, pdog site 2 parcels, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  12. Thalamus parcellation using multi-modal feature classification and thalamic nuclei priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, Jeffrey; Carass, Aaron; Stough, Joshua V.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of the thalamus and thalamic nuclei is useful to quantify volumetric changes from neurodegenerative diseases. Most thalamus segmentation algorithms only use T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and current thalamic parcellation methods require manual interaction. Smaller nuclei, such as the lateral and medial geniculates, are challenging to locate due to their small size. We propose an automated segmentation algorithm using a set of features derived from diffusion tensor image (DTI) and thalamic nuclei location priors. After extracting features, a hierarchical random forest classifier is trained to locate the thalamus. A second random forest classifies thalamus voxels as belonging to one of six thalamic nuclei classes. The proposed algorithm was tested using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme and compared with state-of-the-art algorithms. The proposed algorithm has a higher Dice score compared to other methods for the whole thalamus and several nuclei.

  13. 77 FR 43561 - Proposed Eligibility Criteria for Bound Printed Matter Parcels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... deliver written comments to the manager, Product Classification, U.S. Postal Service, 475 L'Enfant Plaza... effectiveness in the packaging of BPM parcels. The Postal Service also hopes to provide a mechanism for mailers... products. To calculate density, first the length, height and width of each parcel is measured in inches...

  14. Axiomatic definition of valid 3D parcels, potentially in a space partition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R.J.; Van Oosterom, P.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The definition of a valid 3D parcel must be correct and unambiguous, because an error or ambiguity in the definition of the extent of a property can lead to expensive legal disputes or to problems with handling 3D parcels in the information systems or problems during data transfer between two system

  15. Parcelization and land use: A case study in the New York City Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer A. Caron; Rene H. Germain; Nathaniel M. Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Over 75% of the New York City Watershed is forested, and the majority of the land is owned by family forest owners. Ownership fragmentation and development may impact both the working forested landscape and water quality. We surveyed the owners of intact and subdivided family forest parcels across various parcel sizes to gauge their awareness of forest management...

  16. 39 CFR 320.7 - Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels... advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals. (a) The operation of 39 U.S.C. 601(a) (1) through (6) and § 310.2(b) (1) through (6) of this chapter is suspended on all post routes for advertisements...

  17. Design and Testing of a 2-DOF Flexure-based Compliant Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Yunsong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the mechanical design and testing of a 2-DOF flexure-based compliant stage. The prismatic joints are first discussed. To obtain high resonance frequency and decoupled property, the stage composed of four parallel chains with symmetrical configuration should be employed. Finally, an experimental platform is set up to test the cooperative tracking performance. The experimental trajectory is in good agreement with the desired trajectory under various input frequencies. It shows that the maximum tracking error exhibits an increase from 0.8% to 2.7%. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed compliant stage possess good tracking performance under 100 Hz, which also validates the reasonability of the stage.

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, The parcels of the City & County of Denver. These parcels are continually updated as their attributes change. The geometry of this data is not of survey quality and should not be used for survey purposes. It is for general reference purposes only., Published in 2009, City & County of Denver.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2009. It is described as 'The parcels of the City...

  19. SMI-32 parcellates the visual cortical areas of the marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Zsolt B

    The distribution pattern of SMI-32-immunoreactivity (SMI-32-ir) of neuronal elements was examined in the visual cortical areas of marmoset monkey. Layer IV of the primary visual cortex (V1) and layers III and V of the extrastriate areas showed the most abundant SMI-32-ir. The different areal and laminar distribution of SMI-32-ir allowed the distinction between various extrastriate areas and determined their exact anatomical boundaries in the New World monkey, Callithrix penicillata. It is shown here that the parcellating nature of SMI-32 described earlier in the visual cortical areas of other mammals - including Old World monkeys - is also present in the marmoset. Furthermore, a comparison became possible between the chemoanatomical organization of New World and Old World primates' visual cortical areas.

  20. Statistical Decoupling of Lagrangian Fluid Parcel in Newtonian Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The Lagrangian dynamics of a single fluid element within a self-gravitational matter field is intrinsically non-local due to the presence of the tidal force. This complicates the theoretical investigation of the non-linear evolution of various cosmic objects, e.g. dark matter halos, in the context of Lagrangian fluid dynamics, since a fluid parcel with given initial density and shape may evolve differently depending on their environments. In this paper, we provide a statistical solution that could decouple this environmental dependence. After deriving the probability distribution evolution equation of the matter field, our method produces a set of closed ordinary differential equations whose solution is uniquely determined by the initial condition of the fluid element. Mathematically, it corresponds to the projected characteristic curve of the transport equation of the density-weighted probability density function (PDF). Consequently it is guaranteed that the one-point PDF would be preserved by evolving these...

  1. Testing the OPE Wilson coefficient for $A^2$ from lattice QCD with a dynamical charm

    CERN Document Server

    Blossier, B; Brinet, M; De Soto, F; Morenas, V; Pène, O; Petrov, K; Rodríguez-Quintero, J

    2013-01-01

    Gluon and ghost propagators data, obtained in Landau gauge from lattice simulations with two light and two heavy dynamical quark flavours ($N_f$=2+1+1), are described here with a running formula including a four-loop perturbative expression and a nonperturbative OPE correction dominated by the local operator $A^2$. The Wilson coefficients and their variation as a function of the coupling constant are extracted from the numerical data and compared with the theoretical expressions that, after being properly renormalized, are known at ${\\cal O}(\\alpha^4)$. As also $\\Lambda_{\\msbar}$ is rather well known for $N_f$=2+1+1, this allows for a precise consistency test of the OPE approach in the joint description of different observables.

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Hot Spring County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Hot Spring County, AR. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  3. US Forest Service Parcels withdrawn from settlement, sale, mineral location, and/or entry

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting federal land parcels that are withdrawn from settlement, sale, location, or entry under some or all of the general land and...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, New Kent County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally New Kent County, VA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Kent Hanson 701 577 4543, Published in 2007, Williams County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2007. It is described as 'Kent Hanson 701 577 4543'. The extent of these data is generally Williams County, ND. This...

  6. County and Parish Boundaries, Created when parcel dataset was developed, Published in 2000, Eureka County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This County and Parish Boundaries dataset as of 2000. It is described as 'Created when parcel dataset was developed'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  7. An approach for parcellating human cortical areas using resting-state correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Gagan S; Laumann, Timothy O; Petersen, Steven E

    2014-06-01

    Resting State Functional Connectivity (RSFC) reveals properties related to the brain's underlying organization and function. Features related to RSFC signals, such as the locations where the patterns of RSFC exhibit abrupt transitions, can be used to identify putative boundaries between cortical areas (RSFC-Boundary Mapping). The locations of RSFC-based area boundaries are consistent across independent groups of subjects. RSFC-based parcellation converges with parcellation information from other modalities in many locations, including task-evoked activity and probabilistic estimates of cellular architecture, providing evidence for the ability of RSFC to parcellate brain structures into functionally meaningful units. We not only highlight a collection of these observations, but also point out several limitations and observations that mandate careful consideration in using and interpreting RSFC for the purposes of parcellating the brain's cortical and subcortical structures.

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, LandOwnership, Published in 2004, Millard County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2004. It is described as 'LandOwnership'. Data by this publisher...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, some problems with syncronizin, Published in 2011, Grand County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. It is described as 'some problems with syncronizin'. The extent of these data is generally Grand County, CO. This...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, linkage by project only, Published in 2008, Yellow Medicine.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'linkage by project only'. The extent of these data is generally Yellow Medicine County, MN....

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, McLean County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Mclean County, IL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, McLean County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Mclean County, ND. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Charles Mix County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Charleston County, SC. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, St. Charles County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Saint Charles Parish County, LA. This metadata was auto-generated through...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Charles Mix County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Charles Mix County, SD. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, St. Charles Parish Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Saint Charles Parish County, LA. This metadata was auto-generated through...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, McDonald County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Mcdonald County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  18. Fire and EMS Districts, parcel attribute, Published in 2007, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Fire and EMS Districts dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It is described as 'parcel attribute'. Data by...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, had to join to cama database, Published in 2008, Campbell County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'had to join to cama database'. The extent of these data is generally Campbell County, WY....

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Palo Alto County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Palo Alto County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Monroe County Swiss Valley Associates, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sweet Grass County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Includes APN only, Published in 2007, Churchill County, NV.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It is described as 'Includes APN only'....

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Sante Fe County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Santa Fe County, NM. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Monroe County Swiss Valley Associates, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sheridan County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, in house progress uncertain, Published in unknown, Seneca County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'in house progress uncertain'. The extent of these data is generally Seneca County, OH....

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, McKinley County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Mckinley County, NM. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, Ross County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. The extent of these data is generally Ross County, OH. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, 1s8w-36, Published in 2002, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is described as '1s8w-36'. Data by this publisher are...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Buena Vista City Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Buena Vista City County, VA. This metadata was auto-generated through the...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Walla Walla County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Walla Walla County, WA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, In progress "Cadastral Like" parcel geodatabase consisting of: survey level PLSS framework, parcel construction lines, parcel polygons, recorded/filed land surveys polygons, road right-of-way lines, Published in 2013, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Vernon County Wisconsin.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2013. It is described as...

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, La Plata County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally La Plata County, CO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Monroe County Swiss Valley Associates, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Phillips County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in Not Provided, Southwest Georgia RDC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of Not Provided. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, Blue Earth County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. The extent of these data is generally Blue Earth County, MN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, 1s3w-merged, Published in 2001, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2001. It is described as '1s3w-merged'. Data by this publisher are...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Only doing Ag lands - no citie, Published in 2007, Mountrail County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2007. It is described as 'Only doing Ag lands - no citie'. The extent of these data is generally Mountrail County, ND....

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Montana Department of Appraisal & Audit.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Mineral County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Tax parcels in the towns, villages, and the City of Kiel in Manitowoc County. Digital parcel maps were originally created in 2002 - 2005 from numerous sources including WiDNR LandNet, scanned registered/rectified hand-drawn parcel maps, and digital ortho, Published in 2013, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Manitowoc County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2013. It...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Big Horn County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Big Horn County, WY. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Monroe County Swiss Valley Associates, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Big Horn County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2009, Chautauqua County/Elk County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2009. This data set includes internal links to Building...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, state plane central zone surve, Published in unknown, Eagle County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'state plane central zone surve'. The extent of these data is generally Eagle County, CO....

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Digital mapping planned, but n, Published in 2008, Mille Lacs County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'Digital mapping planned, but n'. The extent of these data is generally Mille Lacs County, MN....

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, 1s7w-31, Published in 2002, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is described as '1s7w-31'. Data by this publisher are...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, In begining stages of digital, Published in unknown, Millard County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'In begining stages of digital'. The extent of these data is generally Millard County, UT....

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, 1n4w-indian, Published in 2002, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is described as '1n4w-indian'. Data by this publisher are...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, 1s9w-24, Published in 2002, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is described as '1s9w-24'. Data by this publisher are...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, 1n2w-36, Published in 2002, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2002. It is described as '1n2w-36'. Data by this publisher are often provided in UTM coordinate system; in a Transverse...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, rural addressing does collect address points, Published in unknown, Gibson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'rural addressing does collect address points'. The extent of these data is generally Gila...

  11. CALCULATION OF PER PARCEL PROBABILITY FOR DUD BOMBS IN GERMANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Tavakkoli Sabour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Unexploded aerial Bombs, also known as duds or unfused bombs, of the bombardments in the past wars remain explosive for decades after the war under the earth’s surface threatening the civil activities especially if dredging works are involved. Interpretation of the aerial photos taken shortly after bombardments has been proven to be useful for finding the duds. Unfortunately, the reliability of this method is limited by some factors. The chance of finding a dud on an aerial photo depends strongly on the photography system, the size of the bomb and the landcover. On the other hand, exploded bombs are considerably better detectable on aerial photos and confidently represent the extent and density of a bombardment. Considering an empirical quota of unfused bombs, the expected number of duds can be calculated by the number of exploded bombs. This can help to have a better calculation of cost-risk ratio and to classify the areas for clearance. This article is about a method for calculation of a per parcel probability of dud bombs according to the distribution and density of exploded bombs. No similar work has been reported in this field by other authors.

  12. Improving Reliability of Subject-Level Resting-State fMRI Parcellation with Shrinkage Estimators

    OpenAIRE

    Mejia, Amanda F.; Nebel, Mary Beth; Shou, Haochang; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Pekar, James J.; Mostofsky, Stewart; Caffo, Brian; Lindquist, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    A recent interest in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) lies in subdividing the human brain into anatomically and functionally distinct regions of interest. For example, brain parcellation is often a necessary step for defining the network nodes used in connectivity studies. While inference has traditionally been performed on group-level data, there is a growing interest in parcellating single subject data. However, this is difficult due to the inherent low signal-to...

  13. Evolutionary stability of egg trading and parceling in simultaneous hermaphrodites: the chalk bass revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Philip H; Hart, Mary K

    2007-06-07

    Several species of simultaneously hermaphroditic seabasses living on coral reefs mate by alternating male and female roles with a partner. This is known as egg trading, one of the classic and most widely cited examples of social reciprocity among animals. Some of the egg-trading seabass species, including the chalk bass, Serranus tortugarum, switch mating roles repeatedly, having subdivided their clutch of eggs into parcels offered to the partner for fertilization. Here we attempt to understand these dynamics as a pair of evolutionary games, modifying some previous approaches to better reflect the biological system. We find that the trading of egg clutches is evolutionarily stable via byproduct mutualism and resistant to invasion by rare individuals that take the male role exclusively. We note why and how parceling may reflect sexual conflict between individuals in the mating pair. We estimate evolutionarily stable parcel numbers and show how they depend on parameter values. Typically, two or more sequential parcel numbers are evolutionarily stable, though the lowest of these yields the highest fitness. Assuming that parcel numbers are adjusted to local conditions, we predict that parcel numbers in nature are inversely related both to mating group density (except at low density) and predation risk.

  14. Test Data Report, Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Drag Test of a 2/5 Scale Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne Door-Hinge Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    SPECIAL REPORT RDMR-AD-16-03 TEST DATA REPORT, LOW-SPEED WIND TUNNEL DRAG TEST OF A 2/5 SCALE LOCKHEED AH-56 CHEYENNE DOOR-HINGE HUB Robert D...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Test Data Report, Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Drag Test of a 2/5 Scale Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne...Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) conducted a drag test of a non-rotating 2/5 scale Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne main rotor hub in

  15. STATISTICAL DECOUPLING OF A LAGRANGIAN FLUID PARCEL IN NEWTONIAN COSMOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex, E-mail: xwang@cita.utoronto.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    The Lagrangian dynamics of a single fluid element within a self-gravitational matter field is intrinsically non-local due to the presence of the tidal force. This complicates the theoretical investigation of the nonlinear evolution of various cosmic objects, e.g., dark matter halos, in the context of Lagrangian fluid dynamics, since fluid parcels with given initial density and shape may evolve differently depending on their environments. In this paper, we provide a statistical solution that could decouple this environmental dependence. After deriving the evolution equation for the probability distribution of the matter field, our method produces a set of closed ordinary differential equations whose solution is uniquely determined by the initial condition of the fluid element. Mathematically, it corresponds to the projected characteristic curve of the transport equation of the density-weighted probability density function (ρPDF). Consequently it is guaranteed that the one-point ρPDF would be preserved by evolving these local, yet nonlinear, curves with the same set of initial data as the real system. Physically, these trajectories describe the mean evolution averaged over all environments by substituting the tidal tensor with its conditional average. For Gaussian distributed dynamical variables, this mean tidal tensor is simply proportional to the velocity shear tensor, and the dynamical system would recover the prediction of the Zel’dovich approximation (ZA) with the further assumption of the linearized continuity equation. For a weakly non-Gaussian field, the averaged tidal tensor could be expanded perturbatively as a function of all relevant dynamical variables whose coefficients are determined by the statistics of the field.

  16. Statistical Decoupling of a Lagrangian Fluid Parcel in Newtonian Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex

    2016-03-01

    The Lagrangian dynamics of a single fluid element within a self-gravitational matter field is intrinsically non-local due to the presence of the tidal force. This complicates the theoretical investigation of the nonlinear evolution of various cosmic objects, e.g., dark matter halos, in the context of Lagrangian fluid dynamics, since fluid parcels with given initial density and shape may evolve differently depending on their environments. In this paper, we provide a statistical solution that could decouple this environmental dependence. After deriving the evolution equation for the probability distribution of the matter field, our method produces a set of closed ordinary differential equations whose solution is uniquely determined by the initial condition of the fluid element. Mathematically, it corresponds to the projected characteristic curve of the transport equation of the density-weighted probability density function (ρPDF). Consequently it is guaranteed that the one-point ρPDF would be preserved by evolving these local, yet nonlinear, curves with the same set of initial data as the real system. Physically, these trajectories describe the mean evolution averaged over all environments by substituting the tidal tensor with its conditional average. For Gaussian distributed dynamical variables, this mean tidal tensor is simply proportional to the velocity shear tensor, and the dynamical system would recover the prediction of the Zel’dovich approximation (ZA) with the further assumption of the linearized continuity equation. For a weakly non-Gaussian field, the averaged tidal tensor could be expanded perturbatively as a function of all relevant dynamical variables whose coefficients are determined by the statistics of the field.

  17. Accounting for Parcel-Allocation Variability in Practice: Combining Sources of Uncertainty and Choosing the Number of Allocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterba, Sonya K; Rights, Jason D

    2016-01-01

    Item parceling remains widely used under conditions that can lead to parcel-allocation variability in results. Hence, researchers may be interested in quantifying and accounting for parcel-allocation variability within sample. To do so in practice, three key issues need to be addressed. First, how can we combine sources of uncertainty arising from sampling variability and parcel-allocation variability when drawing inferences about parameters in structural equation models? Second, on what basis can we choose the number of repeated item-to-parcel allocations within sample? Third, how can we diagnose and report proportions of total variability per estimate arising due to parcel-allocation variability versus sampling variability? This article addresses these three methodological issues. Developments are illustrated using simulated and empirical examples, and software for implementing them is provided.

  18. Census parcels cropping system classification from multitemporal remote imagery: a proposed universal methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Torres, Luis; Caballero-Novella, Juan J; Gómez-Candón, David; Peña, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A procedure named CROPCLASS was developed to semi-automate census parcel crop assessment in any agricultural area using multitemporal remote images. For each area, CROPCLASS consists of a) a definition of census parcels through vector files in all of the images; b) the extraction of spectral bands (SB) and key vegetation index (VI) average values for each parcel and image; c) the conformation of a matrix data (MD) of the extracted information; d) the classification of MD decision trees (DT) and Structured Query Language (SQL) crop predictive model definition also based on preliminary land-use ground-truth work in a reduced number of parcels; and e) the implementation of predictive models to classify unidentified parcels land uses. The software named CROPCLASS-2.0 was developed to semi-automatically perform the described procedure in an economically feasible manner. The CROPCLASS methodology was validated using seven GeoEye-1 satellite images that were taken over the LaVentilla area (Southern Spain) from April to October 2010 at 3- to 4-week intervals. The studied region was visited every 3 weeks, identifying 12 crops and others land uses in 311 parcels. The DT training models for each cropping system were assessed at a 95% to 100% overall accuracy (OA) for each crop within its corresponding cropping systems. The DT training models that were used to directly identify the individual crops were assessed with 80.7% OA, with a user accuracy of approximately 80% or higher for most crops. Generally, the DT model accuracy was similar using the seven images that were taken at approximately one-month intervals or a set of three images that were taken during early spring, summer and autumn, or set of two images that were taken at about 2 to 3 months interval. The classification of the unidentified parcels for the individual crops was achieved with an OA of 79.5%.

  19. Phase 1 Environmental Baseline Survey, The Landings at Nellis Housing Area, Parcel H, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    10,000 gallon unleaded gasoline tank. The site is up gradient from the subject parcel. • No ASTs are directly adjacent to the subject parcel...The remainder of this page is left blank intentionally.] 6.2 Table 6.1 Residential Units Sewer, Water, Gas Electricity...responsibility of the Air Force. Gas - There is no gas infrastructure in the Parcel. Misc- The area is enclosed with 1,288 ft of CMU wall, 7 feet high

  20. Independent Review of AFC 2A, 2B, and 2E ATR Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Cappiello; R. Hobbins; K. Penny; L. Walters

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle program, a series of fuels development irradiation tests have been performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. These tests are providing excellent data for advanced fuels development. The program is focused on the transmutation of higher actinides which best can be accomplished in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. Because a fast test reactor is no longer available in the US, a special test vehicle is used to achieve near-prototypic fast reactor conditions (neutron spectra and temperature) for use in ATR (a water-cooled thermal reactor). As part of the testing program, there were many successful tests of advanced fuels including metals and ceramics. Recently however, there have been three experimental campaigns using metal fuels that experienced failure during irradiation. At the request of the program, an independent review committee was convened to review the post-test analyses performed by the fuels development team, to assess the conclusions of the team for the cause of the failures, to assess the adequacy and completeness of the analyses, to identify issues that were missed, and to make recommendations for improvements in the design and operation of future tests. Although there is some difference of opinion, the review committee largely agreed with the conclusions of the fuel development team regarding the cause of the failures. For the most part, the analyses that support the conclusions are sufficient.

