WorldWideScience

Sample records for a-dna

  1. Energy required to pinch a DNA plectoneme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Céline; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2018-03-01

    DNA supercoiling plays an important role from a biological point of view. One of its consequences at the supramolecular level is the formation of DNA superhelices named plectonemes. Normally separated by a distance on the order of 10 nm, the two opposite double strands of a DNA plectoneme must be brought closer if a protein or protein complex implicated in genetic regulation is to be bound simultaneously to both strands, as if the plectoneme was locally pinched. We propose an analytic calculation of the energetic barrier, of elastic nature, required to bring closer the two loci situated on the opposed double strands. We examine how this energy barrier scales with the DNA supercoiling. For physically relevant values of elastic parameters and of supercoiling density, we show that the energy barrier is in the kBT range under physiological conditions, thus demonstrating that the limiting step to loci encounter is more likely the preceding plectoneme slithering bringing the two loci side by side.

  2. Function of BRCA1 at a DNA Replication Origin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieberman, Paul

    2004-01-01

    ... and allow efficient repair of damaged DNA. In this proposal, we present preliminary data that BRCA1 functions in a DNA checkpoint response for the origin of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA replication (Ori P...

  3. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  4. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnia, S., E-mail: s.behnia@sci.uut.ac.ir; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-05

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I–V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive. - Highlights: • Modeling a DNA based molecular transistor and studying its transport properties. • Choosing the appropriate DNA sequence using the quantum chaos tools. • Choosing the functional interval for voltages via the inverse participation ratio tool. • Detecting the rectifier and negative differential resistance behavior of DNA.

  5. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G.; Soumpasis, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG) 5 ] 2 and [d(C 5 G 5 )] 2 . We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers

  6. Towards a DNA Nanoprocessor: Reusable Tile-Integrated DNA Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2016-08-22

    Modern electronic microprocessors use semiconductor logic gates organized on a silicon chip to enable efficient inter-gate communication. Here, arrays of communicating DNA logic gates integrated on a single DNA tile were designed and used to process nucleic acid inputs in a reusable format. Our results lay the foundation for the development of a DNA nanoprocessor, a small and biocompatible device capable of performing complex analyses of DNA and RNA inputs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A DNA aptamer recognising a malaria protein biomarker can function as part of a DNA origami assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godonoga, Maia; Lin, Ting-Yu; Oshima, Azusa; Sumitomo, Koji; Tang, Marco S. L.; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kinghorn, Andrew B.; Dirkzwager, Roderick M.; Zhou, Cunshan; Kuzuya, Akinori; Tanner, Julian A.; Heddle, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA aptamers have potential for disease diagnosis and as therapeutics, particularly when interfaced with programmable molecular technology. Here we have combined DNA aptamers specific for the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) with a DNA origami scaffold. Twelve aptamers that recognise PfLDH were integrated into a rectangular DNA origami and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the incorporated aptamers preserve their ability to specifically bind target protein. Captured PfLDH retained enzymatic activity and protein-aptamer binding was observed dynamically using high-speed AFM. This work demonstrates the ability of DNA aptamers to recognise a malaria biomarker whilst being integrated within a supramolecular DNA scaffold, opening new possibilities for malaria diagnostic approaches based on DNA nanotechnology. PMID:26891622

  8. Force regulated dynamics of RPA on a DNA fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Daldrop, Peter; Pinto, Cosimo; Levikova, Maryna; Cejka, Petr; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-07-08

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein, involved in most aspects of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. Here, we study the behavior of RPA on a DNA substrate that mimics a replication fork. Using magnetic tweezers we show that both yeast and human RPA can open forked DNA when sufficient external tension is applied. In contrast, at low force, RPA becomes rapidly displaced by the rehybridization of the DNA fork. This process appears to be governed by the binding or the release of an RPA microdomain (toehold) of only few base-pairs length. This gives rise to an extremely rapid exchange dynamics of RPA at the fork. Fork rezipping rates reach up to hundreds of base-pairs per second, being orders of magnitude faster than RPA dissociation from ssDNA alone. Additionally, we show that RPA undergoes diffusive motion on ssDNA, such that it can be pushed over long distances by a rezipping fork. Generally the behavior of both human and yeast RPA homologs is very similar. However, in contrast to yeast RPA, the dissociation of human RPA from ssDNA is greatly reduced at low Mg(2+) concentrations, such that human RPA can melt DNA in absence of force. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  10. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization

    KAUST Repository

    Torelli, Emanuela

    2014-03-20

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A DNA barcoding approach to characterize pollen collected by honeybees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Galimberti

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated DNA barcoding effectiveness to characterize honeybee pollen pellets, a food supplement largely used for human nutrition due to its therapeutic properties. We collected pollen pellets using modified beehives placed in three zones within an alpine protected area (Grigna Settentrionale Regional Park, Italy. A DNA barcoding reference database, including rbcL and trnH-psbA sequences from 693 plant species (104 sequenced in this study was assembled. The database was used to identify pollen collected from the hives. Fifty-two plant species were identified at the molecular level. Results suggested rbcL alone could not distinguish among congeneric plants; however, psbA-trnH identified most of the pollen samples at the species level. Substantial variability in pollen composition was observed between the highest elevation locality (Alpe Moconodeno, characterized by arid grasslands and a rocky substrate, and the other two sites (Cornisella and Ortanella at lower altitudes. Pollen from Ortanella and Cornisella showed the presence of typical deciduous forest species; however in samples collected at Ortanella, pollen of the invasive Lonicera japonica, and the ornamental Pelargonium x hortorum were observed. Our results indicated pollen composition was largely influenced by floristic local biodiversity, plant phenology, and the presence of alien flowering species. Therefore, pollen molecular characterization based on DNA barcoding might serve useful to beekeepers in obtaining honeybee products with specific nutritional or therapeutic characteristics desired by food market demands.

  13. Untangling taxonomy: a DNA barcode reference library for Canadian spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoev, Gergin A; deWaard, Jeremy R; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; deWaard, Stephanie L; Lu, Liuqiong; Robertson, James; Telfer, Angela C; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1460 species of spiders have been reported from Canada, 3% of the global fauna. This study provides a DNA barcode reference library for 1018 of these species based upon the analysis of more than 30,000 specimens. The sequence results show a clear barcode gap in most cases with a mean intraspecific divergence of 0.78% vs. a minimum nearest-neighbour (NN) distance averaging 7.85%. The sequences were assigned to 1359 Barcode index numbers (BINs) with 1344 of these BINs composed of specimens belonging to a single currently recognized species. There was a perfect correspondence between BIN membership and a known species in 795 cases, while another 197 species were assigned to two or more BINs (556 in total). A few other species (26) were involved in BIN merges or in a combination of merges and splits. There was only a weak relationship between the number of specimens analysed for a species and its BIN count. However, three species were clear outliers with their specimens being placed in 11-22 BINs. Although all BIN splits need further study to clarify the taxonomic status of the entities involved, DNA barcodes discriminated 98% of the 1018 species. The present survey conservatively revealed 16 species new to science, 52 species new to Canada and major range extensions for 426 species. However, if most BIN splits detected in this study reflect cryptic taxa, the true species count for Canadian spiders could be 30-50% higher than currently recognized. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Paleoparasitological report on Ascaris aDNA from an ancient East Asian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Seok Oh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Ascaris DNA was extracted and sequenced from a medieval archaeological sample in Korea. While Ascaris eggs were confirmed to be of human origin by archaeological evidence, it was not possible to pinpoint the exact species due to close genetic relationships among them. Despite this shortcoming, this is the first Ascaris ancient DNA (aDNA report from a medieval Asian country and thus will expand the scope of Ascaris aDNA research.

  15. Q-Bank Phytoplasma: A DNA Barcoding Tool for Phytoplasma Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contaldo, Nicoletta; Paltrinieri, Samanta; Makarova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding is an identification method based on comparison of a short DNA sequence with known sequences from a database. A DNA barcoding tool has been developed for phytoplasma identification. This phytoplasma DNA barcoding protocol based on the tuf gene has been shown to identify phytoplasmas...

  16. Direct AFM observation of an opening event of a DNA cuboid constructed via a prism structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2011-04-07

    A cuboid structure was constructed using a DNA origami design based on a square prism structure. The structure was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering. The real-time opening event of the cuboid was directly observed by high-speed AFM.

  17. Genetic diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia using a DNA-array based platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Defesche, Joep C.; Tejedor, Diego; Castillo, Sergio; Stef, Marianne; Mata, Nelva; Gomez-Enterria, Pilar; Martinez-Faedo, Ceferino; Forga, Lluis; Mata, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the Lipochip genetic diagnostic platform by assessing effectiveness, sensitivity, specificity and costs for the identification of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Spain. This platform includes the use of a DNA micro array, the detection of

  18. Ancient DNA (aDNA): What is it? Why is it important?- Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Alexa Walker; George Nicholas; Daryl Pullman; Alan Goodman; Bioarchaeology and Genetics Working Group

    2014-01-01

    As genetic research is increasingly applied to new areas of study, including in archaeological and heritage contexts, a range of questions arise concerning the social, ethical, legal, and political implications of ancient DNA. This fact sheet explains the nature and challenges of aDNA research, and why information from it is important and relevant to people today.  

  19. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  20. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production

    OpenAIRE

    Ann-Charlotte Wallenhammar; Albin Gunnarson; Fredrik Hansson; Anders Jonsson

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR) in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to plantin...

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance at the picomole level of a DNA adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Roger; Wang, Poguang; Giese, Roger W

    2013-10-21

    We investigate the limit of detection for obtaining NMR data of a DNA adduct using modern microscale NMR instrumentation, once the adduct has been isolated at the picomole level. Eighty nanograms (130 pmol) of a DNA adduct standard, N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene 5'-monophosphate (AAF-dGMP), in 1.5 μL of D₂O with 10% methanol-d₄, in a vial, was completely picked up as a droplet suspended in a fluorocarbon liquid and loaded efficiently into a microcoil probe. This work demonstrates a practical manual method of droplet microfluidic sample loading, previously demonstrated using automated equipment, which provides a severalfold advantage over conventional flow injection. Eliminating dilution during injection and confining the sample to the observed volume produce the full theoretical mass sensitivity of a microcoil, comparable to that of a microcryo probe. With 80 ng, an NMR spectrum acquired over 40 h showed all of the resonances seen in a standard spectrum of AAF-dGMP, with a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 10, despite broadening due to previously noted effects of conformational exchange. Even with this broadening to 5 Hz, a two-dimensional total correlation spectroscopy spectrum was acquired on 1.6 μg in 18 h. This work helps to define the utility of NMR in combination with other analytical methods for the structural characterization of a small amount of a DNA adduct.

  2. Breather trapping and breather transmission in a DNA model with an interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, A.; Romero, F.R.; Archilla, J.F.R.

    2006-01-01

    We study the dynamics of moving discrete breathers in an interfaced piecewise DNA molecule. This is a DNA chain in which all the base pairs are identical and there exists an interface such that the base pairs dipole moments at each side are oriented in opposite directions. The Hamiltonian...... of the Peyrard-Bishop model is augmented with a term that includes the dipole-dipole coupling between base pairs. Numerical simulations show the existence of two dynamical regimes. If the translational kinetic energy of a moving breather launched towards the interface is below a critical value, it is trapped...

  3. [RTEL1 (regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1), a DNA helicase essential for genome stability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, Tangui; Jullien, Laurent; Schertzer, Mike; Lefebvre, Axelle; Kermasson, Laetitia; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Revy, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    RTEL1 (regulator of telomere length helicase 1) is a DNA helicase that has been identified more than 10 years ago. Many works since, mainly in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the mouse, have highlighted its role in chromosomal stability, maintenance of telomere length, and DNA repair. Recently, four laboratories have characterized RTEL1 mutations in patients with dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson (HH) syndrome, a rare and severe variant of DC. We here summarize the current knowledge on RTEL1 and discuss the possible other functions that RTEL1 could play. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. Production of a DNA Vaccine Specific for the 64 kDa Protective Antigen of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Middlebrooks, Bobby L

    2007-01-01

    The gene for the protective antigen of E. rhusiopathiae will be inserted into a eukaryotic vector both for the production of a DNA vaccine and for large scale production of the recombinant protein (in vitro...

  5. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  6. Building a DNA barcode library of Alaska's non-marine arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Derek S; Bowser, Matthew; Morton, John M; Bickford, Casey; Meierotto, Sarah; Hildebrandt, Kyndall

    2017-03-01

    Climate change may result in ecological futures with novel species assemblages, trophic mismatch, and mass extinction. Alaska has a limited taxonomic workforce to address these changes. We are building a DNA barcode library to facilitate a metabarcoding approach to monitoring non-marine arthropods. Working with the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding, we obtained DNA barcodes from recently collected and authoritatively identified specimens in the University of Alaska Museum (UAM) Insect Collection and the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge collection. We submitted tissues from 4776 specimens, of which 81% yielded DNA barcodes representing 1662 species and 1788 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs), of primarily terrestrial, large-bodied arthropods. This represents 84% of the species available for DNA barcoding in the UAM Insect Collection. There are now 4020 Alaskan arthropod species represented by DNA barcodes, after including all records in Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) of species that occur in Alaska - i.e., 48.5% of the 8277 Alaskan, non-marine-arthropod, named species have associated DNA barcodes. An assessment of the identification power of the library in its current state yielded fewer species-level identifications than expected, but the results were not discouraging. We believe we are the first to deliberately begin development of a DNA barcode library of the entire arthropod fauna for a North American state or province. Although far from complete, this library will become increasingly valuable as more species are added and costs to obtain DNA sequences fall.

  7. Decreased uv mutagenesis in cdc8, a DNA replication mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.; Hinkle, D.; Prakash, S.

    1978-01-01

    A DNA replication mutant of yeast, cdc8, was found to decrease uv-induced reversion of lys2-1, arg4-17, tryl and ural. This effect was observed with all three alleles of cdc8 tested. Survival curves obtained following uv irradiation in cdc8 rad double mutants show that cdc8 is epistatic to rad6, as well as to rad1; cdc8 rad51 double mutants seem to be more sensitive than the single mutants. Since uv-induced reversion in cdc8 rad1 and cdc8 rad51 double mutants is like that of the cdc8 single mutants, we conclude that CDC8 plays a direct role in error-prone repair. To test whether CDC8 codes for a DNA polymerase, we have purified both DNA polymerase I and DNA polymerase II from cdc8 and CDC+ cells. The purified DNA polymerases from cdc8 were no more heat labile than those from CDC+, suggesting that CDC8 is not a structural gene for either enzyme

  8. Femtosecond Laser-Inscripted Direct Ultrafast Fabrication of a DNA Distributor Using Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojun Shin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A femtosecond laser can be used for single or multiple writing processes to create sub 10-μm lines or holes directly without the use of masks. In this study, we characterized the depth and width of micro-channels created by femtosecond laser micro-scribing in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS under various energy doses (1%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% and laser beam passes (5, 10 and 15. Based on a microfluidic simulation in a bio-application, a DNA distributor was designed and fabricated based on an energy dose of 5% and a laser beam pass of 5. The simulated depth and width of the micro-channels was 3.58 and 5.27 μm, respectively. The depth and width of the micro-channels were linearly proportional to the energy dose and the number of laser beam passes. In a DNA distribution experiment, a brighter fluorescent intensity for YOYO-1 Iodide with DNA was observed in the middle channels with longer DNA. In addition, the velocity was the lowest as estimated in the computational simulation. The polymer processability of the femtosecond laser and the bio-applicability of the DNA distributor were successfully confirmed. Therefore, a promising technique for the maskless fabrication of sub 10-μm bio-microfluidic channels was demonstrated.

  9. Spectroscopic study of a DNA brush synthesized in situ by surface initiated enzymatic polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Nuruzzaman; Tjong, Vinalia; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Zharnikov, Michael

    2013-08-29

    We used a combination of synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and angle-resolved near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to study the chemical integrity, purity, and possible internal alignment of single-strand (ss) adenine deoxynucleotide (poly(A)) DNA brushes. The brushes were synthesized by surface-initiated enzymatic polymerization (SIEP) on a 25-mer of adenine self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold (A25-SH), wherein the terminal 3'-OH of the A25-SH serve as the initiation sites for SIEP of poly(A). XPS and NEXAFS spectra of poly(A) brushes were found to be almost identical to those of A25-SH initiator, with no unambiguous traces of contamination. Apart from the well-defined chemical integrity and contamination-free character, the brushes were found to have a high degree of orientational order, with an upright orientation of individual strands, despite their large thickness up to ~55 nm, that corresponds to a chain length of at least several hundred nucleotides for individual ssDNA molecules. The orientational order exhibited by these poly(A) DNA brushes, mediated presumably by base stacking, was found to be independent of the brush thickness as long as the packing density was high enough. The well-defined character and orientational ordering of the ssDNA brushes make them a potentially promising system for different applications.

  10. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  11. Yeast redoxyendonuclease, a DNA repair enzyme similar to Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossett, J.; Lee, K.; Cunningham, R.P.; Doetsch, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    A DNA repair endonuclease (redoxyendonuclease) was isolated from bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The enzyme has been purified by a series of column chromatography steps and cleaves OsO 4 -damaged, double-stranded DNA at sites of thymine glycol and heavily UV-irradiated DNA at sites of cytosine, thymine, and guanine photoproducts. The base specificity and mechanism of phosphodiester bond cleavage for the yeast redoxyendonuclease appear to be identical with those of Escherichia coli endonuclease III when thymine glycol containing, end-labeled DNA fragments of defined sequence are employed as substrates. Yeast redoxyendonuclease has an apparent molecular size of 38,000-42,000 daltons and is active in the absence of divalent metal cations. The identification of such an enzyme in yeast may be of value in the elucidation of the biochemical basis for radiation sensitivity in certain yeast mutants

  12. PPARGC1A DNA methylation in subcutaneous adipose tissue in low birth weight subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillberg, Linn; Jacobsen, Stine; Rönn, Tina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Increased DNA methylation of the metabolic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1A) has been reported in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects and from low birth weight (LBW) subjects with an increased risk of T2D. High...... and insulin-stimulated SAT from LBW and matched normal birth weight (NBW) subjects during control and high-fat overfeeding. MATERIALS/METHODS: Nineteen young healthy men with LBW and 26 NBW controls were studied after both a 5-day high-fat overfeeding and a control diet in a randomized crossover setting. DNA...... methylation was assessed with bisulfite sequencing and mRNA expression with quantitative real-time PCR. RESULTS: Following high-fat overfeeding, increased SAT PPARGC1A DNA methylation was observed in LBW subjects but not in NBW controls. Basal SAT PPARGC1A mRNA expression was unaffected by diet and similar...

  13. Identification of a DNA restriction-modification system in Pectobacterium carotovorum strains isolated from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleron, K; Waleron, M; Osipiuk, J; Podhajska, A J; Lojkowska, E

    2006-02-01

    Polish isolates of pectinolytic bacteria from the species Pectobacterium carotovorum were screened for the presence of a DNA restriction-modification (R-M) system. Eighty-nine strains of P. carotovorum were isolated from infected potato plants. Sixty-six strains belonged to P. carotovorum ssp. atrosepticum and 23 to P. carotovorum ssp. carotovorum. The presence of restriction enzyme Pca17AI, which is an isoschizomer of EcoRII endonuclease, was observed in all isolates of P. c. atrosepticum but not in P. c. carotovorum. The biochemical properties, PCR amplification, and sequences of the Pca17AI restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase genes were compared with the prototype EcoRII R-M system genes. Only when DNA isolated from cells of P. c. atrosepticum was used as a template, amplification of a 680 bp homologous to the gene coding EcoRII endonuclease. Endonuclease Pca17AI, having a relatively low temperature optimum, was identified. PCR amplification revealed that the nucleotide sequence of genes for EcoRII and Pca17AI R-M are different. Dcm methylation was observed in all strains of Pectobacterium and other Erwinia species tested. The sequence of a DNA fragment coding Dcm methylase in P. carotovorum was different from that of Escherichia coli. Pca17AI is the first psychrophilic isoschizomer of EcoRII endonuclease. The presence of specific Dcm methylation in chromosomal DNA isolated from P. carotovorum is described for the first time. A 680 bp PCR product, unique for P. c. atrosepticum strains, could serve as a molecular marker for detection of these bacteria in environmental samples.

  14. Priming of microglia in a DNA-repair deficient model of accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Divya D A; Jaarsma, Dick; Holtman, Inge R; Olah, Marta; Ferreira, Filipa M; Schaafsma, Wandert; Brouwer, Nieske; Meijer, Michel M; de Waard, Monique C; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kreft, Karim L; Laman, Jon D; de Haan, Gerald; Biber, Knut P H; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with reduced function, degenerative changes, and increased neuroinflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence suggests that changes in microglia cells contribute to the age-related deterioration of the CNS. The most prominent age-related change of microglia is enhanced sensitivity to inflammatory stimuli, referred to as priming. It is unclear if priming is due to intrinsic microglia ageing or induced by the ageing neural environment. We have studied this in Ercc1 mutant mice, a DNA repair-deficient mouse model that displays features of accelerated aging in multiple tissues including the CNS. In Ercc1 mutant mice, microglia showed hallmark features of priming such as an exaggerated response to peripheral lipopolysaccharide exposure in terms of cytokine expression and phagocytosis. Specific targeting of the Ercc1 deletion to forebrain neurons resulted in a progressive priming response in microglia exemplified by phenotypic alterations. Summarizing, these data show that neuronal genotoxic stress is sufficient to switch microglia from a resting to a primed state. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intrinsic Dynamics Analysis of a DNA Octahedron by Elastic Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a fundamental component of living systems where it plays a crucial role at both functional and structural level. The programmable properties of DNA make it an interesting building block for the construction of nanostructures. However, molecular mechanisms for the arrangement of these well-defined DNA assemblies are not fully understood. In this paper, the intrinsic dynamics of a DNA octahedron has been investigated by using two types of Elastic Network Models (ENMs. The application of ENMs to DNA nanocages include the analysis of the intrinsic flexibilities of DNA double-helices and hinge sites through the calculation of the square fluctuations, as well as the intrinsic collective dynamics in terms of cross-collective map calculation coupled with global motions analysis. The dynamics profiles derived from ENMs have then been evaluated and compared with previous classical molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The results presented here revealed that ENMs can provide useful insights into the intrinsic dynamics of large DNA nanocages and represent a useful tool in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology.

  16. A DNA Mini-Barcoding System for Authentication of Processed Fish Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokralla, Shadi; Hellberg, Rosalee S; Handy, Sara M; King, Ian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2015-10-30

    Species substitution is a form of seafood fraud for the purpose of economic gain. DNA barcoding utilizes species-specific DNA sequence information for specimen identification. Previous work has established the usability of short DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-for identification of specimens harboring degraded DNA. This study aims at establishing a DNA mini-barcoding system for all fish species commonly used in processed fish products in North America. Six mini-barcode primer pairs targeting short (127-314 bp) fragments of the cytochrome c oxidase I (CO1) DNA barcode region were developed by examining over 8,000 DNA barcodes from species in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Seafood List. The mini-barcode primer pairs were then tested against 44 processed fish products representing a range of species and product types. Of the 44 products, 41 (93.2%) could be identified at the species or genus level. The greatest mini-barcoding success rate found with an individual primer pair was 88.6% compared to 20.5% success rate achieved by the full-length DNA barcode primers. Overall, this study presents a mini-barcoding system that can be used to identify a wide range of fish species in commercial products and may be utilized in high throughput DNA sequencing for authentication of heavily processed fish products.

  17. A DNA Barcode Library for North American Pyraustinae (Lepidoptera: Pyraloidea: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaofu; Landry, Jean-François; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-01-01

    Although members of the crambid subfamily Pyraustinae are frequently important crop pests, their identification is often difficult because many species lack conspicuous diagnostic morphological characters. DNA barcoding employs sequence diversity in a short standardized gene region to facilitate specimen identifications and species discovery. This study provides a DNA barcode reference library for North American pyraustines based upon the analysis of 1589 sequences recovered from 137 nominal species, 87% of the fauna. Data from 125 species were barcode compliant (>500bp, barcode sharing, creating a total of 155 BINs. Two systems for OTU designation, ABGD and BIN, were examined to check the correspondence between current taxonomy and sequence clusters. The BIN system performed better than ABGD in delimiting closely related species, while OTU counts with ABGD were influenced by the value employed for relative gap width. Different species with low or no interspecific divergence may represent cases of unrecognized synonymy, whereas those with high intraspecific divergence require further taxonomic scrutiny as they may involve cryptic diversity. The barcode library developed in this study will also help to advance understanding of relationships among species of Pyraustinae.

  18. BOKP: A DNA Barcode Reference Library for Monitoring Herbal Drugs in the Korean Pharmacopeia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxin Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbal drug authentication is an important task in traditional medicine; however, it is challenged by the limitations of traditional authentication methods and the lack of trained experts. DNA barcoding is conspicuous in almost all areas of the biological sciences and has already been added to the British pharmacopeia and Chinese pharmacopeia for routine herbal drug authentication. However, DNA barcoding for the Korean pharmacopeia still requires significant improvements. Here, we present a DNA barcode reference library for herbal drugs in the Korean pharmacopeia and developed a species identification engine named KP-IDE to facilitate the adoption of this DNA reference library for the herbal drug authentication. Using taxonomy records, specimen records, sequence records, and reference records, KP-IDE can identify an unknown specimen. Currently, there are 6,777 taxonomy records, 1,054 specimen records, 30,744 sequence records (ITS2 and psbA-trnH and 285 reference records. Moreover, 27 herbal drug materials were collected from the Seoul Yangnyeongsi herbal medicine market to give an example for real herbal drugs authentications. Our study demonstrates the prospects of the DNA barcode reference library for the Korean pharmacopeia and provides future directions for the use of DNA barcoding for authenticating herbal drugs listed in other modern pharmacopeias.

