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Sample records for a140v mouse model

  1. Abnormalities of cell packing density and dendritic complexity in the MeCP2 A140V mouse model of Rett syndrome/X-linked mental retardation

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    Blue Mary

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rett syndrome (RTT, a common cause of mental retardation in girls, is associated with mutations in the MECP2 gene. Most human cases of MECP2 mutation in girls result in classical or variant forms of RTT. When these same mutations occur in males, they often present as severe neonatal encephalopathy. However, some MECP2 mutations can also lead to diseases characterized as mental retardation syndromes, particularly in boys. One of these mutations, A140V, is a common, recurring missense mutation accounting for about 0.6% of all MeCP2 mutations and ranking 21st by frequency. It has been described in familial X-linked mental retardation (XLMR, PPM- X syndrome (Parkinsonism, Pyramidal signs, Macroorchidism, X-linked mental retardation and in other neuropsychiatric syndromes. Interestingly, this mutation has been reported to preserve the methyl-CpG binding function of the MeCP2 protein while compromising its ability to bind to the mental retardation associated protein ATRX. Results We report the construction and initial characterization of a mouse model expressing the A140V MeCP2 mutation. These initial descriptive studies in male hemizygous mice have revealed brain abnormalities seen in both RTT and mental retardation. The abnormalities found include increases in cell packing density in the brain and a significant reduction in the complexity of neuronal dendritic branching. In contrast to some MeCP2 mutation mouse models, the A140V mouse has an apparently normal lifespan and normal weight gain patterns with no obvious seizures, tremors, breathing difficulties or kyphosis. Conclusion We have identified various neurological abnormalities in this mouse model of Rett syndrome/X-linked mental retardation which may help to elucidate the manner in which MECP2 mutations cause neuronal changes resulting in mental retardation without the confounding effects of seizures, chronic hypoventilation, or other Rett syndrome associated symptoms.

  2. Reduced neuronal size and mTOR pathway activity in the Mecp2 A140V Rett syndrome mouse model [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Sampathkumar Rangasamy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutation in the X-linked MECP2 gene, encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. We have created a mouse model (Mecp2 A140V “knock-in” mutant expressing the recurrent human MECP2 A140V mutation linked to an X-linked mental retardation/Rett syndrome phenotype. Morphological analyses focused on quantifying soma and nucleus size were performed on primary hippocampus and cerebellum granule neuron (CGN cultures from mutant (Mecp2A140V/y and wild type (Mecp2+/y male mice. Cultured hippocampus and cerebellar granule neurons from mutant animals were significantly smaller than neurons from wild type animals. We also examined soma size in hippocampus neurons from individual female transgenic mice that express both a mutant  (maternal allele and a wild type Mecp2 gene linked to an eGFP transgene (paternal allele. In cultures from such doubly heterozygous female mice, the size of neurons expressing the mutant (A140V allele also showed a significant reduction compared to neurons expressing wild type MeCP2, supporting a cell-autonomous role for MeCP2 in neuronal development. IGF-1 (insulin growth factor-1 treatment of neuronal cells from Mecp2 mutant mice rescued the soma size phenotype. We also found that Mecp2  mutation leads to down-regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, known to be involved in neuronal size regulation. Our results suggest that i reduced neuronal size is an important in vitro cellular phenotype of Mecp2 mutation in mice, and ii MeCP2 might play a critical role in the maintenance of neuronal structure by modulation of the mTOR pathway. The definition of a quantifiable cellular phenotype supports using neuronal size as a biomarker in the development of a high-throughput, in vitro assay to screen for compounds that rescue small neuronal phenotype (“phenotypic assay”.

  3. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

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    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  4. Mouse models of medulloblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochong Wu; Paul A. Northcott; Sidney Croul; Michael D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite its prevalence and importance in pediatric neuro-oncology, the genes and pathways responsible for its initiation, maintenance,and progression remain poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models are an essential tool for uncovering the molecular and cellular basis of human diseases, including cancer, and serve a valuable role as preclinical models for testing targeted therapies. In this review, we summarize how such models have been successfully applied to the study of medulloblastoma over the past decade and what we might expect in the coming years.

  5. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  6. Mouse models for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Lynette Moore; Ping Ji

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to leamn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Joumnal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue.

  7. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

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    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  8. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

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    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  9. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

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    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics.

  10. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

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    Timothy C. Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field.

  11. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches,chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments.Here,we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments.

  12. Mouse models for methylmalonic aciduria.

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    Heidi L Peters

    Full Text Available Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM. MMA is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent renal and neurological complications. Transgenic mice carrying an intact human MCM locus have been produced. Four separate transgenic lines were established and characterised as carrying two, four, five or six copies of the transgene in a single integration site. Transgenic mice from the 2-copy line were crossed with heterozygous knockout MCM mice to generate mice hemizygous for the human transgene on a homozygous knockout background. Partial rescue of the uniform neonatal lethality seen in homozygous knockout mice was observed. These rescued mice were significantly smaller than control littermates (mice with mouse MCM gene. Biochemically, these partial rescue mice exhibited elevated methylmalonic acid levels in urine, plasma, kidney, liver and brain tissue. Acylcarnitine analysis of blood spots revealed elevated propionylcarnitine levels. Analysis of mRNA expression confirms the human transgene is expressed at higher levels than observed for the wild type, with highest expression in the kidney followed closely by brain and liver. Partial rescue mouse fibroblast cultures had only 20% of the wild type MCM enzyme activity. It is anticipated that this humanised partial rescue mouse model of MMA will enable evaluation of long-term pathophysiological effects of elevated methylmalonic acid levels and be a valuable model for the investigation of therapeutic strategies, such as cell transplantation.

  13. Mouse Models for Methylmalonic Aciduria

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    Peters, Heidi L.; Pitt, James J.; Wood, Leonie R.; Hamilton, Natasha J.; Sarsero, Joseph P.; Buck, Nicole E.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). MMA is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent renal and neurological complications. Transgenic mice carrying an intact human MCM locus have been produced. Four separate transgenic lines were established and characterised as carrying two, four, five or six copies of the transgene in a single integration site. Transgenic mice from the 2-copy line were crossed with heterozygous knockout MCM mice to generate mice hemizygous for the human transgene on a homozygous knockout background. Partial rescue of the uniform neonatal lethality seen in homozygous knockout mice was observed. These rescued mice were significantly smaller than control littermates (mice with mouse MCM gene). Biochemically, these partial rescue mice exhibited elevated methylmalonic acid levels in urine, plasma, kidney, liver and brain tissue. Acylcarnitine analysis of blood spots revealed elevated propionylcarnitine levels. Analysis of mRNA expression confirms the human transgene is expressed at higher levels than observed for the wild type, with highest expression in the kidney followed closely by brain and liver. Partial rescue mouse fibroblast cultures had only 20% of the wild type MCM enzyme activity. It is anticipated that this humanised partial rescue mouse model of MMA will enable evaluation of long-term pathophysiological effects of elevated methylmalonic acid levels and be a valuable model for the investigation of therapeutic strategies, such as cell transplantation. PMID:22792386

  14. Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

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    Wang, Yutang; Emeto, Theophilus I; Lee, James; Marshman, Laurence; Moran, Corey; Seto, Sai-wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a highly lethal medical condition. Current management strategies for unruptured intracranial aneurysms involve radiological surveillance and neurosurgical or endovascular interventions. There is no pharmacological treatment available to decrease the risk of aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is growing interest in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm focused on the development of drug therapies to decrease the incidence of aneurysm rupture. The study of rodent models of intracranial aneurysms has the potential to improve our understanding of intracranial aneurysm development and progression. This review summarizes current mouse models of intact and ruptured intracranial aneurysms and discusses the relevance of these models to human intracranial aneurysms. The article also reviews the importance of these models in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the disease. Finally, potential pharmaceutical targets for intracranial aneurysm suggested by previous studies are discussed. Examples of potential drug targets include matrix metalloproteinases, stromal cell-derived factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, the renin-angiotensin system and the β-estrogen receptor. An agreed clear, precise and reproducible definition of what constitutes an aneurysm in the models would assist in their use to better understand the pathology of intracranial aneurysm and applying findings to patients.

  15. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

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    Kelly L. Warfield

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs, guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data, but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study.

  16. The wobbler mouse, an ALS animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Jakob Maximilian; Bigini, Paolo; Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review article is focused on the research progress made utilizing the wobbler mouse as animal model for human motor neuron diseases, especially the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The wobbler mouse develops progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons and shows striking...

  17. Mouse models in male fertility research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duangporn Jamsai; Moira K O'Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Limited knowledge of the genetic causes of male infertility has resulted in few treatment and targeted therapeutic options.Although the ideal approach to identify infertility causing mutations is to conduct studies in the human population,this approach has progressed slowly due to the limitations described herein.Given the complexity of male fertility,the entire process cannot be modeled in vitro.As such,animal models,in particular mouse models,provide a valuable alternative for gene identification and experimentation.Since the introduction of molecular biology and recent advances in animal model production,there has been a substantial acceleration in the identification and characterization of genes associated with many diseases,including infertility.Three major types of mouse models are commonly used in biomedical research,including knockout/knockin/gene-trapped,transgenic and chemical-induced point mutant mice.Using these mouse models,over 400 genes essential for male fertility have been revealed.It has,however,been estimated that thousands of genes are involved in the regulation of the complex process of male fertility,as many such genes remain to be characterized.The current review is by no means a comprehensive list of these mouse models,rather it contains examples of how mouse models have advanced our knowledge of post-natal germ cell development and male fertility regulation.

  18. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

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    2005-05-01

    Presenescent or senescent hBF (1.2 or 18x×10 4/well, respectively) [M, Stampfer , P. Yaswen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wdre suspended in 60 l cold...2.8 1 2.8 Inducing a human-like senescent phenotype in mouse fibroblasts Jean-Philihoo Copp , Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher K. Patil...MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND TUMORIGENESIS: A MOUSE MODEL FOR HUMAN AGING. Jean-Philippe Coppe, Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher

  19. Peripheral Neuropathy in Mouse Models of Diabetes.

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    Jolivalt, Corinne G; Frizzi, Katie E; Guernsey, Lucie; Marquez, Alex; Ochoa, Joseline; Rodriguez, Maria; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of chronic diabetes that most commonly presents as a distal degenerative polyneuropathy with sensory loss. Around 20% to 30% of such patients may also experience neuropathic pain. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms are uncertain, and therapeutic options are limited. Rodent models of diabetes have been used for more than 40 years to study neuropathy and evaluate potential therapies. For much of this period, streptozotocin-diabetic rats were the model of choice. The emergence of new technologies that allow relatively cheap and routine manipulations of the mouse genome has prompted increased use of mouse models of diabetes to study neuropathy. In this article, we describe the commonly used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and provide protocols to phenotype the structural, functional, and behavioral indices of peripheral neuropathy, with a particular emphasis on assays pertinent to the human condition. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Preclinical Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis

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    2007-10-01

    arachnoidal cells is rate-limiting for meningioma development in the mouse. Genes & Development, 2002, 16:1060-1065. Kissil JL, Johnson KC, Eckman MS and...doubly mutant Nf1 and Wv hematopoietic cells. Blood 2003; 101: 1984-1986. Shannon, K.M. 35 Kissil JL, Wilker EW, Johnson KC, Eckman MS, Yaffe M, and... Paul E. McKeever, Shannon, K.M. 38 Megan Lim, Simon J. Conway, Luis F. Parada, Yuan Zhu, and Sean J. Morrison. 2007. The loss of Nf1 transiently

  1. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

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    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete.

  2. Mouse Models for Studying Diabetic Nephropathy.

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    Chow, Bryna S M; Allen, Terri J

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a term used to describe kidney damage cause by diabetes. With DN as one of the leading causes of end-stage renal disease worldwide, there is a strong need for appropriate animal models to study DN pathogenesis and develop therapeutic strategies. To date, most experiments are carried out in mouse models as opposed to other species for several reasons including lower cost, ease of handling, and easy manipulation of the mouse genome to generate transgenic and knockout animals. This unit provides detailed insights and technical knowledge in setting up one of the most widely used models of DN, the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model. This model has been extensively exploited to study the mechanism of diabetic renal injury. The advantages and limitations of the STZ model and the availability of other genetic models of DN are also discussed.

  3. Genetically engineered mouse models of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Bergman, Andreas M.; van der Poel, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Mouse models of prostate cancer are used to test the contribution of individual genes to the transformation process, evaluate the collaboration between multiple genetic lesions observed in a single tumour, and perform preclinical intervention studies in prostate cancer research. Methods:

  4. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, L.; Youssef, S. A.; de Bruin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of geroscience, wh

  5. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837261

    2016-01-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience,"

  6. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-01-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience,"

  7. Effects of verbenalin on prostatitis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Mingsan; Guo, Lin; Yan, Xiaoli; Wang, Tan; Li, Zuming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the treatment characteristics of verbenalin on a prostatitis mouse model. Give Xiaozhiling injection in the prostate locally to make a prostatitis mouse model. High, medium and low doses of verbenalin were each given to different mouse groups. The amount of water was determined in 14th, 28th. The number of white cells and lecithin corpuscle density in prostatic fluid were determined. Morphological changes in the prostate, testis, epididymis and kidney were detected. Compared with the model control group, the mice treated with high, medium and low doses of verbenalin had significantly increased amounts of water, and prostate white blood cell count and prostate volume density (Vv) were decreased significantly, the density of lecithin corpuscle score increased, and pathologic prostatitis changes were significantly reduced. Pathological change in the testis was significantly reduced and the change in the epididymis was obviously reduced. The thymic cortex thickness and the number of lymphocytes increased significantly and could reduce the renal pathological changes in potential. Verbenalin has a good therapeutic effect on the prostatitis mouse model. PMID:26858560

  8. Mouse Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Brosius, Frank C.; Alpers, Charles E.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Breyer, Matthew D.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Gurley, Susan B.; Harris, Raymond C.; Kakoki, Masao; Kretzler, Matthias; Leiter, Edward H.; Levi, Moshe; McIndoe, Richard A.; Sharma, Kumar; Smithies, Oliver; Susztak, Katalin

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Despite its prevalence, identification of specific factors that cause or predict diabetic nephropathy has been delayed in part by lack of reliable animal models that mimic the disease in humans. The Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (AMDCC) was created 8 years ago by the National Institutes of Health to develop and characterize models of diabetic nephropathy and other complications. This interim rep...

  9. Engineering a new mouse model for vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Prashiela; Orlow, Seth J

    2012-07-01

    Although the precise mechanisms that trigger vitiligo remain elusive, autoimmune responses mediate its progression. The development of therapies has been impeded by a paucity of animal models, since mice lack interfollicular melanocytes, the primary targets in vitiligo. In this issue, Harris et al. describe a mouse model in which interfollicular melanocytes are retained by Kit ligand overexpression and an immune response is initiated by transplanting melanocyte-targeting CD8+ T cells.

  10. Digenic Inheritance in Cystinuria Mouse Model.

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    Meritxell Espino

    Full Text Available Cystinuria is an aminoaciduria caused by mutations in the genes that encode the two subunits of the amino acid transport system b0,+, responsible for the renal reabsorption of cystine and dibasic amino acids. The clinical symptoms of cystinuria relate to nephrolithiasis, due to the precipitation of cystine in urine. Mutations in SLC3A1, which codes for the heavy subunit rBAT, cause cystinuria type A, whereas mutations in SLC7A9, which encodes the light subunit b0,+AT, cause cystinuria type B. By crossing Slc3a1-/- with Slc7a9-/- mice we generated a type AB cystinuria mouse model to test digenic inheritance of cystinuria. The 9 genotypes obtained have been analyzed at early (2- and 5-months and late stage (8-months of the disease. Monitoring the lithiasic phenotype by X-ray, urine amino acid content analysis and protein expression studies have shown that double heterozygous mice (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/- present lower expression of system b0,+ and higher hyperexcretion of cystine than single heterozygotes (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/+ and Slc7a9+/+Slc3a1+/- and give rise to lithiasis in 4% of the mice, demonstrating that cystinuria has a digenic inheritance in this mouse model. Moreover in this study it has been demonstrated a genotype/phenotype correlation in type AB cystinuria mouse model providing new insights for further molecular and genetic studies of cystinuria patients.

  11. Mouse models of anemia of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airie Kim

    Full Text Available Anemia of cancer (AC may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI, with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC.

  12. Mouse models of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Arion J; Ellacott, Kate L J; King, Victoria L; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterized by obesity concomitant with other metabolic abnormalities such as hypertriglyceridemia, reduced high-density lipoprotein levels, elevated blood pressure and raised fasting glucose levels. The precise definition of MetS, the relationships of its metabolic features, and what initiates it, are debated. However, obesity is on the rise worldwide, and its association with these metabolic symptoms increases the risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (among many other diseases). Research needs to determine the mechanisms by which obesity and MetS increase the risk of disease. In light of this growing epidemic, it is imperative to develop animal models of MetS. These models will help determine the pathophysiological basis for MetS and how MetS increases the risk for other diseases. Among the various animal models available to study MetS, mice are the most commonly used for several reasons. First, there are several spontaneously occurring obese mouse strains that have been used for decades and that are very well characterized. Second, high-fat feeding studies require only months to induce MetS. Third, it is relatively easy to study the effects of single genes by developing transgenic or gene knockouts to determine the influence of a gene on MetS. For these reasons, this review will focus on the benefits and caveats of the most common mouse models of MetS. It is our hope that the reader will be able to use this review as a guide for the selection of mouse models for their own studies.

  13. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    models that recapitulate the human disease . Therefore, we introduced mutations in the endogenous mouse T7 cationic trypsinogen gene and obtained several...ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project? Our original proposal had three specific aims. Aim 1. Identify and biochemically characterize...pancreatitis in mutant mice which do not develop spontaneous disease (strains T7-D23del-Cre, T7-D23del-Neo, T7-K24R-Cre and T7- K24R-Neo), will be

  14. A humanoid mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumi, Toru

    2010-10-01

    Even now fruit of the human genome project is available, we have difficulties to approach neuropsychiatric disorders at the molecular level. Autism is a complex psychiatric illness but has received considerable attention as a developmental brain disorder not only from basic researchers but also from society. Substantial evidence suggests that chromosomal abnormalities contribute to autism risk. The duplication of human chromosome 15q11-13 is known to be the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in autism. We succeeded to generate mice with a 6.3-Mb-wide interstitial duplication in mouse chromosome 7c that is highly syntenic to human 15q11-13 by using a Cre-loxP-based chromosome-engineering technique. The only paternally duplicated mice display autistic behavioral features such as poor social interaction and stereotypical behavior, and exhibit a developmental abnormality in ultrasonic vocalizations as well as anxiety. The detailed analysis focusing on a non-coding small nucleolar RNA, MBII52, within the duplicated region, revealed that the paternally duplicated mice alter the editing ratio of serotonin (5-HT) 2c receptor pre-mRNA and intracellular calcium responses by a 5-HT2c receptor specific agonist are changed in neurons. This result may explain one of molecular mechanisms of abnormal behaviors in the paternal duplicated mice. The first chromosome-engineered mouse model for human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication fulfills not only face validity of human autistic phenotypes but also construct validity based on human chromosome abnormality. This model will be a founder mouse for forward genetics of autistic disease and an invaluable tool for its therapeutic development.

  15. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of mouse tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Kung, Andrew L

    2015-01-05

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has become an essential technique for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapeutics and provides sensitive and quantitative measurements of tumor burden in experimental cancer models. For light generation, a vector encoding firefly luciferase is introduced into human cancer cells that are grown as tumor xenografts in immunocompromised hosts, and the enzyme substrate luciferin is injected into the host. Alternatively, the reporter gene can be expressed in genetically engineered mouse models to determine the onset and progression of disease. In addition to expression of an ectopic luciferase enzyme, bioluminescence requires oxygen and ATP, thus only viable luciferase-expressing cells or tissues are capable of producing bioluminescence signals. Here, we summarize a BLI protocol that takes advantage of advances in hardware, especially the cooled charge-coupled device camera, to enable detection of bioluminescence in living animals with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range.

  16. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Mouse Model Resources for Vision Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungyeon Won

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for mouse models, with their well-developed genetics and similarity to human physiology and anatomy, is clear and their central role in furthering our understanding of human disease is readily apparent in the literature. Mice carrying mutations that alter developmental pathways or cellular function provide model systems for analyzing defects in comparable human disorders and for testing therapeutic strategies. Mutant mice also provide reproducible, experimental systems for elucidating pathways of normal development and function. Two programs, the Eye Mutant Resource and the Translational Vision Research Models, focused on providing such models to the vision research community are described herein. Over 100 mutant lines from the Eye Mutant Resource and 60 mutant lines from the Translational Vision Research Models have been developed. The ocular diseases of the mutant lines include a wide range of phenotypes, including cataracts, retinal dysplasia and degeneration, and abnormal blood vessel formation. The mutations in disease genes have been mapped and in some cases identified by direct sequencing. Here, we report 3 novel alleles of Crxtvrm65, Rp1tvrm64, and Rpe65tvrm148 as successful examples of the TVRM program, that closely resemble previously reported knockout models.

  18. Neuron Loss in Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Wirths

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their initial generation in the mid 1990s, transgenic mouse models of Alzheimers's disease (AD have been proven to be valuable model systems which are indispensable for modern AD research. Whereas most of these models are characterized by extensive amyloid plaque pathology, inflammatory changes and often behavioral deficits, modeling of neuron loss was much less successful. The present paper discusses the current achievements of modeling neuron loss in transgenic mouse models based on APP/Aβ and Tau overexpression and provides an overview of currently available AD mouse models showing these pathological alterations.

  19. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  20. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  1. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  2. Mouse models for BRAF-induced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, C; Carragher, L; Aldridge, V; Giblett, S; Jin, H; Foster, C; Andreadi, C; Kamata, T

    2007-11-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the BRAF gene are detected in approximately 7% of human cancer samples with a particularly high frequency of mutation in malignant melanomas. Over 40 different missense BRAF mutations have been found, but the vast majority (>90%) represent a single nucleotide change resulting in a valine-->glutamate mutation at residue 600 ((V600E)BRAF). In cells cultured in vitro, (V600E)BRAF is able to stimulate endogenous MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) kinase] and ERK phosphorylation leading to an increase in cell proliferation, cell survival, transformation, tumorigenicity, invasion and vascular development. Many of these hallmarks of cancer can be reversed by treatment of cells with siRNA (small interfering RNA) to BRAF or by inhibiting MEK, indicating that BRAF and MEK are attractive therapeutic targets in cancer samples with BRAF mutations. In order to fully understand the role of oncogenic BRAF in cancer development in vivo as well as to test the in vivo efficacy of anti-BRAF or anti-MEK therapies, GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models) have been generated in which expression of oncogenic BRaf is conditionally dependent on the Cre recombinase. The delivery/activation of the Cre recombinase can be regulated in both a temporal and spatial manner and therefore these mouse models can be used to recapitulate the somatic mutation of BRAF that occurs in different tissues in the development of human cancer. The data so far obtained following Cre-mediated activation in haemopoietic tissue and the lung indicate that (V600E)BRAF mutation can drive tumour initiation and that its primary effect is to induce high levels of cyclin D1-mediated cell proliferation. However, hallmarks of OIS (oncogene-induced senescence) are evident that restrain further development of the tumour.

  3. Decerebrate mouse model for studies of the spinal cord circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; Mayr, Kyle A; Manuel, Marin

    2017-01-01

    The adult decerebrate mouse model (a mouse with the cerebrum removed) enables the study of sensory-motor integration and motor output from the spinal cord for several hours without compromising these functions with anesthesia. For example, the decerebrate mouse is ideal for examining locomotor...... behavior using intracellular recording approaches, which would not be possible using current anesthetized preparations. This protocol describes the steps required to achieve a low-blood-loss decerebration in the mouse and approaches for recording signals from spinal cord neurons with a focus on motoneurons...

  4. Mouse models of rhinovirus infection and airways disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Nathan W; Singanayagam, Aran; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are invaluable tools for gaining insight into host immunity during virus infection. Until recently, no practical mouse model for rhinovirus infection was available. Development of infection models was complicated by the existence of distinct groups of viruses that utilize different host cell surface proteins for binding and entry. Here, we describe mouse infection models, including virus purification and measurement of host immune responses, for representative viruses from two of these groups: (1) infection of unmodified Balb/c mice with minor group rhinovirus serotype 1B (RV-1B) and (2) infection of transgenic Balb/c mice with major group rhinovirus serotype 16 (RV-16).

  5. Carcinogenic effects in a phenylketonuria mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Sidell

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU is a metabolic disorder caused by impaired phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH. This condition results in hyperphenylalaninemia and elevated levels of abnormal phenylalanine metabolites, among which is phenylacetic acid/phenylacetate (PA. In recent years, PA and its analogs were found to have anticancer activity against a variety of malignancies suggesting the possibility that PKU may offer protection against cancer through chronically elevated levels of PA. We tested this hypothesis in a genetic mouse model of PKU (PAH(enu2 which has a biochemical profile that closely resembles that of human PKU. Plasma levels of phenylalanine in homozygous (HMZ PAH(enu2 mice were >12-fold those of heterozygous (HTZ littermates while tyrosine levels were reduced. Phenylketones, including PA, were also markedly elevated to the range seen in the human disease. Mice were subjected to 7,12 dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA carcinogenesis, a model which is sensitive to the anticancer effects of the PA derivative 4-chlorophenylacetate (4-CPA. Tumor induction by DMBA was not significantly different between the HTZ and HMZ mice, either in total tumor development or in the type of cancers that arose. HMZ mice were then treated with 4-CPA as positive controls for the anticancer effects of PA and to evaluate its possible effects on phenylalanine metabolism in PKU mice. 4-CPA had no effect on the plasma concentrations of phenylalanine, phenylketones, or tyrosine. Surprisingly, the HMZ mice treated with 4-CPA developed an unexplained neuromuscular syndrome which precluded its use in these animals as an anticancer agent. Together, these studies support the use of PAH(enu2 mice as a model for studying human PKU. Chronically elevated levels of PA in the PAH(enu2 mice were not protective against cancer.

  6. Mouse models for studying the formation and propagation of prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Joel C; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2014-07-18

    Prions are self-propagating protein conformers that cause a variety of neurodegenerative disorders in humans and animals. Mouse models have played key roles in deciphering the biology of prions and in assessing candidate therapeutics. The development of transgenic mice that form prions spontaneously in the brain has advanced our understanding of sporadic and genetic prion diseases. Furthermore, the realization that many proteins can become prions has necessitated the development of mouse models for assessing the potential transmissibility of common neurodegenerative diseases. As the universe of prion diseases continues to expand, mouse models will remain crucial for interrogating these devastating illnesses.

  7. Characterization of a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mook-Kanamori Barry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. pneumoniae is the most common causative agent of meningitis, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to develop an integrated and representative pneumococcal meningitis mouse model resembling the human situation. Methods Adult mice (C57BL/6 were inoculated in the cisterna magna with increasing doses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 colony forming units (CFU; n = 24, 104, 105, 106 and 107 CFU and survival studies were performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, brain, blood, spleen, and lungs were collected. Subsequently, mice were inoculated with 104 CFU S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and sacrificed at 6 (n = 6 and 30 hours (n = 6. Outcome parameters were bacterial outgrowth, clinical score, and cytokine and chemokine levels (using Luminex® in CSF, blood and brain. Meningeal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, parenchymal and subarachnoidal hemorrhages, microglial activation and hippocampal apoptosis were assessed in histopathological studies. Results Lower doses of bacteria delayed onset of illness and time of death (median survival CFU 104, 56 hrs; 105, 38 hrs, 106, 28 hrs. 107, 24 hrs. Bacterial titers in brain and CSF were similar in all mice at the end-stage of disease independent of inoculation dose, though bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment was less at lower inoculation doses. At 30 hours after inoculation with 104 CFU of S. pneumoniae, blood levels of KC, IL6, MIP-2 and IFN- γ were elevated, as were brain homogenate levels of KC, MIP-2, IL-6, IL-1β and RANTES. Brain histology uniformly showed meningeal inflammation at 6 hours, and, neutrophil infiltration, microglial activation, and hippocampal apoptosis at 30 hours. Parenchymal and subarachnoidal and cortical hemorrhages were seen in 5 of 6 and 3 of 6 mice at 6 and 30 hours, respectively. Conclusion We have developed and validated a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  8. Genetically modified mouse models addressing gonadotropin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Laura D; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-03-01

    The development of genetically modified animals has been useful to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the gonadotropin function. It is well known that alterations in the secretion of a single hormone is capable of producing profound reproductive abnormalities. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone normally secreted by the human placenta, and structurally and functionally it is related to pituitary LH. LH and hCG bind to the same LH/hCG receptor, and hCG is often used as an analog of LH to boost gonadotropin action. There are many physiological and pathological conditions where LH/hCG levels and actions are elevated. In order to understand how elevated LH/hCG levels may impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis we have developed a transgenic mouse model with chronic hCG hypersecretion. Female mice develop many gonadal and extragonadal phenotypes including obesity, infertility, hyperprolactinemia, and pituitary and mammary gland tumors. This article summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms involved in pituitary gland tumorigenesis and hyperprolactinemia in the female mice hypersecreting hCG, in particular the relationship of progesterone with the hyperprolactinemic condition of the model. In addition, we describe the role of hyperprolactinemia as the main cause of infertility and the phenotypic abnormalities in these mice, and the use of dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline to normalize these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB): a database of mouse models for human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Sundberg, John P; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) database is a unique online compendium of mouse models for human cancer. MTB provides online access to expertly curated information on diverse mouse models for human cancer and interfaces for searching and visualizing data associated with these models. The information in MTB is designed to facilitate the selection of strains for cancer research and is a platform for mining data on tumor development and patterns of metastases. MTB curators acquire data through manual curation of peer-reviewed scientific literature and from direct submissions by researchers. Data in MTB are also obtained from other bioinformatics resources including PathBase, the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress. Recent enhancements to MTB improve the association between mouse models and human genes commonly mutated in a variety of cancers as identified in large-scale cancer genomics studies, provide new interfaces for exploring regions of the mouse genome associated with cancer phenotypes and incorporate data and information related to Patient-Derived Xenograft models of human cancers.

  10. Gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K R; Brooks, S P; Dunnett, S B; Jones, L

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, resulting in expansion of the CAG repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. The resulting mutant huntingtin protein has been implicated in the disruption of a variety of cellular functions, including transcription. Mouse models of HD have been central to the development of our understanding of gene expression changes in this disease, and are now beginning to elucidate the relationship between gene expression and behaviour. Here, we review current mouse models of HD and their characterisation in terms of gene expression. In addition, we look at how this can inform behaviours observed in mouse models of disease. The relationship between gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD is important, as this will further our knowledge of disease progression and its underlying molecular events, highlight new treatment targets, and potentially provide new biomarkers for therapeutic trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162111.html FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research Researchers hope strain of mice will help speed development of vaccines, treatments To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. (*this news ...

  12. Mouse models to study dengue virus immunology and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël M. Zellweger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of a compelling murine model of dengue virus (DENV infection has been challenging, because dengue virus clinical isolates do not readily replicate or cause pathology in immunocompetent mice. However, research using immunocompromised mice and/or mouse-adapted viruses allows to investigate questions that may be impossible to address in human studies. In this review, we discuss the potential strengths and limitations of existing mouse models of dengue disease. Human studies are descriptive by nature; moreover, the strain, time, and sequence of infection are often unknown. In contrast, in mice, the conditions of infection are well defined and a large number of experimental parameters can be varied at will. Therefore, mouse models offer an opportunity to experimentally test hypotheses that are based on epidemiological observations. In particular, gain-of-function or loss-of-function models can be established to assess how different components of the immune system (either alone or in combination contribute to protection or pathogenesis during secondary infections or after vaccination. In addition, mouse models have been used for pre-clinical testing of antiviral drug or for vaccine development studies. Conclusions based on mouse experiments must be extrapolated to DENV infection in humans with caution due to the inherent limitations of animal models. However, research in mouse models is a useful complement to in vitro and epidemiological data, and may delineate new areas that deserve attention during future human studies.

  13. Mouse models for inherited endocrine and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piret, Siân E; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2011-12-01

    In vivo models represent important resources for investigating the physiological mechanisms underlying endocrine and metabolic disorders, and for pre-clinical translational studies that may include the assessments of new treatments. In the study of endocrine diseases, which affect multiple organs, in vivo models provide specific advantages over in vitro models, which are limited to investigation of isolated systems. In recent years, the mouse has become the popular choice for developing such in vivo mammalian models, as it has a genome that shares ∼85% identity to that of man, and has many physiological systems that are similar to those in man. Moreover, methods have been developed to alter the expression of genes in the mouse, thereby generating models for human diseases, which may be due to loss- or gain-of-function mutations. The methods used to generate mutations in the mouse genome include: chemical mutagenesis; conventional, conditional and inducible knockout models; knockin models and transgenic models, and these strategies are often complementary. This review describes some of the different strategies that are utilised for generating mouse models. In addition, some mouse models that have been successfully generated by these methods for some human hereditary endocrine and metabolic disorders are reviewed. In particular, the mouse models generated for parathyroid disorders, which include: the multiple endocrine neoplasias; hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome; disorders of the calcium-sensing receptor and forms of inherited hypoparathyroidism are discussed. The advances that have been made in our understanding of the mechanisms of these human diseases by investigations of these mouse models are described.

  14. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jessica B.; Swarts, Jessica L.; Wilkins, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Green, Richard; Sekine, Aimee; Voss, Kathleen M.; Mooney, Michael; Choonoo, Gabrielle; Miller, Darla R.; Pardo Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Gale, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013)F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans. PMID:27806117

  15. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica B Graham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with West Nile virus (WNV leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans.

  16. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  17. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  18. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  19. Behavioral and Neuroanatomical Phenotypes in Mouse Models of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegood, Jacob; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the consequences of the mutation on behavioral and biological phenotypes relevant to autism, mutations in many of the risk genes for autism spectrum disorder have been experimentally generated in mice. Here, we summarize behavioral outcomes and neuroanatomical abnormalities, with a focus on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of postmortem mouse brains. Results are described from multiple mouse models of autism spectrum disorder and comorbid syndromes, including the 15q11-13, 16p11.2, 22q11.2, Cntnap2, Engrailed2, Fragile X, Integrinβ3, MET, Neurexin1a, Neuroligin3, Reelin, Rett, Shank3, Slc6a4, tuberous sclerosis, and Williams syndrome models, and inbred strains with strong autism-relevant behavioral phenotypes, including BTBR and BALB. Concomitant behavioral and neuroanatomical abnormalities can strengthen the interpretation of results from a mouse model, and may elevate the usefulness of the model system for therapeutic discovery.

  20. The value of incomplete mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radde, Rebecca; Duma, Cecilia; Goedert, Michel; Jucker, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    To study Alzheimer's disease (AD), a variety of mouse models has been generated through the overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein and/or the presenilins harboring one or several mutations found in familial AD. With aging, these mice develop several lesions similar to those of AD, including diffuse and neuritic amyloid deposits, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, dystrophic neurites and synapses, and amyloid-associated neuroinflammation. Other characteristics of AD, such as neurofibrillary tangles and nerve cell loss, are not satisfactorily reproduced in these models. Mouse models that recapitulate only specific aspects of AD pathogenesis are of great advantage when deciphering the complexity of the disease and can contribute substantially to diagnostic and therapeutic innovations. Incomplete mouse models have been key to the development of Abeta42-targeted therapies, as well as to the current understanding of the interrelationship between cerebral beta-amyloidosis and tau neurofibrillary lesions, and are currently being used to develop novel diagnostic agents for in vivo imaging.

  1. Application of hepatitis B virus replication mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the value of the hepatitis B virus(HBV) replication mouse model with regard to several aspects of the study of HBV biology.METHODS:To evaluate the HBV replication mouse model in detecting the efficacy of anti-HBV agents,the interferon inducer polyinosinic-polytidylin acid(polyIC) and nucleotide analogues adefovir and entecavir were administered to mice injected with wild type pHBV4.1,and the inhibiting effect of these agents on HBV DNA replication was evaluated.To identify the model's value ...

  2. Mouse models for understanding human developmental anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The mouse experimental system presents an opportunity for studying the nature of the underlying mutagenic damage and the molecular pathogenesis of this class of anomalies by virtue of the accessibility of the zygote and its descendant blastomeres. Such studies could contribute to the understanding of the etiology of certain sporadic but common human malformations. The vulnerability of the zygotes to mutagens as demonstrated in the studies described in this report should be a major consideration in chemical safety evaluation. It raises questions regarding the danger to human zygotes when the mother is exposed to drugs and environmental chemicals.

  3. History and milestones of mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinhua; Huang, Qiaoniang; Petersen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders mediated by self-reactive T cells and/or autoantibodies. Mice, as the most widely used animal for modeling autoimmune disorders, have been extensively used in the investigation of disease pathogenesis as well as in the search for novel therapeutics. Since the first mouse model of multiple sclerosis was established more than 60 years ago, hundreds of mouse models have been established for tens of autoimmune diseases. These mouse models can be divided into three categories based on the approaches used for disease induction. The first one represents the induced models in which autoimmunity is initiated in mice by immunization, adoptive transfer or environmental factors. The second group is formed by the spontaneous models where mice develop autoimmune disorders without further induction. The third group refers to the humanized models in which mice bearing humanized cells, tissues, or genes, develop autoimmune diseases either spontaneously or by induction. This article reviews the history and highlights the milestones of the mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  5. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Tjalsma

    Full Text Available The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1 and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2 at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  6. Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis 1 and 2

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    David H. Gutmann

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurofibromatoses represent two of the most common inherited tumor predisposition syndromes affecting the nervous system. Individuals with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1 are prone to the development of astrocytomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumors whereas those affected with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2 develop schwannomas and meningiomas. The development of traditional homozygous knockout mice has provided insights into the roles of the NF1 and NF2 genes during development and in differentiation, but has been less instructive regarding the contribution of NF1 and NF2 dysfunction to the pathogenesis of specific benign and malignant tumors. Recent progress employing novel mouse targeting strategies has begun to illuminate the roles of the NF1 and NF2 gene products in the molecular pathogenesis of NF-associated tumors.

  7. A Mouse Model for Laser-induced Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ronil S; Soetikno, Brian T; Lajko, Michelle; Fawzi, Amani A

    2015-12-27

    The mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) model has been a crucial mainstay model for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) research. By administering targeted laser injury to the RPE and Bruch's membrane, the procedure induces angiogenesis, modeling the hallmark pathology observed in neovascular AMD. First developed in non-human primates, the laser-induced CNV model has come to be implemented into many other species, the most recent of which being the mouse. Mouse experiments are advantageously more cost-effective, experiments can be executed on a much faster timeline, and they allow the use of various transgenic models. The miniature size of the mouse eye, however, poses a particular challenge when performing the procedure. Manipulation of the eye to visualize the retina requires practice of fine dexterity skills as well as simultaneous hand-eye-foot coordination to operate the laser. However, once mastered, the model can be applied to study many aspects of neovascular AMD such as molecular mechanisms, the effect of genetic manipulations, and drug treatment effects. The laser-induced CNV model, though useful, is not a perfect model of the disease. The wild-type mouse eye is otherwise healthy, and the chorio-retinal environment does not mimic the pathologic changes in human AMD. Furthermore, injury-induced angiogenesis does not reflect the same pathways as angiogenesis occurring in an age-related and chronic disease state as in AMD. Despite its shortcomings, the laser-induced CNV model is one of the best methods currently available to study the debilitating pathology of neovascular AMD. Its implementation has led to a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AMD, as well as contributing to the development of many of the AMD therapies currently available.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS VIRULENCE USING AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED MOUSE MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    An immunocompromised mouse model was used to characterize Aeromonas strains for their ability to cause opportunistic, extraintestinal infections. A total of 34 isolates of Aeromonas (A. hydrophila [n = 12]), A. veronii biotype sobria [n = 7], A. caviae [n = 4], A. enchelia [n = 4...

  9. Establishing the colitis-associated cancer progression mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haiming; Lu, Zhanjun; Wang, Ruhua; Chen, Niwei; Zheng, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been reported as an important inducer of colorectal cancer (CRC). The most malignant IBD-associated CRC type has been highlighted as colitis-associated cancer (CAC). However, lack of CAC cases and difficulties of the long follow-up research have challenged researchers in molecular mechanism probing. Here, we established pre-CAC mouse models (dextran sulfate sodium [DSS] group and azoxymethane [AOM] group) and CAC mouse model (DSS/AOM group) to mimic human CAC development through singly or combinational treatment with DSS and AOM followed by disease activity index analysis. We found that these CAC mice showed much more severe disease phenotype, including serious diarrhea, body weight loss, rectal prolapse and bleeding, bloody stool, tumor burden, and bad survival. By detecting expression patterns of several therapeutic targets-Apc, p53, Kras, and TNF-α-in these mouse models through western blot, histology analysis, qRT-PCR, and ELISA methods, we found that the oncogene Kras expression remained unchanged, while the tumor suppressors-Apc and p53 expression were both significantly downregulated with malignancy progression from pre-CAC to CAC, and TNF-α level was elevated the most in CAC mice blood which is of potential clinical use. These data indicated the successful establishment of CAC development mouse models, which mimics human CAC well both in disease phenotype and molecular level, and highlighted the promoting role of inflammation in CAC progression. This useful tool will facilitate the further study in CAC molecular mechanism.

  10. Rapid genetic algorithm optimization of a mouse computational model: Benefits for anthropomorphization of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Teodora Bot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While the mouse presents an invaluable experimental model organism in biology, its usefulness in cardiac arrhythmia research is limited in some aspects due to major electrophysiological differences between murine and human action potentials (APs. As previously described, these species-specific traits can be partly overcome by application of a cell-type transforming clamp (CTC to anthropomorphize the murine cardiac AP. CTC is a hybrid experimental-computational dynamic clamp technique, in which a computationally calculated time-dependent current is inserted into a cell in real time, to compensate for the differences between sarcolemmal currents of that cell (e.g., murine and the desired species (e.g., human. For effective CTC performance, mismatch between the measured cell and a mathematical model used to mimic the measured AP must be minimal. We have developed a genetic algorithm (GA approach that rapidly tunes a mathematical model to reproduce the AP of the murine cardiac myocyte under study. Compared to a prior implementation that used a template-based model selection approach, we show that GA optimization to a cell-specific model results in a much better recapitulation of the desired AP morphology with CTC. This improvement was more pronounced when anthropomorphizing neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to human-like APs than to guinea pig APs. CTC may be useful for a wide range of applications, from screening effects of pharmaceutical compounds on ion channel activity, to exploring variations in the mouse or human genome. Rapid GA optimization of a cell-specific mathematical model improves CTC performance and may therefore expand the applicability and usage of the CTC technique.

  11. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Leach, Prescott T; Silverman, Jill L; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2014-11-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively silences FMR1 gene expression and reduces levels of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is important for the regulation of protein expression. In an effort to further understand how loss of FMR1 and FMRP contribute to FXS symptomology, several FXS animal models have been created. The most well characterized rodent model is the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, which lacks FMRP protein due to a disruption in its Fmr1 gene. Here, we review the behavioral phenotyping of the Fmr1 KO mouse to date, and discuss the clinical relevance of this mouse model to the human FXS condition. While much remains to be learned about FXS, the Fmr1 KO mouse is a valuable tool for understanding the repercussions of functional loss of FMRP and assessing the efficacy of pharmacological compounds in ameliorating the molecular and behavioral phenotypes relevant to FXS.

  12. Cardiac disease and arrhythmogenesis: Mechanistic insights from mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Choy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is the second mammalian species, after the human, in which substantial amount of the genomic information has been analyzed. With advances in transgenic technology, mutagenesis is now much easier to carry out in mice. Consequently, an increasing number of transgenic mouse systems have been generated for the study of cardiac arrhythmias in ion channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. Mouse hearts are also amenable to physical manipulation such as coronary artery ligation and transverse aortic constriction to induce heart failure, radiofrequency ablation of the AV node to model complete AV block and even implantation of a miniature pacemaker to induce cardiac dyssynchrony. Last but not least, pharmacological models, despite being simplistic, have enabled us to understand the physiological mechanisms of arrhythmias and evaluate the anti-arrhythmic properties of experimental agents, such as gap junction modulators, that may be exert therapeutic effects in other cardiac diseases. In this article, we examine these in turn, demonstrating that primary inherited arrhythmic syndromes are now recognized to be more complex than abnormality in a particular ion channel, involving alterations in gene expression and structural remodelling. Conversely, in cardiomyopathies and heart failure, mutations in ion channels and proteins have been identified as underlying causes, and electrophysiological remodelling are recognized pathological features. Transgenic techniques causing mutagenesis in mice are extremely powerful in dissecting the relative contributions of different genes play in producing disease phenotypes. Mouse models can serve as useful systems in which to explore how protein defects contribute to arrhythmias and direct future therapy.

  13. Current Concepts: Mouse Models of Sjögren's Syndrome

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    Tegan N. Lavoie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome (SjS is a complex chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology which primarily targets the exocrine glands, resulting in eventual loss of secretory function. The disease can present as either primary SjS or secondary SjS, the latter of which occurs concomitantly with another autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, or primary biliary cirrhosis. Current advancements in therapeutic prevention and treatment for SjS are impeded by lack of understanding in the pathophysiological and clinical progression of the disease. Development of appropriate mouse models for both primary and secondary SjS is needed in order to advance knowledge of this disease. This paper details important features, advantages, and pitfalls of current animal models of SjS, including spontaneous, transgenic, knockout, immunization, and transplantation chimera mouse models, and emphasizes the need for a better model in representing the human SjS phenotype.

  14. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; Desai, Jigar; Lazar, Gloria; King, Benjamin; Rollins, Jarod; Spurr, Melissa; Joseph, Jamie; Kadambi, Sindhuja; Li, Yang; Cherry, Allison; Matteson, Paul G.; Paigen, Beverly; Millonig, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Korstanje R, Desai J, Lazar G, King B, Rollins J, Spurr M, Joseph J, Kadambi S, Li Y, Cherry A, Matteson PG, Paigen B, Millonig JH. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects. Physiol Genomics 35: 296-30

  15. Loganin inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse 3T3L1 adipocytes and mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Chenxu; Shen, Bingyu; Tian, Ye; Feng, Haihua

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vascular walls. ApoCIII is an independent factor which promotes atherosclerotic processes. This study aimed to investigate whether Loganin administration inhibits the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. In the apoCIII-induced mouse adipocytes, the levels of cytokines, including TNF-α, MCP-1 and IL-6 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and their gene expressions were measured through RT-PCR. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) proteins was analyzed by Western blotting. Our results showed that Loganin markedly decreased TNF-α, MCP-1 and IL-6 concentrations as well as their gene expressions. Western blotting analysis indicated that Loganin suppressed the activation of NF-κB signaling. In the Tyloxapol-treated mouse model, Loganin reduced the contents of TC and TG in mouse serum. The results of Oil Red-O Staining showed that Loganin reduced the production of lipid droplets. So it is suggested that Loganin might be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing the inflammation stress in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Spallanzani's mouse: a model of restoration and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber-Katz, E; Leferovich, J M; Bedelbaeva, K; Gourevitch, D

    2004-01-01

    The ability to regenerate is thought to be a lost phenotype in mammals, though there are certainly sporadic examples of mammalian regeneration. Our laboratory has identified a strain of mouse, the MRL mouse, which has a unique capacity to heal complex tissue in an epimorphic fashion, i.e., to restore a damaged limb or organ to its normal structure and function. Initial studies using through-and-through ear punches showed rapid full closure of the ear holes with cartilage growth, new hair follicles, and normal tissue architecture reminiscent of regeneration seen in amphibians as opposed to the scarring usually seen in mammals. Since the ear hole closure phenotype is a quantitative trait, this has been used to show-through extensive breeding and backcrossing--that the trait is heritable. Such analysis reveals that there is a complex genetic basis for this trait with multiple loci. One of the major phenotypes of the MRL mouse is a potent remodeling response with the absence or a reduced level of scarring. MRL healing is associated with the upregulation of the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and the downregulation of their inhibitors TIMP-2 and TIMP-3, both present in inflammatory cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. This model has more recently been extended to the heart. In this case, a cryoinjury to the right ventricle leads to near complete scarless healing in the MRL mouse whereas scarring is seen in the control mouse. In the MRL heart, bromodeoxyuridine uptake by cardiomyocytes filling the wound site can be seen 60 days after injury. This does not occur in the control mouse. Function in the MRL heart, as measured by echocardiography, returns to normal.

  17. Mouse models for atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Hoorn, J. van der; Princen, H.M.; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial highly-complex disease with numerous etiologies that work synergistically to promote lesion development. The ability to develop preventive and ameliorative treatments will depend on animal models that mimic the human subject metabolically and pathophysiologically

  18. Mouse models for atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Hoorn, J. van der; Princen, H.M.; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial highly-complex disease with numerous etiologies that work synergistically to promote lesion development. The ability to develop preventive and ameliorative treatments will depend on animal models that mimic the human subject metabolically and pathophysiologically

  19. Chemically induced mouse models of intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Weigmann, Benno; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-01-01

    Animal models of intestinal inflammation are indispensable for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease in humans. Here, we provide protocols for establishing murine 2,4,6-trinitro benzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-, oxazolone- and both acute and chronic dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis, the most widely used chemically induced models of intestinal inflammation. In the former two models, colitis is induced by intrarectal administration of the covalently reactive reagents TNBS/oxazolone, which are believed to induce a T-cell-mediated response against hapten-modified autologous proteins/luminal antigens. In the DSS model, mice are subjected several days to drinking water supplemented with DSS, which seems to be directly toxic to colonic epithelial cells of the basal crypts. The procedures for the hapten models of colitis and acute DSS colitis can be accomplished in about 2 weeks but the protocol for chronic DSS colitis takes about 2 months.

  20. Dissecting Alzheimer disease in Down syndrome using mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Yu eChoong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a common genetic condition caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21 (trisomy 21. This greatly increases the risk for Alzheimer disease (AD, but although virtually all people with DS have AD neuropathology by 40 years of age, not all develop dementia. To dissect the genetic contribution of trisomy 21 to DS phenotypes including those relevant to AD, a range of DS mouse models has been generated which are trisomic for chromosome segments syntenic to human chromosome 21. Here, we consider key characteristics of human AD in DS (AD-DS, and our current state of knowledge on related phenotypes in AD and DS mouse models. We go on to review important features needed in future models of AD-DS, to understand this type of dementia and so highlight pathogenic mechanisms relevant to all populations at risk of AD.

  1. Mouse models of ciliopathies: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic P. Norris

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The ciliopathies are an apparently disparate group of human diseases that all result from defects in the formation and/or function of cilia. They include disorders such as Meckel-Grüber syndrome (MKS, Joubert syndrome (JBTS, Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS and Alström syndrome (ALS. Reflecting the manifold requirements for cilia in signalling, sensation and motility, different ciliopathies exhibit common elements. The mouse has been used widely as a model organism for the study of ciliopathies. Although many mutant alleles have proved lethal, continued investigations have led to the development of better models. Here, we review current mouse models of a core set of ciliopathies, their utility and future prospects.

  2. Mouse models of myeloproliferative neoplasms: JAK of all grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, several groups identified a single gain-of-function point mutation in the JAK2 kinase that was present in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. Since this discovery, much effort has been dedicated to understanding the molecular consequences of the JAK2V617F mutation in the haematopoietic system. Three waves of mouse models have been produced recently (bone marrow transplantation, transgenic and targeted knock-in, which have facilitated the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of JAK2V617F-positive MPNs, providing potential platforms for designing and validating novel therapies in humans. This Commentary briefly summarises the first two types of mouse models and then focuses on the more recently generated knock-in models.

  3. Mouse models and aging: longevity and progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen-Yu; Kennedy, Brian K

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex, multifactorial process that is likely influenced by the activities of a range of biological pathways. Genetic approaches to identify genes modulating longevity have been highly successful and recent efforts have extended these studies to mammalian aging. A variety of genetic models have been reported to have enhanced lifespan and, similarly, many genetic interventions lead to progeroid phenotypes. Here, we detail and evaluate both sets of models, focusing on the insights they provide about the molecular processes modulating aging and the extent to which mutations conferring progeroid pathologies really phenocopy accelerated aging.

  4. A transgenic mouse model for trilateral retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, J.M.; Marcus, D.M.; Bernards, R.A.; Carpenter, J.L.; Windle, J.J.; Mellon, P.; Albert, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    We present a murine model of trilateral retinoblastoma. Ocular retinoblastoma and central nervous system tumors are observed in a line of mice formed by the transgenic expression of SV40 T-antigen. An oncogenic protein known to bind to the retinoblastoma gene product (p105-Rb) is specifically expres

  5. Genetically engineered mouse models and human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Alvin JM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common form of bone cancer. Pivotal insight into the genes involved in human osteosarcoma has been provided by the study of rare familial cancer predisposition syndromes. Three kindreds stand out as predisposing to the development of osteosarcoma: Li-Fraumeni syndrome, familial retinoblastoma and RecQ helicase disorders, which include Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome in particular. These disorders have highlighted the important roles of P53 and RB respectively, in the development of osteosarcoma. The association of OS with RECQL4 mutations is apparent but the relevance of this to OS is uncertain as mutations in RECQL4 are not found in sporadic OS. Application of the knowledge or mutations of P53 and RB in familial and sporadic OS has enabled the development of tractable, highly penetrant murine models of OS. These models share many of the cardinal features associated with human osteosarcoma including, importantly, a high incidence of spontaneous metastasis. The recent development of these models has been a significant advance for efforts to improve our understanding of the genetics of human OS and, more critically, to provide a high-throughput genetically modifiable platform for preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics.

  6. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  7. Mouse models of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakur Mohibi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Despite advances in genetic and biochemical analyses, the incidence of breast cancer and its associated mortality remain very high. About 60 - 70% of breast cancers are Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α positive and are dependent on estrogen for growth. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs have therefore provided an effective targeted therapy to treat ER-α positive breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, development of resistance to endocrine therapy is frequent and leads to cancer recurrence. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the development of ER-α positive tumors and their resistance to ER antagonists is currently limited due to lack of experimental models of ER-α positive breast cancer. In most mouse models of breast cancer, the tumors that form are typically ER-negative and independent of estrogen for their growth. However, in recent years more attention has been given to develop mouse models that develop different subtypes of breast cancers, including ER-positive tumors. In this review, we discuss the currently available mouse models that develop ER-α positive mammary tumors and their potential use to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of ER-α positive breast cancer development and endocrine resistance.