  1. Node Detection Using High-Dimensional Fuzzy Parcellation Applied to the Insular Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Vercelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several functional connectivity approaches require the definition of a set of regions of interest (ROIs that act as network nodes. Different methods have been developed to define these nodes and to derive their functional and effective connections, most of which are rather complex. Here we aim to propose a relatively simple “one-step” border detection and ROI estimation procedure employing the fuzzy c-mean clustering algorithm. To test this procedure and to explore insular connectivity beyond the two/three-region model currently proposed in the literature, we parcellated the insular cortex of 20 healthy right-handed volunteers scanned in a resting state. By employing a high-dimensional functional connectivity-based clustering process, we confirmed the two patterns of connectivity previously described. This method revealed a complex pattern of functional connectivity where the two previously detected insular clusters are subdivided into several other networks, some of which are not commonly associated with the insular cortex, such as the default mode network and parts of the dorsal attentional network. Furthermore, the detection of nodes was reliable, as demonstrated by the confirmative analysis performed on a replication group of subjects.

  2. Routine patch testing with the sesquiterpene lactone mix in Europe: a 2-year experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, E; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandão, F M

    1999-01-01

    To test the screening value of the sesquiterpene lactone (SL) mix in Europe today and describe epidemiological and clinical features of Compositae-sensitive patients, the SL mix 0.1% pet. was included in the standard patch test series in 11 European clinics. 10,695 patients were tested, and 106 (1...... proportion of the patients. More than 1/3 were positive to perfume and/or colophony, possibly reflecting cross-reactivity. With only 1 case of active sensitization and no irritant reactions, the SL mix is a safe allergen and the overall prevalence of positive reactions supports its continued use...

  3. Response of a 2-story test-bed structure for the seismic evaluation of nonstructural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroushian, Siavash; Maragakis, E. "Manos"; Zaghi, Arash E.; Rahmanishamsi, Esmaeel; Itani, Ahmad M.; Pekcan, Gokhan

    2016-03-01

    A full-scale, two-story, two-by-one bay, steel braced-frame was subjected to a number of unidirectional ground motions using three shake tables at the UNR-NEES site. The test-bed frame was designed to study the seismic performance of nonstructural systems including steel-framed gypsum partition walls, suspended ceilings and fire sprinkler systems. The frame can be configured to perform as an elastic or inelastic system to generate large floor accelerations or large inter story drift, respectively. In this study, the dynamic performance of the linear and nonlinear test-beds was comprehensively studied. The seismic performance of nonstructural systems installed in the linear and nonlinear test-beds were assessed during extreme excitations. In addition, the dynamic interactions of the test-bed and installed nonstructural systems are investigated.

  4. Removal characteristics of dissolved organic matters in modified A2O process of pilot test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo LI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to guarantee the running effect of Guodian Shenyang North Wastewater Treatment Plant, based on excitation-emission matrix (EEM fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence regional integration (FRI and material balance are used to evaluate the dissolved organic matter removal performance of modified A2O process. The results suggest that the albuminoid matters are the dominant components in modified A2O process influent, and there is small amount of fulvic-like materials. The removal efficiencies of the normalized integral volume of region Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅳ are 81.5%, 54.0% and 63.4%, respectively, while the removal performance of normalized integral volume of region Ⅲ and Ⅴ is low, and the removal efficiencies are 30.2%, 27.8%, respectively. The calculation of material balance shows that pre-anoxic and anaerobic zones are mainly used for the material removal in the region Ⅰ and Ⅳ. Anoxic zone is mainly used for material removal in the region Ⅰ. Aerobic zone could remove material in all regions. In addition, normalized integral volume of region Ⅳ and the soluble chemical oxygen demand have nice linear correlation, and the correlation coefficient R2 is 0.991 1. The normalized integral volume of region Ⅳ can better reflect the variation trend of soluble chemical oxygen demand in modified A2O process.

  5. Utility Test Results of a 2-Megawatt, 10-Second Reserve-Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BALL,GREG J.; NORRIS,BENJAMIN L.

    1999-10-01

    This report documents the 1996 evaluation by Pacific Gas and Electric Company of an advanced reserve-power system capable of supporting 2 MW of load for 10 seconds. The system, developed under a DOE Cooperative Agreement with AC Battery Corporation of East Troy, Wisconsin, contains battery storage that enables industrial facilities to ''ride through'' momentary outages. The evaluation consisted of tests of system performance using a wide variety of load types and operating conditions. The tests, which included simulated utility outages and voltage sags, demonstrated that the system could provide continuous power during utility outages and other disturbances and that it was compatible with a variety of load types found at industrial customer sites.

  6. A test of a 2 Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Henryk; Carcagno, Ruben; Claypool, Brad; Foster, George W.; Hays, Steven L.; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Malamud, Ernest; Mazur, Peter O.; Nehring,; Oleck, Andrew; Rabehl, Roger; Schlabach, Phil; Sylvester, Cosmore; Velev, Gueorgui; Volk, James; /Fermilab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Superconducting transmission line magnet test system for an injector accelerator of a staged VLHC proton-proton colliding beam accelerator has been built and operated at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, twin-aperture, combined function dipole magnet of 2 Tesla field is excited by a single turn 100 kA transmission line superconductor. The 100 kA dc current is generated using dc-dc switching converters powered by a bulk 240 kW supply. A pair of horizontally placed conventional leads facilitates transfer of this current to the magnet transmission line superconductor operating at liquid helium temperature. Fabrication of magnet components and magnet assembly work are described. The magnet test system and its operation are presented, and the performance is summarized.

  7. Point of care testing of phospholipase A2 group IIA for serological diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nathan J.; Chapman, Robert; Lin, Yiyang; Mmesi, Jonas; Bentham, Andrew; Tyreman, Matthew; Abraham, Sonya; Stevens, Molly M.

    2016-02-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care.Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08423g

  8. Green-Kubo relation for viscosity tested using experimental data for a 2D dusty plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Bin; Cohen, E G D

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical Green-Kubo relation for viscosity is tested using experimentally obtained data. In a dusty plasma experiment, micron-size dust particles are introduced into a partially-ionized argon plasma, where they become negatively charged. They are electrically levitated to form a single-layer Wigner crystal, which is subsequently melted using laser heating. In the liquid phase, these dust particles experience interparticle electric repulsion, laser heating, and friction from the ambient neutral argon gas, and they can be considered to be in a nonequilibrium steady state. Direct measurements of the positions and velocities of individual dust particles are then used to obtain a time series for an off-diagonal element of the stress tensor and its time autocorrelation function. This calculation also requires the interparticle potential, which was not measured experimentally, but was obtained using a Debye-H\\"{u}ckel-type model with experimentally determined parameters. Integrating the autocorrelation functi...

  9. 9 CFR 325.2 - Parcel post and ferries deemed carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parcel post and ferries deemed carriers. 325.2 Section 325.2 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... to transportation by ferry of any products loaded on a truck or other vehicle, or otherwise moved by...

  10. 78 FR 65392 - Product Change-Parcel Return Service Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Product Change--Parcel Return Service Negotiated Service Agreement AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Notice... Return Service Contract 5 to Competitive Product List. Documents are available at www.prc.gov ,...

  11. 77 FR 28410 - Product Change-Parcel Select Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Product Change--Parcel Select Negotiated Service Agreement AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Postal Service gives notice of filing a request with the Postal Regulatory Commission to add...

  12. 76 FR 2930 - Product Change-Parcel Select Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Product Change--Parcel Select Negotiated Service Agreement AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Postal Service notice of filing of a request with the Postal Regulatory Commission to add a...

  13. 77 FR 42780 - Product Change-Parcel Select Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Product Change--Parcel Select Negotiated Service Agreement AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Postal Service gives notice of filing a request with the Postal Regulatory Commission to add...

  14. 78 FR 56248 - Product Change-Parcel Select Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Product Change--Parcel Select Negotiated Service Agreement AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Postal Service gives notice of filing a request with the Postal Regulatory Commission to add...

  15. 15 CFR 740.12 - Gift parcels and humanitarian donations (GFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... marking. To secure this advantage, the sender should show the words “U.S.A. Gift Parcel” on the addressee... paragraph (d) of the EAR for licensing of multiple gift parcels). (2) Commodity, value and other limitations... short wave publicly available frequency bands, and batteries for such equipment; clothing; personal...

  16. Private forestland parcelization and development in Wisconsin's Northwoods: perceptions of resource-oriented stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gobster; Mark G. Rickenbach

    2004-01-01

    Increases in the parcelization and development of private forestlands in the US and other countries have become a major concern of natural resource agencies and groups. This concern is particularly heightened in heavily forested areas such as Wisconsin's "Northwoods," where private lands make up a majority of the forest area and play a critical role in...

  17. 75 FR 74755 - Product Change-Parcel Return Service Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Product Change--Parcel Return Service Negotiated Service Agreement AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Postal Service notice of filing of a request with the Postal Regulatory Commission to add...

  18. Vineyard parcel identification from Worldview-2 images using object-based classification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertel, Elif; Yay, Irmak

    2014-01-01

    Accurate identification of spatial distribution and characteristics of vineyard parcels is an important task for the effective management of vineyard areas, precision viticulture, and farmer registries. This study aimed to develop rule sets to be used in object-based classification of Worldview-2 satellite images to accurately delineate the boundaries of vineyards having different plantation styles. Multilevel segmentation was applied to Worldview-2 images to create different sizes of image objects representing different land cover categories with respect to scale parameter. Texture analysis and several new spectral indices were applied to objects at different segmentation levels to accurately classify land cover classes of forest, cultivated areas, harvested areas, impervious, bareland, and vineyards. A specific attention was given to vineyard class to identify vine areas at the parcel level considering their different plantation styles. The results illustrated that the combined usage of a newly developed decision tree and image segmentation during the object-based classification process could provide highly accurate results for the identification of vineyard parcels. Linearly planted vineyards could be classified with 100% producer's accuracy due to their regular textural characteristics, whereas regular gridwise and irregular gridwise (distributed) vineyard parcels could be classified with 94.87% producer's accuracy in this research.

  19. Validation of a Parcel-Based Reduced-Complexity Model for River Delta Formation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Geleynse, N.; Passalacqua, P.; Edmonds, D. A.; Kim, W.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced-Complexity Models (RCMs) take an intuitive yet quantitative approach to represent processes with the goal of getting maximum return in emergent system-scale behavior with minimum investment in computational complexity. This approach is in contrast to reductionist models that aim at rigorously solving the governing equations of fluid flow and sediment transport. RCMs have had encouraging successes in modeling a variety of geomorphic systems, such as braided rivers, alluvial fans, and river deltas. Despite the fact that these models are not intended to resolve detailed flow structures, questions remain on how to interpret and validate the output of RCMs beyond qualitative behavior-based descriptions. Here we present a validation of the newly developed RCM for river delta formation with channel dynamics (Liang, 2013). The model uses a parcel-based 'weighted-random-walk' method that resolves the formation of river deltas at the scale of channel dynamics (e.g., avulsions and bifurcations). The main focus of this validation work is the flow routing model component. A set of synthetic test cases were designed to compare hydrodynamic results from the RCM and Delft3D, including flow in a straight channel, around a bump, and flow partitioning at a single bifurcation. Output results, such as water surface slope and flow field, are also compared to field observations collected at Wax Lake Delta. Additionally, we investigate channel avulsion cycles and flow path selection in an alluvial fan with differential styles of subsidence and compare model results to laboratory experiments, as a preliminary effort in pairing up numerical and experimental models to understand channel organization at process scale. Strengths and weaknesses of the RCM are discussed and potential candidates for model application identified.

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 529: Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2004-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 529, Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-17, Contaminated Wash, is the only CAS in CAU 529 and is located in Area 25 of the NTS, in Nye County, Nevada (Figure 1-2). Corrective Action Site 25-23-17, Contaminated Wash, was divided into nine parcels because of the large area impacted by past operations and the complexity of the source areas. The CAS was subdivided into separate parcels based on separate and distinct releases as determined and approved in the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process and Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP). Table 1-1 summarizes the suspected sources for the nine parcels. Corrective Action Site 25-23-17 is comprised of the following nine parcels: (1) Parcel A, Kiwi Transient Nuclear Test (TNT) 16,000-foot (ft) Arc Area (Kiwi TNT); (2) Parcel B, Phoebus 1A Test 8,000-ft Arc Area (Phoebus); (3) Parcel C, Topopah Wash at Test Cell C (TCC); (4) Parcel D, Buried Contaminated Soil Area (BCSA) l; (5) Parcel E, BCSA 2; (6) Parcel F, Borrow Pit Burial Site (BPBS); (7) Parcel G, Drain/Outfall Discharges; (8) Parcel H, Contaminated Soil Storage Area (CSSA); and (9) Parcel J, Main Stream/Drainage Channels.

  1. Parcellating an individual subject's cortical and subcortical brain structures using snowball sampling of resting-state correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Gagan S; Laumann, Timothy O; Cohen, Alexander L; Power, Jonathan D; Nelson, Steven M; Glasser, Matthew F; Miezin, Francis M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Petersen, Steven E

    2014-08-01

    We describe methods for parcellating an individual subject's cortical and subcortical brain structures using resting-state functional correlations (RSFCs). Inspired by approaches from social network analysis, we first describe the application of snowball sampling on RSFC data (RSFC-Snowballing) to identify the centers of cortical areas, subdivisions of subcortical nuclei, and the cerebellum. RSFC-Snowballing parcellation is then compared with parcellation derived from identifying locations where RSFC maps exhibit abrupt transitions (RSFC-Boundary Mapping). RSFC-Snowballing and RSFC-Boundary Mapping largely complement one another, but also provide unique parcellation information; together, the methods identify independent entities with distinct functional correlations across many cortical and subcortical locations in the brain. RSFC parcellation is relatively reliable within a subject scanned across multiple days, and while the locations of many area centers and boundaries appear to exhibit considerable overlap across subjects, there is also cross-subject variability-reinforcing the motivation to parcellate brains at the level of individuals. Finally, examination of a large meta-analysis of task-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging data reveals that area centers defined by task-evoked activity exhibit correspondence with area centers defined by RSFC-Snowballing. This observation provides important evidence for the ability of RSFC to parcellate broad expanses of an individual's brain into functionally meaningful units.

  2. Parcelling activity of the National Bank for Agriculture in interwar Poland in the years 1924-1929

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Kłusek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific literature related to the problem in focus is exceptionally poor. The only book publication concerns the National Bank for Agriculture in the twenty-year interwar period is book position of Marek Nowak’s authorship [Nowak 1988]. But, on account of its modest range, bank agrarian activity has been treated too generally. In this publication author’s opinion is that this activity needs deeper analysis. Parcelling is an economic process which took part in Poland and lasted from the moment of grant freehold. It ran with special intensification towards the end of XIX century and at the beginning of XX century. In inter-war period, on account of source of parcelled soil, parcellation was divided into private and governmental. Governmental parcellation, which related to public property, included lands by Regional District Councils and territories included by military settlement. However, lands allocated by the National Bank for Agriculture and by individual people made private parcellation. The beginning of the National Bank for Agriculture’s agrarian activity’ was enabled by Poland President’s directive from 1924. One of the main tasks put against NBA was support: parcellation and settlement, agricul-tural regulations by landed estates purchase for parcelling aims and giving long-term credits for land purchase. However, according to status, the National Bank for Agriculture was able to parcel out landed properties, both purchased for private property and entrusted to commission state. Tasks put against parcellation conducted by the National Bank for Ag-riculture were not carried out in a satisfactory way. The Bank’s activity did not contribute to shopping the process of farms fragmentation at serious level and process of agrarian overpopulation’s growth among fewer ownership. Similarly, it also was not an essential source of establishing new farms capable of competing with vast-land ownership.

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Complete files of all parcels located in Haywood County. Includes private and government owned land., Published in 1982, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Haywood County Land Records/Geographic Information Systems.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 1982. It...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Parcel boundaries (both surveyed and for tax purposes) maintained by the department of Pulbic Works and Assessor's Office, Published in 2007, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, County of Los Angeles.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  5. Commercial Properties, Parcels - Commercial properties are included in the zoning info inside the parcel layer, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Commercial Properties dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2010. It is described as 'Parcels...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Rural cadastral data layers including parcel, lot, block, subdivision, dimensions, govt lot, etc, Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Scott County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2010. It...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, parcels city scale 1:100 and ruarl scale 1:400, Published in 2007, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Rice County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Dorchester County Parcel Lines - some records include distance and direction (COGO information), Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Dorchester County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2011. It...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, we have a contractor working on the parcel layer from assessors paper data, Published in 2009, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Apache County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Full parcel layer for entire county. Has not been QC as yet., Published in 2009, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Ford County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2009. It...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, This data set consists of digital map files containing parcel-level cadastral information obtained from property descriptions. Cadastral features contained in the data set include real property boundary lines, rights-of-way boundaries, property dimensions, Published in Not Provided, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Racine County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Parcels and Land Ownership dataset current as of unknown. This data set consists of digital map files containing parcel-level cadastral information obtained from...

  12. Building Permits, Building Permits exist in tabular form. We link on the PIN # to get parcel boundaries with building permits. The parcels and the building permits table join is a many to many relationship., Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Building Permits dataset current as of 2010. Building Permits exist in tabular form. We link on the PIN # to get parcel boundaries with building permits. The parcels...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Our parcel layer is maintained by the Land Records Department. We use General CAD to draw the linework and FME Workbench to create the shapefiles tied to current tax data., Published in 2013, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Chippewa County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Parcels and Land Ownership dataset current as of 2013. Our parcel layer is maintained by the Land Records Department. We use General CAD to draw the linework and FME...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2006, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Sauk County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006....

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 1998, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Door County, Wisconsin.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 1998....

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, linkage by project only, Published in 2008, Upper Minnesota Valley Regional Development Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'linkage by project only'. The extent of these data is generally Yellow Medicine County, MN....

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Harper County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Not Provided information as of 2008. Data by this...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, CTS Land, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Tooele County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, CTS Owners, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Tooele County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 1992, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Walker County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 1992. This data set...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2006, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. This...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2007, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, La Paz County Community Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. This...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Columbus County Tax Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of unknown. This...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 1998, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Greenwood County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 1998....

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 1997, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, County of Lexington.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 1997. This data set...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, subdivisions, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, minor subdivision, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, recorder lines, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Export AS400 to txt join apn, Published in 2007, McKenzie County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2007. It is described as 'Export AS400 to txt join apn'. The extent of these data is generally Mckenzie County, ND....

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, ski line sites, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  11. Parcels and Land Ownership, connected on a project basis

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'connected on a project basis

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, connect with PIN attribute

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. It is described as 'connect with PIN attribute

  13. Parcellation of fMRI Datasets with ICA and PLS-A Data Driven Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Yongnan; Aickelin, Uwe; Pitiot, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Inter-subject parcellation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data based on a standard General Linear Model (GLM)and spectral clustering was recently proposed as a means to alleviate the issues associated with spatial normalization in fMRI. However, for all its appeal, a GLM-based parcellation approach introduces its own biases, in the form of a priori knowledge about the shape of Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF) and task-related signal changes, or about the subject behaviour during the task. In this paper, we introduce a data-driven version of the spectral clustering parcellation, based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and Partial Least Squares (PLS) instead of the GLM. First, a number of independent components are automatically selected. Seed voxels are then obtained from the associated ICA maps and we compute the PLS latent variables between the fMRI signal of the seed voxels (which covers regional variations of the HRF) and the principal components of the signal across all voxels. F...

  14. Automatic method for thalamus parcellation using multi-modal feature classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, Joshua V; Glaister, Jeffrey; Ye, Chuyang; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L; Carass, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation and parcellation of the thalamus is an important step in providing volumetric assessment of the impact of disease n brain structures. Conventionally, segmentation is carried out on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images and nuclear parcellation using diffusion weighted MR images. We present the first fully automatic method that incorporates both tissue contrasts and several derived fea-fractional anisotrophy, fiber orientation from the 5D Knutsson representation of the principal eigenvectors, and connectivity between the thalamus and the cortical lobes, as features. Combining these multiple information sources allows us to identify discriminating dimensions and thus parcellate the thalamic nuclei. A hierarchical random forest framework with a multidimensional feature per voxel, first distinguishes thalamus from background, and then separates each group of thalamic nuclei. Using a leave one out cross-validation on 12 subjects we have a mean Dice score of 0.805 and 0.799 for the left and right thalami, respectively. We also report overlap for the thalamic nuclear groups.

  15. A dataset of multiresolution functional brain parcellations in an elderly population with no or mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Tam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present group eight resolutions of brain parcellations for clusters generated from resting-state functional magnetic resonance images for 99 cognitively normal elderly persons and 129 patients with mild cognitive impairment, pooled from four independent datasets. This dataset was generated as part of the following study: Common Effects of Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment on Resting-State Connectivity Across Four Independent Studies (Tam et al., 2015 [1]. The brain parcellations have been registered to both symmetric and asymmetric MNI brain templates and generated using a method called bootstrap analysis of stable clusters (BASC (Bellec et al., 2010 [2]. We present two variants of these parcellations. One variant contains bihemisphereic parcels (4, 6, 12, 22, 33, 65, 111, and 208 total parcels across eight resolutions. The second variant contains spatially connected regions of interest (ROIs that span only one hemisphere (10, 17, 30, 51, 77, 199, and 322 total ROIs across eight resolutions. We also present maps illustrating functional connectivity differences between patients and controls for four regions of interest (striatum, dorsal prefrontal cortex, middle temporal lobe, and medial frontal cortex. The brain parcels and associated statistical maps have been publicly released as 3D volumes, available in .mnc and .nii file formats on figshare and on Neurovault. Finally, the code used to generate this dataset is available on Github.