  19. A DNA Origami Mechanical Device for the Regulation of Microcosmic Structural Rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Neng; Hong, Zhouping; Wang, Huading; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Ziyue; Li, Chao; Xia, Han; Fang, Yan; Li, Maoteng; Zhan, Yi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2017-11-01

    DNA origami makes it feasible to fabricate a tremendous number of DNA nanostructures with various geometries, dimensions, and functionalities. Moreover, an increasing amount of research on DNA nanostructures is focused on biological and biomedical applications. Here, the reversible regulation of microcosmic structural rigidity is accomplished using a DNA origami device in vitro. The designed DNA origami monomer is composed of an internal central axis and an external sliding tube. Due to the external tube sliding, the device transforms between flexible and rigid states. By transporting the device into the liposome, the conformational change of the origami device induces a structural change in the liposome. The results obtained demonstrate that the programmed DNA origami device can be applied to regulate the microcosmic structural rigidity of liposomes. Because microcosmic structural rigidity is important to cell proliferation and function, the results obtained potentially provide a foundation for the regulation of cell microcosmic structural rigidity using DNA nanostructures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Direct analysis of Holliday junction resolving enzyme in a DNA origami nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Endo, Masayuki; Cañas, Cristina; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-06-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolution is a fundamental step for completion of homologous recombination. HJ resolving enzymes (resolvases) distort the junction structure upon binding and prior cleavage, raising the possibility that the reactivity of the enzyme can be affected by a particular geometry and topology at the junction. Here, we employed a DNA origami nano-scaffold in which each arm of a HJ was tethered through the base-pair hybridization, allowing us to make the junction core either flexible or inflexible by adjusting the length of the DNA arms. Both flexible and inflexible junctions bound to Bacillus subtilis RecU HJ resolvase, while only the flexible junction was efficiently resolved into two duplexes by this enzyme. This result indicates the importance of the structural malleability of the junction core for the reaction to proceed. Moreover, cleavage preferences of RecU-mediated reaction were addressed by analyzing morphology of the reaction products. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Voltammetric Detection of Damage to DNA by Arsenic Compounds at a DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wennrich

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA biosensor can serve as a powerfull tool for simple in vitro tests of chemicaltoxicity. In this paper, damage to DNA attached to the surface of screen-printed carbonelectrode by arsenic compounds in solution is described. Using the Co(III complex with1,10-phenanthroline, [Co(phen3]3+ , as an electrochemical DNA marker and the Ru(IIcomplex with bipyridyne, [Ru(bipy3]2+ , as a DNA oxidation catalyst, the portion of originaldsDNA which survives an incubation of the biosensor in the cleavage medium was evaluated.The model cleavage mixture was composed of an arsenic compound at 10-3 mol/Lconcentration corresponding to real contaminated water, 2x10-4 mol/L Fe(II or Cu(II ions asthe redox catalyst, and 1.5x10-2 mol/L hydrogen peroxide. DNA damage by arsenite,dimethylarsinic acid as the metabolic product of inorganic arsenic and widely used herbicide,as well as phenylarsonic acid and p-arsanilic acid as the representatives of feed additives wasfound in difference to arsenate.

  2. Tailored protein encapsulation into a DNA host using geometrically organized supramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Andreas; Lill, Pascal; Stegemann, Pierre; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Schöneweiß, Elisa-C.; Merdanovic, Melisa; Gudnason, Daniel; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Gamrad, Lisa; Barcikowski, Stephan; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Birkedal, Victoria; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Ehrmann, Michael; Saccà, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The self-organizational properties of DNA have been used to realize synthetic hosts for protein encapsulation. However, current strategies of DNA-protein conjugation still limit true emulation of natural host-guest systems, whose formation relies on non-covalent bonds between geometrically matching interfaces. Here we report one of the largest DNA-protein complexes of semisynthetic origin held in place exclusively by spatially defined supramolecular interactions. Our approach is based on the decoration of the inner surface of a DNA origami hollow structure with multiple ligands converging to their corresponding binding sites on the protein surface with programmable symmetry and range-of-action. Our results demonstrate specific host-guest recognition in a 1:1 stoichiometry and selectivity for the guest whose size guarantees sufficient molecular diffusion preserving short intermolecular distances. DNA nanocontainers can be thus rationally designed to trap single guest molecules in their native form, mimicking natural strategies of molecular recognition and anticipating a new method of protein caging.

  3. Inhibition of BACE1 Activity by a DNA Aptamer in an Alzheimer's Disease Cell Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyu Liang

    Full Text Available An initial step in amyloid-β (Aβ production includes amyloid precursor protein (APP cleavage via β-Site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1. Increased levels of brain Aβ have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Thus, β-secretase represents a primary target for inhibitor drug development in AD. In this study, aptamers were obtained from combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries using a technology referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. A purified human BACE1 extracellular domain was used as a target to conduct an in vitro selection process using SELEX. Two DNA aptamers were capable of binding to BACE1 with high affinity and good specificity, with Kd values in the nanomolar range. We subsequently confirmed that one aptamer, A1, exhibited a distinct inhibitory effect on BACE1 activity in an AD cell model. We detected the effects of M17-APPsw cells that stably expressed Swedish mutant APP after aptamer A1 treatment. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations secreted by M17-APPsw cells decreased intracellularly and in culture media. Furthermore, Western blot analysis indicated that sAPPβ expression significantly decreased in the A1 treated versus control groups. These findings support the preliminary feasibility of an aptamer evolved from a SELEX strategy to function as a potential BACE1 inhibitor. To our knowledge, this is the first study to acquire a DNA aptamer that exhibited binding specificity to BACE1 and inhibited its activity.

  4. A DNA-Inspired Encryption Methodology for Secure, Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Users are pushing for greater physical mobility with their network and Internet access. Mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) can provide an efficient mobile network architecture, but security is a key concern. A figure summarizes differences in the state of network security for MANET and fixed networks. MANETs require the ability to distinguish trusted peers, and tolerate the ingress/egress of nodes on an unscheduled basis. Because the networks by their very nature are mobile and self-organizing, use of a Public Key Infra structure (PKI), X.509 certificates, RSA, and nonce ex changes becomes problematic if the ideal of MANET is to be achieved. Molecular biology models such as DNA evolution can provide a basis for a proprietary security architecture that achieves high degrees of diffusion and confusion, and resistance to cryptanalysis. A proprietary encryption mechanism was developed that uses the principles of DNA replication and steganography (hidden word cryptography) for confidentiality and authentication. The foundation of the approach includes organization of coded words and messages using base pairs organized into genes, an expandable genome consisting of DNA-based chromosome keys, and a DNA-based message encoding, replication, and evolution and fitness. In evolutionary computing, a fitness algorithm determines whether candidate solutions, in this case encrypted messages, are sufficiently encrypted to be transmitted. The technology provides a mechanism for confidential electronic traffic over a MANET without a PKI for authenticating users.

  5. Methods for transforming and expression screening of filamentous fungal cells with a DNA library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Sarah; Lamsa, Michael; Cherry, Joel; Ward, Connie

    2015-06-02

    The present invention relates to methods for expression screening of filamentous fungal transformants, comprising: (a) isolating single colony transformants of a DNA library introduced into E. coli; (b) preparing DNA from each of the single colony E. coli transformants; (c) introducing a sample of each of the DNA preparations of step (b) into separate suspensions of protoplasts of a filamentous fungus to obtain transformants thereof, wherein each transformant contains one or more copies of an individual polynucleotide from the DNA library; (d) growing the individual filamentous fungal transformants of step (c) on selective growth medium, thereby permitting growth of the filamentous fungal transformants, while suppressing growth of untransformed filamentous fungi; and (e) measuring activity or a property of each polypeptide encoded by the individual polynucleotides. The present invention also relates to isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides of interest obtained by such methods, to nucleic acid constructs, expression vectors, and recombinant host cells comprising the isolated polynucleotides, and to methods of producing the polypeptides encoded by the isolated polynucleotides.

  6. Horses for courses: a DNA-based test for race distance aptitude in thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Emmeline W; Ryan, Donal P; MacHugh, David E

    2012-12-01

    Variation at the myostatin (MSTN) gene locus has been shown to influence racing phenotypes in Thoroughbred horses, and in particular, early skeletal muscle development and the aptitude for racing at short distances. Specifically, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the first intron of MSTN (g.66493737C/T) is highly predictive of best race distance among Flat racing Thoroughbreds: homozygous C/C horses are best suited to short distance races, heterozygous C/T horses are best suited to middle distance races, and homozygous T/T horses are best suited to longer distance races. Patent applications for this gene marker association, and other linked markers, have been filed. The information contained within the patent applications is exclusively licensed to the commercial biotechnology company Equinome Ltd, which provides a DNA-based test to the international Thoroughbred horse racing and breeding industry. The application of this information in the industry enables informed decision making in breeding and racing and can be used to assist selection to accelerate the rate of change of genetic types among distinct populations (Case Study 1) and within individual breeding operations (Case Study 2).

  7. Investigating the Effects of a DNA Fingerprinting Workshop on 10th Grade Students' Self Efficacy and Attitudes toward Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Duygu; Simcox, Amanda

    The purpose of this study was investigate the effects of a DNA Fingerprinting Workshop on 10th grade students' self efficacy and attitudes toward science. The content of the workshop based on high school science curriculum and includes multimedia instruction, laboratory experiment and participation of undergraduate students as mentors. N=93…

  8. Precise Coating of a Wide Range of DNA Templates by a Protein Polymer with a DNA Binding Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Estrich, Nicole A.; Werten, Marc W.T.; Maarel, van der Johan R.C.; Labean, Thomas H.; Wolf, de Frits A.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Vries, de Renko

    2017-01-01

    Emerging DNA-based nanotechnologies would benefit from the ability to modulate the properties (e.g., solubility, melting temperature, chemical stability) of diverse DNA templates (single molecules or origami nanostructures) through controlled, self-assembling coatings. We here introduce a DNA

  9. Traditional Mold Analysis Compared to a DNA-based Method of Mold Analysis with Applications in Asthmatics' Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional environmental mold analysis is based-on microscopic observations and counting of mold structures collected from the air on a sticky surface or culturing of molds on growth media for identification and quantification. A DNA-based method of mold analysis called mol...

  10. One-by-one single-molecule detection of mutated nucleobases by monitoring tunneling current using a DNA tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Phuc Tan; Nishino, Tomoaki; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-31

    A DNA molecule was utilized as a probe tip to achieve single-molecule genetic diagnoses. Hybridization of the probe and target DNAs resulted in electron tunneling along the emergent double-stranded DNA. Simple stationary monitoring of the tunneling current leads to single-molecule DNA detection and discovery of base mismatches and methylation.

  11. Correction of the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group E by injection of a DNA damage binding protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Keeney; A.P.M. Eker (André); T. Brody; W. Vermeulen (Wim); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S. Linn

    1994-01-01

    textabstractCells from a subset of patients with the DNA-repair-defective disease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) are known to lack a DNA damage-binding (DDB) activity. Purified human DDB protein was injected into XP-E cells to test whether the DNA-repair defect in these cells

  12. Structural features of an exocyclic adduct positioned opposite an abasic site in a DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouchakdjian, M.; Patel, D.J.; Eisenberg, M.; Johnson, F.; Grollman, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    Structural studies have been extended to dual lesions where an exocyclic adduct is positioned opposite an abasic site in the center of a DNA oligomer duplex. NMR and energy minimization studies were performed on the 1,N 2 -propanodeoxyguanosine exocyclic adduct (X) positioned opposite a tetrahydrofuran abasic site (F) with the dual lesions located in the center of the (C1-A2-T3-G4-X5-G6-T7-A8-C9)·(G10-T11-A12-C13-F14-C15-A16-T17-G18) X·F 9-mer duplex. Two-dimensional NMR experiments establish that the X·F 9-mer helix is right-handed with Watson-Crick A·T and G·C base pairing on either side of the lesion site. NOEs are detected from the methylene protons of the exocyclic ring of X5 to the imino protons of G4·C15 and G6·C13 which flank the lesion site, as well as to the H1' and H1 double-prime protons of the cross strand F14 tetrahydrofuran moiety. These NMR results establish that the exocyclic adduct X5 is positioned between flanking G4·C15 and G6·C13 base pairs and directed toward the abasic lesion F14 on the partner strand. These studies establish that the exocyclic ring of the 1,N 2 -propanodeoxyguanosine adduct fits into the cavity generated by the abasic site

  13. A DNA metabarcoding study of a primate dietary diversity and plasticity across its entire fragmented range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Quéméré

    Full Text Available In tropical regions, most primary ecosystems have been replaced by mosaic landscapes in which species must cope with a large shift in the distribution of their habitat and associated food resources. Primates are particularly vulnerable to habitat modifications. Most species persist in small fragments surrounded by complex human-mediated matrices whose structure and connectivity may strongly influence their dispersal and feeding behavior. Behavioral plasticity appears to be a crucial parameter governing the ability of organisms to exploit the resources offered by new matrix habitats and thus to persist in fragmented habitats. In this study, we were interested in the dietary plasticity of the golden-crowned sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli, an endangered species of lemur, found only in the Daraina region in north-eastern Madagascar. We used a DNA-based approach combining the barcoding concept and Illumina next-generation sequencing to (i describe the species diet across its entire range and (ii evaluate the influence of landscape heterogeneity on diet diversity and composition. Faeces from 96 individuals were sampled across the entire species range and their contents were analyzed using the trnL metabarcoding approach. In parallel, we built a large DNA reference database based on a checklist of the plant species of the Daraina region. Our results suggest that golden-crowned sifakas exhibit remarkable dietary diversity with at least 130 plant species belonging to 80 genera and 49 different families. We highlighted an influence of both habitat type and openness on diet composition suggesting a high flexibility of foraging strategies. Moreover, we observed the presence of numerous cultivated and naturalized plants in the faeces of groups living in forest edge areas. Overall, our findings support our initial expectation that P. tattersalli is able to cope with the current level of alteration of the landscape and confirm our previous results on the

  14. Molecular and immunological characterization of a DNA-launched yellow fever virus 17D infectious clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Lukashevich, Igor S; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Franco, David

    2015-04-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV)-17D is an empirically developed, highly effective live-attenuated vaccine that has been administered to human beings for almost a century. YFV-17D has stood as a paradigm for a successful viral vaccine, and has been exploited as a potential virus vector for the development of recombinant vaccines against other diseases. In this study, a DNA-launched YFV-17D construct (pBeloBAC-FLYF) was explored as a new modality to the standard vaccine to combine the commendable features of both DNA vaccine and live-attenuated viral vaccine. The DNA-launched YFV-17D construct was characterized extensively both in cell culture and in mice. High titres of YFV-17D were generated upon transfection of the DNA into cells, whereas a mutant with deletion in the capsid-coding region (pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC) was restricted to a single round of infection, with no release of progeny virus. Homologous prime-boost immunization of AAD mice with both pBeloBAC-FLYF and pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC elicited specific dose-dependent cellular immune response against YFV-17D. Vaccination of A129 mice with pBeloBAC-FLYF resulted in the induction of YFV-specific neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinated subjects. These promising results underlined the potential of the DNA-launched YFV both as an alternative to standard YFV-17D vaccination and as a vaccine platform for the development of DNA-based recombinant YFV vaccines. © 2015.

  15. Selection of a DNA barcode for Nectriaceae from fungal whole-genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhaoqing; Zhao, Peng; Luo, Jing; Zhuang, Wenying; Yu, Zhihe

    2012-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a short segment of sequence that is able to distinguish species. A barcode must ideally contain enough variation to distinguish every individual species and be easily obtained. Fungi of Nectriaceae are economically important and show high species diversity. To establish a standard DNA barcode for this group of fungi, the genomes of Neurospora crassa and 30 other filamentous fungi were compared. The expect value was treated as a criterion to recognize homologous sequences. Four candidate markers, Hsp90, AAC, CDC48, and EF3, were tested for their feasibility as barcodes in the identification of 34 well-established species belonging to 13 genera of Nectriaceae. Two hundred and fifteen sequences were analyzed. Intra- and inter-specific variations and the success rate of PCR amplification and sequencing were considered as important criteria for estimation of the candidate markers. Ultimately, the partial EF3 gene met the requirements for a good DNA barcode: No overlap was found between the intra- and inter-specific pairwise distances. The smallest inter-specific distance of EF3 gene was 3.19%, while the largest intra-specific distance was 1.79%. In addition, there was a high success rate in PCR and sequencing for this gene (96.3%). CDC48 showed sufficiently high sequence variation among species, but the PCR and sequencing success rate was 84% using a single pair of primers. Although the Hsp90 and AAC genes had higher PCR and sequencing success rates (96.3% and 97.5%, respectively), overlapping occurred between the intra- and inter-specific variations, which could lead to misidentification. Therefore, we propose the EF3 gene as a possible DNA barcode for the nectriaceous fungi.

  16. ITS1: a DNA barcode better than ITS2 in eukaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Cun; Liu, Chang; Huang, Liang; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Chen, Haimei; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Cai, Dayong; Li, Jian-Qin

    2015-05-01

    A DNA barcode is a short piece of DNA sequence used for species determination and discovery. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS/ITS2) region has been proposed as the standard DNA barcode for fungi and seed plants and has been widely used in DNA barcoding analyses for other biological groups, for example algae, protists and animals. The ITS region consists of both ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Here, a large-scale meta-analysis was carried out to compare ITS1 and ITS2 from three aspects: PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and species discrimination, in terms of the presence of DNA barcoding gaps, species discrimination efficiency, sequence length distribution, GC content distribution and primer universality. In total, 85 345 sequence pairs in 10 major groups of eukaryotes, including ascomycetes, basidiomycetes, liverworts, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, monocotyledons, eudicotyledons, insects and fishes, covering 611 families, 3694 genera, and 19 060 species, were analysed. Using similarity-based methods, we calculated species discrimination efficiencies for ITS1 and ITS2 in all major groups, families and genera. Using Fisher's exact test, we found that ITS1 has significantly higher efficiencies than ITS2 in 17 of the 47 families and 20 of the 49 genera, which are sample-rich. By in silico PCR amplification evaluation, primer universality of the extensively applied ITS1 primers was found superior to that of ITS2 primers. Additionally, shorter length of amplification product and lower GC content was discovered to be two other advantages of ITS1 for sequencing. In summary, ITS1 represents a better DNA barcode than ITS2 for eukaryotic species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A DNA barcode library for Germany's mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinière, Jérôme; Hendrich, Lars; Balke, Michael; Beermann, Arne J; König, Tobias; Hess, Monika; Koch, Stefan; Müller, Reinhard; Leese, Florian; Hebert, Paul D N; Hausmann, Axel; Schubart, Christoph D; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    Mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera) are prominent representatives of aquatic macroinvertebrates, commonly used as indicator organisms for water quality and ecosystem assessments. However, unambiguous morphological identification of EPT species, especially their immature life stages, is a challenging, yet fundamental task. A comprehensive DNA barcode library based upon taxonomically well-curated specimens is needed to overcome the problematic identification. Once available, this library will support the implementation of fast, cost-efficient and reliable DNA-based identifications and assessments of ecological status. This study represents a major step towards a DNA barcode reference library as it covers for two-thirds of Germany's EPT species including 2,613 individuals belonging to 363 identified species. As such, it provides coverage for 38 of 44 families (86%) and practically all major bioindicator species. DNA barcode compliant sequences (≥500 bp) were recovered from 98.74% of the analysed specimens. Whereas most species (325, i.e., 89.53%) were unambiguously assigned to a single Barcode Index Number (BIN) by its COI sequence, 38 species (18 Ephemeroptera, nine Plecoptera and 11 Trichoptera) were assigned to a total of 89 BINs. Most of these additional BINs formed nearest neighbour clusters, reflecting the discrimination of geographical subclades of a currently recognized species. BIN sharing was uncommon, involving only two species pairs of Ephemeroptera. Interestingly, both maximum pairwise and nearest neighbour distances were substantially higher for Ephemeroptera compared to Plecoptera and Trichoptera, possibly indicating older speciation events, stronger positive selection or faster rate of molecular evolution. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Efficacy of a DNA Vaccine Carrying Eimeria maxima Gam56 Antigen Gene against Coccidiosis in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    To control coccidiosis without using prophylactic medications, a DNA vaccine targeting the gametophyte antigen Gam56 from Eimeria maxima in chickens was constructed, and the immunogenicity and protective effects were evaluated. The ORF of Gam56 gene was cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(zeo)+. Expression of Gam56 protein in COS-7 cells transfected with recombinant plasmid pcDNA-Gam56 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The DNA vaccine was injected intramuscularly to yellow feathered broilers of 1-week old at 3 dosages (25, 50, and 100 µg/chick). Injection was repeated once 1 week later. One week after the second injection, birds were challenged orally with 5×104 sporulated oocysts of E. maxima, then weighed and killed at day 8 post challenge. Blood samples were collected and examined for specific peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation activity and serum antibody levels. Compared with control groups, the administration of pcDNA-Gam56 vaccine markedly increased the lymphocyte proliferation activity (P<0.05) at day 7 and 14 after the first immunization. The level of lymphocyte proliferation started to decrease on day 21 after the first immunization. A similar trend was seen in specific antibody levels. Among the 3 pcDNA-Gam56 immunized groups, the median dosage group displayed the highest lymphocyte proliferation and antibody levels (P<0.05). The median dosage group had the greatest relative body weight gain (89.7%), and the greatest oocyst shedding reduction (53.7%). These results indicate that median dosage of DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and immune protection effects, and may be used in field applications for coccidiosis control. PMID:23710081

  19. Methods for interpreting lists of affected genes obtained in a DNA microarray experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedegaard Jakob

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper was to describe and compare the methods used and the results obtained by the participants in a joint EADGENE (European Animal Disease Genomic Network of Excellence and SABRE (Cutting Edge Genomics for Sustainable Animal Breeding workshop focusing on post analysis of microarray data. The participating groups were provided with identical lists of microarray probes, including test statistics for three different contrasts, and the normalised log-ratios for each array, to be used as the starting point for interpreting the affected probes. The data originated from a microarray experiment conducted to study the host reactions in broilers occurring shortly after a secondary challenge with either a homologous or heterologous species of Eimeria. Results Several conceptually different analytical approaches, using both commercial and public available software, were applied by the participating groups. The following tools were used: Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, MAPPFinder, LIMMA, GOstats, GOEAST, GOTM, Globaltest, TopGO, ArrayUnlock, Pathway Studio, GIST and AnnotationDbi. The main focus of the approaches was to utilise the relation between probes/genes and their gene ontology and pathways to interpret the affected probes/genes. The lack of a well-annotated chicken genome did though limit the possibilities to fully explore the tools. The main results from these analyses showed that the biological interpretation is highly dependent on the statistical method used but that some common biological conclusions could be reached. Conclusion It is highly recommended to test different analytical methods on the same data set and compare the results to obtain a reliable biological interpretation of the affected genes in a DNA microarray experiment.

  20. Development of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer can be Predicted by a DNA Hypermethylation Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Javier C; Andrés, Guillermo; Ashour, Nadia; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; López, Jose I; Ropero, Santiago

    2016-03-01

    Detection of DNA hypermethylation has emerged as a novel molecular biomarker for prostate cancer diagnosis and evaluation of prognosis. We sought to define whether a hypermethylation profile of patients with prostate cancer on androgen deprivation would predict castrate resistant prostate cancer. Genome-wide methylation analysis was performed using a methylation cancer panel in 10 normal prostates and 45 tumor samples from patients placed on androgen deprivation who were followed until castrate resistant disease developed. Castrate resistant disease was defined according to EAU (European Association of Urology) guideline criteria. Two pathologists reviewed the Gleason score, Ki-67 index and neuroendocrine differentiation. Hierarchical clustering analysis was performed and relationships with outcome were investigated by Cox regression and log rank analysis. We found 61 genes that were significantly hypermethylated in greater than 20% of tumors analyzed. Three clusters of patients were characterized by a DNA methylation profile, including 1 at risk for earlier castrate resistant disease (log rank p = 0.019) and specific mortality (log rank p = 0.002). Hypermethylation of ETV1 (HR 3.75) and ZNF215 (HR 2.89) predicted disease progression despite androgen deprivation. Hypermethylation of IRAK3 (HR 13.72), ZNF215 (HR 4.81) and SEPT9 (HR 7.64) were independent markers of prognosis. Prostate specific antigen greater than 25 ng/ml, Gleason pattern 5, Ki-67 index greater than 12% and metastasis at diagnosis also predicted a negative response to androgen deprivation. Study limitations included the retrospective design and limited number of cases. Epigenetic silencing of the mentioned genes could be novel molecular markers for the prognosis of advanced prostate cancer. It might predict castrate resistance during hormone deprivation and, thus, disease specific mortality. Gene hypermethylation is associated with disease progression in patients who receive hormone therapy. It

  1. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cui; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (plife cycle.

  2. A DNA Computing Model for the Graph Vertex Coloring Problem Based on a Probe Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The biggest bottleneck in DNA computing is exponential explosion, in which the DNA molecules used as data in information processing grow exponentially with an increase of problem size. To overcome this bottleneck and improve the processing speed, we propose a DNA computing model to solve the graph vertex coloring problem. The main points of the model are as follows: ① The exponential explosion problem is solved by dividing subgraphs, reducing the vertex colors without losing the solutions, and ordering the vertices in subgraphs; and ② the bio-operation times are reduced considerably by a designed parallel polymerase chain reaction (PCR technology that dramatically improves the processing speed. In this article, a 3-colorable graph with 61 vertices is used to illustrate the capability of the DNA computing model. The experiment showed that not only are all the solutions of the graph found, but also more than 99% of false solutions are deleted when the initial solution space is constructed. The powerful computational capability of the model was based on specific reactions among the large number of nanoscale oligonucleotide strands. All these tiny strands are operated by DNA self-assembly and parallel PCR. After thousands of accurate PCR operations, the solutions were found by recognizing, splicing, and assembling. We also prove that the searching capability of this model is up to O(359. By means of an exhaustive search, it would take more than 896 000 years for an electronic computer (5 × 1014 s−1 to achieve this enormous task. This searching capability is the largest among both the electronic and non-electronic computers that have been developed since the DNA computing model was proposed by Adleman’s research group in 2002 (with a searching capability of O(220. Keywords: DNA computing, Graph vertex coloring problem, Polymerase chain reaction

  3. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhao

    Full Text Available A DNA-binding protein (DBP [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05, indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01. The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01. The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle.