  8. Genetically modified mouse models for premature ovarian failure (POF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarlamudi, Krishna; Reddy, Pradeep; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2010-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a complex disorder that affects approximately 1% of women. POF is characterized by the depletion of functional ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years, and clinically, patients may present with primary amenorrhea or secondary amenorrhea. Although some genes have been hypothesized to be candidates responsible for POF, the etiology of most of the cases is idiopathic, with the underlying causes still unidentified because of the heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we consider some mutant mouse models that exhibit phenotypes which are comparable to human POF, and we suggest that the use of these mouse models may help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying POF in humans.

  9. Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease: Focus on Electrophysiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cepeda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the HD (Huntington's disease gene in 1993 led to the creation of genetic mouse models of the disease and opened the doors for mechanistic studies. In particular, the early changes and progression of the disease could be followed and examined systematically. The present review focuses on the contribution of these genetic mouse models to the understanding of functional changes in neurons as the HD phenotype progresses, and concentrates on two brain areas: the striatum, the site of most conspicuous pathology in HD, and the cortex, a site that is becoming increasingly important in understanding the widespread behavioural abnormalities. Mounting evidence points to synaptic abnormalities in communication between the cortex and striatum and cell-cell interactions as major determinants of HD symptoms, even in the absence of severe neuronal degeneration and death.

  10. Posterolateral inter-transverse lumbar fusion in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobyn Justin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal fusion is a common orthopaedic procedure that has been previously modeled using canine, lapine, and rodent subjects. Despite the increasing availability of genetically modified mouse strains, murine models have only been infrequently described. Purpose To present an efficient and minimally traumatic procedure for achieving spinal fusion in a mouse model and determine the optimal rhBMP-2 dose to achieve sufficient fusion mass. Method MicroCT reconstructions of the unfused mouse spine and human spine were compared to design a surgical approach. In phase 1, posterolateral lumbar spine fusion in the mouse was evaluated using 18 animals allocated to three experimental groups. Group 1 received decortication only (n = 3, Group 2 received 10 μg rhBMP-2 in a collagen sponge bilaterally (n = 6, and Group 3 received 10 μg rhBMP-2 + decortication (n = 9. The surgical technique was assessed for intra-operative safety, efficacy, access and reproducibility. Spines were harvested for analysis at 3 weeks (Groups 1, 2 and 1, 2, and 3 weeks (Group 3. In phase 2, a dose response study was carried out in an additional 18 animals with C57BL6 mice receiving sponges containing 0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 μg of rhBMP-2 per sponge bilaterally. Results The operative procedure via midline access was rapid and reproducible, and fusion of the murine articular processes was found to be analogous to the human procedure. Unlike reports from other species, decortication alone (Group 1 yielded no new bone formation. Addition of rhBMP-2 (Groups 2 and 3 yielded a significant bone mass that bridged the L4-L6 vertebrae. The subsequent dose response experiment revealed that 0.5 μg rhBMP-2 per sponge was sufficient to create a fusion mass. Conclusion We describe a new approach for mouse lumbar spine fusion that is safe, efficient, and highly reproducible. The technique we employed is analogous to the human midline procedure and may be highly

  11. Magnolol inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mouse mastitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wang; Dejie, Liang; Xiaojing, Song; Tiancheng, Wang; Yongguo, Cao; Zhengtao, Yang; Naisheng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Mastitis comprises an inflammation of the mammary gland, which is almost always linked with bacterial infection. The treatment of mastitis concerns antimicrobial substances, but not very successful. On the other hand, anti-inflammatory therapy with Chinese traditional medicine becomes an effective way for treating mastitis. Magnolol is a polyphenolic binaphthalene compound extracted from the stem bark of Magnolia sp., which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of magnolol on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis mouse model in vivo and the mechanism of this protective effects in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) in vitro. The damage of tissues was determined by histopathology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. The results showed that magnolol significantly inhibit the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production both in vivo and vitro. Magnolol declined the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK in LPS-stimulated MMECs. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS-stimulated MMECs. In vivo study, it was also observed that magnolol attenuated the damage of mastitis tissues in the mouse models. These findings demonstrated that magnolol attenuate LPS-stimulated inflammatory response by suppressing TLR4/NF-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system. Thereby, magnolol may be a therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  12. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse.

  13. Restoration of cone vision in a mouse model of achromatopsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, John J; Umino, Yumiko; Everhart, Drew; Chang, Bo; Min, Seok H; Li, Qiuhong; Timmers, Adrian M; Hawes, Norman L; Pang, Ji-jing; Barlow, Robert B; Hauswirth, William W

    2014-01-01

    Loss of cone function in the central retina is a pivotal event in the development of severe vision impairment for many prevalent blinding diseases. Complete achromatopsia is a genetic defect resulting in cone vision loss in 1 in 30,000 individuals. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy, we show that it is possible to target cones and rescue both the cone-mediated electroretinogram response and visual acuity in the Gnat2cpfl3 mouse model of achromatopsia. PMID:17515894

  14. Genetically engineered mucin mouse models for inflammation and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suhasini; Kumar, Sushil; Bafna, Sangeeta; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Jain, Maneesh

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins primarily produced by glandular and ductal epithelial cells, either in membrane-tethered or secretory forms, for providing lubrication and protection from various exogenous and endogenous insults. However, recent studies have linked their aberrant overexpression with infection, inflammation, and cancer that underscores their importance in tissue homeostasis. In this review, we present current status of the existing mouse models that have been developed to gain insights into the functional role(s) of mucins under physiological and pathological conditions. Knockout mouse models for membrane-associated (Muc1 and Muc16) and secretory mucins (Muc2) have helped us to elucidate the role of mucins in providing effective and protective barrier functions against pathological threats, participation in disease progression, and improved our understanding of mucin interaction with biotic and abiotic environmental components. Emphasis is also given to available transgenic mouse models (MUC1 and MUC7), which has been exploited to understand the context-dependent regulation and therapeutic potential of human mucins during inflammation and cancer. PMID:25634251

  15. The cardiovascular phenotype of a mouse model of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzard, Ashley S; Emerson, Michael; Prehar, Sukhpal; Neyses, Ludwig; Trainer, Peter; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Heagerty, Anthony M

    2009-10-01

    Although, it is accepted that there is an excess of cardiovascular mortality in acromegaly, it is uncertain whether this is due to the direct effects of growth hormone-induced-cardiomyopathy or is a consequence of atherosclerosis secondary to the metabolic syndrome often observed in this condition. Direct comparison of a mouse model of acromegaly to a mouse model of Laron's syndrome allowed us to carry out detailed phenotyping and better understand the role GH plays in the circulatory system. Transgenic mice that overexpress the growth hormone gene (GH) developed gigantism, including insulin resistance and higher blood pressures commensurate with increased body mass. In these giant mice, the hearts were hypertrophied but haemodynamic studies suggested contractile function was normal. Segments of small arteries mounted in a pressure myograph showed vascular wall hypertrophy but a preserved lumen diameter. Vascular contractile function was normal. Mice in which the GH receptor gene was disrupted or 'knocked out' were dwarf and had low blood pressure, small hearts and blood vessels but a normally functioning circulation. Correlations of body mass with cardiovascular parameters suggested that blood pressure and structural characteristics develop in line with body size. In this transgenic mouse model of acromegaly, there is cardiac and vascular hypertrophy commensurate with GH excess but normal function. Our findings support the contention that the excess mortality in this condition may be due to the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy rather than increased rates of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease.

  16. Mouse models: the ketogenic diet and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Karin

    2008-11-01

    Literature on the anticonvulsant effects of the ketogenic diet (KD) in mouse seizure models is summarized. Recent data show that a KD balanced in vitamin, mineral, and antioxidant content is anticonvulsant in mice, confirming that the KD's effect in mice can be attributed to the composition of the diet and not other dietary factors. Given that the anticonvulsant mechanism of the KD is still unknown, the anticonvulsant profile of the diet in different seizure models may help to decipher this mechanism. The implications of the findings that the KD is anticonvulsant in electrical seizure models are indicated. Further, the potential involvement of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the KD's anticonvulsant mechanism is discussed.

  17. Mouse models of dengue virus infection for vaccine testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathy, Vanessa V; Milligan, Gregg N; Bourne, Nigel; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four serologically and genetically related viruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. With an annual global burden of approximately 390 million infections occurring in the tropics and subtropics worldwide, an effective vaccine to combat dengue is urgently needed. Historically, a major impediment to dengue research has been development of a suitable small animal infection model that mimics the features of human illness in the absence of neurologic disease that was the hallmark of earlier mouse models. Recent advances in immunocompromised murine infection models have resulted in development of lethal DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 models in AG129 mice that are deficient in both the interferon-α/β receptor (IFN-α/β R) and the interferon-γ receptor (IFN-γR). These models mimic many hallmark features of dengue disease in humans, such as viremia, thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and cytokine storm. Importantly AG129 mice develop lethal, acute, disseminated infection with systemic viral loads, which is characteristic of typical dengue illness. Infected AG129 mice generate an antibody response to DENV, and antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) models have been established by both passive and maternal transfer of DENV-immune sera. Several steps have been taken to refine DENV mouse models. Viruses generated by peripheral in vivo passages incur substitutions that provide a virulent phenotype using smaller inocula. Because IFN signaling has a major role in immunity to DENV, mice that generate a cellular immune response are desired, but striking the balance between susceptibility to DENV and intact immunity is complicated. Great strides have been made using single-deficient IFN-α/βR mice for DENV-2 infection, and conditional knockdowns may offer additional approaches to provide a panoramic view that includes viral virulence and host immunity. Ultimately, the DENV AG129 mouse models result in reproducible lethality and offer multiple

  18. The Event Coordination Notation: Behaviour Modelling Beyond Mickey Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The Event Coordination Notation (ECNO) allows modelling the desired behaviour of a software system on top of any object-oriented software. Together with existing technologies from Model-based Software Engineering (MBSE) for automatically generating the software for the structural parts, ECNO allows...... management system. This way, we demonstrate that ECNO can be used for modelling software beyond the typical Mickey Mouse examples. This example demonstrates that the essence of workflow management – including its behaviour – can be captured in ECNO: in a sense, it is a domain model of workflow management...... generating fully functional software from a combination of class diagrams and ECNO models. What is more, software generated from ECNO models, integrates with existing software and software generated by other technologies. ECNO started out from some challenges in behaviour modelling and some requirements...

  19. Mouse models of acute exacerbations of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh K; Herbert, Cristan; Foster, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Most of the healthcare costs associated with asthma relate to emergency department visits and hospitalizations because of acute exacerbations of underlying chronic disease. Development of appropriate animal models of acute exacerbations of asthma is a necessary prerequisite for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms and assessing potential novel therapeutic approaches. Most such models have been developed using mice. Relatively few mouse models attempt to simulate the acute-on-chronic disease that characterizes human asthma exacerbations. Instead, many reported models involve relatively short-term challenge with an antigen to which animals are sensitized, followed closely by an unrelated triggering agent, so are better described as models of potentiation of acute allergic inflammation. Triggers for experimental models of asthma exacerbations include (i) challenge with high levels of the sensitizing allergen (ii) infection by viruses or fungi, or challenge with components of these microorganisms (iii) exposure to environmental pollutants. In this review, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of published mouse models, their application for investigation of novel treatments and potential future developments.

  20. Genetic Mouse Models: The Powerful Tools to Study Fat Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xingxing; Williams, Kevin W; Liu, Tiemin

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with a variety of comorbidities that contribute to mortality around the world. Although significant effort has been expended in understanding mechanisms that mitigate the consequences of this epidemic, the field has experienced limited success thus far. The potential ability of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to counteract obesity and metabolic disease in rodents (and potentially in humans) has been a topical realization. Recently, there is also another thermogenic fat cell called beige adipocytes, which are located among white adipocytes and share similar activated responses to cyclic AMP as classical BAT. In this chapter, we review contemporary molecular strategies to investigate the role of adipose tissue depots in metabolism. In particular, we will discuss the generation of adipose tissue-specific knockout and overexpression of target genes in various mouse models. We will also discuss how to use different Cre (cyclization recombination) mouse lines to investigate diverse types of adipocytes.

  1. Combination radiotherapy in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Tamalee R; Camphausen, Kevin

    2012-03-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are the most common and aggressive adult primary brain tumors. In recent years there has been substantial progress in the understanding of the mechanics of tumor invasion, and direct intracerebral inoculation of tumor provides the opportunity of observing the invasive process in a physiologically appropriate environment. As far as human brain tumors are concerned, the orthotopic models currently available are established either by stereotaxic injection of cell suspensions or implantation of a solid piece of tumor through a complicated craniotomy procedure. In our technique we harvest cells from tissue culture to create a cell suspension used to implant directly into the brain. The duration of the surgery is approximately 30 minutes, and as the mouse needs to be in a constant surgical plane, an injectable anesthetic is used. The mouse is placed in a stereotaxic jig made by Stoetling (figure 1). After the surgical area is cleaned and prepared, an incision is made; and the bregma is located to determine the location of the craniotomy. The location of the craniotomy is 2 mm to the right and 1 mm rostral to the bregma. The depth is 3 mm from the surface of the skull, and cells are injected at a rate of 2 μl every 2 minutes. The skin is sutured with 5-0 PDS, and the mouse is allowed to wake up on a heating pad. From our experience, depending on the cell line, treatment can take place from 7-10 days after surgery. Drug delivery is dependent on the drug composition. For radiation treatment the mice are anesthetized, and put into a custom made jig. Lead covers the mouse's body and exposes only the brain of the mouse. The study of tumorigenesis and the evaluation of new therapies for GBM require accurate and reproducible brain tumor animal models. Thus we use this orthotopic brain model to study the interaction of the microenvironment of the brain and the tumor, to test the effectiveness of different therapeutic agents with and without

  2. Mouse models for genes involved in impaired spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, M K; de Kretser, D

    2006-02-01

    Since the introduction of molecular biology and gene ablation technologies there have been substantial advances in our understanding of how sperm are made and fertilization occurs. There have been at least 150 different models of specifically altered gene function produced that have resulted in male infertility spanning virtually all aspects of the spermatogenic, sperm maturation and fertilization processes. While each has, or potentially will reveal, novel aspects of these processes, there is still much of which we have little knowledge. The current review is by no means a comprehensive list of these mouse models, rather it gives an overview of the potential for such models which up to this point have generally been 'knockouts'; it presents alternative strategies for the production of new models and emphasizes the importance of thorough phenotypic analysis in order to extract a maximum amount of information from each model.

  3. Mouse models of SCN5A-related cardiac arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien eCharpentier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of SCN5A gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.5, underlie hereditary cardiac arrhythmic syndromes such as the type 3 long QT syndrome, cardiac conduction diseases, the Brugada syndrome, the sick sinus syndrome, atrial standstill and numerous overlap syndromes. Patch-clamp studies in heterologous expression systems have provided important information to understand the genotype-phenotype relationships of these diseases. However, they could not clarify how SCN5A mutations can be responsible for such a large spectrum of diseases, for the late age of onset or the progressiveness of some of these diseases and for the overlapping syndromes. Genetically modified mice rapidly appeared as promising tools for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac SCN5A-related arrhythmic syndromes and several mouse models have been established. This paper reviews some of the results obtained on these models that, for most of them, recapitulate the clinical phenotypes of the patients. It also points out that these models also have their own limitations. Overall, mouse models appear as powerful tools to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of SCN5A-related diseases and offer the opportunity to investigate the secondary cellular consequences of SCN5A mutations such as the expression remodelling of other genes that might participate to the overall phenotype. Finally, they constitute useful tools for addressing the role of genetic and environmental modifiers on cardiac electrical activity.

  4. Recent advances in mouse models of obesityandnonalcoholic steatohepatitis-associatedhepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth mostcommon cancer, and obesity has been establishedas a risk factor for HCC development. Nonalcoholicsteatohepatitis (NASH) is apparently the key linkbetween obesity and hepatocarcinogenesis, and obesityalso accelerates HCC development synergistically withother risk factors, such as hepatitis virus infectionand alcohol consumption. As an explanation for thepathogenesis of NASH, the so-called "two-hit" theoryhas been widely accepted, but recently, a better model,the so-called "multiple-hits hypothesis" was proposed,which states that many disease-promoting factors mayoccur in parallel, rather than consecutively. However,the overall mechanism remains largely unknown. Variouscell-cell and organ-organ interactions are involved inthe pathogenesis of NASH, and thus appropriate in vivodisease models are essential for a deeper understanding.However, replicating the full spectrum of human NASHhas been difficult, as NASH involves obesity, insulinresistance, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and ultimately HCC,and the lack of an appropriate mouse model has beena considerable barrier to determining the missing linksamong obesity, NASH, and HCC. In recent years, severalinnovative mouse models presenting obesity- and NASHassociatedHCC have been established by modifieddiets, chemotoxic agents, genetic manipulation, or acombination of these factors, shedding some light onthis complex network and providing new therapeuticstrategies. Thus, in this paper, I review the mousemodels of obesity- and NASH-associated HCC, especiallyfocusing on recent advances and their clinical relevance.

  5. Transgenic mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, M; Adachi, H; Inukai, A; Sobue, G

    2003-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by proximal muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. Only males develop symptoms, while female carriers usually are asymptomatic. A specific treatment for SBMA has not been established. The molecular basis of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic hallmark is nuclear inclusions (NIs) containing the mutant and truncated AR with expanded polyQ in the residual motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord as well as in some other visceral organs. Several transgenic (Tg) mouse models have been created for studying the pathogenesis of SBMA. The Tg mouse model carrying pure 239 CAGs under human AR promoter and another model carrying truncated AR with expanded CAGs show motor impairment and nuclear NIs in spinal motor neurons. Interestingly, Tg mice carrying full-length human AR with expanded polyQ demonstrate progressive motor impairment and neurogenic pathology as well as sexual difference of phenotypes. These models recapitulate the phenotypic expression observed in SBMA. The ligand-dependent nuclear localization of the mutant AR is found to be involved in the disease mechanism, and hormonal therapy is suggested to be a therapeutic approach applicable to SBMA.

  6. A new mouse model of metabolic syndrome and associated complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Zheng, Yue; Nishina, Patsy M; Naggert, Jürgen K

    2009-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) encompasses a clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. We characterized a new mouse model carrying a dominant mutation, C57BL/6J-Nmf15/+ (B6-Nmf15/+), which develops additional complications of MS such as adipose tissue inflammation and cardiomyopathy. A backcross was used to genetically map the Nmf15 locus. Mice were examined in the comprehensive laboratory animal monitoring system, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and blood chemistry analyses were performed. Hypothalamic LEPR, SOCS1, and STAT3 phosphorylation were examined. Cardiac function was assessed by echo- and electrocardiography. Adipose tissue inflammation was characterized by in situ hybridization and measurement of Jun kinase activity. The Nmf15 locus mapped to distal mouse chromosome 5 with an LOD (logarithm of odds) score of 13.8. Nmf15 mice developed obesity by 12 weeks of age. Plasma leptin levels were significantly elevated in pre-obese Nmf15 mice at 8 weeks of age and an attenuated STAT3 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus suggests a primary leptin resistance. Adipose tissue from Nmf15 mice showed a remarkable degree of inflammation and macrophage infiltration as indicated by expression of the F4/80 marker and increased phosphorylation of JUN N-terminal kinase 1/2. Lipidosis was observed in tubular epithelial cells and glomeruli of the kidney. Nmf15 mice demonstrate both histological and pathophysiological evidence of cardiomyopathy. The Nmf15 mouse model provides a new entry point into pathways mediating leptin resistance and obesity. It is one of few models that combine many aspects of MS and can be useful for testing new therapeutic approaches for combating obesity complications, particularly cardiomyopathy.

  7. Mouse models for the discovery of colorectal cancer driver genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher R; Starr, Timothy K

    2016-01-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) constitutes a major public health problem as the third most commonly diagnosed and third most lethal malignancy worldwide. The prevalence and the physical accessibility to colorectal tumors have made CRC an ideal model for the study of tumor genetics. Early research efforts using patient derived CRC samples led to the discovery of several highly penetrant mutations (e.g., APC, KRAS, MMR genes) in both hereditary and sporadic CRC tumors. This knowledge has enabled researchers to develop genetically engineered and chemically induced tumor models of CRC, both of which have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of CRC. Despite these advances, the morbidity and mortality of CRC remains a cause for concern and highlight the need to uncover novel genetic drivers of CRC. This review focuses on mouse models of CRC with particular emphasis on a newly developed cancer gene discovery tool, the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis model of CRC.

  8. Mouse model of ulcerative colitis using trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Ahmad Rather

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Animal model of intestinal inflammation is of paramount significance that aids in discerning the pathologies underlying ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, the two clinical presentations of inflammatory bowel disease. The 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS colitis model represents one such intestinal inflammation-prototype that is generated in susceptible strains of mice through intra-rectal instillation of compound TNBS. In this paper, we demonstrate the experimental induction of TNBS-mediated colitis in a susceptible strain of ICR mice. This can be done by the following steps: a acclimation, b induction and c observation. TNBS-mouse model provides the information in shortest possible time and simultaneously represents a cost effective and highly reproducible model method of studying the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Developmental Defects in Trisomy 21 and Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Maurice Delabar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidies have diverse phenotypic consequences, ranging from mental retardation and developmental abnormalities to susceptibility to common phenotypes and various neoplasms. This review focuses on the developmental defects of murine models of a prototype human aneuploidy: trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS, T21. Murine models are clearly the best tool for dissecting the phenotypic consequences of imbalances that affect single genes or chromosome segments. Embryos can be studied freely in mice, making murine models particularly useful for the characterization of developmental abnormalities. This review describes the main phenotypic alterations occurring during the development of patients with T21 and the developmental abnormalities observed in mouse models, and investigates phenotypes common to both species.

  10. Dantrolene is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the Huntingtin protein which results in the selective degeneration of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. Our group has previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca2+ signaling is abnormal in MSNs from the yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128. Moreover, we demonstrated that deranged intracellular Ca2+ signaling sensitizes YAC128 MSNs to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity when compared to wild type (WT MSNs. In previous studies we also observed abnormal neuronal Ca2+ signaling in neurons from spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2 and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3 mouse models and demonstrated that treatment with dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and clinically relevant Ca2+ signaling stabilizer, was neuroprotective in experiments with these mouse models. The aim of the current study was to evaluate potential beneficial effects of dantrolene in experiments with YAC128 HD mouse model. Results The application of caffeine and glutamate resulted in increased Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in YAC128 MSN cultures when compared to WT MSN cultures. Pre-treatment with dantrolene protected YAC128 MSNs from glutamate excitotoxicty, with an effective concentration of 100 nM and above. Feeding dantrolene (5 mg/kg twice a week to YAC128 mice between 2 months and 11.5 months of age resulted in significantly improved performance in the beam-walking and gait-walking assays. Neuropathological analysis revealed that long-term dantrolene feeding to YAC128 mice significantly reduced the loss of NeuN-positive striatal neurons and reduced formation of Httexp nuclear aggregates. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that deranged Ca2+ signaling plays an important role in HD pathology. Our data also implicate the RyanRs as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HD and demonstrate that Ryan

  11. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40-70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The LEGSKO mouse: a mouse model of age-related nuclear cataract based on genetic suppression of lens glutathione synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Fan

    Full Text Available Age-related nuclear cataracts are associated with progressive post-synthetic modifications of crystallins from various physical chemical and metabolic insults, of which oxidative stress is a major factor. The latter is normally suppressed by high concentrations of glutathione (GSH, which however are very low in the nucleus of the old lens. Here we generated a mouse model of oxidant stress by knocking out glutathione synthesis in the mouse in the hope of recapitulating some of the changes observed in human age-related nuclear cataract (ARNC. A floxed Gclc mouse was generated and crossed with a transgenic mouse expressing Cre in the lens to generate the LEGSKO mouse in which de novo GSH synthesis was completely abolished in the lens. Lens GSH levels were reduced up to 60% in homozygous LEGSKO mice, and a decreasing GSH gradient was noticed from cortical to nuclear region at 4 months of age. Oxidation of crystallin methionine and sulfhydryls into sulfoxides was dramatically increased, but methylglyoxal hydroimidazolones levels that are GSH/glyoxalase dependent were surprisingly normal. Homozygous LEGSKO mice developed nuclear opacities starting at 4 months that progressed into severe nuclear cataract by 9 months. We conclude that the LEGSKO mouse lens mimics several features of human ARNC and is thus expected to be a useful model for the development of anti-cataract agents.

  13. Revisiting the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim CB

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clifford B Kim,1,2 Patricia A D’Amore,2–4 Kip M Connor1,2 1Angiogenesis Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, 3Schepens Eye Research Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 4Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina is a hallmark of many retinal diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. In particular, ROP has been an important health concern for physicians since the advent of routine supplemental oxygen therapy for premature neonates more than 70 years ago. Since then, researchers have explored several animal models to better understand ROP and retinal vascular development. Of these models, the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR has become the most widely used, and has played a pivotal role in our understanding of retinal angiogenesis and ocular immunology, as well as in the development of groundbreaking therapeutics such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for wet age-related macular degeneration. Numerous refinements to the model have been made since its inception in the 1950s, and technological advancements have expanded the use of the model across multiple scientific fields. In this review, we explore the historical developments that have led to the mouse OIR model utilized today, essential concepts of OIR, limitations of the model, and a representative selection of key findings from OIR, with particular emphasis on current research progress. Keywords: ROP, OIR, angiogenesis

  14. Experimental Mouse Model of Lumbar Ligamentum Flavum Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takeyuki; Yokota, Kazuya; Kobayakawa, Kazu; Hara, Masamitsu; Kubota, Kensuke; Harimaya, Katsumi; Kawaguchi, Kenichi; Hayashida, Mitsumasa; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Doi, Toshio; Shiba, Keiichiro; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Okada, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) is one of the most common spinal disorders in elderly people, with the number of LSCS patients increasing due to the aging of the population. The ligamentum flavum (LF) is a spinal ligament located in the interior of the vertebral canal, and hypertrophy of the LF, which causes the direct compression of the nerve roots and/or cauda equine, is a major cause of LSCS. Although there have been previous studies on LF hypertrophy, its pathomechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to establish a relevant mouse model of LF hypertrophy and to examine disease-related factors. First, we focused on mechanical stress and developed a loading device for applying consecutive mechanical flexion-extension stress to the mouse LF. After 12 weeks of mechanical stress loading, we found that the LF thickness in the stress group was significantly increased in comparison to the control group. In addition, there were significant increases in the area of collagen fibers, the number of LF cells, and the gene expression of several fibrosis-related factors. However, in this mecnanical stress model, there was no macrophage infiltration, angiogenesis, or increase in the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), which are characteristic features of LF hypertrophy in LSCS patients. We therefore examined the influence of infiltrating macrophages on LF hypertrophy. After inducing macrophage infiltration by micro-injury to the mouse LF, we found excessive collagen synthesis in the injured site with the increased TGF-β1 expression at 2 weeks after injury, and further confirmed LF hypertrophy at 6 weeks after injury. Our findings demonstrate that mechanical stress is a causative factor for LF hypertrophy and strongly suggest the importance of macrophage infiltration in the progression of LF hypertrophy via the stimulation of collagen production.

  15. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

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    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of a spontaneous retinal neovascular mouse model.

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    Eiichi Hasegawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vision loss due to vascular disease of the retina is a leading cause of blindness in the world. Retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP is a subgroup of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD, whereby abnormal blood vessels develop in the retina leading to debilitating vision loss and eventual blindness. The novel mouse strain, neoretinal vascularization 2 (NRV2, shows spontaneous fundus changes associated with abnormal neovascularization. The purpose of this study is to characterize the induction of pathologic angiogenesis in this mouse model. METHODS: The NRV2 mice were examined from postnatal day 12 (p12 to 3 months. The phenotypic changes within the retina were evaluated by fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis. The pathological neovascularization was imaged by confocal microscopy and reconstructed using three-dimensional image analysis software. RESULTS: We found that NRV2 mice develop multifocal retinal depigmentation in the posterior fundus. Depigmented lesions developed vascular leakage observed by fluorescein angiography. The spontaneous angiogenesis arose from the retinal vascular plexus at postnatal day (p15 and extended toward retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. By three months of age, histological analysis revealed encapsulation of the neovascular lesion by the RPE in the photoreceptor cell layer and subretinal space. CONCLUSIONS: The NRV2 mouse strain develops early neovascular lesions within the retina, which grow downward towards the RPE beginning at p15. This retinal neovascularization model mimics early stages of human retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP and will likely be a useful in elucidating targeted therapeutics for patients with ocular neovascular disease.

  17. A calcium channel mutant mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

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    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Burns, Dennis K; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F; Struyk, Arie F; Schneider, Martin F; Cannon, Stephen C

    2012-12-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is a familial skeletal muscle disorder that presents with recurrent episodes of severe weakness lasting hours to days associated with reduced serum potassium (K+). HypoPP is genetically heterogeneous, with missense mutations of a calcium channel (Ca(V)1.1) or a sodium channel (Na(V)1.4) accounting for 60% and 20% of cases, respectively. The mechanistic link between Ca(V)1.1 mutations and the ictal loss of muscle excitability during an attack of weakness in HypoPP is unknown. To address this question, we developed a mouse model for HypoPP with a targeted Ca(V)1.1 R528H mutation. The Ca(V)1.1 R528H mice had a HypoPP phenotype for which low K+ challenge produced a paradoxical depolarization of the resting potential, loss of muscle excitability, and weakness. A vacuolar myopathy with dilated transverse tubules and disruption of the triad junctions impaired Ca2+ release and likely contributed to the mild permanent weakness. Fibers from the Ca(V)1.1 R528H mouse had a small anomalous inward current at the resting potential, similar to our observations in the Na(V)1.4 R669H HypoPP mouse model. This "gating pore current" may be a common mechanism for paradoxical depolarization and susceptibility to HypoPP arising from missense mutations in the S4 voltage sensor of either calcium or sodium channels.

  18. UV radiation and mouse models of herpes simplex virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norval, Mary; El-Ghorr, A.A. [Edinburgh Univ. Medical School (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Microbiology

    1996-08-01

    Orolabial human infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are very common; following the primary epidermal infection, the virus is retained in a latent form in the trigeminal ganglia from where it can reactivate and cause a recrudescent lesion. Recrudescences are triggered by various stimuli including exposure to sunlight. In this review three categories of mouse models are used to examine the effects of UV irradiation on HSV infections: these are UV exposure prior to primary infection, UV exposure as a triggering event for recrudescence and UV exposure prior to challenge with virus is mice already immunized to HSV. In each of these models immunosuppression occurs, which is manifest, in some instances, in increased morbidity or an increased rate of recrudescence. Where known, the immunological mechanisms involved in the models are summarized and their relevance to human infections considered. (Author).

  19. Translational Mouse Models of Autism: Advancing Toward Pharmacological Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Leach, Prescott T; Yang, Mu; Silverman, Jill L; Solomon, Marjorie; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    Animal models provide preclinical tools to investigate the causal role of genetic mutations and environmental factors in the etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Knockout and humanized knock-in mice, and more recently knockout rats, have been generated for many of the de novo single gene mutations and copy number variants (CNVs) detected in ASD and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders. Mouse models incorporating genetic and environmental manipulations have been employed for preclinical testing of hypothesis-driven pharmacological targets, to begin to develop treatments for the diagnostic and associated symptoms of autism. In this review, we summarize rodent behavioral assays relevant to the core features of autism, preclinical and clinical evaluations of pharmacological interventions, and strategies to improve the translational value of rodent models of autism.

  20. A new mouse model to explore therapies for preeclampsia.

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    Abdulwahab Ahmed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre-eclampsia, a pregnancy-specific multisystemic disorder is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. This syndrome has been known to medical science since ancient times. However, despite considerable research, the cause/s of preeclampsia remain unclear, and there is no effective treatment. Development of an animal model that recapitulates this complex pregnancy-related disorder may help to expand our understanding and may hold great potential for the design and implementation of effective treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the CBA/J x DBA/2 mouse model of recurrent miscarriage is also a model of immunologically-mediated preeclampsia (PE. DBA/J mated CBA/J females spontaneously develop many features of human PE (primigravidity, albuminuria, endotheliosis, increased sensitivity to angiotensin II and increased plasma leptin levels that correlates with bad pregnancy outcomes. We previously reported that antagonism of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling by soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1 is involved in placental and fetal injury in CBA/J x DBA/2 mice. Using this animal model that recapitulates many of the features of preeclampsia in women, we found that pravastatin restores angiogenic balance, ameliorates glomerular injury, diminishes hypersensitivity to angiotensin II and protects pregnancies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We described a new mouse model of PE, were the relevant key features of human preeclampsia develop spontaneously. The CBA/J x DBA/2 model, that recapitulates this complex disorder, helped us identify pravastatin as a candidate therapy to prevent preeclampsia and its related complications. We recognize that these studies were conducted in mice and that clinical trials are needed to confirm its application to humans.

  1. Parametric Modeling of the Mouse Left Ventricular Myocardial Fiber Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Samer S; Gomez, Arnold David; Morgan, James L; Hsu, Edward W

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has greatly facilitated detailed quantifications of myocardial structures. However, structural patterns, such as the distinctive transmural rotation of the fibers, remain incompletely described. To investigate the validity and practicality of pattern-based analysis, 3D DTI was performed on 13 fixed mouse hearts and fiber angles in the left ventricle were transformed and fitted to parametric expressions constructed from elementary functions of the prolate spheroidal spatial variables. It was found that, on average, the myocardial fiber helix angle could be represented to 6.5° accuracy by the equivalence of a product of 10th-order polynomials of the radial and longitudinal variables, and 17th-order Fourier series of the circumferential variable. Similarly, the fiber imbrication angle could be described by 10th-order polynomials and 24th-order Fourier series, to 5.6° accuracy. The representations, while relatively concise, did not adversely affect the information commonly derived from DTI datasets including the whole-ventricle mean fiber helix angle transmural span and atlases constructed for the group. The unique ability of parametric models for predicting the 3D myocardial fiber structure from finite number of 2D slices was also demonstrated. These findings strongly support the principle of parametric modeling for characterizing myocardial structures in the mouse and beyond.

  2. MicroRNAs in mouse models of lymphoid malignancies

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    Nicola A. O. Zanesi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs has revealed a new layer of gene expression regulation that affects many normal and pathologic biological systems. Among the malignancies affected by the dysregulation of miRNAs there are cancers of lymphoid origin, in which miRNAs are thought to have tumor suppressive or tumor promoting activities, depending on the nature of their specific targets. In the last 4-5 years, the experimental field that provided the deepest insights into the in vivo biology of miRNAs is that of mouse modeling in which transgenic and knockout animals mimic, respectively, over-expression or down-regulation of specific miRNAs involved in human leukemia/lymphoma. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of lymphoid malignancies based on the natural and engineered mouse models of three different miRNAs, miR-15a/16-1 cluster, miR-155, and miR-17-92 cluster.

  3. A mouse model for Meckel syndrome type 3.

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    Cook, Susan A; Collin, Gayle B; Bronson, Roderick T; Naggert, Jürgen K; Liu, Dong P; Akeson, Ellen C; Davisson, Muriel T

    2009-04-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 (MKS3; OMIM 607361) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bilateral polycystic kidney disease. Other malformations associated with MKS3 include cystic changes in the liver, polydactyly, and brain abnormalities (occipital encephalocele, hydrocephalus, and Dandy Walker-type cerebellar anomalies). The disorder is hypothesized to be caused by defects in primary cilia. In humans, the underlying mutated gene, TMEM67, encodes transmembrane protein 67, also called meckelin (OMIM 609884), which is an integral protein of the renal epithelial cell and membrane of the primary cilium. Here, we describe a spontaneous deletion of the mouse ortholog, Tmem67, which results in polycystic kidney disease and death by 3 wk after birth. Hydrocephalus also occurs in some mutants. We verified the mutated gene by transgenic rescue and characterized the phenotype with microcomputed tomography, histology, scanning electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. This mutant provides a mouse model for MKS3 and adds to the growing set of mammalian models essential for studying the role of the primary cilium in kidney function.

  4. A mouse model for Chlamydia suis genital infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Manuela; Di Paolo, Maria; Favaroni, Alison; Aldini, Rita; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Ostanello, Fabio; Biondi, Roberta; Cremonini, Eleonora; Ginocchietti, Laura; Cevenini, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    A mouse model for Chlamydia suis genital infection was developed. Ninety-nine mice were randomly divided into three groups and intravaginally inoculated with chlamydia: 45 mice (group 1) received C. suis purified elementary bodies (EBs), 27 (group 2) were inoculated with C. trachomatis genotype E EBs and 27 mice (group 3) with C. trachomatis genotype F EBs. Additionally, 10 mice were used as a negative control. At seven days post-infection (dpi) secretory anti-C. suis IgA were recovered from vaginal swabs of all C. suis inoculated mice. Chlamydia suis was isolated from 93, 84, 71 and 33% vaginal swabs at 3, 5, 7 and 12 dpi. Chlamydia trachomatis genotype E and F were isolated from 100% vaginal swabs up to 7 dpi and from 61 and 72%, respectively, at 12 dpi. Viable C. suis and C. trachomatis organisms were isolated from uterus and tubes up to 16 and 28 dpi, respectively. The results of the present study show the susceptibility of mice to intravaginal inoculation with C. suis. A more rapid course and resolution of C. suis infection, in comparison to C. trachomatis, was highlighted. The mouse model could be useful for comparative investigations involving C. suis and C. trachomatis species.

  5. Chronic mouse model of TMA-induced contact hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Claudia; Döcke, Wolf-Dietrich F; Zollner, Thomas M; Röse, Lars

    2009-04-01

    Due to the steadily increasing incidence of atopic dermatitis (AD), especially in children, there is a high medical need for new therapies and improved animal models. In mice, trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is routinely used to trigger T-cell-dependent contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reactions. In this study, we compared the standard acute TMA-induced CHS in Balb/c mice with subacute and chronic models of TMA-induced ear inflammation. Compared to the acute model, the chronic CHS model more closely reflects characteristics of AD, such as typical morphological changes of the inflamed skin, strong infiltration with T cells, major histocompatibility complex II-positive cells, eosinophils, and mast cells, a T-helper cell-type (Th) 2 cytokine profile and a strong increase of serum IgE levels. Moreover, a strong lymph node involvement with T-helper cell dominance and a mixed Th1/Th2 T-cell differentiation and activation pattern was demonstrated. Importantly, as demonstrated by successful therapy with prednisolone, the chronic TMA-induced CHS model, in contrast to acute and subacute models, made prolonged therapeutic treatment of a pre-established skin inflammation possible. Altogether, we present an improved model of mouse T-cell-dependent skin inflammation for AD. We hope this model will enhance the predictive value of animal models for therapeutic treatment of atopic eczema.

  6. Gait analysis in a mouse model resembling Leigh disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Ria; Russel, Frans G; Smeitink, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Leigh disease (LD) is one of the clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial OXPHOS disorders and also known as sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. The disease has an incidence of 1 in 77,000 live births. Symptoms typically begin early in life and prognosis for LD patients is poor. Currently, no clinically effective treatments are available. Suitable animal and cellular models are necessary for the understanding of the neuropathology and the development of successful new therapeutic strategies. In this study we used the Ndufs4 knockout (Ndufs4(-/-)) mouse, a model of mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Ndusf4(-/-) mice exhibit progressive neurodegeneration, which closely resemble the human LD phenotype. When dissecting behavioral abnormalities in animal models it is of great importance to apply translational tools that are clinically relevant. To distinguish gait abnormalities in patients, simple walking tests can be assessed, but in animals this is not easy. This study is the first to demonstrate automated CatWalk gait analysis in the Ndufs4(-/-) mouse model. Marked differences were noted between Ndufs4(-/-) and control mice in dynamic, static, coordination and support parameters. Variation of walking speed was significantly increased in Ndufs4(-/-) mice, suggesting hampered and uncoordinated gait. Furthermore, decreased regularity index, increased base of support and changes in support were noted in the Ndufs4(-/-) mice. Here, we report the ability of the CatWalk system to sensitively assess gait abnormalities in Ndufs4(-/-) mice. This objective gait analysis can be of great value for intervention and drug efficacy studies in animal models for mitochondrial disease.

  7. Development of A Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; questions of the cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology.A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1-5% (it is not a null mutation. Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer.Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention.

  8. Regression of retinopathy by squalamine in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Rosemary D; Yan, Yun; Geng, Yixun; Zasloff, Michael; Williams, Jon I

    2004-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether an antiangiogenic agent, squalamine, given late during the evolution of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in the mouse, could improve retinal neovascularization. OIR was induced in neonatal C57BL6 mice and the neonates were treated s.c. with squalamine doses begun at various times after OIR induction. A system of retinal whole mounts and assessment of neovascular nuclei extending beyond the inner limiting membrane from animals reared under room air or OIR conditions and killed periodically from d 12 to 21 were used to assess retinopathy in squalamine-treated and untreated animals. OIR evolved after 75% oxygen exposure in neonatal mice with florid retinal neovascularization developing by d 14. Squalamine (single dose, 25 mg/kg s.c.) given on d 15 or 16, but not d 17, substantially improved retinal neovascularization in the mouse model of OIR. There was improvement seen in the degree of blood vessel tuft formation, blood vessel tortuosity, and central vasoconstriction with squalamine treatment at d 15 or 16. Single-dose squalamine at d 12 was effective at reducing subsequent development of retinal neovascularization at doses as low as 1 mg/kg. Squalamine is a very active inhibitor of OIR in mouse neonates at doses as low as 1 mg/kg given once. Further, squalamine given late in the course of OIR improves retinopathy by inducing regression of retinal neovessels and abrogating invasion of new vessels beyond the inner-limiting membrane of the retina.

  9. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  10. Insights into granulosa cell tumors using spontaneous or genetically engineered mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Youn

    2016-03-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that have been studied for decades. However, their infrequency has delayed efforts to research their etiology. Recently, mutations in human GCTs have been discovered, which has led to further research aimed at determining the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Mouse models have been important tools for studying GCTs, and have provided means to develop and improve diagnostics and therapeutics. Thus far, several genetically modified mouse models, along with one spontaneous mouse model, have been reported. This review summarizes the phenotypes of these mouse models and their applicability in elucidating the mechanisms of granulosa cell tumor development.

  11. Neurobehavioral deficits in the KIKO mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMackin, Marissa Z; Henderson, Chelsea K; Cortopassi, Gino A

    2017-01-01

    Friedreich's Ataxia (FA) is a pediatric neurodegenerative disease whose clinical presentation includes ataxia, muscle weakness, and peripheral sensory neuropathy. The KIKO mouse is an animal model of FA with frataxin deficiency first described in 2002, but neurobehavioral deficits have never been described in this model. The identification of robust neurobehavioral deficits in KIKO mice could support the testing of drugs for FA, which currently has no approved therapy. We tested 13 neurobehavioral tasks to identify a robust KIKO phenotype: Open Field, Grip Strength Test(s), Cylinder, Skilled Forelimb Grasp Task(s), Treadmill Endurance, Locotronic Motor Coordination, Inverted Screen, Treadscan, and Von Frey. Of these, Inverted Screen, Treadscan and Von Frey produced significant neurobehavioral deficits at >8 months of age, and relate to the clinically relevant endpoints of muscle strength and endurance, gait ataxia, and peripheral insensitivity. Thus we identify robust phenotypic measures related to Friedreich's ataxia clinical endpoints which could be used to test effectiveness of potential drug therapy.

  12. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gargiulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT, high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing.

  13. The German Mouse Clinic: a platform for systemic phenotype analysis of mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H; Gailus-Durner, V; Adler, T; Pimentel, J A Aguilar; Becker, L; Bolle, I; Brielmeier, M; Calzada-Wack, J; Dalke, C; Ehrhardt, N; Fasnacht, N; Ferwagner, B; Frischmann, U; Hans, W; Hölter, S M; Hölzlwimmer, G; Horsch, M; Javaheri, A; Kallnik, M; Kling, E; Lengger, C; Maier, H; Mossbrugger, I; Mörth, C; Naton, B; Nöth, U; Pasche, B; Prehn, C; Przemeck, G; Puk, O; Racz, I; Rathkolb, B; Rozman, J; Schäble, K; Schreiner, R; Schrewe, A; Sina, C; Steinkamp, R; Thiele, F; Willershäuser, M; Zeh, R; Adamski, J; Busch, D H; Beckers, J; Behrendt, H; Daniel, H; Esposito, I; Favor, J; Graw, J; Heldmaier, G; Höfler, H; Ivandic, B; Katus, H; Klingenspor, M; Klopstock, T; Lengeling, A; Mempel, M; Müller, W; Neschen, S; Ollert, M; Quintanilla-Martinez, L; Rosenstiel, P; Schmidt, J; Schreiber, S; Schughart, K; Schulz, H; Wolf, E; Wurst, W; Zimmer, A; Hrabé de Angelis, M

    2009-02-01

    The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) is a large scale phenotyping center where mouse mutant lines are analyzed in a standardized and comprehensive way. The result is an almost complete picture of the phenotype of a mouse mutant line--a systemic view. At the GMC, expert scientists from various fields of mouse research work in close cooperation with clinicians side by side at one location. The phenotype screens comprise the following areas: allergy, behavior, clinical chemistry, cardiovascular analyses, dysmorphology, bone and cartilage, energy metabolism, eye and vision, host-pathogen interactions, immunology, lung function, molecular phenotyping, neurology, nociception, steroid metabolism, and pathology. The German Mouse Clinic is an open access platform that offers a collaboration-based phenotyping to the scientific community (www.mouseclinic.de). More than 80 mutant lines have been analyzed in a primary screen for 320 parameters, and for 95% of the mutant lines we have found new or additional phenotypes that were not associated with the mouse line before. Our data contributed to the association of mutant mouse lines to the corresponding human disease. In addition, the systemic phenotype analysis accounts for pleiotropic gene functions and refines previous phenotypic characterizations. This is an important basis for the analysis of underlying disease mechanisms. We are currently setting up a platform that will include environmental challenge tests to decipher genome-environmental interactions in the areas nutrition, exercise, air, stress and infection with different standardized experiments. This will help us to identify genetic predispositions as susceptibility factors for environmental influences.

  14. Mouse models of age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2013-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. Overall, 10% of the population has a hearing loss in the US, and this age-related hearing disorder is projected to afflict more than 28 million Americans by 2030. Age-related hearing loss is associated with loss of sensory hair cells (sensory hearing loss) and/or spiral ganglion neurons (neuronal hearing loss) in the cochlea of the inner ear. Many lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress and associated mitochondrial dysfunction play a central role in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and are a cause of age-related neurosensory hearing loss. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of how oxidative stress and/or mitochondrial dysfunction lead to hearing loss during aging remain unclear, and currently there is no treatment for this age-dependent disorder. Several mouse models of aging and age-related diseases have been linked to age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss. Evaluation of these animal models has offered basic knowledge of the mechanism underlying hearing loss associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and aging. Here we review the evidence that specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that affect mitochondrial function result in increased oxidative damage and associated loss of sensory hair cells and/or spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea during aging, thereby causing hearing loss in these mouse models. Future studies comparing these models will provide further insight into fundamental knowledge about the disordered process of hearing and treatments to improve the lives of individuals with communication disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Five Mouse Models Identifies Similarities and Differences with Human Psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swindell, William R.; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P.; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Ward, Nicole L.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the huma

  16. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.R. Swindell (William R.); A. Johnston (Andrew); S. Carbajal (Steve); G. Han (Gangwen); C.T. Wohn (Christopher); J. Lu (Jun); X. Xing (Xianying); R.P. Nair (Rajan P.); J.J. Voorhees (John); J.T. Elder (James); X.J. Wang (Xian Jiang); S. Sano (Shigetoshi); E.P. Prens (Errol); J. DiGiovanni (John); M.R. Pittelkow (Mark R.); N.L. Ward (Nicole); J.E. Gudjonsson (Johann Eli)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features

  17. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.R. Swindell (William R.); A. Johnston (Andrew); S. Carbajal (Steve); G. Han (Gangwen); C.T. Wohn (Christopher); J. Lu (Jun); X. Xing (Xianying); R.P. Nair (Rajan P.); J.J. Voorhees (John); J.T. Elder (James); X.J. Wang (Xian Jiang); S. Sano (Shigetoshi); E.P. Prens (Errol); J. DiGiovanni (John); M.R. Pittelkow (Mark R.); N.L. Ward (Nicole); J.E. Gudjonsson (Johann Eli)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features

  18. EGFR-specific nanoprobe biodistribution in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashir, Samia A.; Castilho, Maiara L.; Hupman, Michael A.; Lee, Christopher L. D.; Raniero, Leandro J.; Alwayn, Ian; Hewitt, Kevin C.

    2015-06-01

    Nanotechnology offers a targeted approach to both imaging and treatment of cancer, the leading cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have found nanoparticles with a wide variety of coatings initiate an immune response leading to sequestration in the liver and spleen. In an effort to find a nanoparticle platform which does not elicit an immune response we created 43/44 nm gold or silver nanoparticles coated with biomolecules normally produced by the body, α-lipoic acid and the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), and have used mass spectroscopy to determine their biodistribution in mouse models, 24 hours following tail vein injection. Relative to controls, mouse EGF (mEGF) coated silver and gold nanoprobes are found at reduced levels in the liver and spleen. mEGF coated gold nanoprobes on the other hand do not appear to elicit any immune response, as they are found at background levels in these organs. As a result they should remain in circulation for longer and accumulate at high levels in tumors by the enhanced permeability retention (EPR) effect.

  19. The first knockin mouse model of episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Samuel J; Kriener, Lisa H; Heinzer, Ann K; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Hess, Ellen J

    2014-11-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with attacks of ataxia that are typically precipitated by stress, ethanol, caffeine or exercise. EA2 is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the α1A subunit of the CaV2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. To better understand the pathomechanisms of this disorder in vivo, we created the first genetic animal model of EA2 by engineering a mouse line carrying the EA2-causing c.4486T>G (p.F1406C) missense mutation in the orthologous mouse Cacna1a gene. Mice homozygous for the mutated allele exhibit a ~70% reduction in CaV2.1 current density in Purkinje cells, though surprisingly do not exhibit an overt motor phenotype. Mice hemizygous for the knockin allele (EA2/- mice) did exhibit motor dysfunction measurable by rotarod and pole test. Studies using Cre-flox conditional genetics explored the role of cerebellar Purkinje cells or cerebellar granule cells in the poor motor performance of EA2/- mice and demonstrate that manipulation of either cell type alone did not cause poor motor performance. Thus, it is possible that subtle dysfunction arising from multiple cell types is necessary for the expression of certain ataxia syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathogenicity of Conidiobolus coronatus and Fusarium solani in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadi; Fang, Xiangang; Zhou, Xiaoqian; Geng, Suying; Wang, Yuxin; Yang, Xiumin

    2017-06-01

    To study the pathogenicity of Conidiobolus coronatus (C. coronatus) and Fusarium solani (F. solani) in animal models. Immunocompromised mice were treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone via intraperitoneal injection before and after inoculation. According to pathogenic characteristics of different fungi, C. coronatus was used to infect mice via intravenous inoculation, intraperitoneal inoculation, gastrointestinal infusion and intradermal inoculation methods. And F. solani was used to infect mice by inoculation via the abraded or normal skin. In the group of immunocompromised mice, C. coronatus was isolated from the lung tissues of one mouse on day 7 and another on day 10 respectively. The corresponding histopathology revealed infiltration of local inflammatory cells in the lung tissue. Pathogenic lesions were observed in all normal and immunocompromised mice infected with F. solani via abraded skin. The lesions in the immunocompromised mice were more severe and persisted longer than those in the normal mice. Moreover, hyphae were mostly observed in the histopathological examination and fungal culture from the immunocompromised mouse. The pathogenicity of C. coronatus was relatively weak as it did not induce local infections and did not disseminate the disease in immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice. Therefore, F. solani is a type of opportunistic pathogenic fungus, and abraded skin is one of the causative routes of infection. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Learning Delays in a mouse model of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Amanda R.; Truong, Dongnhu T.; Fitch, R. Holly

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder with core symptoms of atypical social interactions and repetitive behaviors. It has also been reported that individuals with ASD have difficulty with multisensory integration, and this may disrupt higher-order cognitive abilities such as learning and social communication. Impairments in the integration of sensory information could in turn reflect diminished cross-modal white matter connectivity. Moreover, the genetic contribution in ASD appears to be strong, with heritability estimates as high as 90%. However, no single gene has been identified, and over 1,000 risk genes have been reported. One of these genes -- contactin-associated-like-protein 2 (CNTNAP2) -- was first associated with Specific Language Impairment, and more recently has been linked to ASD. CNTNAP2 encodes a cell adhesion protein regulating synaptic signal transmission. To better understand the behavioral and biological underlying mechanisms of ASD, a transgenic mouse model was created with a genetic knockout (KO) of the rodent homolog Cntnap2. Initial studies on this mouse revealed poor social interactions, behavioral perseveration, and reduced vocalizations -- all strongly resembling human ASD symptoms. Cntnap2 KO mice also show abnormalities in myelin formation, consistent with a hypo-connectivity model of ASD. The current study was designed to further assess the behavioral phenotype of this mouse model, with a focus on learning and memory. Cntnap2 KO and wild-type mice were tested on a 4/8 radial arm water maze for 14 consecutive days. Error scores (total, working memory, reference memory, initial and repeated reference memory), latency and average turn angle were independently assessed using a 2 × 14 repeated measures ANOVA. Results showed that Cntnap2 KO mice exhibited significant deficits in working and reference memory during the acquisition period of the task. During the retention period (i.e., after asymptote in

  2. Beethoven, a mouse model for dominant, progressive hearing loss DFNA36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugde, Sarah; Erven, Alexandra; Kros, Corné J; Marcotti, Walter; Fuchs, Helmut; Kurima, Kiyoto; Wilcox, Edward R; Friedman, Thomas B; Griffith, Andrew J; Balling, Rudi; Hrabé De Angelis, Martin; Avraham, Karen B; Steel, Karen P

    2002-03-01

    Despite recent progress in identifying genes underlying deafness, there are still relatively few mouse models of specific forms of human deafness. Here we describe the phenotype of the Beethoven (Bth) mouse mutant and a missense mutation in Tmc1 (transmembrane cochlear-expressed gene 1). Progressive hearing loss (DFNA36) and profound congenital deafness (DFNB7/B11) are caused by dominant and recessive mutations of the human ortholog, TMC1 (ref. 1), for which Bth and deafness (dn) are mouse models, respectively.