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, Square-mile, section-wide, property ownerhip parcel and lot-block boundaries. Includes original platted lot lines. These coverages are maintained interactively by GIS staff. Primary attributes include Parcel IDS (Control, Key, and PIN), platted lot and, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County, Kansas.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2008. It...

  17. Design and Testing of a 2-Hour Oxygen Prebreathe Protocol for Space Walks from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Conkin, J.; Foster, P. P.; Pilmanis, A. A.; Butler, B. D.; Beltran, E.; Fife, C. E.; Vann, R. D.; Gerth, W. A.; Loftin, K. C.; hide

    2000-01-01

    To develop and test a 2-hour prebreathe protocol for performing extravehicular activities (EVAs) from the International Space Station (ISS). Combinations of adynamia (non-walking), prebreathe exercise, and space suit donning options (10.2 vs. 14.7 psi) were evaluated, against timeline and consumable contraints to develop an operational 2- hour prebreathe protocol. Prospective accept/reject criteria were defined for decompression sickness (DCS) and venous gas emboli (VGE) from analysis of historical DCS data, combined with risk management of DCS under ISS mission circumstances. Maximum operational DCS levels were defined based on protecting for EVA capability with two crew-members at 95% confidence, throughout ISS lifetime (within the constraints of NASA DCS disposition policy JPG 1800.3). The accept/reject limits were adjusted for greater safety based on analysis of related medical factors. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to design a closed sequential, multi-center human trial. Protocols were tested with 4 different prebreathe exercises (Phases I-IV), prior to exposure to 4.3 psi for 4 hrs. Subject selection, Doppler monitoring for VGE, test termination criteria, and DCS definitions were standardized. Phase I: upper and lower body exercises using dual-cycle ergometry (75% VO2 max for 10 min). Phase II: ergometry plus 24 min of light exercise (simulating space-suit preparations). Phase III: same 24 min of light exercise but no ergometry, and Phase IV: 56 min of light exercise without ergometry. A prebreathe procedure was accepted if, at 95% confidence, the incidence of DCS was less than 15% (with no Type II DCS), and Grade IV VGE was less than 20%.

  18. Anatomical parcellation of the brainstem and cerebellar white matter: a preliminary probabilistic tractography study at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe; Cabanis, Emmanuel A. [UPMC Paris 6, Service de NeuroImagerie, Hopital des Quinze-Vingts, Paris (France)

    2007-10-15

    The aims of this study were: (1) to test whether higher spatial resolution diffusion tensor images and a higher field strength (3 T) enable a more accurate delineation of the anatomical tract within the brainstem, and, in particular, (2) to try to distinguish the different components of the corticopontocerebellar paths in terms of their cortical origins. The main tracts of the brainstem of four volunteers were studied at 3 T using a probabilistic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) axonal tracking. The resulting tractograms enabled anatomical well-delineated structures to be identified on the diffusion tensor coloured images. We tracked corticopontine, corticospinal, central tegmental, inferior and superior cerebellopeduncular, transverse, medial lemniscal and, possibly, longitudinal medial fibres. Moreover, DTI tracking allowed a broad delineation of the corticopontocerebellar paths. Diffusion tensor coloured images allow a rapid and reliable access to the white matter broad parcellation of the brainstem and of the cerebellum, which can be completed by fibre tracking. However, a more accurate and exhaustive depiction of the anatomical connectivity within the brainstem requires the application of more sophisticated techniques and tractography algorithms, such as diffusion spectrum imaging. (orig.)

  19. Green infrastructure retrofits on residential parcels: Ecohydrologic modeling for stormwater design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, B.; Band, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    To meet water quality goals stormwater utilities and not-for-profit watershed organizations in the U.S. are working with citizens to design and implement green infrastructure on residential land. Green infrastructure, as an alternative and complement to traditional (grey) stormwater infrastructure, has the potential to contribute to multiple ecosystem benefits including stormwater volume reduction, carbon sequestration, urban heat island mitigation, and to provide amenities to residents. However, in small (1-10-km2) medium-density urban watersheds with heterogeneous land cover it is unclear whether stormwater retrofits on residential parcels significantly contributes to reduce stormwater volume at the watershed scale. In this paper, we seek to improve understanding of how small-scale redistribution of water at the parcel scale as part of green infrastructure implementation affects urban water budgets and stormwater volume across spatial scales. As study sites we use two medium-density headwater watersheds in Baltimore, MD and Durham, NC. We develop ecohydrology modeling experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of redirecting residential rooftop runoff to un-altered pervious surfaces and to engineered rain gardens to reduce stormwater runoff. As baselines for these experiments, we performed field surveys of residential rooftop hydrologic connectivity to adjacent impervious surfaces, and found low rates of connectivity. Through simulations of pervasive adoption of downspout disconnection to un-altered pervious areas or to rain garden stormwater control measures (SCM) in these catchments, we find that most parcel-scale changes in stormwater fate are attenuated at larger spatial scales and that neither SCM alone is likely to provide significant changes in streamflow at the watershed scale.

  20. Adapting Parcellation Schemes to Study Fetal Brain Connectivity in Serial Imaging Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Xi; Wilm, Jakob; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa

    2013-01-01

    of the developing fetal brain such functional and associated structural markers are not consistently present over time. In this study we adapt two non-atlas based parcellation schemes to study the development of connectivity networks of a fetal monkey brain using Diffusion Weighted Imaging techniques. Results......A crucial step in studying brain connectivity is the definition of the Regions Of Interest (ROI's) which are considered as nodes of a network graph. These ROI's identified in structural imaging reflect consistent functional regions in the anatomies being compared. However in serial studies...

  1. Connectivity-Based Parcellation of the Cortical Mantle Using q-Ball Diffusion Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Perrin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper exploits the idea that each individual brain region has a specific connection profile to create parcellations of the cortical mantle using MR diffusion imaging. The parcellation is performed in two steps. First, the cortical mantle is split at a macroscopic level into 36 large gyri using a sulcus recognition system. Then, for each voxel of the cortex, a connection profile is computed using a probabilistic tractography framework. The tractography is performed from q-ball fields using regularized particle trajectories. Fiber ODF are inferred from the q-balls using a sharpening process focusing the weight around the q-ball local maxima. A sophisticated mask of propagation computed from a T1-weighted image perfectly aligned with the diffusion data prevents the particles from crossing the cortical folds. During propagation, the particles father child particles in order to improve the sampling of the long fascicles. For each voxel, intersection of the particle trajectories with the gyri lead to a connectivity profile made up of only 36 connection strengths. These profiles are clustered on a gyrus by gyrus basis using a K-means approach including spatial regularization. The reproducibility of the results is studied for three subjects using spatial normalization.

  2. Connectivity-Based Parcellation of the Cortical Mantle Using q-Ball Diffusion Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, M.; Cointepas, Y.; Poupon, C.; Riviere, D.; Cathier, P.; El Kouby, V.; Le Bihan, D.; Mangin, J.F. [NeuroSpin Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, CEA, DSV, I2BM, Gif-sur-Yvette 91191 (France); Perrin, M.; Cointepas, Y.; Cachia, A.; Poupon, C.; Riviere, D.; Cathier, P.; El Kouby, V.; Le Bihan, D.; Mangin, J.F. [Institut Federatif de Recherche 49, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Perrin, M. [GE Healthcare, F-78457 Velizy (France); Cachia, A.; Mangin, J.F. [CEA-INSERM Research Unit, Neuroimaging and psychiatry, SHFJ, Orsay(France); Thirion, B. [Parietal Project, INRIA Futurs, NeuroSpin, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Constantinesco, A. [Hop de Hautepierre, Serv Biophys Med Nucl, Strasbourg (France)

    2008-07-01

    This paper exploits the idea that each individual brain region has a specific connection profile to create parcellations of the cortical mantle using MR diffusion imaging. The parcellation is performed in two steps. First, the cortical mantle is split at a macroscopic level into 36 large gyri using a sulcus recognition system. Then, for each voxel of the cortex, a connection profile is computed using a probabilistic tractography framework. The tractography is performed from q fields using regularized particle trajectories. Fiber ODF are inferred from the q-balls using a sharpening process focusing the weight around the q-ball local maxima. A sophisticated mask of propagation computed from a T1-weighted image perfectly aligned with the diffusion data prevents the particles from crossing the cortical folds. During propagation, the particles father child particles in order to improve the sampling of the long fascicles. For each voxel, intersection of the particle trajectories with the gyri lead to a connectivity profile made up of only 36 connection strengths. These profiles are clustered on a gyrus by gyrus basis using a K-means approach including spatial regularization. The reproducibility of the results is studied for three subjects using spatial normalization. (authors)

  3. Assessing the usefulness of the photogrammetric method in the process of capturing data on parcel boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benduch, Piotr; Pęska-Siwik, Agnieszka

    2017-06-01

    A parcel is the most important object of real estate cadastre. Its primary spatial attribute are boundaries, determining the extent of property rights. Capturing the data on boundaries should be performed in the way ensuring sufficiently high accuracy and reliability. In recent years, as part of the project "ZSIN - Construction of Integrated Real Estate Information System - Stage I", in the territories of the participating districts, actions were taken aimed at the modernization of the register of land and buildings. In many cases, this process was carried out basing on photogrammetric materials. Applicable regulations allow such a possibility. This paper, basing on the documentation from the National Geodetic and Cartographic Documentation Center and on the authors' own surveys attempts to assess the applicability of the photogrammetric method to capture data on the boundaries of cadastral parcels. The scope of the research, most importantly, included the problem of accuracy with which it was possible to determine the position of a boundary point using photogrammetric surveys carried out on the terrain model created from processed aerial photographs. The article demonstrates the manner of recording this information in the cadastral database, as well as the resulting legal consequences. Moreover, the level of reliability of the entered values of the selected attributes of boundary points was assessed.

  4. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  5. In vitro testing of biological control agents on A1 and A2 isolates of Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianne Elliott; Simon Shamoun

    2008-01-01

    Biological control products were tested in vitro with six isolates of Phytophthora ramorum. These isolates were geographically diverse and were selected based on their pathogenicity to detached Rhododendron leaves. In addition to five commercially available biocontrol products, nine species of Trichoderma were tested. The in vitro...

  6. Environmental Baseline Survey Parcel E2, F, and I, Military Housing Areas Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    CES/CEF, 2.7 Capt. David Wooten , Deputy Flight Commander, 99 AMDS/SGPB, Patrick Hickey, Environmental Fuels Program Manager, 99 CES/CEAN...stations, or septic systems located on the subject parcels. Capt. David Wooten , Bioenvironmental Engineering Deputy Flight Commander • No environmental

  7. Phase 1 Environmental Baseline Survey Parcels E2, F, and I, Military Housing Areas, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    David Wooten , Deputy Flight Commander, 99 AMDS/SGPB, Patrick Hickey, Environmental Fuels Program Manager, 99 CES/CEAN, [The remainder of...located on the subject parcels. Capt. David Wooten , Bioenvironmental Engineering Deputy Flight Commander • No environmental concerns at the subject

  8. An overview of 3D cadastre from a physical land parcel and a legal property object perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karki, S.; McDougall, K.; Thompson, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    The physical land parcel based model of representing, storing and manipulating cadastral data, which includes two-dimensional geometry as well as the rights, restrictions and responsibilities attached to it, has largely been very successful in dealing with the present needs of land administration. T

  9. A Hybrid Metaheuristic Approach to Optimize the Districting Design of a Parcel Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. González-Ramírez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we address a districting problem faced by a pickup and delivery parcel company over a determinedservice region. The service region is divided into districts, each served by a single vehicle that departs from a centraldepot. Two objectives are optimized: compactness and balance of the workload content among the districts. Wepresent a mathematical formulation of the problem and a heuristic algorithm to solve the problem. Numerical resultsare presented in comparison to CPLEX 11.1 solutions for the smaller size instances. The results show that theheuristic performs well. The algorithm is able to solve moderate size instances in reasonable computational time,given the strategic nature of the problem.

  10. 3D computational and experimental radiation transport assessments of Pu-Be sources and graded moderators for parcel screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghita, Gabriel; Sjoden, Glenn; Baciak, James; Huang, Nancy

    2006-05-01

    The Florida Institute for Nuclear Detection and Security (FINDS) is currently working on the design and evaluation of a prototype neutron detector array that may be used for parcel screening systems and homeland security applications. In order to maximize neutron detector response over a wide spectrum of energies, moderator materials of different compositions and amounts are required, and can be optimized through 3-D discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo model simulations verified through measurement. Pu-Be sources can be used as didactic source materials to augment the design, optimization, and construction of detector arrays with proper characterization via transport analysis. To perform the assessments of the Pu-Be Source Capsule, 3-D radiation transport computations are used, including Monte Carlo (MCNP5) and deterministic (PENTRAN) methodologies. In establishing source geometry, we based our model on available source schematic data. Because both the MCNP5 and PENTRAN codes begin with source neutrons, exothermic (α,n) reactions are modeled using the SCALE5 code from ORNL to define the energy spectrum and the decay of the source. We combined our computational results with experimental data to fully validate our computational schemes, tools and models. Results from our computational models will then be used with experiment to generate a mosaic of the radiation spectrum. Finally, we discuss follow-up studies that highlight response optimization efforts in designing, building, and testing an array of detectors with varying moderators/thicknesses tagged to specific responses predicted using 3-D radiation transport models to augment special nuclear materials detection.

  11. Volumetric Parcellation Methodology of the Human Hypothalamus in Neuroimaging: Normative Data and Sex Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Nikos; Swaab, Dick F.; van der Kouwe, Andre; Abbs, Brandon; Boriel, Denise; Handa, Robert; Tobet, Stuart; Goldstein, Jill M.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence regarding the importance of the hypothalamus for understanding sex differences in relation to neurological, psychiatric, endocrine and sleep disorders. Although different in histology, physiology, connections and function, multiple hypothalamic nuclei subserve non-voluntary functions and are nodal points for the purpose of maintaining homeostasis of the organism. Thus, given the critical importance of hypothalamic nuclei and their key multiple roles in regulating basic functions, it is important to develop the ability to conduct in vivo human studies of anatomic structure, volume, connectivity, and function of hypothalamic regions represented at the level of its nuclei. The goals of the present study were to develop a novel method of semi-automated volumetric parcellation for the human hypothalamus that could be used to investigate clinical conditions using MRI and to demonstrate its applicability. The proposed new method subdivides the hypothalamus into five parcels based on visible anatomic landmarks associated with specific nuclear groupings and was confirmed using two ex vivo hypothalami that were imaged in a 7 Tesla (7T) scanner and processed histologically. Imaging results were compared with histology from the same brain. Further, the method was applied to 44 healthy adults (26 men; 18 women, comparable on age, handedness, ethnicity, SES) to derive normative volumes and assess sex differences in hypothalamic regions using 1.5 Tesla MRI. Men compared to women had a significantly larger total hypothalamus, relative to cerebrum size, similar for both hemispheres, a difference that was primarily driven by the tuberal region, with the sex effect size being largest in the superior tuberal region and, to a lesser extent, inferior tuberal region. Given the critical role of hypothalamic nuclei in multiple chronic diseases and the importance of sex differences, we argue that the use of the novel methodology presented here will allow for

  12. Regional structural differences across functionally parcellated Brodmann areas of human primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa-María; Besle, Julien; Mougin, Olivier; Gowland, Penny; Bowtell, Richard; Schluppeck, Denis; Francis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    Ultra-high-field (UHF) MRI is ideally suited for structural and functional imaging of the brain. High-resolution structural MRI can be used to map the anatomical boundaries between functional domains of the brain by identifying changes related to the pattern of myelination within cortical gray matter, opening up the possibility to study the relationship between functional domains and underlying structure in vivo. In a recent study, we demonstrated the correspondence between functional (based on retinotopic mapping) and structural (based on changes in T2(⁎)-weighted images linked to myelination) parcellations of the primary visual cortex (V1) in vivo at 7T (Sanchez-Panchuelo et al., 2012b). Here, we take advantage of the improved BOLD CNR and high spatial resolution achievable at 7T to study regional structural variations across the functionally defined areas within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in individual subjects. Using a traveling wave fMRI paradigm to map the internal somatotopic representation of the index, middle, and ring fingers in S1, we were able to identify multiple map reversals at the tip and base, corresponding to the boundaries between Brodmann areas 3a, 3b, 1 and 2. Based on high resolution structural MRI data acquired in the same subjects, we inspected these functionally-parcellated Brodmann areas for differences in cortical thickness and MR contrast measures (magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and signal intensity in phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images) that are sensitive to myelination. Consistent area-related differences in cortical thickness and MTR/PSIR measurements were found across subjects. However these measures did not have sufficient sensitivity to allow definition of areal boundaries.

  13. Introduction to Ecological Landscaping: A Holistic Description and Framework to Guide the Study and Management of Urban Landscape Parcels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parwinder Grewal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Urbanized ecosystems and urban human populations are expanding around the world causing many negative environmental effects. A challenge for achieving sustainable urban social-ecological systems is understanding how urbanized landscapes can be designed and managed to minimize negative outcomes. To this end, an interdisciplinary Ecological Landscaping conference was organized to examine the interacting sociocultural and ecological causes and consequences of landscaping practices and products. This special issue of Cities and the Environment contains a diverse set of articles arising from that conference. In this introductory paper, we describe the meaning of ecological landscaping and a new conceptual framework that helps organize the topic’s complex issues. The essence of ecological landscaping is a holistic systems-thinking perspective for understanding the interrelationships among physical-ecological and sociocultural variables that give rise to the patterns and processes of biodiversity, abiotic conditions, and ecosystem processes within and among individually-managed urban landscape parcels. This perspective suggests that 1 variables not considered part of traditional landscaping and 2 the effects of landscaping within an individual parcel on variables outside of it must both be considered when making design and management decisions about a parcel. To illustrate how these points help create a more holistic, ecological approach to landscaping, a traditional ecosystem model is used to create a framework for discussing how sociocultural and physical-ecological inputs to a landscape parcel affect its characteristics and outputs. As exemplified by papers in this issue, an integrated sociocultural-ecological approach to the study of urban landscaping practices and products is needed to 1 understand why and how humans design and mange urban landscape parcels, 2 describe how the combined characteristics and outputs of many parcels give rise to the

  14. Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1: The Critical Components to Simulate Cirrus Initiation Explicitly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; O'C. Starr, David; Demott, Paul J.; Cotton, Richard; Sassen, Kenneth; Jensen, Eric; Kärcher, Bernd; Liu, Xiaohong

    2002-08-01

    The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project, a project of the GCSS [Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Studies] Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems, involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal nucleation and growth for specified, typical, cirrus cloud environments. In Phase 1 of the project reported here, simulated cirrus cloud microphysical properties from seven models are compared for `warm' (40°C) and `cold' (60°C) cirrus, each subject to updrafts of 0.04, 0.2, and 1 m s1. The models employ explicit microphysical schemes wherein the size distribution of each class of particles (aerosols and ice crystals) is resolved into bins or the evolution of each individual particle is traced. Simulations are made including both homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanisms (all-mode simulations). A single initial aerosol population of sulfuric acid particles is prescribed for all simulations. Heterogeneous nucleation is disabled for a second parallel set of simulations in order to isolate the treatment of the homogeneous freezing (of haze droplets) nucleation process. Analysis of these latter simulations is the primary focus of this paper.Qualitative agreement is found for the homogeneous-nucleation-only simulations; for example, the number density of nucleated ice crystals increases with the strength of the prescribed updraft. However, significant quantitative differences are found. Detailed analysis reveals that the homogeneous nucleation rate, haze particle solution concentration, and water vapor uptake rate by ice crystal growth (particularly as controlled by the deposition coefficient) are critical components that lead to differences in the predicted microphysics.Systematic differences exist between results based on a modified classical theory approach and models using an effective freezing temperature approach to the treatment of nucleation. Each method is constrained by critical freezing data from

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, State owned and managed lands, Published in unknown, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Office of Shared Solutions.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown....

  16. Parcels and Land Ownership, k7200pri - Parowan, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, k2400pri - Parowan, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, 8/2011 The western portion of the county is not spatially correct., Published in unknown, La Paz County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of unknown. It is described as '8/2011 The western portion of the county is not spatially correct.'. The extent of these...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Hogansville, Georgia Zoning map, Published in 2002, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2002. It is described...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, property boundaries for private lands within Pitkin County, Published in 1992, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, City of Aspen & Pitkin County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 1992. It...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Coweta County, Georgia Future Landuse Shapefile, Published in 2004, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2004. It is...

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, t36s r12w sec29, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, GIS version of municipal tax maps, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Township of Montgomery.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2010. It...