  4. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenhammar, Ann-Charlotte; Gunnarson, Albin; Hansson, Fredrik; Jonsson, Anders

    2016-04-22

    Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR) in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to planting, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 60% of 45 fields on 10 of 18 farms. In 2014, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 44% of 59 fields in 14 of 36 farms, in the main winter OSR producing region in southern Sweden. P. brassicae was present indicative of a risk for >10% yield loss with susceptible cultivars (>1300 DNA copies g soil(-1)) in 47% and 44% of fields in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Furthermore, P. brassicae DNA was indicative of sites at risk of complete crop failure if susceptible cultivars were grown (>50 000 copies g(-1) soil) in 14% and 8% of fields in 2013 and 2014, respectively. A survey of all fields at Lanna research station in western Sweden showed that P. brassicae was spread throughout the farm, as only three of the fields (20%) showed infection levels below the detection limit for P.brassicae DNA, while the level was >50,000 DNA copies g(-1) soil in 20% of the fields. Soil-borne spread is of critical importance and soil scraped off footwear showed levels of up to 682 million spores g(-1) soil. Soil testing is an important tool for determining the presence of P. brassicae and providing an indication of potential yield loss, e.g., in advisory work on planning for a sustainable OSR crop rotation. This soil test is gaining acceptance as a tool that increases the likelihood of success in precision agriculture and in applied research conducted in commercial oilseed fields and at research stations. The present application highlights the importance of prevention of

  5. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Charlotte Wallenhammar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to planting, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 60% of 45 fields on 10 of 18 farms. In 2014, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 44% of 59 fields in 14 of 36 farms, in the main winter OSR producing region in southern Sweden. P. brassicae was present indicative of a risk for >10% yield loss with susceptible cultivars (>1300 DNA copies g soil−1 in 47% and 44% of fields in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Furthermore, P. brassicae DNA was indicative of sites at risk of complete crop failure if susceptible cultivars were grown (>50 000 copies g−1 soil in 14% and 8% of fields in 2013 and 2014, respectively. A survey of all fields at Lanna research station in western Sweden showed that P. brassicae was spread throughout the farm, as only three of the fields (20% showed infection levels below the detection limit for P.brassicae DNA, while the level was >50,000 DNA copies g−1 soil in 20% of the fields. Soil-borne spread is of critical importance and soil scraped off footwear showed levels of up to 682 million spores g−1 soil. Soil testing is an important tool for determining the presence of P. brassicae and providing an indication of potential yield loss, e.g., in advisory work on planning for a sustainable OSR crop rotation. This soil test is gaining acceptance as a tool that increases the likelihood of success in precision agriculture and in applied research conducted in commercial oilseed fields and at research stations. The present application highlights the importance of

  6. Particle integrity, sampling, and application of a DNA-tagged tracer for aerosol transport studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeser, Cynthia Jeanne [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-07-21

    Aerosols are an ever-present part of our daily environment and have extensive effects on both human and environmental health. Particles in the inhalable range (1-10 μm diameter) are of particular concern because their deposition in the lung can lead to a variety of illnesses including allergic reactions, viral or bacterial infections, and cancer. Understanding the transport of inhalable aerosols across both short and long distances is necessary to predict human exposures to aerosols. To assess the transport of hazardous aerosols, surrogate tracer particles are required to measure their transport through occupied spaces. These tracer particles must not only possess similar transport characteristics to those of interest but also be easily distinguished from the background at low levels and survive the environmental conditions of the testing environment. A previously-developed DNA-tagged particle (DNATrax), composed of food-grade sugar and a DNA oligonucleotide as a “barcode” label, shows promise as a new aerosol tracer. Herein, the use of DNATrax material is validated for use in both indoor and outdoor environments. Utilizing passive samplers made of materials commonly found in indoor environments followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for endpoint particle detection, particles detection was achieved up to 90 m from the aerosolization location and across shorter distances with high spatial resolution. The unique DNA label and PCR assay specificity were leveraged to perform multiple simultaneous experiments. This allowed the assessment of experimental reproducibility, a rare occurrence among aerosol field tests. To transition to outdoor testing, the solid material provides some protection of the DNA label when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, with 60% of the DNA remaining intact after 60 minutes under a germicidal lamp and the rate of degradation declining with irradiation time. Additionally, exposure of the DNATrax material using

  7. A smart magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent responsive to adenosine based on a DNA aptamer-conjugated gadolinium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weichen; Lu, Yi

    2011-05-07

    We report a general strategy for developing a smart MRI contrast agent for the sensing of small molecules such as adenosine based on a DNA aptamer that is conjugated to a Gd compound and a protein streptavidin. The binding of adenosine to its aptamer results in the dissociation of the Gd compound from the large protein, leading to decreases in the rotational correlation time and thus change of MRI contrast. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  8. The RecQ helicase-topoisomerase III-Rmi1 complex: a DNA structure-specific 'dissolvasome'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    structures, and we propose here that it functions in a coordinated fashion as a DNA structure-specific 'dissolvasome'. Little is known about how the RTR complex might be regulated or targeted to various DNA structures in vivo. Recent findings indicate that the components of the RTR complex might activate...... the cell cycle checkpoint machinery as well as be a target of checkpoint kinases, suggesting that these events are crucial to ensure faithful DNA replication and chromosome segregation....

  9. Examining the effects of a DNA fingerprinting workshop on science teachers' professional development and student learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Duygu

    behavior. The goal is to understand what factors affect teachers' decision making to implement the new knowledge and skills in their classrooms. For this purpose, the study focuses on the effects of a DNA fingerprinting workshop, which has been developed and is regularly offered by a large Midwestern university in the United States for secondary science teachers and their students through cooperation between the university and a large Midwestern public school district. The workshop focuses on the biotechnology applications of genetics---specifically, use of DNA fingerprinting technology in different areas of social life---while forensic science is emphasized. Results indicate that the teachers' motivation to attend the DNA Fingerprinting professional development workshop was mainly influenced by two variables: (1) the need to improve content knowledge and skills, and (2) requirements associated with current educational policies. Level of content knowledge was also found to be a factor contributing to teachers' motivation to implement the workshop. Concerns related to student maturity and classroom management were also identified as factors influencing teachers' implementation behavior. Evidence that the DNA Fingerprinting workshop can be successfully implemented by classroom teachers was obtained. The DNA fingerprinting workshop was found to be a successful model for packaging professional development experiences for content intensive areas.

  10. Integrating a DNA barcoding project with an ecological survey: a case study on temperate intertidal polychaete communities in Qingdao, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Zhinan; Chen, Haiyan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hui; Guo, Lei; Pan, Haijian

    2010-07-01

    In this study, we integrated a DNA barcoding project with an ecological survey on intertidal polychaete communities and investigated the utility of CO1 gene sequence as a DNA barcode for the classification of the intertidal polychaetes. Using 16S rDNA as a complementary marker and combining morphological and ecological characterization, some of dominant and common polychaete species from Chinese coasts were assessed for their taxonomic status. We obtained 22 haplotype gene sequences of 13 taxa, including 10 CO1 sequences and 12 16S rDNA sequences. Based on intra- and inter-specific distances, we built phylogenetic trees using the neighbor-joining method. Our study suggested that the mitochondrial CO1 gene was a valid DNA barcoding marker for species identification in polychaetes, but other genes, such as 16S rDNA, could be used as a complementary genetic marker. For more accurate species identification and effective testing of species hypothesis, DNA barcoding should be incorporated with morphological, ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic information. The application of DNA barcoding and molecular identification in the ecological survey on the intertidal polychaete communities demonstrated the feasibility of integrating DNA taxonomy and ecology.

  11. DNA ligase III is involved in a DNA-PK independent pathway of NHEJ in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Perrault, A.R.; Qin, W.; Wang, H.; Iliakis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Double strand breaks (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and other cytotoxic agents in the genome of higher eukaryotes are thought to be repaired either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or non-homologous endjoining (NHEJ). We previously reported the operation of two components of NHEJ in vivo: a DNA-PK dependent component that operates with fast kinetics (D-NHEJ), and a DNA-PK independent component that acts as a backup (basic or B-NHEJ) and operates with kinetics an order of magnitude slower. To gain further insight into the mechanisms of B-NHEJ, we investigated DNA endjoining in extracts 180BR, a human cell line deficient in DNA ligase IV, using an in vitro plasmid-based DNA endjoining assay. An anti DNA ligase III antibody inhibited almost completely DNA endjoining activity in these extracts. On the other hand, an anti DNA ligase I antibody had no measurable effect in DNA endjoining activity. Immunodepletion of DNA ligase III from 180BR cell extracts abolished the DNA endjoining activity, which could be restored by addition of purified human DNA ligase IIIb. Full-length DNA ligase III bound to double stranded DNA and stimulated DNA endjoining in both intermolecular and intramolecular ligation. Furthermore, fractionation of HeLa cell extracts demonstrated the presence of an activity stimulating the function of DNA ligase III. Based on these observations we propose that DNA ligase III is the ligase operating in B-NHEJ

  12. Patient identification error among prostate needle core biopsy specimens--are we ready for a DNA time-out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suba, Eric J; Pfeifer, John D; Raab, Stephen S

    2007-10-01

    Patient identification errors in surgical pathology often involve switches of prostate or breast needle core biopsy specimens among patients. We assessed strategies for decreasing the occurrence of these uncommon and yet potentially catastrophic events. Root cause analyses were performed following 3 cases of patient identification error involving prostate needle core biopsy specimens. Patient identification errors in surgical pathology result from slips and lapses of automatic human action that may occur at numerous steps during pre-laboratory, laboratory and post-laboratory work flow processes. Patient identification errors among prostate needle biopsies may be difficult to entirely prevent through the optimization of work flow processes. A DNA time-out, whereby DNA polymorphic microsatellite analysis is used to confirm patient identification before radiation therapy or radical surgery, may eliminate patient identification errors among needle biopsies.

  13. Toehold-Mediated Displacement of an Adenosine-Binding Aptamer from a DNA Duplex by its Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserud, Jon H; Macri, Katherine M; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2016-10-24

    DNA is increasingly used to engineer dynamic nanoscale circuits, structures, and motors, many of which rely on DNA strand-displacement reactions. The use of functional DNA sequences (e.g., aptamers, which bind to a wide range of ligands) in these reactions would potentially confer responsiveness on such devices, and integrate DNA computation with highly varied molecular stimuli. By using high-throughput single-molecule FRET methods, we compared the kinetics of a putative aptamer-ligand and aptamer-complement strand-displacement reaction. We found that the ligands actively disrupted the DNA duplex in the presence of a DNA toehold in a similar manner to complementary DNA, with kinetic details specific to the aptamer structure, thus suggesting that the DNA strand-displacement concept can be extended to functional DNA-ligand systems. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Energy dissipation effects on imaging of soft materials by dynamic atomic force microscopy: A DNA-chip study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaner-Goutorbe, M., E-mail: magali.phaner@ec-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL) UMR CNRS 5270, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Iazykov, M. [Université de Lyon, laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 allée d' Italie 69364 Lyon cedex 07 (France); Villey, R. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL) UMR CNRS 5270, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Université de Lyon, laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée et Nanostructures, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Léon Brillouin 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Sicard, D.; Robach, Y. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL) UMR CNRS 5270, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France)

    2013-05-01

    Using amplitude-mode AFM (AM-AFM), we have obtained valuable information during these recent years through the study of amplitude and phase shift dependence on tip–sample separation, leading to a comprehensive understanding of the interaction processes. Two imaging regimes, attractive and repulsive, have been identified and a relationship between phase and dissipative energy was established, providing information on observed material properties. Most of the previous studies have concerned model systems: either hard or soft materials. In this paper, we present the analysis of a mixed system of soft structures on a hard substrate. This is a DNA chip for biological applications consisting of oligonucleotides covalently linked by a layer of silane to a silicon substrate. A detailed study of amplitude-phase curves as a function of the tip–sample separation allowed us to define the best experimental conditions to obtain specific information: we got reliable conditions to minimize noise during topographic imaging and an understanding of the processes of energy dissipation involved in the DNA breaking for DNA arrays. By calculating the energy dissipated as a function of the amplitude of oscillation, we have demonstrated a transition from an energy dissipation process governed by localized viscoelastic interactions (due to the soft layer) to a process governed by extended irreversible deformations (due to the hard substrate). Highlights: ► Amplitude mode AFM analysis of a DNA array is presented. ► Reliable conditions for noise minimization on topographic images are presented. ► Phase, amplitude vs distance curves are analyzed for different setpoint amplitudes. ► Energy dissipation processes are described from viscoelasticity to DNA breaking.

  15. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Takahashi, Masateru; Takahashi, Etsuko; Joudeh, Luay I.; Marini, Monica; Das, Gobind; Elshenawy, Mohamed; Akal, Anastassja; Sakashita, Kosuke; Alam, Intikhab; Tehseen, Muhammad; Sobhy, Mohamed Abdelmaboud; Stingl, Ulrich; Merzaban, Jasmeen; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Hamdan, Samir

    2018-01-01

    The deep-sea brines of the Red Sea are remote and unexplored environments characterized by high temperatures, anoxic water, and elevated concentrations of salt and heavy metals. This environment provides a rare system to study the interplay between halophilic and thermophilic adaptation in biologic macromolecules. The present article reports the first DNA polymerase with halophilic and thermophilic features. Biochemical and structural analysis by Raman and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the charge distribution on the protein’s surface mediates the structural balance between stability for thermal adaptation and flexibility for counteracting the salt-induced rigid and nonfunctional hydrophobic packing. Salt bridge interactions via increased negative and positive charges contribute to structural stability. Salt tolerance, conversely, is mediated by a dynamic structure that becomes more fixed and functional with increasing salt concentration. We propose that repulsive forces among excess negative charges, in addition to a high percentage of negatively charged random coils, mediate this structural dynamism. This knowledge enabled us to engineer a halophilic version of KOD DNA polymerase.—Takahashi, M., Takahashi, E., Joudeh, L. I., Marini, M., Das, G., Elshenawy, M. M., Akal, A., Sakashita, K., Alam, I., Tehseen, M., Sobhy, M. A., Stingl, U., Merzaban, J. S., Di Fabrizio, E., Hamdan, S. M. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea.

  16. A DNA microarray-based methylation-sensitive (MS)-AFLP hybridization method for genetic and epigenetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, F; Yamamoto, M

    2004-07-01

    We previously developed a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting technique named the Methylation Sensitive (MS)-AFLP method, which permits comparative genome-wide scanning of methylation status with a manageable number of fingerprinting experiments. The technique uses the methylation sensitive restriction enzyme NotI in the context of the existing Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) method. Here we report the successful conversion of this gel electrophoresis-based DNA fingerprinting technique into a DNA microarray hybridization technique (DNA Microarray MS-AFLP). By performing a total of 30 (15 x 2 reciprocal labeling) DNA Microarray MS-AFLP hybridization experiments on genomic DNA from two breast and three prostate cancer cell lines in all pairwise combinations, and Southern hybridization experiments using more than 100 different probes, we have demonstrated that the DNA Microarray MS-AFLP is a reliable method for genetic and epigenetic analyses. No statistically significant differences were observed in the number of differences between the breast-prostate hybridization experiments and the breast-breast or prostate-prostate comparisons.

  17. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid') built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging' is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein. PMID:28134243

  18. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masateru; Takahashi, Etsuko; Joudeh, Luay I; Marini, Monica; Das, Gobind; Elshenawy, Mohamed M; Akal, Anastassja; Sakashita, Kosuke; Alam, Intikhab; Tehseen, Muhammad; Sobhy, Mohamed A; Stingl, Ulrich; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Hamdan, Samir M

    2018-01-24

    The deep-sea brines of the Red Sea are remote and unexplored environments characterized by high temperatures, anoxic water, and elevated concentrations of salt and heavy metals. This environment provides a rare system to study the interplay between halophilic and thermophilic adaptation in biologic macromolecules. The present article reports the first DNA polymerase with halophilic and thermophilic features. Biochemical and structural analysis by Raman and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the charge distribution on the protein's surface mediates the structural balance between stability for thermal adaptation and flexibility for counteracting the salt-induced rigid and nonfunctional hydrophobic packing. Salt bridge interactions via increased negative and positive charges contribute to structural stability. Salt tolerance, conversely, is mediated by a dynamic structure that becomes more fixed and functional with increasing salt concentration. We propose that repulsive forces among excess negative charges, in addition to a high percentage of negatively charged random coils, mediate this structural dynamism. This knowledge enabled us to engineer a halophilic version of KOD DNA polymerase.-Takahashi, M., Takahashi, E., Joudeh, L. I., Marini, M., Das, G., Elshenawy, M. M., Akal, A., Sakashita, K., Alam, I., Tehseen, M., Sobhy, M. A., Stingl, U., Merzaban, J. S., Di Fabrizio, E., Hamdan, S. M. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea.

  19. Building a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Peninsula Malaysia: what about the subspecies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John-James; Sing, Kong-Wah; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and subspecies. Analyses confirmed the capacity of the new DNA barcode reference library to distinguish the vast majority of species (92%) and revealed that most subspecies possessed unique DNA barcodes (84%). In some cases conspecific subspecies exhibited genetic distances between their DNA barcodes that are typically seen between species, and these were often taxa that have previously been regarded as full species. Subspecies designations as shorthand for geographically and morphologically differentiated groups provide a useful heuristic for assessing how such groups correlate with clustering patterns of DNA barcodes, especially as the number of DNA barcodes per species in reference libraries increases. Our study demonstrates the value in attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records as they can reveal a history of taxonomic concepts and expose important units of biodiversity.

  20. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino (Rutgers); (LBNL); (Connecticut); (TJU); (MSU)

    2017-01-30

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid’) built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging’ is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein.

  1. Controlling the stoichiometry and strand polarity of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex structure by using a DNA origami frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Arivazhagan; Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Lan Thao Tran, Phong; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Guanine-rich oligonucleotides often show a strong tendency to form supramolecular architecture, the so-called G-quadruplex structure. Because of the biological significance, it is now considered to be one of the most important conformations of DNA. Here, we describe the direct visualization and single-molecule analysis of the formation of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex in KCl solution. The conformational changes were carried out by incorporating two duplex DNAs, with G–G mismatch repeats in the middle, inside a DNA origami frame and monitoring the topology change of the strands. In the absence of KCl, incorporated duplexes had no interaction and laid parallel to each other. Addition of KCl induced the formation of a G-quadruplex structure by stably binding the duplexes to each other in the middle. Such a quadruplex formation allowed the DNA synapsis without disturbing the duplex regions of the participating sequences, and resulted in an X-shaped structure that was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Further, the G-quadruplex formation in KCl solution and its disruption in KCl-free buffer were analyzed in real-time. The orientation of the G-quadruplex is often difficult to control and investigate using traditional biochemical methods. However, our method using DNA origami could successfully control the strand orientations, topology and stoichiometry of the G-quadruplex. PMID:23863846

  2. Design and construction of a DNA origami drug delivery system based on MPT64 antibody aptamer for tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Hafezi-Moghadam, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-02-01

    With all of the developments on infectious diseases, tuberculosis (TB) remains a cause of death among people. One of the most promising assembly techniques in nano-technology is "scaffolded DNA origami" to design and construct a nano-scale drug delivery system. Because of the global health problems of tuberculosis, the development of potent new anti-tuberculosis drug delivery system without cross-resistance with known anti-mycobacterial agents is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to design a nano-scale drug delivery system for TB treatment using the DNA origami method. In this study, we presented an experimental research on a DNA drug delivery system for treating Tuberculosis. TEM images were visualized with an FEI Tecnai T12 BioTWIN at 120 kV. The model was designed by caDNAno software and computational prediction of the 3D solution shape and its flexibility was calculated with a CanDo server. Synthesizing the product was imaged using transmission electron microscopy after negative-staining by uranyl formate. We constructed a multilayer 3D DNA nanostructure system by designing square lattice geometry with the scaffolded-DNA-origami method. With changes in the lock and key sequences, we recommend that this system be used for other infectious diseases to target the pathogenic bacteria.

  3. KISS1 can be used as a novel target for developing a DNA immunocastration vaccine in ram lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanguo; Liu, Guiqiong; Jiang, Xunping; Ijaz, Nabeel; Tesema, Birhanu; Xie, Guangyue

    2015-02-04

    KISS1 gene-encoding kisspeptins are critical for the onset of puberty and control of adult fertility. This study investigated whether KISS1 can be used as a novel target for immunocastration. Human KISS1 was fused with the HBsAg-S gene for constructing an antibiotic-free recombinant plasmid pKS-asd that coded for 31.168 kDa target fusion protein. Six male Hu sheep lambs were divided into two equal groups, treatment and control. The vaccine (1mg/ram lamb) prepared in saline solution was injected into lambs at weeks 0, 3 and 6 of the experiment, respectively. Vaccine efficacy was evaluated in terms of KISS1-specific IgG antibody response, serum testosterone levels, scrotal circumference, testicular weight, length and breadth, extent of testicular tissue damage, and sexual behaviour changes. The specific anti-KISS1 antibody titre in vaccinated animals was significantly higher than that in controls (pvaccinated animals showed lower serum testosterone level, testicular weight and length and smaller scrotal circumference than those in controls (pvaccinated animals was suppressed; sexual behaviours in vaccinated animals were significantly lower (pvaccine induced a strong antibody response and resulted in the suppression of gonadal function and sexual behaviour in animals, demonstrating that KISS1 can be used as a novel target for developing a DNA immunocastration vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-dependent bioactivation of clofibric acid to a DNA-damaging intermediate in mouse hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaoui, Roula; Sallustio, Benedetta C; Burcham, Philip C; Fontaine, Frank R

    2003-05-06

    Glucuronidation of a number of carboxyl-containing drugs generates reactive acyl glucuronide metabolites. These electrophilic species alkylate cell proteins and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of toxic syndromes seen in patients receiving the parent aglycones. Whether acyl glucuronides also attack nuclear DNA is unknown, although the acyl glucuronide formed from clofibric acid was recently found to decrease the transfection efficiency of phage DNA and generate strand breaks in plasmid DNA in vitro. To determine if such a DNA damage occurs within a cellular environment, the comet assay (i.e. single-cell gel electrophoresis) was used to detect DNA lesions in the nuclear genome of isolated mouse hepatocytes cultured with clofibric acid. Overnight exposure to 50 microM and higher concentrations of clofibric acid produced concentration-dependent increases in the comet areas of hepatocyte nuclei, with 1 mM clofibrate producing a 3.6-fold elevation over controls. These effects closely coincided with culture medium concentrations of the glucuronide metabolite formed from clofibric acid, 1-O-beta-clofibryl glucuronide. Consistent with a role for glucuronidation in the DNA damage observed, the glucuronidation inhibitor borneol diminished glucuronide formation from 100 microM clofibrate by 98% and returned comet areas to baseline levels. Collectively, these results suggest that the acyl glucuronide formed from clofibric acid is capable of migrating from its site of formation within the endoplasmic reticulum to generate strand nicks in nuclear DNA.

  5. The Species and Origin of Shark Fins in Taiwan's Fishing Ports, Markets, and Customs Detention: A DNA Barcoding Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Po-Shun; Hung, Tzu-Chiao; Chang, Hung-An; Huang, Chien-Kang; Shiao, Jen-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    The increasing consumption of shark products, along with the shark's fishing vulnerabilities, has led to the decrease in certain shark populations. In this study we used a DNA barcoding method to identify the species of shark landings at fishing ports, shark fin products in retail stores, and shark fins detained by Taiwan customs. In total we identified 23, 24, and 14 species from 231 fishing landings, 316 fin products, and 113 detained shark fins, respectively. All the three sample sources were dominated by Prionace glauca, which accounted for more than 30% of the collected samples. Over 60% of the species identified in the fin products also appeared in the port landings, suggesting the domestic-dominance of shark fin products in Taiwan. However, international trade also contributes a certain proportion of the fin product markets, as four species identified from the shark fin products are not found in Taiwan's waters, and some domestic-available species were also found in the customs-detained sample. In addition to the species identification, we also found geographical differentiation in the cox1 gene of the common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus), the pelagic thresher shark (A. pelagicus), the smooth hammerhead shark (Sphyrna zygaena), and the scalloped hammerhead shark (S. lewini). This result might allow fishing authorities to more effectively trace the origins as well as enforce the management and conservation of these sharks.

  6. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Takahashi, Masateru

    2018-01-24

    The deep-sea brines of the Red Sea are remote and unexplored environments characterized by high temperatures, anoxic water, and elevated concentrations of salt and heavy metals. This environment provides a rare system to study the interplay between halophilic and thermophilic adaptation in biologic macromolecules. The present article reports the first DNA polymerase with halophilic and thermophilic features. Biochemical and structural analysis by Raman and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the charge distribution on the protein’s surface mediates the structural balance between stability for thermal adaptation and flexibility for counteracting the salt-induced rigid and nonfunctional hydrophobic packing. Salt bridge interactions via increased negative and positive charges contribute to structural stability. Salt tolerance, conversely, is mediated by a dynamic structure that becomes more fixed and functional with increasing salt concentration. We propose that repulsive forces among excess negative charges, in addition to a high percentage of negatively charged random coils, mediate this structural dynamism. This knowledge enabled us to engineer a halophilic version of KOD DNA polymerase.—Takahashi, M., Takahashi, E., Joudeh, L. I., Marini, M., Das, G., Elshenawy, M. M., Akal, A., Sakashita, K., Alam, I., Tehseen, M., Sobhy, M. A., Stingl, U., Merzaban, J. S., Di Fabrizio, E., Hamdan, S. M. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea.

  7. The Species and Origin of Shark Fins in Taiwan's Fishing Ports, Markets, and Customs Detention: A DNA Barcoding Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Shun Chuang

    Full Text Available The increasing consumption of shark products, along with the shark's fishing vulnerabilities, has led to the decrease in certain shark populations. In this study we used a DNA barcoding method to identify the species of shark landings at fishing ports, shark fin products in retail stores, and shark fins detained by Taiwan customs. In total we identified 23, 24, and 14 species from 231 fishing landings, 316 fin products, and 113 detained shark fins, respectively. All the three sample sources were dominated by Prionace glauca, which accounted for more than 30% of the collected samples. Over 60% of the species identified in the fin products also appeared in the port landings, suggesting the domestic-dominance of shark fin products in Taiwan. However, international trade also contributes a certain proportion of the fin product markets, as four species identified from the shark fin products are not found in Taiwan's waters, and some domestic-available species were also found in the customs-detained sample. In addition to the species identification, we also found geographical differentiation in the cox1 gene of the common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus, the pelagic thresher shark (A. pelagicus, the smooth hammerhead shark (Sphyrna zygaena, and the scalloped hammerhead shark (S. lewini. This result might allow fishing authorities to more effectively trace the origins as well as enforce the management and conservation of these sharks.