  3. Increased levels of inosine in a mouse model of inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Erin G; Mangerich, Aswin; Pang, Bo; McFaline, Jose L; Lonkar, Pallavi; Sullivan, Matthew R; Trudel, Laura J; Taghizedeh, Koli; Dedon, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    One possible mechanism linking inflammation with cancer involves the generation of reactive oxygen, nitrogen and halogen species by activated macrophages and neutrophils infiltrating sites of infection or tissue damage, with these chemical mediators causing damage that ultimately leads to cell death and mutation. To determine the most biologically deleterious chemistries of inflammation, we previously assessed products across the spectrum of DNA damage arising in inflamed tissues in the SJL mouse model nitric oxide over-production (Pang et al., Carcinogenesis 28: 1807–1813, 2007). Among the anticipated DNA damage chemistries, we observed significant changes only in lipid peroxidation-derived etheno adducts. We have now developed an isotope-dilution, liquid chromatography-coupled, tandem quadrupole mass spectrometric method to quantify representative species across the spectrum of RNA damage products predicted to arise at sites of inflammation, including nucleobase deamination (xanthosine, inosine), oxidation (8-oxoguanosine), and alkylation (1,N6-etheno-adenosine). Application of the method to liver, spleen, and kidney from the SJL mouse model revealed generally higher levels of oxidative background RNA damage than was observed in DNA in control mice. However, compared to control mice, RcsX treatment to induce nitric oxide overproduction resulted in significant increases only in inosine and only in the spleen. Further, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-methylarginine, did not significantly affect the levels of inosine in control and RcsX-treated mice. The differences between DNA and RNA damage in the same animal model of inflammation point to possible influences from DNA repair, RcsX-induced alterations in adenosine deaminase activity, and differential accessibility of DNA and RNA to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as determinants of nucleic acid damage during inflammation. PMID:23506120

  4. Neuroprotection in a novel mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Lidster

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease that currently lacks any neuroprotective treatments. Innovative neuroprotective trial designs are required to hasten the translational process of drug development. An ideal target to monitor the efficacy of strategies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis is the visual system, which is the most accessible part of the human central nervous system. A novel C57BL/6 mouse line was generated that expressed transgenes for a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific T cell receptor and a retinal ganglion cell restricted-Thy1 promoter-controlled cyan fluorescent protein. This model develops spontaneous or induced optic neuritis, in the absence of paralytic disease normally associated with most rodent autoimmune models of multiple sclerosis. Demyelination and neurodegeneration could be monitored longitudinally in the living animal using electrophysiology, visual sensitivity, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography all of which are relevant to human trials. This model offers many advantages, from a 3Rs, economic and scientific perspective, over classical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models that are associated with substantial suffering of animals. Optic neuritis in this model led to inflammatory damage of axons in the optic nerve and subsequent loss of retinal ganglion cells in the retina. This was inhibited by the systemic administration of a sodium channel blocker (oxcarbazepine or intraocular treatment with siRNA targeting caspase-2. These novel approaches have relevance to the future treatment of neurodegeneration of MS, which has so far evaded treatment.

  5. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  6. Mouse models of autism: testing hypotheses about molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roullet, Florence I; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2011-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is currently diagnosed by the presence of three behavioral criteria (1) qualitative impairments in reciprocal social interactions, (2) deficits in communication, including delayed language and noninteractive conversation, and (3) motor stereotypies, repetitive behaviors, insistence on sameness, and restricted interests. This chapter describes analogous behavioral assays that have been developed for mice, including tests for social approach, reciprocal social interactions, olfactory communication, ultrasonic vocalizations, repetitive and perseverative behaviors, and motor stereotypies. Examples of assay applications to genetic mouse models of autism are provided. Robust endophenotypes that are highly relevant to the core symptoms of autism are enabling the search for the genetic and environmental causes of autism, and the discovery of effective treatments.

  7. Quercetin inhibits inflammatory bone resorption in a mouse periodontitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napimoga, Marcelo H; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana T; Macedo, Cristina G; Freitas, Fabiana F; Stipp, Rafael N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2013-12-27

    Periodontitis is a disease that leads to bone destruction and represents the main cause of tooth loss in adults. The development of aggressive periodontitis has been associated with increased inflammatory response that is induced by the presence of a subgingival biofilm containing Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The flavonoid quercetin (1) is widespread in vegetables and fruits and exhibits many biological properties for possible medical and clinical applications such as its anti-inflamatory and antioxidant effects. Thus, in the present study, the properties of 1 have been evaluated in bone loss and inflammation using a mouse periodontitis model induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. Subcutaneous treatment with 1 reduced A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone loss and IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and ICAM-1 production in the gingival tissue without affecting bacterial counts. These results demonstrated that quercetin exhibits protective effects in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis in mice by modulating cytokine and ICAM-1 production.

  8. Mechanisms of protective immunity in Hymenolepis nana/mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoletti, G; Gabriele, F; Palmas, C

    1992-12-01

    Some immunological and parasitological aspects related to the infection of Hymenolepsis nana in mice are summarized in this review, focusing on the immune effector mechanisms involved in this host/parasite relationship. H. nana is a small cestode tapeworm of man and mice. A primary egg-infection determines within few days a strong immunity. Immunity elicited by low-level primary infection is effective as a high-level infection. The protective role of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity is summarized. The histological findings demonstrate that eosinophils and mast-cells are implicated as effector cells. This review is an attempt to re-examine, at low-level infection, the immune mechanisms in H. nana/mouse model.

  9. Optimization of Glioblastoma Mouse Orthotopic Xenograft Models for Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irtenkauf, Susan M; Sobiechowski, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura A; Nelson, Kevin K; Transou, Andrea D; Carlton, Enoch T; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor predominantly localized to the cerebral cortex. We developed a panel of patient-derived mouse orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) for preclinical drug studies by implanting cancer stem cells (CSC) cultured from fresh surgical specimens intracranially into 8-wk-old female athymic nude mice. Here we optimize the glioblastoma PDOX model by assessing the effect of implantation location on tumor growth, survival, and histologic characteristics. To trace the distribution of intracranial injections, toluidine blue dye was injected at 4 locations with defined mediolateral, anterioposterior, and dorsoventral coordinates within the cerebral cortex. Glioblastoma CSC from 4 patients and a glioblastoma nonstem-cell line were then implanted by using the same coordinates for evaluation of tumor location, growth rate, and morphologic and histologic features. Dye injections into one of the defined locations resulted in dye dissemination throughout the ventricles, whereas tumor cell implantation at the same location resulted in a much higher percentage of small multifocal ventricular tumors than did the other 3 locations tested. Ventricular tumors were associated with a lower tumor growth rate, as measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and decreased survival in 4 of 5 cell lines. In addition, tissue oxygenation, vasculature, and the expression of astrocytic markers were altered in ventricular tumors compared with nonventricular tumors. Based on this information, we identified an optimal implantation location that avoided the ventricles and favored cortical tumor growth. To assess the effects of stress from oral drug administration, mice that underwent daily gavage were compared with stress-positive and -negative control groups. Oral gavage procedures did not significantly affect the survival of the implanted mice or physiologic measurements of stress. Our findings document the importance of optimization of the implantation site for

  10. Effect of endothelial progenitor cell on hematopoietic reconstitution in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    化静

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) on hematopoietic reconsititution in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) mouse model.Methods Allo-HSCT mouse model was established with condition of BU/CY,in which C57BL/6 (H-2b) and BABL/c (H-2d) mice were used

  11. A novel mouse model of advanced diabetic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Thibodeau

    Full Text Available Currently available rodent models exhibit characteristics of early diabetic nephropathy (DN such as hyperfiltration, mesangial expansion, and albuminuria yet features of late DN (hypertension, GFR decline, tubulointerstitial fibrosis are absent or require a significant time investment for full phenotype development. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of advanced DN with hypertension superimposed (HD mice. Mice transgenic for human renin cDNA under the control of the transthyretin promoter (TTRhRen were employed as a model of angiotensin-dependent hypertension. Diabetes was induced in TTRhRen mice through low dose streptozotocin (HD-STZ mice or by intercrossing with OVE26 diabetic mice (HD-OVE mice. Both HD-STZ and HD-OVE mice displayed more pronounced increases in urinary albumin levels as compared with their diabetic littermates. Additionally, HD mice displayed renal hypertrophy, advanced glomerular scarring and evidence of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Both HD-OVE and HD-STZ mice showed evidence of GFR decline as FITC-inulin clearance was decreased compared to hyperfiltering STZ and OVE mice. Taken together our results suggest that HD mice represent a robust model of type I DN that recapitulates key features of human disease which may be significant in studying the pathogenesis of DN and in the assessment of putative therapeutics.

  12. A STAT-1 knockout mouse model for Machupo virus pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurtleff Amy C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Machupo virus (MACV, a member of the Arenaviridae, causes Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, with ~20% lethality in humans. The pathogenesis of MACV infection is poorly understood, and there are no clinically proven treatments for disease. This is due, in part, to a paucity of small animal models for MACV infection in which to discover and explore candidate therapeutics. Methods Mice lacking signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1 were infected with MACV. Lethality, viral replication, metabolic changes, hematology, histopathology, and systemic cytokine expression were analyzed throughout the course of infection. Results We report here that STAT-1 knockout mice succumbed to MACV infection within 7-8 days, and presented some relevant clinical and histopathological manifestations of disease. Furthermore, the model was used to validate the efficacy of ribavirin in protection against infection. Conclusions The STAT-1 knockout mouse model can be a useful small animal model for drug testing and preliminary immunological analysis of lethal MACV infection.

  13. Stochastic model of Tsc1 lesions in mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Prabhakar

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder due to mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 that affects many organs with hamartomas and tumors. TSC-associated brain lesions include subependymal nodules, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and tubers. Neurologic manifestations in TSC comprise a high frequency of mental retardation and developmental disorders including autism, as well as epilepsy. Here, we describe a new mouse model of TSC brain lesions in which complete loss of Tsc1 is achieved in multiple brain cell types in a stochastic pattern. Injection of an adeno-associated virus vector encoding Cre recombinase into the cerebral ventricles of mice homozygous for a Tsc1 conditional allele on the day of birth led to reduced survival, and pathologic findings of enlarged neurons, cortical heterotopias, subependymal nodules, and hydrocephalus. The severity of clinical and pathologic findings as well as survival was shown to be dependent upon the dose and serotype of Cre virus injected. Although several other models of TSC brain disease exist, this model is unique in that the pathology reflects a variety of TSC-associated lesions involving different numbers and types of cells. This model provides a valuable and unique addition for therapeutic assessment.

  14. A knock-in mouse model of congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ged, C; Mendez, M; Robert, E; Lalanne, M; Lamrissi-Garcia, I; Costet, P; Daniel, J Y; Dubus, P; Mazurier, F; Moreau-Gaudry, F; de Verneuil, H

    2006-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a recessive autosomal disorder characterized by a deficiency in uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS), the fourth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. The severity of the disease, the lack of specific treatment except for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and the knowledge of the molecular lesions are strong arguments for gene therapy. An animal model of CEP has been designed to evaluate the feasibility of retroviral gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells. We have previously demonstrated that the knockout of the Uros gene is lethal in mice (Uros(del) model). This work describes the achievement of a knock-in model, which reproduces a mutation of the UROS gene responsible for a severe UROS deficiency in humans (P248Q missense mutant). Homozygous mice display erythrodontia, moderate photosensitivity, hepatosplenomegaly, and hemolytic anemia. Uroporphyrin (99% type I isomer) accumulates in urine. Total porphyrins are increased in erythrocytes and feces, while Uros enzymatic activity is below 1% of the normal level in the different tissues analyzed. These pathological findings closely mimic the CEP disease in humans and demonstrate that the Uros(mut248) mouse represents a suitable model of the human disease for pathophysiological, pharmaceutical, and therapeutic purposes.

  15. Haemorrhagic and thrombotic diatheses in mouse models with thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassel, Catherine; Kubovcakova, Lucia; Mangin, Pierre H; Ravanat, Catherine; Freund, Monique; Skoda, Radek C; Denis, Cécile V; Dupuis, Arnaud; Herbrecht, Raoul; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François

    2015-02-01

    We studied haemostasis in two mouse models with thrombocytosis caused by different pathogenic mechanisms. In one strain (Yall;Mpl-/-) thrombocytosis is driven by a misbalance between thrombopoietin and its receptor, whereas in the other strain, thrombocytosis is caused by expressing a human JAK2-V617F transgene (FF1) that depends on activation by Cre-recombinase (VavCre;FF1, MxCre;FF1). Thrombotic responses were increased following some, but not all types of challenges. In a vaso-occlusive thrombotic model following collagen-adrenaline injection we found increased mortality in both strains. Arterial thrombosis, examined after ferric chloride-induced carotid injury, was accelerated but with little impact on maximal thrombus size. In a vena cava stasis model, clots were of similar size as in wild-type controls, but exhibited a different composition with a higher platelet to fibrin ratio. Both thrombocytosis strains displayed increased haemorrhagic tendency in a tail bleeding assay. Yall;Mpl and VavCre;FF1 displayed a lower proportion of the more reactive high-molecular-weight forms of von Willebrand factor in their plasma, mimicking essential thrombocythaemia with very high platelet counts. Bleeding could not be explained by clear defects in platelet activation, which were normal or only weakly decreased. In conclusion, these models of thrombocytosis recapitulate several features of the haemorrhagic and thrombotic diatheses in ET and PV demonstrating potentials but also some limitations to study these major complications.

  16. Eeyore: a novel mouse model of hereditary deafness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry A Miller

    Full Text Available Animal models that recapitulate human disease are proving to be an invaluable tool in the identification of novel disease-associated genes. These models can improve our understanding of the complex genetic mechanisms involved in disease and provide a basis to guide therapeutic strategies to combat these conditions. We have identified a novel mouse model of non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss with linkage to a region on chromosome 18. Eeyore mutant mice have early onset progressive hearing impairment and show abnormal structure of the sensory epithelium from as early as 4 weeks of age. Ultrastructural and histological analyses show irregular hair cell structure and degeneration of the sensory hair bundles in the cochlea. The identification of new genes involved in hearing is central to understanding the complex genetic pathways involved in the hearing process and the loci at which these pathways are interrupted in people with a genetic hearing loss. We therefore discuss possible candidate genes within the linkage region identified in eeyore that may underlie the deafness phenotype in these mice. Eeyore provides a new model of hereditary sensorineural deafness and will be an important tool in the search for novel deafness genes.

  17. Sleep phenotyping in a mouse model of extreme trait anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimira Jakubcakova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is accumulating evidence that anxiety impairs sleep. However, due to high sleep variability in anxiety disorders, it has been difficult to state particular changes in sleep parameters caused by anxiety. Sleep profiling in an animal model with extremely high vs. low levels of trait anxiety might serve to further define sleep patterns associated with this psychopathology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sleep-wake behavior in mouse lines with high (HAB, low (LAB and normal (NAB anxiety-related behaviors was monitored for 24 h during baseline and recovery after 6 h sleep deprivation (SD. The amounts of each vigilance state, sleep architecture, and EEG spectral variations were compared between the mouse lines. In comparison to NAB mice, HAB mice slept more and exhibited consistently increased delta power during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. Their sleep patterns were characterized by heavy fragmentation, reduced maintenance of wakefulness, and frequent intrusions of rapid eye movement (REM sleep. In contrast, LAB mice showed a robust sleep-wake rhythm with remarkably prolonged sleep latency and a long, persistent period of wakefulness. In addition, the accumulation of delta power after SD was impaired in the LAB line, as compared to HAB mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sleep-wake patterns were significantly different between HAB and LAB mice, indicating that the genetic predisposition to extremes in trait anxiety leaves a biological scar on sleep quality. The enhanced sleep demand observed in HAB mice, with a strong drive toward REM sleep, may resemble a unique phenotype reflecting not only elevated anxiety but also a depression-like attribute.

  18. Mouse model of Timothy syndrome recapitulates triad of autistic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Patrick L; Faizi, Mehrdad; Kim, Leo H; Owen, Scott F; Tadross, Michael R; Alfa, Ronald W; Bett, Glenna C L; Tsien, Richard W; Rasmusson, Randall L; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2011-09-13

    Autism and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) typically arise from a mixture of environmental influences and multiple genetic alterations. In some rare cases, such as Timothy syndrome (TS), a specific mutation in a single gene can be sufficient to generate autism or ASD in most patients, potentially offering insights into the etiology of autism in general. Both variants of TS (the milder TS1 and the more severe TS2) arise from missense mutations in alternatively spliced exons that cause the same G406R replacement in the Ca(V)1.2 L-type calcium channel. We generated a TS2-like mouse but found that heterozygous (and homozygous) animals were not viable. However, heterozygous TS2 mice that were allowed to keep an inverted neomycin cassette (TS2-neo) survived through adulthood. We attribute the survival to lowering of expression of the G406R L-type channel via transcriptional interference, blunting deleterious effects of mutant L-type channel overactivity, and addressed potential effects of altered gene dosage by studying Ca(V)1.2 knockout heterozygotes. Here we present a thorough behavioral phenotyping of the TS2-neo mouse, capitalizing on this unique opportunity to use the TS mutation to model ASD in mice. Along with normal general health, activity, and anxiety level, TS2-neo mice showed markedly restricted, repetitive, and perseverative behavior, altered social behavior, altered ultrasonic vocalization, and enhanced tone-cued and contextual memory following fear conditioning. Our results suggest that when TS mutant channels are expressed at levels low enough to avoid fatality, they are sufficient to cause multiple, distinct behavioral abnormalities, in line with the core aspects of ASD.

  19. Introducing Human APOE into Aβ Transgenic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon M. Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (apoE and apoE/amyloid-β (Aβ transgenic (Tg mouse models are critical to understanding apoE-isoform effects on Alzheimer's disease risk. Compared to wild type, apoE−/− mice exhibit neuronal deficits, similar to apoE4-Tg compared to apoE3-Tg mice, providing a model for Aβ-independent apoE effects on neurodegeneration. To determine the effects of apoE on Aβ-induced neuropathology, apoE−/− mice were crossed with Aβ-Tg mice, resulting in a significant delay in plaque deposition. Surprisingly, crossing human-apoE-Tg mice with apoE−/−/Aβ-Tg mice further delayed plaque deposition, which eventually developed in apoE4/Aβ-Tg mice prior to apoE3/Aβ-Tg. One approach to address hAPOE-induced temporal delay in Aβ pathology is an additional insult, like head injury. Another is crossing human-apoE-Tg mice with Aβ-Tg mice that have rapid-onset Aβ pathology. For example, because 5xFAD mice develop plaques by 2 months, the prediction is that human-apoE/5xFAD-Tg mice develop plaques around 6 months and 12 months before other human-apoE/Aβ-Tg mice. Thus, tractable models for human-apoE/Aβ-Tg mice continue to evolve.

  20. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  1. Altered Cortical Ensembles in Mouse Models of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jordan P; Peterka, Darcy S; Gogos, Joseph A; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-04-05

    In schizophrenia, brain-wide alterations have been identified at the molecular and cellular levels, yet how these phenomena affect cortical circuit activity remains unclear. We studied two mouse models of schizophrenia-relevant disease processes: chronic ketamine (KET) administration and Df(16)A(+/-), modeling 22q11.2 microdeletions, a genetic variant highly penetrant for schizophrenia. Local field potential recordings in visual cortex confirmed gamma-band abnormalities similar to patient studies. Two-photon calcium imaging of local cortical populations revealed in both models a deficit in the reliability of neuronal coactivity patterns (ensembles), which was not a simple consequence of altered single-neuron activity. This effect was present in ongoing and sensory-evoked activity and was not replicated by acute ketamine administration or pharmacogenetic parvalbumin-interneuron suppression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that schizophrenia is an "attractor" disease and demonstrate that degraded neuronal ensembles are a common consequence of diverse genetic, cellular, and synaptic alterations seen in chronic schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Activation of tumor cell proliferation by thyroid hormone in a mouse model of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most common malignancy of the endocrine system in humans. To understand the molecular genetic events underlying thyroid carcinogenesis, we have generated a mouse model that spontaneously develops follicular thyroid carcinoma similar to human thyroid cancer (ThrbPV/PV mouse). This mutant mouse harbors a dominantnegative mutated thyroid hormone receptor β (denoted PV). The PV mutation was identified in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (TH). ThrbPV/PV mice exh...

  3. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Swindell

    Full Text Available Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1. While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis.

  4. Indirubin Treatment of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Mastitis in a Mouse Model and Activity in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jin-Lun; Liu, Yu-Hui; Peng, Yong-Chong; Ge, Pan; He, Chen-Fei; Liu, Chang; Chen, Ying-Yu; Guo, Ai-Zhen; Hu, Chang-Min

    2017-01-01

    Indirubin is a Chinese medicine extracted from indigo and known to be effective for treating chronic myelogenous leukemia, neoplasia, and inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of indirubin in a lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced mouse mastitis model. The indirubin mechanism and targets were evaluated in vitro in mouse mammary epithelial cells. In the mouse model, indirubin significantly attenuated the severity of inflammatory lesions, edema, inflammatory hyperemia, milk stasis and local tissue necrosis, and neutrophil infiltration. Indirubin significantly decreased myeloperoxidase activity and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 caused by LPS. In vitro, indirubin inhibited LPS-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. It also downregulated LPS-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and inhibited phosphorylation of LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) P65 protein and inhibitor of kappa B. In addition to its effect on the NF-κB signaling pathway, indirubin suppressed the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by inhibiting phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), P38, and c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Indirubin improved LPS-induced mouse mastitis by suppressing TLR4 and downstream NF-κB and MAPK pathway inflammatory signals and might be a potential treatment of mastitis and other inflammatory diseases.

  5. Using the mouse to model human disease: increasing validity and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Justice

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments that use the mouse as a model for disease have recently come under scrutiny because of the repeated failure of data, particularly derived from preclinical studies, to be replicated or translated to humans. The usefulness of mouse models has been questioned because of irreproducibility and poor recapitulation of human conditions. Newer studies, however, point to bias in reporting results and improper data analysis as key factors that limit reproducibility and validity of preclinical mouse research. Inaccurate and incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions also contribute. Here, we provide guidance on best practice in mouse experimentation, focusing on appropriate selection and validation of the model, sources of variation and their influence on phenotypic outcomes, minimum requirements for control sets, and the importance of rigorous statistics. Our goal is to raise the standards in mouse disease modeling to enhance reproducibility, reliability and clinical translation of findings.

  6. The mouse gut microbiome revisited: From complex diversity to model ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Thomas; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Blaut, Michael; Stecher, Bärbel

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory mice are the most commonly used animal model in translational medical research. In recent years, the impact of the gut microbiota (i.e. communities of microorganisms in the intestine) on host physiology and the onset of diseases, including metabolic and neuronal disorders, cancers, gastrointestinal infections and chronic inflammation, became a focal point of interest. There is abundant evidence that mouse phenotypes in disease models vary greatly between animal facilities or commercial providers, and that this variation is associated with differences in the microbiota. Hence, there is a clear discrepancy between the widespread use of mouse models in research and the patchwork knowledge on the mouse gut microbiome. In the present manuscript, we summarize data pertaining to the diversity and functions of the mouse gut microbiota, review existing work on gnotobiotic mouse models, and discuss challenges and opportunities for current and future research in the field.

  7. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  8. The mouse genome database: genotypes, phenotypes, and models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD's catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations.

  9. Differential oligonucleotide activity in cell culture versus mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, E; Tyson, F L

    1997-01-01

    The usual course of drug discovery begins with the demonstration of compound activity in cells and, usually, a lower level of activity in animals. Successive rounds of drug design may result in a compound with sufficient activity in animals to justify clinical trials. The basic endpoints of therapeutic oligonucleotide experiments include target antigen reduction, target messenger reduction and inhibition of transformed cell proliferation or viral replication. However, one should expect oligonucleotides to exhibit pleiotropic behaviour, as do all other drugs. In an animal oligonucleotides will necessarily bind to and dissociate from all macromolecules encountered in the blood, in tissues, on cell surfaces and within cellular compartments. Contrary to expectations, oligonucleotides designed to be complementary to certain transcripts have sometimes been found moderately effective in cell-free extracts, more effective in cell culture and most effective in animal models. If greater potency against standard endpoints is reported in mouse models than was observed in cell culture, critical examination must consider alternate modes of action in animals that may not apply in cell culture. This counterintuitive paradox will be examined, based on studies of Ha-ras expression in bladder cancer, Ki-ras expression in pancreatic cancer, erbB2 expression in ovarian cancer and c-myc expression in B cell lymphoma.

  10. Breathing abnormalities in a female mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M; Cui, Ningren; Zhong, Weiwei; Oginsky, Max F; Jiang, Chun

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a female neurodevelopmental disease with breathing abnormalities. To understand whether breathing defects occur in the early lives of a group of female Mecp2(+/-) mice, a mouse model of RTT, and what percentage of mice shows RTT-like breathing abnormality, breathing activity was measured by plethysmography in conscious mice. Breathing frequency variation and central apnea in a group of Mecp2(+/-) females displayed a distribution pattern similar to Mecp2(-/Y) males, while the rest resembled the wild-type mice. Similar results were obtained using the k-mean clustering statistics analysis. With two independent methods, about 20% of female Mecp2(+/-) mice showed RTT-like breathing abnormalities that began as early as 3 weeks of age in the Mecp2(+/-) mice, and were suppressed with 3% CO2. The finding that only a small proportion of Mecp2(+/-) mice develops RTT-like breathing abnormalities suggests incomplete allele inactivation in the RTT-model Mecp2(+/-) mice.

  11. The tumor suppressor kinase LKB1: lessons from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saara Ollila; Tomi P. M(a)kel(a)

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene LKB1 are important in hereditary Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,as well as in sporadic cancers including lung and cervical cancer.LKB1 is a kinase-activating Kinase,and a number of LKB1-dependent phosphorylation cascades regulate fundamental cellular and organismal processes in at least metabolism,polarity,cytoskeleton organization,and proliferation.Conditional targeting approaches are beginning to demonstrate the relevance and specificity of these signaling pathways in development and homeostasis of multiple organs.More than one of the pathways also appear to contribute to tumor growth following Lkb1 deficiencies based on a number of mouse tumor models.Lkb1-dependent activation of AMPK and subsequent inactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling are implicated in several of the models,and other less well characterized pathways are also involved.Conditional targeting studies of Lkb1 also point an important role of LKB1 in epithelial-masenchymal interactions,significantly expanding knowledge on the relevance of LKB1 in human disease.

  12. The gut microbiota in mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi eGkouskou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestine and the intestinal immune system have evolved through a symbiotic homeostasis under which a highly diverse microbial flora is maintained in the gastrointestinal tract while pathogenic bacteria are recognized and eliminated. Disruption of the balance between the immune system and the gut microbiota results in the development of multiple pathologies in humans. Inflammatory bowel diseases have been associated with alterations in the composition of intestinal flora but whether these changes are causal or result of inflammation is still under dispute. Various chemical and genetic models of inflammatory bowel diseases have been developed and utilized to elucidate the complex relationship between intestinal epithelium, immune system and the gut microbiota. In this review we describe some of the most commonly used mouse models of colitis and Crohn’s disease and summarize the current knowledge of how changes in microbiota composition may affect intestinal disease pathogenesis. The pursuit of gut-microbiota interactions will no doubt continue to provide invaluable insight into the complex biology of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Cardiac Dysfunction in the BACHD Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analyne M Schroeder

    Full Text Available While Huntington's disease (HD is classified as a neurological disorder, HD patients exhibit a high incidence of cardiovascular events leading to heart failure and death. In this study, we sought to better understand the cardiovascular phenotype of HD using the BACHD mouse model. The age-related decline in cardiovascular function was assessed by echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, histological and microarray analysis. We found that structural and functional differences between WT and BACHD hearts start at 3 months of age and continue throughout life. The aged BACHD mice develop cardiac fibrosis and ultimately apoptosis. The BACHD mice exhibited adaptive physiological changes to chronic isoproterenol treatment; however, the medication exacerbated fibrotic lesions in the heart. Gene expression analysis indicated a strong tilt toward apoptosis in the young mutant heart as well as changes in genes involved in cellular metabolism and proliferation. With age, the number of genes with altered expression increased with the large changes occurring in the cardiovascular disease, cellular metabolism, and cellular transport clusters. The BACHD model of HD exhibits a number of changes in cardiovascular function that start early in the disease progress and may provide an explanation for the higher cardiovascular risk in HD.

  14. Therapeutic Effect of Berberine on Huntington's Disease Transgenic Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiao Jiang

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD represents a family of neurodegenerative diseases that are caused by misfolded proteins. The misfolded proteins accumulate in the affected brain regions in an age-dependent manner to cause late-onset neurodegeneration. Transgenic mouse models expressing the HD protein, huntingtin, have been widely used to identify therapeutics that may retard disease progression. Here we report that Berberine (BBR, an organic small molecule isolated from plants, has protective effects on transgenic HD (N171-82Q mice. We found that BBR can reduce the accumulation of mutant huntingtin in cultured cells. More importantly, when given orally, BBR could effectively alleviate motor dysfunction and prolong the survival of transgenic N171-82Q HD mice. We found that BBR could promote the degradation of mutant huntingtin by enhancing autophagic function. Since BBR is an orally-taken drug that has been safely used to treat a number of diseases, our findings suggest that BBR can be tested on different HD animal models and HD patients to further evaluate its therapeutic effects.

  15. Analysis of a Mouse Skin Model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanan; Dreier, John R.; Cao, Juxiang; Du, Heng; Granter, Scott R.; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant tumor suppressor gene syndrome in which patients develop several types of tumors, including facial angiofibroma, subungual fibroma, Shagreen patch, angiomyolipomas, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis. It is due to inactivating mutations in TSC1 or TSC2. We sought to generate a mouse model of one or more of these tumor types by targeting deletion of the Tsc1 gene to fibroblasts using the Fsp-Cre allele. Mutant, Tsc1ccFsp-Cre+ mice survived a median of nearly a year, and developed tumors in multiple sites but did not develop angiomyolipoma or lymphangioleiomyomatosis. They did develop a prominent skin phenotype with marked thickening of the dermis with accumulation of mast cells, that was minimally responsive to systemic rapamycin therapy, and was quite different from the pathology seen in human TSC skin lesions. Recombination and loss of Tsc1 was demonstrated in skin fibroblasts in vivo and in cultured skin fibroblasts. Loss of Tsc1 in fibroblasts in mice does not lead to a model of angiomyolipoma or lymphangioleiomyomatosis. PMID:27907099

  16. Asparaginase Potentiates Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Janke, Laura J; Kawedia, Jitesh D; Ramsey, Laura B; Cai, Xiangjun; Mattano, Leonard A; Boyd, Kelli L; Funk, Amy J; Relling, Mary V

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a common dose-limiting toxicity of glucocorticoids. Data from clinical trials suggest that other medications can increase the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Here we utilized a mouse model to study the effect of asparaginase treatment on dexamethasone-induced osteonecrosis. Mice receiving asparaginase along with dexamethasone had a higher rate of osteonecrosis than those receiving only dexamethasone after 6 weeks of treatment (44% vs. 10%, P = 0.006). Similarly, epiphyseal arteriopathy, which we have shown to be an initiating event for osteonecrosis, was observed in 58% of mice receiving asparaginase and dexamethasone compared to 17% of mice receiving dexamethasone only (P = 0.007). As in the clinic, greater exposure to asparaginase was associated with greater plasma exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.0001). This model also recapitulated other clinical risk factors for osteonecrosis, including age at start of treatment, and association with the systemic exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.027) and asparaginase (P = 0.036). We conclude that asparaginase can potentiate the osteonecrotic effect of glucocorticoids.

  17. Effects of Tetrodotoxin in Mouse Models of Visceral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cano, Rafael; Tejada, Miguel Ángel; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Entrena, José Manuel; Wood, John N; Cendán, Cruz Miguel

    2017-06-21

    Visceral pain is very common and represents a major unmet clinical need for which current pharmacological treatments are often insufficient. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin that exerts analgesic actions in both humans and rodents under different somatic pain conditions, but its effect has been unexplored in visceral pain. Therefore, we tested the effects of systemic TTX in viscero-specific mouse models of chemical stimulation of the colon (intracolonic instillation of capsaicin and mustard oil) and intraperitoneal cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. The subcutaneous administration of TTX dose-dependently inhibited the number of pain-related behaviors in all evaluated pain models and reversed the referred mechanical hyperalgesia (examined by stimulation of the abdomen with von Frey filaments) induced by capsaicin and cyclophosphamide, but not that induced by mustard oil. Morphine inhibited both pain responses and the referred mechanical hyperalgesia in all tests. Conditional nociceptor‑specific Nav1.7 knockout mice treated with TTX showed the same responses as littermate controls after the administration of the algogens. No motor incoordination after the administration of TTX was observed. These results suggest that blockade of TTX-sensitive sodium channels, but not Nav1.7 subtype alone, by systemic administration of TTX might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of visceral pain.

  18. Sparse Statistical Deformation Model for the Analysis of Craniofacial Malformations in the Crouzon Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Hansen, Michael Sass; Sjöstrand, Karl;

    2007-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome is characterised by the premature fusion of cranial sutures. Recently the first genetic Crouzon mouse model was generated. In this study, Micro CT skull scannings of wild-type mice and Crouzon mice were investigated. Using nonrigid registration, a wild-type mouse atlas was built...

  19. Structure guided homology model based design and engineering of mouse antibodies for humanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella, Vinodh B; Gali, Reddy

    2014-01-01

    No universal strategy exists for humanizing mouse antibodies, and most approaches are based on primary sequence alignment and grafting. Although this strategy theoretically decreases the immunogenicity of mouse antibodies, it neither addresses conformational changes nor steric clashes that arise due to grafting of human germline frameworks to accommodate mouse CDR regions. To address these issues, we created and tested a structure-based biologic design approach using a de novo homology model to aid in the humanization of 17 unique mouse antibodies. Our approach included building a structure-based de novo homology model from the primary mouse antibody sequence, mutation of the mouse framework residues to the closest human germline sequence and energy minimization by simulated annealing on the humanized homology model. Certain residues displayed force field errors and revealed steric clashes upon closer examination. Therefore, further mutations were introduced to rationally correct these errors. In conclusion, use of de novo antibody homology modeling together with simulated annealing improved the ability to predict conformational and steric clashes that may arise due to conversion of a mouse antibody into the humanized form and would prevent its neutralization when administered in vivo. This design provides a robust path towards the development of a universal strategy for humanization of mouse antibodies using computationally derived antibody homologous structures.

  20. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  1. Modeling transcranial electric stimulation in mouse: a high resolution finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, John M; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are widely used in studies of various forms of transcranial electric stimulation (TES). However, there is limited knowledge of the electric field distribution induced by TES in mice, and computational models to estimate this distribution are lacking. This study examines the electric field and current density distribution in the mouse brain induced by TES. We created a high-resolution finite element mouse model incorporating ear clip electrodes commonly used in mouse TES to study, for example, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The electric field strength and current density induced by an ear clip electrode configuration were computed in the anatomically realistic, inhomogenous mouse model. The results show that the median electric field strength induced in the brain at 1 mA of stimulus current is 5.57 V/m, and the strongest field of 20.19 V/m was observed in the cerebellum. Therefore, to match the median electric field in human ECT at 800 mA current, the electrode current in mouse should be set to approximately 15 mA. However, the location of the strongest electric field in posterior brain regions in the mouse does not model well human ECT which targets more frontal regions. Therefore, the ear clip electrode configuration may not be a good model of human ECT. Using high-resolution realistic models for simulating TES in mice may guide the establishment of appropriate stimulation parameters for future in vivo studies.

  2. Conditional Expression of Human 15-Lipoxygenase-1 in Mouse Prostate Induces Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia: The FLiMP Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddhav P. Kelavkar

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa vary greatly in different geographic regions, for which lifestyle factors, such as dietary fat intake, have been implicated. Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LO-1, which metabolizes polyunsaturated fatty acids, is a highly regulated, tissue-specific, lipid-peroxidating enzyme that functions in physiological membrane remodeling and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. We have shown that aberrant overexpression of 15-LO-1 occurs in human PCa, particularly high-grade PCa, and in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN, and that the murine orthologue is increased in SV40-based genetically engineered mouse (GEM models of PCa, such as LADY and TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate. To further define the role of 15-LO-1 in prostate carcinogenesis, we established a novel GEM model with targeted overexpression of h15-LO-1 in the prostate [human fifteen lipoxygenase-1 in mouse prostate (FLiMP]. We used a Cre- mediated and a loxP-mediated recombination strategy to target h15-LO-1 specifically to the prostate of C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type (wt, FLiMP+/-, and FLiMP+/+ mice aged 7 to 21, 24 to 28, and 35 weeks were characterized by histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and DNA/RNA and enzyme analyses. Compared to wt mice, h15-LO-1 enzyme activity was increased similarly in both homozygous FLiMP+/+ and hemizygous FLiMP+/- prostates. Dorsolateral and ventral prostates of FLiMP mice showed focal and progressive epithelial hyperplasia with nuclear atypia, indicative of the definition of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN according to the National Cancer Institute. These foci showed increased proliferation by Ki-67 IHC. No progression to invasive PCa was noted up to 35 weeks. By IHC, h15-LO-1 expression was limited to luminal epithelial cells, with increased expression in mPIN foci (similar to human HGPIN. In summary, targeted overexpression of h

  3. Innovations in phenotyping of mouse models in the German Mouse Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Neschen, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Bohla, Alexander; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cohrs, Christian; Dewert, Anna; Fridrich, Barbara; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Hurt, Anja; Janas, Eva; Janik, Dirk; Kahle, Melanie; Kistler, Martin; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Lengger, Christoph; Ludwig, Tonia; Maier, Holger; Marschall, Susan; Micklich, Kateryna; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Räss, Michael; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Scheerer, Markus; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Steinkamp, Ralph; Stöger, Claudia; Sun, Minxuan; Szymczak, Wilfried; Treise, Irina; Vargas Panesso, Ingrid Liliana; Vernaleken, Alexandra M; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolff-Muscate, Annemarie; Zeh, Ramona; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Eickelberg, Oliver; Favor, Jack; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Höschen, Christoph; Katus, Hugo; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Stöger, Tobias; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Under the label of the German Mouse Clinic (GMC), a concept has been developed and implemented that allows the better understanding of human diseases on the pathophysiological and molecular level. This includes better understanding of the crosstalk between different organs, pleiotropy of genes, and the systemic impact of envirotypes and drugs. In the GMC, experts from various fields of mouse genetics and physiology, in close collaboration with clinicians, work side by side under one roof. The GMC is an open-access platform for the scientific community by providing phenotypic analysis in bilateral collaborations ("bottom-up projects") and as a partner and driver in international large-scale biology projects ("top-down projects"). Furthermore, technology development is a major topic in the GMC. Innovative techniques for primary and secondary screens are developed and implemented into the phenotyping pipelines (e.g., detection of volatile organic compounds, VOCs).

  4. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vyazunova

    Full Text Available Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  5. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  6. Increased opioid dependence in a mouse model of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gallego

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Panic disorder is a highly prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder that shows co-occurrence with substance abuse. Here, we demonstrate that TrkC, the high affinity receptor for neurotrophin-3, is a key molecule involved in panic disorder and opiate dependence, using a transgenic mouse model (TgNTRK3. Constitutive TrkC overexpression in TgNTRK3 mice dramatically alters spontaneous firing rates of locus coeruleus neurons and the response of the noradrenergic system to chronic opiate exposure, possibly related to the altered regulation of neurotrophic peptides observed. Notably, TgNTRK3 locus coeruleus neurons showed an increased firing rate in saline-treated conditions and profound abnormalities in their response to met5-enkephalin. Behaviorally, chronic morphine administration induced a significantly increased withdrawal syndrome in TgNTRK3 mice. In conclusion, we show here that the NT-3/TrkC system is an important regulator of neuronal firing in locus coeruleus and could contribute to the adaptations of the noradrenergic system in response to chronic opiate exposure. Moreover, our results indicate that TrkC is involved in the molecular and cellular changes in noradrenergic neurons underlying both panic attacks and opiate dependence and support a functional endogenous opioid deficit in panic disorder patients.

  7. [A Nude Mouse Model for Human Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jiongcai; Liu, Hongyu; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Chongli; Zhang, Zhimei

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the hematopoietic potentiality and the migration and homing routine of separated as well as cryopreserved umbilical cord blood hematopoietic cells, the BALB/cnu(+) mice were used to establish a murine model. This can prepare for the clinical transplantation and the establishment of a large-scale cord blood bank. The result indicated that the hydroxyethyl starch (HES) sedimentation and DMSO step-by-step cryopreservation procedure resulted in only less losses of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also unharmful to the hematopietic potentiality. We can found evidence for successful transplantation in each mouse which received (1.0 - 2.0) x 10(7) separated or cryopresered hematopoietic cells from cord blood, which lasted for about fifty days. The results demonstrated that (1) HES sedimentation and DMSO cryopreservation procedure can keep the hematopoietic potentiality of cord blood, and so can be used to clinical transplantation or establishment of a cord blood bank; (2) Rich hematopoietic stem cells in human cord blood can cross the xenogenetic barriers and successfully engraft mice; (3) The hematopoietic cells migrated among bone marrow, liver, spleen, lung and kidney in the mice and homed to bone marrow by the end. Cryopreservation may influence the adhesion molecule on the hematopoietic cells and the homing behaviour, but not influence their hematopoietic potentiality.

  8. Immune Checkpoint Blockade Biology in Mouse Models of Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Alan T; Charest, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant primary brain cancer that is associated with abysmal prognosis. The median survival of GBM patients is ∼15 months and there have not been any significant advance in therapies in over a decade, leaving treatment options limited. There is clearly an unmet need for GBM treatment. Immunotherapies are treatments based on usurping the power of the host's immune system to recognize and eliminate cancer cells. They have recently proven to be a successful strategy for combating a variety of cancers. Of the various types of immunotherapies, checkpoint blockade approaches have thus far produced significant clinical responses in several cancers including melanoma, non small-cell lung cancer, renal cancer, and prostate cancer. This review focuses on the biological rationale for using checkpoint blockade immunotherapeutic approaches in primary brain cancer and an up-to-date summary of current and ongoing checkpoint inhibitors-based clinical trials for malignant glioma. In addition, we expand on new concepts for further improving checkpoint blockade treatments, with a particular focus on the advantages of using genetically engineered mouse models for studies of immunotherapies in GBM. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2516-2527, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Enzyme replacement therapy in a mouse model of aspartylglycosaminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunder, U; Kaartinen, V; Valtonen, P; Väänänen, E; Kosma, V M; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Mononen, I

    2000-02-01

    Aspartylglycosaminuria (AGU), the most common lysosomal disorder of glycoprotein degradation, is caused by deficient activity of glycosylasparaginase (AGA). AGA-deficient mice share most of the clinical, biochemical and histopathologic characteristics of human AGU disease. In the current study, recombinant human AGA administered i.v. to adult AGU mice disappeared from the systemic circulation of the animals in two phases predominantly into non-neuronal tissues, which were rapidly cleared from storage compound aspartylglucosamine. Even a single AGA injection reduced the amount of aspartylglucosamine in the liver and spleen of AGU mice by 90% and 80%, respectively. Quantitative biochemical analyses along with histological and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the pathophysiologic characteristics of AGU were effectively corrected in non-neuronal tissues of AGU mice during 2 wk of AGA therapy. At the same time, AGA activity increased to 10% of that in normal brain tissue and the accumulation of aspartylglucosamine was reduced by 20% in total brain of the treated animals. Immunohistochemical studies suggested that the corrective enzyme was widely distributed within the brain tissue. These findings suggest that AGU may be correctable by enzyme therapy.-Dunder, U., Kaartinen, V., Valtonen, P., Väänänen, E., Kosma, V.-M., Heisterkamp, N., Groffen, J., Mononen, I. Enzyme replacement therapy in a mouse model of aspartylglycosaminuria.

  10. Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of cartilage development in mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sicong; Xue, Wenqian; Sun, Qiqi; Li, Xuesong; Huang, Jiandong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2017-02-01

    Kinesin-1 is a kind of motor protein responsible for intracellular transportation and has been studied in a variety of tissues. However, its roles in cartilage development are not clear. In this study, a kinesin-1 heavy chain (Kif5b) knockout mouse model is used to study the functions of kinesin-1 in the cartilage development. We developed a multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) to investigate the morphological and biomedical characteristics of fresh tibial cartilage from normal and mutant mice at different developmental stages. The combined forward and backward SHG imaging resolved the fine structure of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. Meanwhile, the chondrocyte morphology in different zones of cartilage was visualized by label-free SRS and TPEF images. The results show that the fibrillar collagen in the superficial zone of cartilage in postnatal day 10 and 15 (P10 and P15) knockout mice was significantly less than that of control mice. Moreover, we observed distorted morphology and disorganization of columnar arrangement of chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage of mutant mice. This study reveals the significant roles of kinesin-1 in collagen formation and chondrocyte morphogenesis.

  11. Genetic mouse models for behavioral analysis through transgenic RNAi technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delic, S; Streif, S; Deussing, J M; Weber, P; Ueffing, M; Hölter, S M; Wurst, W; Kühn, R

    2008-10-01

    Pharmacological inhibitors and knockout mice have developed into routine tools to analyze the role of specific genes in behavior. Both strategies have limitations like the availability of inhibitors for only a subset of proteins and the large efforts required to construct specific mouse mutants. The recent emergence of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing provides a fast alternative that can be applied to any coding gene. We established an approach for the efficient generation of transgenic knockdown mice by targeted insertion of short hairpin (sh) RNA vectors into a defined genomic locus and studied the efficiency of gene silencing in the adult brain and the utility of such mice for behavioral analysis. We generated shRNA knockdown mice for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (Crhr1), the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrkk2) and the purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 7 (P2rx7) genes and show the ubiquitous expression of shRNA and efficient suppression of the target mRNA and protein in the brain of young and 11-month-old knockdown mice. Knockdown mice for the Crhr1 gene exhibited decreased anxiety-related behavior, an impaired stress response, and thereby recapitulate the phenotype of CRHR1 knockout mice. Our results show the feasibility of gene silencing in the adult brain and validate knockdown mice as new genetic models suitable for behavioral analysis.

  12. Mouse Models of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baribault, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a fast-growing epidemic in industrialized countries, associated with obesity, lack of physical exercise, aging, family history, and ethnic background. Diagnostic criteria are elevated fasting or postprandial blood glucose levels, a consequence of insulin resistance. Early intervention can help patients to revert the progression of the disease together with lifestyle changes or monotherapy. Systemic glucose toxicity can have devastating effects leading to pancreatic beta cell failure, blindness, nephropathy, and neuropathy, progressing to limb ulceration or even amputation. Existing treatments have numerous side effects and demonstrate variability in individual patient responsiveness. However, several emerging areas of discovery research are showing promises with the development of novel classes of antidiabetic drugs.The mouse has proven to be a reliable model for discovering and validating new treatments for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We review here commonly used methods to measure endpoints relevant to glucose metabolism which show good translatability to the diagnostic of type 2 diabetes in humans: baseline fasting glucose and insulin, glucose tolerance test, insulin sensitivity index, and body type composition. Improvements on these clinical values are essential for the progression of a novel potential therapeutic molecule through a preclinical and clinical pipeline.

  13. RANKL, osteopontin, and osteoclast homeostasis in a hyperocclusion mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Cameron G.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Dangaria, Smit; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H. (UIC)

    2009-10-21

    The biological mechanisms that maintain the position of teeth in their sockets establish a dynamic equilibrium between bone resorption and apposition. In order to reveal some of the dynamics involved in the tissue responses towards occlusal forces on periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone homeostasis, we developed the first mouse model of hyperocclusion. Swiss-Webster mice were kept in hyperocclusion for 0, 3, 6, and 9 d. Morphological and histological changes in the periodontium were assessed using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ground sections with fluorescent detection of vital dye labels. Sections were stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteopontin (OPN) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Traumatic occlusion resulted in enamel surface abrasion, inhibition of alveolar bone apposition, significant formation of osteoclasts at 3, 6 and 9 d, and upregulation of OPN and RANKL. Data from this study suggest that both OPN and RANKL contribute to the stimulation of bone resorption in the hyperocclusive state. In addition, we propose that the inhibition of alveolar bone apposition by occlusal forces is an important mechanism for the control of occlusal height that might work in synergy with RANKL-induced bone resorption to maintain normal occlusion.

  14. Migraine pathophysiology: lessons from mouse models and human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel D; Klever, Roselin R; Terwindt, Gisela M; Ayata, Cenk; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling, and undertreated episodic brain disorder that is more common in women than in men. Unbiased genome-wide association studies have identified 13 migraine-associated variants pointing at genes that cluster in pathways for glutamatergic neurotransmission, synaptic function, pain sensing, metalloproteinases, and the vasculature. The individual pathogenetic contribution of each gene variant is difficult to assess because of small effect sizes and complex interactions. Six genes with large effect sizes were identified in patients with rare monogenic migraine syndromes, in which hemiplegic migraine and non-hemiplegic migraine with or without aura are part of a wider clinical spectrum. Transgenic mouse models with human monogenic-migraine-syndrome gene mutations showed migraine-like features, increased glutamatergic neurotransmission, cerebral hyperexcitability, and enhanced susceptibility to cortical spreading depression, which is the electrophysiological correlate of aura and a putative trigger for migraine. Enhanced susceptibility to cortical spreading depression increased sensitivity to focal cerebral ischaemia, and blocking of cortical spreading depression improved stroke outcome in these mice. Changes in female hormone levels in these mice modulated cortical spreading depression susceptibility in much the same way that hormonal fluctuations affect migraine activity in patients. These findings confirm the multifactorial basis of migraine and might allow new prophylactic options to be developed, not only for migraine but potentially also for migraine-comorbid disorders such as epilepsy, depression, and stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Sound of Silence: Mouse Models for Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumantra Chatterjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common disabilities in humans. It is estimated that about 278 million people worldwide have slight to extreme hearing loss in both ears, which results in an economic loss for the country and personal loss for the individual. It is thus critical to have a deeper understanding of the causes for hearing loss to better manage and treat the affected individuals. The mouse serves as an excellent model to study and recapitulate some of these phenotypes, identify new genes which cause deafness, and to study their roles in vivo and in detail. Mutant mice have been instrumental in elucidating the function and mechanisms of the inner ear. The development and morphogenesis of the inner ear from an ectodermal layer into distinct auditory and vestibular components depends on well-coordinated gene expression and well-orchestrated signaling cascades within the otic vesicle and interactions with surrounding layers of tissues. Any disruption in these pathways can lead to hearing impairment. This review takes a look at some of the genes and their corresponding mice mutants that have shed light on the mechanism governing hearing impairment (HI in humans.

  16. A mouse model to study thrombotic complications of thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Yosef; Malyutin, Zeev; Shai, Ela; Dana, Mutaz; Avraham, Limor; Jahshan, Nivin; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer; Fibach, Eitan; Varon, David

    2015-03-01

    Patients with β-thalassemia major and mainly intermedia have an increased risk for developing venous and arterial thrombosis which may be related to circulating pathological red blood cells (RBC) and continuous platelet activation. In the present study we used a modified thalassemic mice model in conjunction with a "real-time" carotid thrombus formation procedure to investigate thrombotic complications of thalassemia. Heterozygous Th3/+ mice, which lack one copy of their β-major and β-minor globin genes, exhibit anomalies in RBC size and shape, chronic anemia and splenomegaly which recapitulate the phenotype of human β-thalassemia intermedia. Flow cytometry measurements showed higher reactive oxygen species generation, indicating oxidative stress, in platelets and RBC of the thalassemic mice compared with wild type mice concomitant with an increase in reduced glutathione content which may represent a compensatory response to oxidative stress, and exposed phosphatidylserine which indicates platelet activation. To elucidate the effect of thalassemia on the development of arterial thrombosis, we studied photochemical-induced real-time thrombus formation in the carotid artery of these mice. The results indicated a significantly shorter "time to occlusion" in the thalassemic mice compared to wild type mice, which was prolonged following in vivo aspirin treatment. We suggest that this mouse model may contribute to our understanding of platelet activation and the hypercoagulable state in thalassemia and lay foundations to screening of anti-platelet drugs as well as anti-oxidants as possible therapeutics for prevention of thrombosis in thalassemia patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A gastrointestinal rotavirus infection mouse model for immune modulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Amerongen Geert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. The current study was conducted to assess whether colostrum containing rotavirus-specific antibodies (Gastrogard-R® could protect against rotavirus infection. In addition, this illness model was used to study modulatory effects of intervention on several immune parameters after re-infection. Methods BALB/c mice were treated by gavage once daily with Gastrogard-R® from the age of 4 to 10 days, and were inoculated with rhesus rotavirus (RRV at 7 days of age. A secondary inoculation with epizootic-diarrhea infant-mouse (EDIM virus was administered at 17 days of age. Disease symptoms were scored daily and viral shedding was measured in fecal samples during the post-inoculation periods. Rotavirus-specific IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses in serum, T cell proliferation and rotavirus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH responses were also measured. Results Primary inoculation with RRV induced a mild but consistent level of diarrhea during 3-4 days post-inoculation. All mice receiving Gastrogard-R® were 100% protected against rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Mice receiving both RRV and EDIM inoculation had a lower faecal-viral load following EDIM inoculation then mice receiving EDIM alone or Gastrogard-R®. Mice receiving Gastrogard-R® however displayed an enhanced rotavirus-specific T-cell proliferation whereas rotavirus-specific antibody subtypes were not affected. Conclusions Preventing RRV-induced diarrhea by Gastrogard-R® early in life showed a diminished protection against EDIM re-infection, but a rotavirus-specific immune response was developed including both B cell and T cell responses. In general, this intervention model can be used for studying clinical symptoms as well as the immune responses required for protection against viral re-infection.