  4. Parcels and Land Ownership, Tagged Line cadastral model, Published in 2008, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Delaware County Office of Geographic Information.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2008. It is described...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Randolph County, Published in unknown, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, River Valley Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of unknown. It is...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Luthersville, Georgia Tax Areas UTM-NAD 83, Published in 2004, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2004. It is...

  7. Parcels and Land Ownership, Greenville, Georgia Vacent Lots Shapefile, Published in 2004, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2004. It is...

  8. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in unknown, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of California - Office of the State Chief Information Officer.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. This data set...

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Plat Book 1-17, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Uintah County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  10. Localization and quantification of intramuscular damage using statistical parametric mapping and skeletal muscle parcellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouré, Alexandre; Le Troter, Arnaud; Guye, Maxime; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2015-12-22

    In the present study, we proposed an original and robust methodology which combines the spatial normalization of skeletal muscle images, the statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis and the use of a specific parcellation in order to accurately localize and quantify the extent of skeletal muscle damage within the four heads of the quadriceps femoris. T2 maps of thigh muscles were characterized before, two (D2) and four (D4) days after 40 maximal isometric electrically-evoked contractions in 25 healthy young males. On the basis of SPM analysis of coregistrated T2 maps, the alterations were similarly detected at D2 and D4 in the superficial and distal regions of the vastus medialis (VM) whereas the proportion of altered muscle was higher in deep muscle regions of the vastus lateralis at D4 (deep: 35 ± 25%, superficial: 23 ± 15%) as compared to D2 (deep: 18 ± 13%, superficial: 17 ± 13%). The present methodology used for the first time on skeletal muscle would be of utmost interest to detect subtle intramuscular alterations not only for the diagnosis of muscular diseases but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions and clinical treatment strategies.

  11. Data model for the collaboration between land administration systems and agricultural land parcel identification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Halil Ibrahim; Sagris, Valentina; Devos, Wim; Milenov, Pavel; van Oosterom, Peter; Zevenbergen, Jaap

    2010-12-01

    The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) of the European Union (EU) has dramatically changed after 1992, and from then on the CAP focused on the management of direct income subsidies instead of production-based subsidies. For this focus, Member States (MS) are expected to establish Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS), including a Land Parcel Identification System (LPIS) as the spatial part of IACS. Different MS have chosen different solutions for their LPIS. Currently, some MS based their IACS/LPIS on data from their Land Administration Systems (LAS), and many others use purpose built special systems for their IACS/LPIS. The issue with these different IACS/LPIS is that they do not have standardized structures; rather, each represents a unique design in each MS, both in the case of LAS based or special systems. In this study, we aim at designing a core data model for those IACS/LPIS based on LAS. For this purpose, we make use of the ongoing standardization initiatives for LAS (Land Administration Domain Model: LADM) and IACS/LPIS (LPIS Core Model: LCM). The data model we propose in this study implies the collaboration between LADM and LCM and includes some extensions. Some basic issues with the collaboration model are discussed within this study: registration of farmers, land use rights and farming limitations, geometry/topology, temporal data management etc. For further explanation of the model structure, sample instance level diagrams illustrating some typical situations are also included.

  12. Fine-Grained Parcellation of Brain Connectivity Improves Differentiation of States of Consciousness During Graded Propofol Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Lauer, Kathryn K; Ward, B Douglas; Roberts, Christopher J; Liu, Suyan; Gollapudy, Suneeta; Rohloff, Robert; Gross, William; Xu, Zhan; Chen, Guangyu; Binder, Jeffrey R; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hudetz, Anthony G

    2017-08-01

    Conscious perception relies on interactions between spatially and functionally distinct modules of the brain at various spatiotemporal scales. These interactions are altered by anesthesia, an intervention that leads to fading consciousness. Relatively little is known about brain functional connectivity and its anesthetic modulation at a fine spatial scale. Here, we used functional imaging to examine propofol-induced changes in functional connectivity in brain networks defined at a fine-grained parcellation based on a combination of anatomical and functional features. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional imaging in wakeful baseline, mild sedation, deep sedation, and recovery of consciousness. Compared with wakeful baseline, propofol produced widespread, dose-dependent functional connectivity changes that scaled with the extent to which consciousness was altered. The dominant changes in connectivity were associated with the frontal lobes. By examining node pairs that demonstrated a trend of functional connectivity change between wakefulness and deep sedation, quadratic discriminant analysis differentiated the states of consciousness in individual participants more accurately at a fine-grained parcellation (e.g., 2000 nodes) than at a coarse-grained parcellation (e.g., 116 anatomical nodes). Our study suggests that defining brain networks at a high granularity may provide a superior imaging-based distinction of the graded effect of anesthesia on consciousness.

  13. Let's Not Waste Time: Using Temporal Information in Clustered Activity Estimation with Spatial Adjacency Restrictions (CAESAR) for Parcellating FMRI Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ronald J; Jylänki, Pasi; van Gerven, Marcel A J

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed a Bayesian approach for functional parcellation of whole-brain FMRI measurements which we call Clustered Activity Estimation with Spatial Adjacency Restrictions (CAESAR). We use distance-dependent Chinese restaurant processes (dd-CRPs) to define a flexible prior which partitions the voxel measurements into clusters whose number and shapes are unknown a priori. With dd-CRPs we can conveniently implement spatial constraints to ensure that our parcellations remain spatially contiguous and thereby physiologically meaningful. In the present work, we extend CAESAR by using Gaussian process (GP) priors to model the temporally smooth haemodynamic signals that give rise to the measured FMRI data. A challenge for GP inference in our setting is the cubic scaling with respect to the number of time points, which can become computationally prohibitive with FMRI measurements, potentially consisting of long time series. As a solution we describe an efficient implementation that is practically as fast as the corresponding time-independent non-GP model with typically-sized FMRI data sets. We also employ a population Monte-Carlo algorithm that can significantly speed up convergence compared to traditional single-chain methods. First we illustrate the benefits of CAESAR and the GP priors with simulated experiments. Next, we demonstrate our approach by parcellating resting state FMRI data measured from twenty participants as taken from the Human Connectome Project data repository. Results show that CAESAR affords highly robust and scalable whole-brain clustering of FMRI timecourses.

  14. Organization and Detailed Parcellation of Human Hippocampal Head and Body Regions Based on a Combined Analysis of Cyto- and Chemoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Song-Lin; Van Hoesen, Gary W

    2015-10-15

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is one of the hottest regions in neuroscience because it is critical to learning, memory, and cognition, while being vulnerable to many neurological and mental disorders. With increasing high-resolution imaging techniques, many scientists have started to use distinct landmarks along the anterior-posterior axis of HF to allow segmentation into individual subfields in order to identify specific functions in both normal and diseased conditions. These studies urgently call for more reliable and accurate segmentation of the HF subfields DG, CA3, CA2, CA1, prosubiculum, subiculum, presubiculum, and parasubiculum. Unfortunately, very limited data are available on detailed parcellation of the HF subfields, especially in the complex, curved hippocampal head region. In this study we revealed detailed organization and parcellation of all subfields of the hippocampal head and body regions on the base of a combined analysis of multiple cyto- and chemoarchitectural stains and dense sequential section sampling. We also correlated these subfields to macro-anatomical landmarks, which are visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Furthermore, we created three versions of the detailed anatomic atlas for the hippocampal head region to account for brains with four, three, or two hippocampal digitations. These results will provide a fundamental basis for understanding the organization, parcellation, and anterior-posterior difference of human HF, facilitating accurate segmentation and measurement of HF subfields in the human brain on MRI scans.

  15. A fully Bayesian approach to the parcel-based detection-estimation of brain activity in fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makni, S. [Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Oxford Ctr Funct Magnet Resonance Imaging Brain, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Idier, J. [IRCCyN CNRS, Nantes (France); Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, P. [CEA, NeuroSpin, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Vincent, T.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Ciuciu, P. [Inst Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, IFR 49, Paris (France); Thirion, B. [INRIA Futurs, Orsay (France); Dehaene-Lambertz, G. [INSERM, NeuroSpin, U562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Within-subject analysis in fMRI essentially addresses two problems, i. e., the detection of activated brain regions in response to an experimental task and the estimation of the underlying dynamics, also known as the characterisation of Hemodynamic response function (HRF). So far, both issues have been treated sequentially while it is known that the HRF model has a dramatic impact on the localisation of activations and that the HRF shape may vary from one region to another. In this paper, we conciliate both issues in a region-based joint detection-estimation framework that we develop in the Bayesian formalism. Instead of considering function basis to account for spatial variability, spatially adaptive General Linear Models are built upon region-based non-parametric estimation of brain dynamics. Regions are first identified as functionally homogeneous parcels in the mask of the grey matter using a specific procedure [Thirion, B., Flandin, G., Pinel, P., Roche, A., Ciuciu, P., Poline, J.B., August 2006. Dealing with the shortcomings of spatial normalization: Multi-subject parcellation of fMRI datasets. Hum. Brain Mapp. 27 (8), 678-693.]. Then, in each parcel, prior information is embedded to constrain this estimation. Detection is achieved by modelling activating, deactivating and non-activating voxels through mixture models within each parcel. From the posterior distribution, we infer upon the model parameters using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Bayesian model comparison allows us to emphasize on artificial datasets first that inhomogeneous gamma-Gaussian mixture models outperform Gaussian mixtures in terms of sensitivity/specificity trade-off and second that it is worthwhile modelling serial correlation through an AR(1) noise process at low signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. Our approach is then validated on an fMRI experiment that studies habituation to auditory sentence repetition. This phenomenon is clearly recovered as well as the hierarchical temporal

  16. Cloud parcel modelling of CCN activation in megacity air based on observations from Beijing and Guangzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Reutter, P.; Trentmann, J.; Rose, D.; Gunthe, S.; Simmel, M.; Nowak, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Zhu, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    The other team members are P. Achtert (3), M. Hu (4), M. Shao (4), and Y.H. Zhang (4). The activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) determines the initial number of cloud droplets, and thus influences the evolution of the cloud and formation of precipitation. Characterizing the CCN activation process by parcel model studies with detailed cloud microphysics and dynamics provides useful information for parameterizing the activation process in meso-scale and global-scale models. During the CAREBEIJING 2006 campaign in Beijing and the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in Guangzhou, fast condensational growth of particles was frequently observed and the CCN size distribution was sometimes dominated by the growing nucleation mode (Aitken Mode) rather than by the accumulation mode. In this study we investigated the implications of the experimental findings using a cloud parcel model with detailed spectral cloud microphysics and with the ΰ-Köhler model approach for efficient and realistic description of the effective hygroscopicity and CCN activity of aerosol particles. The number of droplets formed at the cloud base was examined for a wide range of updraft velocities and aerosol particle number concentrations. Moreover, the impact of aerosol hygroscopicity, size distribution and giant CCN were also evaluated. References: Reutter, P., Trentmann, J., Su, H., Simmel M., Rose, D., Wernli, H., Andreae, M. O., and Pöschl, U.: Activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) under smoky and pyro-convective conditions, manuscript in preparation, 2009 Rose, D., Gunthe, S. S., Mikhailov, E., Frank, G. P., Dusek, U., Andreae, M. O., and Pöschl, U.: Calibration and measurement uncertainties of a continuous-flow cloud condensation nuclei counter (DMT-CCNC): CCN activation of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride aerosol particles in theory and experiment, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 1153-1179, 2008. Rose, D., Nowak, A., Achtert, P., Wiedensohler, A., Hu, M., Shao, M

  17. Parametric studies of contrail ice particle formation in jet regime using microphysical parcel modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Condensation trails (contrails formed from water vapor emissions behind aircraft engines are the most uncertain components of the aviation impacts on climate change. To gain improved knowledge of contrail and contrail-induced cirrus cloud formation, understanding of contrail ice particle formation immediately after aircraft engines is needed. Despite many efforts spent in modeling the microphysics of ice crystal formation in jet regime (with a plume age <5 s, systematic understanding of parametric effects of variables affecting contrail ice particle formation is still limited. In this work, we apply a microphysical parcel modeling approach to study contrail ice particle formation in near-field aircraft plumes up to 1000 m downstream of an aircraft engine in the soot-rich regime (soot number emission index >1×1015 (kg-fuel−1 at cruise. The effects of dilution history, ion-mediated nucleation, ambient relative humidity, fuel sulfur contents, and initial soot emissions were investigated. Our simulation results suggest that ice particles are mainly formed by water condensation on emitted soot particles. The growth of ice coated soot particles is driven by water vapor emissions in the first 1000 m and by ambient relative humidity afterwards. The presence of chemi-ions does not significantly contribute to the formation of ice particles in the soot-rich regime, and the effect of fuel sulfur contents is small over the range typical of standard jet fuels. The initial properties of soot emissions play the most critical role, and our calculations suggest that higher number concentration and smaller size of contrail particle nuclei may be able to effectively suppress the formation of contrail ice particles. Further modeling and experimental studies are needed to verify if our findings can provide a possible approach for contrail mitigation.

  18. A Lagrangian study tracing water parcel origins in the Canary Upwelling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Mason

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The regional ocean circulation within the Canary Upwelling System between 31°N and 35°N is studied using numerical tools. Seasonal mean and near-instantaneous velocity fields from a previously-generated climatological Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS solution of the Canary Basin are used to force a series of offline Lagrangian particle-tracking experiments. The primary objective is to identify the pathways through which water parcels arrive at the upwelling region north of Cape Ghir. Examining year-long pathways, the Azores Current contributes over 80% of particles annually, of which a large proportion arrive directly from offshore (from the northwest, while others travel along the shelf and slope from the Gulf of Cadiz. The remaining ~20% originate within the Gulf of Cadiz or come from the south, although the southern contribution is only significant in autumn and winter. When season-long pathways are considered, the alongshore contributions become increasingly important: northern contributions reach 40% in spring and summer, while southern values exceed 35% in winter. This study also shows that coastal upwelling changes both spatially and temporally. Upwelling becomes intensified near Cape Beddouza, with most upwelling occurring within ~40 km from shore although significant values may reach as far as 120 km offshore north of Cape Beddouza; at these locations the offshore integrated upwelling reaches as much as 4 times the offshore Ekman transport. In the Cape Beddouza area (32°N to 33°N, upwelling is negligible in February but intensifies in autumn, reaching as much as 3 times the offshore Ekman transport.

  19. Lowering bronchoaspiration rate in an acute stroke unit by means of a 2 volume/3 texture dysphagia screening test with pulsioximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocho, D; Sagales, M; Cobo, M; Homs, I; Serra, J; Pou, M; Perez, G; Pujol, G; Tantinya, S; Bao, P; Aloy, A; Sabater, R; Gendre, J; Otermin, P

    During acute stroke, 30% of all patients present dysphagia and 50% of that subgroup will experience bronchoaspiration. Our aim was to compare mortality and bronchoaspiration rates associated with the water test compared to those associated with a 2 volume/3 texture test controlled with pulse oximetry (2v/3t-P test) in our stroke unit. Over a 5-year period, we performed a prospective analysis of all consecutive acute ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised in the Stroke Unit. Dysphagia was evaluated using the water test between 2008 and 2010 (group 0 or G0), and the 2v/3t-P test (group 1 or G1) between 2011 and 2012. We analysed demographic data, vascular risk factors, neurological deficit on the NIHSS, aetiological subtype according to TOAST criteria, clinical subtype according to the Oxfordshire classification, prevalence of dysphagia, percentage of patients with bronchoaspiration, and mortality. We examined 418 patients with acute stroke (G0=275, G1=143). There were significant differences between the 2 groups regarding the percentage of patients with TACI (17% in G0 vs. 29% in G1, P=.005) and median NIHSS score (4 points in G0 vs. 7 points in G1, P=.003). Since adopting the new swallowing test, we detected a non-significant increase in the percentage of dysphagia (22% in G0 vs. 25% in G1, P=.4), lower mortality (1.7% in G0 vs. 0.7% in G1, P=.3) and a significant decrease in the bronchoaspiration rate (6.2% in G0 vs. 2.1% in G1, P=.05). Compared to the water test used for dysphagia screening, the new 2v/3t-P test lowered bronchoaspiration rates in acute stroke patients. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a super-pressure balloon with a diamond-shaped net --- result of a ground inflation test of a 2,000 cubic-meter balloon ---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Nakashino, Kyoichi; Akita, Daisuke; Matsushima, Kiyoho; Shimadu, Shigeyuki; Goto, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Takuma

    2016-07-01

    A light super-pressure balloon has been developed using a method to cover a balloon with a diamond-shaped net of high-tensile fibers. The goal is to fly a payload of 900 kg to the altitude of 37 km with a 300,000 m^{3} balloon. Beginning from a demonstration test of the net-balloon with a 10 m^{3} balloon in 2010, we have been polished the net-balloon through ground inflation tests and flight tests, including a flight test of a 3,000 m ^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 15,000 m^{3} zero-pressure balloon in 2012, and a flight test of a 10 m^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 2 kg rubber balloon in 2013, as reported in the last COSPAR. In 2014, we developed a 5,000 m^{3} balloon and performed a ground inflation test to find that the balloon burst from a lip panel for termination with a differential pressure of 425 Pa. It was due to a stress concentration at the edge of a thick tape attached along the termination mechanism. In 2015, we modified the balloon by adding tapes on the lip panel to avoid the stress concentration, and also shorten the net length to leave some margin of the film and performed a ground inflation test again to find the balloon showed asymmetrical deployment and burst from the edge of the net with a differential pressure of 348 Pa. We consider it is due to the margin of the film along the circumferential direction, and proposed a gore shape which circumference length is kept as determined by the pumpkin shape of the balloon but setting meridian length longer than that. We developed a 10 m^{3} balloon with the gore design to find that the balloon deployed symmetrically and showed the burst pressure of 10,000 Pa. In 2016, we are going to develop a 2,000 m^{3} balloon with the gore design and perform its ground inflation test. In this paper, we are going to report its result with the sequence of the development.

  1. Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 and Historic Assessement of the Happy Valley Worker Camp Roane County, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    New South Associates

    2009-08-17

    Parcel ED-3 was the location of a portion of 'Happy Valley', a temporary worker housing area occupied from 1943 to 1947 during the construction of the K-25 Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The project was carried out under subcontract for the Department of Energy. The survey report will be used in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). New South Associates conducted a Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation in Roane County, Tennessee. The survey was conducted in two parts. The first survey was carried out in 2008 and covered an area measuring approximately 110 acres. The second survey took place in 2009 and focused on 72 acres west of the first survey area. The objective of the surveys was to identify any archaeological remains associated with Happy Valley and any additional sites on the property and to assess these sites for National Register eligibility. New South Associates also conducted a historic assessment to gather information on Happy Valley. This historic assessment was used in conjunction with the archaeological survey to evaluate the significance of the Happy Valley site. Archaeological remains of Happy Valley were located throughout the parcel, but no additional sites were located. The official state site number for Happy Valley is 40RE577. During the two surveys a total of 13 artifact concentrations, 14 isolated finds, and 75 structural features were located. Due to the Happy Valley's stron gassociation with the Manhattan Project, the site is recommended eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A.

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, The Tax Parcel shows the area and boundary of each property in a seamless layer covering the whole county along with the ability to connect to other matching tables., Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Washington County GIS Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2011. It...

  3. Applying geographic information systems to delineate residential suburbs and summarise data based on individual parcel attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan A. Sinske

    2013-02-01

    delineation could be automated in the GIS environment. The tool prevents subjective results that would be prone to error. The automated procedure described could effectively delineate a large number of predominantly residential suburbs in a relatively short time span and produce repeatable results. A reasonable outline could only be obtained if a sufficient number of parcels in the area contained the same suburb name. Functionality was added to the tool so that a limit could be set for this purpose. The default was that if more than 20% of the records were erroneous it was considered impractical to delineate a suburb. The derived suburb boundaries correspond to useful information in other data bases and would thus enable more effective management of the information.Conclusion: A novel procedure to delineate suburb boundaries in the GIS environment was illustrated in this article. Information at two different spatial scales, namely, individual consumers and suburbs, could be married for the purpose of further research into suburban attributes. The tool was applied as part of a parallel research project to delineate 468 suburbs in this manner, results of which were submitted for publication elsewhere.

  4. Use of a modified hair strand test to assess the antifungal activity kinetics of dog hair after a 2% climbazole shampoo application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Jean Yanique; Cavana, Paola; Thoumire, Sandra; Guillot, Jacques; Perrot, Sébastien

    2016-06-01

    The "hair strand test" was first developed as a model to evaluate the antifungal activity of antidandruff shampoos. To assess the residual activity of an antifungal shampoo on the hair shafts of dogs after a single application, followed by bathing with a physiological shampoo one month later. Six beagles (two males and four females) from a research colony. Dogs were bathed with a 2% climbazole shampoo. Hairs were collected before application of the shampoo and at scheduled intervals for 30 days after treatment. A physiological shampoo was then applied to all dogs and hairs were collected following the same schedule. The inhibition zone around the hair shafts was measured after incubation on Sabouraud's dextrose agar plates streaked with three Malassezia pachydermatis strains. Inhibition zones around hairs collected from dogs bathed with 2% climbazole shampoo were significantly larger than those around hairs collected before shampooing at all time points (P = 0.003). An increase in the width of the inhibition zones around climbazole treated hairs was observed following physiological shampoo on Day 30 (P = 0.005). No significant differences were observed between Malassezia pachydermatis isolates (P = 0.571). No inhibition zones were seen around the hairs of dogs bathed with physiological shampoo only. The modified hair strand test is useful for the assessment of residual antifungal activity on animal hairs. Use of a physiological shampoo following antifungal shampoo therapy may increase the efficacy of the antifungal product for the control of Malassezia overgrowth. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  5. Experimental testing of ab initio potential energy surfaces: Stereodynamics of NO(A2Σ+) + Ne inelastic scattering at multiple collision energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxford, Thomas F. M.; Sharples, Thomas R.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.; Costen, Matthew L.