  8. Building a DNA Barcode Reference Library for the True Butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Peninsula Malaysia: What about the Subspecies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John-James; Sing, Kong-Wah; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and subspecies. Analyses confirmed the capacity of the new DNA barcode reference library to distinguish the vast majority of species (92%) and revealed that most subspecies possessed unique DNA barcodes (84%). In some cases conspecific subspecies exhibited genetic distances between their DNA barcodes that are typically seen between species, and these were often taxa that have previously been regarded as full species. Subspecies designations as shorthand for geographically and morphologically differentiated groups provide a useful heuristic for assessing how such groups correlate with clustering patterns of DNA barcodes, especially as the number of DNA barcodes per species in reference libraries increases. Our study demonstrates the value in attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records as they can reveal a history of taxonomic concepts and expose important units of biodiversity. PMID:24282514

  9. ARG1 (altered response to gravity) encodes a DnaJ-like protein that potentially interacts with the cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedbrook, J. C.; Chen, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Gravitropism allows plant organs to direct their growth at a specific angle from the gravity vector, promoting upward growth for shoots and downward growth for roots. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying gravitropic signal transduction. We found that mutations in the ARG1 locus of Arabidopsis thaliana alter root and hypocotyl gravitropism without affecting phototropism, root growth responses to phytohormones or inhibitors of auxin transport, or starch accumulation. The positional cloning of ARG1 revealed a DnaJ-like protein containing a coiled-coil region homologous to coiled coils found in cytoskeleton-interacting proteins. These data suggest that ARG1 participates in a gravity-signaling process involving the cytoskeleton. A combination of Northern blot studies and analysis of ARG1-GUS fusion-reporter expression in transgenic plants demonstrated that ARG1 is expressed in all organs. Ubiquitous ARG1 expression in Arabidopsis and the identification of an ortholog in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that ARG1 is involved in other essential processes.

  10. Building a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies (Lepidoptera of Peninsula Malaysia: what about the subspecies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-James Wilson

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and subspecies. Analyses confirmed the capacity of the new DNA barcode reference library to distinguish the vast majority of species (92% and revealed that most subspecies possessed unique DNA barcodes (84%. In some cases conspecific subspecies exhibited genetic distances between their DNA barcodes that are typically seen between species, and these were often taxa that have previously been regarded as full species. Subspecies designations as shorthand for geographically and morphologically differentiated groups provide a useful heuristic for assessing how such groups correlate with clustering patterns of DNA barcodes, especially as the number of DNA barcodes per species in reference libraries increases. Our study demonstrates the value in attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records as they can reveal a history of taxonomic concepts and expose important units of biodiversity.

  11. A new assay format for NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altevogt, Dominik; Hrenn, Andrea; Kern, Claudia; Clima, Lilia; Bannwarth, Willi; Merfort, Irmgard

    2009-10-07

    Herein we report a feasibility study for a new concept to detect DNA binding protein NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix formation in combination with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The new principle avoids expensive antibodies and radioactivity and might have implications for assays of other DNA binding proteins.

  12. MicroRNA expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein gene of Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    particularly to sea-farmed rainbow trout and thus necessitates strategies to mitigate potential disease outbreaks. A DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein gene of VHSV has been developed and shown to elicit protective immune responses in laboratory trials. It is important to identify key factors as biomarkers...

  13. Rapid one-step selection method for generating nucleic acid aptamers: development of a DNA aptamer against α-bungarotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse H Lauridsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nucleic acids based therapeutic approaches have gained significant interest in recent years towards the development of therapeutics against many diseases. Recently, research on aptamers led to the marketing of Macugen®, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF for the treatment of age related macular degeneration (AMD. Aptamer technology may prove useful as a therapeutic alternative against an array of human maladies. Considering the increased interest in aptamer technology globally that rival antibody mediated therapeutic approaches, a simplified selection, possibly in one-step, technique is required for developing aptamers in limited time period. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we present a simple one-step selection of DNA aptamers against α-bungarotoxin. A toxin immobilized glass coverslip was subjected to nucleic acid pool binding and extensive washing followed by PCR enrichment of the selected aptamers. One round of selection successfully identified a DNA aptamer sequence with a binding affinity of 7.58 µM. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated a one-step method for rapid production of nucleic acid aptamers. Although the reported binding affinity is in the low micromolar range, we believe that this could be further improved by using larger targets, increasing the stringency of selection and also by combining a capillary electrophoresis separation prior to the one-step selection. Furthermore, the method presented here is a user-friendly, cheap and an easy way of deriving an aptamer unlike the time consuming conventional SELEX-based approach. The most important application of this method is that chemically-modified nucleic acid libraries can also be used for aptamer selection as it requires only one enzymatic step. This method could equally be suitable for developing RNA aptamers.

  14. ThrR, a DNA-binding transcription factor involved in controlling threonine biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Müller, Peter; Lentes, Sabine; Thiele, Martin J; Zeigler, Daniel R; Tödter, Dominik; Paulus, Henry; Brantl, Sabine; Stülke, Jörg; Commichau, Fabian M

    2016-09-01

    The threonine dehydratase IlvA is part of the isoleucine biosynthesis pathway in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Consequently, deletion of ilvA causes isoleucine auxotrophy. It has been reported that ilvA pseudo-revertants having a derepressed hom-thrCB operon appear in the presence of threonine. Here we have characterized two classes of ilvA pseudo-revertants. In the first class the hom-thrCB operon was derepressed unmasking the threonine dehydratase activity of the threonine synthase ThrC. In the second class of mutants, threonine biosynthesis was more broadly affected. The first class of ilvA pseudo-revertants had a mutation in the Phom promoter (P*hom ), resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. In the second class of ilvA pseudo-revertants, the thrR gene encoding a putative DNA-binding protein was inactivated, also resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. Here we demonstrate that ThrR is indeed a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates the hom-thrCB operon and the thrD aspartokinase gene. DNA binding assays uncovered the DNA-binding site of ThrR and revealed that the repressor competes with the RNA polymerase for DNA binding. This study also revealed that ThrR orthologs are ubiquitous in genomes from the Gram-positive phylum Firmicutes and in some Gram-negative bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Hybrid-hybrid matrix structural refinement of a DNA three-way junction from 3D NOESY-NOESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Luxon, Bruce A.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Illangasekare, Nishantha; Donne, David G.; Gorenstein, David G.

    1999-01-01

    Homonuclear 3D NOESY-NOESY has shown great promise for the structural refinement of large biomolecules. A computationally efficient hybrid-hybrid relaxation matrix refinement methodology, using 3D NOESY-NOESY data, was used to refine the structure of a DNA three-way junction having two unpaired bases at the branch point of the junction. The NMR data and the relaxation matrix refinement confirm that the DNA three-way junction exists in a folded conformation with two of the helical stems stacked upon each other. The third unstacked stem extends away from the junction, forming an acute angle (∼60 deg.) with the stacked stems. The two unpaired bases are stacked upon each other and are exposed to the solvent. Helical parameters for the bases in all three strands show slight deviations from typical values expected for right-handed B-form DNA. Inter-nucleotide imino-imino NOEs between the bases at the branch point of the junction show that the junction region is well defined. The helical stems show mobility (± 20 deg.) indicating dynamic processes around the junction region. The unstacked helical stem adjacent to the unpaired bases shows greater mobility compared to the other two stems. The results from this study indicate that the 3D hybrid-hybrid matrix MORASS refinement methodology, by combining the spectral dispersion of 3D NOESY-NOESY and the computational efficiency of 2D refinement programs, provides an accurate and robust means for structure determination of large biomolecules. Our results also indicate that the 3D MORASS method gives higher quality structures compared to the 2D complete relaxation matrix refinement method

  16. TH-CD-201-11: Optimizing the Response and Cost of a DNA Double-Strand Break Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A DNA double-strand break (DSB) dosimeter was developed to measure the biological effect of radiation. The goal here is to refine the fabrication method of this dosimeter to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation (CoV) and reduce the cost for the dosimeter. Methods: Our dosimeter consists of 4 kilo-base pair DNA strands (labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein) attached to streptavidin magnetic beads. The final step of the DNA dosimeter fabrication is to suspend these attached beads in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The amount of PBS used to suspend the attached beads and the relative volume of the DNA strands to the beads both affect the CoV and dosimeter cost. We diluted the beads attached with DNA in different volumes of PBS (100, 200, and 400 µL) to create different concentrations of the DNA dosimeter. Then we irradiated these dosimeters (50 µL samples) in a water-equivalent plastic phantom at 25 and 50 Gy (three samples per dose) and calculated the CoV for each dosimeter concentration. Also, we used different masses of DNA strands (1, 2, 8, 16, 24, and 32 µg) to attach to the same volume of magnetic beads (100 µL) to explore how this affects the cost of the dosimeter. Results: The lowest CoV was produced for the highest concentration of dosimeter (100 µL of PBS), which created CoV of 2.0 and 1.0% for 25 and 50 Gy, respectively. We found that the lowest production cost for the dosimeter occurs by attaching 16 µg of DNA strands with 100 µL of beads. Conclusion: : We optimized the fabrication of the DNA dosimeter to produce low CoV and cost, but we still need to explore ways to further improve the dosimeter for use at lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  17. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Kang, H.N.; Babiuk, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    boosting with a recombinant E2 protein vaccine formulated with CpG ODN and 10% Emulsigen. The immunogenicity of HCV E2 vaccines was analyzed by ELISA for antibody responses, MTT assay for lymphocyte proliferation, ELISPOT for the number of interferon-gamma secreting cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays...... and shifted the immune response towards Th2-like ones in piglets. CONCLUSION: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein elicited E2-specific immune responses in mice and piglets. Recombinant E2 protein vaccination following DNA immunization significantly increased the antibody response......AIM: To characterize the immunogenicity of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 DNA vaccine alone or with a protein vaccine boost in murine and porcine animal models. METHODS: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein was constructed and used to vaccinate mice and piglets with or without...

  18. Public involvement in pharmacogenomics research: a national survey on public attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research and the willingness to donate DNA samples to a DNA bank in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eriko; Satoh, Nobunori

    2009-11-01

    To assess the attitudes of the Japanese general public towards pharmacogenomics research and a DNA bank for identifying genomic markers associated with ADRs and their willingness to donate DNA samples, we conducted a national survey for 1,103 Japanese adults from the general public, not a patient population. The response rate was 36.8%. The majority of the respondents showed a positive attitude towards pharmacogenomics research (81.0%) and a DNA bank (70.4%). Considering fictitious clinical situations such as taking medications and experiencing ADRs, the willingness to donate DNA samples when experiencing ADRs (61.7%) was higher than when taking medications (45.3%). Older generations were significantly associated with a decreased willingness to donate (OR = 0.45, CI 0.28-0.72 in 50s. OR = 0.49, CI: 0.31-0.77 in 60s). Positive attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research, a DNA bank, blood/bone marrow/organ donation were significantly associated with an increased willingness. However, the respondents had the following concerns regarding a DNA bank: the confidentiality of their personal information, the manner by which research results were utilized and simply the use of their own DNA for research. In order to attain public understanding to overcome these concerns, a process of public awareness should be put into place to emphasize the beneficial aspects of identifying genomic markers associated with ADRs and to address these concerns raised in our study. Further study is needed to assess the willingness of actual patients taking medications in real situations, since the respondents in our study were from the general public, not a patient population, and their willingness was assessed on the condition of assuming that they were patients taking medications.

  19. Public involvement in pharmacogenomics research: a national survey on patients' attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research and the willingness to donate DNA samples to a DNA bank in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eriko; Sakurada, Tomoya; Ueda, Shiro; Satoh, Nobunori

    2011-05-01

    To assess the attitude of Japanese patients towards pharmacogenomics research and a DNA bank for identifying genomic markers associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their willingness to donate DNA samples, we conducted a survey of 550 male and female patients. The majority of the respondents showed a positive attitude towards pharmacogenomics research (87.6%) and a DNA bank (75.1%). The willingness to donate DNA samples when experiencing severe ADRs (55.8%) was higher than when taking medications (40.4%). Positive attitudes towards a DNA bank and organ donation were significantly associated with an increased willingness to donate. Though the level of positive attitude in the patient population was higher than that in the general public in our former study (81.0 and 70.4%, respectively), the level of the willingness of patients to donate was 40.4% when taking medications and 55.8% when experiencing severe ADRs which was lower than that of the general public in our former study (45.3 and 61.7%). The results suggested that the level of true willingness in the patient population was lower than that of the general public considering the fictitious situation presented to the public (to suppose that they were patients receiving medication). It is important to assess the willingness of patients who are true potential donors, not the general public.

  20. Safety and preliminary evidence of biologic efficacy of a mammaglobin-a DNA vaccine in patients with stable metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Tucker, Natalia; Herndon, John; Li, Lijin; Sturmoski, Mark; Ellis, Matthew; Ma, Cynthia; Naughton, Michael; Lockhart, A Craig; Gao, Feng; Fleming, Timothy; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Gillanders, William E

    2014-12-01

    Mammaglobin-A (MAM-A) is overexpressed in 40% to 80% of primary breast cancers. We initiated a phase I clinical trial of a MAM-A DNA vaccine to evaluate its safety and biologic efficacy. Patients with breast cancer with stable metastatic disease were eligible for enrollment. Safety was monitored with clinical and laboratory assessments. The CD8 T-cell response was measured by ELISPOT, flow cytometry, and cytotoxicity assays. Progression-free survival (PFS) was described using the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator. Fourteen subjects have been treated with the MAM-A DNA vaccine and no significant adverse events have been observed. Eight of 14 subjects were HLA-A2(+), and the CD8 T-cell response to vaccination was studied in detail. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in the frequency of MAM-A-specific CD8 T cells after vaccination (0.9% ± 0.5% vs. 3.8% ± 1.2%; P cells (41 ± 32 vs. 215 ± 67 spm; P cell responses, and preliminary evidence suggests improved PFS. Additional studies are required to define the potential of the MAM-A DNA vaccine for breast cancer prevention and/or therapy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. DVC1 (C1orf124) is a DNA damage-targeting p97 adaptor that promotes ubiquitin-dependent responses to replication blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Anna; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Kagias, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated processes orchestrate critical DNA-damage signaling and repair pathways. We identify human DVC1 (C1orf124; Spartan) as a cell cycle-regulated anaphase-promoting complex (APC) substrate that accumulates at stalled replication forks. DVC1 recruitment to sites of replication stress...... synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase η (Pol η) from monoubiquitylated PCNA. DVC1 knockdown enhances UV light-induced mutagenesis, and depletion of human DVC1 or the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog DVC-1 causes hypersensitivity to replication stress-inducing agents. Our findings establish DVC1 as a DNA damage...

  2. Mycobacterium smegmatis Lhr Is a DNA-dependent ATPase and a 3'-to-5' DNA translocase and helicase that prefers to unwind 3'-tailed RNA:DNA hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Heather; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-05-17

    We are interested in the distinctive roster of helicases of Mycobacterium, a genus of the phylum Actinobacteria that includes the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its avirulent relative Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we identify and characterize M. smegmatis Lhr as the exemplar of a novel clade of superfamily II helicases, by virtue of its biochemical specificities and signature domain organization. Lhr is a 1507-amino acid monomeric nucleic acid-dependent ATPase that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive unidirectional 3'-to-5' translocation along single strand DNA and to unwind duplexes en route. The ATPase is more active in the presence of calcium than magnesium. ATP hydrolysis is triggered by either single strand DNA or single strand RNA, yet the apparent affinity for a DNA activator is 11-fold higher than for an RNA strand of identical size and nucleobase sequence. Lhr is 8-fold better at unwinding an RNA:DNA hybrid than it is at displacing a DNA:DNA duplex of identical nucleobase sequence. The truncated derivative Lhr-(1-856) is an autonomous ATPase, 3'-to-5' translocase, and RNA:DNA helicase. Lhr-(1-856) is 100-fold better RNA:DNA helicase than DNA:DNA helicase. Lhr homologs are found in bacteria representing eight different phyla, being especially prevalent in Actinobacteria (including M. tuberculosis) and Proteobacteria (including Escherichia coli).

  3. Tyramine Hydrochloride Based Label-Free System for Operating Various DNA Logic Gates and a DNA Caliper for Base Number Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2017-07-05

    DNA is believed to be a promising candidate for molecular logic computation, and the fluorogenic/colorimetric substrates of G-quadruplex DNAzyme (G4zyme) are broadly used as label-free output reporters of DNA logic circuits. Herein, for the first time, tyramine-HCl (a fluorogenic substrate of G4zyme) is applied to DNA logic computation and a series of label-free DNA-input logic gates, including elementary AND, OR, and INHIBIT logic gates, as well as a two to one encoder, are constructed. Furthermore, a DNA caliper that can measure the base number of target DNA as low as three bases is also fabricated. This DNA caliper can also perform concatenated AND-AND logic computation to fulfil the requirements of sophisticated logic computing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline

    2015-01-01

    such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine......The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute...... to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages...

  5. Unique parasite aDNA in moa coprolites from New Zealand suggests mass parasite extinctions followed human-induced megafauna extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Hopkins, Skylar R.

    2018-01-01

    Having split early from Gondwana, Zealandia (now modern New Zealand) escaped discovery until the late 13th century, and therefore remains an important glimpse into a human-free world. Without humans or other land mammals, diverse and peculiar birds evolved in isolation, including several flightless moa species, the giant pouakai eagle (Harpagornis moorei), the kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), and the kakapo parrot (Strigops habroptila). This unique community has fascinated paleoecologists, who have spent almost two centuries devising new ways to glean information from ancient bird remains. In PNAS, Boast et al. (1) apply one recent technological advance, ancient DNA (aDNA) metabarcoding, to confirm previous discoveries and report new details about moa and kakapo diets, parasites, and niches. Their efforts confirm Zealandia was a lot different before humans arrived.

  6. Assessment of a DNA vaccine encoding an anchored-glycosylphosphatidylinositol tegumental antigen complexed to protamine sulphate on immunoprotection against murine schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo JM Nascimento

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Protamine sulphate/DNA complexes have been shown to protect DNA from DNase digestion in a lipid system for gene transfer. A DNA-based vaccine complexed to protamine sulphate was used to induce an immune response against Schistosoma mansoni anchored-glycosylphosphatidylinositol tegumental antigen in BALB/c mice. The protection elicited ranged from 33 to 44%. The spectrum of the elicited immune response induced by the vaccine formulation without protamine was characterized by a high level of IgG (IgG1> IgG2a. Protamine sulphate added to the DNA vaccine formulation retained the green fluorescent protein encoding-plasmid longer in muscle and spleen. The experiments in vivo showed that under protamine sulphate effect, the scope of protection remained unchanged, but a modulation in antibody production (IgG1= IgG2a was observed.

  7. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng [National Yang Ming Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Radiological Sciences] (and others)

    2001-12-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  8. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng

    2001-01-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  9. Electrochemical detection of avian influenza virus H5N1 gene sequence using a DNA aptamer immobilized onto a hybrid nanomaterial-modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xianggang; Cheng Ziqiang; Fan Hai; Ai Shiyun; Han Ruixia

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A sensitive electrochemical biosensor for the detection of gene sequence was developed. → The biosensor was assembled by MWNT, polypyrrole nanowires and gold nanoparticles. → The hybrid nanomaterials could provide a porous structure with good properties. → The biosensor has highly selectivity and sensitivity. → The design strategy is expected to have extensive applications in other biosensors - Abstract: A sensitive electrochemical method for the detection of avian influenza virus (AIV) H5N1 gene sequence using a DNA aptamer immobilized onto a hybrid nanomaterial-modified electrode was developed. To enhance the selectivity and sensitivity, the modified electrode was assembled with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), polypyrrole nanowires (PPNWs) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). This electrode offered a porous structure with a large effective surface area, highly electrocatalytic activities and electronic conductivity. Therefore, the amount of DNA aptamer immobilized onto the electrode was increased while the accessibility of the detection target was maintained. The biosensor is based on the hybridization and preferred orientation of a DNA aptamer immobilized onto a modified electrode surface with its target (H5N1 specific sequence) present in solution. It is selective for the H5N1 specific sequence, and the signal of the indicator was approximately linear to log(concentration) of the H5N1 specific sequence from 5.0 x 10 -12 to 1.0 x 10 -9 M (R = 0.9863) with a detection limit of 4.3 x 10 -13 M. These studies showed that the new hybrid nanomaterial (MWNT/PPNWs/GNPs) and the DNA aptamer could be used to fabricate an electrochemical biosensor for gene sequence detection. Furthermore, this design strategy is expected to have extensive applications in other biosensors.

  10. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Goto, Yamafumi [Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Takata, Minoru [Department of Dermatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medical Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Zervos, Antonis S., E-mail: azervos@mail.ucf.edu [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  11. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. → THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. → THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. → THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  12. Electrochemical detection of avian influenza virus H5N1 gene sequence using a DNA aptamer immobilized onto a hybrid nanomaterial-modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xianggang [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Cheng Ziqiang, E-mail: czqsd@126.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Fan Hai [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Ai Shiyun, E-mail: ashy@sdau.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Han Ruixia [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > A sensitive electrochemical biosensor for the detection of gene sequence was developed. > The biosensor was assembled by MWNT, polypyrrole nanowires and gold nanoparticles. > The hybrid nanomaterials could provide a porous structure with good properties. > The biosensor has highly selectivity and sensitivity. > The design strategy is expected to have extensive applications in other biosensors - Abstract: A sensitive electrochemical method for the detection of avian influenza virus (AIV) H5N1 gene sequence using a DNA aptamer immobilized onto a hybrid nanomaterial-modified electrode was developed. To enhance the selectivity and sensitivity, the modified electrode was assembled with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), polypyrrole nanowires (PPNWs) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). This electrode offered a porous structure with a large effective surface area, highly electrocatalytic activities and electronic conductivity. Therefore, the amount of DNA aptamer immobilized onto the electrode was increased while the accessibility of the detection target was maintained. The biosensor is based on the hybridization and preferred orientation of a DNA aptamer immobilized onto a modified electrode surface with its target (H5N1 specific sequence) present in solution. It is selective for the H5N1 specific sequence, and the signal of the indicator was approximately linear to log(concentration) of the H5N1 specific sequence from 5.0 x 10{sup -12} to 1.0 x 10{sup -9} M (R = 0.9863) with a detection limit of 4.3 x 10{sup -13} M. These studies showed that the new hybrid nanomaterial (MWNT/PPNWs/GNPs) and the DNA aptamer could be used to fabricate an electrochemical biosensor for gene sequence detection. Furthermore, this design strategy is expected to have extensive applications in other biosensors.

  13. The synergistic effect of combined immunization with a DNA vaccine and chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus leads to strong protection against dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana S Azevedo

    Full Text Available The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2 and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2. The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  14. Extensive and equivalent repair in both radiation-resistant and radiation-sensitive E. coli determined by a DNA-unwinding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnstroem, G.; George, A.M.; Cramp, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    The extent of strand breakage and repair in irradiated E. coli B/r and Bsub(s-l) was studied using a DNA-unwinding technique in denaturing conditions of weak alkali. Although these two strains showed widely different response to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation, they both had an equal capacity to repair radiation-induced breaks in DNA. Oxygen enhancement ratios for the killing of B/r and Bsub(s-l) were respectively 4 and 2; but after repair in non-nutrient or nutrient post-irradiation conditions, the oxygen enhancement values for the residual strand breaks were always the same for the two strains. The equal abilities of E.coli B/r and E.coli Bsub(s-l) to remove the strand breaks measured by this weak-alkali technqiue has led to the suggestion that some other type of damage to either DNA or another macromolecule may play a major role in determining whether or not the cells survive to proliferate. (author)

  15. A Turn-on Fluorescence Sensor for Heparin Detection Based on a Release of Taiwan Cobra Cardiotoxin from a DNA Aptamer or Adenosine-Based Molecular Beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi-Jun; Wang, Liang-Jun; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Huang, Chia-Hui; Hu, Wan-Ping; Chang, Long-Sen

    2018-02-19

    This study presents two sensitive fluorescent assays for sensing heparin on the basis of the electrostatic interaction between heparin and Naja naja atra cardiotoxin 3 (CTX3). Owing to CTX3-induced folded structure of an adenosine-based molecular beacon (MB) or a DNA aptamer against CTX3, a reduction in the fluorescent signal of the aptamer or MB 5'-end labeled with carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and 3'-end labeled with 4-([4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo)-benzoic acid (DABCYL) was observed upon the addition of CTX3. The presence of heparin and formation of the CTX3-heparin complex caused CTX3 detachment from the MB or aptamer, and restoration of FAM fluorescence of the 5'-FAM-and-3'-DABCYL-labeled MB and aptamer was subsequently noted. Moreover, the detection of heparin with these CTX3-aptamer and CTX3-MB sensors showed high sensitivity and selectivity toward heparin over chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid regardless of the presence of plasma. The limit of detection for heparin in plasma was determined to be 16 ng/mL and 15 ng/mL, respectively, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This study validates the practical utility of the CTX3-aptamer and CTX3-MB systems for determining the concentration of heparin in a biological matrix.

  16. Fanconi Anemia: A DNA repair disorder characterized by accelerated decline of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and other features of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosh, Robert M; Bellani, Marina; Liu, Yie; Seidman, Michael M

    2017-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), endocrine dysfunction, cancer, and other clinical features commonly associated with normal aging. The anemia stems directly from an accelerated decline of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. Although FA is a complex heterogeneous disease linked to mutations in 19 currently identified genes, there has been much progress in understanding the molecular pathology involved. FA is broadly considered a DNA repair disorder and the FA gene products, together with other DNA repair factors, have been implicated in interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair. However, in addition to the defective DNA damage response, altered epigenetic regulation, and telomere defects, FA is also marked by elevated levels of inflammatory mediators in circulation, a hallmark of faster decline in not only other hereditary aging disorders but also normal aging. In this review, we offer a perspective of FA as a monogenic accelerated aging disorder, citing the latest evidence for its multi-factorial deficiencies underlying its unique clinical and cellular features. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE: a DNA finger printing technique to study the genetic diversity of blood disease bacterium of banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HADIWIYONO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadiwiyono, Widada J, Subandiyah S, Fegan F (2011 Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE: a DNA finger printing technique to study the genetic diversity of blood disease bacterium of banana. Biodiversitas 12: 12-16. Blood disease bacterium (BDB is the most important pathogen of bananas in Indonesia. In some field, the disease incidence reaches over 80%. Epidemiologically, the disease is similar to moko disease in South America and bugtok disease in the Philippines caused by Ralstonia solanacearum race 2. However, BDB is different in phenotype and genotype from the two diseases. Previously BDB was limited in South Sulawesi since 1920s – 1980s and recently was reported in 27 of 30 provinces in Indonesia. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE is a genomic DNA fingerprinting method, which employs rare cutting restriction endonucleases to digest genome prior to electrophoresis using specialized condition to separate of large DNA fragments. The results showed that PFGE analysis was a discriminative tool to study the genetic diversity of BDB. Based on the PFGE analysis, BDB isolates obtained from different localities in Yogyakarta and Central Java were quit diverse.