  18. Automatic Assessment of Craniofacial Growth in a Mouse Model of Crouzon Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Signe Strann; Larsen, Rasmus; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & PURPOSE: Crouzon syndrome is characterized by growth disturbances caused by premature craniosynostosis. A mouse model with mutation Fgfr2C342Y, equivalent to the most common Crouzon syndrome mutation (henceforth called the Crouzon mouse model), has a phenotype showing many parallels...... to the human counterpart. Quantifying growth in the Crouzon mouse model could test hypotheses of the relationship between craniosynostosis and dysmorphology, leading to better understanding of the causes of Crouzon syndrome as well as providing knowledge relevant for surgery planning. METHODS: Automatic non...... for each mouse-type; growth models were created using linear interpolation and visualized as 3D animations. Spatial regions of significantly different growth were identified using the local False Discovery Rate method, estimating the expected percentage of false predictions in a set of predictions. For all...

  19. Novel autoimmune response in a tauopathy mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Nogueras-Ortiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular diagnostic tools with non-invasive properties that allow detection of pathological events in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and other neurodegenerative tauopathies are essential for the development of therapeutics. Several diagnostic strategies based on the identification of biomarkers have been proposed. However, its specificity among neurodegenerative disorders is disputable as the association with pathological events remains elusive. Recently, we showed that Amphiphysin-1 (AMPH1 protein’s abundance is reduced in the central nervous system (CNS of the tauopathy mouse model JNPL3 and AD brains. AMPH1 is a synaptic protein that plays an important role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and associates with BIN1, one of the most important risk loci for AD. Also, it has been associated with a rare neurological disease known as Stiff-Person Syndrome (SPS. Auto-antibodies against AMPH1 are used as diagnostic biomarkers for a paraneoplastic variant of SPS. Therefore, we set up to evaluate the presence and abundance of auto-AMPH1 antibodies in tau-mediated neurodegeneration. Immunoblots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were conducted to detect the presence of auto-AMPH1 antibodies in sera from euthanized mice that developed neurodegeneration (JNPL3 and healthy control mice (NTg. Results showed increased levels of auto-AMPH1 antibodies in JNPL3 sera compared to NTg controls. The abundance of auto-AMPH1 antibodies correlated with motor impairment and AMPH1 protein level decrease in the CNS. The results suggest that auto-AMPH1 antibodies could serve as a biomarker for the progression of tau-mediated neurodegeneration in JNPL3 mice.

  20. A humanized mouse model of anaphylactic peanut allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Oliver T; Stranks, Amanda J; Tamayo, Jaciel M; Koleoglou, Kyle J; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Oettgen, Hans C

    2017-01-01

    Food allergy is a growing health problem with very limited treatment options. Investigation of the immunologic pathways underlying allergic sensitization to foods in humans has been greatly constrained by the limited availability of intestinal tissue and gut-resident immune cells. Although mouse models have offered insights into pathways of food sensitization, differences between rodent and human immune physiology limit the extension of these findings to our understanding of human disease. We sought to develop a strategy for the generation of mice with humanized adaptive immune systems, complete with tissue engraftment by human mast cells that are competent to mount specific IgE-mediated responses and drive systemic anaphylaxis on ingestion challenge. Nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice lacking the cytokine receptor common gamma chain (γc(-/-)) and carrying a human stem cell factor transgene were engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells. The impact of peanut (PN) feeding and IgE neutralization on the development of immune responses, mast cell homeostasis, and anaphylactic food allergy was assessed in these animals. Humanized nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient common gamma chain-deficient stem cell factor (huNSG) mice exhibited robust engraftment with functional human T and B lymphocytes and human mast cells were found in significant numbers in their tissues, including the intestinal mucosa. Following gavage feeding with PN, they mounted specific antibody responses, including PN-specific IgE. When enterally challenged with PN, they exhibited mast-cell-mediated systemic anaphylaxis, as indicated by hypothermia and increases in plasma tryptase levels. Anti-IgE (omalizumab) treatment ablated this anaphylactic response. huNSG mice provide a novel tool for studying food allergy and IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Botulinum toxin B-induced mouse model of keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwan-apichon, Olan; Rizen, Michael; Rangsin, Ram; Herretes, Samantha; Reyes, Johann M G; Lekhanont, Kaevalin; Chuck, Roy S

    2006-01-01

    To develop a mouse model of human chronic dry eye (keratoconjunctivitis sicca [KCS]). Under direct visualization with an operating microscope, CBA/J mice received a transconjunctival injection of saline or 1.25, 5, or 20 milliunits (mU) of botulinum toxin B (BTX-B) into the lacrimal gland. The mice were either left unstressed or were subjected to an air blower for 5 h/d, 5 d/wk in fixed temperature and humidity conditions. Tear production and corneal fluorescein staining were evaluated in all groups before injection and at several time points after. Tear production was measured with phenol red-impregnated cotton threads. Corneal fluorescein staining was photographed under cobalt blue light with a digital camera fitted with a macro lens. BTX-B-injected mice displayed significantly decreased tear production until the 4-week time point. Throughout all time points, the addition of environmental blower stress did not appear to alter tear production significantly. Linear regression models, used to evaluate the effects of various doses of BTX-B on tear production, showed that doses higher than 1.25 mU did not provide significantly different outcomes. After 3 days, saline-injected mice showed no corneal staining, whereas BTX-B-injected mice displayed various amounts of staining. At the early time point (day 3), there did not appear to be an additional effect of the blower on corneal fluorescein staining. However, at 1, 2, and 4 weeks, the blower stress appeared to increase the amount of corneal fluorescein staining at each BTX-B dose, although not significantly. Furthermore, at 8 to 10 weeks, in the BTX B-injected groups, corneas had persistent staining, even though tear production had already returned to normal levels. Histopathologic analyses revealed no inflammatory cell infiltration of the stroma or acini of the lacrimal glands and conjunctivae of both saline-injected and BTX-B-injected animals. Intralacrimal gland injection of BTX-B resulted in persistent corneal

  2. Neuronal mechanisms and circuits underlying repetitive behaviors in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyopil; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by three central behavioral symptoms: impaired social interaction, impaired social communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. However, the symptoms are heterogeneous among patients and a number of ASD mouse models have been generated containing mutations that mimic the mutations found in human patients with ASD. Each mouse model was found to display a unique set of repetitive b...

  3. Genetic mouse models to study blood–brain barrier development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Sohet, Fabien; Daneman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological structure formed by the blood vessels of the central nervous system (CNS) that tightly regulates the movement of substances between the blood and the neural tissue. Recently, the generation and analysis of different genetic mouse models has allowed for greater understanding of BBB development, how the barrier is regulated during health, and its response to disease. Here we discuss: 1) Genetic mouse models that have been used to study th...

  4. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Bility, Moses T.; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system’s contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mous...

  5. Experimental mouse tumour models: what can be learnt about human cancer immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranoff, Glenn

    2011-12-02

    The recent demonstration that cancer immunotherapy extends patient survival has reinvigorated interest in elucidating the role of immunity in tumour pathogenesis. Experimental mouse tumour models have provided key mechanistic insights into host antitumour immune responses, and these have guided the development of novel treatment strategies. To accelerate the translation of these findings into clinical benefits, investigators need to gain a better understanding of the strengths and limitations of mouse model systems as tools for deciphering human antitumour immune responses.

  6. Regulatory Forum commentary: alternative mouse models for future cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Daniel; Sistare, Frank D; Nambiar, Prashant R; Turner, Oliver C; Radi, Zaher; Bower, Nancy

    2014-07-01

    International regulatory and pharmaceutical industry scientists are discussing revision of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) S1 guidance on rodent carcinogenicity assessment of small molecule pharmaceuticals. A weight-of-evidence approach is proposed to determine the need for rodent carcinogenicity studies. For compounds with high human cancer risk, the product may be labeled appropriately without conducting rodent carcinogenicity studies. For compounds with minimal cancer risk, only a 6-month transgenic mouse study (rasH2 mouse or p53+/- mouse) or a 2-year mouse study would be needed. If rodent carcinogenicity testing may add significant value to cancer risk assessment, a 2-year rat study and either a 6-month transgenic mouse or a 2-year mouse study is appropriate. In many cases, therefore, one rodent carcinogenicity study could be sufficient. The rasH2 model predicts neoplastic findings relevant to human cancer risk assessment as well as 2-year rodent models, produces fewer irrelevant neoplastic outcomes, and often will be preferable to a 2-year rodent study. Before revising ICH S1 guidance, a prospective evaluation will be conducted to test the proposed weight-of-evidence approach. This evaluation offers an opportunity for a secondary analysis comparing the value of alternative mouse models and 2-year rodent studies in the proposed ICH S1 weight-of-evidence approach for human cancer risk assessment.

  7. Application and detection of (14)c-hd in two mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Thomas P; Shutz, Michael; Schulz, Susan M; Railer, Roy; Ricketts, Karen M; Casillas, Robert P

    2002-01-01

    The CD1-haired mouse and the SKH-hairless mouse are two animal models that have been used to evaluate sulfur mustard (HD) exposure and protection in our laboratory. In a recent study we observed that a substance P inhibitor protected the haired mouse ear against an HD solution, but the same drug was not successful in protecting the hairless mouse against HD vapor. This experiment prompted us to compare HD exposures between these models. We determined the (14)C content in the skin after exposures to HD containing (14)C-HD. Rate curves were generated for applications of (1) HD in methylene chloride to the haired mouse ear; (2) HD in methylene chloride to the hairless mouse dorsal skin; and (3) saturated HD vapor to the hairless mouse dorsal skin for 6 min. The curves showed a reduction in (14)C disintegrations per min in animals euthanized 0 to 2 h postexposure. The largest percentage of decrease of (14)C content in skin occurred within 30 min of HD challenge for all exposures. An 8-mm skin-punch biopsy and a 14-mm annular skin section surrounding the region of the 8-mm skin punch were taken from the hairless mouse dorsal skin exposed to HD in methylene chloride. The ratio of the (14)C content in the 8-mm skin punch to that in the surrounding 14-mm annular skin section was 7.3, demonstrating that the HD application spreads beyond the initially biopsied site. A concentration/time value of 6.3 mug/cm(2)/min was determined by counting skin (14)C disintegrations per minute in animals euthanized immediately after exposure to saturated HD vapor. Determinations of the amount of HD showed that similar quantities of HD, 0.4 mg, were detected on each model. These results contribute to a better quantitative understanding of HD application in the haired and hairless mouse models.

  8. Intravenous transplantation of mouse embryonic stem cells attenuates demyelination in an ICR outbred mouse model of demyelinating diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kidsadagon Pringproa; Anucha Sathanawongs; Chananthida Khamphilai; Sarocha Sukkarinprom; Apichart Oranratnachai

    2016-01-01

    Induction of demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS) of experimental mice using cuprizone is widely used as an animal model for studying the pathogenesis and treatment of demyelination. How-ever, different mouse strains used result in different pathological outcomes. Moreover, because current medicinal treatments are not always effective in multiple sclerosis patients, so the study of exogenous cell transplantation in an animal model is of great importance. hTe aims of the present study were to establish an alternative ICR outbred mouse model for studying demyelination and to evaluate the effects of intrave-nous cell transplantation in the present developed mouse model. Two sets of experiments were conducted. Firstly, ICR outbred and BALB/c inbred mice were fed with 0.2% cuprizone for 6 consecutive weeks; then demyelinating scores determined by luxol fast blue stain or immunolabeling with CNPase were evaluated. Secondly, attenuation of demyelination in ICR mice by intravenous injection of mES cells was studied. Scores for demyelination in the brains of ICR mice receiving cell injection (mES cells-injected group) and vehicle (sham-inoculated group) were assessed and compared. hTe results showed that cuprizone signiif-cantly induced demyelination in the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum of both ICR and BALB/c mice. Additionally, intravenous transplantation of mES cells potentially attenuated demyelination in ICR mice compared with sham-inoculated groups. hTe present study is among the earliest reports to describe the cuprizone-induced demyelination in ICR outbred mice. Although it remains unclear whether mES cells or trophic effects from mES cells are the cause of enhanced remyelination, the results of the present study may shed some light on exogenous cell therapy in central nervous system demyelinating diseases.

  9. A mouse model for binge-level methamphetamine use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkelzen Shabani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Binge/crash cycles of methamphetamine (MA use are frequently reported by individuals suffering from MA use disorders. An MA binge is self-reported as multiple daily doses that commonly accumulate to 800 mg/day (~10 mg/kg/day for a 170 pound human. A genetic animal model with a similar vulnerability to binge-level MA intake is missing. We used selectively bred MA high drinking (MAHDR and low drinking (MALDR mouse lines to determine whether several procedural variations would result in binge-level MA intake. Data were also collected in two progenitor populations of the MA drinking lines, the DBA/2J (D2 strain and the F2 cross of the D2 and C57BL/6J strains. The impact of 3 factors was examined: (1 concentration of MA in the two-bottle choice procedure used for selective breeding; (2 ratio of bottles containing MA vs. water, and (3 length of the withdrawal (or abstinence period between MA drinking sessions. When MA concentration was progressively increased every 4 days in 20 mg/l amounts from 20 to 140 mg/l, maximum intake in MALDR mice was 1.1 mg/kg, whereas MAHDR mice consumed as much as 14.6 mg/kg. When these concentrations were tested in a multiple bottle choice procedure, the highest ratio of MA to water bottles (3:1 was associated with escalated MA intake of up to 29.1 mg/kg in MAHDR mice and 12.0 mg/kg in F2 mice; MALDR mice did not show a ratio-dependent escalation in MA intake. Finally, MAHDR and D2 mice were offered 3 bottles of MA vs. water at increasing concentrations from 20 to 80 mg/l, and tested under an intermittent 6-h withdrawal period, which was lengthened to 30 hours (D2 mice or to 30 or 78 hours (MAHDR. D2 and MAHDR mice initially consumed similar amounts of 14-16 mg/kg MA, but D2 mice reduced their MA intake 3-fold after introduction of 30-h abstinence periods, whereas MAHDR mice retained their high level of intake regardless of withdrawal period. MAHDR mice provide a genetic model of binge-level MA intake appropriate for the

  10. Understanding melatonin receptor pharmacology: latest insights from mouse models, and their relevance to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications toward type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances, and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2 , which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1 /MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models.

  11. The mouse as a developmental model for cleft lip and palate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms are essential for deciphering biological processes. One of these, the mouse, proved to be a valuable model for understanding the etiopathogenesis of a vast array of human diseases, including congenital malformations such as orofacial clefting conditions. This small mammal's usefulness in cleft lip and palate research stems not only from the striking anatomical and molecular similarities of lip and palate development between human and mouse embryos, but also from its amenability to experimental and genetic manipulation. Using some recent studies as illustrative examples, this review describes different ways of generating and exploiting mouse models to study normal and abnormal development of the lip and palate. Despite a few surmountable disadvantages of using the mouse, numerous mutants have revealed a growing number of molecular key players and have pointed at a tight and complex molecular control during each step of lip and palate development.

  12. Using genetic mouse models to gain insight into glaucoma: Past results and future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Kimberly A; Harder, Jeffrey M; Williams, Pete A; Rausch, Rebecca L; Kiernan, Amy E; Nair, K Saidas; Anderson, Michael G; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R; Libby, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    While all forms of glaucoma are characterized by a specific pattern of retinal ganglion cell death, they are clinically divided into several distinct subclasses, including normal tension glaucoma, primary open angle glaucoma, congenital glaucoma, and secondary glaucoma. For each type of glaucoma there are likely numerous molecular pathways that control susceptibility to the disease. Given this complexity, a single animal model will never precisely model all aspects of all the different types of human glaucoma. Therefore, multiple animal models have been utilized to study glaucoma but more are needed. Because of the powerful genetic tools available to use in the laboratory mouse, it has proven to be a highly useful mammalian system for studying the pathophysiology of human disease. The similarity between human and mouse eyes coupled with the ability to use a combination of advanced cell biological and genetic tools in mice have led to a large increase in the number of studies using mice to model specific glaucoma phenotypes. Over the last decade, numerous new mouse models and genetic tools have emerged, providing important insight into the cell biology and genetics of glaucoma. In this review, we describe available mouse genetic models that can be used to study glaucoma-relevant disease/pathobiology. Furthermore, we discuss how these models have been used to gain insights into ocular hypertension (a major risk factor for glaucoma) and glaucomatous retinal ganglion cell death. Finally, the potential for developing new mouse models and using advanced genetic tools and resources for studying glaucoma are discussed.

  13. Maternal diet modulates the risk for neural tube defects in a mouse model of diabetic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Kappen, Claudia; Kruger, Claudia; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Salbaum, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes have long been known to carry a higher risk for congenital malformations, such as neural tube defects. Using the FVB inbred mouse strain and the Streptozotocin-induced diabetes model, we tested whether the incidence of neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies can be modulated by maternal diet. In a comparison of two commercial mouse diets, which are considered nutritionally replete, we found that maternal consumption of the unfavorable diet was ...

  14. Histopathological characteristics of a novel knock-in mouse prostate cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wu

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is relatively unique to man. There is no naturally occurring prostate cancer in the mouse. Pre-clinical studies involve the establishment of a genetically engineered mouse prostate cancer model with features close to those of the human situation. A new knock-in mouse adenocarcinoma prostate (KIMAP model was established, which showed close-to-human kinetics of tumor development. In order to determine if the similar kinetics is associated with heterogeneous tumor architecture similar to the human situation, we utilized a new mouse histological grading system (Gleason analogous grading system similar to the Gleason human grading system and flow cytometry DNA analysis to measure and compare the adenocarcinoma of the KIMAP model with human prostate cancer. Sixty KIMAP prostate cancer samples from 60 mice were measured and compared with human prostate cancer. Flow cytometry DNA analysis was performed on malignant prostate tissues obtained from KIMAP models. Mice with prostate cancer from KIMAP models showed a 53.3% compound histological score rate, which was close to the human clinical average (50% and showed a significant correlation with age (P = 0.001. Flow cytometry analyses demonstrated that most KIMAP tumor tissues were diploid, analogous to the human situation. The similarities of the KIMAP mouse model with tumors of the human prostate suggest the use of this experimental model to complement studies of human prostate cancer.

  15. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Ignatenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  16. A metabolomic comparison of mouse models of the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salek, Reza M.; Pears, Michael R. [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry and Cambridge Systems Biology Centre (United Kingdom); Cooper, Jonathan D. [King' s College London, Pediatric Storage Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry (United Kingdom); Mitchison, Hannah M. [Royal Free and University College Medical School, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health (United Kingdom); Pearce, David A. [Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota, Department of Pediatrics (United States); Mortishire-Smith, Russell J. [Johnson and Johnson PR and D (Belgium); Griffin, Julian L., E-mail: jlg40@mole.bio.cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry and the Cambridge Systems Biology Centre (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of fatal inherited neurodegenerative diseases in humans distinguished by a common clinical pathology, characterized by the accumulation of storage body material in cells and gross brain atrophy. In this study, metabolic changes in three NCL mouse models were examined looking for pathways correlated with neurodegeneration. Two mouse models; motor neuron degeneration (mnd) mouse and a variant model of late infantile NCL, termed the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (nclf) mouse were investigated experimentally. Both models exhibit a characteristic accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neuronal and non neuronal cells. The NMR profiles derived from extracts of the cortex and cerebellum from mnd and nclf mice were distinguished according to disease/wildtype status. In particular, a perturbation in glutamine and glutamate metabolism, and a decrease in {gamma}-amino butyric acid (GABA) in the cerebellum and cortices of mnd (adolescent mice) and nclf mice relative to wildtype at all ages were detected. Our results were compared to the Cln3 mouse model of NCL. The metabolism of mnd mice resembled older (6 month) Cln3 mice, where the disease is relatively advanced, while the metabolism of nclf mice was more akin to younger (1-2 months) Cln3 mice, where the disease is in its early stages of progression. Overall, our results allowed the identification of metabolic traits common to all NCL subtypes for the three animal models.

  17. Alterations in Striatal Synaptic Transmission are Consistent across Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI*** (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  18. Alterations in striatal synaptic transmission are consistent across genetic mouse models of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  19. Olfaction in three genetic and two MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kurtenbach

    Full Text Available Various genetic or toxin-induced mouse models are frequently used for investigation of early PD pathology. Although olfactory impairment is known to precede motor symptoms by years, it is not known whether it is caused by impairments in the brain, the olfactory epithelium, or both. In this study, we investigated the olfactory function in three genetic Parkinson's disease (PD mouse models and mice treated with MPTP intraperitoneally and intranasally. To investigate olfactory function, we performed electro-olfactogram recordings (EOGs and an olfactory behavior test (cookie-finding test. We show that neither a parkin knockout mouse strain, nor intraperitoneal MPTP treated animals display any olfactory impairment in EOG recordings and the applied behavior test. We also found no difference in the responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorants in a mouse strain over-expressing doubly mutated α-synuclein, while this mouse strain was not suitable to test olfaction in a cookie-finding test as it displays a mobility impairment. A transgenic mouse expressing mutated α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons performed equal to control animals in the cookie-finding test. Further we show that intranasal MPTP application can cause functional damage of the olfactory epithelium.

  20. Mouse models of the fragile x premutation and the fragile X associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Michael R; Arque, Gloria; Berman, Robert F; Willemsen, Rob; Hukema, Renate K

    2012-01-01

    The use of mutant mouse models of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease is essential in order to understand the pathogenesis of many genetic diseases such as fragile X syndrome and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). The choice of which animal model is most suitable to mimic a particular disease depends on a range of factors, including anatomical, physiological, and pathological similarities; presence of orthologs of genes of interest; and conservation of basic cell biological and metabolic processes. In this chapter, we will discuss two mouse models of the fragile X premutation which have been generated to study the pathogenesis of FXTAS and the effects of potential therapeutic interventions. Behavioral, molecular, neuropathological, and endocrine features of the mouse models and their relation to human FXTAS are discussed.

  1. Ultrastructural study of Rift Valley fever virus in the mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Christopher; Steele, Keith E.; Honko, Anna; Shamblin, Joshua; Hensley, Lisa E. [United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, MD (United States); Smith, Darci R., E-mail: darci.smith1@us.army.mil [United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, MD (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Detailed ultrastructural studies of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in the mouse model are needed to develop and characterize a small animal model of RVF for the evaluation of potential vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, the ultrastructural features of RVFV infection in the mouse model were analyzed. The main changes in the liver included the presence of viral particles in hepatocytes and hepatic stem cells accompanied by hepatocyte apoptosis. However, viral particles were observed rarely in the liver; in contrast, particles were extremely abundant in the CNS. Despite extensive lymphocytolysis, direct evidence of viral replication was not observed in the lymphoid tissue. These results correlate with the acute-onset hepatitis and delayed-onset encephalitis that are dominant features of severe human RVF, but suggest that host immune-mediated mechanisms contribute significantly to pathology. The results of this study expand our knowledge of RVFV-host interactions and further characterize the mouse model of RVF.

  2. A Multihit Model: Colitis Lessons from the Interleukin-10–deficient Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keubler, Lydia M.; Buettner, Manuela; Häger, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Complex mechanisms are pulling the strings to initiate the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Current evidence indicates that an interaction of genetic susceptibilities (polymorphisms), environmental factors, and the host microbiota leads to a dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. In the past decades, the interleukin-10–deficient mouse has served as an excellent model to mirror the multifactorial nature of this disease. Here, we want to review in detail the interplay of the genetic factors, immune aspects, and especially summarize and discuss the role of the microbiota contributing to colitis development in the interleukin-10–deficient mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease as a multihit model. PMID:26164667

  3. Lack of species-specific difference in pulmonary function when using mouse versus human plasma in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Fontaine, Magali J; Hall, Kelly; Herrera, Anthony V; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2016-11-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that the early and empiric use of plasma improves survival after hemorrhagic shock. We have demonstrated in rodent models of hemorrhagic shock that resuscitation with plasma is protective to the lungs compared with lactated Ringer's solution. As our long-term objective is to determine the molecular mechanisms that modulate plasma's protective effects in injured bleeding patients, we have used human plasma in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock. The goal of the current experiments is to determine if there are significant adverse effects on lung injury when using human versus mouse plasma in an established murine model of hemorrhagic shock and laparotomy. Mice underwent laparotomy and 90 minutes of hemorrhagic shock to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 ± 5 mm Hg followed by resuscitation at 1× shed blood using either mouse fresh frozen plasma (FFP), human FFP, or human lyophilized plasma. Mean arterial pressure was recorded during shock and for the first 30 minutes of resuscitation. After 3 hours, animals were killed, and lungs collected for analysis. There was a significant increase in early MAP when mouse FFP was used to resuscitate animals compared with human FFP or human lyophilized plasma. However, despite these differences, analysis of the mouse lungs revealed no significant differences in pulmonary histopathology, lung permeability, or lung edema between all three plasma groups. Analysis of neutrophil infiltration in the lungs revealed that mouse FFP decreased neutrophil influx as measured by neutrophil staining; however, myeloperoxidase immunostaining revealed no significant differences in between groups. The study of human plasma in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock is feasible but does reveal some differences compared with mouse plasma-based resuscitation in physiologic measures such as MAP postresuscitation. Measures of end organ function such as lung injury appear to be comparable in this acute model of hemorrhagic

  4. Structural characterization of mouse neutrophil serine proteases and identification of their substrate specificities: relevance to mouse models of human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalupov, Timofey; Brillard-Bourdet, Michèle; Dadé, Sébastien; Serrano, Hélène; Wartelle, Julien; Guyot, Nicolas; Juliano, Luiz; Moreau, Thierry; Belaaouaj, Azzaq; Gauthier, Francis

    2009-12-01

    It is widely accepted that neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) play a critical role in neutrophil-associated lung inflammatory and tissue-destructive diseases. To investigate NSP pathogenic role(s), various mouse experimental models have been developed that mimic acutely or chronically injured human lungs. We and others are using mouse exposure to cigarette smoke as a model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with or without exacerbation. However, the relative contribution of NSPs to lung disease processes as well as their underlying mechanisms remains still poorly understood. And the lack of purified mouse NSPs and their specific substrates have hampered advances in these studies. In this work, we compared mouse and human NSPs and generated three-dimensional models of murine NSPs based on three-dimensional structures of their human homologs. Analyses of these models provided compelling evidence that peptide substrate specificities of human and mouse NSPs are different despite their conserved cleft and close structural resemblance. These studies allowed us to synthesize for the first time novel sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates for individual mouse NSPs. Our findings and the newly identified substrates should better our understanding about the role of NSPs in the pathogenesis of cigarette-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as other neutrophils-associated inflammatory diseases.

  5. Hypothalamic food intake regulation in a cancer-cachectic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Dijk, van M.; Dijk, F.J.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Faber, J.; Argiles, J.M.; Laviano, A.; Müller, M.R.; Witkamp, R.F.; Norren, van K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Appetite is frequently affected in cancer patients leading to anorexia and consequently insufficient food intake. In this study, we report on hypothalamic gene expression profile of a cancer-cachectic mouse model with increased food intake. In this model, mice bearing C26 tumour have an i

  6. Establishment of mouse Mac-2 binding protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and its application for mouse chronic liver disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Ayumi; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Ebisutani, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Akiko; Ueda, Yui; Arai, Hitomi; Fujii, Hironobu; Takamatsu, Shinji; Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Maeda, Masahiro; Takehara, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2017-08-01

    We identified Mac-2 (galectin-3) binding protein (Mac-2bp) as a novel diagnostic and liver fibrosis predicting biomarker for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in humans. In mouse models, there are no serum biomarkers predicting liver disease severity. In this study, we developed a mouse Mac-2bp enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system and determined its efficacy for predicting the severity of liver disease in mouse models, especially in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. We established several rat monoclonal antibodies against mouse Mac-2bp, selected two clones for the ELISA, and checked the accuracy and reproducibility of the ELISA, especially for NAFLD models and liver fibrosis models. We also investigated the relationships between serum levels and hepatic gene expression of Mac-2bp in mouse models. Our ELISA system had high accuracy and reproducibility (R(2)  = 0.999). The intra-assay and inter-assay results for the coefficient of variation were 2.0-3.7% and 1.7-6.9%, respectively. The levels of bilirubin, hemoglobin, and chyle did not affect the Mac-2bp serum levels detected by our ELISA kit. In the mouse models, serum Mac-2bp levels increased with liver disease progression (F0/F1/F2/F3, 239.1 ± 36.7 / 259.1 ± 43.0 / 457.5 ± 162.0 / 643.7 ± 116.0 ng/mL; P Mac-2bp (R = 0.42, P Mac-2bp ELISA system effectively predicts severity of NAFLD and liver fibrosis in mouse models. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  7. Low dose of lipopolysaccharide pretreatment can alleviate the inflammatory response in wound infection mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Yang Liu; Yan-Rui Zhao; Jun-Lin Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:To assess the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreatment on wound infection mouse model and evaluate the biological safety of the optimal pretreatment dose in vivo.Methods:Mice were pretreated with LPS of different doses at 48 and 24 h before femoral medial longitudinal incision was made and infected with different bacteria.Results:It is showed that 0.5 mg/kg/time of LPS pretreatment can significantly alleviate the inflammation in mouse model infected with methicillin-resistances Staphylococcus aureus,methicillin-sensitive S.aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa,or Escherichia coli compared with doses of 0.25 mg/kg/time,1 mg/kg/time,and 1.5 mg/kg/time.Conclusions:LP5 pretreatment can alleviate the inflammation in mouse model and the optimal dose is 0.5 mg/kg/time,and meanwhile it does not damage organs' function.

  8. Neuronal mechanisms and circuits underlying repetitive behaviors in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyopil; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-20

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by three central behavioral symptoms: impaired social interaction, impaired social communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. However, the symptoms are heterogeneous among patients and a number of ASD mouse models have been generated containing mutations that mimic the mutations found in human patients with ASD. Each mouse model was found to display a unique set of repetitive behaviors. In this review, we summarize the repetitive behaviors of the ASD mouse models and variations found in their neural mechanisms including molecular and electrophysiological features. We also propose potential neuronal mechanisms underlying these repetitive behaviors, focusing on the role of the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits and brain regions associated with both social and repetitive behaviors. Further understanding of molecular and circuitry mechanisms of the repetitive behaviors associated with ASD is necessary to aid the development of effective treatments for these disorders.

  9. Distinct Defects in Spine Formation or Pruning in Two Gene Duplication Mouse Models of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Li, Huiping; Takumi, Toru; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu; Yu, Xiang; Bian, Wen-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encompasses a complex set of developmental neurological disorders, characterized by deficits in social communication and excessive repetitive behaviors. In recent years, ASD is increasingly being considered as a disease of the synapse. One main type of genetic aberration leading to ASD is gene duplication, and several mouse models have been generated mimicking these mutations. Here, we studied the effects of MECP2 duplication and human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication on synaptic development and neural circuit wiring in the mouse sensory cortices. We showed that mice carrying MECP2 duplication had specific defects in spine pruning, while the 15q11-13 duplication mouse model had impaired spine formation. Our results demonstrate that spine pathology varies significantly between autism models and that distinct aspects of neural circuit development may be targeted in different ASD mutations. Our results further underscore the importance of gene dosage in normal development and function of the brain.

  10. Patient-derived xenograft mouse models of pseudomyxoma peritonei recapitulate the human inflammatory tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuracha, Murali R; Thomas, Peter; Loggie, Brian W; Govindarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a neoplastic syndrome characterized by peritoneal tumor implants with copious mucinous ascites. The standard of care for PMP patients is aggressive cytoreductive surgery performed in conjunction with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Not all patients are candidates for these procedures and a majority of the patients will have recurrent disease. In addition to secreted mucin, inflammation and fibrosis are central to PMP pathogenesis but the molecular processes that regulate tumor-stromal interactions within the peritoneal tumor microenvironment remain largely unknown. This knowledge is critical not only to elucidate PMP pathobiology but also to identify novel targets for therapy. Here, we report the generation of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models for PMP and assess the ability of these models to replicate the inflammatory peritoneal microenvironment of human PMP patients. PDX mouse models of low- and high-grade PMP were generated and were of a similar histopathology as human PMP. Cytokines previously shown to be elevated in human PMP were also elevated in PDX ascites. Significant differences in IL-6 and IL-8/KC/MIP2 were seen between human and PDX ascites. Interestingly, these cytokines were mostly secreted by mouse-derived, tumor-associated stromal cells rather than by human-derived PMP tumor cells. Our data suggest that the PMP PDX mouse models are especially suited to the study of tumor-stromal interactions that regulate the peritoneal inflammatory environment in PMP as the tumor and stromal cells in these mouse models are of human and murine origins, respectively. These mouse models are therefore, likely to be useful in vivo surrogates for testing and developing novel therapeutic treatment interventions for PMP.

  11. Illuminating cancer systems with genetically engineered mouse models and coupled luciferase reporters in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Brandon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2013-06-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a powerful noninvasive tool that has dramatically accelerated the in vivo interrogation of cancer systems and longitudinal analysis of mouse models of cancer over the past decade. Various luciferase enzymes have been genetically engineered into mouse models (GEMM) of cancer, which permit investigation of cellular and molecular events associated with oncogenic transcription, posttranslational processing, protein-protein interactions, transformation, and oncogene addiction in live cells and animals. Luciferase-coupled GEMMs ultimately serve as a noninvasive, repetitive, longitudinal, and physiologic means by which cancer systems and therapeutic responses can be investigated accurately within the autochthonous context of a living animal.

  12. Chronic Hypertension Leads to Neurodegeneration in the TgSwDI Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyer, Anna; Soplop, Nadine; Strickland, Sidney; Norris, Erin H

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies link vascular disorders, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hypertension, specifically, is an important modifiable risk factor for late-onset AD. To examine the link between midlife hypertension and the onset of AD later in life, we chemically induced chronic hypertension in the TgSwDI mouse model of AD in early adulthood. Hypertension accelerated cognitive deficits in the Barnes maze test (Phypertension induced hippocampal neurodegeneration at an early age in this mouse line (43% reduction in the dorsal subiculum; P<0.05), establishing this as a useful research model of AD with mixed vascular and amyloid pathologies.

  13. Bio-electrosprayed living composite matrix implanted into mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Warnes, Gary; Scotton, Chris J

    2011-10-10

    We show that composite de novo structures can be generated using bio-electrosprays. Mouse lung fibroblasts are bio-electrosprayed directly with a biopolymer to form cell-bearing matrices, which are viable even when implanted subcutaneously into murine hosts. Generated cell-bearing matrices are assessed in-vitro and found to undergo all expected cellular behaviour. Subsequent in-vivo studies demonstrate the implanted living matrices integrating as expected with the surrounding microenvironment. The in-vitro and in-vivo studies elucidate and validate the ability for either bio-electrosprays or cell electrospinning to form a desired living architecture for undergoing investigation for repairing, replacing and rejuvenating damaged and/or ageing tissues.

  14. Neurotropism of Saffold virus in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Lardinois, Cécile; Jacobs, Sophie; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Kaspers, Bernd; Michiels, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Saffold virus (SAFV) is a highly seroprevalent human Cardiovirus discovered recently. No clear association between SAFV infection and human disease has been established. Rare infection cases, however, correlated with neurological symptoms. To gain insight into the pathogenesis potential of the virus, we performed experimental mouse infection with SAFV strains of genotypes 2 and 3 (SAFV-2 and SAFV-3). After intraperitoneal infection, both strains exhibited a typical Cardiovirus tropism. Viral load was most prominent in the pancreas. Heart, spleen, brain and spinal cord were also infected. In IFN-receptor 1 deficient (IFNAR-KO) mice, SAFV-3 caused a severe encephalitis. The virus was detected by immunohistochemistry in many parts of the brain and spinal cord, both in neurons and astrocytes, but astrocyte infection was more extensive. In vitro, SAFV-3 also infected astrocytes better than neurons in mixed primary cultures. Astrocytes were, however, very efficiently protected by IFN-α/β treatment.

  15. BRCA1 deficient Mouse Models to Study Pathogenesis and Therapy of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Cruz, Edgar S.; Cabrera, Marina C.; Nakles, Rebecca; Rutstein, Beth H.; Furth, Priscilla A

    2010-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice along with allograft and xenograft models can be used to effectively model triple negative breast cancer both for studies of pathophysiology as well as preclinical prevention and therapeutic drug studies. In this review eight distinct genetically engineered mouse models of BRCA1 deficiency are discussed in relationship to the generation of triple negative mammary cancer. Allograft models derived from some of these genetically engineered mice are considered and xeno...

  16. A novel method of sampling gingival crevicular fluid from a mouse model of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shinji; Movila, Alexandru; Suzuki, Maiko; Kajiya, Mikihito; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Kayal, Rayyan; Hirshfeld, Josefine; Al-Dharrab, Ayman; Savitri, Irma J; Mira, Abdulghani; Kurihara, Hidemi; Taubman, Martin A; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2016-11-01

    Using a mouse model of silk ligature-induced periodontal disease (PD), we report a novel method of sampling mouse gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) to evaluate the time-dependent secretion patterns of bone resorption-related cytokines. GCF is a serum transudate containing host-derived biomarkers which can represent cellular response in the periodontium. As such, human clinical evaluations of PD status rely on sampling this critical secretion. At the same time, a method of sampling GCF from mice is absent, hindering the translational value of mouse models of PD. Therefore, we herein report a novel method of sampling GCF from a mouse model of periodontitis, involving a series of easy steps. First, the original ligature used for induction of PD was removed, and a fresh ligature for sampling GCF was placed in the gingival crevice for 10min. Immediately afterwards, the volume of GCF collected in the sampling ligature was measured using a high precision weighing balance. The sampling ligature containing GCF was then immersed in a solution of PBS-Tween 20 and subjected to ELISA. This enabled us to monitor the volume of GCF and detect time-dependent changes in the expression of such cytokines as IL-1b, TNF-α, IL-6, RANKL, and OPG associated with the levels of alveolar bone loss, as reflected in GCF collected from a mouse model of PD. Therefore, this novel GCF sampling method can be used to measure various cytokines in GCF relative to the dynamic changes in periodontal bone loss induced in a mouse model of PD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Neuropathological assessment and validation of mouse models for Alzheimer's disease: applying NIA-AA guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, C Dirk; Darvas, Martin; Kraemer, Brian; Liggitt, Denny; Sigurdson, Christina; Ladiges, Warren

    2016-01-01

    Dozens of transgenic mouse models, generally based on mutations associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been developed, in part, for preclinical testing of candidate AD therapies. However, none of these models has successfully predicted the clinical efficacy of drugs for treating AD patients. Therefore, development of more translationally relevant AD mouse models remains a critical unmet need in the field. A concept not previously implemented in AD preclinical drug testing is the use of mouse lines that have been validated for neuropathological features of human AD. Current thinking suggests that amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle deposition is an essential component for accurate modeling of AD. Therefore, the AD translational paradigm would require pathologic Aβ and tau deposition, a disease-relevant distribution of plaques and tangles, and a pattern of disease progression of Aβ and tau isoforms similar to the neuropathological features found in the brains of AD patients. Additional parameters useful to evaluate parallels between AD and animal models would include 1) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarker changes with reduced Aβ and increased phospho-tau/tau; 2) structural and functional neuroimaging patterns including MRI hippocampal atrophy, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and amyloid/tau PET alterations in activity and/or patterns of pathologic peptide deposition and distribution; and 3) cognitive impairment with emphasis on spatial learning and memory to distinguish presymptomatic and symptomatic mice at specific ages. A validated AD mouse model for drug testing would likely show tau-related neurofibrillary degeneration following Aβ deposition and demonstrate changes in pathology, CSF analysis, and neuroimaging that mirror human AD. Development of the ideal model would revolutionize the ability to establish the translational value of AD mouse models and serve as a platform for discussions about national phenotyping guidelines and standards

  18. Neuropathological assessment and validation of mouse models for Alzheimer's disease: applying NIA-AA guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dirk Keene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dozens of transgenic mouse models, generally based on mutations associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD, have been developed, in part, for preclinical testing of candidate AD therapies. However, none of these models has successfully predicted the clinical efficacy of drugs for treating AD patients. Therefore, development of more translationally relevant AD mouse models remains a critical unmet need in the field. A concept not previously implemented in AD preclinical drug testing is the use of mouse lines that have been validated for neuropathological features of human AD. Current thinking suggests that amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle deposition is an essential component for accurate modeling of AD. Therefore, the AD translational paradigm would require pathologic Aβ and tau deposition, a disease-relevant distribution of plaques and tangles, and a pattern of disease progression of Aβ and tau isoforms similar to the neuropathological features found in the brains of AD patients. Additional parameters useful to evaluate parallels between AD and animal models would include 1 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF AD biomarker changes with reduced Aβ and increased phospho-tau/tau; 2 structural and functional neuroimaging patterns including MRI hippocampal atrophy, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG, and amyloid/tau PET alterations in activity and/or patterns of pathologic peptide deposition and distribution; and 3 cognitive impairment with emphasis on spatial learning and memory to distinguish presymptomatic and symptomatic mice at specific ages. A validated AD mouse model for drug testing would likely show tau-related neurofibrillary degeneration following Aβ deposition and demonstrate changes in pathology, CSF analysis, and neuroimaging that mirror human AD. Development of the ideal model would revolutionize the ability to establish the translational value of AD mouse models and serve as a platform for discussions about national phenotyping guidelines

  19. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Duarte, Nadia; Nilsson, Julia; Lundholm, Marie; Mayans, Sofia; Larefalk, Åsa; Hannibal, Tine D.; Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Ivars, Fredrik; Cardell, Susanna; Palmqvist, Richard; Rozell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders. PMID:27441847

  20. A humanized microbiota mouse model of ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Sadarangani, Manish; Brown, Eric M; Russell, Shannon L; Nimmo, Michael; Dean, John; Turvey, Stuart E; Chan, Edmond S; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-07-03

    There is increasing evidence for a role of early life gut microbiota in later development of asthma in children. In our recent study, children with reduced abundance of the bacterial genera Lachnospira, Veillonella, Faecalibacterium, and Rothia had an increased risk of development of asthma and addition of these bacteria in a humanized mouse model reduced airway inflammation. In this Addendum, we provide additional data on the use of a humanized gut microbiota mouse model to study the development of asthma in children, highlighting the differences in immune development between germ-free mice colonized with human microbes compared to those colonized with mouse gut microbiota. We also demonstrate that there is no association between the composition of the gut microbiota in older children and the diagnosis of asthma, further suggesting the importance of the gut microbiota-immune system axis in the first 3 months of life.

  1. Etanercept reduces neuroinflammation and lethality in mouse model of Japanese encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Jiang, Rong; Cui, Min; Zhu, Bibo; Sun, Leqiang; Wang, Yueyun; Zohaib, Ali; Dong, Qian; Ruan, Xindi; Song, Yunfeng; He, Wen; Chen, Huanchun; Cao, Shengbo

    2014-09-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a neurotropic flavivirus that causes Japanese encephalitis (JE), which leads to high fatality rates in human. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a key factor that mediates immunopathology in the central nervous system (CNS) during JE. Etanercept is a safe anti-TNF-α drug that has been commonly used in the treatment of various human autoimmune diseases. The effect of etanercept on JE was investigated with a JEV-infected mouse model. Four groups of mice were assigned to receive injections of phosphate-buffered saline, etanercept, JEV, or JEV plus etanercept. Inflammatory responses in mouse brains and mortality of mice were evaluated within 23 days post infection. The in vitro assay with mouse neuron/glia cultures showed that etanercept treatment reduced the inflammatory response induced by JEV infection. In vivo experiments further demonstrated that administration of etanercept protected mice from JEV-induced lethality. Neuronal damage, glial activation, and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines were found to be markedly decreased in JEV-infected mice that received etanercept treatment. Additionally, etanercept treatment restored the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and reduced viral load in mouse brains. Etanercept effectively reduces the inflammation and provides protection against acute encephalitis in a JEV-infected mouse model. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. A Novel Three-Dimensional Mouse Embryonic Implantation Model In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yu-xuan; CAO Bin-yun

    2007-01-01

    To regenerate three-dimensional endometrium in vitro as a novel model for studying the mechanism of implantation of embryos, the luminal epithelial cells and stromal cells of the rabbit uterus were separated and cultured in vitro. The type Ⅰ mouse tail collagen was used as scaffolding material. The stromal cells were inoculated in the type Ⅰ mouse tail collagen, and the luminal epithelial cells were inoculated on the type Ⅰ mouse tail collagen to regenerate the endometrium in vitro. The regenerated endometrium was cultured in DMEM-F/12 media containing 100 nmol L-1 progesterone, 10 nM β-estradiol, and 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 3 d. The media were then replaced with CZB containing 100 nM progesterone, 10 nmol L-1 β-estradiol, and 10% FBS, and the mouse blastulas were co-cultured with it. The results of scanning electronic micrography showed that the epithelial cells on the surface of the reconstructed endometrium were covered with numerous slender microvilli and some epithelial cells protruded pinopodes. After culturing for 12 h with the mouse blastula, the shedding, attachment, and implantation of the blastula were observed. The blastula can escape from zona pellucida and attach to the three-dimensional endometrium and is then implanted into it. Thisstudy showed that the reconstructed three-dimensional endometrium can serve as a robust embryo implantation model in vitro.

  3. Brief but chronic increase in allopregnanolone cause accelerated AD pathology differently in two mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Sara K; Johansson, Maja; Backstrom, Torbjorn; Nitsch, Roger M; Wang, Mingde

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that chronic treatment with allopregnanolone (ALLO) for three months impaired learning function in the Swe/PS1 mouse model. ALLO is a neurosteroid, produced in the CNS and a GABAA receptor agonist. ALLO modulates the general inhibitory system in the CNS by enhancing the effect of GABA. Chronic treatment with other GABAA receptor active compounds, such as benzodiazepines, ethanol and medroxy-progesterone acetate has been associated to cognitive decline and/or increased risk for dementia. In this study, we sufficed with a treatment period of one month for the Swe/PS1 mouse, and included another Alzheimer's disease mouse model; the Swe/Arc model. We found that one month of chronic treatment with elevated ALLO levels within physiological range impaired learning and memory function in the Swe/Arc female and male mice. Male Swe/PS1 mice also showed marginally impaired function, while the female mice did not. Furthermore, the chronic ALLO treatment caused increased levels of soluble Aβ in the Swe/PS1 mouse model while the levels were unchanged in the Swe/Arc model. Therefore, both Swe/Arc and Swe/PS1 mice showed signs of accelerated disease progression. Still, further studies are required to determine the mechanisms behind the cognitive impairment and the increased Aβ-levels caused by mildly elevated ALLO-levels.

  4. Basal glycogenolysis in mouse skeletal muscle: in vitro model predicts in vivo fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeth, Melissa J.; Kushmerick, Martin J.; Marcinek, David J.; Conley, Kevin E.

    2002-01-01

    A previously published mammalian kinetic model of skeletal muscle glycogenolysis, consisting of literature in vitro parameters, was modified by substituting mouse specific Vmax values. The model demonstrates that glycogen breakdown to lactate is under ATPase control. Our criteria to test whether in vitro parameters could reproduce in vivo dynamics was the ability of the model to fit phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) dynamic NMR data from ischemic basal mouse hindlimbs and predict biochemically-assayed lactate concentrations. Fitting was accomplished by optimizing four parameters--the ATPase rate coefficient, fraction of activated glycogen phosphorylase, and the equilibrium constants of creatine kinase and adenylate kinase (due to the absence of pH in the model). The optimized parameter values were physiologically reasonable, the resultant model fit the [PCr] and [Pi] timecourses well, and the model predicted the final measured lactate concentration. This result demonstrates that additional features of in vivo enzyme binding are not necessary for quantitative description of glycogenolytic dynamics.

  5. A DNA Vaccine for Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Protects Against Disease and Death in Two Lethal Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-18

    currently no licensed vaccines to prevent CCHFV infection. We developed a DNA vaccine expressing the M-segment glycoprotein genes of CCHFV and assessed its...immunogenicity and protective efficacy in two lethal mouse models of disease: type I interferon receptor knockout (IFNAR-/-) mice; and a novel...humoral immune responses with neutralizing titers after three vaccinations in both IFNAR-/- and IS mouse models.

  6. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  7. An optimised mouse model of chronic pancreatitis with a combination of ethanol and cerulein

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Rahmani, Mohammad-Reza; Fakhari, Shohreh; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Jalili, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an intractable and multi-factorial disorder. Developing appropriate animal models is an essential step in pancreatitis research, and the best ones are those which mimic the human disorder both aetiologically and pathophysiologically. The current study presents an optimised protocol for creating a murine model of CP, which mimics the initial steps of chronic pancreatitis in alcohol chronic pancreatitis and compares it with two other mouse models treate...

  8. A Novel Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Initiated in Pax3-Expressing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L. Misuraca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG is a rare and incurable brain tumor that arises predominately in children and involves the pons, a structure that along with the midbrain and medulla makes up the brainstem. We have previously developed genetically engineered mouse models of brainstem glioma using the RCAS/Tv-a system by targeting PDGF-B overexpression, p53 loss, and H3.3K27M mutation to Nestin-expressing brainstem progenitor cells of the neonatal mouse. Here we describe a novel mouse model targeting these same genetic alterations to Pax3-expressing cells, which in the neonatal mouse pons consist of a Pax3+/Nestin+/Sox2+ population lining the fourth ventricle and a Pax3+/NeuN+ parenchymal population. Injection of RCAS-PDGF-B into the brainstem of Pax3-Tv-a mice at postnatal day 3 results in 40% of mice developing asymptomatic low-grade glioma. A mixture of low- and high-grade glioma results from injection of Pax3-Tv-a;p53fl/fl mice with RCAS-PDGF-B and RCAS-Cre, with or without RCAS-H3.3K27M. These tumors are Ki67+, Nestin+, Olig2+, and largely GFAP− and can arise anywhere within the brainstem, including the classic DIPG location of the ventral pons. Expression of the H3.3K27M mutation reduces overall H3K27me3 as compared with tumors without the mutation, similar to what has been previously shown in human and mouse tumors. Thus, we have generated a novel genetically engineered mouse model of DIPG, which faithfully recapitulates the human disease and represents a novel platform with which to study the biology and treatment of this deadly disease.

  9. T2 weighted MRI for assessing renal lesions in transgenic mouse models of tuberous sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalogerou, Maria; Zhang, Yadan; Yang, Jian; Garrahan, Nigel [Institute of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN (United Kingdom); Paisey, Stephen; Tokarczuk, Paweł; Stewart, Andrew [School of Bioscience, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3AX (United Kingdom); Gallacher, John [Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4YS (United Kingdom); Sampson, Julian R. [Institute of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN (United Kingdom); Shen, Ming Hong, E-mail: shenmh@cf.ac.uk [Institute of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: Transgenic mouse models of tuberous sclerosis (TSC) develop renal cysts, cystadenomas, solid adenomas and carcinomas. Identification and characterisation of these lesions in vivo may help in TSC pre-clinical trials. This study was to evaluate T2 weighted MRI for assessment of renal lesions in two Tsc mouse models. Materials and Methods: Tsc1{sup +/−}, Tsc2{sup +/−} and wild type mice were subjected to a first MRI scan at 12 months of age and a second scan 2 months later. One Tsc2{sup +/−} mouse was treated with rapamycin for two months after the initial scan. Immediately following the second scan, mice were sacrificed and MRI images were compared to renal histological findings. Results: MRI identified all types of Tsc-associated renal lesions in both Tsc1{sup +/−} and Tsc2{sup +/−} mice. The smallest detectable lesions were <0.1 mm{sup 3}. Eighty three percent of all renal lesions detected in the first scan were re-identified in the second scan. By MRI, these lesions demonstrated significant growth in the 9 untreated Tsc1{sup +/−} and Tsc2{sup +/−} mice but shrinkage in the rapamycin treated Tsc2{sup +/−} mouse. Between the two scans, MRI also revealed significant increase in both the total number and volume of lesions in untreated mice and decrease in the rapamycin treated mouse, respectively. In comparison to histological analysis MRI detected most cysts and cystadenomas (66%) but only a minority of solid tumours (29%). Conclusion: These results suggest that T2 weighted MRI may be a useful tool for assessing some renal lesions in pre-clinical studies using Tsc mouse models. However, improved sensitivity for T2 weighted MRI is required, particularly for solid renal lesions.

  10. Identifying genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, though differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor was examined using a two-choice feeding system and the Student’s t statistic. To eliminate the confounding effect of processin...

  11. Genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse (Mus musculus) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor preference and discrimination were examined using a two-choice feeding system and 24-h trials and the Student’s t statistic. To elimi...

  12. Metabolic and Blood Pressure Effects of Walnut Supplementation in a Mouse Model of the Metabolic Syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicola J. A. Scott; Leigh J. Ellmers; Anna P. Pilbrow; Lotte Thomsen; Arthur Mark Richards; Chris M. Frampton; Vicky A. Cameron

    2017-01-01

    ... with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) remain uncertain. We compared a range of cardio-metabolic traits and related tissue gene expression associated with 21 weeks of dietary walnut supplementation in a mouse model of MetS (MetS-Tg) and wild-type (WT) mice (n...

  13. Comparative Exposure to Soy Biodiesel Emissions in an Allergic Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    We assessed the immunological effects following inhalation of emissions from 100% Soy biodiesel (S100) or a 20% mix with conventional petrodiesel (S20), in a house dust mite (HDM) allergic Balb/cJ mouse model. Female mice (8/group) were exposed whole body (4 hr/d, 5 d/wk, 4wk) to...