    2016-11-01

    We present a crossed molecular beam velocity-map ion imaging study of state-to-state rotational energy transfer of NO(A2Σ+, v = 0, N = 0, j = 0.5) in collisions with Ne atoms. From these measurements, we report differential cross sections and angle-resolved rotational angular momentum alignment moments for product states N' = 3 and 5-10 for collisions at an average energy of 523 cm-1, and N' = 3 and 5-14 for collisions at an average energy of 1309 cm-1, respectively. The experimental results are compared to the results of close-coupled quantum scattering calculations on two literature ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) [Pajón-Suárez et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 429, 389 (2006) and Cybulski and Fernández, J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 7319 (2012)]. The differential cross sections from both experiment and theory show clear rotational rainbow structures at both collision energies, and comparison of the angles observed for the rainbow peaks leads to the conclusion that Cybulski and Fernández PES better represents the NO(A2Σ+)-Ne interaction at the collision energies used here. Sharp, forward scattered (<10°), peaks are observed in the experimental differential cross sections for a wide range of N' at both collision energies, which are not reproduced by theory on either PES. We identify these as L-type rainbows, characteristic of attractive interactions, and consistent with a shallow well in the collinear Ne-N-O geometry, similar to that calculated for the NO(A2Σ+)-Ar surface [Kłos et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 244303 (2008)], but absent from both of the NO(A2Σ+)-Ne surfaces tested here. The angle-resolved alignment moments calculated by quantum scattering theory are generally in good agreement with the experimental results, but both experiment and quantum scattering theories are dramatically different to the predictions of a classical rigid-shell, kinematic-apse conservation model. Strong oscillations are resolved in the experimental alignment moments as a

  6. Experimental testing of ab initio potential energy surfaces: Stereodynamics of NO(A(2)Σ(+)) + Ne inelastic scattering at multiple collision energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxford, Thomas F M; Sharples, Thomas R; McKendrick, Kenneth G; Costen, Matthew L

    2016-11-07

    We present a crossed molecular beam velocity-map ion imaging study of state-to-state rotational energy transfer of NO(A(2)Σ(+), v = 0, N = 0, j = 0.5) in collisions with Ne atoms. From these measurements, we report differential cross sections and angle-resolved rotational angular momentum alignment moments for product states N' = 3 and 5-10 for collisions at an average energy of 523 cm(-1), and N' = 3 and 5-14 for collisions at an average energy of 1309 cm(-1), respectively. The experimental results are compared to the results of close-coupled quantum scattering calculations on two literature ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) [Pajón-Suárez et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 429, 389 (2006) and Cybulski and Fernández, J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 7319 (2012)]. The differential cross sections from both experiment and theory show clear rotational rainbow structures at both collision energies, and comparison of the angles observed for the rainbow peaks leads to the conclusion that Cybulski and Fernández PES better represents the NO(A(2)Σ(+))-Ne interaction at the collision energies used here. Sharp, forward scattered (theory on either PES. We identify these as L-type rainbows, characteristic of attractive interactions, and consistent with a shallow well in the collinear Ne-N-O geometry, similar to that calculated for the NO(A(2)Σ(+))-Ar surface [Kłos et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 244303 (2008)], but absent from both of the NO(A(2)Σ(+))-Ne surfaces tested here. The angle-resolved alignment moments calculated by quantum scattering theory are generally in good agreement with the experimental results, but both experiment and quantum scattering theories are dramatically different to the predictions of a classical rigid-shell, kinematic-apse conservation model. Strong oscillations are resolved in the experimental alignment moments as a function of scattering angle, confirming and extending the preliminary report of this behavior [Steill et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 8163

  7. Creatine, similarly to ketamine, affords antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test via adenosine A₁ and A2A receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Pazini, Francis L; Rosa, Julia M; Ramos-Hryb, Ana B; Oliveira, Ágatha; Kaster, Manuella P; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-06-01

    The benefits of creatine supplementation have been reported in a broad range of central nervous systems diseases, including depression. A previous study from our group demonstrated that creatine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test (TST), a predictive model of antidepressant activity. Since depression is associated with a dysfunction of the adenosinergic system, we investigated the involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of creatine in the TST. The anti-immobility effect of creatine (1 mg/kg, po) or ketamine (a fast-acting antidepressant, 1 mg/kg, ip) in the TST was prevented by pretreatment of mice with caffeine (3 mg/kg, ip, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) (2 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist), and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-{2-furyl}{1,2,4}triazolo-{2,3-a}{1,3,5}triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)-phenol (ZM241385) (1 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist). In addition, the combined administration of subeffective doses of creatine and adenosine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, nonselective adenosine receptor agonist) or inosine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, nucleoside formed by the breakdown of adenosine) reduced immobility time in the TST. Moreover, the administration of subeffective doses of creatine or ketamine combined with N-6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) (0.05 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist), N-6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) (0.1 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist), or dipyridamole (0.1 μg/mouse, icv, adenosine transporter inhibitor) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the TST. These results indicate that creatine, similarly to ketamine, exhibits antidepressant-like effect in the TST probably mediated by the activation of both adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, further reinforcing the potential of targeting the purinergic system to the management of mood disorders.

  8. Water pipe (Shisha, Hookah, Arghile) Smoking and Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Effects on CYP1A2 and CYP2A6 Phenotypes as Measured by Caffeine Urine Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Llerena, Adrián; De Andrés, Fernando; Karakaş, Ümit; Gündoğar, Hasan; Erciyas, Kamile; Kimyon, Sabit; Mete, Alper; Güngör, Kıvanç; Özdemir, Vural

    2017-03-01

    Public policies to stop or reduce cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke and associated diseases have yielded successful results over the past decade. Yet, the growing worldwide popularity of another form of tobacco consumption, water pipe smoking, has received relatively less attention. To the best of our knowledge, no study to date has evaluated the effects of water pipe smoking on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) activities and drug interaction potential in humans, whereas only limited information is available on the impact of secondhand smoke on drug metabolism. In a sample of 99 healthy volunteers (28 water pipe smokers, 30 secondhand tobacco smoke exposed persons, and 41 controls), we systematically compared CYP1A2 and CYP2A6 enzyme activities in vivo using caffeine urine test. The median self-reported duration of water pipe smoking was 7.5 h/week and 3 years of exposure in total. The secondhand smoke group had a median of 14 h of self-reported weekly exposure to tobacco smoke indoor where a minimum of five cigarettes were smoked/hour for a total of 3.5 years (median). Analysis of variance did not find a significant difference in CYP1A2 and CYP2A6 activities among the three study groups (p > 0.05). Nor was there a significant association between the extent of water pipe or secondhand smoke exposure and the CYP1A2 and CYP2A6 activities (p > 0.05). Further analysis in a subsample with smoke exposure more than the median values also did not reveal a significant difference from the controls. Although we do not rule out an appreciable possible impact of water pipe smoke and secondhand smoke on in vivo activities of these two drug metabolism pathways, variability in smoke constituents from different tobacco consumption methods (e.g., water pipe) might affect drug metabolism in ways that might differ from that of cigarette smoke. Further studies in larger prospective samples are recommended to evaluate water pipe and secondhand tobacco smoke effects

  9. 基于ObjectARX的宗海界址图快速自动化绘制技术%Fast-Automatic Technology for Drawing Parcel Sea Boundary Map Base on ObjectARX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玉超; 曾纪胜

    2014-01-01

    宗海图精确记载宗海位置、界址点、界址线及与相邻宗海关系,是申明海域使用权属的重要依据,宗海图包括宗海位置图和宗海界址图。目前,大部分宗海界址图都是通过AutoCAD结合ArcGIS等多个软件绘制,绘制步骤比较繁琐。该文提出了基于ObjectARX的宗海界址图快速自动化绘制技术,基于该技术开发出的宗海界址图快速成图系统可以减少宗海界址图的绘制步骤,实现了在单一AutoCAD环境下宗海界址图的快速自动化绘制。%Parcel sea map record parcels the sea location,sea boundary points,sea boundary line and the relationship with the adjacentsea accurately, which is the important basis for stating the sea using right.Parcel sea map includes the parcel sea location map and parcel sea boundary map.Currently,the parcel sea boundary map is drawed by AutoCAD combine with ArcGIS and other softwares,but there are complicated steps by mixed using these softwares .This paper proposed the Fast-automatic technology for drawing parcel sea boundary map base on ObjectARX, the parcel sea boundary map fast mapping system which developed by the above-mentioned technology reduced the steps of drawing parcel sea boundary map, and realized the Fast-automatic parcel sea boundary map drawing use only AutoCAD.

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Sensititre YeastOne and CLSI M38-A2 Reference Method for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Aspergillus spp. against Echinocandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siopi, Maria; Pournaras, Spyros; Meletiadis, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (YO) panels were assessed for in vitro susceptibility testing of echinocandins against 39 isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, and A. terreus, including two echinocandin-resistant A. fumigatus strains, using different inocula (10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) CFU/ml), incubation times (16 to 48 h), and endpoints (first blue or purple well) and compared to CLSI M38-A2. The best agreement was found with an inoculum of 10(4) CFU/ml, incubation times of 20 h for A. flavus and of 30 h for A. fumigatus and A. terreus, and reading the first purple well. The reproducibility within ±1 2-fold dilutions was 100% for all three echinocandins. YO color endpoints were 2 to 3 2-fold dilutions lower than CLSI minimum effective concentrations (MECs) of caspofungin and 1 to 2 2-fold dilutions higher than CLSI MECs of micafungin. For anidulafungin, off-scale YO color endpoints were observed. Nevertheless, A. fumigatus echinocandin-resistant isolates were detected after 24 h of incubation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. 图斑自动编号程序的编写%A Program on Assigning Parcel Numbers Automatically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭小波; 孙变富; 霍涛

    2012-01-01

    Encoding parcels is an important job in land survey, but the artificial way is errorprone and inefficient. This paper introduces an automatic numbering program which makes the job efficient and accurate. This program adopts C #and ArcEngine compoments to number the mapsheets. Meanwhile, the source code is provided for reference.%图斑编号是土地调查工作中一项重要的工作,采用人工的方式既容易出错,效率也低下,本文采用C#及ArcEngine组件库开发了以图幅为单位图斑自动编号的程序,较好地解决了这个问题,并提供了源程序,供相关技术人员参考。

  12. The Evaluation of the Impact of New Technologies for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Trucks on Fuel Consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijuan; Duran, Adam; Kelly, Kenneth; Konan, Arnaud; Lammert, Michael; Prohaska, Robert

    2016-10-06

    In this paper, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory present the results of simulation studies to evaluate potential fuel savings as a result of improvements to vehicle rolling resistance, coefficient of drag, and vehicle weight as well as hybridization for four power trains for medium-duty parcel delivery vehicles. The vehicles will be modeled and simulated over 1,290 real-world driving trips to determine the fuel savings potential based on improvements to each technology and to identify best use cases for each platform. The results of impacts of new technologies on fuel saving will be presented, and the most favorable driving routes on which to adopt them will be explored.

  13. Characterization of the temporo-parietal junction by combining data-driven parcellation, complementary connectivity analyses, and functional decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdok, Danilo; Langner, Robert; Schilbach, Leonhard; Jakobs, Oliver; Roski, Christian; Caspers, Svenja; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    The right temporo-parietal junction (RTPJ) is consistently implicated in two cognitive domains, attention and social cognitions. We conducted multi-modal connectivity-based parcellation to investigate potentially separate functional modules within RTPJ implementing this cognitive dualism. Both task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping and task-free resting-state connectivity analysis independently identified two distinct clusters within RTPJ, subsequently characterized by network mapping and functional forward/reverse inference. Coactivation mapping and resting-state correlations revealed that the anterior cluster increased neural activity concomitantly with a midcingulate–motor–insular network, functionally associated with attention, and decreased neural activity concomitantly with a parietal network, functionally associated with social cognition and memory retrieval. The posterior cluster showed the exact opposite association pattern. Our data thus suggest that RTPJ links two antagonistic brain networks processing external versus internal information. PMID:23689016

  14. Laying Out Land Parcels and the Oldest Boundary Stone in Croatia from the 4th Century BC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Solarić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Geographical position of the Chora Pharos (nowadays Starogradsko polje, climate conditions and brief historical development of colonization on the island of Hvar are described in the paper. Also described is how Greek from the island of Paros established the town Pharos (today’s Stari Grad and how they constructed Chora Pharos (today’s Starogradsko polje. They divided the field Starogradsko polje into rectangular parcels with dimensions 1 Greek stage × 5 Greek stage (181 m × 905 m. The large project “Starogradsko polje” demonstrated that one Pharos foot equals 0.3026 m. They used the groma for pegging out orthogonal angles. Finally, there is a photograph of the boundary stone from the Chora Pharos (Starogradsko polje from the 4th century before Christ which is deposited in the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb. This is the oldest boundary stone in Croatia and as geodesists, we can consider it a geodetic monument.

  15. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Land Parcel ED-4 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAIC

    2008-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of a land parcel referred to as 'ED-4' (ED-4) at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land to the Heritage Center, LLC. Parcel ED-4 is a land parcel that consists of two noncontiguous areas comprising a total of approximately 18 acres located east of the ETTP. The western tract of ED-4 encompasses approximately 8.5 acres in the northeastern quadrant of the intersection of Boulevard Road and Highway 58. The eastern tract encompasses an area of approximately 9.5 acres in the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of Blair Road and Highway 58 (the Oak Ridge Turnpike). Aerial photographs and site maps from throughout the history of the ETTP, going back to its initial development in the 1940s as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), indicate that this area has been undeveloped woodland with the exception of three support facilities for workers constructing the ORGDP since federal acquisition in 1943. These three support facilities, which were located in the western tract of ED-4, included a recreation hall, the Town Hall Camp Operations Building, and the Property Warehouse. A railroad spur also formerly occupied a portion of Parcel ED-4. These former facilities only occupied approximately 5 percent of the total area of Parcel ED-4. This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity. This EBS is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). In order to support a Clean Parcel Determination (CPD) in accordance with CERCLA Sect. 120(h)(4)(d), groundwater and sediment samples were collected within, and adjacent to, the Parcel ED-4 study area. The potential for DOE to make a CPD for ED-4 is

  16. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  17. Land-Parcel Land-Use History as a Key to Site Selection for Documenting Soil Contamination Risk:a Case Study from Australian Suburbia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jie; Ursula Pietrzak; Jim Peterson

    2005-01-01

    In that orcharding in early-to-mid twentieth century southeastern Australia involved use of certain heavy metal and As compounds in regular pest-control spray procedures, some interest attaches to the possibility that these landparcels are underlain by soils with above-background Cu, Pb and As levels. Interpretation of Land-cover changes allowed land parcels previously occupied by orchards to be identified in the 1950s through time-series air-photos. A comparison of soil analysis results referring to soil samples from control sites, and from land parcels formerly occupied by orchardists, shows that contamination (above-background)levels of cations in the pesticides can be found in the top 6 cm of former orchard soils. It is clear that digital spatial data handling and culturally-informed air photo interpretation has a place in soil contamination studies,land-use planning (with particular reference to re-development) and in administration of public health.

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Separate county layers for an eleven county region. Each layer uses a common field structure. The same information is not available for all counties., Published in 2007, NC Dept of Commerce - DCA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Separate county layers for an eleven...

  19. Park Facilities, Boundaries were determined from parcel mapping lines & site specific items, such as shelter locations, were obtained by field GPS observation, Published in 2010, Not Applicable scale, Chippewa County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Park Facilities dataset current as of 2010. Boundaries were determined from parcel mapping lines & site specific items, such as shelter locations, were obtained...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, West Point, Georgia City Layout NAD 83, NAD 27, .shp.... mp076, mp094, mp095,, Published in 2003, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2003. It is...

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Ownership 24 - Created for the Wasatch Canyons Master Plan project, Published in 1989, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 1989. It is described as...

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF GEO-PROCESSING MODELS FOR THE AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF REMEDIATION PLAN AND NAVIGATION DATA TO USE IN INDUSTRIAL DISASTER REMEDIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lucas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces research done on the automatic preparation of remediation plans and navigation data for the precise guidance of heavy machinery in clean-up work after an industrial disaster. The input test data consists of a pollution extent shapefile derived from the processing of hyperspectral aerial survey data from the Kolontár red mud disaster. Three algorithms were developed and the respective scripts were written in Python. The first model aims at drawing a parcel clean-up plan. The model tests four different parcel orientations (0, 90, 45 and 135 degree and keeps the plan where clean-up parcels are less numerous considering it is an optimal spatial configuration. The second model drifts the clean-up parcel of a work plan both vertically and horizontally following a grid pattern with sampling distance of a fifth of a parcel width and keep the most optimal drifted version; here also with the belief to reduce the final number of parcel features. The last model aims at drawing a navigation line in the middle of each clean-up parcel. The models work efficiently and achieve automatic optimized plan generation (parcels and navigation lines. Applying the first model we demonstrated that depending on the size and geometry of the features of the contaminated area layer, the number of clean-up parcels generated by the model varies in a range of 4% to 38% from plan to plan. Such a significant variation with the resulting feature numbers shows that the optimal orientation identification can result in saving work, time and money in remediation. The various tests demonstrated that the model gains efficiency when 1/ the individual features of contaminated area present a significant orientation with their geometry (features are long, 2/ the size of pollution extent features becomes closer to the size of the parcels (scale effect. The second model shows only 1% difference with the variation of feature number; so this last is less interesting for

  3. Influence of purchaser perceptions and intentions on price for forest land parcels: a hedonic pricing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanie A. Snyder; Michael A. Kilgore; Rachel Hudson; Jacob Donnay

    2008-01-01

    A hedonic model was developed to analyze the market for undeveloped forest land in Minnesota. Variables describing in situ conditions, locational characteristics, buyer perceptions and intentions, and transactional terms were tested for their influence on sale price. The independent variables explained 67% of the per hectare sale price variation. Water frontage, road...

  4. Parcel-based connectivity analysis of fMRI data for the study of epileptic seizure propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tana, Maria Gabriella; Bianchi, Anna Maria; Sclocco, Roberta; Franchin, Tiziana; Cerutti, Sergio; Leal, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is to improve fMRI Granger Causality Analysis (GCA) by proposing and comparing two strategies for defining the topology of the networks among which cerebral connectivity is measured and to apply fMRI GCA for studying epileptic seizure propagation. The first proposed method is based on information derived from anatomical atlas only; the other one is based on functional information and employs an algorithm of hierarchical clustering applied to fMRI data directly. Both methods were applied to signals recorded during seizures on a group of epileptic subjects and two connectivity matrices were obtained for each patient. The performances of the different parcellation strategies were evaluated in terms of their capability to recover information about the source and the sink of the network (i.e., the starting and the ending point of the seizure propagation). The first method allows to clearly identify the seizure onset in all patients, whereas the network sources are not so immediately recognizable when the second method was used. Nevertheless, results obtained using functional clustering do not contradict those obtained with the anatomical atlas and are able to individuate the main pattern of propagation. In conclusion, the way nodes are defined can influence the easiness of identification of the epileptogenic focus but does not produce contradictory results showing the effectiveness of proposed approach to formulate hypothesis about seizure propagation at least in the early phase of investigation.

  5. Using structured decision making with landowners to address private forest management and parcelization: balancing multiple objectives and incorporating uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige F. B. Ferguson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parcelization and forest fragmentation are of concern for ecological, economic, and social reasons. Efforts to keep large, private forests intact may be supported by a decision-making process that incorporates landowners' objectives and uncertainty. We used structured decision making (SDM with owners of large, private forests in Macon County, North Carolina. Macon County has little land use regulation and a history of discordant, ineffective attempts to address land use and development. We worked with landowners to define their objectives, identify decision options for forest management, build a Bayesian decision network to predict the outcomes of decisions, and determine the optimal and least-desirable decision options. The optimal forest management options for an average, large, forested property (30 ha property with 22 ha of forest in Macon County was crown-thinning timber harvest under the Present-Use Value program, in which enrolled property is taxed at the present-use value (growing timber for commercial harvest rather than full market value. The least-desirable forest management actions were selling 1 ha and personal use of the forest (e.g., trails, firewood with or without a conservation easement. Landowners reported that they enjoyed participating in the project (85% and would reconsider what they are currently doing to manage their forest (69%. The decision that landowners initially thought would best meet their objectives did not match results from the decision network. This highlights the usefulness of SDM, which typically has been applied to decision problems involving public resources.