  18. A DNA-Encoded Library of Chemical Compounds Based on Common Scaffolding Structures Reveals the Impact of Ligand Geometry on Protein Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, Nicholas; Biendl, Stefan; Hartmann, Marco; Piazzi, Jacopo; Sladojevich, Filippo; Gräslund, Susanne; Brown, Peter J; Näreoja, Katja; Schüler, Herwig; Scheuermann, Jörg; Franzini, Raphael; Neri, Dario

    2018-06-01

    A DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) with 1.2 million compounds was synthesized by combinatorial reaction of seven central scaffolds with two sets of 343×492 building blocks. Library screening by affinity capture revealed that for some target proteins, the chemical nature of building blocks dominated the selection results, whereas for other proteins, the central scaffold also crucially contributed to ligand affinity. Molecules based on a 3,5-bis(aminomethyl)benzoic acid core structure were found to bind human serum albumin with a K d value of 6 nm, while compounds with the same substituents on an equidistant but flexible l-lysine scaffold showed 140-fold lower affinity. A 18 nm tankyrase-1 binder featured l-lysine as linking moiety, while molecules based on d-Lysine or (2S,4S)-amino-l-proline showed no detectable binding to the target. This work suggests that central scaffolds which predispose the orientation of chemical building blocks toward the protein target may enhance the screening productivity of encoded libraries. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics dynamics simulation of A-DNA double strands irradiated by ultra-low-energy carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngaojampa, C.; Nimmanpipug, P. [Computer Simulation and Modeling Laboratory (CSML), Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.t [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Lee, V.S., E-mail: vannajan@gmail.co [Computer Simulation and Modeling Laboratory (CSML), Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2011-02-15

    In order to promote understanding of the fundamentals of ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA, molecular dynamics simulations using combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics of poly-AT and poly-GC A-DNA double strands irradiated by <200 eV carbon ions were performed to investigate the molecular implications of mutation bias. The simulations were focused on the responses of the DNA backbones and nitrogenous bases to irradiation. Analyses of the root mean square displacements of the backbones and non-hydrogen atoms of base rings of the simulated DNA structure after irradiation revealed a potential preference of DNA double strand separation, dependent on the irradiating energy. The results show that for the backbones, the large difference in the displacement between poly-GC and poly-AT in the initial time period could be the reason for the backbone breakage; for the nitrogenous base pairs, A-T is 30% more sensitive or vulnerable to ion irradiation than G-C, demonstrating a preferential, instead of random, effect of irradiation-induced mutation.

  20. Gene Gun Bombardment with DNA-Coated Golden Particles Enhanced the Protective Effect of a DNA Vaccine Based on Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase of Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with Schistosoma species, remains an important parasitic zoonosis. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjTGR plays an important role in the development of the parasite and for its survival. Here we present a recombinant plasmid DNA vaccine, pVAX1/SjTGR, to estimate its protection against S. japonicum in BALB/c mice. The DNA vaccine administrated by particle bombardment induced higher protection than by intramuscular injection. All animals vaccinated with pVAX1/SjTGR developed significant specific anti-SjTGR antibodies than control groups. Moreover, animals immunized by gene gun exhibited a splenocyte proliferative response, with an increase in IFN-γ and IL-4. The recombinant plasmid administrated by gene gun achieved a medium protective efficacy of 27.83–38.83% ( of worm reduction and 40.38–44.51% ( of liver egg count reduction. It suggests that different modes of administering a DNA vaccine can influence the protective efficacy induced by the vaccine. Interestingly, from the enzymatic activity results, we found that worms obtained from pVAX1/SjTGR-vaccinated animals expressed lower enzymatic activity than the control group and the antibodies weakened the enzymatic activity of SjTGR in vitro, too. It implies that the high-level antibodies may contribute to the protective effects.

  1. The Species and Origin of Shark Fins in Taiwan’s Fishing Ports, Markets, and Customs Detention: A DNA Barcoding Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Po-Shun; Hung, Tzu-Chiao; Chang, Hung-An; Huang, Chien-Kang; Shiao, Jen-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    The increasing consumption of shark products, along with the shark’s fishing vulnerabilities, has led to the decrease in certain shark populations. In this study we used a DNA barcoding method to identify the species of shark landings at fishing ports, shark fin products in retail stores, and shark fins detained by Taiwan customs. In total we identified 23, 24, and 14 species from 231 fishing landings, 316 fin products, and 113 detained shark fins, respectively. All the three sample sources were dominated by Prionace glauca, which accounted for more than 30% of the collected samples. Over 60% of the species identified in the fin products also appeared in the port landings, suggesting the domestic-dominance of shark fin products in Taiwan. However, international trade also contributes a certain proportion of the fin product markets, as four species identified from the shark fin products are not found in Taiwan’s waters, and some domestic-available species were also found in the customs-detained sample. In addition to the species identification, we also found geographical differentiation in the cox1 gene of the common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus), the pelagic thresher shark (A. pelagicus), the smooth hammerhead shark (Sphyrna zygaena), and the scalloped hammerhead shark (S. lewini). This result might allow fishing authorities to more effectively trace the origins as well as enforce the management and conservation of these sharks. PMID:26799827

  2. Combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics dynamics simulation of A-DNA double strands irradiated by ultra-low-energy carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngaojampa, C.; Nimmanpipug, P.; Yu, L.D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Lee, V.S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to promote understanding of the fundamentals of ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA, molecular dynamics simulations using combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics of poly-AT and poly-GC A-DNA double strands irradiated by <200 eV carbon ions were performed to investigate the molecular implications of mutation bias. The simulations were focused on the responses of the DNA backbones and nitrogenous bases to irradiation. Analyses of the root mean square displacements of the backbones and non-hydrogen atoms of base rings of the simulated DNA structure after irradiation revealed a potential preference of DNA double strand separation, dependent on the irradiating energy. The results show that for the backbones, the large difference in the displacement between poly-GC and poly-AT in the initial time period could be the reason for the backbone breakage; for the nitrogenous base pairs, A-T is 30% more sensitive or vulnerable to ion irradiation than G-C, demonstrating a preferential, instead of random, effect of irradiation-induced mutation.

  3. First-passage problems in DNA replication: effects of template tension on stepping and exonuclease activities of a DNA polymerase motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ajeet K; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-01-01

    A DNA polymerase (DNAP) replicates a template DNA strand. It also exploits the template as the track for its own motor-like mechanical movement. In the polymerase mode it elongates the nascent DNA by one nucleotide in each step. However, whenever it commits an error by misincorporating an incorrect nucleotide, it can switch to an exonuclease mode. In the latter mode it excises the wrong nucleotide before switching back to its polymerase mode. We develop a stochastic kinetic model of DNA replication that mimics an in vitro experiment where single-stranded DNA, subjected to a mechanical tension F, is converted to double-stranded DNA by a single DNAP. The F-dependence of the average rate of replication, which depends on the rates of both polymerase and exonuclease activities of the DNAP, is in good qualitative agreement with the corresponding experimental results. We introduce nine novel distinct conditional dwell times of a DNAP. Using the method of first-passage times, we also derive the exact analytical expressions for the probability distributions of these conditional dwell times. The predicted F-dependences of these distributions are, in principle, accessible to single-molecule experiments. (paper)

  4. Lactococcus lactis carrying a DNA vaccine coding for the ESAT-6 antigen increases IL-17 cytokine secretion and boosts the BCG vaccine immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, V B; da Cunha, V P; Preisser, T M; Souza, B M; Turk, M Z; De Castro, C P; Azevedo, M S P; Miyoshi, A

    2017-06-01

    A regimen utilizing Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and another vaccine system as a booster may represent a promising strategy for the development of an efficient tuberculosis vaccine for adults. In a previous work, we confirmed the ability of Lactococcus lactis fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA+) (pValac:ESAT-6), a live mucosal DNA vaccine, to produce a specific immune response in mice after oral immunization. In this study, we examined the immunogenicity of this strain as a booster for the BCG vaccine in mice. After immunization, cytokine and immunoglobulin profiles were measured. The BCG prime L. lactis FnBPA+ (pValac:ESAT-6) boost group was the most responsive group, with a significant increase in splenic pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-17, IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α compared with the negative control. Based on the results obtained here, we demonstrated that L. lactis FnBPA+ (pValac:ESAT-6) was able to increase the BCG vaccine general immune response. This work is of great scientific and social importance because it represents the first step towards the development of a booster to the BCG vaccine using L. lactis as a DNA delivery system. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Extensive and equivalent repair in both radiation-resistant and radiation-sensitive E. coli determined by a DNA-unwinding technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnstroem, G [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); George, A M; Cramp, W A

    1978-10-01

    The extent of strand breakage and repair in irradiated E. coli B/r and Bsub(s-l) was studied using a DNA-unwinding technique in denaturing conditions of weak alkali. Although these two strains showed widely different response to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation, they both had an equal capacity to repair radiation-induced breaks in DNA. Oxygen enhancement ratios for the killing of B/r and Bsub(s-l) were respectively 4 and 2; but after repair in non-nutrient or nutrient post-irradiation conditions, the oxygen enhancement values for the residual strand breaks were always the same for the two strains. The equal abilities of E.coli B/r and E.coli Bsub(s-l) to remove the strand breaks measured by this weak-alkali technqiue has led to the suggestion that some other type of damage to either DNA or another macromolecule may play a major role in determining whether or not the cells survive to proliferate.

  6. A quantum dot-aptamer beacon using a DNA intercalating dye as the FRET reporter: application to label-free thrombin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Li, Yi-Shan; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2011-03-15

    A new quantum dot (QD)-aptamer (apt) beacon that acts by folding-induced dissociation of a DNA intercalating dye, BOBO-3(B), is demonstrated with label-free thrombin detection. The beacon, denoted as QD-apt:B, is constructed by (1) coupling of a single-stranded thrombin aptamer to Qdot 565 via EDC/Sulfo-NHS chemistry and (2) staining the duplex regions of the aptamer on QD with excess BOBO-3 before thrombin binding. When mixing a thrombin sample with QD-apt:B, BOBO-3 is competed away from the beacon due to target-induced aptamer folding, which then causes a decrease in QD fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-mediated BOBO-3 emission and achieves thrombin quantitation. In this work, the effects of Mg(2+), coupling time, and aptamer type on the beacon's performances are investigated and discussed thoroughly with various methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and two-color differential gel electrophoresis. Using the best aptamer beacon (HTQ37), we attain highly specific and wide-range detection (from nM to μM) of thrombin in buffer, and the beacon can sense nM-range thrombin in 15% diluted serum. Compared to the reported QD aptamer assays, our method is advantageous from the aspect of using a simple sensory unit design without losing the detection sensitivity. Therefore, we consider the QD-apt:B beacon a potential alternative to immuno-reagents and an effective tool to study nucleic acid folding on QD as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative analysis and molecular characterization of a gene BANF1 encoded a DNA-binding protein during mitosis from the Giant Panda and Black Bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yichun; Hou, Yi-Ling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wan-Ru; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Barrier to autointegration factor 1 (BANF1) is a DNA-binding protein found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells that functions to establish nuclear architecture during mitosis. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of BANF1 were cloned from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus mupinensis) using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cDNA of the BANF1 cloned from Giant Panda and Black Bear is 297 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 270 bp encoding 89 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence from Giant Panda is 521 bp, from Black Bear is 536 bp, which were found both to possess 2 exons. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved to some mammalian species studied. Topology prediction showed there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Casein kinase II phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Giant Panda, and there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Black Bear. The BANF1 gene can be readily expressed in E. coli. Results showed that the protein BANF1 fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 14 kD polypeptide that formed inclusion bodies. The expression products obtained could be used to purify the proteins and study their function further.

  8. A DNA vaccine encoding multiple HIV CD4 epitopes elicits vigorous polyfunctional, long-lived CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Santoro Rosa

    Full Text Available T-cell based vaccines against HIV have the goal of limiting both transmission and disease progression by inducing broad and functionally relevant T cell responses. Moreover, polyfunctional and long-lived specific memory T cells have been associated to vaccine-induced protection. CD4(+ T cells are important for the generation and maintenance of functional CD8(+ cytotoxic T cells. We have recently developed a DNA vaccine encoding 18 conserved multiple HLA-DR-binding HIV-1 CD4 epitopes (HIVBr18, capable of eliciting broad CD4(+ T cell responses in multiple HLA class II transgenic mice. Here, we evaluated the breadth and functional profile of HIVBr18-induced immune responses in BALB/c mice. Immunized mice displayed high-magnitude, broad CD4(+/CD8(+ T cell responses, and 8/18 vaccine-encoded peptides were recognized. In addition, HIVBr18 immunization was able to induce polyfunctional CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells that proliferate and produce any two cytokines (IFNγ/TNFα, IFNγ/IL-2 or TNFα/IL-2 simultaneously in response to HIV-1 peptides. For CD4(+ T cells exclusively, we also detected cells that proliferate and produce all three tested cytokines simultaneously (IFNγ/TNFα/IL-2. The vaccine also generated long-lived central and effector memory CD4(+ T cells, a desirable feature for T-cell based vaccines. By virtue of inducing broad, polyfunctional and long-lived T cell responses against conserved CD4(+ T cell epitopes, combined administration of this vaccine concept may provide sustained help for CD8(+ T cells and antibody responses- elicited by other HIV immunogens.

  9. A DNA vaccine co-expressing Trichinella spiralis MIF and MCD-1 with murine ubiquitin induces partial protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, F; Xu, L; Yan, R; Song, X; Li, X

    2013-03-01

    Co-expression of Trichinella spiralis macrophage migration inhibitory factor (TsMIF) with T. spiralis cystatin-like domain protein (TsMCD-1) in a DNA vaccine induces a Th1 immune response and partial protection against T. spiralis infection. The present study evaluated whether co-expression of mouse ubiquitin (Ub) with TsMIF and TsMCD-1 might improve the immune response against T. spiralis infection. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized twice at 2-week intervals with 100 μg of plasmid DNA encoding either a TsMIF-TsMCD-1 fusion protein (pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1) or an Ub-co-expressing triple fusion protein Ub-TsMIF-TsMCD-1 (pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1). Control animals were immunized with pVAX1-Ub or blank vector plasmid. Specific antibody levels (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgM, IgA, IgE) against the recombinant protein TsMIF-TsMCD-1, serum cytokines (interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-17), CD4+/CD8+ T cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses were monitored. Challenge infection was performed 2 weeks after the second immunization and worm burden was assayed at 35 days post-challenge. Antibody responses induced by pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 were significantly lower than for TsMIF-TsMCD-1, but the vaccine induced increased levels of Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and increased T-cell cytotoxicity. The reduction of worm burden (37.95%) following immunization with pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 was significantly greater than that induced by the pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 vaccine (23.17%; P< 0.05).

  10. Immunization with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii Superoxide dismutase (TgSOD) induces partial immune protection against acute toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Cao, Aiping; Li, Yawen; Li, Xun; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2017-06-07

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects all warm-blooded animals including humans and causes toxoplasmosis. An effective vaccine could be an ideal choice for preventing and controlling toxoplasmosis. T. gondii Superoxide dismutase (TgSOD) might participate in affecting the intracellular growth of both bradyzoite and tachyzoite forms. In the present study, the TgSOD gene was used to construct a DNA vaccine (pEGFP-SOD). TgSOD gene was amplified and inserted into eukaryotic vector pEGFP-C1 and formed the DNA vaccine pEGFP-SOD. Then the BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with the DNA vaccine and those injected with pEGFP-C1, PBS or nothing were treated as controls. Four weeks after the last immunization, all mouse groups followed by challenging intraperitoneally with tachyzoites of T. gondii ME49 strain. Results showed higher levels of total IgG, IgG2α in the sera and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in the splenocytes from pEGFP-SOD inoculated mice than those unvaccinated, or inoculated with either empty plasmid vector or PBS. The proportions of CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells in the spleen from pEGFP-SOD inoculated mice were significantly (p < 0.05) increased compared to control groups. In addition, the survival time of mice immunized with pEGFP-SOD was significantly prolonged as compared to the controls (p < 0.05) although all the mice died. The present study revealed that the DNA vaccine triggered strong humoral and cellular immune responses, and aroused partial protective immunity against acute T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice. The collective data suggests the SOD may be a potential vaccine candidate for further development.

  11. The C-terminal domain of the bacterial SSB protein acts as a DNA maintenance hub at active chromosome replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated in vivo the role of the carboxy-terminal domain of the Bacillus subtilis Single-Stranded DNA Binding protein (SSB(Cter as a recruitment platform at active chromosomal forks for many proteins of the genome maintenance machineries. We probed this SSB(Cter interactome using GFP fusions and by Tap-tag and biochemical analysis. It includes at least 12 proteins. The interactome was previously shown to include PriA, RecG, and RecQ and extended in this study by addition of DnaE, SbcC, RarA, RecJ, RecO, XseA, Ung, YpbB, and YrrC. Targeting of YpbB to active forks appears to depend on RecS, a RecQ paralogue, with which it forms a stable complex. Most of these SSB partners are conserved in bacteria, while others, such as the essential DNA polymerase DnaE, YrrC, and the YpbB/RecS complex, appear to be specific to B. subtilis. SSB(Cter deletion has a moderate impact on B. subtilis cell growth. However, it markedly affects the efficiency of repair of damaged genomic DNA and arrested replication forks. ssbΔCter mutant cells appear deficient in RecA loading on ssDNA, explaining their inefficiency in triggering the SOS response upon exposure to genotoxic agents. Together, our findings show that the bacterial SSB(Cter acts as a DNA maintenance hub at active chromosomal forks that secures their propagation along the genome.

  12. A DNA-based pattern classifier with in vitro learning and associative recall for genomic characterization and biosensing without explicit sequence knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Seok; Chen, Junghuei; Deaton, Russell; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Genetic material extracted from in situ microbial communities has high promise as an indicator of biological system status. However, the challenge is to access genomic information from all organisms at the population or community scale to monitor the biosystem's state. Hence, there is a need for a better diagnostic tool that provides a holistic view of a biosystem's genomic status. Here, we introduce an in vitro methodology for genomic pattern classification of biological samples that taps large amounts of genetic information from all genes present and uses that information to detect changes in genomic patterns and classify them. We developed a biosensing protocol, termed Biological Memory, that has in vitro computational capabilities to "learn" and "store" genomic sequence information directly from genomic samples without knowledge of their explicit sequences, and that discovers differences in vitro between previously unknown inputs and learned memory molecules. The Memory protocol was designed and optimized based upon (1) common in vitro recombinant DNA operations using 20-base random probes, including polymerization, nuclease digestion, and magnetic bead separation, to capture a snapshot of the genomic state of a biological sample as a DNA memory and (2) the thermal stability of DNA duplexes between new input and the memory to detect similarities and differences. For efficient read out, a microarray was used as an output method. When the microarray-based Memory protocol was implemented to test its capability and sensitivity using genomic DNA from two model bacterial strains, i.e., Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis, results indicate that the Memory protocol can "learn" input DNA, "recall" similar DNA, differentiate between dissimilar DNA, and detect relatively small concentration differences in samples. This study demonstrated not only the in vitro information processing capabilities of DNA, but also its promise as a genomic pattern classifier that could

  13. Interaction of Zn(II)bleomycin-A2 and Zn(II)peplomycin with a DNA hairpin containing the 5'-GT-3' binding site in comparison with the 5'-GC-3' binding site studied by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Shelby E; Ingersoll, Azure D; Murray, Sally A; Reilly, Teresa M; Lehmann, Teresa E

    2017-10-01

    Bleomycins are a group of glycopeptide antibiotics synthesized by Streptomyces verticillus that are widely used for the treatment of various neoplastic diseases. These antibiotics have the ability to chelate a metal center, mainly Fe(II), and cause site-specific DNA cleavage. Bleomycins are differentiated by their C-terminal regions. Although this antibiotic family is a successful course of treatment for some types of cancers, it is known to cause pulmonary fibrosis. Previous studies have identified that bleomycin-related pulmonary toxicity is linked to the C-terminal region of these drugs. This region has been shown to closely interact with DNA. We examined the binding of Zn(II)peplomycin and Zn(II)bleomycin-A 2 to a DNA hairpin of sequence 5'-CCAGTATTTTTACTGG-3', containing the binding site 5'-GT-3', and compared the results with those obtained from our studies of the same MBLMs bound to a DNA hairpin containing the binding site 5'-GC-3'. We provide evidence that the DNA base sequence has a strong impact in the final structure of the drug-target complex.

  14. Signal replication in a DNA nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Oscar; Houmadi, Said; Aimé, Jean-Pierre; Elezgaray, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reaction are the basic building blocks of future nanorobotic systems. The circuits tethered to DNA origami platforms present several advantages over solution-phase versions where couplings are always diffusion-limited. Here we consider a possible implementation of one of the basic operations needed in the design of these circuits, namely, signal replication. We show that with an appropriate preparation of the initial state, signal replication performs in a reproducible way. We also show the existence of side effects concomitant to the high effective concentrations in tethered circuits, such as slow leaky reactions and cross-activation.

  15. Thermal denaturation of A-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle-Orero, J; Wildes, A R; Theodorakopoulos, N; Cuesta-López, S; Peyrard, M; Garden, J-L; Danilkin, S

    2014-01-01

    The DNA molecule can take various conformational forms. Investigations focus mainly on the so-called ‘B-form’, schematically drawn in the famous paper by Watson and Crick [1]. This is the usual form of DNA in a biological environment and is the only form that is stable in an aqueous environment. Other forms, however, can teach us much about DNA. They have the same nucleotide base pairs for ‘building blocks’ as B-DNA, but with different relative positions, and studying these forms gives insight into the interactions between elements under conditions far from equilibrium in the B-form. Studying the thermal denaturation is particularly interesting because it provides a direct probe of those interactions which control the growth of the fluctuations when the ‘melting’ temperature is approached. Here we report such a study on the ‘A-form’ using calorimetry and neutron scattering. We show that it can be carried further than a similar study on B-DNA, requiring the improvement of thermodynamic models for DNA. (paper)

  16. A DNA barcode for land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-04

    DNA barcoding involves sequencing a standard region of DNA as a tool for species identification. However, there has been no agreement on which region(s) should be used for barcoding land plants. To provide a community recommendation on a standard plant barcode, we have compared the performance of 7 leading candidate plastid DNA regions (atpF-atpH spacer, matK gene, rbcL gene, rpoB gene, rpoC1 gene, psbK-psbI spacer, and trnH-psbA spacer). Based on assessments of recoverability, sequence quality, and levels of species discrimination, we recommend the 2-locus combination of rbcL+matK as the plant barcode. This core 2-locus barcode will provide a universal framework for the routine use of DNA sequence data to identify specimens and contribute toward the discovery of overlooked species of land plants.

  17. Drama Drives a DNA Fingerprinting Lab Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Elaine C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise for an intermediate cell and molecular biology course that uses a murder-mystery play. Provokes students to think critically about important issues in scientific methodology in general and DNA analysis in particular. (JRH)

  18. A DNA barcode for land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Forrest, Laura L.; Spouge, John L.; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; van der Bank, Michelle; Chase, Mark W.; Cowan, Robyn S.; Erickson, David L.; Fazekas, Aron J.; Graham, Sean W.; James, Karen E.; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kress, W. John; Schneider, Harald; van AlphenStahl, Jonathan; Barrett, Spencer C.H.; van den Berg, Cassio; Bogarin, Diego; Burgess, Kevin S.; Cameron, Kenneth M.; Carine, Mark; Chacón, Juliana; Clark, Alexandra; Clarkson, James J.; Conrad, Ferozah; Devey, Dion S.; Ford, Caroline S.; Hedderson, Terry A.J.; Hollingsworth, Michelle L.; Husband, Brian C.; Kelly, Laura J.; Kesanakurti, Prasad R.; Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Young-Dong; Lahaye, Renaud; Lee, Hae-Lim; Long, David G.; Madriñán, Santiago; Maurin, Olivier; Meusnier, Isabelle; Newmaster, Steven G.; Park, Chong-Wook; Percy, Diana M.; Petersen, Gitte; Richardson, James E.; Salazar, Gerardo A.; Savolainen, Vincent; Seberg, Ole; Wilkinson, Michael J.; Yi, Dong-Keun; Little, Damon P.

    2009-01-01

    DNA barcoding involves sequencing a standard region of DNA as a tool for species identification. However, there has been no agreement on which region(s) should be used for barcoding land plants. To provide a community recommendation on a standard plant barcode, we have compared the performance of 7 leading candidate plastid DNA regions (atpF–atpH spacer, matK gene, rbcL gene, rpoB gene, rpoC1 gene, psbK–psbI spacer, and trnH–psbA spacer). Based on assessments of recoverability, sequence quality, and levels of species discrimination, we recommend the 2-locus combination of rbcL+matK as the plant barcode. This core 2-locus barcode will provide a universal framework for the routine use of DNA sequence data to identify specimens and contribute toward the discovery of overlooked species of land plants. PMID:19666622

  19. Synthesis and antitumor activity evaluation of a novel combi-nitrosourea prodrug: Designed to release a DNA cross-linking agent and an inhibitor of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guohui; Zhang, Na; Zhao, Lijiao; Fan, Tengjiao; Zhang, Shufen; Zhong, Rugang

    2016-05-01

    The drug resistance of CENUs induced by O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), which repairs the O(6)-alkylated guanine and subsequently inhibits the formation of dG-dC cross-links, hinders the application of CENU chemotherapies. Therefore, the discovery of CENU analogs with AGT inhibiting activity is a promising approach leading to novel CENU chemotherapies with high therapeutic index. In this study, a new combi-nitrosourea prodrug 3-(3-(((2-amino-9H-purin-6-yl)oxy)methyl)benzyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (6), designed to release a DNA cross-linking agent and an inhibitor of AGT, was synthesized and evaluated for its antitumor activity and ability to induce DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). The results indicated that 6 exhibited higher cytotoxicity against mer(+) glioma cells compared with ACNU, BCNU, and their respective combinations with O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG). Quantifications of dG-dC cross-links induced by 6 were performed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Higher levels of dG-dC cross-link were observed in 6-treated human glioma SF763 cells (mer(+)), whereas lower levels of dG-dC cross-link were observed in 6-treated calf thymus DNA, when compared with the groups treated with BCNU and ACNU. The results suggested that the superiority of 6 might result from the AGT inhibitory moiety, which specifically functions in cells with AGT activity. Molecular docking studies indicated that five hydrogen bonds were formed between the O(6)-BG analogs released from 6 and the five residues in the active pocket of AGT, which provided a reasonable explanation for the higher AGT-inhibitory activity of 6 than O(6)-BG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influência do biofármaco DNA-hsp65 na lesão pulmonar induzida por bleomicina Influence of a DNA-hsp65 vaccine on bleomycin-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ignacio de Padua

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência do biofármaco DNA-hsp65 em um modelo de distúrbio fibrosante pulmonar experimental. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 120 camundongos machos C57BL/6, divididos em quatro grupos: grupo SS, animais tratados com salina (placebo e injetados com salina intratraqueal (IT; grupo SB, tratados com salina (placebo e injetados com bleomicina IT; grupo PB, tratados com plasmídeo, sem gene bacteriano, e injetados com bleomicina IT; e grupo BB, tratados com DNA-hsp65 e injetados com bleomicina IT. A bleomicina foi injetada 15 dias após a última imunização, e os animais sacrificados seis semanas após o uso da droga IT. O pulmão esquerdo retirado foi utilizado para análise morfológica, e o pulmão direito para dosagens de hidroxiprolina. RESULTADOS: A proporção de camundongos que apresentaram morte não-programada depois de 48 h da injeção IT foi maior no grupo SB em comparação ao grupo SS (57,7% vs. 11,1%. A área percentual média de interstício septal foi maior nos grupos SB e PB (53,1 ± 8,6% e 53,6 ± 9,3%, respectivamente em comparação aos grupos SS e BB (32,9 ± 2,7% e 34,3 ± 6,1%, respectivamente. Os grupos SB, PB e BB mostraram aumentos nos valores médios da área de interstício septal corada por picrosirius em comparação ao grupo SS (SS: 2,0 ± 1,4%; SB: 8,2 ± 4,9%; PB: 7,2 ± 4,2%; e BB:6,6±4,1%.O conteúdo pulmonar de hidroxiprolina no grupo SS foi inferior ao dos demais grupos (SS: 104,9 ± 20,9 pg/pulmão; SB: 160,4 ±47,8 pg/pulmão; PB:170,0 ± 72,0 pg/pulmão; e BB: 162,5 ± 39,7 pg/pulmão. CONCLUSÕES: A imunização com o biofármaco DNA-hsp65 interferiu na deposição de matriz não-colágena em um modelo de lesão pulmonar induzida por bleomicina.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of immunization with a DNA-hsp65 vaccine in an experimental model of pulmonary fibrosis. METHODS: A total of 120 male C57BL/6 mice were distributed into four groups: SS, injected with saline (placebo and then

  1. Capturing a DNA duplex under near-physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Xu, Wei; Liu, Xiaogang; Stellacci, Francesco; Thong, John T. L.