  14. Reduced activity-dependent protein levels in a mouse model of the fragile X premutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.E. von Leden (Ramona); L.C. Curley (Lindsey); G.D. Greenberg (Gian); M.R. Hunsaker (Michael); R. Willemsen (Rob); R.F. Berman (Robert)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractEnvironmental enrichment results in increased levels of Fmrp in brain and increased dendritic complexity. The present experiment evaluated activity-dependent increases in Fmrp levels in the motor cortex in response to training on a skilled forelimb reaching task in the CGG KI mouse model

  15. A new conditional Apc-mutant mouse model for colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Robanus-Maandag (Els); P.J. Koelink (Pim); C. Breukel (Cor); D.C.F. Salvatori (Daniela); S.C. Jagmohan-Changur (Shantie); C.A.J. Bosch (Cathy); H.W. Verspaget; P. Devilee (Peter); R. Fodde (Riccardo); M.J.M. Smits (Ron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene predispose individuals to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), characterized by multiple tumours in the large intestine. Most mouse models heterozygous for truncating mutant Apc alleles mimic FAP, however, the intestinal tumours occ

  16. Male sex aggravates the phenotype in mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, AH; Maier, SKG

    2005-01-01

    The authors have created transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mutations in either cardiac troponin T or myosin heavy chain. Mice mutant in myosin heavy chain develop significant cardiac hypertrophy at young adult age. Female mice keep that hypertrophic state, whereas male mice

  17. Tissue specific mutagenic and carcinogenic responses in NER defective mouse models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Hoogervorst, Esther M; Waard, Harm de; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der; Steeg, Harry van

    2007-01-01

    Several mouse models with defects in genes encoding components of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway have been developed. In NER two different sub-pathways are known, i.e. transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) and global-genome repair (GG-NER). A defect in one particular NER protein can le

  18. Leptin resistance contributes to obesity and hypertension in mouse models of Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmouni, Kamal; Fath, Melissa A; Seo, Seongjin; Thedens, Daniel R; Berry, Christopher J; Weiss, Robert; Nishimura, Darryl Y; Sheffield, Val C

    2008-04-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by many features, including obesity and cardiovascular disease. We previously developed knockout mouse models of 3 BBS genes: BBS2, BBS4, and BBS6. To dissect the mechanisms involved in the metabolic disorders associated with BBS, we assessed the development of obesity in these mouse models and found that BBS-null mice were hyperphagic, had low locomotor activity, and had elevated circulating levels of the hormone leptin. The effect of exogenous leptin on body weight and food intake was attenuated in BBS mice, which suggests that leptin resistance may contribute to hyperleptinemia. In other mouse models of obesity, leptin resistance may be selective rather than systemic; although mice became resistant to leptin's anorectic effects, the ability to increase renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) was preserved. Although all 3 of the BBS mouse models were similarly resistant to leptin, the sensitivity of renal SNA to leptin was maintained in Bbs4 -/- and Bbs6 -/- mice, but not in Bbs2 -/- mice. Consequently, Bbs4 -/- and Bbs6 -/- mice had higher baseline renal SNA and arterial pressure and a greater reduction in arterial pressure in response to ganglionic blockade. Furthermore, we found that BBS mice had a decreased hypothalamic expression of proopiomelanocortin, which suggests that BBS genes play an important role in maintaining leptin sensitivity in proopiomelanocortin neurons.

  19. The origin of Pasteurella multocida impacts pathology and inflammation when assessed in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Susanne E.; Chadfield, Mark S.; Sorensen, Dorte B.

    2016-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions of Pasteurella multocida isolates of different origin were studied in a mouse model, focusing on pathology, bacterial load and expression of the metalloproteinase MMP9 and its inhibitor TIMP1. Intranasal inoculation with one of three doses (10(6), 10(4), 10(2) CFU...

  20. Transgenic mouse models to study the role of APOE in hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, M.H.; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic technologies have provided a series of very useful mouse models to study hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Normally, mice carry cholesterol mainly in the high density lipoprotein (HDL) sized lipoproteins, and have low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cho

  1. A novel brain trauma model in the mouse : effects of dexamethasone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobágyi, Tibor; Hortobagyi, S; Gorlach, C; Harkany, T; Benbyo, Z; Gorogh, T; Nagel, W; Wahl, M

    2000-01-01

    We describe a novel methodological approach for inducing cold lesion in the mouse as a model of human cortical contusion trauma. To validate its reproducibility and reliability, dexamethasone (Dxm) was repeatedly applied to demonstrate possible antioedematous drug effects. Following tho induction of

  2. Oral administration of methysticin improves cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassios Fragoulis

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: In summary, these findings show that methysticin administration activates the Nrf2 pathway and reduces neuroinflammation, hippocampal oxidative damage and memory loss in a mouse model of AD. Therefore, kavalactones might be suitable candidates to serve as lead compounds for the development of a new class of neuroprotective drugs.

  3. Activity-Dependent Changes in MAPK Activation in the Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonova, Irina; Trotter, Justin H.; Banko, Jessica L.; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by disruption of the maternal "UBE3A" gene. Ube3a protein is identified as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows neuron-specific imprinting. Despite extensive research evaluating the localization and basal expression profiles of Ube3a in mouse models, the molecular…

  4. A novel brain trauma model in the mouse : effects of dexamethasone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobágyi, Tibor; Hortobagyi, S; Gorlach, C; Harkany, T; Benbyo, Z; Gorogh, T; Nagel, W; Wahl, M

    2000-01-01

    We describe a novel methodological approach for inducing cold lesion in the mouse as a model of human cortical contusion trauma. To validate its reproducibility and reliability, dexamethasone (Dxm) was repeatedly applied to demonstrate possible antioedematous drug effects. Following tho induction of

  5. New Mouse Model May Aid in Developing Effective Therapies for Ovarian Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A new genetically engineered mouse model appears promising as an effective tool for preclinical testing of novel therapies for ovarian cancer, which tends to be diagnosed in late stage. There are few effective treatments for the disease.

  6. Role of lipotoxicity in insulin resistance in subtotally nephrectomized mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Koppe

    2012-06-01

    In subtotally nephrectomized mouse model we showed an ectopic intramuscular and intrahepatic lipid redistribution concomitant with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance and lipotoxicity may represent the missing links (beyond the classical cardiovascular risk factors that may help explain the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in CKD.

  7. Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus elicits anti-glioma immunity in an immunocompetent mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Jiang (Hao); K. Clise-Dwyer (Karen); K.E. Ruisaard (Kathryn); X. Fan (Xuejun); W. Tian (Weihua); J. Gumin (Joy); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); A. Kleijn (Anne); F.F. Lang (Frederick); S. Yung (Sun); L.M. Vence (Luis); C. Gomez-Manzano (Candelaria); J. Fueyo (Juan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Emerging evidence suggests anti-cancer immunity is involved in the therapeutic effect induced by oncolytic viruses. Here we investigate the effect of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus on innate and adaptive anti-glioma immunity. Design: Mouse GL261-glioma model was set up in

  8. Male sex aggravates the phenotype in mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, AH; Maier, SKG

    2005-01-01

    The authors have created transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mutations in either cardiac troponin T or myosin heavy chain. Mice mutant in myosin heavy chain develop significant cardiac hypertrophy at young adult age. Female mice keep that hypertrophic state, whereas male mice

  9. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the Mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the diet...

  10. Breeding a PKU-mouse model on Phe-free diet, is it possible?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Johansen, Karen Singers; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    The PKU-mouse model mutated in the PAH gene was developed in the 1990s in the laboratory of Dr. Alexandra Shedlovsky at the McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin. The mutation was generated by ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) treatment of BTBR males. Several mutation was foun...

  11. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bility, Moses T; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system's contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mouse model engrafted with both human immune and human liver cells is needed to study infection and immunopathogenesis of HBV/HCV infection in vivo. We have recently developed the humanized mouse model with both human immune and human liver cells (AFC8-hu HSC/Hep) to study immunopathogenesis and therapy of HCV infection in vivo. In this review, we summarize the current models of HBV/HCV infection and their limitations in immunopathogenesis. We will then present our recent findings of HCV infection and immunopathogenesis in the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse, which supports HCV infection, human T-cell response and associated liver pathogenesis. Inoculation of humanized mice with primary HCV isolates resulted in long-term HCV infection. HCV infection induced elevated infiltration of human immune cells in the livers of HCV-infected humanized mice. HCV infection also induced HCV-specific T-cell immune response in lymphoid tissues of humanized mice. Additionally, HCV infection induced liver fibrosis in humanized mice. Anti-human alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) staining showed elevated human hepatic stellate cell activation in HCV-infected humanized mice. We discuss the limitation and future improvements of the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse model and its application in evaluating novel therapeutics, as well as studying both HCV and HBV infection, human immune responses, and associated human liver fibrosis and cancer.

  12. DREADDs suppress seizure-like activity in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epileptic brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avaliani, N.; Andersson, M.; Thomsen, Annika Højrup Runegaard

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder with a prevalence of ≈1% of general population. Available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have multiple side effects and are ineffective in 30% of patients. Therefore, development of effective treatment strategies is highly needed, requiring drug-screening models...... in mouse OHSCs. As we also found that STIB in mouse OHSCs is resistant to common AED, valproic acid, collectively our findings suggest that DREADD-based strategy may be effective in suppressing epileptiform activity in a pharamcoresitant epileptic brain tissue....

  13. The Oak Ridge Polycystic Kidney mouse: modeling ciliopathies of mice and men.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, J M [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Michaud III, Edward J [ORNL; Schoeb, T [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Aydin Son, Yesim [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Miller, M [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Yoder, Bradley [University of Alabama, Birmingham

    2008-08-01

    The Oak Ridge Polycystic Kidney (ORPK) mouse was described nearly 14 years ago as a model for human recessive polycystic kidney disease. The ORPK mouse arose through integration of a transgene into an intron of the Ift88 gene resulting in a hypomorphic allele (Ift88Tg737Rpw). The Ift88Tg737Rpw mutation impairs intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process required for assembly of motile and immotile cilia. Historically, the primary immotile cilium was thought to have minimal importance for human health; however, a rapidly expanding number of human disorders have now been attributed to ciliary defects. Importantly, many of these phenotypes are present and can be analyzed using the ORPK mouse. In this review, we highlight the research conducted using the OPRK mouse and the phenotypes shared with human cilia disorders. Furthermore, we describe an additional follicular dysplasia phenotype in the ORPK mouse, which alongside the ectodermal dysplasias seen in human Ellis-van Creveld and Sensenbrenner's syndromes, suggests an unappreciated role for primary cilia in the skin and hair follicle.

  14. Is the Mouse a Good Model of Human PPARγ-Related Metabolic Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Attila; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Peloquin, Matthew; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of patients affected with metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis and insulin resistance, academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies are eager to better understand metabolic syndrome and develop new drugs for its treatment. Many studies have focused on the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), which plays a crucial role in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism. These studies have been able to connect this transcription factor to several human metabolic diseases. Due to obvious limitations concerning experimentation in humans, animal models—mainly mouse models—have been generated to investigate the role of PPARγ in different tissues. This review focuses on the metabolic features of human and mouse PPARγ-related diseases and the utility of the mouse as a model. PMID:27483259

  15. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  16. Development of the Nonobese Diabetic Mouse and Contribution of Animal Models for Understanding Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 1974, the discovery of a mouse and a rat that spontaneously developed hyperglycemia led to the development of 2 autoimmune diabetes models: nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse and Bio-Breeding rat. These models have contributed to our understanding of autoimmune diabetes, provided tools to dissect autoimmune islet damage, and facilitated development of early detection, prevention, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. The genetic characterization, monoclonal antibodies, and congenic strains have made NOD mice especially useful. Although the establishment of the inbred NOD mouse strain was documented by Makino et al (Jikken Dobutsu. 1980;29:1–13), this review will focus on the not-as-well-known history leading to the discovery of a glycosuric female mouse by Yoshihiro Tochino. This discovery was spearheaded by years of effort by Japanese scientists from different disciplines and dedicated animal care personnel and by the support of the Shionogi Pharmaceutical Company, Osaka, Japan. The history is based on the early literature, mostly written in Japanese, and personal communications especially with Dr Tochino, who was involved in diabetes animal model development and who contributed to the release of NOD mice to the international scientific community. This article also reviews the scientific contributions made by the Bio-Breeding rat to autoimmune diabetes. PMID:28291161

  17. Characterization of behavioral and neuromuscular junction phenotypes in a novel allelic series of SMA mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Melissa; Gomez, Daniel; Feng, Zhihua; McEwen, Corissa; Beltran, Jose; Cirillo, Kim; El-Khodor, Bassem; Lin, Ming-Yi; Li, Yun; Knowlton, Wendy M; McKemy, David D; Bogdanik, Laurent; Butts-Dehm, Katherine; Martens, Kimberly; Davis, Crystal; Doty, Rosalinda; Wardwell, Keegan; Ghavami, Afshin; Kobayashi, Dione; Ko, Chien-Ping; Ramboz, Sylvie; Lutz, Cathleen

    2012-10-15

    A number of mouse models for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) have been genetically engineered to recapitulate the severity of human SMA by using a targeted null mutation at the mouse Smn1 locus coupled with the transgenic addition of varying copy numbers of human SMN2 genes. Although this approach has been useful in modeling severe SMA and very mild SMA, a mouse model of the intermediate form of the disease would provide an additional research tool amenable for drug discovery. In addition, many of the previously engineered SMA strains are multi-allelic by design, containing a combination of transgenes and targeted mutations in the homozygous state, making further genetic manipulation difficult. A new genetic engineering approach was developed whereby variable numbers of SMN2 sequences were incorporated directly into the murine Smn1 locus. Using combinations of these alleles, we generated an allelic series of SMA mouse strains harboring no, one, two, three, four, five, six or eight copies of SMN2. We report here the characterization of SMA mutants in this series that displayed a range in disease severity from embryonic lethal to viable with mild neuromuscular deficits.

  18. Pathological features of glycogen storage disease type II highlighted in the knockout mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijvoet, A G; Van Hirtum, H; Vermey, M; Van Leenen, D; Van Der Ploeg, A T; Mooi, W J; Reuser, A J

    1999-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII; Pompe's disease) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency. Skeletal muscle weakness is the most conspicuous clinical symptom of patients suffering from GSDII and skeletal muscle also is prominently involved in the knockout mouse model of this disease. Thus far, however, little detailed information has been published on the pathological changes in other mouse tissues. This paper aims to provide these data and gives a record of the clinical course of the mouse model over a 2-year period. Four-month-old affected mice perform worse in a running wheel than their unaffected littermates, but do not yet display other clear signs of disease. The lysosomal glycogen storage, already evident at birth, becomes more severe in time, leading to muscle wasting by 9-10 months of age and then limb girdle weakness and kyphosis. The disease does not markedly shorten the animal's life span despite the serious tissue pathology, which is not limited to heart and skeletal muscle, but is also seen in the smooth muscle of blood vessels and of the respiratory, digestive, and urogenital tracts. In addition, the mice have lysosomal glycogen storage in the liver, kidney, spleen, and salivary gland; in Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves, and in a subset of neurons in the central nervous system. By pathological criteria, the knockout mouse model parallels the human infantile form of GSDII and is attractive for studying the possible reversal of tissue pathology and symptomatology under different therapeutic regimes.

  19. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  20. Mouse models of rhinovirus-induced disease and exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Nathan W; Walton, Ross P; Edwards, Michael R; Aniscenko, Juliya; Caramori, Gaetano; Zhu, Jie; Glanville, Nicholas; Choy, Katherine J; Jourdan, Patrick; Burnet, Jerome; Tuthill, Tobias J; Pedrick, Michael S; Hurle, Michael J; Plumpton, Chris; Sharp, Nigel A; Bussell, James N; Swallow, Dallas M; Schwarze, Jurgen; Guy, Bruno; Almond, Jeffrey W; Jeffery, Peter K; Lloyd, Clare M; Papi, Alberto; Killington, Richard A; Rowlands, David J; Blair, Edward D; Clarke, Neil J; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2008-02-01

    Rhinoviruses cause serious morbidity and mortality as the major etiological agents of asthma exacerbations and the common cold. A major obstacle to understanding disease pathogenesis and to the development of effective therapies has been the lack of a small-animal model for rhinovirus infection. Of the 100 known rhinovirus serotypes, 90% (the major group) use human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as their cellular receptor and do not bind mouse ICAM-1; the remaining 10% (the minor group) use a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and can bind the mouse counterpart. Here we describe three novel mouse models of rhinovirus infection: minor-group rhinovirus infection of BALB/c mice, major-group rhinovirus infection of transgenic BALB/c mice expressing a mouse-human ICAM-1 chimera and rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation. These models have features similar to those observed in rhinovirus infection in humans, including augmentation of allergic airway inflammation, and will be useful in the development of future therapies for colds and asthma exacerbations.

  1. The SCID-hu mouse as a model for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrovandi, G M; Feuer, G; Gao, L; Jamieson, B; Kristeva, M; Chen, I S; Zack, J A

    1993-06-24

    During normal fetal ontogeny, one of the first organs to harbour CD4-positive cells is the thymus. This organ could therefore be one of the earliest targets infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in utero. HIV-1-infected cells and pathological abnormalities of the thymus have been seen in HIV-1-infected adults and children, and in some fetuses aborted from infected women. Studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis have been hampered by lack of a suitable animal model system. Here we use the SCID-hu mouse as a model to investigate the effect of virus infection on human tissue. The mouse is homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) defect. The model is constructed by implanting human fetal liver and thymus under the mouse kidney capsule. A conjoint human organ develops, which allows normal maturation of human thymocytes. After direct inoculation of HIV-1 into these implants, we observed severe depletion of human CD4-bearing cells within a few weeks of infection. This correlated with increasing virus load in the implants. Thus the SCID-hu mouse may be a useful in vivo system for the study of HIV-1-induced pathology.

  2. Impact of an additional chronic BDNF reduction on learning performance in an Alzheimer mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura ePsotta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a crucial role in AD pathology. A number of studies demonstrated that AD patients exhibit reduced BDNF levels in the brain and the blood serum, and in addition, several animal-based studies indicated a potential protective effect of BDNF against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. In order to further investigate the role of BDNF in the etiology of AD, we created a novel mouse model by crossing a well-established AD mouse model (APP/PS1 with a mouse exhibiting a chronic BDNF deficiency (BDNF+/-. This new triple transgenic mouse model enabled us to further analyze the role of BDNF in AD in vivo. We reasoned that in case BDNF has a protective effect against AD pathology, an AD-like phenotype in our new mouse model should occur earlier and/or in more severity than in the APP/PS1-mice. Indeed, the behavioral analysis re-vealed that the APP/PS1-BDNF+/--mice show an earlier onset of learning impairments in a two-way active avoidance task in comparison to APP/PS1- and BDNF+/--mice. However in the Morris water maze test, we could not observe an overall aggrevated impairment in spatial learning and also short-term memory in an object recognition task remained intact in all tested mouse lines. In addition to the behavioral experiments, we analyzed the amyloid plaque pa-thology in the APP/PS1 and APP/PS1-BDNF+/--mice and observed a comparable plaque den-sity in the two genotypes. Moreover, our results revealed a higher plaque density in prefrontal cortical compared to hippocampal brain regions. Our data reveal that higher cognitive tasks requiring the recruitment of cortical networks appear to be more severely affected in our new mouse model than learning tasks requiring mainly sub-cortical networks. Furthermore, our observations of an accelerated impairment in active avoidance learning in APP/PS1-BDNF+/--mice further supports the hypothesis that BDNF deficiency amplifies AD

  3. Application of Novel Rotation Angular Model for 3D Mouse System Based on MEMS Accelerometers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Li; CHEN Wen-yuan; XU Guo-ping

    2009-01-01

    A new scheme is proposed to model 3D angular motion of a revolving regular object with miniature, low-cost micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometers (instead of gyroscope), which is employed in 3D mouse system. To sense 3D angular motion, the static property of MEMS accelerometer, sensitive to gravity acceleration, is exploited. With the three outputs of configured accelerometers, the proposed model is implemented to get the rotary motion of the rigid object. In order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed model, an input device is developed with the configuration of the scheme. Experimental results show that a simulated 3D cube can accurately track the rotation of the input device. The result indicates the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model in the 3D mouse system.

  4. Histopathological Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle with Specific Reference to Mouse Models of Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Rebecca L; Wells, Dominic J

    2016-12-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of degenerative diseases for which many mouse models are available. These models are frequently used to assess potential therapeutic interventions and histological evaluation of multiple muscles is an important part of this assessment. Histological evaluation is especially useful when combined with tests of muscle function. This unit describes a protocol for necropsy, processing, cryosectioning, and histopathological evaluation of murine skeletal muscles, which is applicable to both models of muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular conditions. Key histopathological features of dystrophic muscle are discussed using the mdx mouse (a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy) as an example. Optimal handling during dissection, processing and sectioning is vital to avoid artifacts that can confound or prevent future analyses. Muscles carefully processed using this protocol are suitable for further evaluation using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, special histochemical stains, and immuoblotting. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. A mouse model for oral squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.L. Schoop (Remilio); M.H.M. Noteborn (Mathieu); R.J. Baatenburg de Jong (Robert Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDespite recent advances, the prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma is still poor. Therapeutic options such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery and the novel treatment option gene therapy are being investigated in animal models. Diverse models have been studied to induce oral squam

  6. Estimating Lead (Pb) Bioavailability In A Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children are exposed to Pb through ingestion of Pb-contaminated soil. Soil Pb bioavailability is estimated using animal models or with chemically defined in vitro assays that measure bioaccessibility. However, bioavailability estimates in a large animal model (e.g., swine) can be...

  7. DISC1 mouse models as a tool to decipher gene-environment interactions in psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler eCash-Padgett

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available DISC1 was discovered in a Scottish pedigree in which a chromosomal translocation that breaks this gene segregates with psychiatric disorders, mainly depression and schizophrenia. Linkage and association studies in diverse populations support DISC1 as a susceptibility gene to a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Many Disc1 mouse models have been generated to study its neuronal functions. These mouse models display variable phenotypes, some of them relevant to schizophrenia, others to depression.The Disc1 mouse models are popular genetic models for studying gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. Five different Disc1 models have been combined with environmental factors. The environmental stressors employed can be classified as either early immune activation or later social paradigms. These studies cover major time points along the neurodevelopmental trajectory: prenatal, early postnatal, adolescence, and adulthood. Various combinations of molecular, anatomical and behavioral methods have been used to assess the outcomes. Additionally, three of the studies sought to rescue the resulting abnormalities.Here we provide background on the environmental paradigms used, summarize the results of these studies combining Disc1 mouse models with environmental stressors and discuss what we can learn and how to proceed. A major question is how the genetic and environmental factors determine which psychiatric disorder will be clinically manifested. To address this we can take advantage of the many Disc1 models available and expose them to the same environmental stressor. The complementary experiment would be to expose the same model to different environmental stressors. DISC1 is an ideal gene for this approach, since in the Scottish pedigree the same chromosomal translocation results in different psychiatric conditions.

  8. A new conditional Apc-mutant mouse model for colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Robanus-Maandag, E C; Koelink, P J; Breukel, C; Salvatori, D. C. F.; Jagmohan-Changur, S. C.; Bosch, C. A. J.; Verspaget, H. W.; Devilee, P; Fodde, R.; Smits, R

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene predispose individuals to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), characterized by multiple tumours in the large intestine. Most mouse models heterozygous for truncating mutant Apc alleles mimic FAP, however, the intestinal tumours occur mainly in the small intestine. To model large intestinal tumours, we generated a new conditional Apc-mutant allele, Apc15lox, with exon 15 flanked by loxP sites. Similar survival of Apc1638N/15l...

  9. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fraysse, Bodvaël; Guicheney, Pascale; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2), a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2 R465W model. Heterozygous (HTZ) KI-Dnm2 mice progressively develop muscle atro...

  10. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bodvaël Fraysse; Pascale Guicheney; Marc Bitoun

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2), a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2 R465W model. Heterozygous (HTZ) KI-Dnm2 mice progressively deve...

  11. Bezafibrate improves mitochondrial function in the CNS of a mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Noe, Natalie; Dillon, Lloye; Lellek, Veronika; Diaz, Francisca; Hida, Aline; Moraes, Carlos T; Wenz, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction frequently affects the central nervous system. Here, we investigated the effect of bezafibrate treatment on neuronal mitochondrial function and its impact on the progression of a mitochondrial encephalopathy. We used a murine model with a forebrain-specific cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by conditional deletion of the COX10 gene. In this mouse model, bezafibrate-administration improved the phenotype of the mice associated with an increase in mitochondrial pro...

  12. Precision cancer mouse models through genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    Mou, Haiwei; Kennedy, Zachary; Anderson, Daniel G.; Yin, Hao; Xue, Wen

    2015-01-01

    The cancer genome is highly complex, with hundreds of point mutations, translocations, and chromosome gains and losses per tumor. To understand the effects of these alterations, precise models are needed. Traditional approaches to the construction of mouse models are time-consuming and laborious, requiring manipulation of embryonic stem cells and multiple steps. The recent development of the clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system, a powerful genome-edi...

  13. A filter based encoding model for mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Q; Roychowdhury, V; Boykin, P; Jacobs, A; Nirenberg, S

    2005-01-01

    We adopt a system theoretic approach and explore the model of retinal ganglion cells as linear filters followed by a maximum-likelihood Bayesian predictor. We evaluate the model by using cross-validation, i.e., first the model parameters are estimated using a training set, and then the prediction error is computed (by comparing the stochastic rate predicted by the model with the rate code of the response) for a test set. As in system identification theory, we present spatially uniform stimuli to the retina, whose temporal intensity is drawn independently from a Gaussian distribution, and we simultaneously record the spike trains from multiple neurons. The optimal linear filter for each cell is obtained by maximizing the mutual information between the filtered stimulus values and the output of the cell (as measured in terms of a stochastic rate code). Our results show that the model presented in this paper performs well on the test set, and it outperforms the identity Bayesian model and the traditional linear model. Moreover, in order to reduce the number of optimal filters needed for prediction, we cluster the cells based on the filters' shapes, and use the cluster consensus filters to predict the firing rates of all neurons in the same class. We obtain almost the same performance with these cluster filters. These results provide hope that filter-based retinal prosthetics might be an effective and feasible idea.

  14. Resveratrol lacks protective activity against acute seizures in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaciello, Francesca; Leclercq, Karine; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2016-10-06

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-stilbenetriol) is a natural product having diverse anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The compound has a wide spectrum of pharmacological and metabolic activity, including cardioprotective, neuroprotective, anticarcinogenic and anti-aging effects reported in numerous studies. Some reports also suggest potential anticonvulsant properties of resveratrol. In the present study, we used in mice three different seizure models which are routinely applied in preclinical drug discovery. The protective effects of resveratrol were evaluated in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), maximal electroshock (MES) and 6-Hz electrical seizure models. Resveratrol (up to 300mg/kg) administered ip (5-60min pre-treatment time) remained without any protective activity against seizures induced in these models. There was only a trend towards a delay in seizure latency, which reached statistical significance after treatment with resveratrol (100mg/kg; 15min) in case of tonic convulsions induced by PTZ. Phenobarbital (PHB, ip, 45min), used as a reference compound, displayed a clear-cut and dose-dependent protection against seizures in all the models. The ED50 values obtained with PHB were as follows: 7.3mg/kg (PTZ model), 13.3mg/kg (MES model) and 29.7mg/kg (6-Hz model). The present data demonstrate that an acute treatment with resveratrol does not provide any significant protection in three seizure models which collectively are able to detect anticonvulsants with diverse mechanisms of action. However, it cannot be excluded that chronic treatment with resveratrol may offer some protection in these or other seizure models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Michael J; Pérez, Mariana Angoa; Briggs, Denise I.; Viano, David C.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an imp...

  16. A Mathematical Model of Skeletal Muscle Disease and Immune Response in the mdx Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Salam Jarrah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic disease that results in the death of affected boys by early adulthood. The genetic defect responsible for DMD has been known for over 25 years, yet at present there is neither cure nor effective treatment for DMD. During early disease onset, the mdx mouse has been validated as an animal model for DMD and use of this model has led to valuable but incomplete insights into the disease process. For example, immune cells are thought to be responsible for a significant portion of muscle cell death in the mdx mouse; however, the role and time course of the immune response in the dystrophic process have not been well described. In this paper we constructed a simple mathematical model to investigate the role of the immune response in muscle degeneration and subsequent regeneration in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our model suggests that the immune response contributes substantially to the muscle degeneration and regeneration processes. Furthermore, the analysis of the model predicts that the immune system response oscillates throughout the life of the mice, and the damaged fibers are never completely cleared.

  17. Diabetic nephropathy in a nonobese mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallipattu, Sandeep K; Gallagher, Emily J; LeRoith, Derek; Liu, Ruijie; Mehrotra, Anita; Horne, Sylvia J; Chuang, Peter Y; Yang, Vincent W; He, John C

    2014-05-01

    A large body of research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. Yet, many questions remain regarding the progression of a disease that accounts for nearly half the patients entering dialysis yearly. Several murine models of diabetic nephropathy secondary to Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do exist, and some are more representative than others, but all have limitations. In this study, we aimed to identify a new mouse model of diabetic nephropathy secondary to T2DM in a previously described T2DM model, the MKR (MCK-KR-hIGF-IR) mouse. In this mouse model, T2DM develops as a result of functional inactivation of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in the skeletal muscle. These mice are lean, with marked insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia and thus are representative of nonobese human T2DM. We show that the MKR mice, when under stress (high-fat diet or unilateral nephrectomy), develop progressive diabetic nephropathy with marked albuminuria and meet the histopathological criteria as defined by the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium. Finally, these MKR mice are fertile and are on a common background strain, making it a novel model to study the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  18. Mouse models of frontotemporal dementia: A comparison of phenotypes with clinical symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Irish, Muireann; van Eersel, Janet; Ittner, Arne; Ke, Yazi D; Volkerling, Alexander; van der Hoven, Julia; Tanaka, Kimi; Karl, Tim; Kassiou, Michael; Kril, Jillian J; Piguet, Olivier; Götz, Jürgen; Kiernan, Matthew C; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Ittner, Lars M

    2017-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common cause of young onset dementia. It is increasingly recognized that there is a clinical continuum between FTD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At a clinical, pathological and genetic level there is much heterogeneity in FTD, meaning that our understanding of this condition, pathophysiology and development of treatments has been limited. A number of mouse models focusing predominantly on recapitulating neuropathological and molecular changes of disease have been developed, with most transgenic lines expressing a single specific protein or genetic mutation. Together with the species-typical presentation of functional deficits, this makes the direct translation of results from these models to humans difficult. However, understanding the phenotypical presentations in mice and how they relate to clinical symptomology in humans is essential for advancing translation. Here we review current mouse models in FTD and compare their phenotype to the clinical presentation in patients.

  19. A model for gas and nutrient exchange in the chorionic vasculature system of the mouse placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbod, Parisa; Sled, John

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an analytical model for the oxygen and nutrient transport from the umbilical cord to the small villous capillaries. The nutrient and carbon dioxide removal from the fetal cotyledons in the mouse placental system has also been considered. This model describes the mass transfer between the fetal and the maternal red blood cells in the chorionic arterial vasculature system. The model reveals the detail fetal vasculature system and its geometry and the precise mechanisms of mass transfer through the placenta. The dimensions of the villous capillaries, the total length of the villous trees, the total villi surface area, and the total resistance to mass transport in the fetal villous trees has also been defined. This is the first effort to explain the reason why there are at least 7 lobules in the mouse placenta from the fluid dynamics point of view.

  20. Partial corrosion casting to assess cochlear vasculature in mouse models of presbycusis and CMV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Mattia; Park, Albert H; Harrison, Robert V

    2016-02-01

    Some forms of sensorineural hearing loss involve damage or degenerative changes to the stria vascularis and/or other vascular structures in the cochlea. In animal models, many methods for anatomical assessment of cochlear vasculature exist, each with advantages and limitations. One methodology, corrosion casting, has proved useful in some species, however in the mouse model this technique is difficult to achieve because digestion of non vascular tissue results in collapse of the delicate cast specimen. We have developed a partial corrosion cast method that allows visualization of vasculature along much of the cochlear length but maintains some structural integrity of the specimen. We provide a detailed step-by-step description of this novel technique. We give some illustrative examples of the use of the method in mouse models of presbycusis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection.

  1. Mouse models in liver cancer research: A review of current literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martijn WH Leenders; Maarten W Nijkamp; Inne HM Borel Rinkes

    2008-01-01

    Primary liver cancer remains one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Due to differences in prevalence of etiological factors the incidence of primary liver cancer varies among the world, with a peak in EasL-Asia. As this disease is still lethal in most of the cases, research has to be done to improve our understanding of the disease, offering insights for possible treatment options. For this purpose, animal models are widely used,especially mouse models. In this review, we describe the different types of mouse models used in liver cancer research, with emphasis on genetically engineered mice used in this field. We focus on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as this is by far the most common Lype of primary liver cancer, accounting for 70%-85% of cases.

  2. Rate equation model of phototransduction into the membranous disks of mouse rod cells

    CERN Document Server

    Takamoto, Rei; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to investigate the rod phototransduction process in the mouse. In particular, we explored the biochemical reactions of several chemical components that contribute to the signaling process into/around the membranous disks in the outer segments of the rod cells. We constructed a rate equation model incorporating the molecular crowding effects of rhodopsin according to experimental results, which may hinder the diffusion of molecules on the disk mem- brane. The present model could effectively reproduce and explain the mechanisms of the following phenomena observed in experiments. First, the activations and relaxation of the wild-type mouse rod cell progressed more slowly than those of mutant cells containing half the amount of rhodopsin on the disk membrane. Second, the strong photoactivated state of the cell was sustained for a longer period when the light stimuli were strong. Finally, the lifetime of photoactivation exhibited a logarithmic increase with increasing light streng...

  3. Mouse models of advanced spontaneous metastasis for experimental therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Cruz-Munoz, William; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Kerbel, Robert S

    2011-02-01

    An enduring problem in cancer research is the failure to reproduce highly encouraging preclinical therapeutic findings using transplanted or spontaneous primary tumours in mice in clinical trials of patients with advanced metastatic disease. There are several reasons for this, including the failure to model established, visceral metastatic disease. We therefore developed various models of aggressive multi-organ spontaneous metastasis after surgical resection of orthotopically transplanted human tumour xenografts. In this Opinion article we provide a personal perspective summarizing the prospect of their increased clinical relevance. This includes the reduced efficacy of certain targeted anticancer drugs, the late emergence of spontaneous brain metastases and the clinical trial results evaluating a highly effective therapeutic strategy previously tested using such models.

  4. Quantification of Lung Metastases from In Vivo Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has made significant progress in terms of understanding and targeting primary tumors; however, the challenge remains for the successful treatment of metastatic cancers. This highlights the importance to use in vivo models to study the metastatic process, as well as for preclinical testing of compounds that could inhibit metastasis. As a result, proper quantification of metastases from in vivo models is of the utmost significance. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for collecting and handling lung tissues from mice, and guidance for subsequent analysis of metastases, as well as interpretation of data.

  5. Quantification of Lung Metastases from In Vivo Mouse Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has made significant progress in terms of understanding and targeting primary tumors; however, the challenge remains for the successful treatment of metastatic cancers. This highlights the importance to use in vivo models to study the metastatic process, as well as for preclinical...... testing of compounds that could inhibit metastasis. As a result, proper quantification of metastases from in vivo models is of the utmost significance. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for collecting and handling lung tissues from mice, and guidance for subsequent analysis of metastases, as well...

  6. [Experimental studies on treatment of depression with YJ-XCC1Z3 in mouse models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Hui; Chang, Hong-Sheng; Zhai, Wei-Feng; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the pre-clinical effect of YJ-XCC1Z3 on the treatment of depression with the mice mouse. YJ-XCC1Z3 was administered at the dose of 405 mg x kg(-1) and 135 mg x kg(-1) to observe the locomotor activity with the mouse locomotor activity recorder apparatus, to observe the effect of YJ-XCC1Z3 on the duration of immohility in the mouse forced swimming test and tail suspension test, to observe the effect of YJ-XCC1Z3 on the body temperature and the metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters in mouse brain in the mouse model of reserpine induced hypothermia, and to observe the effect of YJ-XCC1 Z3 on the times of 5-HTP induced head-twitches in mice. There were no significant changes in the locomotor activity, but a significant reduction in the immobility time was observed in the mice treated with YJ-XCC1Z3 405 mg x kg(-1) and imipramine in the forced swimming test and the tail suspension test. YJ-XCC1Z3 135 mg x kg(-1) and 405 mg x kg(-1) could improve the range of reserpine induced hypothermia in mice, and the latter could also enhance the times of 5-HTP induced head-twitches in mice. YJ-XCC1Z3 405 mg x kg(-1) and 135 mg x kg(-1) could increase the content of 5-HT and NE and decrease the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT in mouse brain, but the dose of 405 mg x kg(-1) could decrease the content of DA. The dose of 405 mg x kg(-1) could increase the content of 5-HIAA and had no obvious effect on the content of HVA and DOPAC. YJ-XCC1Z3 shows potent antidepressant effect by improving the behaviour of the mouse in depression and not inducing hyperlocomotion in the mice. This effect results in the increase of the content of 5-HT and NE in the mouse brain. YJ-XCC1Z3 can decrease the metabolism of 5-HT to effect the content of 5-HT.

  7. MicroRNAs and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Human Disease Mouse Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingiz Underbayev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human disease animal models are absolutely invaluable tools for our understanding of mechanisms involved in both physiological and pathological processes. By studying various genetic abnormalities in these organisms we can get a better insight into potential candidate genes responsible for human disease development. To this point a mouse represents one of the most used and convenient species for human disease modeling. Hundreds if not thousands of inbred, congenic, and transgenic mouse models have been created and are now extensively utilized in the research labs worldwide. Importantly, pluripotent stem cells play a significant role in developing new genetically engineered mice with the desired human disease-like phenotype. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells which represent reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells represent a significant advancement in research armament. The novel application of microRNA manipulation both in the generation of iPS cells and subsequent lineage-directed differentiation is discussed. Potential applications of induced pluripotent stem cell—a relatively new type of pluripotent stem cells—for human disease modeling by employing human iPS cells derived from normal and diseased somatic cells and iPS cells derived from mouse models of human disease may lead to uncovering of disease mechanisms and novel therapies.

  8. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo.

  9. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Herve; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Oehlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Molenaar, IQ; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G. J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  10. Organoid models of human and mouse ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D; Wilson, John P; Feigin, Michael E; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H M; Molenaar, I Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D; Pappin, Darryl J; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G J; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  11. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Herve; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Oehlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Molenaar, IQ; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G. J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  12. Organoid models of human and mouse ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D; Wilson, John P; Feigin, Michael E; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H M; Molenaar, I Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D; Pappin, Darryl J; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G J; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  13. A genetically humanized mouse model for hepatitis C virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorner, M.; Horwitz, J.A.; Robbins, J.B.; Barry, W.T.; Feng, Q.; Mu, K.; Jones, C.T.; Schoggins, J.W.; Catanese, M.T.; Burton, D.R.; Law, M.; Rice, C.M.; Ploss, A.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major medical problem. Antiviral treatment is only partially effective and a vaccine does not exist. Development of more effective therapies has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Although xenotransplantation of immunodeficient mice with hum

  14. CSF transthyretin neuroprotection in a mouse model of brain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Sofia Duque; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm

    2010-01-01

    Brain injury caused by ischemia is a major cause of human mortality and physical/cognitive disability worldwide. Experimentally, brain ischemia can be induced surgically by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Using this model, we studied the influence of transthyretin in ischemic stroke...... neuronal cell death, edema and inflammation, thereby influencing the survival of endangered neurons in cerebral ischemia....

  15. Establishment of a uremic apolipoprotein E knockout mouse model to explore the mechanism of uremic atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To establish a uremic apoE-/-mouse model to observe serum biochemical parameters and features of aortic root atherosclerosis (AS) in the model. Methods A uremic model was induced surgically in apoE-/- mice:electrocautery of the right kidney at 8 weeks of age and nephrectomy (NX) of the left one 2 weeks later. Control mice were sham-operated. Two weeks after NX,renal functions were detected in the uremic and control mice to evaluate the efficiency of the model. After 10 weeks of NX,blood samples we...

  16. FXN Promoter Silencing in the Humanized Mouse Model of Friedreich Ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh K Chutake

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene that results in epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter. This silencing mechanism is seen in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells but it remains unknown if it is a widespread phenomenon affecting multiple cell types and tissues.The humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia (YG8sR, which carries a single transgenic insert of the human FXN gene with an expanded GAA triplet-repeat in intron 1, is deficient for FXN transcript when compared to an isogenic transgenic mouse lacking the expanded repeat (Y47R. We found that in YG8sR the deficiency of FXN transcript extended both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat, suggestive of deficient transcriptional initiation. This pattern of deficiency was seen in all tissues tested, irrespective of whether they are known to be affected or spared in disease pathogenesis, in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and in cultured primary fibroblasts. FXN promoter function was directly measured via metabolic labeling of newly synthesized transcripts in fibroblasts, which revealed that the YG8sR mouse was significantly deficient in transcriptional initiation compared to the Y47R mouse.Deficient transcriptional initiation accounts for FXN transcriptional deficiency in the humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia, similar to patient-derived cells, and the mechanism underlying promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is widespread across multiple cell types and tissues.

  17. Skeletal metastasis: treatments, mouse models,and the Wnt signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth C.Valkenburg; Matthew R.Steensma; Bart O.Williams; Zhendong Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastases result in significant morbidity and mortality.This is particularly true of cancers with a strong predilection for the bone,such as breast,prostate,and lung cancers.There is currently no reliable cure for skeletal metastasis,and palliative therapy options are limited.The Wnt signaling pathway has been found to play an integral role in the process of skeletal metastasis and may be an important clinical target.Several experimental models of skeletal metastasis have been used to find new biomarkers and test new treatments.In this review,we discuss pathologic process of bone metastasis,the roles of the Wnt signaling,and the available experimental models and treatments.

  18. A nude mouse model of endometriosis and its biological behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dan-bo; ZHANG Shu-lan; NIU Hui-yan; LU Jing-ming

    2005-01-01

    @@ Endometriosis (EM) as a common and intractable gynecological disease is characterized by unknown etiology and complex pathologic changes. Many factors of the disease are uncertain at the molecular level and it is difficult to study clinically. In this study, we attempted to establish a nude mice model of EM for dynamical observation of the genesis and development of the disease, morphological changes in tissue, and biological behaviors.

  19. Mouse models for pre-clinical drug testing in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sanil; Daschkey, Svenja; Lang, Franziska; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hauer, Julia

    2016-11-01

    The development of novel drugs which specifically target leukemic cells, with the overall aim to increase complete remission and to reduce toxicity and morbidity, is the most important prerequisite for modern leukemia treatment. In this regard, the current transition rate of potential novel drugs from bench to bedside is remarkably low. Although many novel drugs show promising data in vitro and in vivo, testing of these medications in clinical phase I trials is often sobering with intolerable toxic side effects leading to failure in FDA approval. Areas covered: In this review, the authors discuss the development of murine model generation in the context of targeted therapy development for the treatment of childhood leukemia, aiming to decrease the attrition rate of progressively complex targeted therapies ranging from small molecules to cell therapy. As more complex therapeutic approaches develop, more complex murine models are needed, to recapitulate closely the human phenotype. Expert opinion: Combining xenograft models for efficacy testing and GEMMs for toxicity testing will be a global approach for pre-clinical testing of complex therapeutics and will contribute to the clinical approval of novel compounds. Finally, this approach is likely to increase clinical approval of novel compounds.

  20. A Susceptible Mouse Model for Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowall, Stuart D; Graham, Victoria A; Rayner, Emma; Atkinson, Barry; Hall, Graham; Watson, Robert J; Bosworth, Andrew; Bonney, Laura C; Kitchen, Samantha; Hewson, Roger

    2016-05-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen which has recently spread beyond Africa and into Pacific and South American regions. Despite first being detected in 1947, very little information is known about the virus, and its spread has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. There are currently no known vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV infection. Progress in assessing interventions will require the development of animal models to test efficacies; however, there are only limited reports on in vivo studies. The only susceptible murine models have involved intracerebral inoculations or juvenile animals, which do not replicate natural infection. Our report has studied the effect of ZIKV infection in type-I interferon receptor deficient (A129) mice and the parent strain (129Sv/Ev) after subcutaneous challenge in the lower leg to mimic a mosquito bite. A129 mice developed severe symptoms with widespread viral RNA detection in the blood, brain, spleen, liver and ovaries. Histological changes were also striking in these animals. 129Sv/Ev mice developed no clinical symptoms or histological changes, despite viral RNA being detectable in the blood, spleen and ovaries, albeit at lower levels than those seen in A129 mice. Our results identify A129 mice as being highly susceptible to ZIKV and thus A129 mice represent a suitable, and urgently required, small animal model for the testing of vaccines and antivirals.

  1. A Susceptible Mouse Model for Zika Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart D Dowall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen which has recently spread beyond Africa and into Pacific and South American regions. Despite first being detected in 1947, very little information is known about the virus, and its spread has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. There are currently no known vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV infection. Progress in assessing interventions will require the development of animal models to test efficacies; however, there are only limited reports on in vivo studies. The only susceptible murine models have involved intracerebral inoculations or juvenile animals, which do not replicate natural infection. Our report has studied the effect of ZIKV infection in type-I interferon receptor deficient (A129 mice and the parent strain (129Sv/Ev after subcutaneous challenge in the lower leg to mimic a mosquito bite. A129 mice developed severe symptoms with widespread viral RNA detection in the blood, brain, spleen, liver and ovaries. Histological changes were also striking in these animals. 129Sv/Ev mice developed no clinical symptoms or histological changes, despite viral RNA being detectable in the blood, spleen and ovaries, albeit at lower levels than those seen in A129 mice. Our results identify A129 mice as being highly susceptible to ZIKV and thus A129 mice represent a suitable, and urgently required, small animal model for the testing of vaccines and antivirals.

  2. A Susceptible Mouse Model for Zika Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart D Dowall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen which has recently spread beyond Africa and into Pacific and South American regions. Despite first being detected in 1947, very little information is known about the virus, and its spread has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. There are currently no known vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV infection. Progress in assessing interventions will require the development of animal models to test efficacies; however, there are only limited reports on in vivo studies. The only susceptible murine models have involved intracerebral inoculations or juvenile animals, which do not replicate natural infection. Our report has studied the effect of ZIKV infection in type-I interferon receptor deficient (A129 mice and the parent strain (129Sv/Ev after subcutaneous challenge in the lower leg to mimic a mosquito bite. A129 mice developed severe symptoms with widespread viral RNA detection in the blood, brain, spleen, liver and ovaries. Histological changes were also striking in these animals. 129Sv/Ev mice developed no clinical symptoms or histological changes, despite viral RNA being detectable in the blood, spleen and ovaries, albeit at lower levels than those seen in A129 mice. Our results identify A129 mice as being highly susceptible to ZIKV and thus A129 mice represent a suitable, and urgently required, small animal model for the testing of vaccines and antivirals.

  3. Salmonella vaccines: lessons from the mouse model or bad teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugnell, Richard A; Scott, Timothy A; Wang, Nancy; Yang, Chenying; Peres, Newton; Bedoui, Sammy; Kupz, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica includes several very important human serovars including Typhi, Paratyphi, Typhimurium and Enteritidis. These bacteria cause a significant global burden of disease, typically classified into enteric fever, gastroenteritis and, more recently, invasive non-typhoidal salmonellosis (iNTS). Vaccines have been developed for one of these serovars, S. Typhi and the recent increase in iNTS cases has resulted in a push to develop new vaccines that will inhibit disease by S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, the most common iNTS S. enterica serovars. The development of new human vaccines has been informed by studies in the murine model of typhoid fever based on S. Typhimurium infections of very 'sensitive' (Nramp-1(S)) mice, which has some obvious deficiencies, not the least that antibodies protect humans against S. Typhi infection but are only weakly protective in 'sensitive' mice infected with S. Typhimurium. S. Typhimurium also lacks Vi, the target of protective antibodies in typhoid fever. Notwithstanding these deficiencies, the murine model has identified a very complex series of innate and adaptive immune responses to infection that might be exploited to develop new vaccines. Equally, advances in understanding the pathogenesis of infection, through pathogenomics and more sophisticated animal models will likely contribute to the development of novel immunogens.

  4. Mouse models for pseudoxanthoma elasticum: genetic and dietary modulation of the ectopic mineralization phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    Full Text Available Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, a heritable ectopic mineralization disorder, is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. Null mice (Abcc6(-/- recapitulate the genetic, histopathologic and ultrastructural features of PXE, and they demonstrate early and progressive mineralization of vibrissae dermal sheath, which serves as a biomarker of the overall mineralization process. Recently, as part of a mouse aging study at The Jackson Laboratory, 31 inbred mouse strains were necropsied, and two of them, KK/HlJ and 129S1/SvImJ, were noted to have vibrissae dermal mineralization similar to Abcc6(-/- mice. These two strains were shown to harbor a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs32756904 in the Abcc6 gene, which resulted in out-of-frame splicing and marked reduction in ABCC6 protein expression in the liver of these mice. The same polymorphism is present in two additional mouse strains, DBA/2J and C3H/HeJ, with similar reduction in Abcc6 protein levels, yet these mice did not demonstrate tissue mineralization when kept on standard rodent diet. However, all four mouse strains, when placed on experimental diet enriched in phosphate and low in magnesium, developed extensive ectopic mineralization. These results indicate that the genetic background of mice and the mineral composition of their diet can profoundly modulate the ectopic mineralization process predicated on mutations in the Abcc6 gene. These mice provide novel model systems to study the pathomechanisms and the reasons for strain background on phenotypic variability of PXE.

  5. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic Acid cycle in Huntington disease and in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Nima N; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Cortes, Etty P; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-06-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease, and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (-50% to 90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the human HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%) suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients.

  6. Novel basophil- or eosinophil-depleted mouse models for functional analyses of allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Kunie; Shitara, Hiroshi; Taya, Choji; Kohno, Kenji; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Yonekawa, Hiromichi

    2013-01-01

    Basophils and eosinophils play important roles in various host defense mechanisms but also act as harmful effectors in allergic disorders. We generated novel basophil- and eosinophil-depletion mouse models by introducing the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor gene under the control of the mouse CD203c and the eosinophil peroxidase promoter, respectively, to study the critical roles of these cells in the immunological response. These mice exhibited selective depletion of the target cells upon DT administration. In the basophil-depletion model, DT administration attenuated a drop in body temperature in IgG-mediated systemic anaphylaxis in a dose-dependent manner and almost completely abolished the development of ear swelling in IgE-mediated chronic allergic inflammation (IgE-CAI), a typical skin swelling reaction with massive eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, in the eosinophil-depletion model, DT administration ameliorated the ear swelling in IgE-CAI whether DT was administered before, simultaneously, or after, antigen challenge, with significantly lower numbers of eosinophils infiltrating into the swelling site. These results confirm that basophils and eosinophils act as the initiator and the effector, respectively, in IgE-CAI. In addition, antibody array analysis suggested that eotaxin-2 is a principal chemokine that attracts proinflammatory cells, leading to chronic allergic inflammation. Thus, the two mouse models established in this study are potentially useful and powerful tools for studying the in vivo roles of basophils and eosinophils. The combination of basophil- and eosinophil-depletion mouse models provides a new approach to understanding the complicated mechanism of allergic inflammation in conditions such as atopic dermatitis and asthma.

  7. Novel basophil- or eosinophil-depleted mouse models for functional analyses of allergic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunie Matsuoka

    Full Text Available Basophils and eosinophils play important roles in various host defense mechanisms but also act as harmful effectors in allergic disorders. We generated novel basophil- and eosinophil-depletion mouse models by introducing the human diphtheria toxin (DT receptor gene under the control of the mouse CD203c and the eosinophil peroxidase promoter, respectively, to study the critical roles of these cells in the immunological response. These mice exhibited selective depletion of the target cells upon DT administration. In the basophil-depletion model, DT administration attenuated a drop in body temperature in IgG-mediated systemic anaphylaxis in a dose-dependent manner and almost completely abolished the development of ear swelling in IgE-mediated chronic allergic inflammation (IgE-CAI, a typical skin swelling reaction with massive eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, in the eosinophil-depletion model, DT administration ameliorated the ear swelling in IgE-CAI whether DT was administered before, simultaneously, or after, antigen challenge, with significantly lower numbers of eosinophils infiltrating into the swelling site. These results confirm that basophils and eosinophils act as the initiator and the effector, respectively, in IgE-CAI. In addition, antibody array analysis suggested that eotaxin-2 is a principal chemokine that attracts proinflammatory cells, leading to chronic allergic inflammation. Thus, the two mouse models established in this study are potentially useful and powerful tools for studying the in vivo roles of basophils and eosinophils. The combination of basophil- and eosinophil-depletion mouse models provides a new approach to understanding the complicated mechanism of allergic inflammation in conditions such as atopic dermatitis and asthma.

  8. A mouse model of early-onset renal failure due to a xanthine dehydrogenase nonsense mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian E Piret

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by renal fibrosis that can lead to end-stage renal failure, and studies have supported a strong genetic influence on the risk of developing CKD. However, investigations of the underlying molecular mechanisms are hampered by the lack of suitable hereditary models in animals. We therefore sought to establish hereditary mouse models for CKD and renal fibrosis by investigating mice treated with the chemical mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, and identified a mouse with autosomal recessive renal failure, designated RENF. Three-week old RENF mice were smaller than their littermates, whereas at birth they had been of similar size. RENF mice, at 4-weeks of age, had elevated concentrations of plasma urea and creatinine, indicating renal failure, which was associated with small and irregularly shaped kidneys. Genetic studies using DNA from 10 affected mice and 91 single nucleotide polymorphisms mapped the Renf locus to a 5.8 Mbp region on chromosome 17E1.3. DNA sequencing of the xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh gene revealed a nonsense mutation at codon 26 that co-segregated with affected RENF mice. The Xdh mutation resulted in loss of hepatic XDH and renal Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression. XDH mutations in man cause xanthinuria with undetectable plasma uric acid levels and three RENF mice had plasma uric acid levels below the limit of detection. Histological analysis of RENF kidney sections revealed abnormal arrangement of glomeruli, intratubular casts, cellular infiltration in the interstitial space, and interstitial fibrosis. TUNEL analysis of RENF kidney sections showed extensive apoptosis predominantly affecting the tubules. Thus, we have established a mouse model for autosomal recessive early-onset renal failure due to a nonsense mutation in Xdh that is a model for xanthinuria in man. This mouse model could help to increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with renal fibrosis and the

  9. A human lung xenograft mouse model of Nipah virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Valbuena

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus (family Paramyxoviridae that causes severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans with high mortality rates (up to 92%. NiV can cause Acute Lung Injury (ALI in humans, and human-to-human transmission has been observed in recent outbreaks of NiV. While the exact route of transmission to humans is not known, we have previously shown that NiV can efficiently infect human respiratory epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms of NiV-associated ALI in the human respiratory tract are unknown. Thus, there is an urgent need for models of henipavirus infection of the human respiratory tract to study the pathogenesis and understand the host responses. Here, we describe a novel human lung xenograft model in mice to study the pathogenesis of NiV. Following transplantation, human fetal lung xenografts rapidly graft and develop mature structures of adult lungs including cartilage, vascular vessels, ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, and primitive "air" spaces filled with mucus and lined by cuboidal to flat epithelium. Following infection, NiV grows to high titers (10(7 TCID50/gram lung tissue as early as 3 days post infection (pi. NiV targets both the endothelium as well as respiratory epithelium in the human lung tissues, and results in syncytia formation. NiV infection in the human lung results in the production of several cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IP-10, eotaxin, G-CSF and GM-CSF on days 5 and 7 pi. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NiV can replicate to high titers in a novel in vivo model of the human respiratory tract, resulting in a robust inflammatory response, which is known to be associated with ALI. This model will facilitate progress in the fundamental understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis and virus-host interactions; it will also provide biologically relevant models for other respiratory viruses.