  6. Parcellation of the healthy neonatal brain into 107 regions using atlas propagation through intermediate time points in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eBlesa Cabez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39+5 weeks, range 37+2-41+6. An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database, with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33 constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modelling brain growth during development.

  7. Assessing the Battery Cost at Which Plug-In Hybrid Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles Become Cost-Effective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J. D.; Brooker, A. D.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validated diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid medium-duty parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reductions and cost implications of hybrid and plug-in hybrid diesel variants. The hybrid and plug-in hybrid variants are run on a field data-derived design matrix to analyze the effect of drive cycle, distance, engine downsizing, battery replacements, and battery energy on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. For an array of diesel fuel costs, the battery cost per kilowatt-hour at which the hybridized configuration becomes cost-effective is calculated. This builds on a previous analysis that found the fuel savings from medium duty plug-in hybrids more than offset the vehicles' incremental price under future battery and fuel cost projections, but that they seldom did so under present day cost assumptions in the absence of purchase incentives. The results also highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle specific daily distance and kinetic intensity.

  8. Parcelling out the Watershed: The Recurring Consequences of Organising Columbia River Management within a Basin-Based Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Vogel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines a 75-year history of North America’s Columbia river to answer the question: what difference does a river basin territory actually make? Advocates reason that river basins and watersheds are natural and holistic water management spaces, and can avoid the fragmentations and conflicts endemic to water management within traditional political territories. However, on the Columbia, this reasoning has not played out in practice. Instead, basin management has been shaped by challenges from and negotiations with more traditional jurisdictional spaces and political districts. The recurring result has been 'parcelling out the watershed': coordinating river management to produce a few spreadable benefits, and distributing these benefits, as well as other responsibilities and policy-making influence, to jurisdictional parts and political districts. To provide generous spreadable benefits, river management has unevenly emphasised hydropower, resulting in considerable environmental losses. However, benefits have been widely spread and shared – and over time challengers have forced management to diversify. Thus a river basin territory over time produced patterns of both positive and negative environmental, social, economic, and democratic outcomes. To improve the outcomes of watershed-based water management, we need more interactive and longer-term models attentive to dynamic politics and geographies.

  9. Rationale for reading fluconazole MICs at 24 hours rather than 48 hours when testing Candida spp. by the CLSI M27-A2 standard method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Rex, John H; Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J; Alexander, Barbara D; Andes, David; Brown, Steven D; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Knapp, Cindy C; Sheehan, Daniel J; Walsh, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    We investigated if CLSI M27-A2 Candida species breakpoints for fluconazole MIC are valid when read at 24 h. Analysis of a data set showed good correlation between 48- and 24-h MICs, as well as similar outcomes and pharmacodynamic efficacy parameters, except for isolates in the susceptible dose-dependent category, such as Candida glabrata.

  10. Rationale for Reading Fluconazole MICs at 24 Hours Rather than 48 Hours When Testing Candida spp. by the CLSI M27-A2 Standard Method▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Rex, John H.; Pfaller, Michael A.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Andes, David; Brown, Steven D.; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Knapp, Cindy C.; Sheehan, Daniel J.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated if CLSI M27-A2 Candida species breakpoints for fluconazole MIC are valid when read at 24 h. Analysis of a data set showed good correlation between 48- and 24-h MICs, as well as similar outcomes and pharmacodynamic efficacy parameters, except for isolates in the susceptible dose-dependent category, such as Candida glabrata. PMID:18809944

  11. Let’s Not Waste Time: Using Temporal Information in Clustered Activity Estimation with Spatial Adjacency Restrictions (CAESAR) for Parcellating FMRI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jylänki, Pasi; van Gerven, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed a Bayesian approach for functional parcellation of whole-brain FMRI measurements which we call Clustered Activity Estimation with Spatial Adjacency Restrictions (CAESAR). We use distance-dependent Chinese restaurant processes (dd-CRPs) to define a flexible prior which partitions the voxel measurements into clusters whose number and shapes are unknown a priori. With dd-CRPs we can conveniently implement spatial constraints to ensure that our parcellations remain spatially contiguous and thereby physiologically meaningful. In the present work, we extend CAESAR by using Gaussian process (GP) priors to model the temporally smooth haemodynamic signals that give rise to the measured FMRI data. A challenge for GP inference in our setting is the cubic scaling with respect to the number of time points, which can become computationally prohibitive with FMRI measurements, potentially consisting of long time series. As a solution we describe an efficient implementation that is practically as fast as the corresponding time-independent non-GP model with typically-sized FMRI data sets. We also employ a population Monte-Carlo algorithm that can significantly speed up convergence compared to traditional single-chain methods. First we illustrate the benefits of CAESAR and the GP priors with simulated experiments. Next, we demonstrate our approach by parcellating resting state FMRI data measured from twenty participants as taken from the Human Connectome Project data repository. Results show that CAESAR affords highly robust and scalable whole-brain clustering of FMRI timecourses. PMID:27935937

  12. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Salas, Joaquin; Arcos, David (Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and waste management company (SKB) is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) to test the behaviour of the bentonite buffer under conditions similar to those expected in a KBS-3 deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste (HLNW). In the present work a numerical model is developed to simulate (i) the thermo-hydraulic, (ii) transport and (iii) geochemical processes that have been observed in the LOT A2 test parcel. The LOT A2 test lasted approximately 6 years, and consists of a 4 m long vertical borehole drilled in diorite rock, from the ground of the Aespoe HRL tunnel. The borehole is composed of a central heater, maintained at 130 deg C in the lower 2 m of the borehole, a copper tube surrounding the heater and a 100 mm thick ring of pre-compacted Wyoming MX-80 bentonite around the copper tube /Karnland et al. 2009/. The numerical model developed here is a 1D axis-symmetric model that simulates the water saturation of the bentonite under a constant thermal gradient; the transport of solutes; and, the geochemical reactions observed in the bentonite blocks. Two cases have been modelled, one considering the highest temperature reached by the bentonite (at 3 m depth in the borehole, where temperatures of 130 and 85 deg C have been recorded near the copper tube and near the granitic host rock, respectively) and the other case assuming a constant temperature of 25 deg C, representing the upper part of borehole, where the bentonite has not been heated. In the LOT A2 test, the initial partially saturated bentonite becomes progressively water saturated, due to the injection of Aespoe granitic groundwater at granite - bentonite interface. The transport of solutes during the bentonite water saturation stage is believed to be controlled by water uptake from the surrounding groundwater to the wetting front and, additionally, in the case of heated bentonite, by a cyclic evaporation

  13. International and multicenter comparison of EUCAST and CLSI M27-A2 broth microdilution methods for testing susceptibilities of Candida spp. to fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Barchiesi, F.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Pfaller, M.A.; Rinaldi, M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Verweij, P.E.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole obtained by the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI (formerly NCCLS) methods in each of six centers for 15 Candida albicans (5 fluconazole-resistant and 4 susc

  14. International and multicenter comparison of EUCAST and CLSI M27-A2 broth microdilution methods for testing susceptibilities of Candida spp. to fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Barchiesi, F.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Pfaller, M.A.; Rinaldi, M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Verweij, P.E.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole obtained by the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI (formerly NCCLS) methods in each of six centers for 15 Candida albicans (5 fluconazole-resistant and 4 susc

  15. Realizing the cognitive potential of children 5-7 with a mathematics focus: post-test and long-term effects of a 2-year intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayer, Michael; Adhami, Mundher

    2010-09-01

    In the context of the British Government's policy directed on improving standards in schools, this paper presents research on the effects of a programme intended to promote the cognitive development of children in the first 2 years of primary school (Y1 & 2, aged 5-7 years). The programme is based on earlier work dealing with classroom-based interventions with older children at both primary and secondary levels of schooling. The hypothesis tested is that it is possible to increase the cognitive ability of children by assisting teachers towards that aim in the context of mathematics. A corollary hypothesis is that such an increase would result in an increase in long-term school achievement. The participants were 8 teachers in one local education authority (LEA) and 10 teachers in another. Data were analysed on 275 children present at Year 1 pre-test in 2002 and at long-term Key Stage 2 post-test in 2008. Two intervention methods were employed: a Y1 set of interactive activities designed around Piagetian concrete operational schemata, and mathematics lessons in both Y1 and Y2 designed from a theory-base derived from both Piaget and Vygotsky. At post-test in 2004, the mean effect sizes for cognitive development of the children - assessed by the Piagetian test Spatial Relations - were 0.71 SD in one LEA and 0.60 SD in the other. Five classes achieved a median increase of 1.3 SD. The mean gains over pre-test in 2002 for all children in Key Stage 1 English in 2004 were 0.51 SD, and at Key Stage 2 English in 2008 - the long-term effect - were 0.36 SD, an improvement of 14 percentile points. The main hypothesis was supported by the data on cognitive development. The corollary hypothesis is supported by the gains in English. The implications of this study are that relative intelligence can be increased and is not fixed, and that children can be led into collaborating with each other to the benefit of their own thinking, and that there does exist a theory-based methodology

  16. Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning: 1. Lagrangian parcel studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Matthew James; Prinn, Ronald G.

    2009-05-01

    We have developed a new model of the gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry of biomass burning smoke plumes called Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP). Here we use ASP combined with a Lagrangian parcel model to simulate the chemistry in smoke plumes from three fires: the Otavi savannah fire in Namibia, an Alaska boreal forest fire, and the Timbavati savannah fire. Our model explained the observations of ozone in the Otavi and Alaska plumes fairly well, but our initial model simulation of the Timbavati plume underestimated the concentrations of ozone, OH, and secondary aerosol matter. The Timbavati simulation agrees with observations if we increase OH to equal its observed levels. Heterogeneous reactions of NO2 and SO2 could explain the needed higher concentrations of OH and the rapid formation of ozone, nitrate, and sulfate in the smoke plume if the uptake coefficients on smoke aerosols are large (O(10-3) and O(10-4), respectively). Uncharacterized organic species in the smoke plume were likely responsible for the rapid formation of aerosol organic carbon. The changes in the aerosol size distribution were dominated by plume dilution and condensational growth. The single scattering albedo of the modeled smoke increases from 0.866 to 0.902 over 1 h of aging. The change in aerosol scattering with relative humidity for the modeled fresh smoke matches observations up to 66% RH, but the model greatly overestimates the humidification factor at 80% RH (2.88 versus an observed value of 1.70-1.79). For the aged smoke, the modeled humidification factor is 1.22, slightly below the observed value of 1.40.

  17. Connectivity-based parcellation of the thalamus explains specific cognitive and behavioural symptoms in patients with bilateral thalamic infarct.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Serra

    Full Text Available A novel approach based on diffusion tractography was used here to characterise the cortico-thalamic connectivity in two patients, both presenting with an isolated bilateral infarct in the thalamus, but exhibiting partially different cognitive and behavioural profiles. Both patients (G.P. and R.F. had a pervasive deficit in episodic memory, but only one of them (R.F. suffered also from a dysexecutive syndrome. Both patients had an MRI scan at 3T, including a T1-weighted volume. Their lesions were manually segmented. T1-volumes were normalised to standard space, and the same transformations were applied to the lesion masks. Nineteen healthy controls underwent a diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI scan. Their DTI data were normalised to standard space and averaged. An atlas of Brodmann areas was used to parcellate the prefrontal cortex. Probabilistic tractography was used to assess the probability of connection between each voxel of the thalamus and a set of prefrontal areas. The resulting map of corticothalamic connections was superimposed onto the patients' lesion masks, to assess whether the location of the thalamic lesions in R.F. (but not in G. P. implied connections with prefrontal areas involved in dysexecutive syndromes. In G.P., the lesion fell within areas of the thalamus poorly connected with prefrontal areas, showing only a modest probability of connection with the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Conversely, R.F.'s lesion fell within thalamic areas extensively connected with the ACC bilaterally, with the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and with the left supplementary motor area. Despite a similar, bilateral involvement of the thalamus, the use of connectivity-based segmentation clarified that R.F.'s lesions only were located within nuclei highly connected with the prefrontal cortical areas, thus explaining the patient's frontal syndrome. This study confirms that DTI tractography is a useful tool to examine in vivo the effect of focal

  18. 'Poppets and parcels': the links between staff experience of work and acutely ill older peoples' experience of hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maben, Jill; Adams, Mary; Peccei, Riccardo; Murrells, Trevor; Robert, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    Few empirical studies have directly examined the relationship between staff experiences of providing healthcare and patient experience. Present concerns over the care of older people in UK acute hospitals - and the reported attitudes of staff in such settings - highlight an important area of study. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES. To examine the links between staff experience of work and patient experience of care in a 'Medicine for Older People' (MfOP) service in England. A mixed methods case study undertaken over 8 months incorporating a 149-item staff survey (66/192 - 34% response rate), a 48-item patient survey (26/111 - 23%), 18 staff interviews, 18 patient and carer interviews and 41 hours of non-participant observation. Variation in patient experience is significantly influenced by staff work experiences. A high-demand/low-control work environment, poor staffing, ward leadership and co-worker relationships can each add to the inherent difficulties staff face when caring for acutely ill older people. Staff seek to alleviate the impact of such difficulties by finding personal satisfaction from caring for 'the poppets'; those patients they enjoy caring for and for whom they feel able to 'make a difference'. Other patients - noting dehumanising aspects of their care - felt like 'parcels'. Patients are aware of being seen by staff as 'difficult' or 'demanding' and seek to manage their relationships with nursing staff accordingly. The work experiences of staff in a MfOP service impacted directly on patient care experience. Poor ward and patient care climates often lead staff to seek job satisfaction through caring for 'poppets', leaving less favoured - and often more complex patients - to receive less personalised care. Implications for practice. Investment in staff well-being and ward climate is essential for the consistent delivery of high-quality care for older people in acute settings. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. New particle-dependent parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes: sensitivity studies of convective clouds with an air parcel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Diehl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the outcome of laboratory results, new particle-dependent parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing were derived and used to improve and extend a two-dimensional spectral microphysics scheme. They include (1 a particle-type dependent parameterization of immersion freezing using the numbers of active sites per mass, (2 a particle-type and size-resolved parameterization of contact freezing, and (3 a particle-type dependent description of deposition freezing. The modified microphysical scheme was embedded in an adiabatic air parcel model with entrainment. Sensitivity studies were performed to simulate convective situations and the impact of ice nuclei concentrations and types on ice formation. As a central diagnostic parameter the ice water fraction IWF was selected which is the relation of the ice water content to the total water content. The following parameters were varied: initial aerosol particle number size distributions, types of ice nucleating particles, strength of convection, and the fractions of potential ice nucleating particles. Single and coupled freezing processes were investigated. The results show that immersion freezing seems to be the most efficient process and, in competition with contact freezing, the dominant process. Contact freezing is constrained by the collision kernel between supercooled drops and potential ice nucleating particles and becomes relevant at temperatures lower than −25 °C. The importance of deposition freezing lies in secondary ice formation, i.e. small ice particles produced by deposition nucleation trigger the freezing of supercooled drops by collisions. Thus, a broader ice particle spectrum is generated than by immersion and contact freezing. Competition of contact and deposition freezing is negligible because of involved particle sizes. As already suggested in literature, mineral dust particles seem to be the most important ice nucleating particles. Biological particles are probably not

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI

  1. Testis-enriched heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2): Adaptive advantages of the birds with internal testes over the mammals with testicular descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Abinash; Ghaly, Mona M; Ma, Li

    2016-01-06

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2), a member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) family, plays an important role in spermatogenesis and male fertility. Although HSPA2 is evolutionarily highly conserved across the metazoan lineages, the observation of striking differences in temperature-sensitive expressions, testicular physiology, spermatogenesis, as well as its role in male fertility indicates that avian and mammalian HSPA2 may exhibit distinct evolutionary trajectory. The present study reports that while mammalian HSPA2 is constrained by intense purifying selection, avian HSPA2 has been subjected to positive selection. The majority of the positively selected amino acid residues fall on the α-helix and β-sheets of the peptide-binding domain located at the carboxyl-terminal region of the avian HSPA2. The detection of positively selected sites at the helix and β-sheets, which are less tolerant to molecular adaptation, indicates an important functional consequence and contribution to the structural and functional diversification of the avian HSPA2. Collectively, avian HSPA2 may have an adaptive advantage over the mammals in response to heat stress, and therefore, mammals with testicular descent may be at a greater risk in the event of scrotal temperature rise.

  2. Development and testing of a 2.5 kW synchronous generator with a high temperature superconducting stator and permanent magnet rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Timing; Song, Peng; Yu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Chen; Li, Longnian; Li, Xiaohang; Wang, Dewen; Hu, Boping; Chen, Duxing; Zeng, Pan; Han, Zhenghe

    2014-04-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) armature windings have the potential for increasing the electric loading of a synchronous generator due to their high current transport capacity, which could increase the power density of an HTS rotating machine. In this work, a novel synchronous generator prototype with an HTS stator and permanent magnet rotor has been developed. It has a basic structure of four poles and six slots. The armature winding was constructed from six double-pancake race-track coils with 44 turns each. It was designed to deliver 2.5 kW at 300 rpm. A concentrated winding configuration was proposed, to prevent interference at the ends of adjacent HTS coils. The HTS stator was pressure mounted into a hollow Dewar cooled with liquid nitrogen. The whole stator could be cooled down to around 82 K by conduction cooling. In the preliminary testing, the machine worked properly and could deliver 1.8 kW power when the armature current was 14.4 A. Ic for the HTS coils was found to be suppressed due to the influence of the temperature and the leakage field.

  3. International and multicenter comparison of EUCAST and CLSI M27-A2 broth microdilution methods for testing susceptibilities of Candida spp. to fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Barchiesi, F; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Verweij, P E

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole obtained by the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI (formerly NCCLS) methods in each of six centers for 15 Candida albicans (5 fluconazole-resistant and 4 susceptible-dose-dependent [S-DD] isolates), 10 C. dubliniensis, 7 C. glabrata (2 fluconazole-resistant isolates), 5 C. guilliermondii (2 fluconazole-resistant isolates), 10 C. krusei, 9 C. lusitaniae, 10 C. parapsilosis, and 5 C. tropicalis (1 fluconazole-resistant isolate) isolates. CLSI MICs were obtained visually at 24 and 48 h and spectrophotometric EUCAST MICs at 24 h. The agreement (within a 3-dilution range) between the methods was species, drug, and incubation time dependent and due to lower EUCAST than CLSI MICs: overall, 94 to 95% with fluconazole and voriconazole and 90 to 91% with posaconazole and itraconazole when EUCAST MICs were compared against 24-h CLSI results. The agreement was lower (85 to 94%) against 48-h CLSI endpoints. The overall interlaboratory reproducibility by each method was > or =92%. When the comparison was based on CLSI breakpoint categorization, the agreement was 68 to 76% for three of the four species that included fluconazole-resistant and S-DD isolates; 9% very major discrepancies ( or =64 microg/ml) were observed among fluconazole-resistant isolates and 50% with voriconazole ( or =4 microg/ml). Similar results were observed with itraconazole for seven of the eight species evaluated (28 to 77% categorical agreement). Posaconazole EUCAST MICs were also substantially lower than CLSI MIC modes (0.008 to 1 microg/ml versus 1 to > or =8 microg/ml) for some of these isolates. Therefore, the CLSI breakpoints should not be used to interpret EUCAST MIC data.

  4. International and Multicenter Comparison of EUCAST and CLSI M27-A2 Broth Microdilution Methods for Testing Susceptibilities of Candida spp. to Fluconazole, Itraconazole, Posaconazole, and Voriconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Barchiesi, F.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Pfaller, M. A.; Rinaldi, M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J. L.; Verweij, P. E.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole obtained by the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI (formerly NCCLS) methods in each of six centers for 15 Candida albicans (5 fluconazole-resistant and 4 susceptible-dose-dependent [S-DD] isolates), 10 C. dubliniensis, 7 C. glabrata (2 fluconazole-resistant isolates), 5 C. guilliermondii (2 fluconazole-resistant isolates), 10 C. krusei, 9 C. lusitaniae, 10 C. parapsilosis, and 5 C. tropicalis (1 fluconazole-resistant isolate) isolates. CLSI MICs were obtained visually at 24 and 48 h and spectrophotometric EUCAST MICs at 24 h. The agreement (within a 3-dilution range) between the methods was species, drug, and incubation time dependent and due to lower EUCAST than CLSI MICs: overall, 94 to 95% with fluconazole and voriconazole and 90 to 91% with posaconazole and itraconazole when EUCAST MICs were compared against 24-h CLSI results. The agreement was lower (85 to 94%) against 48-h CLSI endpoints. The overall interlaboratory reproducibility by each method was ≥92%. When the comparison was based on CLSI breakpoint categorization, the agreement was 68 to 76% for three of the four species that included fluconazole-resistant and S-DD isolates; 9% very major discrepancies (≤8 μg/ml versus ≥64 μg/ml) were observed among fluconazole-resistant isolates and 50% with voriconazole (≤1 μg/ml versus ≥4 μg/ml). Similar results were observed with itraconazole for seven of the eight species evaluated (28 to 77% categorical agreement). Posaconazole EUCAST MICs were also substantially lower than CLSI MIC modes (0.008 to 1 μg/ml versus 1 to ≥8 μg/ml) for some of these isolates. Therefore, the CLSI breakpoints should not be used to interpret EUCAST MIC data. PMID:16081926

  5. Amino acids analysis using grouping and parceling of neutrons cross sections techniques; Analise de aminoacidos atraves das tecnicas do agrupamento e parcelamento de secoes de choque para neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voi, Dante Luiz Voi [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Helio Fenandes da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira

    2002-07-01

    Amino acids used in parenteral administration in hospital patients with special importance in nutritional applications were analyzed to compare with the manufactory data. Individual amino acid samples of phenylalanine, cysteine, methionine, tyrosine and threonine were measured with the neutron crystal spectrometer installed at the J-9 irradiation channel of the 1 kW Argonaut Reactor of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN). Gold and D{sub 2}O high purity samples were used for the experimental system calibration. Neutron cross section values were calculated from chemical composition, conformation and molecular structure analysis of the materials. Literature data were manipulated by parceling and grouping neutron cross sections. (author)

  6. An SWOT Analysis of Intelligent Express Delivery Parcel Cabinets%基于SWOT分析的智能快递投递箱发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄正伟; 刘欢; 赵国莲; 张瑞

    2015-01-01

    介绍了智能快递投递箱的发展现状,然后采用SWOT分析法,对我国智能快递投递箱的发展优势、劣势、机遇与威胁进行分析,在此基础上提出若干对策建议.%In this paper, we introduced the current status of the development of the intelligent express delivery parcel cabinets, then using the SWOT analysis process, analyzed the strength, weakness, opportunities and threats in their development, and at the end, on such basis, proposed the corresponding countermeasures.