    2010-10-01

    We report in situ trapping of a thiolated DNA duplex with eight base pairs into a polymer-protected gold nanogap device under near-physiological conditions. The double-stranded DNA was captured by electrophoresis and covalently attached to the nanogap electrodes through sulfur-gold bonding interaction. The immobilization of the DNA duplex was confirmed by direct electrical measurements under near-physiological conditions. The conductance of the DNA duplex was estimated to be 0.09 μS. We also demonstrate the control of DNA dehybridization by heating the device to temperatures above the melting point of the DNA.

  2. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Maciel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated yellow fever (YF virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE, aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies.

  3. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies.

  4. Plasmid containing a DNA ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Griffin, K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    A ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into the shuttle vector pDM2. Although the plasmid did not affect X-ray sensitivity, it caused an increase in UV sensitivity of the wild-type but not excision-defective H. influenzae and a decrease in UV sensitivity of the rec-1 mutant. 14 references, 2 figures

  5. Scaffolded DNA Origami of a DNA Tetrahedron Molecular Container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Yongang; Sharma, Jaswinder; Liu, Minghui

    2009-01-01

    We describe a strategy of scaffolded DNA origami to design and construct 3D molecular cages of tetrahedron geometry with inside volume closed by triangular faces. Each edge of the triangular face is ∼54 nm in dimension. The estimated total external volume and the internal cavity of the triangular...... pyramid are about 1.8 × 10-23 and 1.5 × 10-23 m3, respectively. Correct formation of the tetrahedron DNA cage was verified by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering techniques....

  6. Divergent Requirement for a DNA Repair Enzyme during Enterovirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maciejewski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Viruses of the Enterovirus genus of picornaviruses, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, and human rhinovirus, commandeer the functions of host cell proteins to aid in the replication of their small viral genomic RNAs during infection. One of these host proteins is a cellular DNA repair enzyme known as 5′ tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2. TDP2 was previously demonstrated to mediate the cleavage of a unique covalent linkage between a viral protein (VPg and the 5′ end of picornavirus RNAs. Although VPg is absent from actively translating poliovirus mRNAs, the removal of VPg is not required for the in vitro translation and replication of the RNA. However, TDP2 appears to be excluded from replication and encapsidation sites during peak times of poliovirus infection of HeLa cells, suggesting a role for TDP2 during the viral replication cycle. Using a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line lacking TDP2, we found that TDP2 is differentially required among enteroviruses. Our single-cycle viral growth analysis shows that CVB3 replication has a greater dependency on TDP2 than does poliovirus or human rhinovirus replication. During infection, CVB3 protein accumulation is undetectable (by Western blot analysis in the absence of TDP2, whereas poliovirus protein accumulation is reduced but still detectable. Using an infectious CVB3 RNA with a reporter, CVB3 RNA could still be replicated in the absence of TDP2 following transfection, albeit at reduced levels. Overall, these results indicate that TDP2 potentiates viral replication during enterovirus infections of cultured cells, making TDP2 a potential target for antiviral development for picornavirus infections.

  7. A DNA Vaccine against Yellow Fever Virus: Development and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies. PMID:25875109

  8. A DNA mini-barcode for land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Damon P

    2014-05-01

    Small portions of the barcode region - mini-barcodes - may be used in place of full-length barcodes to overcome DNA degradation for samples with poor DNA preservation. 591,491,286 rbcL mini-barcode primer combinations were electronically evaluated for PCR universality, and two novel highly universal sets of priming sites were identified. Novel and published rbcL mini-barcode primers were evaluated for PCR amplification [determined with a validated electronic simulation (n = 2765) and empirically (n = 188)], Sanger sequence quality [determined empirically (n = 188)], and taxonomic discrimination [determined empirically (n = 30,472)]. PCR amplification for all mini-barcodes, as estimated by validated electronic simulation, was successful for 90.2-99.8% of species. Overall Sanger sequence quality for mini-barcodes was very low - the best mini-barcode tested produced sequences of adequate quality (B20 ≥ 0.5) for 74.5% of samples. The majority of mini-barcodes provide correct identifications of families in excess of 70.1% of the time. Discriminatory power noticeably decreased at lower taxonomic levels. At the species level, the discriminatory power of the best mini-barcode was less than 38.2%. For samples believed to contain DNA from only one species, an investigator should attempt to sequence, in decreasing order of utility and probability of success, mini-barcodes F (rbcL1/rbcLB), D (F52/R193) and K (F517/R604). For samples believed to contain DNA from more than one species, an investigator should amplify and sequence mini-barcode D (F52/R193). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Divergent Requirement for a DNA Repair Enzyme during Enterovirus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Sonia; Nguyen, Joseph H C; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Caldecott, Keith W; Semler, Bert L

    2015-12-29

    Viruses of the Enterovirus genus of picornaviruses, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), and human rhinovirus, commandeer the functions of host cell proteins to aid in the replication of their small viral genomic RNAs during infection. One of these host proteins is a cellular DNA repair enzyme known as 5' tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2). TDP2 was previously demonstrated to mediate the cleavage of a unique covalent linkage between a viral protein (VPg) and the 5' end of picornavirus RNAs. Although VPg is absent from actively translating poliovirus mRNAs, the removal of VPg is not required for the in vitro translation and replication of the RNA. However, TDP2 appears to be excluded from replication and encapsidation sites during peak times of poliovirus infection of HeLa cells, suggesting a role for TDP2 during the viral replication cycle. Using a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line lacking TDP2, we found that TDP2 is differentially required among enteroviruses. Our single-cycle viral growth analysis shows that CVB3 replication has a greater dependency on TDP2 than does poliovirus or human rhinovirus replication. During infection, CVB3 protein accumulation is undetectable (by Western blot analysis) in the absence of TDP2, whereas poliovirus protein accumulation is reduced but still detectable. Using an infectious CVB3 RNA with a reporter, CVB3 RNA could still be replicated in the absence of TDP2 following transfection, albeit at reduced levels. Overall, these results indicate that TDP2 potentiates viral replication during enterovirus infections of cultured cells, making TDP2 a potential target for antiviral development for picornavirus infections. Picornaviruses are one of the most prevalent groups of viruses that infect humans and livestock worldwide. These viruses include the human pathogens belonging to the Enterovirus genus, such as poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), and human rhinovirus. Diseases caused by enteroviruses pose a major problem for public health and have significant economic impact. Poliovirus can cause paralytic poliomyelitis. CVB3 can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease and myocarditis. Human rhinovirus is the causative agent of the common cold, which has a severe economic impact due to lost productivity and severe health consequences in individuals with respiratory dysfunction, such as asthma. By gaining a better understanding of the enterovirus replication cycle, antiviral drugs against enteroviruses may be developed. Here, we report that the absence of the cellular enzyme TDP2 can significantly decrease viral yields of poliovirus, CVB3, and human rhinovirus, making TDP2 a potential target for an antiviral against enterovirus infections. Copyright © 2016 Maciejewski et al.

  10. 3D-DART: a DNA structure modelling server

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in structural studies of DNA by both experimental and computational approaches. Often, 3D-structural models of DNA are required, for instance, to serve as templates for homology modeling, as starting structures for macro-molecular docking or as scaffold for NMR structure

  11. Scaffolded DNA origami of a DNA tetrahedron molecular container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yonggang; Sharma, Jaswinder; Liu, Minghui; Jahn, Kasper; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2009-06-01

    We describe a strategy of scaffolded DNA origami to design and construct 3D molecular cages of tetrahedron geometry with inside volume closed by triangular faces. Each edge of the triangular face is approximately 54 nm in dimension. The estimated total external volume and the internal cavity of the triangular pyramid are about 1.8 x 10(-23) and 1.5 x 10(-23) m(3), respectively. Correct formation of the tetrahedron DNA cage was verified by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering techniques.

  12. A DNA-based nanomechanical device with three robust states

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Banani; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2008-01-01

    DNA has been used to build a variety of devices, ranging from those that are controlled by DNA structural transitions to those that are controlled by the addition of specific DNA strands. These sequence-dependent devices fulfill the promise of DNA in nanotechnology because a variety of devices in the same physical environment can be controlled individually. Many such devices have been reported, but most of them contain one or two structurally robust end states, in addition to a floppy interme...

  13. A DNA-based nanomechanical device with three robust states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Banani; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2008-11-11

    DNA has been used to build a variety of devices, ranging from those that are controlled by DNA structural transitions to those that are controlled by the addition of specific DNA strands. These sequence-dependent devices fulfill the promise of DNA in nanotechnology because a variety of devices in the same physical environment can be controlled individually. Many such devices have been reported, but most of them contain one or two structurally robust end states, in addition to a floppy intermediate or even a floppy end state. We describe a system in which three different structurally robust end states can be obtained, all resulting from the addition of different set strands to a single floppy intermediate. This system is an extension of the PX-JX(2) DNA device. The three states are related to each other by three different motions, a twofold rotation, a translation of approximately 2.1-2.5 nm, and a twofold screw rotation, which combines these two motions. We demonstrate the transitions by gel electrophoresis, by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and by atomic force microscopy. The control of this system by DNA strands opens the door to trinary logic and to systems containing N devices that are able to attain 3(N) structural states.

  14. Contribution towards the development of a DNA barcode reference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA barcoding is a widely used molecular approach for species cataloging for unambiguous identification and conservation. In the present study, DNA barcoding of some West African mammals were performed with six new mitochondrial CO1 sequences for Civettictis civetta, Tadarida nigeriae, Orycteropus afer, ...

  15. Production optimisation of a DNA vaccine candidate against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccines are promising means to prevent and treat infectious diseases, such as leishmaniasis, but immunisation protocols require large amounts of supercoiled plasmid DNA (scpDNA). Although pDNA can be produced at a reasonable cost in bioreactors; this scale of production may not be the best ...

  16. Identification of Meconopsis species by a DNA barcode sequence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcoding is a novel technology that uses a standard DNA sequence to facilitate species identification. Species identification is necessary for the authentication of traditional plant based medicines. Although a consensus has not been agreed regarding which DNA sequences can be used as ...

  17. Identifying aggressive prostate cancer foci using a DNA methylation classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Chopra, Sameer; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Duymich, Christopher; Lakshminarasimhan, Ranjani; Nichols, Peter W; Aron, Manju; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Ukimura, Osamu; Aron, Monish; Stern, Mariana; Gill, Parkash; Carpten, John D; Ørntoft, Torben F; Sørensen, Karina D; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Jones, Peter A; Duddalwar, Vinay; Gill, Inderbir; Liang, Gangning

    2017-01-12

    Slow-growing prostate cancer (PC) can be aggressive in a subset of cases. Therefore, prognostic tools to guide clinical decision-making and avoid overtreatment of indolent PC and undertreatment of aggressive disease are urgently needed. PC has a propensity to be multifocal with several different cancerous foci per gland. Here, we have taken advantage of the multifocal propensity of PC and categorized aggressiveness of individual PC foci based on DNA methylation patterns in primary PC foci and matched lymph node metastases. In a set of 14 patients, we demonstrate that over half of the cases have multiple epigenetically distinct subclones and determine the primary subclone from which the metastatic lesion(s) originated. Furthermore, we develop an aggressiveness classifier consisting of 25 DNA methylation probes to determine aggressive and non-aggressive subclones. Upon validation of the classifier in an independent cohort, the predicted aggressive tumors are significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases and invasive tumor stages. Overall, this study provides molecular-based support for determining PC aggressiveness with the potential to impact clinical decision-making, such as targeted biopsy approaches for early diagnosis and active surveillance, in addition to focal therapy.

  18. The (6-4) Dimeric Lesion as a DNA Photosensitizer

    OpenAIRE

    Vendrell Criado, Victoria; Rodríguez Muñiz, Gemma María; Lhiaubet ., Virginie Lyria; Cuquerella Alabort, Maria Consuelo; Miranda Alonso, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Based on our previous investigations into the photophysical properties of the 5-methyl-2-pyrimidone (Pyo) chromophore, we now extend our studies to the photobehavior of the dimeric (6-4) thymine photoproducts (6-4 PP) to evaluate their capability to act as instrinsic DNA photosensitizers. The lesion presents significant absorption in the UVB/UVA region, weak fluorescence emission, a singlet-excited-state energy of approximately 351 kJ mol(-1), and a triplet-excited-state energy of 297 kJ...

  19. The (6-4) Dimeric Lesion as a DNA Photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell-Criado, Victoria; Rodríguez-Muñiz, Gemma M; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-07-04

    Based on our previous investigations into the photophysical properties of the 5-methyl-2-pyrimidone (Pyo) chromophore, we now extend our studies to the photobehavior of the dimeric (6-4) thymine photoproducts (6-4 PP) to evaluate their capability to act as instrinsic DNA photosensitizers. The lesion presents significant absorption in the UVB/UVA region, weak fluorescence emission, a singlet-excited-state energy of approximately 351 kJ mol(-1) , and a triplet-excited-state energy of 297 kJ mol(-1) . Its triplet transient absorption has a maximum at 420-440 nm, a lifetime of around 7 μs, and a high formation quantum yield, ΦISC =0.86. This species is efficiently quenched by thymidine. Its DNA photosensitizing properties are demonstrated by a series of experiments run on a pBR322 plasmid. The lesion photoinduces both single-strand breaks and the formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers. Altogether, these results show that, the substitution of the pyrimidone ring at C4 by a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine does not cancel out the photosensitization properties of the chromophore. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A DNA Melting Exercise for a Large Laboratory Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lauren A.; Junker, Matthew; Stark, Myranda; Greenleaf, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    A simple and economical experimental setup is described that enables multiple individuals or groups within a laboratory class to measure the thermal melting of double stranded DNA simultaneously. The setup utilizes a basic spectrophotometer capable of measuring absorbance at 260 nm, UV plastic cuvettes, and a stirring hot plate. Students measure…

  1. Priming of microglia in a DNA-repair deficient model of accelerated aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, Divya D. A.; Jaarsma, Dick; Holtman, Inge R.; Olah, Marta; Ferreira, Filipa M.; Schaafsma, Wandert; Brouwer, Nieske; Meijer, Michel M.; de Waard, Monique C.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kreft, Karim L.; Laman, Jon D.; de Haan, Gerald; Biber, Knut P. H.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    Aging is associated with reduced function, degenerative changes, and increased neuroinflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence suggests that changes in microglia cells contribute to the age-related deterioration of the CNS. The most prominent age-related change of

  2. Consequences of intramolecular dityrosine formation on a DNA-protein complex: a molecular modeling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, Julien; Sy, Denise; Eon, Severine; Charlier, Michel; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation of the free lac repressor with γ-rays abolishes protein's ability to specifically bind operator DNA. A possible radiation-induced protein damage is a dityrosine (DTyr) formed by two spatially close radiation-induced tyrosyl radicals. We performed the molecular modeling of complexes between operator DNA and DTyr-bearing parts (headpieces) of the repressor. The presence of DTyr affects the structure and the interactions between partners. A detailed analysis allows to conclude this damage can partially account for the loss of repressor ability to bind DNA

  3. Immobilization of proteins onto microbeads using a DNA binding tag for enzymatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takaaki; Mizoguchi, Takuro; Ota, Eri; Hata, Jumpei; Homma, Keisuke; Zhu, Bo; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    A novel DNA-binding protein tag, scCro-tag, which is a single-chain derivative of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor, has been developed to immobilize proteins of interest (POI) on a solid support through binding OR consensus DNA (ORC) that is tightly bound by the scCro protein. The scCro-tag successfully bound a transglutaminase 2 (TGase 2) substrate and manganese peroxidase (MnP) to microbeads via scaffolding DNA. The resulting protein-coated microbeads can be utilized for functional analysis of the enzymatic activity using flow cytometry. The quantity of bead-bound proteins can be enhanced by increasing the number of ORCs. In addition, proteins with the scCro-tag that were synthesized using a cell-free protein synthesis system were also immobilized onto the beads, thus indicating that this bead-based system would be applicable to high-throughput analysis of various enzymatic activities. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification and Characterization of uvrA, a DNA Repair Gene of Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    alkylating agents , such as methyl-N-nitro~N~nitrosoguanidine(MNNG), N-methyl-N~ nitrosourea (MNU), and to a lesser extent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS...6,4) Photoproduct 17 c. Thymine Glycols and Cross-links 17 3. Ionizing Radiation Damage " 17 4. Chemical Damage 20 a. Alkylating Agents .20 b. Cross...Examples of base damage induced by ionizing radiation 19 6. Nucleotide centers in DNA that are most reactive to alkylating agents 21 7. Schematic

  5. Second-harmonic generation as a DNA malignancy indicator of prostate glandular epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng-Fei, Zhuang; Han-Ping, Liu; Zhou-Yi, Guo; Xiao-Yuan, Deng; Shuang-Mu, Zhuo; Bi-Ying, Yu

    2010-01-01

    This paper first demonstrates second-harmonic generation (SHG) in the intact cell nucleus, which acts as an optical indicator of DNA malignancy in prostate glandular epithelial cells. Within a scanning region of 2.7 μm×2.7 μm in cell nuclei, SHG signals produced from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (PC) tissues (mouse model C57BL/6) have been investigated. Statistical analyses (t test) of a total of 405 measurements (204 nuclei from BPH and 201 nuclei from PC) show that SHG signals from BPH and PC have a distinct difference (p < 0.05), suggesting a potential optical method of revealing very early malignancy in prostate glandular epithelial cells based upon induced biochemical and/or biophysical modifications in DNA. (geophysics, astronomy and astrophysics)

  6. Immune priming of microglia in a DNA repair deficient model of accelerated aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, D. A.; Jaarsma, D.; Brouwer, N.; Hoeijmakers, J. H. J.; Eggen, B. J. L.; Biber, K. P. H.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Ageing of brain tissue has been associated with enhanced activity and immune priming of microglia in mice, rats and primates. It is, however, not clear yet whether this age-related microglia activation is due to the intrinsic process of microglia aging or is an adapted response of microglia to the

  7. Early development and characterization of a DNA-based radiation dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avarmaa, Kirsten A.

    It is the priority of first responders to minimize damage to persons and infrastructure in the case of a nuclear emergency due to an accident or deliberate terrorist attack -- if this emergency includes a radioactive hazard, first responders require a simple-to-use, accurate and complete dosimeter for radiation protection purposes in order to minimize the health risk to these individuals and the general population at large. This work consists of the early evaluation of the design and performance of a biologically relevant dosimeter which uses DNA material that can respond to the radiation of any particle type. The construct consists of fluorescently tagged strands of DNA. The signalling components of this dosimeter are also investigated for their sensitivity to radiation damage and light exposure. The dual-labelled dosimeter that is evaluated in this work gave a measurable response to gamma radiation at dose levels of 10 Gy for the given detector design and experimental setup. Further testing outside of this work confirmed this finding and indicated a working range of 100 mGy to 10 Gy using a custom-built fluorimeter as part of a larger CRTI initiative. Characterization of the chromatic components of the dosimeter showed that photobleaching is not expected to have an effect on dosimeter performance, but that radiation can damage the non-DNA signalling components at higher dose levels, although this damage is minimal at lower doses over the expected operating ranges. This work therefore describes the early steps in the quantification of the behaviour of the DNA dosimeter as a potential biologically-based device to measure radiation dose.

  8. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Díaz-Badillo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  9. A DNA minor groove electronegative potential genome map based on photo-chemical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Hansen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA of the genome contains both sequence information directly relating to the protein and RNA coding as well as functional and structural information relating to protein recognition. Only recently is the importance of DNA shape in this recognition process being fully appreciat...

  10. Identification of the vascular plants of Churchill, Manitoba, using a DNA barcode library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmina Maria L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because arctic plant communities are highly vulnerable to climate change, shifts in their composition require rapid, accurate identifications, often for specimens that lack diagnostic floral characters. The present study examines the role that DNA barcoding can play in aiding floristic evaluations in the arctic by testing the effectiveness of the core plant barcode regions (rbcL, matK and a supplemental ribosomal DNA (ITS2 marker for a well-studied flora near Churchill, Manitoba. Results This investigation examined 900 specimens representing 312 of the 354 species of vascular plants known from Churchill. Sequencing success was high for rbcL: 95% for fresh specimens and 85% for herbarium samples (mean age 20 years. ITS2 worked equally well for the fresh and herbarium material (89% and 88%. However, sequencing success was lower for matK, despite two rounds of PCR amplification, which reflected less effective primer binding and sensitivity to the DNA degradation (76% of fresh, 45% of herbaria samples. A species was considered as taxonomically resolved if its members showed at least one diagnostic difference from any other taxon in the study and formed a monophyletic clade. The highest species resolution (69% was obtained by combining information from all three genes. The joint sequence information for rbcL and matK distinguished 54% of 286 species, while rbcL and ITS2 distinguished 63% of 285 species. Discrimination of species within Salix, which constituted 8% of the flora, was particularly problematic. Despite incomplete resolution, the barcode results revealed 22 misidentified herbarium specimens, and enabled the identification of field specimens which were otherwise too immature to identify. Although seven cases of ITS2 paralogy were noted in the families Cyperaceae, Juncaceae and Juncaginaceae, this intergenic spacer played an important role in resolving congeneric plant species at Churchill. Conclusions Our results provided fast and cost-effective solution to create a comprehensive, effective DNA barcode reference library for a local flora.

  11. Towards the development of a DNA-sequence based approach to serotyping of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Julie MJ

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fliC and fljB genes in Salmonella code for the phase 1 (H1 and phase 2 (H2 flagellin respectively, the rfb cluster encodes the majority of enzymes for polysaccharide (O antigen biosynthesis, together they determine the antigenic profile by which Salmonella are identified. Sequencing and characterisation of fliC was performed in the development of a molecular serotyping technique. Results FliC sequencing of 106 strains revealed two groups; the g-complex included those exhibiting "g" or "m,t" antigenic factors, and the non-g strains which formed a second more diverse group. Variation in fliC was characterised and sero-specific motifs identified. Furthermore, it was possible to identify differences in certain H antigens that are not detected by traditional serotyping. A rapid short sequencing assay was developed to target serotype-specific sequence motifs in fliC. The assay was evaluated for identification of H1 antigens with a panel of 55 strains. Conclusion FliC sequences were obtained for more than 100 strains comprising 29 different H1 alleles. Unique pyrosequencing profiles corresponding to the H1 component of the serotype were generated reproducibly for the 23 alleles represented in the evaluation panel. Short read sequence assays can now be used to identify fliC alleles in approximately 97% of the 50 medically most important Salmonella in England and Wales. Capability for high throughput testing and automation give these assays considerable advantages over traditional methods.

  12. A DNA sequence element that advances replication origin activation time in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Thomas J; Kolor, Katherine; Fangman, Walton L; Brewer, Bonita J; Raghuraman, M K

    2013-11-06

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication undergo activation at various times in S-phase, allowing the genome to be duplicated in a temporally staggered fashion. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation times of individual origins are not intrinsic to those origins but are instead governed by surrounding sequences. Currently, there are two examples of DNA sequences that are known to advance origin activation time, centromeres and forkhead transcription factor binding sites. By combining deletion and linker scanning mutational analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to measure fork direction in the context of a two-origin plasmid, we have identified and characterized a 19- to 23-bp and a larger 584-bp DNA sequence that are capable of advancing origin activation time.

  13. Unstable Hoogsteen base pairs adjacent to echinomycin binding sites within a DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.E.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Feigon, J.