  10. Comparative evaluation of a newly developed 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chulmin; Kwon, Eun-Young; Choi, Su-Mi; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Byun, Ji-Hyun; Park, Jung Yeon; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kang, Jin Han; Shin, Jinhwan; Kim, Hun

    2016-12-14

    Animal models facilitate evaluation of vaccine efficacy at relatively low cost. This study was a comparative evaluation of the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a new 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) with a control vaccine in a mouse model. After vaccination, anti-capsular antibody levels were evaluated by pneumococcal polysaccharide (PnP) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and opsonophagocytic killing assay (OPA). Also, mice were challenged intraperitoneally with 100-fold of the 50% lethal dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The anti-capsular IgG levels against serotypes 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C, 19A, and 19F were high (quartile 2 >1,600), while those against the other serotypes were low (Q2 ≤ 800). Also, the OPA titres were similar to those determined by PnP ELISA. Comparative analysis between new PCV13 and control vaccination group in a mouse model exhibited significant differences in serological immunity of a few serotypes and the range of anti-capsular IgG in the population. Challenge of wild-type or neutropenic mice with serotypes 3, 5, 6A, 6B, and 9V showed protective immunity despite of induced relatively low levels of anti-capsular antibodies. With comparison analysis, a mouse model should be adequate for evaluating serological efficacy and difference in the population level as preclinical trial.

  11. MicroRNAs and Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models: Current Insights and Future Research Avenues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Delay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from clinical trials as well as from studies performed in animal models suggest that both amyloid and tau pathologies function in concert with other factors to cause the severe neurodegeneration and dementia in Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Accumulating data in the literature suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs could be such factors. These conserved, small nonprotein-coding RNAs are essential for neuronal function and survival and have been implicated in the regulation of key genes involved in genetic and sporadic AD. The study of miRNA changes in AD mouse models provides an appealing approach to address the cause-consequence relationship between miRNA dysfunction and AD pathology in humans. Mouse models also provide attractive tools to validate miRNA targets in vivo and provide unique platforms to study the role of specific miRNA-dependent gene pathways in disease. Finally, mouse models may be exploited for miRNA diagnostics in the fight against AD.

  12. The Use of Mouse Models for Understanding the Biology of Down Syndrome and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido N. Vacano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is a complex condition caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21. The biology of aging may be different in individuals with Down syndrome; this is not well understood in any organism. Because of its complexity, many aspects of Down syndrome must be studied either in humans or in animal models. Studies in humans are essential but are limited for ethical and practical reasons. Fortunately, genetically altered mice can serve as extremely useful models of Down syndrome, and progress in their production and analysis has been remarkable. Here, we describe various mouse models that have been used to study Down syndrome. We focus on segmental trisomies of mouse chromosome regions syntenic to human chromosome 21, mice in which individual genes have been introduced, or mice in which genes have been silenced by targeted mutagenesis. We selected a limited number of genes for which considerable evidence links them to aspects of Down syndrome, and about which much is known regarding their function. We focused on genes important for brain and cognitive function, and for the altered cancer spectrum seen in individuals with Down syndrome. We conclude with observations on the usefulness of mouse models and speculation on future directions.

  13. The use of mouse models for understanding the biology of down syndrome and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacano, Guido N; Duval, Nathan; Patterson, David

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome is a complex condition caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21. The biology of aging may be different in individuals with Down syndrome; this is not well understood in any organism. Because of its complexity, many aspects of Down syndrome must be studied either in humans or in animal models. Studies in humans are essential but are limited for ethical and practical reasons. Fortunately, genetically altered mice can serve as extremely useful models of Down syndrome, and progress in their production and analysis has been remarkable. Here, we describe various mouse models that have been used to study Down syndrome. We focus on segmental trisomies of mouse chromosome regions syntenic to human chromosome 21, mice in which individual genes have been introduced, or mice in which genes have been silenced by targeted mutagenesis. We selected a limited number of genes for which considerable evidence links them to aspects of Down syndrome, and about which much is known regarding their function. We focused on genes important for brain and cognitive function, and for the altered cancer spectrum seen in individuals with Down syndrome. We conclude with observations on the usefulness of mouse models and speculation on future directions.

  14. The value of incomplete mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radde, Rebecca; Duma, Cecilia; Jucker, Mathias [University of Tuebingen, Department of Cellular Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Tuebingen (Germany); Goedert, Michel [Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    To study Alzheimer's disease (AD), a variety of mouse models has been generated through the overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein and/or the presenilins harboring one or several mutations found in familial AD. With aging, these mice develop several lesions similar to those of AD, including diffuse and neuritic amyloid deposits, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, dystrophic neurites and synapses, and amyloid-associated neuroinflammation. Other characteristics of AD, such as neurofibrillary tangles and nerve cell loss, are not satisfactorily reproduced in these models. Mouse models that recapitulate only specific aspects of AD pathogenesis are of great advantage when deciphering the complexity of the disease and can contribute substantially to diagnostic and therapeutic innovations. Incomplete mouse models have been key to the development of A{beta}42-targeted therapies, as well as to the current understanding of the interrelationship between cerebral {beta}-amyloidosis and tau neurofibrillary lesions, and are currently being used to develop novel diagnostic agents for in vivo imaging. (orig.)

  15. Immunohistochemical visualization of hippocampal neuron activity after spatial learning in a mouse model of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Pangrazzi, Luca; Poli, Andrea; Berardi, Nicoletta; Bozzi, Yuri

    2015-05-12

    Induction of phosphorylated extracellular-regulated kinase (pERK) is a reliable molecular readout of learning-dependent neuronal activation. Here, we describe a pERK immunohistochemistry protocol to study the profile of hippocampal neuron activation following exposure to a spatial learning task in a mouse model characterized by cognitive deficits of neurodevelopmental origin. Specifically, we used pERK immunostaining to study neuronal activation following Morris water maze (MWM, a classical hippocampal-dependent learning task) in Engrailed-2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice, a model of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). As compared to wild-type (WT) controls, En2(-/-) mice showed significant spatial learning deficits in the MWM. After MWM, significant differences in the number of pERK-positive neurons were detected in specific hippocampal subfields of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT animals. Thus, our protocol can robustly detect differences in pERK-positive neurons associated to hippocampal-dependent learning impairment in a mouse model of ASD. More generally, our protocol can be applied to investigate the profile of hippocampal neuron activation in both genetic or pharmacological mouse models characterized by cognitive deficits.

  16. Mouse models of NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia: biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportoletti, P; Varasano, E; Rossi, R; Mupo, A; Tiacci, E; Vassiliou, G; Martelli, M P; Falini, B

    2015-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) carrying nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations displays distinct biological and clinical features that led to its inclusion as a provisional disease entity in the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid neoplasms. Studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NPM1-mutated AML have benefited greatly from several mouse models of this leukemia developed over the past few years. Immunocompromised mice xenografted with NPM1-mutated AML served as the first valuable tool for defining the biology of the disease in vivo. Subsequently, genetically engineered mouse models of the NPM1 mutation, including transgenic and knock-in alleles, allowed the generation of mice with a constant genotype and a reproducible phenotype. These models have been critical for investigating the nature of the molecular effects of these mutations, defining the function of leukemic stem cells in NPM1-mutated AML, identifying chemoresistant preleukemic hemopoietic stem cells and unraveling the key molecular events that cooperate with NPM1 mutations to induce AML in vivo. Moreover, they can serve as a platform for the discovery and validation of new antileukemic drugs in vivo. Advances derived from the analysis of these mouse models promise to greatly accelerate the development of new molecularly targeted therapies for patients with NPM1-mutated AML.

  17. A mouse model of mitochondrial complex III dysfunction induced by myxothiazol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoudi, Mina [Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund 22185 (Sweden); Kallijärvi, Jukka; Marjavaara, Sanna [Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00014 (Finland); Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva [Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund 22185 (Sweden); Levéen, Per [Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund 22185 (Sweden); Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00014 (Finland); Fellman, Vineta, E-mail: Vineta.Fellman@med.lu.se [Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund 22185 (Sweden); Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00014 (Finland); Children’s Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00029 (Finland)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Reversible chemical inhibition of complex III in wild type mouse. • Myxothiazol causes decreased complex III activity in mouse liver. • The model is useful for therapeutic trials to improve mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Myxothiazol is a respiratory chain complex III (CIII) inhibitor that binds to the ubiquinol oxidation site Qo of CIII. It blocks electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome b and thus inhibits CIII activity. It has been utilized as a tool in studies of respiratory chain function in in vitro and cell culture models. We developed a mouse model of biochemically induced and reversible CIII inhibition using myxothiazol. We administered myxothiazol intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.56 mg/kg to C57Bl/J6 mice every 24 h and assessed CIII activity, histology, lipid content, supercomplex formation, and gene expression in the livers of the mice. A reversible CIII activity decrease to 50% of control value occurred at 2 h post-injection. At 74 h only minor histological changes in the liver were found, supercomplex formation was preserved and no significant changes in the expression of genes indicating hepatotoxicity or inflammation were found. Thus, myxothiazol-induced CIII inhibition can be induced in mice for four days in a row without overt hepatotoxicity or lethality. This model could be utilized in further studies of respiratory chain function and pharmacological approaches to mitochondrial hepatopathies.

  18. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Heike; Damme, Markus; Stroobants, Stijn;

    2016-01-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fuc...... demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model may be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis....

  19. Animal models of melanoma: a somatic cell gene delivery mouse model allows rapid evaluation of genesimplicated in human melanoma%Animal models of melanoma: a somatic cell gene delivery mouse model allows rapid evaluation of genes implicated in human melanoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea J. McKinney; Sheri L. Holmen

    2011-01-01

    The increasing incidence and mortality associated with advanced stages of melanoma are cause for concern. Few treatment options are available for advanced melanoma and the 5-year survival rate is less than 15%. Targeted therapies may revolutionize melanoma treatment by providing less toxic and more effective strategies. However, maximizing effectiveness requires further understanding of the molecular alterations that drive tumor formation, progression, and maintenance, as well as elucidating the mechanisms of resistance. Several different genetic alterations identified in human melanoma have been recapitulated in mice. This review outlines recent progress made in the development of mouse models of melanoma and summarizes what these findings reveal about the human disease. We begin with a discussion of traditional models and conclude with the recently developed RCAS/TVA somatic cell gene delivery mouse model of melanoma.

  20. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  1. Anti-apoptotic treatment in mouse models of age-related hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengchan Han; Oumei Wang; Quanxiang Cai

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL), or presbycusis, is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and top communication deficit of the aged population. Genetic predisposition is one of the major factors in the development of AHL. Generally, AHL is associated with an age-dependent loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons and stria vascularis cells in the inner ear. Although the mechanisms leading to genetic hearing loss are not completely understood, caspase-family proteases function as important signals in the inner ear pathology. It is now accepted that mouse models are the best tools to study the mechanism of genetic hearing loss or AHL. Here, we provide a brief review of recent studies on hearing improvement in mouse models of AHL by anti-apoptotic treatment.

  2. The relevance of mouse models for investigating age-related bone loss in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilka, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    Mice are increasingly used for investigation of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis because their genome is easily manipulated, and their skeleton is similar to that of humans. Unlike the human skeleton, however, the murine skeleton continues to grow slowly after puberty and lacks osteonal remodeling of cortical bone. Yet, like humans, mice exhibit loss of cancellous bone, thinning of cortical bone, and increased cortical porosity with advancing age. Histologic evidence in mice and humans alike indicates that inadequate osteoblast-mediated refilling of resorption cavities created during bone remodeling is responsible. Mouse models of progeria also show bone loss and skeletal defects associated with senescence of early osteoblast progenitors. Additionally, mouse models of atherosclerosis, which often occurs in osteoporotic participants, also suffer bone loss, suggesting that common diseases of aging share pathophysiological pathways. Knowledge of the causes of skeletal fragility in mice should therefore be applicable to humans if inherent limitations are recognized.

  3. Fucoidan Extracted from Fucus evanescens Prevents Endotoxin-Induced Damage in a Mouse Model of Endotoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana A. Kuznetsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An important problem of treating patients with endotoxemia is to find drugs to reduce the negative effects of endotoxin on the organism. We tested fucoidan (sulfated polysaccharide from the brown alga Fucus evanescens as a potential drug in a mouse model of endotoxemia inducted by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The survival time of mice injected with LPS increased under fucoidan treatment compared with the group of mice injected with LPS only. The preventive administration of fucoidan to mice with endotoxemia resulted in inhibition of increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα and IL-6, as well as decreasing of the processes of hypercoagulability. The parenteral or per os administration of fucoidan resulted in decreasing the degree of microcirculatory disorders and secondary dystrophic-destructive changes in parenchymal organs of mice with endotoxemia. Taken together, these results demonstrate that fucoidan prevents endotoxin-induced damage in a mouse model of endotoxemia and increases the mice’s resistance to LPS.

  4. Perinatal Gjb2 gene transfer rescues hearing in a mouse model of hereditary deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Takashi; Kamiya, Kazusaku; Gotoh, Satoru; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Masaaki; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most widespread sensory disorder, with an incidence of congenital genetic deafness of 1 in 1600 children. For many ethnic populations, the most prevalent form of genetic deafness is caused by recessive mutations in the gene gap junction protein, beta 2, 26 kDa (GJB2), which is also known as connexin 26 (Cx26). Despite this knowledge, existing treatment strategies do not completely recover speech perception. Here we used a gene delivery system to rescue hearing in a mouse model of Gjb2 deletion. Mice lacking Cx26 are characterized by profound deafness from birth and improper development of cochlear cells. Cochlear delivery of Gjb2 using an adeno-associated virus significantly improved the auditory responses and development of the cochlear structure. Using gene replacement to restore hearing in a new mouse model of Gjb2-related deafness may lead to the development of therapies for human hereditary deafness.

  5. Chronic Toxoplasmosis Modulates the Induction of Contact Hypersensitivity by TNCB in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2015-12-01

    Mouse models of chronic toxoplasmosis and atopic dermatitis (AD) were combined to clarify the effect of opportunistic Toxoplasma gondii infection on the development of AD. AD was induced as a chronic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) with repeated challenge of 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on the dorsal skin of mice. TNCB induced skin thickness increases in both normal and toxoplasmic mice. The changing patterns were different from the sigmoidal which saturated at 20 days in normal mice to the convex saturated at 12 days in toxoplasmic mice with the crossing at 18 days. Compared to normal mice, toxoplasmic mice presented CHS more severely in earlier times and then moderately in later times. These data suggest that host immune modification by T. gondii infection enhances CHS in early times of atopic stimulation but soothes the reaction of CHS in later times in mouse model.

  6. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott T Kelley

    Full Text Available Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet.

  7. GDF11 administration does not extend lifespan in a mouse model of premature aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas-Rodríguez, Sandra; Rodríguez, Francisco; Folgueras, Alicia R.

    2016-01-01

    GDF11 has recently emerged as a powerful anti-aging candidate, found in young blood, capable of rejuvenating a number of aged tissues, such as heart, skeletal muscle and brain. However, recent reports have shown contradictory data questioning its capacity to reverse age-related tissue dysfunction. The availability of a mouse model of accelerated aging, which shares most of the features occurring in physiological aging, gives us an excellent opportunity to test in vivo therapies aimed at extending lifespan both in pathological and normal aging. On this basis, we wondered whether the proposed anti-aging functions of GDF11 would have an overall effect on longevity. We first confirmed the existence of a reduction in GDF11/8 levels in our mouse model of accelerated aging compared with wild-type littermates. However, we show herein that GDF11 daily administration does not extend lifespan of premature-aged mice. PMID:27507054

  8. Mouse model of alloimmune-induced vascular rejection and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Winnie; von Rossum, Anna; Choy, Jonathan

    2015-05-17

    Vascular rejection that leads to transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the leading representation of chronic heart transplant failure. In TA, the immune system of the recipient causes damage of the arterial wall and dysfunction of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. This triggers a pathological repair response that is characterized by intimal thickening and luminal occlusion. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system causes vasculature rejection and TA may inform the development of novel ways to manage graft failure. Here, we describe a mouse aortic interposition model that can be used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of vascular rejection and TA. The model involves grafting of an aortic segment from a donor animal into an allogeneic recipient. Rejection of the artery segment involves alloimmune reactions and results in arterial changes that resemble vascular rejection. The basic technical approach we describe can be used with different mouse strains and targeted interventions to answer specific questions related to vascular rejection and TA.

  9. An overview of loco-regional treatments in patients and mouse models for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Palaia, Raffaele; Leongito, Maddalena; Albino, Vittorio; Piccirillo, Mauro; Arra, Claudio; Izzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a highly aggressive malignancy and is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although surgery is currently considered the most effective curative treatment for this type of cancer, it is note that most of patients have a poor prognosis due to chemioresistence and tumor recurrence. Loco-regional therapies, including radiofrequency ablation, surgical resection and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization play a major role in the clinical management of hepatocellular carcinoma. In order to improve the treatment outcome of patients diagnosed with this disease, several in vivo studies by using different techniques on cancer mouse models have been performed. This review will focus on the latest papers on the efficacy of loco-regional therapy and combined treatments in patients and mouse models of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Modeling chromosomes in mouse to explore the function of genes, genomic disorders, and chromosomal organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Brault

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges of genomic research after the completion of the human genome project is to assign a function to all the genes and to understand their interactions and organizations. Among the various techniques, the emergence of chromosome engineering tools with the aim to manipulate large genomic regions in the mouse model offers a powerful way to accelerate the discovery of gene functions and provides more mouse models to study normal and pathological developmental processes associated with aneuploidy. The combination of gene targeting in ES cells, recombinase technology, and other techniques makes it possible to generate new chromosomes carrying specific and defined deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations that are accelerating functional analysis. This review presents the current status of chromosome engineering techniques and discusses the different applications as well as the implication of these new techniques in future research to better understand the function of chromosomal organization and structures.

  11. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P. Crampton

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease.

  12. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  13. Good and bad consequences of altered fatty acid metabolism in heart failure: evidence from mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurrachim, Desiree; Luiken, Joost J F P; Nicolay, Klaas; Glatz, Jan F C; Prompers, Jeanine J; Nabben, Miranda

    2015-05-01

    The shift in substrate preference away from fatty acid oxidation (FAO) towards increased glucose utilization in heart failure has long been interpreted as an oxygen-sparing mechanism. Inhibition of FAO has therefore evolved as an accepted approach to treat heart failure. However, recent data indicate that increased reliance on glucose might be detrimental rather than beneficial for the failing heart. This review discusses new insights into metabolic adaptations in heart failure. A particular focus lies on data obtained from mouse models with modulations of cardiac FA metabolism at different levels of the FA metabolic pathway and how these differently affect cardiac function. Based on studies in which these mouse models were exposed to ischaemic and non-ischaemic heart failure, we discuss whether and when modulations in FA metabolism are protective against heart failure.

  14. The kd/kd mouse is a model of collapsing glomerulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisoni, Laura; Madaio, Michael P; Eraso, Maria; Gasser, David L; Nelson, Peter J

    2005-10-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is associated with disorders that markedly perturb the phenotype of podocytes. The kd/kd mouse has been studied for immune and genetic causes of microcystic tubulointerstitial nephritis with little attention to its glomerular lesion. Because histologic examination revealed classic morphologic features of CG, the question arises whether podocytes in kd/kd mice exhibit additional phenotypic criteria for CG. Utilizing Tg26 mice as a positive control, immunohistochemical profiling of the podocyte phenotype was conducted simultaneously on both models. Similar to Tg26 kidneys, podocytes in kd/kd kidneys showed de novo cyclin D1, Ki-67, and desmin expression with loss of synaptopodin and WT-1 expression. Electron micrographs showed collapsed capillaries, extensive foot process effacement, and dysmorphic mitochondria in podocytes. These results indicate that the kd/kd mouse is a model of CG and raise the possibility that human equivalents of the kd susceptibility gene may exist in patients with CG.

  15. Imaging noradrenergic influence on amyloid pathology in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkeler, A.; Waerzeggers, Y.; Klose, A.; Monfared, P.; Thomas, A.V.; Jacobs, A.H. [Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research with Klaus-Joachim-Zuelch-Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Cologne, Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Cologne (Germany); Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Schubert, M. [Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Heneka, M.T. [Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); University of Muenster, Department of Neurology, Muenster (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims towards the non-invasive characterization of disease-specific molecular alterations in the living organism in vivo. In that, molecular imaging opens a new dimension in our understanding of disease pathogenesis, as it allows the non-invasive determination of the dynamics of changes on the molecular level. The imaging technology being employed includes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging as well as optical-based imaging technologies. These imaging modalities are employed together or alone for disease phenotyping, development of imaging-guided therapeutic strategies and in basic and translational research. In this study, we review recent investigations employing positron emission tomography and MRI for phenotyping mouse models of Alzheimers' disease by imaging. We demonstrate that imaging has an important role in the characterization of mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. (orig.)

  16. Mouse Models of Diabetes, Obesity and Related Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Chen, Hui; Teh, Rachel; McGrath, Rachel T.; Chen, Jason; Pollock, Carol A.; Wong, Muh Geot; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rodent models have been used to study diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The purpose of the present study was to compare models of diabetes and obesity-induced metabolic syndrome and determine differences in renal outcomes. C57BL/6 male mice were fed either normal chow or high fat diet (HFD). At postnatal week 8, chow-fed mice were randomly assigned to low-dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day, five consecutive days) or vehicle control, whereas HFD-fed mice were given either one high-dose of STZ (100 mg/kg) or vehicle control. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed at Week 14, 20 and 30. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine were measured, and renal structure was assessed using Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining at Week 32. Results showed that chow-fed mice exposed to five doses of STZ resembled type 1 diabetes mellitus with a lean phenotype, hyperglycaemia, microalbuminuria and increased serum creatinine levels. Their kidneys demonstrated moderate tubular injury with evidence of tubular dilatation and glycogenated nuclear inclusion bodies. HFD-fed mice resembled metabolic syndrome as they were obese with dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance, and significantly impaired glucose tolerance. One dose STZ, in addition to HFD, did not worsen metabolic features (including fasting glucose, non esterified fatty acid, and triglyceride levels). There were significant increases in urinary ACR and serum creatinine levels, and renal structural changes were predominantly related to interstitial vacuolation and tubular dilatation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:27579698

  17. Autophagy impairment in a mouse model of neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berliocchi Laura

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autophagy is an intracellular membrane trafficking pathway controlling the delivery of cytoplasmic material to the lysosomes for degradation. It plays an important role in cell homeostasis in both normal settings and abnormal, stressful conditions. It is now recognised that an imbalance in the autophagic process can impact basal cell functions and this has recently been implicated in several human diseases, including neurodegeneration and cancer. Here, we investigated the consequences of nerve injury on the autophagic process in a commonly used model of neuropathic pain. The expression and modulation of the main autophagic marker, the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3, was evaluated in the L4-L5 cord segment seven days after spinal nerve ligation (SNL. Levels of LC3-II, the autophagosome-associated LC3 form, were markedly higher in the spinal cord ipsilateral to the ligation side, appeared to correlate with the upregulation of the calcium channel subunit α2δ-1 and were not present in mice that underwent sham surgery. However, LC3-I and Beclin 1 expression were only slightly increased. On the contrary, SNL promoted the accumulation of the ubiquitin- and LC3-binding protein p62, which inversely correlates with autophagic activity, thus pointing to a block of autophagosome turnover. Our data showed for the first time that basal autophagy is disrupted in a model of neuropathic pain.

  18. Mouse models for the study of postnatal cardiac hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Del Olmo-Turrubiarte

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to create a postnatal model for cardiac hypertrophy (CH, in order to explain the mechanisms that are present in childhood cardiac hypertrophy. Five days after implantation, intraperitoneal (IP isoproterenol (ISO was injected for 7 days to pregnant female mice. The fetuses were obtained at 15, 17 and 19 dpc from both groups, also newborns (NB, neonates (7–15 days and young adults (6 weeks of age. Histopathological exams were done on the hearts. Immunohistochemistry and western blot demonstrated GATA4 and PCNA protein expression, qPCR real time the mRNA of adrenergic receptors (α-AR and β-AR, alpha and beta myosins (α-MHC, β-MHC and GATA4. After the administration of ISO, there was no change in the number of offsprings. We observed significant structural changes in the size of the offspring hearts. Morphometric analysis revealed an increase in the size of the left ventricular wall and interventricular septum (IVS. Histopathological analysis demonstrated loss of cellular compaction and presence of left ventricular small fibrous foci after birth. Adrenergic receptors might be responsible for changing a physiological into a pathological hypertrophy. However GATA4 seemed to be the determining factor in the pathology. A new animal model was established for the study of pathologic CH in early postnatal stages.

  19. An In Vivo Mouse Model for Human Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Havens

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed a sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR assay that allows us to track early lodging/homing events in vivo. We used this technology to develop a metastasis assay of human prostate cancer (PCa growth in severe combined immunodeficient mice. For this purpose, marked human PCa cell lines were implanted subcutaneously or in the prostate (orthotopically of severe combined immunodeficient mice as models of primary tumors. Mice were then sacrificed at various time points, and distant tissues were investigated for the presence of metastatic cells. At 3 weeks, a number of tissues were recovered and evaluated by QPCR for the presence of metastatic cells. The data demonstrate that several PCa cell lines are able to spread from the primary lesion and take up residence in distant sites. If the primary tumors were resected at 3 weeks, in several cases, metastastic lesions were identified over the course of 9 months. We propose that this new model may be particularly useful in exploring the molecular events in early metastasis, identifying the metastatic niche, and studying issues pertaining to dormancy.

  20. GFAP expression as an indicator of disease severity in mouse models of Alexander disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albee Messing

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available AxD (Alexander disease is a rare disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein resulting in accumulation of the GFAP protein and elevation of Gfap mRNA. To test whether GFAP itself can serve as a biomarker of disease status or progression, we investigated two independent measures of GFAP expression in AxD mouse models, one using a genetic reporter of promoter activity and the other quantifying GFAP protein directly in a manner that could also be employed in human studies. Using a transgenic reporter line that expresses firefly luciferase under the control of the murine Gfap promoter (Gfap-luc, we found that luciferase activity reflected the regional CNS (central nervous system variability of Gfap mRNA in Gfap+/+ mice, and increased in mice containing a point mutation in Gfap that mimics a common human mutation in AxD (R239H in the human sequence, and R236H in the murine sequence. In a second set of studies, we quantified GFAP protein in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid taken from three different AxD mouse models and littermate controls. GFAP levels in CSF were increased in all three AxD models, in a manner corresponding to the concentrations of GFAP in brain. These studies demonstrate that transactivation of the Gfap promoter is an early and sustained indicator of the disease process in the mouse. Furthermore, GFAP in CSF serves as a potential biomarker that is comparable between mouse models and human patients.

  1. Novel insight into glucagon receptor action: lessons from knockout and transgenic mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Vuguin, P. M.; Charron, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Using knockout and transgenic technology, genetically modified animal models allowed us to understand the role of glucagon signalling in metabolism. Mice with a global deletion of the glucagon receptor gene (Gcgr) were designed using gene targeting. The phenotype of Gcgr−/− mouse provided important clues about the role of Gcgr in foetal growth, pancreatic development and glucose and lipid homeostasis. The lack of Gcgr activation was associated with: (i) hypoglycaemic pregnancies, poor foetal ...

  2. Caspase-3 triggers early synaptic dysfunction in a mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amelio M; Cavallucci V; Middei S; Marchetti C; Pacioni S; Ferri A; Diamantini A; De Zio D; Carrara P; Battistini L; Moreno S; Bacci A.,; Ammassari-Teule M; Marie H; Cecconi F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Synaptic loss is the best pathological correlate of the cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease; yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic failure are unknown. Here we report a non-apoptotic baseline caspase-3 activity in hippocampal dendritic spines, and an enhancement of this activity at the onset of memory decline in the Tg2576-APPswe mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease. We show that, in spines, caspase-3 activates calcineurin which, in turn, triggers dephosphor...

  3. Lovastatin Corrects Excess Protein Synthesis and Prevents Epileptogenesis in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Sidorov, Michael; Bianchi, Riccardo; Wong, Robert K.S.; Osterweil, Emily; Bear, Mark; Chubykin, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric symptoms of fragile X syndrome (FXS) are believed to be a consequence of altered regulation of protein synthesis at synapses. We discovered that lovastatin, a drug that is widely prescribed for the treatment of high cholesterol, can correct excess hippocampal protein synthesis in the mouse model of FXS and can prevent one of the robust functional consequences of increased protein synthesis in FXS, epileptogenesis. These data suggest that lovastatin is potentially disease...

  4. Obesity-Linked Mouse Models of Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmy Stauffer, Ph.D., and colleagues working with Robert  Wiltrout, Ph.D., in CCR’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, along with collaborators in the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, have developed a novel mouse model that demonstrates how fat-producing phenotypes can influence the development of hepatic cancer.   The team recently reported their findings in Cancer Research.

  5. Vanadium Inhalation in a Mouse Model for the Understanding of Air-Suspended Particle Systemic Repercussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Fortoul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increased concern about the health effects that air-suspended particles have on human health which have been dissected in animal models. Using CD-1 mouse, we explore the effects that vanadium inhalation produce in different tissues and organs. Our findings support the systemic effects of air pollution. In this paper, we describe our findings in different organs in our conditions and contrast our results with the literature.

  6. Local Signaling Environments and Human Male Infertility: What Can Be Learned from Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most prevalent public health problems facing young adult males in today’s society. A clear, treatable cause of infertility cannot be determined in a large number of these patients, and a growing body of evidence suggests that infertility in many of these men may be due to genetic causes. Studies utilizing animal models, and most importantly, mouse knockout technology, have been integral not only for the study of normal spermatogenesis but also for identifying protein...

  7. A Physiological Systems Approach to Modeling and Resetting of Mouse Thermoregulation under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    of mice with consider- ation of passive ( conduction , convection , and radiation) and active systems. The passive system was developed using dif...attained during heat exposure, as well as recovery Ta. MATERIALS AND METHODS Mouse heat transfer mechanisms were modeled with consideration of conduction ... convection , and radiation through the skin to the environment as a passive system. In addition, metabolic heat produc- tion, blood flow, saliva

  8. DRAVET SYNDROME Insights into pathophysiology and therapy from a mouse model of Dravet syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Oakley, John C; Kalume, Franck; Catterall, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels are associated with epilepsy syndromes with a wide range of severity. Complete loss of function in the Nav1.1 channel encoded by the SCN1A gene is associated with severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI), a devastating infantile-onset epilepsy with ataxia, cognitive dysfunction, and febrile and afebrile seizures resistant to current medications. Genetic mouse models of SMEI have been created that strikingly recapitulate the SMEI phenotype includin...

  9. Mouse models to unravel the role of inhaled pollutants on allergic sensitization and airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Nemery Benoit; Vanoirbeek Jeroen AJ; Cataldo Didier D; Lanckacker Ellen A; Provoost Sharen; Maes Tania; Tournoy Kurt G; Joos Guy F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Air pollutant exposure has been linked to a rise in wheezing illnesses. Clinical data highlight that exposure to mainstream tobacco smoke (MS) and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as well as exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) could promote allergic sensitization or aggravate symptoms of asthma, suggesting a role for these inhaled pollutants in the pathogenesis of asthma. Mouse models are a valuable tool to study the potential effects of these pollutants in the pathogenesis o...

  10. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chun-Bin Jiang; Mei-Lien Cheng; Chia-Yuan Liu; Szu-Wen Chang; Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau; Hung-Chang Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orall...

  11. Pathogenic sequence for dissecting aneurysm formation in a hypomorphic polycystic kidney disease 1 mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Hassane, S.; Claij, N.; Lantinga-van Leeuwen, I.S.; Munsteren, J.C. van; Lent, N. van; Hanemaaijer, R; Breuning, M H; Peters, D.J.M.; Ruiter, M.C. de

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a multi-system disorder characterized by progressive cyst formation in the kidneys. Serious complications of ADPKD are intracranial and aortic aneurysms. The condition is mainly caused by mutations in the PKD1 or PKD2 gene. We have carefully analyzed vascular remodeling in hypomorphic Pkd1 mouse model with dissecting aneurysms in the aorta. METHODS AND RESULTS - Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that i...

  12. The primary locus of motor neuron death in an ALS–PDC mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis–parkinsonism–dementia complex based on the consumption of cycad seed flour was used to determine whether the observed pathology of motor neuron loss begins in the distal axons or the spinal cord. Assessments of neuromuscular junction integrity and motor neurons were performed at multiple time points. Mice fed cycad pellets performed worse on the wire hang than controls. Microglial activation in cycad-fed mice was observed with motor neuron degene...

  13. Dysregulation of immune responses in an allergic mouse model following low-level toluene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Kunugita, Naoki; Arashidani, Keiichi

    2011-08-15

    To investigate the effect of low-level toluene inhalation on immune regulation in an allergic mouse model, C3H/HeN mice were exposed to 0, 5, 50, or 500ppm of toluene for 6h/day, 5 days/week for 3 or 6 weeks. For allergic mouse model, half of the mice in each group were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA). Allergic mice exposed to toluene for 3 weeks did not exhibit any changes in their plasma, lung or spleen samples. Although exposure to toluene alone for 6 weeks did not increase the number of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, coexposure to 50ppm toluene and OVA increased the number of BAL cells. Histological changes and increased amounts of fibronectin were observed in the lungs of OVA-immunized, 50-ppm-toluene-exposed mice. Exposure to 500ppm significantly increased the expressions of transcription factors STAT3, STAT4 and STAT5a mRNAs in spleen. In spleens from the allergic mouse model, the expressions of STAT3, STAT4, STAT5a, STAT6, GATA3 and Foxp3 mRNAs were significantly enhanced following exposure to 50ppm toluene for 6 weeks, but the expression of T-bet mRNA was not increased. Regarding the Th1/Th2 balance, the expressions of IL-4 and IL-12 mRNAs were enhanced in the spleens of toluene-exposed mice. Total IgG1 antibody production in the plasma was significantly increased in the 50-ppm-toluene-exposed allergic mouse model. These results indicate that low-level toluene exposure might dysregulate the allergic responses to OVA in C3H/HeN mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of the MeCP2R168X knockin mouse model for Rett syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Wegener

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome, one of the most common causes of mental retardation in females, is caused by mutations in the X chromosomal gene MECP2. Mice deficient for MeCP2 recapitulate some of the symptoms seen in patients with Rett syndrome. It has been shown that reactivation of silent MECP2 alleles can reverse some of the symptoms in these mice. We have generated a knockin mouse model for translational research that carries the most common nonsense mutation in Rett syndrome, R168X. In this article we describe the phenotype of this mouse model. In male MeCP2(R168X mice life span was reduced to 12-14 weeks and bodyweight was significantly lower than in wild type littermates. First symptoms including tremor, hind limb clasping and inactivity occurred at age 27 days. At age 6 weeks nest building, rotarod, open-field and elevated plus maze experiments showed impaired motor performance, reduced activity and decreased anxiety-like behavior. Plethysmography at the same time showed apneas and irregular breathing with reduced frequency. Female MeCP2R168X mice showed no significant abnormalities except decreased performance on the rotarod at age 9 months. In conclusion we show that the male MeCP2(R168X mice have a phenotype similar to that seen in MECP2 knockout mouse models and are therefore well suited for translational research. The female mice, however, have a much milder and less constant phenotype making such research with this mouse model more challenging.

  15. The importance of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model in autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, James A; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the pancreatic infiltration of immune cells resulting in T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. The successes of the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model have come in multiple forms including identifying key genetic and environmental risk factors e.g. Idd loci and effects of microorganisms including the gut microbiota, respectively, and how they may contribute to disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. Furthermore, the NOD model also provides insights into the roles of the innate immune cells as well as the B cells in contributing to the T cell-mediated disease. Unlike many autoimmune disease models, the NOD mouse develops spontaneous disease and has many similarities to human T1D. Through exploiting these similarities many targets have been identified for immune-intervention strategies. Although many of these immunotherapies did not have a significant impact on human T1D, they have been shown to be effective in the NOD mouse in early stage disease, which is not equivalent to trials in newly-diagnosed patients with diabetes. However, the continued development of humanized NOD mice would enable further clinical developments, bringing T1D research to a new translational level. Therefore, it is the aim of this review to discuss the importance of the NOD model in identifying the roles of the innate immune system and the interaction with the gut microbiota in modifying diabetes susceptibility. In addition, the role of the B cells will also be discussed with new insights gained through B cell depletion experiments and the impact on translational developments. Finally, this review will also discuss the future of the NOD mouse and the development of humanized NOD mice, providing novel insights into human T1D.

  16. Characterization of the MeCP2R168X knockin mouse model for Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Eike; Brendel, Cornelia; Fischer, Andre; Hülsmann, Swen; Gärtner, Jutta; Huppke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome, one of the most common causes of mental retardation in females, is caused by mutations in the X chromosomal gene MECP2. Mice deficient for MeCP2 recapitulate some of the symptoms seen in patients with Rett syndrome. It has been shown that reactivation of silent MECP2 alleles can reverse some of the symptoms in these mice. We have generated a knockin mouse model for translational research that carries the most common nonsense mutation in Rett syndrome, R168X. In this article we describe the phenotype of this mouse model. In male MeCP2(R168X) mice life span was reduced to 12-14 weeks and bodyweight was significantly lower than in wild type littermates. First symptoms including tremor, hind limb clasping and inactivity occurred at age 27 days. At age 6 weeks nest building, rotarod, open-field and elevated plus maze experiments showed impaired motor performance, reduced activity and decreased anxiety-like behavior. Plethysmography at the same time showed apneas and irregular breathing with reduced frequency. Female MeCP2R168X mice showed no significant abnormalities except decreased performance on the rotarod at age 9 months. In conclusion we show that the male MeCP2(R168X) mice have a phenotype similar to that seen in MECP2 knockout mouse models and are therefore well suited for translational research. The female mice, however, have a much milder and less constant phenotype making such research with this mouse model more challenging.

  17. Mouse models of rhinovirus-induced disease and exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Rhinoviruses cause serious morbidity and mortality as the major etiological agents of asthma exacerbations and the common cold. A major obstacle to understanding disease pathogenesis and to the development of effective therapies has been the lack of a small-animal model for rhinovirus infection. Of the 100 known rhinovirus serotypes, 90% (the major group) use human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as their cellular receptor and do not bind mouse ICAM-1; the remaining 10% (the minor ...

  18. A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OF IN VIVO MOUSE TIBIAL COMPRESSION LOADING: INFLUENCE OF BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Razi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Though bone is known to adapt to its mechanical challenges, the relationship between the local mechanical stimuli and the adaptive tissue response seems so far unclear. A major challenge appears to be a proper characterization of the local mechanical stimuli of the bones (e.g. strains. The finite element modeling is a powerful tool to characterize these mechanical stimuli not only on the bone surface but across the tissue. However, generating a predictive finite element model of biological tissue strains (e.g., physiological-like loading encounters aspects that are inevitably unclear or vague and thus might significantly influence the predicted findings. We aimed at investigating the influence of variations in bone alignment, joint contact surfaces and displacement constraints on the predicted strains in an in vivo mouse tibial compression experiment. We found that the general strain state within the mouse tibia under compressive loading was not affected by these uncertain factors. However, strain magnitudes at various tibial regions were highly influenced by specific modeling assumptions. The displacement constraints to control the joint contact sites appeared to be the most influential factor on the predicted strains in the mouse tibia. Strains could vary up to 150% by modifying the displacement constraints. To a lesser degree, bone misalignment (from 0 to 20° also resulted in a change of strain (+300 µε = 40%. The definition of joint contact surfaces could lead to up to 6% variation. Our findings demonstrate the relevance of the specific boundary conditions in the in vivo mouse tibia loading experiment for the prediction of local mechanical strain values using finite element modeling.

  19. In-depth metabolic phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models in obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui-Young; Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2014-10-01

    The world-wide prevalence of obesity and diabetes has increased sharply during the last two decades. Accordingly, the metabolic phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models is critical for evaluating the functional roles of target genes in obesity and diabetes, and for developing new therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the practical meaning of metabolic phenotyping, the strategy of choosing appropriate tests, and considerations when designing and performing metabolic phenotyping in mice.

  20. Telemetric analysis of haemodynamic regulation during voluntary exercise training in mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Adlam, D; De Bono, J. P.; Danson, E. J.; Zhang, M. H.; Casadei, B.; Paterson, D.J.; Channon, K M

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and improves outcome in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The dynamic changes in blood pressure and heart rate with acute exercise are independently predictive of prognosis. Quantification of the haemodynamic response to exercise training in genetically modified mouse models may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise. We describe, for the first time, the use of radiot...

  1. Clodronate inhibits tumor angiogenesis in mouse models of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusser, Nicole M; Dalton, Heather J; Pradeep, Sunila; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Jennings, Nicholas B; Vasquez, Hernan G; Wen, Yunfei; Rupaimoole, Rajesh; Nagaraja, Archana S; Gharpure, Kshipra; Miyake, Takahito; Huang, Jie; Hu, Wei; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bisphosphonates have been shown to inhibit and deplete macrophages. The effects of bisphosphonates on other cell types in the tumor microenvironment have been insufficiently studied. Here, we sought to determine the effects of bisphosphonates on ovarian cancer angiogenesis and growth via their effect on the microenvironment, including macrophage, endothelial and tumor cell populations. Experimental Design Using in vitro and in vivo models, we examined the effects of clodronate on angiogenesis and macrophage density, and the overall effect of clodronate on tumor size and metastasis. Results Clodronate inhibited the secretion of pro-angiogenic cytokines by endothelial cells and macrophages, and decreased endothelial migration and capillary tube formation. In treated mice, clodronate significantly decreased tumor size, number of tumor nodules, number of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor capillary density. Conclusions Clodronate is a potent inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis. These results highlight clodronate as a potential therapeutic for cancer. PMID:24841852

  2. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Translation from Mouse Models to Human Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Kathleen M; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-06-21

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by single-protein dysfunction and aggregation. Treatment strategies for these diseases have often targeted downstream pathways to ameliorate consequences of protein dysfunction; however, targeting the source of that dysfunction, the affected protein itself, seems most judicious to achieve a highly effective therapeutic outcome. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are small sequences of DNA able to target RNA transcripts, resulting in reduced or modified protein expression. ASOs are ideal candidates for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, given numerous advancements made to their chemical modifications and delivery methods. Successes achieved in both animal models and human clinical trials have proven ASOs both safe and effective. With proper considerations in mind regarding the human applicability of ASOs, we anticipate ongoing in vivo research and clinical trial development of ASOs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a metastatic fluorescent Lewis Lung carcinoma mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Lene; Fregil, Marianne; Høgdall, Estrid;

    2013-01-01

    models. To examine the mechanisms involved in tumor metastasis, we first generated a stably transfected Lewis Lung carcinoma cell line expressing a far-red fluorescent protein, called Katushka. After in vivo growth in syngeneic mice, two fluorescent Lewis Lung cancer subpopulations were isolated from...... primary tumors and lung metastases. The metastasis-derived cells exhibited a significant improvement in in vitro invasive activity compared to the primary tumor-derived cells, using a quantitative invasion chamber assay. Moreover, expression levels of 84 tumor metastasis-related mRNAs, 88 cancer......-related microRNAs as well as Dicer and Drosha were determined using RT-qPCR. Compared to the primary Lewis Lung carcinoma subculture, the metastasis-derived cells exhibited statistically significantly increased mRNA levels for several matrix metalloproteinases as well as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF...

  4. Differential Bone Loss in Mouse Models of Colon Cancer Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetto, Andrea; Kays, Joshua K; Parker, Valorie A; Matthews, Ryan R; Barreto, Rafael; Puppa, Melissa J; Kang, Kyung S; Carson, James A; Guise, Theresa A; Mohammad, Khalid S; Robling, Alexander G; Couch, Marion E; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Zimmers, Teresa A

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia is a distinctive feature of colorectal cancer associated with body weight loss and progressive muscle wasting. Several mechanisms responsible for muscle and fat wasting have been identified, however it is not known whether the physiologic and molecular crosstalk between muscle and bone tissue may also contribute to the cachectic phenotype in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether tumor growth associates with bone loss using several experimental models of colorectal cancer cachexia, namely C26, HT-29, and Apc(Min/+). The effects of cachexia on bone structure and strength were evaluated with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), micro computed tomography (μCT), and three-point bending test. We found that all models showed tumor growth consistent with severe cachexia. While muscle wasting in C26 hosts was accompanied by moderate bone depletion, no loss of bone strength was observed. However, HT-29 tumor bearing mice showed bone abnormalities including significant reductions in whole-body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), femoral trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), but no declines in strength. Similarly, cachexia in the Apc(Min/+) mice was associated with significant decreases in BMD, BMC, BV/TV, Tb.N, and Tb.Th as well as decreased strength. Our data suggest that colorectal cancer is associated with muscle wasting and may be accompanied by bone loss dependent upon tumor type, burden, stage and duration of the disease. It is clear that preserving muscle mass promotes survival in cancer cachexia. Future studies will determine whether strategies aimed at preventing bone loss can also improve outcomes and survival in colorectal cancer cachexia.

  5. Effects of Glycyrrhizin in a Mouse Model of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ping Deng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, there is a global attempt to identify potential anti-cancer agents with low toxicity. Previous studies have found that glycyrrhizin exerts anti-cancer action with low toxicity through suppressing thromboxane A2 (TxA2 in lung cancer cell lines. However, these effects have not yet been determined in animal models of lung cancer. Methods: Human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts were established in nude mice by the introduction of A549 cells with stable transfection of the TxA2 receptor (TPα. The animal model was confirmed by the hematoxylin and eosin (H&E method. Tumor-bearing mice were then administered graded concentrations of glycyrrhizin, cisplatin or both. After the treatments, body weights of all animals were recorded, and immunohistochemistry staining of lung tissues and serum biochemistry detection of aspartate amino transferase (AST, alanine amino transferase (ALT, urea and creatinine were carried out. Results: Treatment with glycyrrhizin alone or the combination of cisplatin and glycyrrhizin profoundly reduced expression of thromboxane synthase (TxAS as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, recovered the body weight, and rescued damage of liver and kidney in tumor-bearing mice. Although it inhibited PCNA expression, cisplatin could not significantly suppress TxAS expression. Because of a positive feedback loop between TPα and TxAS, the effects of glycyrrhizin are possibly attributable to the suppression of the TxA2 pathway. Conclusions: This study provides in vivo evidence to support glycyrrhizin as a potential candidate for developing new regimens to overcome tumor progression and the resistance and toxicity of cisplatin.

  6. Differential Bone Loss in Mouse Models of Colon Cancer Cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetto, Andrea; Kays, Joshua K.; Parker, Valorie A.; Matthews, Ryan R.; Barreto, Rafael; Puppa, Melissa J.; Kang, Kyung S.; Carson, James A.; Guise, Theresa A.; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Robling, Alexander G.; Couch, Marion E.; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2017-01-01

    Cachexia is a distinctive feature of colorectal cancer associated with body weight loss and progressive muscle wasting. Several mechanisms responsible for muscle and fat wasting have been identified, however it is not known whether the physiologic and molecular crosstalk between muscle and bone tissue may also contribute to the cachectic phenotype in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether tumor growth associates with bone loss using several experimental models of colorectal cancer cachexia, namely C26, HT-29, and ApcMin/+. The effects of cachexia on bone structure and strength were evaluated with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), micro computed tomography (μCT), and three-point bending test. We found that all models showed tumor growth consistent with severe cachexia. While muscle wasting in C26 hosts was accompanied by moderate bone depletion, no loss of bone strength was observed. However, HT-29 tumor bearing mice showed bone abnormalities including significant reductions in whole-body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), femoral trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), but no declines in strength. Similarly, cachexia in the ApcMin/+ mice was associated with significant decreases in BMD, BMC, BV/TV, Tb.N, and Tb.Th as well as decreased strength. Our data suggest that colorectal cancer is associated with muscle wasting and may be accompanied by bone loss dependent upon tumor type, burden, stage and duration of the disease. It is clear that preserving muscle mass promotes survival in cancer cachexia. Future studies will determine whether strategies aimed at preventing bone loss can also improve outcomes and survival in colorectal cancer cachexia. PMID:28123369

  7. Mouse Model of Neurological Complications Resulting from Encephalitic Alphavirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, Shannon E.; Smith, Jeanon; Koma, Takaaki; Miller, Magda M.; Yun, Nadezhda; Dineley, Kelly T.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Long-term neurological complications, termed sequelae, can result from viral encephalitis, which are not well understood. In human survivors, alphavirus encephalitis can cause severe neurobehavioral changes, in the most extreme cases, a schizophrenic-like syndrome. In the present study, we aimed to adapt an animal model of alphavirus infection survival to study the development of these long-term neurological complications. Upon low-dose infection of wild-type C57B/6 mice, asymptomatic and symptomatic groups were established and compared to mock-infected mice to measure general health and baseline neurological function, including the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition paradigm. Prepulse inhibition is a robust operational measure of sensorimotor gating, a fundamental form of information processing. Deficits in prepulse inhibition manifest as the inability to filter out extraneous sensory stimuli. Sensory gating is disrupted in schizophrenia and other mental disorders, as well as neurodegenerative diseases. Symptomatic mice developed deficits in prepulse inhibition that lasted through 6 months post infection; these deficits were absent in asymptomatic or mock-infected groups. Accompanying prepulse inhibition deficits, symptomatic animals exhibited thalamus damage as visualized with H&E staining, as well as increased GFAP expression in the posterior complex of the thalamus and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These histological changes and increased GFAP expression were absent in the asymptomatic and mock-infected animals, indicating that glial scarring could have contributed to the prepulse inhibition phenotype observed in the symptomatic animals. This model provides a tool to test mechanisms of and treatments for the neurological sequelae of viral encephalitis and begins to delineate potential explanations for the development of such sequelae post infection.

  8. Antifibrotic effect of pirfenidone in a mouse model of human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Chikara; Tanaka, Miyako; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Shimazu, Noriko; Mori, Kentaro; Furuke, Shunsaku; Miyachi, Yasutaka; Shiba, Kumiko; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Ikeda, Kenji; Ochi, Kozue; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hata, Ken-ichiro; Itoh, Michiko; Suganami, Takayoshi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by steatosis with lobular inflammation and hepatocyte injury. Pirfenidone (PFD) is an orally bioavailable pyridone derivative that has been clinically used for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, it remains unknown whether PFD improves liver fibrosis in a mouse model with human NASH-like phenotypes. In this study, we employed melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient (MC4R-KO) mice as a mouse model with human NASH-like phenotypes to elucidate the effect and action mechanisms of PFD on the development of NASH. PFD markedly attenuated liver fibrosis in western diet (WD)-fed MC4R-KO mice without affecting metabolic profiles or steatosis. PFD prevented liver injury and fibrosis associated with decreased apoptosis of liver cells in WD-fed MC4R-KO mice. Pretreatment of PFD inhibited the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced liver injury and fibrogenic responses associated with decreased apoptosis of liver cells in wild-type mice. PFD also prevented TNF-α-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro with reduced activation of caspase-8 and -3. This study provides evidence for the antifibrotic effect of PFD in a mouse model of human NASH. The data of this study highlight hepatocyte apoptosis as a potential therapeutic target, and suggest that PFD can be repositioned as an antifibrotic drug for human NASH. PMID:28303974

  9. Severe amygdala dysfunction in a MAPT transgenic mouse model of frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Casey; Dunmore, Judy H; Murray, Melissa E; Scheffel, Kristyn; Shukoor, Nawsheen; Tong, Jimei; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Phillips, Virginia; Rousseau, Linda; Penuliar, Michael S; Kurti, Aishe; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard; Fryer, John D

    2014-07-01

    Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy caused by mutations in the tau gene (MAPT). Individuals with FTDP-17 have deficits in learning, memory, and language, in addition to personality and behavioral changes that are often characterized by a lack of social inhibition. Several transgenic mouse models expressing tau mutations have been tested extensively for memory or motor impairments, though reports of amygdala-dependent behaviors are lacking. To this end, we tested the rTg4510 mouse model on a behavioral battery that included amygdala-dependent tasks of exploration. As expected, rTg4510 mice exhibit profound impairments in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory tests, including contextual fear conditioning. However, rTg4510 mice also display an abnormal hyperexploratory phenotype in the open-field assay, elevated plus maze, light-dark exploration, and cued fear conditioning, indicative of amygdala dysfunction. Furthermore, significant tau burden is detected in the amygdala of both rTg4510 mice and human FTDP-17 patients, suggesting that the rTg4510 mouse model recapitulates the behavioral disturbances and neurodegeneration of the amygdala characteristic of FTDP-17. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of mouse model for effective evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo-Yong; Ko, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Choi, Joo-Hyung; You, Su-Hwa; Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Kim, Byounghan; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2016-07-19

    Efficacy evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines has been conducted in target animals such as cows and pigs. In particular, handling FMD virus requires a high level of biosafety management and facilities to contain the virulent viruses. The lack of a laboratory animal model has resulted in inconvenience when it comes to using target animals for vaccine evaluation, bringing about increased cost, time and labor for the experiments. The FMD mouse model has been studied, but most FMD virus (FMDV) strains are not known to cause disease in adult mice. In the present study, we created a series of challenge viruses that are lethal to adult C57BL/6 mice. FMDV types O, A, and Asia1, which are related to frequent FMD outbreaks, were adapted for mice and the pathogenesis of each virus was evaluated in the mouse model. Challenge experiments after vaccination using in-house and commercial vaccines demonstrated vaccine-mediated protection in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we propose that FMD vaccine evaluation should be carried out using mouse-adapted challenge viruses as a swift, effective efficacy test of experimental or commercial vaccines.