  7. ANR Land Dataset (Parcel)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The State of Vermont has a long history of acquiring properties for conservation and recreation purposes. Since the first official state forest (L.R. Jones State...

  8. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAIC

    2010-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Parcel ED-9 consists of about 13 acres that DOE proposes to transfer to Heritage Center, LLC (hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center'), a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). The 13 acres include two tracts of land, referred to as ED-9A (7.06 acres) and ED-9B (5.02 acres), and a third tract consisting of about 900 linear feet of paved road and adjacent right-of-way, referred to as ED-9C (0.98 acres). Transfer of the title to ED-9 will be by deed under a Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This report provides a summary of information to support the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity.

  9. Parcel feature data derived from Google Street View images for urban land use classification in Brooklyn, New York Cityfor urban land use classification in Brooklyn, New York Cityretain-->.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixing; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanrong; Hanink, Dean M; Li, Xiaojiang; Wang, Wenjie

    2017-06-01

    Google Street View (GSV) was used for urban land use classification, together with airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and high resolution orthoimagery, by a parcel-based method. In this data article, we present the input raw GSV images, intermediate products of GSV images, and final urban land use classification data that are related to our research article "Parcel-based urban land use classification in megacity using airborne LiDAR, high resolution orthoimagery, and Google Street View" (Zhang et al., 2017) [1]. More detail about other used data and our findings can be found in Zhang et al. (2017) [1].

  10. Microstructural parcellation of the human cerebral cortex – from Brodmann's post-mortem map to in vivo mapping with high-field magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Geyer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The year 2009 marked the 100th anniversary of the publication of the famous brain map of Korbinian Brodmann. Although a "classic" guide to microanatomical parcellation of the cerebral cortex, it is – from today's state-of-the-art neuroimaging perspective – problematic to use Brodmann's map as a structural guide to functional units in the cortex. In this article we discuss some of the reasons, especially the problematic compatibility of the "post-mortem world" of microstructural brain maps with the "in vivo world" of neuroimaging. We conclude with some prospects for the future of in vivo structural brain mapping: a new approach which has the enormous potential to make direct correlations between microstructure and function in living human brains: "in vivo Brodmann mapping" with high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Covenant Deferral Request for the Proposed Transfer of Land Parcel ED-8 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - Final - May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAIC

    2009-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer a land parcel (hereinafter referred to as 'the Property') designated as Land Parcel ED-8 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by deed, and is submitting this Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, and applicable U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance. The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes ETTP, was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in November 1989. Environmental investigation and cleanup activities are continuing at ETTP in accordance with CERCLA, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). The FFA was entered into by the DOE-Oak Ridge Office (ORO), EPA Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in 1991. The FFA establishes the schedule and milestones for environmental remediation of the ORR. The proposed property transfer is a key component of the Oak Ridge Performance Management Plan (ORPMP) for accelerated cleanup of the ORR. DOE, using its authority under Section 161(g) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), proposes to transfer the Property to Heritage Center, LLC, a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET), hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center.' CROET is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation established to foster the diversification of the regional economy by re-utilizing DOE property for private-sector investment and job creation. The Property is located in the southern portion of ETTP and consists of approximately 84 acres proposed as the potential site for new facilities to be used for office space, industrial activities, or other commercial uses. The parcel contains both grassy fields located outside the ETTP 'main plant' area and infrastructure located inside

  12. Analyzing the Measurement Equivalence of a Translated Test in a Statewide Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Carvajal-Espinoza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available When tests are translated into one or more languages, the question of the equivalence of items across language forms arises. This equivalence can be assessed at the scale level by means of a multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA in the context of structural equation modeling. This study examined the measurement equivalence of a Spanish translated version of a statewide Mathematics test originally constructed in English by using a multi-group CFA approach. The study used samples of native speakers of the target language of the translation taking the test in both the source and target language, specifically Hispanics taking the test in English and Spanish. Test items were grouped in twelve facet-representative parcels. The parceling was accomplished by grouping items that corresponded to similar content and computing an average for each parcel. Four models were fitted to examine the equivalence of the test across groups. The multi-group CFA fixed factor loadings across groups and results supported the equivalence of the two language versions (English and Spanish of the test. The statistical techniques implemented in this study can also be used to address the performance on a test based on dichotomous or dichotomized variables such as gender, socioeconomic status, geographic location and other variables of interest.

  13. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, David A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site

  14. Synchronous changes of cortical thickness and corresponding white matter microstructure during brain development accessed by diffusion MRI tractography from parcellated cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eJeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cortical thickness (CT changes during normal brain development is associated with complicated cellular and molecular processes including synaptic pruning and apoptosis. In parallel, the microstructural enhancement of developmental white matter (WM axons with their neuronal bodies in the cerebral cortex has been widely reported with measurements of metrics derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, especially fractional anisotropy (FA. We hypothesized that the changes of CT and microstructural enhancement of corresponding axons are highly interacted during development. DTI and T1-weighted images of 50 healthy children and adolescents between the ages of 7 to 25 years were acquired. With the parcellated cortical gyri transformed from T1-weighted images to DTI space as the tractography seeds, probabilistic tracking was performed to delineate the WM fibers traced from specific parcellated cortical regions. CT was measured at certain cortical regions and FA was measured from the WM fibers traced from same cortical regions. The CT of all frontal cortical gyri, includeing Brodmann areas 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 44, 45, 46 and 47, decreased significantly and heterogeneously; concurrently, significant and heterogeneous increases of FA of WM traced from corresponding regions were found. We further revealed significant correlation between the slopes of the CT decrease and the slopes of corresponding WM FA increase in all frontal cortical gyri, suggesting coherent cortical pruning and corresponding WM microstructural enhancement. Such correlation was not found in cortical regions other than frontal cortex. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these synchronous changes may be associated with overlapping signaling pathways of axonal guidance, synaptic pruning, neuronal apoptosis and more prevalent interstitial neurons in the prefrontal cortex. Revealing the coherence of cortical and WM structural changes during development may open a new window for

  15. Antifungal susceptibility test of Paecilomyces hepiali by CLSI M38-A2 broth dilution method%CLSI M38-A2肉汤稀释法对蝙蝠蛾拟青霉(Paecilomyces hepiali)的药敏检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵婷; 姚粟; 李辉; 薛强伟; 程池

    2012-01-01

    [目的]对保健食品生产菌株蝙蝠蛾拟青霉(Paecilomyces hepiali)进行6种常见抗真菌药物:伊曲康唑、酮康唑、伏立康唑、环吡酮胺、5-氟胞嘧啶、氟康唑的药敏检测.[方法]参考美国国家临床实验室标准化委员会CLSI M38-A2《肉汤稀释法抗真菌药敏试验参考方案》.[结果]质控菌株MIC值均在参考范围之内,蝙蝠蛾拟青霉(P.hepiali)对以上6种药物的MIC值分别为1 mg/L、0.5 mg/L、0.25 mg/L、≥128 mg/L、64 mg/L、2 mg/L.[结论]M38-A2方案适合用来测定蝙蝠蛾拟青霉(P.hepiali)对抗真菌药物的敏感性,但获得菌株耐药敏感性的判别标准,仍需进一步的试验数据.%[Objective] To test filamentous fungi antifungal susceptibility, this study determined the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 6 antifungal agents: Itraconazole (ITC), Ketoconazole (KET), Voriconazole (VRC), Ciclopirox (CIC), 5-Flurocytosine (5FC), Fluconazole (FLU) to the strain Paecilomyces hepiali which usually used in health food industry.[Methods] Method of Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M38-A2 was referred.[Results] The results showed that the quality control strain Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019T MIC values were within the reference range, the strain P.hepiali MIC values for the 6 antifungal agents were 1 mg/L, 0.5 mg/L, 0.25 mg/L, ≥128 mg/L, 64 mg/L, 2 mg/L respectively.[Conclusion] M38-A2 method could be applied to determine the susceptibility of P.hepiali to antifungal agents.But, more tests needed to acquire the standard interpretation of the strains susceptibility.

  16. Evaluation of CLSI M44-A2 disk diffusion and associated breakpoint testing of caspofungin and micafungin using a well-characterized panel of wild-type and fks hot spot mutant Candida isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Park, Steven; Brown, Steven; Pfaller, Michael; Perlin, David S

    2011-05-01

    Disk diffusion testing has recently been standardized by the CLSI, and susceptibility breakpoints have been established for several antifungal compounds. For caspofungin, 5-μg disks are approved, and for micafungin, 10-μg disks are under evaluation. We evaluated the performances of caspofungin and micafungin disk testing using a panel of Candida isolates with and without known FKS echinocandin resistance mechanisms. Disk diffusion and microdilution assays were performed strictly according to CLSI documents M44-A2 and M27-A3. Eighty-nine clinical Candida isolates were included: Candida albicans (20 isolates/10 mutants), C. glabrata (19 isolates/10 mutants), C. dubliniensis (2 isolates/1 mutant), C. krusei (16 isolates/3 mutants), C. parapsilosis (14 isolates/0 mutants), and C. tropicalis (18 isolates/4 mutants). Quality control strains were C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. krusei ATCC 6258. The correlations between zone diameters and MIC results were good for both compounds, with identical susceptibility classifications for 93.3% of the isolates by applying the current CLSI breakpoints. However, the numbers of fks hot spot mutant isolates misclassified as being susceptible (S) (very major errors [VMEs]) were high (61% for caspofungin [S, ≥11 mm] and 93% for micafungin [S, ≥14 mm]). Changing the disk diffusion breakpoint to S at ≥22 mm significantly improved the discrimination. For caspofungin, 1 VME was detected (a C. tropicalis isolate with an F76S substitution) (3.5%), and for micafungin, 10 VMEs were detected, the majority of which were for C. glabrata (8/10). The broadest separation between zone diameter ranges for wild-type (WT) and mutant isolates was seen for caspofungin (6 to 12 mm versus -4 to 7 mm). In conclusion, caspofungin disk diffusion testing with a modified breakpoint led to excellent separation between WT and mutant isolates for all Candida species.

  17. Evaluation of CLSI M44-A2 Disk Diffusion and Associated Breakpoint Testing of Caspofungin and Micafungin Using a Well-Characterized Panel of Wild-Type and fks Hot Spot Mutant Candida Isolates▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Park, Steven; Brown, Steven; Pfaller, Michael; Perlin, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Disk diffusion testing has recently been standardized by the CLSI, and susceptibility breakpoints have been established for several antifungal compounds. For caspofungin, 5-μg disks are approved, and for micafungin, 10-μg disks are under evaluation. We evaluated the performances of caspofungin and micafungin disk testing using a panel of Candida isolates with and without known FKS echinocandin resistance mechanisms. Disk diffusion and microdilution assays were performed strictly according to CLSI documents M44-A2 and M27-A3. Eighty-nine clinical Candida isolates were included: Candida albicans (20 isolates/10 mutants), C. glabrata (19 isolates/10 mutants), C. dubliniensis (2 isolates/1 mutant), C. krusei (16 isolates/3 mutants), C. parapsilosis (14 isolates/0 mutants), and C. tropicalis (18 isolates/4 mutants). Quality control strains were C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. krusei ATCC 6258. The correlations between zone diameters and MIC results were good for both compounds, with identical susceptibility classifications for 93.3% of the isolates by applying the current CLSI breakpoints. However, the numbers of fks hot spot mutant isolates misclassified as being susceptible (S) (very major errors [VMEs]) were high (61% for caspofungin [S, ≥11 mm] and 93% for micafungin [S, ≥14 mm]). Changing the disk diffusion breakpoint to S at ≥22 mm significantly improved the discrimination. For caspofungin, 1 VME was detected (a C. tropicalis isolate with an F76S substitution) (3.5%), and for micafungin, 10 VMEs were detected, the majority of which were for C. glabrata (8/10). The broadest separation between zone diameter ranges for wild-type (WT) and mutant isolates was seen for caspofungin (6 to 12 mm versus −4 to 7 mm). In conclusion, caspofungin disk diffusion testing with a modified breakpoint led to excellent separation between WT and mutant isolates for all Candida species. PMID:21357293

  18. DEVELOPING AND TESTING A 3D CADASTRAL DATA MODEL A CASE STUDY IN AUSTRALIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aien

    2012-07-01

    Many jurisdictions, organizations and software developers have built their own cadastral data model. Land Administration Domain Model (DIS-ISO 19152, The Netherlands and ePlan (Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping, Australia are examples of existing data models. The variation between these data models is the result of different attitudes towards cadastres. However, there is a basic common thread among them all. Current cadastral data models use a 2D land-parcel concept and extend it to support 3D requirements. These data models cannot adequately manage and represent the spatial extent of 3D RRRs. Most of the current cadastral data models have been influenced by a very broad understanding of 3D cadastral concepts because better clarity in what needs to be represented and analysed in the cadastre needs to be established. This paper presents the first version of a 3D Cadastral Data Model (3DCDM_Version 1.0. 3DCDM models both the legal and physical extent of 3D properties and associated interests. The data model extends the traditional cadastral requirements to cover other applications such as urban planning and land valuation and taxation. A demonstration of a test system on the proposed data model is also presented. The test is based on a case study in Victoria, Australia to evaluate the effectiveness of the data model.

  19. Stratospheric ozone loss in the 1996/1997 Arctic winter: Evaluation based on multiple trajectory analysis for double-sounded air parcels by ILAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Yukio; Sasano, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Hideaki; Tanaka, H. L.; Yasunari, Tetsuzo

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative chemical ozone loss rates and amounts in the Arctic polar vortex for the spring of 1997 are analyzed based on ozone profile data obtained by the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) using an extension of the Match technique. In this study, we calculated additional multiple trajectories and set very strict criteria to overcome the weakness of the satellite sensor data (lower vertical resolution and larger sampling air mass volume) and to identify more accurately a double-sounded air mass. On the average inside the inner edge of the vortex boundary (north of about 70°N equivalent latitude), the local ozone loss rate was 50-80 ppbv/day at the maximum during late February between the levels of 450 and 500 K potential temperatures. The integrated ozone loss during February to March reached 2.0 ± 0.1 ppmv at 475-529 K levels, and the column ozone loss between 400 and 600 K during the 2 months was 96 ± 0.3 DU. Using a relative potential vorticity (rPV) scale, the vortex was divided into some rPV belts, and it was shown that the magnitude of the ozone loss increased gradually toward the vortex center from the edge. The maximum ozone loss rate of 6.0 ± 0.6 ppbv/sunlit hour near the vortex center was higher than near the vortex edge by a factor of 2-3. When we expanded the area of interest to include all the data obtained inside the vortex edge (north of about 65°N equivalent latitude), the local ozone loss rate was about 50 ppbv/day at the maximum. This value is slightly larger than that estimated by the Match analysis using ozonesondes for the same winter by ˜10 ppbv/day. Temperature histories of double-sounded air parcels indicated that the extreme ozone loss in the innermost part of the vortex was observed when the air parcel experienced temperatures below TNAT during the two soundings and had experienced temperatures near Tice in the 10 days prior to the first sounding. These facts suggest that the high ozone loss rate deep inside the vortex

  20. Comparison between the 1% and 2% ibopamine provocative test in primary open-angle glaucoma patients: sensitivity, specificity and tolerability Comparação entre o teste de ibopamina a 1% e a 2% no glaucoma primário de ângulo aberto: sensibilidade, especificidade e tolerabilidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Magacho

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare intraocular pressure (IOP rise in normal individuals and primary open-angle glaucoma patients and the safety and efficacy of ibopamine eye drops in different concentrations as a provocative test for glaucoma. METHODS: Glaucoma patients underwent (same eye the ibopamine provocative test with two concentrations, 1% and 2%, in a random sequence at least 3 weeks apart, but not more than 3 months. The normal individuals were randomly submitted to one of the concentrations of ibopamine (1% and 2%. The test was considered positive if there was an IOP rise greater than 3 or 4 mmHg at 30 or 45 minutes to test which subset of the test has the best sensitivity (Se/specificity (Sp. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in any of the IOP measurements, comparing 1% with 2% ibopamine. The IOP was significantly higher at 30 and 45 minutes with both concentrations (pOBJETIVO: Comparar a tolerabilidade e a eficácia do teste provocativo da ibopamina com diferentes concentrações em pacientes com glaucoma primário de ângulo aberto. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com glaucoma (mesmo olho foram aleatoriamente submetidos ao teste provocativo da ibopamina com as duas concentrações comercialmente disponíveis: 1% e 2% com pelo menos 3 semanas de intervalo, mas não superior a 3 meses. Os indivíduos normais foram randomizados a uma das concentrações utilizadas. O teste era considerado positivo se houvesse elevação da pressão intra-ocular (Pio superior a 3 ou 4 mmHg 30 ou 45 minutos após o início do teste para se estabelecer a melhor relação sensibilidade (Se/especificidade (Es do teste. RESULTADOS: Treze pacientes com glaucoma, 15 indivíduos normais com a ibopamina a 2% e 13 com a ibopamina a 1% foram incluídos. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa em qualquer uma das médias da Pio entre a ibopamina a 1% ou a 2%. A Pio foi significativamente maior aos 30 e 45 minutos com ambas as concentrações (p3 mm

  1. CLSI EP12-A2文件在HBeAb定性检测性能评价中的应用%Application of CLSI EP12-A2 document in the performance evaluation of qualitative test of HbeAb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄妩姣; 黄宪章; 庄俊华; 李强; 黄惠; 张强

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate A and B ELISA kits for detecting qualitatively anti-hepatitis B e antigen antibody( HBeAb ), and to provide useful reference for choosing suitable HBeAb kits. Methods According to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute ( CLSI ) EP12-A2 document,the bias and imprecision of A and B HBeAb kits were analyzed,and their C50,C5-C95 intervals and imprecision curves were compared. The HBeAb of 910 specimens were simultaneously determined by both A and B kits. The 95% confidence interval ( CI )for concordance was calculated. The Kappa value was calculated to evaluate their concordance. Results C50 for A kit was less than that for B kit. C5 - C95 interval of A kit was narrower than that of B kit. The imprecision curve of A kit was steeper than that of B kit. The 95% CI for concordance was calculated as 93. 2%-96. 1% , and the Kappa value was 0. 87. Conclusions EP12-A2 is a useful protocol for the evaluation of qualitative test performance.%目的 对A和B 2种定性检测人血清抗乙型肝炎病毒e抗体(HBeAb)的酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)试剂盒进行评估,为实验室选择合适的HBeAb试剂提供实验依据.方法 参照美国临床实验室标准化协会(CLSI)EP12-A2文件推荐方法,对A和B 2种HBeAb检测试剂做偏倚和不精密度分析,比较2种HBeAb检测试剂的C50、C5~C95区间以及不精密度曲线.用2种试剂同时检测910份标本的HBeAb,计算检测结果一致程度的95%可信区间(CI),计算(Kappa)值,评价一致性.结果 A试剂检测血清HBeAb的C50小于B试剂的C50,A试剂的C5~C95区间比B试剂的窄,A试剂的不精密度曲线比B试剂的陡峭;2种试剂检测标本HBeAb一致程度的95%CI为93.2%~96.1%,Kappa值约0.87.结论 EP12-A2作为定性检测的性能评价方法可行.

  2. Outer Continental Shelf Grids, This is an ESRI SDE feature class that depicts less than parcel size Landuse designations for use in maqpping the Rock County Township Land Use Development Plans., Published in 2006, Rock County Planning, Economic, and Community Development Agency.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Outer Continental Shelf Grids dataset as of 2006. It is described as 'This is an ESRI SDE feature class that depicts less than parcel size Landuse designations...