    1989-01-01

    The bisintercalation complex present between the DNA octamer [d(ACGTACGT)] 2 and the cyclic octadepsipeptide antibiotic echinomycin has been studied by one- and two-dimensional proton NMR, and the results obtained have been compared with the crystal structures of related DNA-echinomycin complexes. Two echinomycins are found to bind cooperatively to each DNA duplex at the CpG steps, with the two quinoxaline rings of each echinomycin bisintercalating between the C·G and A·T base pairs. At low temperatures, the A·T base pairs on either side of the intercalation site adopt the Hoogsteen conformation, as observed in the crystal structures. However, as the temperature is raised, the Hoogsteen base pairs in the interior of the duplex are destabilized and are observed to be exchanging between the Hoogsteen base pair and either an open or a Watson-Crick base-paired state. The terminal A·T base pairs, which are not as constrained by the helix as the internal base pairs, remain stably Hoogsteen base-paired up to at least 45 degree C. The implications of these results for the biological role of Hoogsteen base pairs in echinomycin-DNA complexes in vivo are discussed

  14. Preparation of single rice chromosome for construction of a DNA library using a laser microbeam trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Haowei; Li, Yinmei; Tang, Yesheng; Liu, Yilei; Hu, Xin; Jia, Peixin; Ying, Kai; Feng, Qi; Guan, Jianping; Jin, Chaoqing; Zhang, Lei; Lou, Liren; Zhou, Zhuan; Han, Bin

    2004-04-29

    We report the development of a laser micromanipulation system and its application in the isolation of individual rice chromosomes directly from a metaphase cell. Microdissection and flow sorting are two major methods for the isolation of single chromosome. These methods are dependent on the techniques of chromosome spread and chromosome suspension, respectively. In the development of this system, we avoided using chromosome spread and cell suspension was used instead. The cell wall of metaphase rice cell was cut by optical scissors. The released single chromosome was captured by an optical trap and transported to an area without cell debris. The isolated single chromosome was then collected and specific library was constructed by linker adaptor PCR. The average insert size of the library was about 300 bp. Two hundred inserts of chromosome 4 library were sequenced, and 96.5% were aligned to the corresponding sequences of rice chromosome 4. These results suggest the possible application of this method for the preparation of other subcellular structures and for the cloning of single macromolecule through a laser microbeam trap.

  15. Diversity of marine planktonic ostracods in South China Sea: a DNA taxonomy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Lianggen; Ning, Jiajia; Li, Hong; Ji, Yingying; Du, Feiyan

    2018-04-19

    Ostracods (Crustacea, Ostracoda) are small bivalved crustaceans, contributing over 200 described species to the marine zooplankton community. They are widely distributed and are relatively abundant components of the mesozooplankton, playing an important role in the transport of organic matter to deep layers. However, identification of ostracods based on micro-morphological characters is extremely difficult and time-consuming. Previous fragmentary taxonomic studies of ostracods in the South China Sea (SCA), were based solely on morphology. Here, by analysing the mitochondrial COI gene, we explore the taxa across the SCA using molecular tools for the first time. Our results show that sequence divergence among species varies within a large range, from 12.93% to 35.82%. Sixteen of the taxonomic units recovered by DNA taxonomy agree well with morphology, but Paraconchoecia oblonga, Conchoecia magna and Halocypris brevirostris split into two clades each, each of which contains cryptic species.

  16. A DNA 'barcode blitz': rapid digitization and sequencing of a natural history collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Paul D N; Dewaard, Jeremy R; Zakharov, Evgeny V; Prosser, Sean W J; Sones, Jayme E; McKeown, Jaclyn T A; Mantle, Beth; La Salle, John

    2013-01-01

    DNA barcoding protocols require the linkage of each sequence record to a voucher specimen that has, whenever possible, been authoritatively identified. Natural history collections would seem an ideal resource for barcode library construction, but they have never seen large-scale analysis because of concerns linked to DNA degradation. The present study examines the strength of this barrier, carrying out a comprehensive analysis of moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera) species in the Australian National Insect Collection. Protocols were developed that enabled tissue samples, specimen data, and images to be assembled rapidly. Using these methods, a five-person team processed 41,650 specimens representing 12,699 species in 14 weeks. Subsequent molecular analysis took about six months, reflecting the need for multiple rounds of PCR as sequence recovery was impacted by age, body size, and collection protocols. Despite these variables and the fact that specimens averaged 30.4 years old, barcode records were obtained from 86% of the species. In fact, one or more barcode compliant sequences (>487 bp) were recovered from virtually all species represented by five or more individuals, even when the youngest was 50 years old. By assembling specimen images, distributional data, and DNA barcode sequences on a web-accessible informatics platform, this study has greatly advanced accessibility to information on thousands of species. Moreover, much of the specimen data became publically accessible within days of its acquisition, while most sequence results saw release within three months. As such, this study reveals the speed with which DNA barcode workflows can mobilize biodiversity data, often providing the first web-accessible information for a species. These results further suggest that existing collections can enable the rapid development of a comprehensive DNA barcode library for the most diverse compartment of terrestrial biodiversity - insects.

  17. Starting a DNA barcode reference library for shallow water polychaetes from the southern European Atlantic coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Jorge; Teixeira, Marcos A L; Borges, Luisa M S; Ferreira, Maria S G; Hollatz, Claudia; Gomes, Pedro T; Sousa, Ronaldo; Ravara, Ascensão; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Filipe O

    2016-01-01

    Annelid polychaetes have been seldom the focus of dedicated DNA barcoding studies, despite their ecological relevance and often dominance, particularly in soft-bottom estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we report the first assessment of the performance of DNA barcodes in the discrimination of shallow water polychaete species from the southern European Atlantic coast, focusing on specimens collected in estuaries and coastal ecosystems of Portugal. We analysed cytochrome oxidase I DNA barcodes (COI-5P) from 164 specimens, which were assigned to 51 morphospecies. To our data set from Portugal, we added available published sequences selected from the same species, genus or family, to inspect for taxonomic congruence among studies and collection location. The final data set comprised 290 specimens and 79 morphospecies, which generated 99 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) within Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD). Among these, 22 BINs were singletons, 47 other BINs were concordant, confirming the initial identification based on morphological characters, and 30 were discordant, most of which consisted on multiple BINs found for the same morphospecies. Some of the most prominent cases in the latter category include Hediste diversicolor (O.F. Müller, 1776) (7), Eulalia viridis (Linnaeus, 1767) (2) and Owenia fusiformis (delle Chiaje, 1844) (5), all of them reported from Portugal and frequently used in ecological studies as environmental quality indicators. Our results for these species showed discordance between molecular lineages and morphospecies, or added additional relatively divergent lineages. The potential inaccuracies in environmental assessments, where underpinning polychaete species diversity is poorly resolved or clarified, demand additional and extensive investigation of the DNA barcode diversity in this group, in parallel with alpha taxonomy efforts. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A checklist of the bats of Peninsular Malaysia and progress towards a DNA barcode reference library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Voon-Ching; Ramli, Rosli; Bhassu, Subha; Wilson, John-James

    2017-01-01

    Several published checklists of bat species have covered Peninsular Malaysia as part of a broader region and/or in combination with other mammal groups. Other researchers have produced comprehensive checklists for specific localities within the peninsula. To our knowledge, a comprehensive checklist of bats specifically for the entire geopolitical region of Peninsular Malaysia has never been published, yet knowing which species are present in Peninsular Malaysia and their distributions across the region are crucial in developing suitable conservation plans. Our literature search revealed that 110 bat species have been documented in Peninsular Malaysia; 105 species have precise locality records while five species lack recent and/or precise locality records. We retrieved 18 species from records dated before the year 2000 and seven species have only ever been recorded once. Our search of Barcode of Life Datasystems (BOLD) found that 86 (of the 110) species have public records of which 48 species have public DNA barcodes available from bats sampled in Peninsular Malaysia. Based on Neighbour-Joining tree analyses and the allocation of DNA barcodes to Barcode Index Number system (BINs) by BOLD, several DNA barcodes recorded under the same species name are likely to represent distinct taxa. We discuss these cases in detail and highlight the importance of further surveys to determine the occurences and resolve the taxonomy of particular bat species in Peninsular Malaysia, with implications for conservation priorities.

  19. A DNA Barcode Library for Korean Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) and Indexes for Defining Barcode Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungmin; Song, Kyo-Hong; Ree, Han-Il; Kim, Won

    2012-01-01

    Non-biting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae) are a diverse population that commonly causes respiratory allergies in humans. Chironomid larvae can be used to indicate freshwater pollution, but accurate identification on the basis of morphological characteristics is difficult. In this study, we constructed a mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)-based DNA barcode library for Korean chironomids. This library consists of 211 specimens from 49 species, including adults and unidentified larvae. The interspecies and intraspecies COI sequence variations were analyzed. Sophisticated indexes were developed in order to properly evaluate indistinct barcode gaps that are created by insufficient sampling on both the interspecies and intraspecies levels and by variable mutation rates across taxa. In a variety of insect datasets, these indexes were useful for re-evaluating large barcode datasets and for defining COI barcode gaps. The COI-based DNA barcode library will provide a rapid and reliable tool for the molecular identification of Korean chironomid species. Furthermore, this reverse-taxonomic approach will be improved by the continuous addition of other speceis’ sequences to the library. PMID:22138764

  20. The 75-kilodalton cytoplasmic Chlamydia trachomatis L2 polypeptide is a DnaK-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Lundemose, AG; Christiansen, Gunna

    1990-01-01

    ,980-base-pair open reading frame revealed 94% homology with a 75-kilodalton protein from C. trachomatis serovar D and 57% homology with the DnaK proteins of E. coli and of Bacillus megaterium, while amino acid homology with human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) was 42%. The promoter region was identified......The gene coding for the 75-kilodalton cytoplasmic Chlamydia trachomatis L2 polypeptide has been cloned in Escherichia coli, and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The cloned DNA fragment contained the coding region as well as the putative promoter. The deduced amino acid sequence of the 1...... by computer search and by primer extension of mRNA synthesized in recombinant E. coli. The promoter region which differed from the putative promoter region in serovar D was shown to be a mixed promoter type in which the -10 region showed a regular TATA box configuration while the -35 region showed high...

  1. Blocking Blood Supply to Breast Carcinoma With a DNA Vaccine Encoding VEGF Receptor-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    D2F2 cells and assayed according to instructions provided by the manufacturer (BD Bioscience). Plates were read by IMMUNOSPOT SCANALYSIS, and digitalized ... Medellin , D., Kim, H. T., Lu, C., Ge, G., Schiff, R., Hilsenbeck, S. G., Osborne, C. K., et al. (2002) Oncogene 21, 7680–7689. 9. Chiappetta, G., Tallini, G

  2. A DNA biosensor for molecular diagnosis of Aeromonas hydrophila using zinc sulfide nanospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Negahdary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, identification of pathogenic bacteria using modern and accurate methods is inevitable. Integration in electrochemical measurements with nanotechnology has led to the design of efficient and sensitive DNA biosensors against bacterial agents. Here, efforts were made to detect Aeromonas hydrophila using aptamers as probes and zinc sulfide (ZnS nanospheres as signal enhancers and electron transfer facilitators. After modification of the working electrode area (in a screen-printed electrode with ZnS nanospheres through electrodeposition, the coated surface of a modified electrode with ZnS nanospheres was investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The size of synthesized ZnS nanospheres was estimated at about 20–50 nm and their shape was in the form of porous plates in microscopic observations. All electrochemical measurements were performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, and constant potential amperometry (CPA techniques. The designed DNA biosensor was able to detect deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA of Aeromonas hydrophila in the range 1.0  ×  10−4 to 1.0  ×  10−9 mol L−1; the limit of detection (LOD in this study was 1  ×  10−13 mol L−1. This DNA biosensor showed satisfactory thermal and pH stability. Reproducibility for this DNA biosensor was measured and the relative standard deviation (RSD of the performance of this DNA biosensor was calculated as 5 % during 42 days.

  3. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  4. Optimization of a DNA Nicking Assay to Evaluate Oenocarpus bataua and Camellia sinensis Antioxidant Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Jérôme Leba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at assessing the DNA damage protective activity of different types of extracts (aqueous, methanolic and acetonic using an in vitro DNA nicking assay. Several parameters were optimized using the pUC18 plasmid, especially FeSO4, EDTA, solvent concentrations and incubation time. Special attention has been paid to removing the protective and damaging effect of the solvent and FeSO4 respectively, as well as to identifying the relevant positive and negative controls. For each solvent, the optimal conditions were determined: (i for aqueous extracts, 0.33 mM of FeSO4 and 0.62 mM of EDTA were incubated for 20 min at 37 °C; (ii for acetone extracts, 1.16% solvent were incubated for 15 min at 37 °C with 1.3 mM of FeSO4 and 2.5 mM of EDTA and (iii for methanol extracts, 0.16% solvent, were incubated for 1.5 h at 37 °C with 0.33 mM of FeSO4 and 0.62 mM of EDTA. Using the optimized conditions, the DNA damage protective activity of aqueous, methanolic and acetonic extracts of an Amazonian palm berry (Oenocarpus bataua and green tea (Camellia sinensis was assessed. Aqueous and acetonic Oenocarpus bataua extracts were protective against DNA damage, whereas aqueous, methanolic and acetonic extracts of Camellia sinensis extracts induced DNA damage.

  5. Multifunctional energy landscape for a DNA G-quadruplex: An evolved molecular switch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cragnolini, T.; Chakraborty, D.; Šponer, Jiří; Derreumaux, P.; Pasquali, S.; Wales, D.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 15 (2017), č. článku 152715. ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13721S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : telomeric g-quadruplex * gb1 hairpin peptide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.965, year: 2016

  6. A DNA Logic Gate Automaton for Detection of Rabies and Other Lyssaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Pavithra; Macdonald, Joanne

    2017-07-05

    Immediate activation of biosensors is not always desirable, particularly if activation is due to non-specific interactions. Here we demonstrate the use of deoxyribozyme-based logic gate networks arranged into visual displays to precisely control activation of biosensors, and demonstrate a prototype molecular automaton able to discriminate between seven different genotypes of Lyssaviruses, including Rabies virus. The device uses novel mixed-base logic gates to enable detection of the large diversity of Lyssavirus sequence populations, while an ANDNOT logic gate prevents non-specific activation across genotypes. The resultant device provides a user-friendly digital-like, but molecule-powered, dot-matrix text output for unequivocal results read-out that is highly relevant for point of care applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Facile preparation of a DNA sensor for rapid herpes virus detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh, E-mail: tampd-hast@mail.hut.edu.vn [Hanoi Advanced School of Science and Technology, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Tuan, Mai Anh, E-mail: tuanma-itims@mail.hut.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Huy, Tran Quang [National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), 01 Yersin, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Le, Anh-Tuan [Hanoi Advanced School of Science and Technology, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Hieu, Nguyen Van, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam)

    2010-10-12

    In this paper, a simple DNA sensor platform was developed for rapid herpes virus detection in real samples. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the herpes simplex virus (DNA probe) were directly immobilized on the surface of interdigitated electrodes by electrochemical polymerization along with pyrrole monomers. The potential was scanned from - 0.7 to + 0.6 V, and the scanning rate was 100 mV/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to verify specific DNA sequence binding and the conducting polymer. The morphology of the conducting polymer doped with DNA strands was characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope. As-obtained DNA sensor was used to detect the herpes virus DNA in the real samples. The results show that the current DNA sensors detected the lowest DNA concentration of 2 nM. This sensitivity appears to be better than that of the DNA sensors prepared by immobilization of the DNA probe on the 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) membrane.

  8. On some surprising statistical properties of a DNA fingerprinting technique called AFLP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gort, G.

    2010-01-01

    AFLP is a widely used DNA fingerprinting technique, resulting in band absence - presence profiles, like a bar code. Bands represent DNA fragments, sampled from the genome of an individual plant or other organism. The DNA fragments travel through a lane of an electrophoretic gel or microcapillary

  9. Colour patterns do not diagnose species: quantitative evaluation of a DNA barcoded cryptic bumblebee complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Carolan

    Full Text Available Cryptic diversity within bumblebees (Bombus has the potential to undermine crucial conservation efforts designed to reverse the observed decline in many bumblebee species worldwide. Central to such efforts is the ability to correctly recognise and diagnose species. The B. lucorum complex (Bombus lucorum, B. cryptarum and B. magnus comprises one of the most abundant and important group of wild plant and crop pollinators in northern Europe. Although the workers of these species are notoriously difficult to diagnose morphologically, it has been claimed that queens are readily diagnosable from morphological characters. Here we assess the value of colour-pattern characters in species identification of DNA-barcoded queens from the B. lucorum complex. Three distinct molecular operational taxonomic units were identified each representing one species. However, no uniquely diagnostic colour-pattern character state was found for any of these three molecular units and most colour-pattern characters showed continuous variation among the units. All characters previously deemed to be unique and diagnostic for one species were displayed by specimens molecularly identified as a different species. These results presented here raise questions on the reliability of species determinations in previous studies and highlights the benefits of implementing DNA barcoding prior to ecological, taxonomic and conservation studies of these important key pollinators.

  10. Calcinea of the Red Sea: providing a DNA barcode inventory with description of four new species

    KAUST Repository

    Voigt, Oliver; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gonzá lez-Pech, Rá ul A.; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; Berumen, Michael L.; Wö rheide, Gert

    2017-01-01

    The Red Sea is a biodiversity hotspot with a considerable percentage of endemic species for many marine animals. Little is known about the diversity and distribution of calcareous sponges (Porifera, Class Calcarea) in this marginal sea. Here we analysed calcareous sponges of the subclass Calcinea that were collected between 2009 and 2013 at 20 localities in the Red Sea, ranging from the Gulf of Aqaba in the north to the Farasan Islands in the south, to document the species of this region. For this, we applied an integrative approach: We defined OTUs based on the analyses of a recently suggested standard DNA marker, the LSU C-region. The analysis was complemented with a second marker, the internal transcribed spacer, for selected specimens. Ten OTUs were identified. Specimens of each OTU were morphologically examined with spicule preparations and histological sections. Accordingly, our ten OTUs represent ten species, which cover taxonomically a broad range of the subclass. By combining molecular and morphological data, we describe four new species from the Red Sea: Soleneiscus hamatus sp. nov., Ernstia arabica sp. nov., Clathrina rotundata sp. nov., and Clathrina rowi sp. nov.. One additional small specimen was closely related to “Clathrina” adusta, but due to the small size it could not be properly analysed morphologically. By providing the DNA sequences for the morphologically documented specimens in the Sponge Barcoding Database (www.spongebarcoding.org) we facilitate future DNA-assisted species identification of Red Sea Calcinea, even for small or incomplete samples, which would be insufficient for morphological identification. Application of DNA barcode methods in the subclass will help to further investigate the distribution of Calcinea in the Red Sea and adjacent regions.

  11. Methods for interpreting lists of affected genes obtained in a DNA microarray experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Jakob; Arce, Christina; Bicciato, Silvio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe and compare the methods used and the results obtained by the participants in a joint EADGENE (European Animal Disease Genomic Network of Excellence) and SABRE (Cutting Edge Genomics for Sustainable Animal Breeding) workshop focusing on post analysis of microa...... a microarray experiment conducted to study the host reactions in broilers occurring shortly after a secondary challenge with either a homologous or heterologous species of Eimeria...

  12. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Jianqing, E-mail: jqqi@uw.edu; Anantram, M. P., E-mail: anantmp@uw.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2500 (United States); Govind, Niranjan, E-mail: niri.govind@pnnl.gov [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2015-09-07

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  13. Single Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Behavior on a DNA Origami Template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmig, Sarah Wendelboe; Rotaru, Alexandru; Arian, Dumitru

    2010-01-01

    DNA origami, the folding of a long single-stranded DNA sequence (scaffold strand) by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides (staple strands) into parallel aligned helices, is a highly efficient method to form advanced self-assembled DNA-architectures. Since molecules and various materials can...... be conjugated to each of the short staple strands, the origami method offers a unique possibility of arranging molecules and materials in well-defined positions on a structured surface. Here we combine the action of light with AFM and DNA nanostructures to study the production of singlet oxygen from a single...... photosensitizer molecule conjugated to a selected DNA origami staple strand on an origami structure. We demonstrate a distance-dependent oxidation of organic moieties incorporated in specific positions on DNA origami by singlet oxygen produced from a single photosensitizer located at the center of each origami....

  14. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Ahsan; Waseem, Hassan; Williams, Maggie R.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Gulari, Erdogan; Tiedje, James M.; Hashsham, Syed A.

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics) to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs). Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R2 = 0.8131). PMID:28555058

  15. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Munir

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs. Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R2 = 0.8131.

  16. MO-AB-BRA-04: Radiation Measurements with a DNA Double-Strand-Break Dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Many types of dosimeters are used to measure radiation, but none of them directly measures the biological effect of this dose. The purpose here is to create a dosimeter that can measure the probability of double-strand breaks (DSB) for DNA, which is directly related to the biological effect of radiation. Methods: The dosimeter has DNA strands, which are labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein. The biotin attaches these strands to magnetic beads. We suspended the DNA dosimeter in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as it matches the internal environment of the body. We placed small volumes (50µL) of the DNA dosimeter into tubes and irradiated these samples in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with several doses (three samples per dose). After irradiating the samples, a magnet was placed against the tubes. The fluorescein attached to broken DNA strands was extracted (called the supernatant) and placed into a different tube. The fluorescein on the unbroken strands remained attached to the beads in the tube and was re-suspended with 50µL of PBS. A fluorescence reader was used to measure the fluorescence for both the re-suspended beads and supernatant. To prove that we are measuring DSB, we tested dosimeter response with two different lengths of attached DNA strands (1 and 4 kilo-base pair). Results: The probability of DSB at the dose levels of 5, 10, 25, and 50 Gy were 0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.19, respectively, while the coefficients of variation were 0.14, 0.07, 0.02, and 0.01, respectively. The 4 kilo-base-pair dosimeter produced 5.3 times the response of the 1 kilo-base-pair dosimeter. Conclusion: The DNA dosimeter yields a measurable response to dose that scales with the DNA strand length. The goal now is to refine the dosimeter fabrication to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation for the lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  17. A DNA methylation-based definition of biologically distinct breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Olafur A; Moran, Sebastian; Gomez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Arribas-Jorba, Carlos; Sandoval, Juan; Hilmarsdottir, Holmfridur; Olafsdottir, Elinborg; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Jonasson, Jon G; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Esteller, Manel

    2015-03-01

    In cancer, epigenetic states are deregulated and thought to be of significance in cancer development and progression. We explored DNA methylation-based signatures in association with breast cancer subtypes to assess their impact on clinical presentation and patient prognosis. DNA methylation was analyzed using Infinium 450K arrays in 40 tumors and 17 normal breast samples, together with DNA copy number changes and subtype-specific markers by tissue microarrays. The identified methylation signatures were validated against a cohort of 212 tumors annotated for breast cancer subtypes by the PAM50 method (The Cancer Genome Atlas). Selected markers were pyrosequenced in an independent validation cohort of 310 tumors and analyzed with respect to survival, clinical stage and grade. The results demonstrate that DNA methylation patterns linked to the luminal-B subtype are characterized by CpG island promoter methylation events. In contrast, a large fraction of basal-like tumors are characterized by hypomethylation events occurring within the gene body. Based on these hallmark signatures, we defined two DNA methylation-based subtypes, Epi-LumB and Epi-Basal, and show that they are associated with unfavorable clinical parameters and reduced survival. Our data show that distinct mechanisms leading to changes in CpG methylation states are operative in different breast cancer subtypes. Importantly, we show that a few selected proxy markers can be used to detect the distinct DNA methylation-based subtypes thereby providing valuable information on disease prognosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Engineering of a DNA Polymerase for Direct m6 A Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrenner, Joos; Werner, Stephan; Marchand, Virginie; Adam, Martina; Motorin, Yuri; Helm, Mark; Marx, Andreas

    2018-01-08

    Methods for the detection of RNA modifications are of fundamental importance for advancing epitranscriptomics. N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) is the most abundant RNA modification in mammalian mRNA and is involved in the regulation of gene expression. Current detection techniques are laborious and rely on antibody-based enrichment of m 6 A-containing RNA prior to sequencing, since m 6 A modifications are generally "erased" during reverse transcription (RT). To overcome the drawbacks associated with indirect detection, we aimed to generate novel DNA polymerase variants for direct m 6 A sequencing. Therefore, we developed a screen to evolve an RT-active KlenTaq DNA polymerase variant that sets a mark for N 6 -methylation. We identified a mutant that exhibits increased misincorporation opposite m 6 A compared to unmodified A. Application of the generated DNA polymerase in next-generation sequencing allowed the identification of m 6 A sites directly from the sequencing data of untreated RNA samples. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. Calcinea of the Red Sea: providing a DNA barcode inventory with description of four new species

    KAUST Repository

    Voigt, Oliver

    2017-03-29

    The Red Sea is a biodiversity hotspot with a considerable percentage of endemic species for many marine animals. Little is known about the diversity and distribution of calcareous sponges (Porifera, Class Calcarea) in this marginal sea. Here we analysed calcareous sponges of the subclass Calcinea that were collected between 2009 and 2013 at 20 localities in the Red Sea, ranging from the Gulf of Aqaba in the north to the Farasan Islands in the south, to document the species of this region. For this, we applied an integrative approach: We defined OTUs based on the analyses of a recently suggested standard DNA marker, the LSU C-region. The analysis was complemented with a second marker, the internal transcribed spacer, for selected specimens. Ten OTUs were identified. Specimens of each OTU were morphologically examined with spicule preparations and histological sections. Accordingly, our ten OTUs represent ten species, which cover taxonomically a broad range of the subclass. By combining molecular and morphological data, we describe four new species from the Red Sea: Soleneiscus hamatus sp. nov., Ernstia arabica sp. nov., Clathrina rotundata sp. nov., and Clathrina rowi sp. nov.. One additional small specimen was closely related to “Clathrina” adusta, but due to the small size it could not be properly analysed morphologically. By providing the DNA sequences for the morphologically documented specimens in the Sponge Barcoding Database (www.spongebarcoding.org) we facilitate future DNA-assisted species identification of Red Sea Calcinea, even for small or incomplete samples, which would be insufficient for morphological identification. Application of DNA barcode methods in the subclass will help to further investigate the distribution of Calcinea in the Red Sea and adjacent regions.

  20. A DNA-based semantic fusion model for remote sensing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Sun

    Full Text Available Semantic technology plays a key role in various domains, from conversation understanding to algorithm analysis. As the most efficient semantic tool, ontology can represent, process and manage the widespread knowledge. Nowadays, many researchers use ontology to collect and organize data's semantic information in order to maximize research productivity. In this paper, we firstly describe our work on the development of a remote sensing data ontology, with a primary focus on semantic fusion-driven research for big data. Our ontology is made up of 1,264 concepts and 2,030 semantic relationships. However, the growth of big data is straining the capacities of current semantic fusion and reasoning practices. Considering the massive parallelism of DNA strands, we propose a novel DNA-based semantic fusion model. In this model, a parallel strategy is developed to encode the semantic information in DNA for a large volume of remote sensing data. The semantic information is read in a parallel and bit-wise manner and an individual bit is converted to a base. By doing so, a considerable amount of conversion time can be saved, i.e., the cluster-based multi-processes program can reduce the conversion time from 81,536 seconds to 4,937 seconds for 4.34 GB source data files. Moreover, the size of result file recording DNA sequences is 54.51 GB for parallel C program compared with 57.89 GB for sequential Perl. This shows that our parallel method can also reduce the DNA synthesis cost. In addition, data types are encoded in our model, which is a basis for building type system in our future DNA computer. Finally, we describe theoretically an algorithm for DNA-based semantic fusion. This algorithm enables the process of integration of the knowledge from disparate remote sensing data sources into a consistent, accurate, and complete representation. This process depends solely on ligation reaction and screening operations instead of the ontology.