  11. Longitudinal in vivo muscle function analysis of the DMSXL mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decostre, Valérie; Vignaud, Alban; Matot, Béatrice; Huguet, Aline; Ledoux, Isabelle; Bertil, Emilie; Gjata, Bernard; Carlier, Pierre G; Gourdon, Geneviève; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2013-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common adult muscle dystrophy. In view of emerging therapies, which use animal models as a proof of principle, the development of reliable outcome measures for in vivo longitudinal study of mouse skeletal muscle function is becoming crucial. To satisfy this need, we have developed a device to measure ankle dorsi- and plantarflexion torque in rodents. We present an in vivo 8-month longitudinal study of the contractile properties of the skeletal muscles of the DMSXL mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1. Between 4 and 12 months of age, we observed a reduction in muscle strength in the ankle dorsi- and plantarflexors of DMSXL compared to control mice although the strength per muscle cross-section was normal. Mild steady myotonia but no abnormal muscle fatigue was also observed in the DMSXL mice. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis performed at the end of the study showed respectively reduced muscle cross-section area and smaller muscle fibre diameter in DMSXL mice. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the feasibility of carrying out longitudinal in vivo studies of muscle function over several months in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy confirming the feasibility of this method to test preclinical therapeutics.

  12. Preclinical Testing of Erlotinib in a Transgenic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma Mouse Model

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    Jinu Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is an aggressive childhood malignancy, accounting for more than 50% of all soft-tissue sarcomas in children. Even with extensive therapy, the survival rate among alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma patients with advanced disease is only 20%. The receptor tyrosine kinase Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR has been found to be expressed and activated in human rhabdomyosarcomas. In this study we have used a genetically engineered mouse model for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS which faithfully recapitulates the human disease by activating the pathognomic Pax3:Fkhr fusion gene and inactivating p53 in the maturing myoblasts. We have demonstrated that tumors from our mouse model of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma express EGFR at both the mRNA and protein levels. We then tested the EGFR inhibitor, Erlotinib, for its efficacy in this mouse model of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Surprisingly, Erlotinib had no effect on tumor progression, yet mice treated with Erlotinib showed 10–20% loss of body weight. These results suggest that EGFR might not be an a priori monotherapy target in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

  13. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  14. Knock-in human FGFR3 achondroplasia mutation as a mouse model for human skeletal dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Ching; Song, I-Wen; Pai, Ya-Ju; Chen, Sheng-De; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2017-01-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common genetic dwarfism in human, is caused by a gain-of function mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Currently, there is no effective treatment for ACH. The development of an appropriate human-relevant model is important for testing potential therapeutic interventions before human clinical trials. Here, we have generated an ACH mouse model in which the endogenous mouse Fgfr3 gene was replaced with human FGFR3G380R (FGFR3ACH) cDNA, the most common mutation in human ACH. Heterozygous (FGFR3ACH/+) and homozygous (FGFR3ACH/ACH) mice expressing human FGFR3G380R recapitulate the phenotypes observed in ACH patients, including growth retardation, disproportionate shortening of the limbs, round head, mid-face hypoplasia at birth, and kyphosis progression during postnatal development. We also observed premature fusion of the cranial sutures and low bone density in newborn FGFR3G380R mice. The severity of the disease phenotypes corresponds to the copy number of activated FGFR3G380R, and the phenotypes become more pronounced during postnatal skeletal development. This mouse model offers a tool for assessing potential therapeutic approaches for skeletal dysplasias related to over-activation of human FGFR3, and for further studies of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:28230213

  15. Early-onset behavioral and synaptic deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, J. Steven; Wu, Chi-Cheng; Redwine, Jeffrey M.; Comery, Thomas A.; Arias, Robert; Bowlby, Mark; Martone, Robert; Morrison, John H.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Reinhart, Peter H.; Bloom, Floyd E.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which numerous mouse models have been generated. In both AD patients and mouse models, there is increasing evidence that neuronal dysfunction occurs before the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ)-containing plaques and neurodegeneration. Characterization of the timing and nature of preplaque dysfunction is important for understanding the progression of this disease and to identify pathways and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Hence, we have examined the progression of dysfunction at the morphological, functional, and behavioral levels in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Our data show that decreased dendritic spine density, impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), and behavioral deficits occurred months before plaque deposition, which was first detectable at 18 months of age. We detected a decrease in spine density in the outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) beginning as early as 4 months of age. Furthermore, by 5 months, there was a decline in LTP in the DG after perforant path stimulation and impairment in contextual fear conditioning. Moreover, an increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio was first observed at these early ages. However, total amyloid levels did not significantly increase until ≈18 months of age, at which time significant increases in reactive astrocytes and microglia could be observed. Overall, these data show that the perforant path input from the entorhinal cortex to the DG is compromised both structurally and functionally, and this pathology is manifested in memory defects long before significant plaque deposition. PMID:16549764

  16. Electroporative transfection with KGF-1 DNA improves wound healing in a diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, G; Ferguson, M; Wang, J; Byrnes, C; Dieb, R; Qaiser, R; Bonde, P; Duncan, M D; Harmon, J W

    2004-12-01

    We recently demonstrated that electroporation enhances transfection in a mouse wound-healing model. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is an inducer of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation and has been shown to be under expressed in the wounds of diabetic individuals. We hypothesized that KGF delivered into an excisional wound via naked DNA injection with subsequent electroporation would be a novel and potentially effective method to enhance wound closure in a diabetic mouse model. ELISA assays confirmed production of KGF protein in cultured mouse cells and RT-PCR assays confirmed KGF mRNA in skin samples taken from mice. In all, 32 genetically diabetic mice were given two identical excisional wounds of their dorsum and split into two groups with one group receiving KGF DNA injection and electroporation with the other group receiving no treatment. Over 90% of wounds healed in the presence of KGF and electroporation versus 40% in the untreated group by day 12. Histological analysis of the wounds demonstrated that untreated wounds contained microulcers with thin or incomplete epithelium with unresolved inflammation as compared to treated wounds where intact and mature epithelium was observed. Taken together these findings suggest that a single injection of KGF DNA encoded on a plasmid coupled with electroporation improves and accelerates wound closure in a delayed wound-healing model.

  17. Requirement for estrogen receptor alpha in a mouse model for human papillomavirus-associated cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Wiedmeyer, Kerri; Shai, Anny; Korach, Kenneth S; Lambert, Paul F

    2008-12-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV), which encode the potent E6 and E7 oncogenes. On prolonged treatment with physiologic levels of exogenous estrogen, K14E7 transgenic mice expressing HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein in their squamous epithelia succumb to uterine cervical cancer. Furthermore, prolonged withdrawal of exogenous estrogen results in complete or partial regression of tumors in this mouse model. In the current study, we investigated whether estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) is required for the development of cervical cancer in K14E7 transgenic mice. We show that exogenous estrogen fails to promote either dysplasia or cervical cancer in K14E7/ERalpha-/- mice despite the continued presence of the presumed cervical cancer precursor cell type, reserve cells, and evidence for E7 expression therein. We also observed that cervical cancers in our mouse models are strictly associated with atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM), which is believed to be the precursor for cervical cancer in women. Consistently, E7 and exogenous estrogen failed to promote ASM in the absence of ERalpha. We conclude that ERalpha plays a crucial role at an early stage of cervical carcinogenesis in this mouse model.

  18. Generation of a tightly regulated doxycycline-inducible model for studying mouse intestinal biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sabrina; Franken, Patrick; van Veelen, Wendy; Blonden, Lau; Raghoebir, Lalini; Beverloo, Berna; van Drunen, Ellen; Kuipers, Ernst J; Rottier, Robbert; Fodde, Riccardo; Smits, Ron

    2009-01-01

    To develop a sensitive and inducible system to study intestinal biology, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing the reverse tetracycline transactivator rtTA2-M2 under control of the 12.4 kb murine Villin promoter. The newly generated Villin-rtTA2-M2 mice were then bred with the previously developed tetO-HIST1H2BJ/GFP model to assess inducibility and tissue-specificity. Expression of the histone H2B-GFP fusion protein was observed exclusively upon doxycycline induction and was uniformly distributed throughout the intestinal epithelium. The Villin-rtTA2-M2 was also found to drive transgene expression in the developing mouse intestine. Furthermore, we could detect transgene expression in the proximal tubules of the kidney and in a population of alleged gastric progenitor cells. By administering different concentrations of doxycycline, we show that the Villin-rtTA2-M2 system drives transgene expression in a dosage-dependent fashion. Thus, we have generated a novel doxycycline-inducible mouse model, providing a valuable tool to study the effect of different gene dosages on intestinal physiology and pathology.

  19. Vulnerable Plaque Detection and Quantification with Gold Particle–Enhanced Computed Tomography in Atherosclerotic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David De Wilde

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an apolipoprotein E–deficient (ApoE−/− mouse model with a mutation (C1039G+/− in the fibrillin-1 (Fbn1 gene (ApoE−/−Fbn1C1039G+/− mouse model was developed showing vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, prone to rupture, in contrast to the ApoE−/− mouse model, where mainly stable plaques are present. One indicator of plaque vulnerability is the level of macrophage infiltration. Therefore, this study aimed to measure and quantify in vivo the macrophage infiltration related to plaque development and progression. For this purpose, 5-weekly consecutive gold nanoparticle–enhanced micro–computed tomography (microCT scans were acquired. Histology confirmed that the presence of contrast agent coincided with the presence of macrophages. Based on the microCT scans, regions of the artery wall with contrast agent present were calculated and visualized in three dimensions. From this information, the contrast-enhanced area and contrast-enhanced centerline length were calculated for the branches of the carotid bifurcation (common, external, and internal carotid arteries. Statistical analysis showed a more rapid development and a larger extent of plaques in the ApoE−/−Fbn1C1039G+/− compared to the ApoE−/− mice. Regional differences between the branches were also observable and quantifiable. We developed and applied a methodology based on gold particle–enhanced microCT to visualize the presence of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo.

  20. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  1. Glyburide reduces bacterial dissemination in a mouse model of melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C K W Koh

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei infection (melioidosis is an important cause of community-acquired Gram-negative sepsis in Northeast Thailand, where it is associated with a ~40% mortality rate despite antimicrobial chemotherapy. We showed in a previous cohort study that patients taking glyburide ( = glibenclamide prior to admission have lower mortality and attenuated inflammatory responses compared to patients not taking glyburide. We sought to define the mechanism underlying this observation in a murine model of melioidosis.Mice (C57BL/6 with streptozocin-induced diabetes were inoculated with ~6 × 10(2 cfu B. pseudomallei intranasally, then treated with therapeutic ceftazidime (600 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice daily starting 24 h after inoculation in order to mimic the clinical scenario. Glyburide (50 mg/kg or vehicle was started 7 d before inoculation and continued until sacrifice. The minimum inhibitory concentration of glyburide for B. pseudomallei was determined by broth microdilution. We also examined the effect of glyburide on interleukin (IL 1β by bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM.Diabetic mice had increased susceptibility to melioidosis, with increased bacterial dissemination but no effect was seen of diabetes on inflammation compared to non-diabetic controls. Glyburide treatment did not affect glucose levels but was associated with reduced pulmonary cellular influx, reduced bacterial dissemination to both liver and spleen and reduced IL1β production when compared to untreated controls. Other cytokines were not different in glyburide-treated animals. There was no direct effect of glyburide on B. pseudomallei growth in vitro or in vivo. Glyburide directly reduced the secretion of IL1β by BMDMs in a dose-dependent fashion.Diabetes increases the susceptibility to melioidosis. We further show, for the first time in any model of sepsis, that glyburide acts as an anti-inflammatory agent by reducing IL1β secretion accompanied by diminished

  2. Gluten ataxia: passive transfer in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscolo, Sabrina; Sarich, Alessandra; Lorenzon, Andrea; Passoni, Monica; Rui, Veronica; Stebel, Marco; Sblattero, Daniele; Marzari, Roberto; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2007-06-01

    Gluten sensitivity is an autoimmune disease that usually causes intestinal atrophy resulting in a malabsorption syndrome known as celiac disease. However, gluten sensitivity may involve several organs and is often associated with extraintestinal manifestations. Typically, patients with celiac disease have circulating anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-gliadin antibodies. When patients with gluten sensitivity are affected by other autoimmune diseases, other autoantibodies may arise like anti-epidermal transglutaminase in dermatitis herpetiformis, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies in thyroiditis, and anti-islet cells antibodies in type 1 diabetes. The most common neurological manifestation of gluten sensitivity is ataxia, the so-called gluten ataxia (GA). In patients with GA we have demonstrated that anti-gliadin and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies cross-react with neurons but that additional anti-neural antibodies are present. The aim of the present article is to review the knowledge on animal models of gluten sensitivity, as well as reviewing the role of anti-neural antibodies in GA.

  3. Targeting FGFR4 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma in preclinical mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dorothy M; Lin, Benjamin C; Wang, Manping; Adams, Camellia; Shek, Theresa; Hötzel, Kathy; Bolon, Brad; Ferrando, Ronald; Blackmore, Craig; Schroeder, Kurt; Rodriguez, Luis A; Hristopoulos, Maria; Venook, Rayna; Ashkenazi, Avi; Desnoyers, Luc R

    2012-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling system plays critical roles in a variety of normal developmental and physiological processes. It is also well documented that dysregulation of FGF-FGFR signaling may have important roles in tumor development and progression. The FGFR4-FGF19 signaling axis has been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) in mice, and potentially in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that FGFR4 is required for hepatocarcinogenesis; the progeny of FGF19 transgenic mice, which have previously been shown to develop HCCs, bred with FGFR4 knockout mice fail to develop liver tumors. To further test the importance of FGFR4 in HCC, we developed a blocking anti-FGFR4 monoclonal antibody (LD1). LD1 inhibited: 1) FGF1 and FGF19 binding to FGFR4, 2) FGFR4-mediated signaling, colony formation, and proliferation in vitro, and 3) tumor growth in a preclinical model of liver cancer in vivo. Finally, we show that FGFR4 expression is elevated in several types of cancer, including liver cancer, as compared to normal tissues. These findings suggest a modulatory role for FGFR4 in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma and that FGFR4 may be an important and novel therapeutic target in treating this disease.

  4. Mouse model of sublethal and lethal intraperitoneal glanders (Burkholderia mallei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, D L; Vogel, P; Brown, D R; Deshazer, D; Waag, D M

    2000-11-01

    Sixty male BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with either a sublethal or a lethal dose of Burkholderia mallei China 7 strain, then killed at multiple time points postinoculation. Histopathologic changes were qualitatively similar in both groups and consisted of pyogranulomatous inflammation. In sublethal study mice, changes were first seen at 6 hours in mediastinal lymph nodes, then in spleen, liver, peripheral lymph nodes, and bone marrow at day 3. These changes generally reached maximal incidence and severity by day 4 but decreased by comparison in all tissues except the liver. Changes were first seen in lethal study mice also at 6 hours in mediastinal lymph nodes and in spleens. At day 1, changes were present in liver, peripheral lymph nodes, and bone marrow. The incidence and severity of these changes were maximal at day 2. In contrast to sublethal study mice, the incidence and severity of the changes did not decrease through the remainder of the study. The most significant difference between the two groups was the rapid involvement of the spleen in the lethal study mice. Changes indicative of impaired vascular perfusion were more frequently seen in the sublethal study mice. Our findings indicate that mice are susceptible to B. mallei infection and may serve as an appropriate model for glanders infection in a resistant host such as human beings. Additionally, by immunoelectron microscopy, we showed the presence of type I O-antigenic polysaccharide (capsular) antigen surrounding B. mallei.

  5. Mouse models for preeclampsia: disruption of redox-regulated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chambers Anne E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The concept that oxidative stress contributes to the development of human preeclampsia has never been tested in genetically-defined animal models. Homozygous deletion of catechol-O-methyl transferase (Comt-/- in pregnant mice leads to human preeclampsia-like symptoms (high blood pressure, albuminurea and preterm birth resulting from extensive vasculo-endothelial pathology, primarily at the utero-fetal interface where maternal cardiac output is dramatically increased during pregnancy. Comt converts estradiol to 2-methoxyestradiol 2 (2ME2 which counters angiogenesis by depleting hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha at late pregnancy. We propose that in wild type (Comt++ pregnant mice, 2ME2 destabilizes HIF-1 alpha by inhibiting mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD. Thus, 2ME2 acts as a pro-oxidant, disrupting redox-regulated signaling which blocks angiogenesis in wild type (WT animals in physiological pregnancy. Further, we suggest that a lack of this inhibition under normoxic conditions in mutant animals (Comt-/- stabilises HIF-1 alpha by inactivating prolyl hydroxlases (PHD. We predict that a lack of inhibition of MnSOD, leading to persistent accumulation of HIF-1 alpha, would trigger inflammatory infiltration and endothelial damage in mutant animals. Critical tests of this hypothesis would be to recreate preeclampsia symptoms by inducing oxidative stress in WT animals or to ameliorate by treating mutant mice with Mn-SOD-catalase mimetics or activators of PHD.

  6. Targeting FGFR4 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma in preclinical mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy M French

    Full Text Available The fibroblast growth factor (FGF-FGF receptor (FGFR signaling system plays critical roles in a variety of normal developmental and physiological processes. It is also well documented that dysregulation of FGF-FGFR signaling may have important roles in tumor development and progression. The FGFR4-FGF19 signaling axis has been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs in mice, and potentially in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that FGFR4 is required for hepatocarcinogenesis; the progeny of FGF19 transgenic mice, which have previously been shown to develop HCCs, bred with FGFR4 knockout mice fail to develop liver tumors. To further test the importance of FGFR4 in HCC, we developed a blocking anti-FGFR4 monoclonal antibody (LD1. LD1 inhibited: 1 FGF1 and FGF19 binding to FGFR4, 2 FGFR4-mediated signaling, colony formation, and proliferation in vitro, and 3 tumor growth in a preclinical model of liver cancer in vivo. Finally, we show that FGFR4 expression is elevated in several types of cancer, including liver cancer, as compared to normal tissues. These findings suggest a modulatory role for FGFR4 in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma and that FGFR4 may be an important and novel therapeutic target in treating this disease.

  7. Inducible mouse models illuminate parameters influencing epigenetic inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mimi; Gu, Honggang; Wang, Jingxue; Huang, Haichang; Zhao, Jiugang; Kaundal, Ravinder K; Yu, Ming; Kushwaha, Ritu; Chaiyachati, Barbara H; Deerhake, Elizabeth; Chi, Tian

    2013-02-01

    Environmental factors can stably perturb the epigenome of exposed individuals and even that of their offspring, but the pleiotropic effects of these factors have posed a challenge for understanding the determinants of mitotic or transgenerational inheritance of the epigenetic perturbation. To tackle this problem, we manipulated the epigenetic states of various target genes using a tetracycline-dependent transcription factor. Remarkably, transient manipulation at appropriate times during embryogenesis led to aberrant epigenetic modifications in the ensuing adults regardless of the modification patterns, target gene sequences or locations, and despite lineage-specific epigenetic programming that could reverse the epigenetic perturbation, thus revealing extraordinary malleability of the fetal epigenome, which has implications for 'metastable epialleles'. However, strong transgenerational inheritance of these perturbations was observed only at transgenes integrated at the Col1a1 locus, where both activating and repressive chromatin modifications were heritable for multiple generations; such a locus is unprecedented. Thus, in our inducible animal models, mitotic inheritance of epigenetic perturbation seems critically dependent on the timing of the perturbation, whereas transgenerational inheritance additionally depends on the location of the perturbation. In contrast, other parameters examined, particularly the chromatin modification pattern and DNA sequence, appear irrelevant.

  8. Characterization of a Mouse Model of Oral Potassium Cyanide Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Patrick J; Kobs, Christina L; Gibbs, Seth T; Hong, Peter; Matthews, Claire M; Patton, Kristen M; Sabourin, Carol L; Wakayama, Edgar J

    2016-09-01

    Potassium cyanide (KCN) is an inhibitor of cytochrome C oxidase causing rapid death due to hypoxia. A well-characterized model of oral KCN intoxication is needed to test new therapeutics under the Food and Drug Administration Animal Rule. Clinical signs, plasma pH and lactate concentrations, biomarkers, histopathology, and cyanide and thiocyanate toxicokinetics were used to characterize the pathology of KCN intoxication in adult and juvenile mice. The acute oral LD50s were determined to be 11.8, 11.0, 10.9, and 9.9 mg/kg in water for adult male, adult female, juvenile male, and juvenile female mice, respectively. The time to death was rapid and dose dependent; juvenile mice had a shorter mean time to death. Juvenile mice displayed a more rapid onset and higher incidence of seizures. The time to observance of respiratory signs and prostration was rapid, but mice surviving beyond 2 hours generally recovered fully within 8 hours. At doses up to the LD50, there were no gross necropsy or microscopic findings clearly attributed to administration of KCN in juvenile or adult CD-1 mice from 24 hours to 28 days post-KCN challenge. Toxicokinetic analysis indicated rapid uptake, metabolism, and clearance of plasma cyanide. Potassium cyanide caused a rapid, dose-related decrease in blood pH and increase in serum lactate concentration. An increase in fatty acid-binding protein 3 was observed at 11.5 mg/kg KCN in adult but not in juvenile mice. These studies provide a characterization of KCN intoxication in adult and juvenile mice that can be used to screen or conduct preclinical efficacy studies of potential countermeasures.

  9. Behavioral and neurochemical characterization of new mouse model of hyperphenylalaninemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Pascucci

    Full Text Available Hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA refers to all clinical conditions characterized by increased amounts of phenylalanine (PHE in blood and other tissues. According to their blood PHE concentrations under a free diet, hyperphenylalaninemic patients are commonly classified into phenotypic subtypes: classical phenylketonuria (PKU (PHE > 1200 µM/L, mild PKU (PHE 600-1200 µM/L and persistent HPA (PHE 120-600 µM/L (normal blood PHE < 120 µM/L. The current treatment for hyperphenylalaninemic patients is aimed to keep blood PHE levels within the safe range of 120-360 µM/L through a PHE-restricted diet, difficult to achieve. If untreated, classical PKU presents variable neurological and mental impairment. However, even mildly elevated blood PHE levels, due to a bad compliance to dietary treatment, produce cognitive deficits involving the prefrontal cortical areas, extremely sensible to PHE-induced disturbances. The development of animal models of different degrees of HPA is a useful tool for identifying the metabolic mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits induced by PHE. In this paper we analyzed the behavioral and biochemical phenotypes of different forms of HPA (control, mild-HPA, mild-PKU and classic-PKU, developed on the base of plasma PHE concentrations. Our results demonstrated that mice with different forms of HPA present different phenotypes, characterized by increasing severity of behavioral symptoms and brain aminergic deficits moving from mild HPA to classical PKU forms. In addition, our data identify preFrontal cortex and amygdala as the most affected brain areas and confirm the highest susceptibility of brain serotonin metabolism to mildly elevated blood PHE.

  10. Increased susceptibility to cortical spreading depression in the mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Leo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2 is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura that is caused by mutations of the α2-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, an isoform almost exclusively expressed in astrocytes in the adult brain. We generated the first FHM2 knock-in mouse model carrying the human W887R mutation in the Atp1a2 orthologous gene. Homozygous Atp1a2(R887/R887 mutants died just after birth, while heterozygous Atp1a2(+/R887 mice showed no apparent clinical phenotype. The mutant α2 Na,K-ATPase protein was barely detectable in the brain of homozygous mutants and strongly reduced in the brain of heterozygous mutants, likely as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum retention and subsequent proteasomal degradation, as we demonstrate in transfected cells. In vivo analysis of cortical spreading depression (CSD, the phenomenon underlying migraine aura, revealed a decreased induction threshold and an increased velocity of propagation in the heterozygous FHM2 mouse. Since several lines of evidence involve a specific role of the glial α2 Na,K pump in active reuptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft, we hypothesize that CSD facilitation in the FHM2 mouse model is sustained by inefficient glutamate clearance by astrocytes and consequent increased cortical excitatory neurotransmission. The demonstration that FHM2 and FHM1 mutations share the ability to facilitate induction and propagation of CSD in mouse models further support the role of CSD as a key migraine trigger.

  11. Normal social seeking behavior, hypoactivity and reduced exploratory range in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Lawrence T

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angelman syndrome (AS is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by severe developmental delay with mental retardation, a generally happy disposition, ataxia and characteristic behaviors such as inappropriate laughter, social-seeking behavior and hyperactivity. The majority of AS cases are due to loss of the maternal copy of the UBE3A gene. Maternal Ube3a deficiency (Ube3am-/p+, as well as complete loss of Ube3a expression (Ube3am-/p-, have been reproduced in the mouse model used here. Results Here we asked if two characteristic AS phenotypes - social-seeking behavior and hyperactivity - are reproduced in the Ube3a deficient mouse model of AS. We quantified social-seeking behavior as time spent in close proximity to a stranger mouse and activity as total time spent moving during exploration, movement speed and total length of the exploratory path. Mice of all three genotypes (Ube3am+/p+, Ube3am-/p+, Ube3am-/p- were tested and found to spend the same amount of time in close proximity to the stranger, indicating that Ube3a deficiency in mice does not result in increased social seeking behavior or social dis-inhibition. Also, Ube3a deficient mice were hypoactive compared to their wild-type littermates as shown by significantly lower levels of activity, slower movement velocities, shorter exploratory paths and a reduced exploratory range. Conclusions Although hyperactivity and social-seeking behavior are characteristic phenotypes of Angelman Syndrome in humans, the Ube3a deficient mouse model does not reproduce these phenotypes in comparison to their wild-type littermates. These phenotypic differences may be explained by differences in the size of the genetic defect as ~70% of AS patients have a deletion that includes several other genes surrounding the UBE3A locus.

  12. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    parameters. Taken together, this typically catabolic treatment (disuse and irradiation) appeared to stimulate cortical expansion in MCAT mice but not WT mice. In conclusion, these results reveal the importance of mitochondrial ROS generation in skeletal remodeling and show that MCAT mice provide a useful animal model for bone studies.

  13. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  14. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  15. Synthetic tau fibrils mediate transmission of neurofibrillary tangles in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's-like tauopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iba, Michiyo; Guo, Jing L; McBride, Jennifer D; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2013-01-01

    ...) comprising filamentous tau protein. Although emerging evidence suggests that tau pathology may be transmitted, we demonstrate here that synthetic tau fibrils are sufficient to transmit tau inclusions in a mouse model...

  16. Myocardial contrast echocardiography to assess perfusion in a mouse model of ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, John A.; Li, Yinbo; Christensen, Jonathan P.; Yang, Zequan; French, Brent A.

    2004-04-01

    Noninvasive approaches for measuring anatomical and physiological changes resulting from myocardial ischemia / reperfusion injury in the mouse heart have significant value since the mouse provides a practical, low-cost model for modeling human heart disease. In this work, perfusion was assessed before, during and after an induced closed- chest, coronary ischemic event. Ultrasound contrast agent, similar to MP1950, in a saline suspension, was injected via cannulated carotid artery as a bolus and imaged using a Siemens Sequoia 512 scanner and a 15L8 intraoperative transducer operating in second harmonic imaging mode. Image sequences were transferred from the scanner to a PC for analysis. Regions of interest were defined in septal and anterior segments of the myocardium. During the ischemic event, when perfusion was diminished in the anterior segment, mean video intensity in the affected segment was reduced by one half. Furthermore, following reperfusion, hyperemia (enhanced blood flow) was observed in the anterior segment. Specifically, the mean video intensity in the affected segment was increased by approximately 50% over the original baseline level prior to ischemia. Following the approach of Kaul et al., [1], gamma variate curves were fitted to the time varying level of mean video intensity. This foundation suggests the possibility of quantifying myocardial blood flow in ischemic regions of a mouse heart using automated analysis of contrast image data sets. An improved approach to perfusion assessment using the destruction-reperfusion approach [2] is also presented.

  17. Enhanced fear expression in a psychopathological mouse model of trait anxiety: pharmacological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Simone B; Hauschild, Markus; Bunck, Mirjam; Gaburro, Stefano; Landgraf, Rainer; Singewald, Nicolas

    2011-02-28

    The propensity to develop an anxiety disorder is thought to be determined by genetic and environmental factors. Here we investigated the relationship between a genetic predisposition to trait anxiety and experience-based learned fear in a psychopathological mouse model. Male CD-1 mice selectively bred for either high (HAB), or normal (NAB) anxiety-related behaviour on the elevated plus maze were subjected to classical fear conditioning. During conditioning both mouse lines showed increased fear responses as assessed by freezing behaviour. However, 24 h later, HAB mice displayed more pronounced conditioned responses to both a contextual or cued stimulus when compared with NAB mice. Interestingly, 6 h and already 1 h after fear conditioning, freezing levels were high in HAB mice but not in NAB mice. These results suggest that trait anxiety determines stronger fear memory and/or a weaker ability to inhibit fear responses in the HAB line. The enhanced fear response of HAB mice was attenuated by treatment with either the α(2,3,5)-subunit selective benzodiazepine partial agonist L-838,417, corticosterone or the selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist L-822,429. Overall, the HAB mouse line may represent an interesting model (i) for identifying biological factors underlying misguided conditioned fear responses and (ii) for studying novel anxiolytic pharmacotherapies for patients with fear-associated disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias.

  18. Sex Differences in Circadian Dysfunction in the BACHD Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dika A Kuljis

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects men and women in equal numbers, but some epidemiological studies indicate there may be sex differences in disease progression. One of the early symptoms of HD is disruptions in the circadian timing system, but it is currently unknown whether sex is a factor in these alterations. Since sex differences in HD could provide important insights to understand cellular and molecular mechanism(s and designing early intervention strategies, we used the bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (BACHD to examine whether sex differences in circadian behavioral rhythms are detectable in an animal model of the disease. Similar to BACHD males, BACHD females display circadian disruptions at both 3 and 6 months of age; however, deficits to BACHD female mouse activity levels, rhythm precision, and behavioral fragmentation are either delayed or less severe relative to males. These sex differences are associated with a smaller suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN in BACHD male mice at age of symptom onset (3 months, but are not associated with sex-specific differences in SCN daytime electrical activity deficits, or peptide expression (arginine vasopressin, vasoactive intestinal peptide within the SCN. Notably, BACHD females exhibited delayed motor coordination deficits, as measured using rotarod and challenge beam. These findings suggest a sex specific factor plays a role both in non-motor and motor symptom progression for the BACHD mouse.

  19. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fransén-Pettersson

    Full Text Available Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders.

  20. Toxicogenetics: population-based testing of drug and chemical safety in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Gatti, Daniel M; Wiltshire, Timothy; Wilshire, Timothy; Kleeberger, Steven R; Threadgill, David W

    2010-08-01

    The rapid decline in the cost of dense genotyping is paving the way for new DNA sequence-based laboratory tests to move quickly into clinical practice, and to ultimately help realize the promise of 'personalized' therapies. These advances are based on the growing appreciation of genetics as an important dimension in science and the practice of investigative pharmacology and toxicology. On the clinical side, both the regulators and the pharmaceutical industry hope that the early identification of individuals prone to adverse drug effects will keep advantageous medicines on the market for the benefit of the vast majority of prospective patients. On the environmental health protection side, there is a clear need for better science to define the range and causes of susceptibility to adverse effects of chemicals in the population, so that the appropriate regulatory limits are established. In both cases, most of the research effort is focused on genome-wide association studies in humans where de novo genotyping of each subject is required. At the same time, the power of population-based preclinical safety testing in rodent models (e.g., mouse) remains to be fully exploited. Here, we highlight the approaches available to utilize the knowledge of DNA sequence and genetic diversity of the mouse as a species in mechanistic toxicology research. We posit that appropriate genetically defined mouse models may be combined with the limited data from human studies to not only discover the genetic determinants of susceptibility, but to also understand the molecular underpinnings of toxicity.

  1. AAV-mediated cone rescue in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3-achromatopsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-jing Pang

    Full Text Available Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3 are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia.

  2. Synaptic Vesicle Recycling Is Unaffected in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marland, Jamie R K; Smillie, Karen J; Cousin, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, and arises from trisomy of human chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence from studies of both DS patient tissue and mouse models has suggested that synaptic dysfunction is a key factor in the disorder. The presence of several genes within the DS trisomy that are either directly or indirectly linked to synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis suggested that presynaptic dysfunction could underlie some of these synaptic defects. Therefore we determined whether SV recycling was altered in neurons from the Ts65Dn mouse, the best characterised model of DS to date. We found that SV exocytosis, the size of the SV recycling pool, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, activity-dependent bulk endocytosis and SV generation from bulk endosomes were all unaffected by the presence of the Ts65Dn trisomy. These results were obtained using battery of complementary assays employing genetically-encoded fluorescent reporters of SV cargo trafficking, and fluorescent and morphological assays of fluid-phase uptake in primary neuronal culture. The absence of presynaptic dysfunction in central nerve terminals of the Ts65Dn mouse suggests that future research should focus on the established alterations in excitatory / inhibitory balance as a potential route for future pharmacotherapy.

  3. Synaptic Vesicle Recycling Is Unaffected in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie R K Marland

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, and arises from trisomy of human chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence from studies of both DS patient tissue and mouse models has suggested that synaptic dysfunction is a key factor in the disorder. The presence of several genes within the DS trisomy that are either directly or indirectly linked to synaptic vesicle (SV endocytosis suggested that presynaptic dysfunction could underlie some of these synaptic defects. Therefore we determined whether SV recycling was altered in neurons from the Ts65Dn mouse, the best characterised model of DS to date. We found that SV exocytosis, the size of the SV recycling pool, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, activity-dependent bulk endocytosis and SV generation from bulk endosomes were all unaffected by the presence of the Ts65Dn trisomy. These results were obtained using battery of complementary assays employing genetically-encoded fluorescent reporters of SV cargo trafficking, and fluorescent and morphological assays of fluid-phase uptake in primary neuronal culture. The absence of presynaptic dysfunction in central nerve terminals of the Ts65Dn mouse suggests that future research should focus on the established alterations in excitatory / inhibitory balance as a potential route for future pharmacotherapy.

  4. Curly tail: a 50 year history of the mouse spina bifida model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, Henny W.M.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This paper reviews 50 years of progress towards understanding the aetiology and pathogenesis of neural tube defects (NTD) in the curly tail (ct) mutant mouse. More than 45 papers have been published on various aspects of curly tail with the result that it is now the best understood mouse model of NTD pathogenesis. The failure of closure of the spinal neural tube, which leads to spina bifida in this mouse, has been traced back to a tissue-specific defect of cell proliferation in the tail bud of the E9.5 embryo. This cell proliferation defect results in a growth imbalance in the caudal region that generates ventral curvature of the body axis. Neurulation movements are opposed, leading to delayed neuropore closure and spina bifida, or tail defects. It is interesting to reflect that these advances have been achieved in the absence of information on the nature of the ct gene product, which remains unidentified. In addition to the principal ct gene, which maps to distal Chromosome 4, the curly tail phenotype is influenced by several modifier genes and by environmental factors. NTD in curly tail are resistant to folic acid, but can be prevented by myo-inositol. These and other features of NTD in this system bear striking similarities to the situation in humans, making curly tail a model for understanding a sub-type of human NTD. PMID:11396850

  5. In vitro mouse model in Duchenne muscular dystrophy diagnosis using 50-MHz ultrasound waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, D; Blasco, H; Ferrandis, J Y; Hugon, G; Despaux, G; Leydier, A; Mornet, D

    2010-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the absence of dystrophin, the protein that plays a key mechanical role in maintaining muscle membrane integrity. One of the major consequences of dystrophin deficiency is the degeneration of muscle fibres, with a progressive loss in muscle strength. The objective of this research was to find an ultrasonic parameter sensitive to DMD, which could give relevant information related to microstructure if compared to traditional investigations such as morphometrical analysis. This "in vitro" study focused on the Mdx mouse model and investigated the potential differences between wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mice diaphragms. Using a 50MHz ultrasonic sensor built in our group, we recorded an increase in ultrasonic wave attenuation in the dystrophin-deficient samples in comparison with normal muscles. A correlation between attenuation, mouse age and the percentage of non-muscular proportion in muscle was observed. As Mdx mouse is the best animal model for DMD and reproduces the degenerative pattern observed in human DMD muscles, this approach could be a powerful tool for in vitro DMD investigation and, more generally, for the characterisation of muscle properties. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced fear expression in a psychopathological mouse model of trait anxiety: pharmacological interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone B Sartori

    Full Text Available The propensity to develop an anxiety disorder is thought to be determined by genetic and environmental factors. Here we investigated the relationship between a genetic predisposition to trait anxiety and experience-based learned fear in a psychopathological mouse model. Male CD-1 mice selectively bred for either high (HAB, or normal (NAB anxiety-related behaviour on the elevated plus maze were subjected to classical fear conditioning. During conditioning both mouse lines showed increased fear responses as assessed by freezing behaviour. However, 24 h later, HAB mice displayed more pronounced conditioned responses to both a contextual or cued stimulus when compared with NAB mice. Interestingly, 6 h and already 1 h after fear conditioning, freezing levels were high in HAB mice but not in NAB mice. These results suggest that trait anxiety determines stronger fear memory and/or a weaker ability to inhibit fear responses in the HAB line. The enhanced fear response of HAB mice was attenuated by treatment with either the α(2,3,5-subunit selective benzodiazepine partial agonist L-838,417, corticosterone or the selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist L-822,429. Overall, the HAB mouse line may represent an interesting model (i for identifying biological factors underlying misguided conditioned fear responses and (ii for studying novel anxiolytic pharmacotherapies for patients with fear-associated disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias.

  7. AAV-mediated cone rescue in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3-achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Ji-jing; Deng, Wen-Tao; Dai, Xufeng; Lei, Bo; Everhart, Drew; Umino, Yumiko; Li, Jie; Zhang, Keqing; Mao, Song; Boye, Sanford L; Liu, Li; Chiodo, Vince A; Liu, Xuan; Shi, Wei; Tao, Ye; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3) are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia.

  8. TDP-43 expression in mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansorge Olaf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Redistribution of nuclear TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43 to the cytoplasm and ubiquitinated inclusions of spinal motor neurons and glial cells is characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS pathology. Recent evidence suggests that TDP-43 pathology is common to sporadic ALS and familial ALS without SOD1 mutation, but not SOD1-related fALS cases. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether TDP-43 abnormalities occur in non-ALS forms of motor neuron disease. Here, we characterise TDP-43 localisation, expression levels and post-translational modifications in mouse models of ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Results TDP-43 mislocalisation to ubiquitinated inclusions or cytoplasm was notably lacking in anterior horn cells from transgenic mutant SOD1G93A mice. In addition, abnormally phosphorylated or truncated TDP-43 species were not detected in fractionated ALS mouse spinal cord or brain. Despite partial colocalisation of TDP-43 with SMN, depletion of SMN- and coilin-positive Cajal bodies in motor neurons of affected SMA mice did not alter nuclear TDP-43 distribution, expression or biochemistry in spinal cords. Conclusion These results emphasise that TDP-43 pathology characteristic of human sporadic ALS is not a core component of the neurodegenerative mechanisms caused by SOD1 mutation or SMN deficiency in mouse models of ALS and SMA, respectively.

  9. A novel SCID mouse model for studying spontaneous metastasis of human lung cancer to human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Seyama, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-05-01

    We established a novel severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for the study of human lung cancer metastasis to human lung. Implantation of both human fetal and adult lung tissue into mammary fat pads of SCID mice showed a 100% rate of engraftment, but only fetal lung implants revealed normal morphology of human lung tissue. Using these chimeric mice, we analyzed human lung cancer metastasis to both mouse and human lungs by subcutaneous inoculation of human squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell lines into the mice. In 60 to 70% of SCID mice injected with human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma, RERF-LC-AI, cancer cells were found to have metastasized to both mouse lungs and human fetal lung implants but not to human adult lung implants 80 days after cancer inoculation. Furthermore, human-lung adenocarcinoma cells, RERF-LC-KJ, metastasized to the human lung implants within 90 days in about 40% of SCID mice, whereas there were no metastases to the lungs of the mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this model for the in vivo study of human lung cancer metastasis.

  10. Quantitative 3D investigation of Neuronal network in mouse spinal cord model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukreeva, I.; Campi, G.; Fratini, M.; Spanò, R.; Bucci, D.; Battaglia, G.; Giove, F.; Bravin, A.; Uccelli, A.; Venturi, C.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Cedola, A.

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the neuronal network in mouse spinal cord models represents the basis for the research on neurodegenerative diseases. In this framework, the quantitative analysis of the single elements in different districts is a crucial task. However, conventional 3D imaging techniques do not have enough spatial resolution and contrast to allow for a quantitative investigation of the neuronal network. Exploiting the high coherence and the high flux of synchrotron sources, X-ray Phase-Contrast multiscale-Tomography allows for the 3D investigation of the neuronal microanatomy without any aggressive sample preparation or sectioning. We investigated healthy-mouse neuronal architecture by imaging the 3D distribution of the neuronal-network with a spatial resolution of 640 nm. The high quality of the obtained images enables a quantitative study of the neuronal structure on a subject-by-subject basis. We developed and applied a spatial statistical analysis on the motor neurons to obtain quantitative information on their 3D arrangement in the healthy-mice spinal cord. Then, we compared the obtained results with a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Our approach paves the way to the creation of a “database” for the characterization of the neuronal network main features for a comparative investigation of neurodegenerative diseases and therapies.

  11. Analgesic effects of lappaconitine in leukemia bone pain in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Cui Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone pain is a common and severe symptom in cancer patients. The present study employed a mouse model of leukemia bone pain by injection K562 cells into tibia of mouse to evaluate the analgesic effects of lappacontine. Our results showed that the lappaconitine treatment at day 15, 17 and 19 could effectively reduce the spontaneous pain scoring values, restore reduced degree in the inclined-plate test induced by injection of K562 cells, as well as restore paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency induced by injection of K562 cells to the normal levels. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of lappaconitine’s analgesic effects may be related to affect the expression levels of endogenous opioid system genes (POMC, PENK and MOR, as well as apoptosis-related genes (Xiap, Smac, Bim, NF-κB and p53. Our present results indicated that lappaconitine may become a new analgesic agent for leukemia bone pain management.

  12. Phenotypic and pathologic evaluation of the myd mouse. A candidate model for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, K.D.; Rapisarda, D.; Bailey, H.L. [Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown pathogenesis which is characterized by weakness of the face and shoulder girdle. It is associated with a sensorineural hearing loss which may be subclinical. FSHD has been mapped to the distalmost portion of 4q35, although the gene has not yet been identified. Distal 4q has homology with a region of mouse chromosome 8 to which a mouse mutant, myodystrophy (myd), has been mapped. Muscle from homozygotes for the myd mutation appears dystrophic, showing degenerating and regenerating fibers, inflammatory infiltrates, central nuclei, and variation in fiber size. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials reveal a sensorineural hearing loss in myd homozygotes. Based on the homologous genetic map locations, and the phenotypic syndrome of dystrophic muscle with sensorineural hearing loss, we suggest that myd represents an animal model for the human disease FSHD. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Effects of repetitive exposure to anesthetics and analgesics in the Tg2576 mouse Alzheimer's model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Carolina; Chaparro, Rafael E; Karlnoski, Rachel; Erasso, Diana; Gordon, Marcia; Morgan, David; Bosco, Gerardo; Rubini, Alessandro; Parmagnani, Andrea; Paoli, Antonio; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2014-11-01

    The use of anesthetics and sedatives has been suggested to be a contributor to Alzheimer's disease neuropathogenesis. We wanted to address the in vivo relevance of those substances in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's mouse model. Tg7526 mice were anesthesia-sedated for 90 min once a week for 4 weeks. Y maze, Congo Red, and amyloid beta (Aβ) immunochemistry were performed. We did not find any significant change in the navigation behavior of the exposed mice compared to the controls. Significantly less deposition of Aβ in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice exposed to isoflurane, propofol, diazepam, ketamine, and pentobarbital was observed. In the dentate gyrus, Aβ deposition was significantly greater in the group treated with pentobarbital. Congo Red staining evidenced significantly fewer fibrils in the cortex of mice exposed to diazepam, ketamine, or pentobarbital. The adopted repetitive exposure did not cause a significant detriment in Tg7526 mouse.

  14. Mouse models for pendrin-associated loss of cochlear and vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangemann, Philine

    2013-01-01

    The human gene SLC26A4 and the mouse ortholog Slc26a4 code for the protein pendrin, which is an anion exchanger expressed in apical membranes of selected epithelia. In the inner ear, pendrin is expressed in the cochlea, the vestibular labyrinth and the endolymphatic sac. Loss-of-function and hypo-functional mutations cause an enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA) and sensorineural hearing loss. The relatively high prevalence of SLC26A4 mutations provides a strong imperative to develop rational interventions that delay, ameliorate or prevent pendrin-associated loss of cochlear and vestibular function. This review summarizes recent studies in mouse models that have been developed to delineate the role of pendrin in the physiology of hearing and balance and that have brought forward the concept that a temporally and spatially limited therapy may be sufficient to secure a life-time of normal hearing in children bearing mutations of SLC26A4.

  15. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  16. Mouse neuroblastoma cell based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhwan; Baek, Juyeong; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Mouse neuroblastoma cells are considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and intensively used as a model system in different areas. Among those areas, differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor mediated ion current, and glutamate induced physiological response are actively investigated. The reason for the interest to mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells is that they have a fast growing rate than other cells in neural origin with a few another advantages. This study evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spikes recording of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in mouse N2A cell with our proposed imaging modality, we report that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells can be an important model related to epileptic activity studies. It is concluded that the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce the epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as produced by the neurons or the astrocytes. This evidence advocates the increased and strong level of neurotransmitters release by enhancement in free calcium using the 4-aminopyridine which causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce the epileptic spikes and calcium oscillation.

  17. Effects of Shen'an granules on Wnt signaling pathway in mouse models of diabetic nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xin-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Hu, Ying-Lin; Zhou, Hui-Lan

    2016-01-01

    The effect of Shen'an granules on the Wnt signaling pathway in renal tissues of mouse models of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nephropathy was investigated in the present study. A total of 62 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into the normal control (A group), model (B group), losartan (C group), low-dose Shen'an granules (D group), and high-dose Shen'an granules (E group) groups. The mouse model of diabetic nephropathy was established by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (150 mg/kg). The animals were treated with drugs for 8 weeks, and blood creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, triglycerides (TG), and total cholesterol (CHOL) were measured prior to and after treatment. PAS staining was performed for observation of glomerular microstructure by light microscope, and western blot analysis was performed to detect Wnt1 protein and β-catenin protein. The results indicated that the quantification of 24-h microalbuminuria, and levels of blood creatinine, urea nitrogen, TG, and CHOL were significantly lower in the high- and low-dose Shen'an granules groups than those in the model group (p<0.05). The expression levels of Wnt1 protein and β-catenin protein in the high- and low-dose Shen'an granules groups were significantly lower than those in the model group (p<0.05). In conclusion, proteinuria, renal dysfunction, and dyslipidemias are closely associated with the abnormal activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the mouse model of diabetic nephropathy. The mechanism by which Shen'an granules regulate proteinuria, renal function, and blood lipids may be associated with inhibition of the abnormally activated Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:28105085

  18. Simulating obstructive sleep apnea patients' oxygenation characteristics into a mouse model of cyclical intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Diane C; Brady, Daniel C; Po, Pengse; Chuang, Li Pang; Marcondes, Laise; Kim, Emily Y; Keenan, Brendan T; Guo, Xiaofeng; Maislin, Greg; Galante, Raymond J; Pack, Allan I

    2015-03-01

    Mouse models of cyclical intermittent hypoxia (CIH) are used to study the consequences of both hypoxia and oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Whether or not a mouse model of CIH that simulates OSA patients' oxygenation characteristics would translate into improved patient care remains unanswered. First we identified oxygenation characteristics using the desaturation and resaturation time in 47 OSA subjects from the Molecular Signatures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Cohort (MSOSA). We observe that a cycle of intermittent hypoxia is not sinusoidal; specifically, desaturation time increases in an almost linear relationship to the degree of hypoxia (nadir), whereas resaturation time is somewhat constant (∼15 s), irrespective of the nadir. Second, we modified the Hycon mouse model of CIH to accommodate a 15-s resaturation time. Using this modified CIH model, we explored whether a short resaturation schedule (15 s), which includes the characteristics of OSA patients, had a different effect on levels of oxidative stress (i.e., urinary 8,12-iso-iPF2α-VI levels) compared with sham and a long resaturation schedule (90 s), a schedule that is not uncommon in rodent models of CIH. Results suggest that shorter resaturation time may result in a higher level of 8,12-iso-iPF2α-VI compared with long resaturation or sham conditions. Therefore, simulating the rodent model of CIH to reflect this and other OSA patients' oxygenation characteristics may be worthy of consideration to better understand the effects of hypoxia, oxidative stress, and their interactions.

  19. Cytomegalovirus-induced embryopathology: mouse submandibular salivary gland epithelial-mesenchymal ontogeny as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jing

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human studies suggest, and mouse models clearly demonstrate, that cytomegalovirus (CMV is dysmorphic to early organ and tissue development. CMV has a particular tropism for embryonic salivary gland and other head mesenchyme. CMV has evolved to co-opt cell signaling networks so to optimize replication and survival, to the detriment of infected tissues. It has been postulated that mesenchymal infection is the critical step in disrupting organogenesis. If so, organogenesis dependent on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions would be particularly vulnerable. In this study, we chose to model the vulnerability by investigating the cell and molecular pathogenesis of CMV infected mouse embryonic submandibular salivary glands (SMGs. Results We infected E15 SMG explants with mouse CMV (mCMV. Active infection for up to 12 days in vitro results in a remarkable cell and molecular pathology characterized by atypical ductal epithelial hyperplasia, apparent epitheliomesenchymal transformation, oncocytic-like stromal metaplasia, β-catenin nuclear localization, and upregulation of Nfkb2, Relb, Il6, Stat3, and Cox2. Rescue with an antiviral nucleoside analogue indicates that mCMV replication is necessary to initiate and maintain SMG dysmorphogenesis. Conclusion mCMV infection of embryonic mouse explants results in dysplasia, metaplasia, and, possibly, anaplasia. The molecular pathogenesis appears to center around the activation of canonical and, perhaps more importantly, noncanonical NFκB. Further, COX-2 and IL-6 are important downstream effectors of embryopathology. At the cellular level, there appears to be a consequential interplay between the transformed SMG cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix, resulting in the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. From these studies, a tentative framework has emerged within which additional studies may be planned and performed.

  20. X-ray phase-contrast CT of a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Tapfer

    Full Text Available To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT for preclinical research, a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC was investigated. One ex-vivo mouse specimen was scanned with different grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging setups covering two different settings: i high-resolution synchrotron radiation (SR imaging and ii dose-reduced imaging using either synchrotron radiation or a conventional x-ray tube source. These experimental settings were chosen to assess the potential of phase-contrast imaging for two different types of application: i high-performance imaging for virtual microscopy applications and ii biomedical imaging with increased soft-tissue contrast for in-vivo applications. For validation and as a reference, histological slicing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed on the same mouse specimen. For each x-ray imaging setup, attenuation and phase-contrast images were compared visually with regard to contrast in general, and specifically concerning the recognizability of lesions and cancerous tissue. To quantitatively assess contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR of selected regions of interest (ROI in the attenuation images and the phase images were analyzed and compared. It was found that both for virtual microscopy and for in-vivo applications, there is great potential for phase-contrast imaging: in the SR-based benchmarking data, fine details about tissue composition are accessible in the phase images and the visibility of solid tumor tissue under dose-reduced conditions is markedly superior in the phase images. The present study hence demonstrates improved diagnostic value with phase-contrast CT in a mouse model of a complex endogenous cancer, promoting the use and further development of grating-based phase-contrast CT for biomedical imaging applications.

  1. A genetic mouse model to investigate hyperoxic acute lung injury survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prows, Daniel R; Hafertepen, Amanda P; Gibbons, William J; Winterberg, Abby V; Nick, Todd G

    2007-08-20

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a devastating disease that maintains a high mortality rate, despite decades of research. Hyperoxia, a universal treatment for ALI and other critically ill patients, can itself cause pulmonary damage, which drastically restricts its therapeutic potential. We stipulate that having the ability to use higher levels of supplemental O2 for longer periods would improve recovery rates. Toward this goal, a mouse model was sought to identify genes contributing to hyperoxic ALI (HALI) mortality. Eighteen inbred mouse strains were screened in continuous >95% O2. A significant survival difference was identified between sensitive C57BL/6J and resistant 129X1/SvJ strains. Although resistant, only one-fourth of 129X1/SvJ mice survived longer than any C57BL/6J mouse, demonstrating decreased penetrance of resistance. A survival time difference between reciprocal F1 mice implicated a parent-of-origin (imprinting) effect. To further evaluate imprinting and begin to delineate the genetic components of HALI survival, we generated and phenotyped offspring from all four possible intercrosses. Segregation analysis supported maternal inheritance of one or more genes but paternal inheritance of one or more contributor genes. A significant sex effect was demonstrated, with males more resistant than females for all F2 crosses. Survival time ranges and sensitive-to-resistant ratios of the different F2 crosses also supported imprinting and predicted that increased survival is due to dominant resistance alleles contributed by both the resistant and sensitive parental strains. HALI survival is multigenic with a complex mode of inheritance, which should be amenable to genetic dissection with this mouse model.