  3. Parcels and Land Ownership, aolsa UTM27-The dataset represents the original data from BLM ownership maps with selected revisions performed by SITLA and SLFO. SLFO revisions reflect BLM ownership only and are based on master title plat maps and verified by the SLFO realty specialist., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Tooele County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as...

  4. Cellular Phone Towers, Cell towers developed for Appraiser's Department in 2003. Location was based upon parcel centroids, and corrected to orthophotography. Probably includes towers other than cell towers (uncertain). Not published., Published in 2003, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Cellular Phone Towers dataset current as of 2003. Cell towers developed for Appraiser's Department in 2003. Location was based upon parcel centroids, and corrected...

  5. Within-digit functional parcellation of Brodmann areas of the human primary somatosensory cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Panchuelo, Rosa M; Besle, Julien; Beckett, Alex; Bowtell, Richard; Schluppeck, Denis; Francis, Susan

    2012-11-07

    The primary somatosensory cortex (S1) can be subdivided cytoarchitectonically into four distinct Brodmann areas (3a, 3b, 1, and 2), but these areas have never been successfully delineated in vivo in single human subjects. Here, we demonstrate the functional parcellation of four areas of S1 in individual human subjects based on high-resolution functional MRI measurements made at 7 T using vibrotactile stimulation. By stimulating four sites along the length of the index finger, we were able to identify and locate map reversals of the base to tip representation of the index finger in S1. We suggest that these reversals correspond to the areal borders between the mirrored representations in the four Brodmann areas, as predicted from electrophysiology measurements in nonhuman primates. In all subjects, maps were highly reproducible across scanning sessions and stable over weeks. In four of the six subjects scanned, four, mirrored, within-finger somatotopic maps defining the extent of the Brodmann areas could be directly observed on the cortical surface. In addition, by using multivariate classification analysis, the location of stimulation on the index finger (four distinct sites) could be decoded with a mean accuracy of 65% across subjects. Our measurements thus show that within-finger topography is present at the millimeter scale in the cortex and is highly reproducible. The ability to identify functional areas of S1 in vivo in individual subjects will provide a framework for investigating more complex aspects of tactile representation in S1.

  6. Statistical analyses of correlation between fluconazole MICs for Candida spp. assessed by standard methods set forth by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (E.Dis. 7.1) and CLSI (M27-A2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Donnelly, J.P.; Pfaller, M.A.; Chryssantou, E.; Warn, P.; Denning, D.W.; Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Barchiesi, F.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.

    2007-01-01

    The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing recently published a standard for determining the susceptibility of fermentative yeasts to antifungals. From the beginning, the EUCAST and its North American counterpart, the CLS

  7. Statistical analyses of correlation between fluconazole MICs for Candida spp. assessed by standard methods set forth by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (E.Dis. 7.1) and CLSI (M27-A2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Donnelly, J.P.; Pfaller, M.A.; Chryssantou, E.; Warn, P.; Denning, D.W.; Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Barchiesi, F.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.

    2007-01-01

    The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing recently published a standard for determining the susceptibility of fermentative yeasts to antifungals. From the beginning, the EUCAST and its North American counterpart, the CLS

  8. Green-roof as a solution to solve stormwater management issues? Assessment on a long time period at the parcel scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versini, P.-A.; Petrucci, G.; de Gouvello, B.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental green-roof rainfall-runoff observations have shown a positive impact on stormwater management at the building scale; with a decrease in the peak discharge and a decrease in runoff volume. This efficiency of green-roofs varies from one rainfall event to another depending on precipitation characteristics and substrate antecedent conditions. Due to this variability, currently, green-roofs are rarely officially used as a regulation tool to manage stormwater. Indeed, regulation rules governing the connection to the stormwater network are usually based on absolute threshold values that always have to be respected: maximum areal flow-rate or minimum retention volume for example. In this context, the aim of this study is to illustrate how a green-roof could represent an alternative to solve stormwater management issues, if the regulation rules were further based on statistics. For this purpose, a modelling scheme has been established at the parcel scale to simulate the hydrological response of several roof configurations: impervious, strictly regulated (in terms of areal flow-rate or retention volume), and covered by different types of green-roof matter. Simulations were carried out on a long precipitation time period (23 years) that included a large and heterogeneous set of hydrometeorological conditions. Results obtained for the different roof configurations were compared. Based on the return period of the rainfall event, the probability to respect some regulation rules (defined from real situations) was assessed. They illustrate that green-roofs reduce stormwater runoff compared to an impervious roof surface and can guarantee the respect of the regulation rules in most of the cases. Moreover, their implementation can appear more realistic than that of other infrastructures strictly complying with regulations and demanding significant storage capacity.

  9. The Design and Realization of Management System for Parcel Land Tax Source in Ji′nan%济南市宗地税源管理系统的设计与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴闯; 蔡永宁; 梁勇

    2015-01-01

    Tax Administration levied against asymmetric information , taxpayer concealed , inaccurate registration in-formation and other land parcel tax source management-related problems,we developed Web GIS technology based tax administration system that can efficiently handle data parcel tax the main data sector tax collection information and map -ping unit geospatial data and other information ,to achieve the integration of updated data ,the formation of a "duty to con-trol information than doubtful verification ,dynamic monitoring" of tax management mechanism .Practice has proved that the system is effective management of the parcel tax source ,the system works well for the economic and social develop-ment played an important role .%针对税收管理中征纳双方信息不对称、纳税人瞒报、土地的登记信息不准确等宗地税源管理相关问题,本文研发了基于Web GIS技术的税收管理系统,可以高效处理宗地数据、税务部门的税收征管信息和测绘单位的地理空间信息数据等主要的数据,实现了数据的整合更新,形成了"以地控税、信息比对、疑点核实、动态监控 "的税收管理机制. 实践证明,该系统有效管理了宗地税源,系统运行良好,为经济社会发展发挥了重要作用.

  10. Test-retest reliability of white matter structural brain networks: A multiband diffusion MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengda eZhao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The multiband EPI sequence has been developed for the human connectome project to accelerate MRI data acquisition. However, no study has yet investigated the test-retest (TRT reliability of the graph metrics of white matter (WM structural brain networks constructed from this new sequence. Here, we employed a multiband diffusion MRI (dMRI dataset with repeated scanning sessions and constructed both low- and high-resolution WM networks by volume- and surface-based parcellation methods. The reproducibility of network metrics and its dependence on type of construction procedures was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. We observed conserved topological architecture of WM structural networks constructed from the multiband dMRI data as previous findings from conventional dMRI. For the global network properties, the first order metrics were more reliable than second order metrics. Between two parcellation methods, networks with volume-based parcellation showed better reliability than surface-based parcellation, especially for the global metrics. Between different resolutions, the high-resolution network exhibited higher TRT performance than the low-resolution in terms of the global metrics with a large effect size, whereas the low-resolution performs better in terms of local (region and connection properties with a relatively low effect size. Moreover, we identified that the association and primary cortices showed higher reproducibility than the paralimbic/limbic regions. The important hub regions and rich-club connections are more reliable than the non-hub regions and connections. Finally, we found WM networks from the multiband dMRI showed higher reproducibility compared with those from the conventional dMRI. Together, our results demonstrated the fair to good reliability of the WM structural brain networks from the multiband EPI sequence, suggesting its potential utility for exploring individual differences and for clinical

  11. Test-retest reliability of white matter structural brain networks: a multiband diffusion MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tengda; Duan, Fei; Liao, Xuhong; Dai, Zhengjia; Cao, Miao; He, Yong; Shu, Ni

    2015-01-01

    The multiband EPI sequence has been developed for the human connectome project to accelerate MRI data acquisition. However, no study has yet investigated the test-retest (TRT) reliability of the graph metrics of white matter (WM) structural brain networks constructed from this new sequence. Here, we employed a multiband diffusion MRI (dMRI) dataset with repeated scanning sessions and constructed both low- and high-resolution WM networks by volume- and surface-based parcellation methods. The reproducibility of network metrics and its dependence on type of construction procedures was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). We observed conserved topological architecture of WM structural networks constructed from the multiband dMRI data as previous findings from conventional dMRI. For the global network properties, the first order metrics were more reliable than second order metrics. Between two parcellation methods, networks with volume-based parcellation showed better reliability than surface-based parcellation, especially for the global metrics. Between different resolutions, the high-resolution network exhibited higher TRT performance than the low-resolution in terms of the global metrics with a large effect size, whereas the low-resolution performs better in terms of local (region and connection) properties with a relatively low effect size. Moreover, we identified that the association and primary cortices showed higher reproducibility than the paralimbic/limbic regions. The important hub regions and rich-club connections are more reliable than the non-hub regions and connections. Finally, we found WM networks from the multiband dMRI showed higher reproducibility compared with those from the conventional dMRI. Together, our results demonstrated the fair to good reliability of the WM structural brain networks from the multiband EPI sequence, suggesting its potential utility for exploring individual differences and for clinical applications.

  12. Assessing land-use history for reporting on cropland dynamics - A case study using the Land-Parcel Identification System in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jesko; González, Ainhoa; Jones, Michael; O'Brien, Phillip; Stout, Jane C.; Green, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In developed countries, cropland and grassland conversions and management can be a major factor in Land Use and Land Use Change (LULUC) related Greenhouse Gas (GHG) dynamics. Depending on land use, management and factors such as soil properties land can either act as source or sink for GHGs. Currently many countries depend on national statistics combined with socio-economic modelling to assess current land use as well as inter-annual changes. This potentially introduces a bias as it neither provides information on direct land- use change trajectories nor spatially explicit information to assess the environmental context. In order to improve reporting countries are shifting towards high resolution spatial datasets. In this case study, we used the Land Parcel Identification System (LPIS), a pan-European geographical database developed to assist farmers and authorities with agricultural subsidies, to analyse cropland dynamics in Ireland. The database offer high spatial resolution and is updated annually. Generally Ireland is considered grassland dominated with 90 % of its agricultural area under permanent grassland, and only a small area dedicated to cropland. However an in-depth analysis of the LPIS for the years 2000 to 2012 showed strong underlying dynamics. While the annual area reported as cropland remained relatively constant at 3752.3 ± 542.3 km2, the area of permanent cropland was only 1251.9 km2. Reversely, the area that was reported as cropland for at least one year during the timeframe was 7373.4 km2, revealing a significantly higher area with cropland history than annual statistics would suggest. Furthermore, the analysis showed that one quarter of the land converting from or to cropland will return to the previous land use within a year. To demonstrate potential policy impact, we assessed cropland/grassland dynamics from the 2008 to 2012 commitment period using (a) annual statistics, and (b) data including land use history derived from LPIS. Under

  13. High ice water content at low radar reflectivity near deep convection – Part 2: Evaluation of microphysical pathways in updraft parcel simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Ackerman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aeronautics industry has established that a threat to aircraft is posed by atmospheric conditions of substantial ice water content (IWC where equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze does not exceed 20–30 dBZ and supercooled water is not present; these conditions are encountered almost exclusively in the vicinity of deep convection. Part 1 (Fridlind et al., 2015 of this two-part study presents in situ measurements of such conditions sampled by Airbus in three tropical regions, commonly near 11 km and −43 °C, and concludes that the measured ice particle size distributions are broadly consistent with past literature with profiling radar measurements of Ze and mean Doppler velocity obtained within monsoonal deep convection in one of the regions sampled. In all three regions, the Airbus measurements generally indicate variable IWC that often exceeds 2 g m-3 with relatively uniform mass median area-equivalent diameter (MMDeq of 200–300 μm. Here we use a parcel model with size-resolved microphysics to investigate microphysical pathways that could lead to such conditions. Our simulations indicate that homogeneous freezing of water drops produces a much smaller ice MMDeq than observed, and occurs only in the absence of hydrometeor gravitational collection for the conditions considered. Development of a mass mode of ice aloft that overlaps with the measurements requires a substantial source of small ice particles at temperatures of about −10 °C or warmer, which subsequently grow from water vapor. One conceivable source in our simulation framework is Hallett–Mossop ice production; another is abundant concentrations of heterogeneous ice freezing nuclei acting together with copious shattering of water drops upon freezing. Regardless of the production mechanism, the dominant mass modal diameter of vapor-grown ice is reduced as the ice-multiplication source strength increases and as competition for water vapor increases. Both mass and modal diameter

  14. High Ice Water Content at Low Radar Reflectivity near Deep Convection: Part II. Evaluation of Microphysical Pathways in Updraft Parcel Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, A. S.; Fridlind, A. M.; Grandin, A.; Dezitter, F.; Weber, M.; Strapp, J. W.; Korolev, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The aeronautics industry has established that a threat to aircraft is posed by atmospheric conditions of substantial ice water content (IWC) where equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) does not exceed 20-30 dBZ and supercooled water is not present; these conditions are encountered almost exclusively in the vicinity of deep convection. Part 1 (Fridlind et al., 2015) of this two-part study presents in situ measurements of such conditions sampled by Airbus in three tropical regions, commonly near 11 km and -43 C, and concludes that the measured ice particle size distributions are broadly consistent with past literature with profiling radar measurements of Z(sub e) and mean Doppler velocity obtained within monsoonal deep convection in one of the regions sampled. In all three regions, the Airbus measurements generally indicate variable IWC that often exceeds 2 gm (exp -3) with relatively uniform mass median area-equivalent diameter (MMD(sub eq) of 200-300 micrometers. Here we use a parcel model with size-resolved microphysics to investigate microphysical pathways that could lead to such conditions. Our simulations indicate that homogeneous freezing of water drops produces a much smaller ice MMD(sub eq) than observed, and occurs only in the absence of hydrometeor gravitational collection for the conditions considered. Development of a mass mode of ice aloft that overlaps with the measurements requires a substantial source of small ice particles at temperatures of about -10 C or warmer, which subsequently grow from water vapor. One conceivable source in our simulation framework is Hallett-Mossop ice production; another is abundant concentrations of heterogeneous ice freezing nuclei acting together with copious shattering of water drops upon freezing. Regardless of the production mechanism, the dominant mass modal diameter of vapor-grown ice is reduced as the ice-multiplication source strength increases and as competition for water vapor increases. Both mass and modal

  15. High ice water content at low radar reflectivity near deep convection - Part 2: Evaluation of microphysical pathways in updraft parcel simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, A. S.; Fridlind, A. M.; Grandin, A.; Dezitter, F.; Weber, M.; Strapp, J. W.; Korolev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The aeronautics industry has established that a threat to aircraft is posed by atmospheric conditions of substantial ice water content (IWC) where equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) does not exceed 20-30 dBZ and supercooled water is not present; these conditions are encountered almost exclusively in the vicinity of deep convection. Part 1 (Fridlind et al., 2015) of this two-part study presents in situ measurements of such conditions sampled by Airbus in three tropical regions, commonly near 11 km and -43 °C, and concludes that the measured ice particle size distributions are broadly consistent with past literature with profiling radar measurements of Ze and mean Doppler velocity obtained within monsoonal deep convection in one of the regions sampled. In all three regions, the Airbus measurements generally indicate variable IWC that often exceeds 2 g m-3 with relatively uniform mass median area-equivalent diameter (MMDeq) of 200-300 μm. Here we use a parcel model with size-resolved microphysics to investigate microphysical pathways that could lead to such conditions. Our simulations indicate that homogeneous freezing of water drops produces a much smaller ice MMDeq than observed, and occurs only in the absence of hydrometeor gravitational collection for the conditions considered. Development of a mass mode of ice aloft that overlaps with the measurements requires a substantial source of small ice particles at temperatures of about -10 °C or warmer, which subsequently grow from water vapor. One conceivable source in our simulation framework is Hallett-Mossop ice production; another is abundant concentrations of heterogeneous ice freezing nuclei acting together with copious shattering of water drops upon freezing. Regardless of the production mechanism, the dominant mass modal diameter of vapor-grown ice is reduced as the ice-multiplication source strength increases and as competition for water vapor increases. Both mass and modal diameter are reduced by

  16. High ice water content at low radar reflectivity near deep convection – Part 2: Evaluation of microphysical pathways in updraft parcel simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Ackerman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aeronautics industry has established that a threat to aircraft is posed by atmospheric conditions of substantial ice water content (IWC where equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze does not exceed 20–30 dBZ and supercooled water is not present, encountered almost exclusively in the vicinity of deep convection. Part 1 of this two-part study presents in situ measurements of such conditions sampled by Airbus in three tropical regions, commonly near 11 km and −43 °C, and concludes that the measured ice particle size distributions are broadly consistent with past literature and with profiling radar measurements of Ze and mean Doppler velocity obtained within monsoonal deep convection in one of the regions sampled. In all three regions the Airbus measurements generally indicate variable IWC that often exceeds 2 g m−3 with relatively uniform mass median area-equivalent diameter (MMDeq of 200–300 μm. Here we use a parcel model with size-resolved microphysics to investigate microphysical pathways that could lead to such conditions. Our simulations indicate that homogeneous freezing of water drops produces a much smaller ice MMDeq than observed, and occurs only in the absence of hydrometeor gravitational collection for the conditions considered. Development of a mass mode of ice aloft that overlaps with the measurements requires a substantial source of small ice particles at temperatures of about −10 °C or warmer, which subsequently grow from water vapor. One conceivable source in our simulation framework is Hallett–Mossop ice production; another is abundant concentrations of heterogeneous ice freezing nuclei acting together with copious shattering of water drops upon freezing. Regardless of production mechanism, the dominant mass modal diameter of vapor-grown ice is reduced as the ice multiplication source strength increases and as competition for water vapor increases. Both mass and modal diameter are reduced by entrainment and by

  17. Application evaluation of CLSI EP7-A2 for the interference test in clinical chemistry%CLSI EP7-A2文件在临床化学分析干扰试验中的应用评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建华; 何敏; 柯培锋; 吴晓宾; 王云秀; 黄宪章; 庄俊华

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨美国临床实验室标准化协会(CLSI)EP7-A2文件在临床化学分析干扰评价试验中的应用价值.方法根据CLSI EP7-A2文件,利用已开发上市的干扰试剂盒对前白蛋白(PA)进行干扰评价试验.结果配对差异实验结果显示0.2 g/L 游离胆红素(FBil)、 0.4 g/L 结合胆红素(CBil)和2.41 g/L血红蛋白(Hb)对PA测定无干扰,835浊度的乳糜对PA测定有负干扰.5个浓度系列的剂量效应实验结果显示乳糜浊度对PA测定可产生线性负干扰.结论 依据EP7-A2文件,利用已开发上市的干扰试剂盒,应用医学统计软件统计分析,是一个具有一定应用价值的分析干扰评价方法.

  18. Statistical Analyses of Correlation between Fluconazole MICs for Candida spp. Assessed by Standard Methods Set Forth by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (E.Dis. 7.1) and CLSI (M27-A2)▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Donnelly, J. Peter; Pfaller, Michael A.; Chryssantou, Erja; Warn, Peter; Denning, David W.; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Barchiesi, Francesco; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing recently published a standard for determining the susceptibility of fermentative yeasts to antifungals. From the beginning, the EUCAST and its North American counterpart, the CLSI, decided to work together in order to establish common standards. As part of this exercise, the susceptibility of a set of 475 yeast isolates was tested by both standards. The intraclass correlation coefficient and the equations defining the linear regression between both methods were estimated. Both methods produced very similar results, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.954 (0.945 to 0.962), although linear regression analysis shows that the EUCAST standard resulted in slightly lower MICs. There were only eight isolates showing at least four twofold dilution MIC differences between both standards. After 24 h of incubation, the MICs obtained by the CLSI method were equivalent to those obtained by the EUCAST standard. In summary, both methods produce very similar MICs, indicating that methodology does not pose any obstacle to obtaining uniform standards for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts. PMID:17093015

  19. ATB FUNGUS 3与CLSI M27-A2微量液基稀释法测定酵母菌药物敏感性的一致性比较%Comparative evaluation of ATB FUNGUS 3 procedure and CLSI M27-A2 broth microdilution method for antifungal susceptibility testing of pathogenic yeasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 乔建军; 马彦; 万喆; 李若瑜

    2009-01-01

    为92.4%、93.0%和93.6%.对于有判读折点的念珠菌,2种方法测定FLC、ITC、VRC、5-FC的一致性分别为81.7%、59.2%、90.9%和96.5%.结论 ATB FUNGUS 3方案操作简便,读取结果更加快速,除了FLC和ITC对于有判读折点的念珠菌的抑菌活性外,ATB FUNGUS 3与CLSI M27-A2方案具有良好的一致性.%to common antifungal drugs.

  20. Proficiency Testing and Language Teaching: Russian and Polish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Garn

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential application of proficiency testing in U.S. colleges and universities. Specific consideration is giv-en to: the Oral Proficiency Interview, based on ILR or ACTFL guidelines, administered on a large scale at the Defense Language In-stitute and occasionally employed in American academia; the Diag-nostic Assessment Interview, the assessment tool of choice at DLI, basically unheard of in academia; and the new Polish proficiency test, which is part and parcel of the standardized series of language tests administered throughout Europe, based on Language Testers of Eu-rope guidelines. The author proposes that introducing the underlying principles of proficiency testing into American academia and promot-ing a better awareness of level tasks and expectations on the part of language teachers could help to eliminate the disconnect between testing and teaching. It could benefit instruction from early to ad-vanced stages.