  2. An athymic mouse model to mimic cobalt-60 cutaneous radiation injury

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    Mosca, Rodrigo Crespo; Ferreira, Danilo Cardenuto; Napolitano, Celia Marina; Santin, Stefany Plumeri; Dornelles, Leonardo Dalla Porta; Alvarenga, Eluara Ortigoso; Mathor, Monica Beatriz, E-mail: rcmosca@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Propose: Cutaneous wound from irradiation is the most common complication in radiotherapy treatment, and can be lead to mortality. We describe an athymic mouse model to mimic cutaneous radiation injury by Cobalt-60. Methods: A protocol was including dosimetry with silicon diodes,10x10x5 cm arrangement made by four lead bricks and PVC pipe designed to immobilize the athymic mouse in order to irradiate one clamped back skin point that was subdivided in four parts. To get the measurements of dose rates on the arrangement in Panoramic Irradiator, it was used a silicon diode encased in an opaque protection for ambient light and connected to an electric cable, forming a dosing probe. The currents generated in diode sensitive volume as a function of time of exposure to gamma radiation coming from the radiator, with dose rate of 0,015 Gy/min in positions 1, 0,021 Gy/min in position 2, 0,55 Gy/min in position 3 and 1,45 Gy/min in position four. After the dosimetry, each athymic mouse was anesthetized using Xylazine and Ketamine dilution and entered into a PVC pipe and a small portion of skin (1 cm{sup 3}) was clamped. This tube was then fixed to arrangement and the athymic mouse was irradiate for 60 min, than it was being returned to its cage. Results: The wound was visualized in all animals and photographed after 5 days of irradiation, with the emergence of ulceration after 9 days. No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred or visualized in any animals. Late clinical signs included a wound healing after 22 days. Conclusion: While still being a baseline study, we created a new functional preclinical animal model that can be used for new therapies and may improve radiotherapy management. (author)

  3. Cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of Marfan syndrome develops into two distinctive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyun-Jin; Petrashevskaya, Natalia; Marshall, Shannon; Krawczyk, Melissa; Talan, Mark

    2016-01-15

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. Cardiac dysfunction in MFS has not been characterized halting the development of therapies of cardiac complication in MFS. We aimed to study the age-dependent cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of MFS FbnC1039G+/- mouse [Marfan heterozygous (HT) mouse] and its association with valvular regurgitation. Marfan HT mice of 2-4 mo demonstrated a mild hypertrophic cardiac remodeling with predominant decline of diastolic function and increased transforming growth factor-β canonical (p-SMAD2/3) and noncanonical (p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK) signaling and upregulation of hypertrophic markers natriuretic peptides atrium natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Among older HT mice (6-14 mo), cardiac remodeling was associated with two distinct phenotypes, manifesting either dilated or constricted left ventricular chamber. Dilatation of left ventricular chamber was accompanied by biochemical evidence of greater mechanical stress, including elevated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and higher brain natriuretic peptide expression. The aortic valve regurgitation was registered in 20% of the constricted group and 60% of the dilated group, whereas mitral insufficiency was observed in 40% of the constricted group and 100% of the dilated group. Cardiac dysfunction was not associated with the increase of interstitial fibrosis and nonmyocyte proliferation. In the mouse model fibrillin-1, haploinsufficiency results in the early onset of nonfibrotic hypertrophic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, independently from valvular abnormalities. MFS heart is vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dilatation in the face of valvular regurgitation, and stress-activated MAPK signals represent a potential target for cardiac management in MFS.

  4. Expression of Caytaxin protein in Cayman Ataxia mouse models correlates with phenotype severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Sikora

    Full Text Available Caytaxin is a highly-conserved protein, which is encoded by the Atcay/ATCAY gene. Mutations in Atcay/ATCAY have been identified as causative of cerebellar disorders such as the rare hereditary disease Cayman ataxia in humans, generalized dystonia in the dystonic (dt rat, and marked motor defects in three ataxic mouse lines. While several lines of evidence suggest that Caytaxin plays a critical role in maintaining nervous system processes, the physiological function of Caytaxin has not been fully characterized. In the study presented here, we generated novel specific monoclonal antibodies against full-length Caytaxin to examine endogenous Caytaxin expression in wild type and Atcay mutant mouse lines. Caytaxin protein is absent from brain tissues in the two severely ataxic Atcay(jit (jittery and Atcay(swd (sidewinder mutant lines, and markedly decreased in the mildly ataxic/dystonic Atcay(ji-hes (hesitant line, indicating a correlation between Caytaxin expression and disease severity. As the expression of wild type human Caytaxin in mutant sidewinder and jittery mice rescues the ataxic phenotype, Caytaxin's physiological function appears to be conserved between the human and mouse orthologs. Across multiple species and in several neuronal cell lines Caytaxin is expressed as several protein isoforms, the two largest of which are caused by the usage of conserved methionine translation start sites. The work described in this manuscript presents an initial characterization of the Caytaxin protein and its expression in wild type and several mutant mouse models. Utilizing these animal models of human Cayman Ataxia will now allow an in-depth analysis to elucidate Caytaxin's role in maintaining normal neuronal function.

  5. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D. [Rutgers University, Pharmacology and Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Svoboda, Kathy K. [Texas A and M University, Baylor College of Dentistry, Center for Craniofacial Research 3302 Gaston Ave, Dallas, Texas 75246 (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [MRIGlobal, 425 Volker Boulevard, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Environmental and Occupational Medicine, 170 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gordon, Marion K. [Rutgers University, Pharmacology and Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gerecke, Donald R., E-mail: gerecke@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Rutgers University, Pharmacology and Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  6. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Poliana C. M.; Ayub-Guerrieri, Danielle; Martins-Bach, Aurea B.; Onofre-Oliveira, Paula; Malheiros, Jackeline M.; Tannus, Alberto; de Sousa, Paulo L.; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmdmdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Largemyd, harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmdmdx/Largemyd mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs). We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies. PMID:23798567

  7. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana C. M. Martins

    2013-09-01

    Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmdmdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Largemyd, harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmdmdx/Largemyd mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs. We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies.

  8. Transgenic mouse models resistant to diet-induced metabolic disease: is energy balance the key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Neufer, P Darrell

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence and economic burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes is a driving force for the discovery of molecular targets to improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Here, we review several transgenic mouse models that identify promising targets, ranging from proteins involved in the insulin signaling pathway, alterations of genes affecting energy metabolism, and transcriptional metabolic regulators. Despite the diverse endpoints in each model, a common thread that emerges is the necessity for maintenance of energy balance, suggesting pharmacotherapy must target the development of drugs that decrease energy intake, accelerate energy expenditure in a well controlled manner, or augment natural compensatory responses to positive energy balance.

  9. A mouse model for testing the pathogenicity of equine herpes virus-1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Woensel, P A; Goovaerts, D; Markx, D; Visser, N

    1995-07-01

    A mouse model was developed for testing the pathogenicity of equine herpes virus-1 (EHV-1) strains. The model was validated with EHV-1 strains that are known to be of a low or high pathogenicity in horses. From all parameters tested, the safety index, which was calculated from the body weights of the mice after infection, proved to be the best predictive parameter. When this parameter was used, good and reliable correlations were found with the pathogenicity of the EHV-1 strains in horses. This method enabled the differentiation between the two experimental EHV-1 strains whose genetic backgrounds were supposedly equal.

  10. Cerebrolysin improves sciatic nerve dysfunction in a mouse model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Han-yu Dong; Xin-mei Jiang; Chun-bo Niu; Lin Du; Jun-yan Feng; Fei-yong Jia

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of Cerebrolysin on the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we first established a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus by administering a high-glucose, high-fat diet and a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Mice defined as diabetic in this model were then treated with 1.80, 5.39 or 8.98 mL/kg of Cerebrolysin via intraperitoneal injections for 10 consecutive days. Our results demonstrated that the number, diameter and area of myelinated nerve...

  11. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    53:1787-93. 3 A* san E. Browne May 2004 19. BROWNE SE, Bowling AC, Baik MJ, Gurney M,Brown RH Jr., Beal MF. Metabolic dysfunction in familial, but not...and Experimental Therapeutics, Symposium: Animal Models of Neuropsychiatric Diseases. San Diego, CA, USA. "Modeling Huntington’s Disease in the Mouse...Cell Neurosci. 14:121-128. work abnormalities in early Huntington’s disease: An l(18)FI FDG 31. Martin- Aparicio . E., Avila, J., and Lucas, J. J. 2002

  12. ERK inhibition with PD184161 mitigates brain damage in a mouse model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladbach, Amadeus; van Eersel, Janet; Bi, Mian; Ke, Yazi D; Ittner, Lars M

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death. It has previously been shown that blocking activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) with the MEK inhibitor U0126 mitigates brain damage in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Here we show that the newer MEK inhibitor PD184161 reduces cell death and altered gene expression in cultured neurons and mice undergoing excitotoxicity, and has similar protective effects in a mouse model of stroke. This further supports ERK inhibition as a potential treatment for stroke.

  13. Anti-tumor effects of a human VEGFR-2-based DNA vaccine in mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    XIE, KE; Bai, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Yang; Liu, Quan; Liu,Kang; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2009-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor, VEGFR-2 (Flk-1/KDR), play a key role in tumor angiogenesis. Blocking the VEGF-VEGFR-2 pathway may inhibit tumor growth. Here, we used human VEGFR-2 as a model antigen to explore the feasibility of immunotherapy with a plasmid DNA vaccine based on a xenogeneic homologue of this receptor. Methods The protective effects and therapeutic anti-tumor immunity mediated by the DNA vaccine were investigated in mouse models. Anti-ang...

  14. The sirtuin 2 inhibitor AK-7 is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vanita; Quinti, Luisa; Kim, Jinho; Vollor, Lorraine; Narayanan, K Lakshmi; Edgerly, Christina; Cipicchio, Patricia M; Lauver, Molly A; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Silverman, Richard B; Ferrante, Robert J; Hersch, Steven; Kazantsev, Aleksey G

    2012-12-27

    Inhibition of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) deacetylase mediates protective effects in cell and invertebrate models of Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease (HD). Here we report the in vivo efficacy of a brain-permeable SIRT2 inhibitor in two genetic mouse models of HD. Compound treatment resulted in improved motor function, extended survival, and reduced brain atrophy and is associated with marked reduction of aggregated mutant huntingtin, a hallmark of HD pathology. Our results provide preclinical validation of SIRT2 inhibition as a potential therapeutic target for HD and support the further development of SIRT2 inhibitors for testing in humans.

  15. Recent technological advances in using mouse models to study ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carrie Danielle; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina Messineo

    2014-01-01

    Serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer in the United States with disease recurrence being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of SEOC, the survival rate for women with this disease has remained relatively unchanged in the last two decades. Preclinical mouse models of ovarian cancer, including xenograft, syngeneic, and genetically engineered mice, have been developed to provide a mechanism for studying the development and progression of SEOC. Such models strive to increase our understanding of the etiology and dissemination of ovarian cancer in order to overcome barriers to early detection and resistance to standard chemotherapy. Although there is not a single model that is most suitable for studying ovarian cancer, improvements have led to current models that more closely mimic human disease in their genotype and phenotype. Other advances in the field, such as live animal imaging techniques, allow effective monitoring of the microenvironment and therapeutic efficacy. New and improved preclinical mouse models, combined with technological advances to study such models, will undoubtedly render success of future human clinical trials for patients with SEOC.

  16. Humanized mouse model for assessing the human immune response to xenogeneic and allogeneic decellularized biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Raymond M; Johnson, Todd D; He, Jingjin; Rong, Zhili; Wong, Michelle; Nigam, Vishal; Behfar, Atta; Xu, Yang; Christman, Karen L

    2017-06-01

    Current assessment of biomaterial biocompatibility is typically implemented in wild type rodent models. Unfortunately, different characteristics of the immune systems in rodents versus humans limit the capability of these models to mimic the human immune response to naturally derived biomaterials. Here we investigated the utility of humanized mice as an improved model for testing naturally derived biomaterials. Two injectable hydrogels derived from decellularized porcine or human cadaveric myocardium were compared. Three days and one week after subcutaneous injection, the hydrogels were analyzed for early and mid-phase immune responses, respectively. Immune cells in the humanized mouse model, particularly T-helper cells, responded distinctly between the xenogeneic and allogeneic biomaterials. The allogeneic extracellular matrix derived hydrogels elicited significantly reduced total, human specific, and CD4(+) T-helper cell infiltration in humanized mice compared to xenogeneic extracellular matrix hydrogels, which was not recapitulated in wild type mice. T-helper cells, in response to the allogeneic hydrogel material, were also less polarized towards a pro-remodeling Th2 phenotype compared to xenogeneic extracellular matrix hydrogels in humanized mice. In both models, both biomaterials induced the infiltration of macrophages polarized towards a M2 phenotype and T-helper cells polarized towards a Th2 phenotype. In conclusion, these studies showed the importance of testing naturally derived biomaterials in immune competent animals and the potential of utilizing this humanized mouse model for further studying human immune cell responses to biomaterials in an in vivo environment.

  17. The impact of mouse passaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains prior to virulence testing in the mouse and guinea pig aerosol models.

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    Paul J Converse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that the virulence of lab-passaged Mycobacterium tuberculosis and recombinant M. tuberculosis mutants might be reduced due to multiple in vitro passages, and that virulence might be augmented by passage of these strains through mice before quantitative virulence testing in the mouse or guinea pig aerosol models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By testing three M. tuberculosis H37Rv samples, one deletion mutant, and one recent clinical isolate for survival by the quantitative organ CFU counting method in mouse or guinea pig aerosol or intravenous infection models, we could discern no increase in bacterial fitness as a result of passaging of M. tuberculosis strains in mice prior to quantitative virulence testing in two animal models. Surface lipid expression as assessed by neutral red staining and thin-layer chromatography for PDIM analysis also failed to identify virulence correlates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that animal passaging of M. tuberculosis strains prior to quantitative virulence testing in mouse or guinea pig models does not enhance or restore potency to strains that may have lost virulence due to in vitro passaging. It is critical to verify virulence of parental strains before genetic manipulations are undertaken and comparisons are made.

  18. Oral LD50 toxicity modeling and prediction of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals on rat and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses were performed using the LD(50) oral toxicity data of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) on rodents: rat and mouse. PFCs are studied under the EU project CADASTER which uses the available experimental data for prediction and prioritization of toxic chemicals for risk assessment by using the in silico tools. The methodology presented here applies chemometrical analysis on the existing experimental data and predicts the toxicity of new compounds. QSAR analyses were performed on the available 58 mouse and 50 rat LD(50) oral data using multiple linear regression (MLR) based on theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithm (GA). Training and prediction sets were prepared a priori from available experimental datasets in terms of structure and response. These sets were used to derive statistically robust and predictive (both internally and externally) models. The structural applicability domain (AD) of the models were verified on 376 per- and polyfluorinated chemicals including those in REACH preregistration list. The rat and mouse endpoints were predicted by each model for the studied compounds, and finally 30 compounds, all perfluorinated, were prioritized as most important for experimental toxicity analysis under the project. In addition, cumulative study on compounds within the AD of all four models, including two earlier published models on LC(50) rodent analysis was studied and the cumulative toxicity trend was observed using principal component analysis (PCA). The similarities and the differences observed in terms of descriptors and chemical/mechanistic meaning encoded by descriptors to prioritize the most toxic compounds are highlighted.

  19. Establishment of a standardized mouse model of hepatic fibrosis for biomedical research

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    Hai Nhung Truong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Liver injury causes nodule and scar tissue formation and diffuse fibrosis, which are characteristic of liver cirrhosis. Since there are currently no efficacious therapies to prevent fibrosis, the development of animal models of liver fibrosis is necessary to facilitate further in vivo studies of this pathology. In this study, a mouse model of liver fibrosis was generated using Swiss mice and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 treatment. Induction of liver fibrosis was analyzed using 0.8, 1.0, or 1.2 mL/kg CCl4 to determine the effective dose. In this study, we aimed to develop a standardized hepatic fibrosis mouse model by using CCl4 induction to facilitate further studies in this field. In Swiss mice, we evaluated the dose of CCl4 and the criteria of fibrosis, such as serum markers, fibrosis marker genes, and histopathology. Mice were administered CCl4 three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Body weights, survival rates, levels of serum markers (aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase [AST/ALT] and fibrosis markers (fibronectin, procollagen, nt5e, transforming growth factor-beta [TGF-beta], and integrin, and histopathology (using hematoxylin and eosin [H and E] staining were analyzed to determine the optimal dose of CCl4 for induction of liver fibrosis. Results showed that 1.0 mL/kg CCl4 was the most efficient dose for the establishment of a liver fibrosis mouse model. In a standardized liver fibrosis model, mice were treated with 1.0 mL/kg CCl4 three times per week for 11 consecutive weeks, and levels of serum markers (AST, ALT, bilirubin, and albumin, expression of fibrosis marker genes (using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR], histopathology (using Hematoxylin and eosin staining, and connective tissue formation (using Massive trichrome staining were analyzed. The outcomes showed that serum markers and the levels of fibrosis marker genes were significantly increased in the standardized liver

  20. Establishment of a standardized mouse model of hepatic fibrosis for biomedical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Nhung Truong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Liver injury causes nodule and scar tissue formation and diffuse fibrosis, which are characteristic of liver cirrhosis. Since there are currently no efficacious therapies to prevent fibrosis, the development of animal models of liver fibrosis is necessary to facilitate further in vivo studies of this pathology. In this study, a mouse model of liver fibrosis was generated using Swiss mice and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 treatment. Induction of liver fibrosis was analyzed using 0.8, 1.0, or 1.2 mL/kg CCl4 to determine the effective dose. In this study, we aimed to develop a standardized hepatic fibrosis mouse model by using CCl4 induction to facilitate further studies in this field. In Swiss mice, we evaluated the dose of CCl4 and the criteria of fibrosis, such as serum markers, fibrosis marker genes, and histopathology. Mice were administered CCl4 three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Body weights, survival rates, levels of serum markers (aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase [AST/ALT] and fibrosis markers (fibronectin, procollagen, nt5e, transforming growth factor-beta [TGF-β], and integrin, and histopathology (using hematoxylin and eosin [H&E] staining were analyzed to determine the optimal dose of CCl4 for induction of liver fibrosis. Results showed that 1.0 mL/kg CCl4 was the most efficient dose for the establishment of a liver fibrosis mouse model. In a standardized liver fibrosis model, mice were treated with 1.0 mL/kg CCl4 three times per week for 11 consecutive weeks, and levels of serum markers (AST, ALT, bilirubin, and albumin, expression of fibrosis marker genes (using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR], histopathology (using Hematoxylin and eosin staining, and connective tissue formation (using Massive trichrome staining were analyzed. The outcomes showed that serum markers and the levels of fibrosis marker genes were significantly increased in the standardized liver fibrosis

  1. Application of functional genomics to the chimeric mouse model of HCV infection: optimization of microarray protocols and genomics analysis

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    Smith Maria W

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many model systems of human viral disease involve human-mouse chimeric tissue. One such system is the recently developed SCID-beige/Alb-uPA mouse model of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection which involves a human-mouse chimeric liver. The use of functional genomics to study HCV infection in these chimeric tissues is complicated by the potential cross-hybridization of mouse mRNA on human oligonucleotide microarrays. To identify genes affected by mouse liver mRNA hybridization, mRNA from identical human liver samples labeled with either Cy3 or Cy5 was compared in the presence and absence of known amounts of mouse liver mRNA labeled in only one dye. Results The results indicate that hybridization of mouse mRNA to the corresponding human gene probe on Agilent Human 22 K oligonucleotide microarray does occur. The number of genes affected by such cross-hybridization was subsequently reduced to approximately 300 genes both by increasing the hybridization temperature and using liver samples which contain at least 80% human tissue. In addition, Real Time quantitative RT-PCR using human specific probes was shown to be a valid method to verify the expression level in human cells of known cross-hybridizing genes. Conclusion The identification of genes affected by cross-hybridization of mouse liver RNA on human oligonucleotide microarrays makes it feasible to use functional genomics approaches to study the chimeric SCID-beige/Alb-uPA mouse model of HCV infection. This approach used to study cross-species hybridization on oligonucleotide microarrays can be adapted to other chimeric systems of viral disease to facilitate selective analysis of human gene expression.

  2. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  3. Towards a Humanized Mouse Model of Liver Stage Malaria Using Ectopic Artificial Livers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Stevens, Kelly R.; Mota, Maria M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2017-01-01

    The malaria liver stage is an attractive target for antimalarial development, and preclinical malaria models are essential for testing such candidates. Given ethical concerns and costs associated with non‐human primate models, humanized mouse models containing chimeric human livers offer a valuable alternative as small animal models of liver stage human malaria. The best available human liver chimeric mice rely on cellular transplantation into mice with genetically engineered liver injury, but these systems involve a long and variable humanization process, are expensive, and require the use of breeding-challenged mouse strains which are not widely accessible. We previously incorporated primary human hepatocytes into engineered polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoporous human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs), implanted them in mice without liver injury, and rapidly generated human liver chimeric mice in a reproducible and scalable fashion. By re-designing the PEG scaffold to be macroporous, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of implantable porous HEALs that support liver stage human malaria (P. falciparum) infection in vitro, and also after implantation in mice with normal liver function, 60% of the time. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a tissue engineering strategy towards the development of scalable preclinical models of liver stage malaria infection for future applications. PMID:28361899

  4. Computational multiscale toxicodynamic modeling of silver and carbon nanoparticle effects on mouse lung function.

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    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    Full Text Available A computational, multiscale toxicodynamic model has been developed to quantify and predict pulmonary effects due to uptake of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs in mice. The model consists of a collection of coupled toxicodynamic modules, that were independently developed and tested using information obtained from the literature. The modules were developed to describe the dynamics of tissue with explicit focus on the cells and the surfactant chemicals that regulate the process of breathing, as well as the response of the pulmonary system to xenobiotics. Alveolar type I and type II cells, and alveolar macrophages were included in the model, along with surfactant phospholipids and surfactant proteins, to account for processes occurring at multiple biological scales, coupling cellular and surfactant dynamics affected by nanoparticle exposure, and linking the effects to tissue-level lung function changes. Nanoparticle properties such as size, surface chemistry, and zeta potential were explicitly considered in modeling the interactions of these particles with biological media. The model predictions were compared with in vivo lung function response measurements in mice and analysis of mice lung lavage fluid following exposures to silver and carbon nanoparticles. The predictions were found to follow the trends of observed changes in mouse surfactant composition over 7 days post dosing, and are in good agreement with the observed changes in mouse lung function over the same period of time.

  5. LRRK2 mouse models: dissecting the behavior, striatal neurochemistry and neurophysiology of PD pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Mattia; Melrose, Heather

    2017-02-08

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD), resembling the sporadic disorder. Intensive effort has been directed toward LRRK2 mouse modeling and investigation, aimed at reproducing the human disease to inform mechanistic studies of pathogenesis and design of neuroprotective therapies. The physiological function of LRRK2 is still under exploration, but a clear role in striatal neurophysiology and animal behavior has emerged. Alterations in LRRK2 impair dopamine (DA) transmission, regulation and signaling, in addition to corticostriatal synaptic plasticity. Consistently, several subtle abnormalities in motor and nonmotor abilities have been demonstrated in LRRK2 genetic mouse models, generally paralleling preclinical symptoms of early DA dysfunction. However, the variability in model design and phenotypes observed requires a critical approach in interpreting the results, adapting the model used to the specific research question. Etiologically appropriate knockin mice might represent the ultimate animal model in which to study early disease mechanisms and therapies as well as to investigate drug effectiveness and off-target consequences.

  6. A candidate mouse model for Hartnup disorder deficient in neutral amino acid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symula, D J; Shedlovsky, A; Guillery, E N; Dove, W F

    1997-02-01

    The mutant mouse strain HPH2 (hyperphenylalaninemia) was isolated after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis on the basis of delayed plasma clearance of an injected load of phenylalanine. Animals homozygous for the recessive hph2 mutation excrete elevated concentrations of many of the neutral amino acids in the urine, while plasma concentrations of these amino acids are normal. In contrast, mutant homozygotes excrete normal levels of glucose and phosphorus. These data suggest an amino acid transport defect in the mutant, confirmed in a small reduction in normalized values of 14C-labeled glutamine uptake by kidney cortex brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). The hyperaminoaciduria pattern is very similar to that of Hartnup Disorder cases also show niacin deficiency symptoms, of Hartnup Disorder cases also show niacin deficiency symptoms, which are thought to be multifactorially determined. Similarly, the HPH2 mouse exhibits a niacin-reversible syndrome that is modified by diet and by genetic background. Thus, HPH2 provides a candidate mouse model for the study of Hartnup Disorder, an amino acid transport deficiency and a multifactorial disease in the human.

  7. Synergistic effect of lidocaine with pingyangmycin for treatment of venous malformation using a mouse spleen model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Nan; Chen, Yuan-Zheng; Mao, Kai-Ping; Fu, Yanjie; Lin, Qiang; Xue, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To explore whether lidocaine has the synergistic effect with pingyangmycin (PYM) in the venous malformations (VMs) treatment. Methods: The mouse spleen was chosen as a VM model and injected with different concentration of lidocaine or PYM or jointly treated with lidocaine and PYM. After 2, 5, 8 or 14 days, the mouse spleen tissues were acquired for hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, TUNEL assay and quantitative RT-PCR analysis to examine the toxicological effects of lidocaine and PYM on splenic vascular endothelial cells. Results: 0.4% of lidocaine mildly promoted the apoptosis of endothelial cells, while 2 mg/ml PYM significantly elevated the apoptotic ratios. However, the combination of 0.2% lidocaine and 0.5 mg/ml PYM notably elevated the apoptotic ratios of splenic cells and severely destroyed the configuration of spleen, compared to those of treatment with 0.5 mg/ml PYM alone. Conclusion: Lidocaine exerts synergistic effects with PYM in promoting the apoptosis of mouse splenic endothelial cells, indicating that lidocaine possibly promotes the therapeutic effects of PYM in VMs treatment via synergistically enhancing the apoptosis of endothelial cells of malformed venous lesions. PMID:24966943

  8. Current humanized mouse models for studying human immunology and HIV-1 immuno-pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEISSNER; Eric

    2010-01-01

    A robust animal model for "hypothesis-testing/mechanistic" research in human immunology and immuno-pathology should meet the following criteria.First,it has well-studied hemato-lymphoid organs and target cells similar to those of humans.Second,the human pathogens establish infection and lead to relevant diseases.Third,it is genetically inbred and can be manipulated via genetic,immunological and pharmacological means.Many human-tropic pathogens such as HIV-1 fail to infect murine cells due to the blocks at multiple steps of their life cycle.The mouse with a reconstituted human immune system and other human target organs is a good candidate.A number of human-mouse chimeric models with human immune cells have been developed in the past 20 years,but most with only limited success due to the selective engraftment of xeno-reactive human T cells in hu-PBL-SCID mice or the lack of significant human immune responses in the SCID-hu Thy/Liv mouse.This review summarizes the current understanding of HIV-1 immuno-pathogenesis in human patients and in SIV-infected primate models.It also reviews the recent progress in the development of humanized mouse models with a functional human immune system,especially the recent progress in the immunodeficient mice that carry a defective gammaC gene.NOD/SCID/gammaC-/(NOG or NSG) or the Rag2-/-/gammaC-/double knockout (DKO) mice,which lack NK as well as T and B cells (NTB-null mice),have been used to reconstitute a functional human immune system in central and peripheral lymphoid organs with human CD34+ HSC.These NTB-hu HSC humanized models have been used to investigate HIV-1 infection,immuno-pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions.Such models,with further improvements,will contribute to study human immunology,human-tropic pathogens as well as human stem cell biology in the tissue development and function in vivo.

  9. In vivo regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase in the genetic mutant hph-1 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Richard S; Hyland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    The hph-1 mouse has low liver activity of GTP cyclohydrolase 1, the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)). BH(4) is the cofactor for phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and in the early stages of life the hph-1 mouse is hyperphenylalaninemic. At approximately 15 days after birth the blood phenylalanine levels normalize. During this period the animals provide an in vivo model which can be used to study the regulatory effects of phenylalanine on PAH, and for related pediatric metabolic disease in humans; from birth to youth. We therefore, examined; liver PAH activity using BH(4) and 6-methyltetrahydropterin (6MPH(4)) as cofactor; PAH total enzyme concentration by Western blotting using the PH8 antibody, and PAH state of phosphorylation using the PH7 antibody from 4 to 18 days after birth. The findings were compared to the wild type animals that are not hyperphenylalaninemic during this period. PAH (6MPH(4)) activity and total protein (PH8 antibody) rose steadily in the hph-1 mice. In control mice, both activity and total protein fluctuated. The degree of phosphorylation of PAH in the mutants and the state of activation (as measured by the 6MPH(4)/BH(4) activity ratio) increased as phenylalanine levels rose, and decreased when they fell. Similar patterns were not seen in the control animals. These studies provide in vivo evidence that phenylalanine concentration regulates the activity of PAH in the hph-1 mouse and that this acts via a mechanism that includes phosphorylation of the PAH molecule. The kinetic values (K(m) and V(max)) for mouse PAH are also reported.

  10. Differences in amyloid-β clearance across mouse and human blood-brain barrier models: kinetic analysis and mechanistic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qosa, Hisham; Abuasal, Bilal S; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Oliver; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a characteristic hallmark of amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in the brain. This accumulation of Aβ has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Indeed, preclinical studies that used mice to investigate Aβ clearance showed that efflux across blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain degradation mediate efficient Aβ clearance. However, the contribution of each process to Aβ clearance remains unclear. Moreover, it is still uncertain how species differences between mouse and human could affect Aβ clearance. Here, a modified form of the brain efflux index method was used to estimate the contribution of BBB and brain degradation to Aβ clearance from the brain of wild type mice. We estimated that 62% of intracerebrally injected (125)I-Aβ40 is cleared across BBB while 38% is cleared by brain degradation. Furthermore, in vitro and in silico studies were performed to compare Aβ clearance between mouse and human BBB models. Kinetic studies for Aβ40 disposition in bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3 cells, representative in vitro mouse and human BBB models, respectively, demonstrated 30-fold higher rate of (125)I-Aβ40 uptake and 15-fold higher rate of degradation by bEnd3 compared to hCMEC/D3 cells. Expression studies showed both cells to express different levels of P-glycoprotein and RAGE, while LRP1 levels were comparable. Finally, we established a mechanistic model, which could successfully predict cellular levels of (125)I-Aβ40 and the rate of each process. Established mechanistic model suggested significantly higher rates of Aβ uptake and degradation in bEnd3 cells as rationale for the observed differences in (125)I-Aβ40 disposition between mouse and human BBB models. In conclusion, current study demonstrates the important role of BBB in the clearance of Aβ from the brain. Moreover, it provides insight into the differences between mouse and human BBB with regards to Aβ clearance and offer, for the first time, a mathematical model that describes

  11. Development of a mouse model of abdominal cutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel John Womac

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Autologous tissue transfer, in addition to replacing tissue that was lost during injury or surgery, offers women an excellent option to improve cosmetic appearance and self-confidence following mastectomy due to breast cancer. However, flap necrosis is a complication in obese patients undergoing this procedure. We created a mouse model to study the flap-related complications that leads to decreased flap survival in autologous breast reconstruction. METHODS: Left superficial inferior epigastric (SIE pedicle abdominal-cutaneous flaps were elevated in 8 week-old, obese ob/ob male mice and their lean littermates. Flaps were followed by serial photography. Area of flap necrosis was measured at 7 days. Statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: Necrosis was observed at the distal margin of the flaps, in both lean and obese groups. Lean left SIE flaps (n = 8 had a total area flap necrosis of 9.1% at 7 days whereas obese left SIE flaps (n = 8 had a total area flap necrosis of 45.5% at 7 days. Obese flaps had a statistically significant increase in necrosis compared to the lean flaps, p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant difference between flap survival in lean and obese SIE pedicle flaps in our mouse model. We have developed the first flap model of obesity utilizing the superficial epigastric pedicle in the mouse. This model is optimal for future studies to dissect out mechanisms that lead to the complications related to flap survival for breast reconstruction, especially in obese subjects.

  12. Effect of sclerostin antibody treatment in a mouse model of severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschger, Andreas; Roschger, Paul; Keplingter, Petra; Klaushofer, Klaus; Abdullah, Sami; Kneissel, Michaela; Rauch, Frank

    2014-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone fragility disorder that is usually caused by mutations affecting collagen type I production in osteoblasts. Stimulation of bone formation through sclerostin antibody treatment (Sost-ab) has shown promising results in mouse models of relatively mild OI. We assessed the effect of once-weekly intravenous Sost-ab injections for 4weeks in male Col1a1(Jrt)/+mice, a model of severe dominant OI, starting either at 4weeks (growing mice) or at 20weeks (adult mice) of age. Sost-ab had no effect on weight or femur length. In OI mice, no significant treatment-associated differences in serum markers of bone formation (alkaline phosphatase activity, procollagen type I N-propeptide) or resorption (C-telopeptide of collagen type I) were found. Micro-CT analyses at the femur showed that Sost-ab treatment was associated with higher trabecular bone volume and higher cortical thickness in wild type mice at both ages and in growing OI mice, but not in adult OI mice. Three-point bending tests of the femur showed that in wild type but not in OI mice, Sost-ab was associated with higher ultimate load and work to failure. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging of the femur did not show any effect of Sost-ab on CaPeak (the most frequently occurring calcium concentration in the bone mineral density distribution), regardless of genotype, age or measurement location. Thus, Sost-ab had a larger effect in wild type than in Col1a1(Jrt)/+mice. Previous studies had found marked improvements of Sost-ab on bone mass and strength in an OI mouse model with a milder phenotype. Our data therefore suggest that Sost-ab is less effective in a more severely affected OI mouse model.

  13. Low-dose rapamycin extends lifespan in a mouse model of mtDNA depletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Stephanie; Yang, Hua; Sharma, Rohit; Javors, Martin; Skinner, Owen; Mootha, Vamsi; Hirano, Michio; Schon, Eric A

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondrial disorders affecting oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) are caused by mutations in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. One promising candidate for treatment is the drug rapamycin, which has been shown to extend lifespan in multiple animal models, and which was previously shown to ameliorate mitochondrial disease in a knock-out mouse model lacking a nuclear-encoded gene specifying an OxPhos structural subunit (Ndufs4). In that model, relatively high-dose intraperitoneal rapamycin extended lifespan and improved markers of neurological disease, via an unknown mechanism. Here, we administered low-dose oral rapamycin to a knock-in (KI) mouse model of authentic mtDNA disease, specifically, progressive mtDNA depletion syndrome, resulting from a mutation in the mitochondrial nucleotide salvage enzyme thymidine kinase 2 (TK2). Importantly, low-dose oral rapamycin was sufficient to extend Tk2KI/KI mouse lifespan significantly, and did so in the absence of detectable improvements in mitochondrial dysfunction. We found no evidence that rapamycin increased survival by acting through canonical pathways, including mitochondrial autophagy. However, transcriptomics and metabolomics analyses uncovered systemic metabolic changes pointing to a potential "rapamycin metabolic signature." These changes also implied that rapamycin may have enabled the Tk2KI/KI mice to utilize alternative energy reserves, and possibly triggered indirect signaling events that modified mortality through developmental reprogramming. From a therapeutic standpoint, our results support the possibility that low-dose rapamycin, while not targeting the underlying mtDNA defect, could represent a crucial therapy for the treatment of mtDNA-driven, and some nuclear DNA-driven, mitochondrial diseases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

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    Marc Trimborn

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome. The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608 containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  15. An adjuvant-free mouse model to evaluate the allergenicity of milk whey protein.

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    Gonipeta, B; Parvataneni, S; Tempelman, R J; Gangur, V

    2009-10-01

    Milk allergy is the most common type of food allergy in humans with the potential for fatality. An adjuvant-free mouse model would be highly desirable as a preclinical research tool to develop novel hypoallergenic or nonallergenic milk products. Here we describe an adjuvant-free mouse model of milk allergy that uses transdermal sensitization followed by oral challenge with milk protein. Groups of BALB/c mice were exposed to milk whey protein via a transdermal route, without adjuvant. Systemic IgG1 and IgE antibody responses to transdermal exposure as well as systemic anaphylaxis and hypothermia response to oral protein challenge were studied. Transdermal exposure resulted in a time- and dose-dependent induction of significant IgE and IgG1 antibody responses. Furthermore, oral challenge of sensitized mice resulted in significant clinical symptoms of systemic anaphylaxis within 1 h and significant hypothermia at 30 min postchallenge. To study the underlying mechanism, we examined allergen-driven spleen cell T-helper 2 cytokine (IL-4) responses. There was a robust dose- and time-dependent activation of memory IL-4 responses in allergic mice but not in healthy control mice. These data demonstrate for the first time a novel transdermal sensitization followed by oral challenge mouse model of milk allergy that does not use adjuvant. It is expected that this model may be used not only to study mechanisms of milk allergy, but also to evaluate novel milk products for allergenic potential and aid in the production of hypo- or nonallergenic milk products.

  16. Maternal separation with early weaning: a novel mouse model of early life neglect

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    Elwafi Hani M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood adversity is associated with increased risk for mood, anxiety, impulse control, and substance disorders. Although genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of such disorders, the neurobiological mechanisms involved are poorly understood. A reliable mouse model of early life adversity leading to lasting behavioral changes would facilitate progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these adverse effects. Maternal separation is a commonly used model of early life neglect, but has led to inconsistent results in the mouse. Results In an effort to develop a mouse model of early life neglect with long-lasting behavioral effects in C57BL/6 mice, we designed a new maternal separation paradigm that we call Maternal Separation with Early Weaning (MSEW. We tested the effects of MSEW on C57BL/6 mice as well as the genetically distinct DBA/2 strain and found significant MSEW effects on several behavioral tasks (i.e., the open field, elevated plus maze, and forced swim test when assessed more than two months following the MSEW procedure. Our findings are consistent with MSEW causing effects within multiple behavioral domains in both strains, and suggest increased anxiety, hyperactivity, and behavioral despair in the MSEW offspring. Analysis of pup weights and metabolic parameters showed no evidence for malnutrition in the MSEW pups. Additionally, strain differences in many of the behavioral tests suggest a role for genetic factors in the response to early life neglect. Conclusions These results suggest that MSEW may serve as a useful model to examine the complex behavioral abnormalities often apparent in individuals with histories of early life neglect, and may lead to greater understanding of these later life outcomes and offer insight into novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. Characterization of Putative Erythroid Regulators of Hepcidin in Mouse Models of Anemia

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    Mirciov, Cornel S. G.; Wilkins, Sarah J.; Dunn, Linda A.; Anderson, Gregory J.; Frazer, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Iron is crucial for many biological functions, but quantitatively the most important use of iron is in the production of hemoglobin in red blood cell precursors. The amount of iron in the plasma, and hence its availability for hemoglobin synthesis, is determined by the liver-derived iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. When the iron supply to erythroid precursors is limited, as often occurs during stimulated erythropoiesis, these cells produce signals to inhibit hepatic hepcidin production, thereby increasing the amount of iron that enters the plasma. How stimulated erythropoiesis suppresses hepcidin production is incompletely understood, but erythroferrone, Gdf15 and Twsg1 have emerged as candidate regulatory molecules. To further examine the relationship between erythropoiesis and the candidate erythroid regulators, we have studied five mouse models of anemia, including two models of β-thalassemia (Hbbth3/+ and RBC14), the hemoglobin deficit mouse (hbd), dietary iron deficient mice and mice treated with phenylhydrazine to induce acute hemolysis. Hematological parameters, iron status and the expression of Erfe (the gene encoding erythroferrone), Gdf15 and Twsg1 in the bone marrow and spleen were examined. Erfe expression was the most consistently upregulated of the candidate erythroid regulators in all of the mouse models examined. Gene expression was particularly high in the bone marrow and spleen of iron deficient animals, making erythroferrone an ideal candidate erythroid regulator, as its influence is strongest when iron supply to developing erythroid cells is limited. Gdf15 expression was also upregulated in most of the anemia models studied although the magnitude of the increase was generally less than that of Erfe. In contrast, very little regulation of Twsg1 was observed. These results support the prevailing hypothesis that erythroferrone is a promising erythroid regulator and demonstrate that Erfe expression is stimulated most strongly when the iron supply

  18. CINcere Modelling : What Have Mouse Models for Chromosome Instability Taught Us?

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    Simon, Judith E; Bakker, Bjorn; Foijer, Floris

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a process leading to errors in chromosome segregation and results in aneuploidy, a state in which cells have an abnormal number of chromosomes. CIN is a hallmark of cancer, and furthermore linked to ageing and age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's. Various mouse

  19. Effect of mouse strain as a background for Alzheimer's disease models on the clearance of amyloid-β.

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    Qosa, Hisham; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-04-01

    Novel animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are relentlessly being developed and existing ones are being fine-tuned; however, these models face multiple challenges associated with the complexity of the disease where most of these models do not reproduce the full phenotypical disease spectrum. Moreover, different AD models express different phenotypes that could affect their validity to recapitulate disease pathogenesis and/or response to a drug. One of the most important and understudied differences between AD models is differences in the phenotypic characteristics of the background species. Here, we used the brain clearance index (BCI) method to investigate the effect of strain differences on the clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) from the brains of four mouse strains. These mouse strains, namely C57BL/6, FVB/N, BALB/c and SJL/J, are widely used as a background for the development of AD mouse models. Findings showed that while Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was comparable between the 4 strains, levels of LRP1, an Aβ clearance protein, was significantly lower in SJL/J mice compared to other mouse strains. Furthermore, these mouse strains showed a significantly different response to rifampicin treatment with regard to Aβ clearance and effect on brain level of its clearance-related proteins. Our results provide for the first time an evidence for strain differences that could affect ability of AD mouse models to recapitulate response to a drug, and opens a new research avenue that requires further investigation to successfully develop mouse models that could simulate clinically important phenotypic characteristics of AD.

  20. Evaluation of TorsinA as a target for Parkinson disease therapy in mouse models.

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    Xinru Li

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a common and disabling disorder. No current therapy can slow or reverse disease progression. An important aspect of research in this field is target validation, a systematic approach to evaluating the likelihood that modification of a certain molecule, mechanism or biological pathway may be useful for the development of pharmacological or molecular treatments for the disease. TorsinA, a member of the AAA+ family of chaperone proteins, has been proposed as a potential target of neuroprotective therapy. TorsinA is found in Lewy bodies in human PD, and can suppress toxicity in cellular and invertebrate models of PD. Here, we evaluated the neuroprotective properties of torsinA in mouse models of PD based on intoxication with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP as well as recombinant adeno associated virus (rAAV induced overexpression of alpha-synuclein (α-syn. Using either transgenic mice with overexpression of human torsinA (hWT mice or mice in which torsinA expression was induced using an rAAV vector, we found no evidence for protection against acute MPTP intoxication. Similarly, genetic deletion of the endogenous mouse gene for torsinA (Dyt1 using an rAAV delivered Cre recombinase did not enhance the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons to MPTP. Overexpression of α-syn using rAAV in the mouse substantia nigra lead to a loss of TH positive neurons six months after administration, and no difference in the degree of loss was observed between transgenic animals expressing forms of torsinA and wild type controls. Collectively, we did not observe evidence for a protective effect of torsinA in the mouse models we examined. Each of these models has limitations, and there is no single model with established predictive value with respect to the human disease. Nevertheless, these data do seem to support the view that torsinA is unlikely to be successfully translated as a target of therapy for human PD.

  1. The appropriateness of the mouse model for ataxia-telangiectasia: neurological defects but no neurodegeneration.

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    Lavin, Martin F

    2013-08-01

    Patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) are characterised by genome instability, cancer predisposition and a progressive neurodegeneration. A number of model systems have been developed for A-T but none recapitulate all the phenotype. The majority of these models have been generated in mice. While Atm deficient mouse models exhibit much of the phenotype described in patients with A-T, the broad consensus is that they do not display the most debilitating aspect of A-T, i.e. neurodegeneration. Cerebellar atrophy is one of the neuronal characteristics of A-T patients due to defects in neuronal development and progressive loss of Purkinje and granule cells. This is not evident in Atm-deficient mutants but there are multiple reports on neurological abnormalities in these mice. The focus of this review is to evaluate the appropriateness of Atm mutant mouse models for A-T, particularly with reference to neurological abnormalities and how they might relate to neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mouse modeling of the MDM2/MDMX-p53 signaling axis.

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    Tackmann, Nicole R; Zhang, Yanping

    2017-01-17

    It is evident that p53 activity is critical for tumor prevention and stress response through its transcriptional activation of genes affecting cellular senescence, apoptosis, cellular metabolism, and DNA repair. The regulation of p53 is highly complex, and MDM2 and MDMX are thought to be critical for deciding the fate of p53, both through inhibitory binding and posttranslational modification. Many mouse models have been generated to study the regulation of p53 in vivo, and they have altered our interpretations of how p53 is regulated by MDM2 and MDMX. Although MDM2 is absolutely required for p53 regulation, certain functions are dispensable under unstressed conditions, including the ability of MDM2 to degrade p53. MDMX, on the other hand, may only be required in select situations, like embryogenesis. These models have also clarified how cellular stress signals modify the p53-inhibiting activities of MDM2 and MDMX in vivo It is clear that more work will need to be performed to further understand the contexts for each of these signals and the requirements of various MDM2 and MDMX functions. Here, we will discuss what we have learned from mouse modeling of MDM2 and MDMX and underscore the ways in which these models could inform future therapies.

  3. Neuroprotective efficacy of aminopropyl carbazoles in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Tesla, Rachel; Wolf, Hamilton Parker; Xu, Pin; Drawbridge, Jordan; Estill, Sandi Jo; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Knobbe, Whitney; Burket, Aaron; Tran, Stephanie; Starwalt, Ruth; Morlock, Lorraine; Naidoo, Jacinth; Williams, Noelle S; Ready, Joseph M; McKnight, Steven L; Pieper, Andrew A

    2012-10-16

    We previously reported the discovery of P7C3, an aminopropyl carbazole having proneurogenic and neuroprotective properties in newborn neural precursor cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We have further found that chemicals having efficacy in this in vivo screening assay also protect dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra following exposure to the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, a mouse model of Parkinson disease. Here, we provide evidence that an active analog of P7C3, known as P7C3A20, protects ventral horn spinal cord motor neurons from cell death in the G93A-SOD1 mutant mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). P7C3A20 is efficacious in this model when administered at disease onset, and protection from cell death correlates with preservation of motor function in assays of walking gait and in the accelerating rotarod test. The prototypical member of this series, P7C3, delays disease progression in G93A-SOD1 mice when administration is initiated substantially earlier than the expected time of symptom onset. Dimebon, an antihistaminergic drug with significantly weaker proneurogenic and neuroprotective efficacy than P7C3, confers no protection in this ALS model. We propose that the chemical scaffold represented by P7C3 and P7C3A20 may provide a basis for the discovery and optimization of pharmacologic agents for the treatment of ALS.

  4. Insights into the genetic basis of systemic sclerosis: immunity in human disease and in mouse models

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    Wu M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Minghua Wu, Maureen D Mayes Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunogenetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by vasculopathy, fibrosis, and autoantibodies. In the past decade, great efforts have been made to investigate genetic susceptibility for SSc. To date, over 20 gene loci have been identified as risk factors for SSc in large genome-wide association studies and confirmed by independent replication studies. However, the biological relevance of these genetic associations is still largely unknown. Exploring the mechanism behind these risk loci is essential to better understand disease pathogenesis and to identify novel therapeutic targets. Mouse model studies including knockout, knockin and knockdown of these genes can advance our understanding of pathogenic cellular and molecular mechanisms in human disease. Although such mouse model systems do not exactly correspond to human disease, they can provide insight into pathological mechanisms that influence disease pathways. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the genetic basis of SSc in the setting of genetic manipulation of these pathways in murine models. Keywords: GWAS, Immunochip study, type I interferon pathway, genetic mutation animal models

  5. Mouse Models of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Comprising Host-Virus Immunologic Interactions

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    Tadashi Inuzuka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases associated with various human liver diseases, including acute, fulminant and chronic hepatitis; liver cirrhosis; and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the availability of an HBV vaccine and the development of antiviral therapies, there are still more than 350 million chronically infected people worldwide, approximately 5% of the world population. To understand the virus biology and pathogenesis in HBV-infected patients, several animal models have been developed to mimic hepatic HBV infection and the immune response against HBV, but the narrow host range of HBV infection and lack of a full immune response spectrum in animal models remain significant limitations. Accumulating evidence obtained from studies using a variety of mouse models that recapitulate hepatic HBV infection provides several clues for understanding host-virus immunologic interactions during HBV infection, whereas the determinants of the immune response required for HBV clearance are poorly defined. Therefore, adequate mouse models are urgently needed to elucidate the mechanism of HBV elimination and identify novel targets for antiviral therapies.

  6. Relationship between obesity phenotypes and genetic determinants in a mouse model for juvenile obesity.

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    Brockmann, Gudrun A; Schäfer, Nadine; Hesse, Claudia; Heise, Sebastian; Neuschl, Christina; Wagener, Asja; Churchill, Gary A; Li, Renhua

    2013-09-16

    Obesity, a state of imbalance between lean mass and fat mass, is important for the etiology of diseases affected by the interplay of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although genome-wide association studies have repeatedly associated genes with obesity and body weight, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between the muscle and adipose tissues remain unknown. Using 351 mice (at 10 wk of age) of an intercross population between Berlin Fat Mouse Inbred (BFMI) and C57BL/6NCrl (B6N) mice, we examined the causal relationships between genetic variations and multiple traits: body lean mass and fat mass, adipokines, and bone mineral density. Furthermore, evidence from structural equation modeling suggests causality among these traits. In the BFMI model, juvenile obesity affects lean mass and impairs bone mineral density via adipokines secreted from the white adipose tissues. While previous studies have indicated that lean mass has a causative effect on adiposity, in the Berlin Fat Mouse model that has been selected for juvenile obesity (at 9 wk of age) for >90 generations, however, the causality is switched from fat mass to lean mass. In addition, linkage studies and statistical modeling have indicated that quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 5 and 6 affect both lean mass and fat mass. These lines of evidence indicate that the muscle and adipose tissues interact with one another and the interaction is modulated by genetic variations that are shaped by selections. Experimental examinations are necessary to verify the biological role of the inferred causalities.

  7. Pressure Overload by Transverse Aortic Constriction Induces Maladaptive Hypertrophy in a Titin-Truncated Mouse Model

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    Qifeng Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein titin (TTN are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. We have previously developed a mouse model that imitates a TTN truncation mutation we found in a large pedigree with DCM. While heterozygous Ttn knock-in mice do not display signs of heart failure under sedentary conditions, they recapitulate the human phenotype when exposed to the pharmacological stressor angiotensin II or isoproterenol. In this study we investigated the effects of pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC in heterozygous (Het Ttn knock-in mice. Two weeks after TAC, Het mice developed marked impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.05, while wild-type (WT TAC mice did not. Het mice also trended toward increased ventricular end diastolic pressure and volume compared to WT littermates. We found an increase in histologically diffuse cardiac fibrosis in Het compared to WT in TAC mice. This study shows that a pattern of DCM can be induced by TAC-mediated pressure overload in a TTN-truncated mouse model. This model enlarges our arsenal of cardiac disease models, adding a valuable tool to understand cardiac pathophysiological remodeling processes and to develop therapeutic approaches to combat heart failure.

  8. A Mouse Intra-Intestinal Infusion Model and its Application to the Study of Nanoparticle Distribution

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    Sadio, Ana; Amaral, Ana L.; Nunes, Rute; Ricardo, Sara; Sarmento, Bruno; Almeida, Raquel; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; das Neves, José

    2016-01-01

    The oral route is the most preferable one when it comes to drug administration. Different animal models have been used to characterize the fate of potential medicines upon oral delivery but fail to clarify specific events occurring at localized sites of the gastrointestinal tract, particularly at the small intestine. We developed a new mouse intra-intestinal infusion model that enabled the direct administration of substances (such as drugs or nanoparticle drug carriers) in the small intestine through an implanted catheter, which can be maintained for prolonged periods of time. The location of catheter insertion can be previously determined as more proximal or distal, allowing to test specific portions of the intestine. Since the model is presumably able to maintain normal physiological characteristics, namely the mucus coating of the intestinal wall, it allowed studying the distribution of different nanoparticles upon localized intra-intestinal administration. The hereby proposed mouse model has the potential to be useful in other types of studies, namely in clarifying localized processes occurring at specific sites of the intestine. PMID:27965585

  9. Assessment of photoacoustic computed tomography to classify tissue in a polycystic-kidney disease mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Gattone, Vincent H., II; Kruger, Robert A.; Stantz, Keith M.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate PCT Imaging technique to classify tissue and extract kidney cysts in pcy mice model of human adolescent nephronophthisis. Method: Four mice with late stages of nephronophthisis with polycystic kidney disease-PKD and one normal mouse were scanned in the PCT Small Animal Scanner. Both vivo and ex-vivo images of mice kidney were taken at wavelength from 680 nm to 940 nm. The ex-vivo PCT images were compared with histology photographs to check the sensitivity of detecting cysts. Histograms of kidney images were generated over slices and fitted to Gaussian-curve model for volumetric analysis. The portions of cysts in kidneys were estimated and kidney images were segmented by three different colors to present the distribution of different tissues. Result: A good correspondence between PCT imaging findings and PKD histology result was observed. Histogram curves from images of pcy kidneys and normal kidneys were fitted to Gaussian-curve model. Portions of cysts, parenchyma and area of high level hemoglobin were estimated according to the curve fit result. A growth of cysts associated with relatively volume decrease of parenchyma and tissues with high perfusion of hemoglobin was observed. Conclusion: The PCT enabled visualization of renal cysts for mouse model and had the potential for volumetric measurements of kidney.

  10. Bee venom and its component apamin as neuroprotective agents in a Parkinson disease mouse model.

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    Daniel Alvarez-Fischer

    Full Text Available Bee venom has recently been suggested to possess beneficial effects in the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD. For instance, it has been observed that bilateral acupoint stimulation of lower hind limbs with bee venom was protective in the acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of PD. In particular, a specific component of bee venom, apamin, has previously been shown to have protective effects on dopaminergic neurons in vitro. However, no information regarding a potential protective action of apamin in animal models of PD is available to date. The specific goals of the present study were to (i establish that the protective effect of bee venom for dopaminergic neurons is not restricted to acupoint stimulation, but can also be observed using a more conventional mode of administration and to (ii demonstrate that apamin can mimic the protective effects of a bee venom treatment on dopaminergic neurons. Using the chronic mouse model of MPTP/probenecid, we show that bee venom provides sustained protection in an animal model that mimics the chronic degenerative process of PD. Apamin, however, reproduced these protective effects only partially, suggesting that other components of bee venom enhance the protective action of the peptide.

  11. Mechanisms of intestinal inflammation and development of associated cancers: Lessons learned from mouse models

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    Westbrook, Aya M.; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately 1/5th of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the