  1. A DNA-based semantic fusion model for remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Heng; Weng, Jian; Yu, Guangchuang; Massawe, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    Semantic technology plays a key role in various domains, from conversation understanding to algorithm analysis. As the most efficient semantic tool, ontology can represent, process and manage the widespread knowledge. Nowadays, many researchers use ontology to collect and organize data's semantic information in order to maximize research productivity. In this paper, we firstly describe our work on the development of a remote sensing data ontology, with a primary focus on semantic fusion-driven research for big data. Our ontology is made up of 1,264 concepts and 2,030 semantic relationships. However, the growth of big data is straining the capacities of current semantic fusion and reasoning practices. Considering the massive parallelism of DNA strands, we propose a novel DNA-based semantic fusion model. In this model, a parallel strategy is developed to encode the semantic information in DNA for a large volume of remote sensing data. The semantic information is read in a parallel and bit-wise manner and an individual bit is converted to a base. By doing so, a considerable amount of conversion time can be saved, i.e., the cluster-based multi-processes program can reduce the conversion time from 81,536 seconds to 4,937 seconds for 4.34 GB source data files. Moreover, the size of result file recording DNA sequences is 54.51 GB for parallel C program compared with 57.89 GB for sequential Perl. This shows that our parallel method can also reduce the DNA synthesis cost. In addition, data types are encoded in our model, which is a basis for building type system in our future DNA computer. Finally, we describe theoretically an algorithm for DNA-based semantic fusion. This algorithm enables the process of integration of the knowledge from disparate remote sensing data sources into a consistent, accurate, and complete representation. This process depends solely on ligation reaction and screening operations instead of the ontology.

  2. Development of a robust, versatile, and scalable inoculum train for the production of a DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkowski, J; Kizer-Bentley, L; Listner, K; Robinson, D; Chartrain, M

    2005-01-01

    For many microbial fermentation processes, the inoculum train can have a substantial impact on process performance in terms of productivity, profitability, and process control. In general, it is understood that a well-characterized and flexible inoculum train is essential for future scale-up and implementation of the process in a pilot plant or manufacturing setting. A fermentation process utilizing E. coli DH5 for the production of plasmid DNA carrying the HIV gag gene for use as a vaccine is currently under development in our laboratory. As part of the development effort, we evaluated inoculum train schemes that incorporate one, two, or three stages. In addition, we investigated the effect of inoculum viable-cell concentrations, either thawed or actively growing, over a wide range (from 2.5 x 10(4) to 1.0 x 10(8) viable cells/mL or approximately 0.001% to 4% of final working volume). The various inoculum trains were evaluated in terms of final plasmid yield, process time, reproducibility, robustness, and feasibility at large scale. The results of these studies show that final plasmid yield remained in the desired range, despite the number of stages or inoculation viable-cell concentrations comprising the inoculum train. On the basis of these observations and because it established a large database, the first part of these investigations supports an exceptional flexibility in the design of scalable inoculum trains for this DNA vaccine process. This work also highlighted that a slightly higher level of process reproducibility, as measured by the time for the culture to reach mid-exponential growth, was observed when using actively growing versus frozen cells. It also demonstrated the existence of a viable-cell concentration threshold for the one-stage process, since we observed that inoculation of the production stage with very low amounts of viable cells from a frozen source could lead to increased process sensitivity to external factors such as variation in the quality of the raw materials used in the medium formulation. However, our analysis indicates that, despite this slight disadvantage, a one-stage inoculum train was a viable option in many situations, especially if the inoculation viable-cell concentration was kept above 4.8 x 10(6) viable cells/mL. Because it leads to a reduction in process steps and eliminates some capital investments (i.e., inoculum fermenter), when feasible a one-stage process configuration will positively impact process economics.

  3. Bacillus halodurans RecA-DNA binding and RecAmediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. In Escherichia coli, RecA protein catalyzes DNA pairing and strand exchange activities essential for genetic recombination. This is critical for normal cellular function under conditions that lead to altered. DNA metabolism and DNA damage. The RecA proteins of E. coli and Bacillus halodurans both can bind to DNA ...

  4. Study on Electrochemical Insulin Sensing Utilizing a DNA Aptamer-Immobilized Gold Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Kubo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated an insulin-sensing method by utilizing an insulin-binding aptamer IGA3, which forms an anti-parallel G-quadruplex with folded single strands. Spectroscopic observation indicates that some anti-parallel G-quadruplex bind hemin and show peroxidase activity. In this study, the peroxidase activity of IGA3 with hemin was confirmed by spectrophotometric measurements, i.e., the activity was three-times higher than hemin itself. IGA3 was then immobilized onto a gold electrode to determine its electrochemical activity. The peroxidase activity of the immobilized IGA3-hemin complex was determined by cyclic voltammetry, and a cathodic peak current of the electrode showed a dependence on the concentration of H2O2. The cathodic peak current of the IGA3-hemin complex decreased by binding it to insulin, and this decrease depended on the concentration of insulin.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of a DNA containing a single strand break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Siebers, G.; Furukawa, A.; Otagiri, N.; Osman, R

    2002-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a dodecamer DNA containing a single strand break (SSB), which has been represented by a 3'-OH deoxyribose and 5'-OH phosphate in the middle of the strand. Molecular force field parameters of the 5'-OH phosphate region were determined from an ab initio calculation at the HF/6-31G level using the program package GAMESS. The DNA was placed in a periodic boundary box with water molecules and Na+ counter-ions to produce a neutralised system. After minimisation, the system was heated to 300 K, equilibrated and a production run at constant NTP was executed for 1 ns using AMBER 4.1. Snapshots of the SSB-containing DNA and a detailed analysis of the equilibriated average structure revealed surprisingly small conformational changes compared to normal DNA. However, dynamic properties calculated using the essential dynamics method showed some features that may be important for the recognition of this damage by repair enzymes. (author)

  6. Bio-recognitive photonics of a DNA-guided organic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Seung Hyuk; Park, Jin Hyuk; Cui, Chunzhi; Ahn, Dong June

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of duplex DNA with higher molecular weights has attracted attention for a new opportunity towards a better organic light-emitting diode (OLED) capability. However, biological recognition by OLED materials is yet to be addressed. In this study, specific oligomeric DNA-DNA recognition is successfully achieved by tri (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), an organic semiconductor. Alq3 rods crystallized with guidance from single-strand DNA molecules show, strikingly, a unique distribution of the DNA molecules with a shape of an `inverted' hourglass. The crystal's luminescent intensity is enhanced by 1.6-fold upon recognition of the perfect-matched target DNA sequence, but not in the case of a single-base mismatched one. The DNA-DNA recognition forming double-helix structure is identified to occur only in the rod's outer periphery. This study opens up new opportunities of Alq3, one of the most widely used OLED materials, enabling biological recognition.

  7. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of a DNA repair gene from Serratia marcescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the SOS response and two 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases (TagI and TagII) are required for repair of DNA damaged by alkylating agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Mutations of the recA gene eliminate the SOS response. TagI and TagII are encoded by the tag and alkA genes, respectively. A gene (rpr) encoding 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity was isolated from the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. The gene, localized to a 1.5-kilobase pair SmaI-HindIII restriction fragment, was cloned into plasmid pUC18. The clone complemented E. coli tag alkA and recA mutations for MMS resistance. The rpr gene did not, however, complement recA mutations for resistance to ultraviolet light or the ability to perform homologous recombination reactions, nor did it complement E. coli ada or alkB mutations. Two proteins of molecular weights 42,000 and 16,000 were produced from the rpr locus. Analysis of deletion and insertion mutants of rpr suggested that the 42kD molecule is the active protein. The 16kD protein may either be a breakdown product of the 42kD species or may be encoded by another gene overlapping the reading frame of the rpr gene. Biochemical assays showed that the rpr gene product (Rpr) possesses 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity

  9. Ultrafast dynamics of solvation and charge transfer in a DNA-based biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Batabyal, Subrata; Mondol, Tanumoy; Sao, Dilip; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Charge migration along DNA molecules is a key factor for DNA-based devices in optoelectronics and biotechnology. The association of a significant amount of water molecules in DNA-based materials for the intactness of the DNA structure and their dynamic role in the charge-transfer (CT) dynamics is less documented in contemporary literature. In the present study, we have used a genomic DNA-cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTMA) complex, a technological important biomaterial, and Hoechest 33258 (H258), a well-known DNA minor groove binder, as fluorogenic probe for the dynamic solvation studies. The CT dynamics of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs; 5.2 nm) embedded in the as-prepared and swollen biomaterial have also been studied and correlated with that of the timescale of solvation. We have extended our studies on the temperature-dependent CT dynamics of QDs in a nanoenvironment of an anionic, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate reverse micelle (AOT RMs), whereby the number of water molecules and their dynamics can be tuned in a controlled manner. A direct correlation of the dynamics of solvation and that of the CT in the nanoenvironments clearly suggests that the hydration barrier within the Arrhenius framework essentially dictates the charge-transfer dynamics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxycytidine: a DNA building block with a 'clickable' side chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seela, Frank; Mei, Hui; Xiong, Hai; Budow, Simone; Eickmeier, Henning; Reuter, Hans

    2012-10-01

    The title compound [systematic name: 4-amino-1-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-5-ethynylpyrimidin-2(1H)-one], C(11)H(13)N(3)O(4), shows two conformations in the crystalline state. The N-glycosylic bonds of both conformers adopt similar conformations, with χ = -149.2 (1)° for conformer (I-1) and -151.4 (1)° for conformer (I-2), both in the anti range. The sugar residue of (I-1) shows a C2'-endo envelope conformation ((2)E, S-type), with P = 164.7 (1)° and τ(m) = 36.9 (1)°, while (I-2) shows a major C3'-exo sugar pucker (C3'-exo-C2'-endo, (3)T(2), S-type), with P = 189.2 (1)° and τ(m) = 33.3 (1)°. Both conformers participate in the formation of a layered three-dimensional crystal structure with a chain-like arrangement of the conformers. The ethynyl groups do not participate in hydrogen bonding, but are arranged in proximal positions.

  11. The use of Listeria monocytogenes as a DNA delivery vector for cancer gene therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen that lyses the phagosomal vacuole of infected cells, proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm and can actively enter adjacent cells. The pathogen is therefore well suited to exploitation as a vector for the delivery of DNA to target cells as the lifecycle favors cellular targeting with vector amplification and the potential for cell-to-cell spread. We have recently demonstrated DNA transfer by L. monocytogenes in growing tumors in murine models. Our approach exploited an ampicillin sensitive stain of L. monocytogenes which can be lysed through systemic administration of ampicillin to facilitate release of plasmid DNA for expression by infected mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the implications of this technology and the potential for future improvements of the system.

  12. Identification of the vascular plants of Churchill, Manitoba, using a DNA barcode library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, Maria L; Johnson, Karen L; Barron, Hannah R; Hebert, Paul Dn

    2012-11-28

    Because arctic plant communities are highly vulnerable to climate change, shifts in their composition require rapid, accurate identifications, often for specimens that lack diagnostic floral characters. The present study examines the role that DNA barcoding can play in aiding floristic evaluations in the arctic by testing the effectiveness of the core plant barcode regions (rbcL, matK) and a supplemental ribosomal DNA (ITS2) marker for a well-studied flora near Churchill, Manitoba. This investigation examined 900 specimens representing 312 of the 354 species of vascular plants known from Churchill. Sequencing success was high for rbcL: 95% for fresh specimens and 85% for herbarium samples (mean age 20 years). ITS2 worked equally well for the fresh and herbarium material (89% and 88%). However, sequencing success was lower for matK, despite two rounds of PCR amplification, which reflected less effective primer binding and sensitivity to the DNA degradation (76% of fresh, 45% of herbaria samples). A species was considered as taxonomically resolved if its members showed at least one diagnostic difference from any other taxon in the study and formed a monophyletic clade. The highest species resolution (69%) was obtained by combining information from all three genes. The joint sequence information for rbcL and matK distinguished 54% of 286 species, while rbcL and ITS2 distinguished 63% of 285 species. Discrimination of species within Salix, which constituted 8% of the flora, was particularly problematic. Despite incomplete resolution, the barcode results revealed 22 misidentified herbarium specimens, and enabled the identification of field specimens which were otherwise too immature to identify. Although seven cases of ITS2 paralogy were noted in the families Cyperaceae, Juncaceae and Juncaginaceae, this intergenic spacer played an important role in resolving congeneric plant species at Churchill. Our results provided fast and cost-effective solution to create a comprehensive, effective DNA barcode reference library for a local flora.

  13. A High Phosphorus Diet Affects Lipid Metabolism in Rat Liver: A DNA Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sunwoo; Bamba, Takeshi; Suyama, Tatsuya; Ishijima, Tomoko; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Abe, Keiko; Nakai, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A high phosphorus (HP) diet causes disorders of renal function, bone metabolism, and vascular function. We previously demonstrated that DNA microarray analysis is an appropriate method to comprehensively evaluate the effects of a HP diet on kidney dysfunction such as calcification, fibrillization, and inflammation. We reported that type IIb sodium-dependent phosphate transporter is significantly up-regulated in this context. In the present study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to investigate the effects of a HP diet on the liver, which plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA isolated from the livers of rats fed a control diet (containing 0.3% phosphorus) or a HP diet (containing 1.2% phosphorus). Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that the HP diet induced down-regulation of genes involved in hepatic amino acid catabolism and lipogenesis, while genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation process were up-regulated. Although genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated in HP diet-fed rats, genes important for the elongation and desaturation reactions of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids were up-regulated. Concentrations of hepatic arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were increased in HP diet-fed rats. These essential fatty acids activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a transcription factor for fatty acid β-oxidation. Evaluation of the upstream regulators of DEGs using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that PPARα was activated in the livers of HP diet-fed rats. Furthermore, the serum concentration of fibroblast growth factor 21, a hormone secreted from the liver that promotes fatty acid utilization in adipose tissue as a PPARα target gene, was higher (p = 0.054) in HP diet-fed rats than in control diet-fed rats. These data suggest that a HP diet enhances energy expenditure through the utilization of free fatty acids released via lipolysis of white adipose tissue. PMID:27187182

  14. Speeding up the self-assembly of a DNA nanodevice using a variety of polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Di; Duan, Ruixue; Tan, Yerpeng; Hong, Fan; Wang, Boya; Chen, Zhifei; Xu, Shaofang; Lou, Xiaoding; Wei, Wei; Yurke, Bernard; Xia, Fan

    2014-11-01

    The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an example, first we have demonstrated that the DSDR is highly accelerated in the beginning of the reaction and it can complete 60% of replacement reactions (160% enhancement compared with aqueous buffer) in the first 300 seconds. Secondly, we calculated that the ΔΔG of the DSDR in 20% ethanol (-18.2 kcal mol-1) is lower than that in pure aqueous buffer (-32.6 kcal mol-1), while the activation energy is lowered by introducing ethanol. Finally, we proved that the DSDR on the electrode surface can also be accelerated using this simple strategy. More importantly, to test the efficacy of this approach in nanodevices with a complicated and slow DNA self-assembly process, we apply this strategy in the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and prove the acceleration is fairly obvious in 20% ethanol, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed strategy in DNA nanotechnology and DNA-based biosensors.The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an example, first we have demonstrated that the DSDR is highly accelerated in the beginning of the reaction and it can complete 60% of replacement reactions (160% enhancement compared with aqueous buffer) in the first 300 seconds. Secondly, we calculated that the ΔΔG of the DSDR in 20% ethanol (-18.2 kcal mol-1) is lower than that in pure aqueous buffer (-32.6 kcal mol-1), while the activation energy is lowered by introducing ethanol. Finally, we proved that the DSDR on the electrode surface can also be accelerated using this simple strategy. More importantly, to test the efficacy of this approach in nanodevices with a complicated and slow DNA self-assembly process, we apply this strategy in the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and prove the acceleration is fairly obvious in 20% ethanol, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed strategy in DNA nanotechnology and DNA-based biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures and analytical data are provided. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02257b

  15. Tuberculosis outbreaks predicted by characteristics of first patients in a DNA fingerprint cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, Sandra V; Verver, Suzanne; van Soolingen, Dick; de Haas, Petra E W; Cobelens, Frank G; Kremer, Kristin; van Deutekom, Henk; Borgdorff, Martien W

    2008-07-01

    Some clusters of patients who have Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical DNA fingerprint patterns grow faster than others. It is unclear what predictors determine cluster growth. To assess whether the development of a tuberculosis (TB) outbreak can be predicted by the characteristics of its first two patients. Demographic and clinical data of all culture-confirmed patients with TB in the Netherlands from 1993 through 2004 were combined with DNA fingerprint data. Clusters were restricted to cluster episodes of 2 years to only detect newly arising clusters. Characteristics of the first two patients were compared between small (2-4 cases) and large (5 or more cases) cluster episodes. Of 5,454 clustered cases, 1,756 (32%) were part of a cluster episode of 2 years. Of 622 cluster episodes, 54 (9%) were large and 568 (91%) were small episodes. Independent predictors for large cluster episodes were as follows: less than 3 months' time between the diagnosis of the first two patients, one or both patients were young (<35 yr), both patients lived in an urban area, and both patients came from sub-Saharan Africa. In the Netherlands, patients in new cluster episodes should be screened for these risk factors. When the risk pattern applies, targeted interventions (e.g., intensified contact investigation) should be considered to prevent further cluster expansion.

  16. Colorimetric determination of DNase I activity with a DNA-methyl green substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicropi, D; Baker, D L; Prince, W S; Shiffer, K; Shak, S

    1994-11-01

    A simple, high throughput, and precise assay was developed for quantification of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase; IUB 3.1.21.1) activity. The method was adapted from the procedure devised by Kurnick which employs a substrate comprised of highly polymerized native DNA complexed with methyl green. Hydrolysis of the DNA produced unbound methyl green and a decrease in the absorbance of the solution at 620 nm. By adjusting the time and temperature of the reaction, the assay permits quantification of DNase activity over a wide concentration range (0.4 to 8900 ng/ml). Samples and standards were added to the substrate in microtiter plates and were incubated for 1-24 h at 25-37 degrees C to achieve the desired assay range. The DNase activity of the samples was interpolated from a standard curve generated with Pulmozyme recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I (rhDNase). Interassay precision was less than 12% CV and recovery was within 100 +/- 11%. Activity determination by the DNA-methyl green method correlated well with that determined by the widely used "hyperchromicity" method originated by Kunitz, which is based on the increase in absorbance at 260 nm upon hydrolysis of DNA. The DNA-methyl green assay was simpler and more versatile than the hyperchromicity method and was used to characterize the activity of rhDNase and DNase isolated from human urine.

  17. A DNA fingerprinting procedure for ultra high-throughput genetic analysis of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlipalius, D I; Waldron, J; Carroll, B J; Collins, P J; Ebert, P R

    2001-12-01

    Existing procedures for the generation of polymorphic DNA markers are not optimal for insect studies in which the organisms are often tiny and background molecular information is often non-existent. We have used a new high throughput DNA marker generation protocol called randomly amplified DNA fingerprints (RAF) to analyse the genetic variability in three separate strains of the stored grain pest, Rhyzopertha dominica. This protocol is quick, robust and reliable even though it requires minimal sample preparation, minute amounts of DNA and no prior molecular analysis of the organism. Arbitrarily selected oligonucleotide primers routinely produced approximately 50 scoreable polymorphic DNA markers, between individuals of three independent field isolates of R. dominica. Multivariate cluster analysis using forty-nine arbitrarily selected polymorphisms generated from a single primer reliably separated individuals into three clades corresponding to their geographical origin. The resulting clades were quite distinct, with an average genetic difference of 37.5 +/- 6.0% between clades and of 21.0 +/- 7.1% between individuals within clades. As a prelude to future gene mapping efforts, we have also assessed the performance of RAF under conditions commonly used in gene mapping. In this analysis, fingerprints from pooled DNA samples accurately and reproducibly reflected RAF profiles obtained from individual DNA samples that had been combined to create the bulked samples.

  18. Improvement in the amine glass platform by bubbling method for a DNA microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee SH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Seung Hyun Jee,1 Jong Won Kim,2 Ji Hyeong Lee,2 Young Soo Yoon11Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Gachon University, Seongnam, Gyeonggi, Republic of Korea; 2Genomics Clinical Research Institute, LabGenomics Co., Ltd., Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of KoreaAbstract: A glass platform with high sensitivity for sexually transmitted diseases microarray is described here. An amino-silane-based self-assembled monolayer was coated on the surface of a glass platform using a novel bubbling method. The optimized surface of the glass platform had highly uniform surface modifications using this method, as well as improved hybridization properties with capture probes in the DNA microarray. On the basis of these results, the improved glass platform serves as a highly reliable and optimal material for the DNA microarray. Moreover, in this study, we demonstrated that our glass platform, manufactured by utilizing the bubbling method, had higher uniformity, shorter processing time, lower background signal, and higher spot signal than the platforms manufactured by the general dipping method. The DNA microarray manufactured with a glass platform prepared using bubbling method can be used as a clinical diagnostic tool. Keywords: DNA microarray, glass platform, bubbling method, self-assambled monolayer

  19. Improvement in the amine glass platform by bubbling method for a DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Ji Hyeong; Yoon, Young Soo

    2015-01-01

    A glass platform with high sensitivity for sexually transmitted diseases microarray is described here. An amino-silane-based self-assembled monolayer was coated on the surface of a glass platform using a novel bubbling method. The optimized surface of the glass platform had highly uniform surface modifications using this method, as well as improved hybridization properties with capture probes in the DNA microarray. On the basis of these results, the improved glass platform serves as a highly reliable and optimal material for the DNA microarray. Moreover, in this study, we demonstrated that our glass platform, manufactured by utilizing the bubbling method, had higher uniformity, shorter processing time, lower background signal, and higher spot signal than the platforms manufactured by the general dipping method. The DNA microarray manufactured with a glass platform prepared using bubbling method can be used as a clinical diagnostic tool.

  20. A DNA-Based Procedure for In Planta Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Santos, Fernando M; Ramos, Brisa; García-Sánchez, M Asunción; Eslava, Arturo P; Díaz-Mínguez, José María

    2002-03-01

    ABSTRACT We have characterized strains of Fusarium oxysporum from common bean fields in Spain that were nonpathogenic on common bean, as well as F. oxysporum strains (F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli) pathogenic to common bean by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. We identified a RAPD marker (RAPD 4.12) specific for the highly virulent pathogenic strains of the seven races of F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli. Sequence analysis of RAPD 4.12 allowed the design of oligonucleotides that amplify a 609-bp sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker (SCAR-B310A280). Under controlled environmental and greenhouse conditions, detection of the pathogen by polymerase chain reaction was 100% successful in root samples of infected but still symptomless plants and in stem samples of plants with disease severity of >/=4 in the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT; Cali, Colombia) scale. The diagnostic procedure can be completed in 5 h and allows the detection of all known races of the pathogen in plant samples at early stages of the disease with no visible symptoms.

  1. Solar ultraviolet light potentiates stannous chloride effects as a DNA damaging agent: a spectrophotometrical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, J.C.P. de; Bernardo-Filho, M.; Leitao, A.C.; Caldeira-de-Araujo, A.; Lage, C.; Leitao, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Stannous chloride (Sn Cl 2 ) is a reducing agent widely used to reduce 99m Tc in several radio pharmaceuticals compounds. In spite of being used in nuclear medicine, its genotoxic effects are under investigation in our laboratory. In E. coli, Sn Cl 2 has been shown to have lethal and mutagenic effects, which are thought to occur mainly via active oxygen species. In order to detect some possible direct influence of Sn Cl 2 on nucleic acid, DNA, nucleotides and isolated bases were allowed to react with S N Cl 2 in an in vitro system and the effects analyzed spectro photometrically. Since Sn Cl 2 absorbs light in the UV region, we expected that UV could modify the Sn Cl 2 effects on DNA. Our results indicate that: a. Sn Cl 2 or UV (312 nm, 10 5 J/m 2 ) alone caused only slight alterations in the 260-nm absorption peak of supercoiled plasmid DNA (p U C 9.1); b. Sn Cl 2 + UV (312 nm, 10 5 J/m 2 ) led DNA (p U C 9.1) to a complete loss of its characteristic absorption in the 260-nm region; and c. when reacting with isolated A T P or T T P, Sn Cl 2 + UV (312 nm, 5 x 10 4 J/m 2 ) caused a significant decrease in their 260-nm absorption peaks, as compared to Sn CL 2 alone. Put together, our results indicate that Sn Cl 2 effects are potentiated by the action of solar UV light

  2. Bacillus halodurans RecA-DNA binding and RecA- mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... ... University of Ngaoundéré, Faculty of Science, Department of Biological Sciences, P. O. Box 454, ... Kowalczykowski, 1991; Roca and Cox, 1997; Walker, ... plasmid was transformed and overexpressed into the arabinose-.

  3. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manera, M G; Spadavecchia, J; Taurino, A; Rella, R

    2010-01-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV–vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA–Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA–DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T) 15 ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality

  4. Structure of a DNA glycosylase that unhooks interstrand cross-links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Warren, Garrett M.; Bradley, Noah P.; Eichman, Brandt F. (Vanderbilt)

    2017-04-10

    DNA glycosylases are important editing enzymes that protect genomic stability by excising chemically modified nucleobases that alter normal DNA metabolism. These enzymes have been known only to initiate base excision repair of small adducts by extrusion from the DNA helix. However, recent reports have described both vertebrate and microbial DNA glycosylases capable of unhooking highly toxic interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and bulky minor groove adducts normally recognized by Fanconi anemia and nucleotide excision repair machinery, although the mechanisms of these activities are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of Streptomyces sahachiroi AlkZ (previously Orf1), a bacterial DNA glycosylase that protects its host by excising ICLs derived from azinomycin B (AZB), a potent antimicrobial and antitumor genotoxin. AlkZ adopts a unique fold in which three tandem winged helix-turn-helix motifs scaffold a positively charged concave surface perfectly shaped for duplex DNA. Through mutational analysis, we identified two glutamine residues and a β-hairpin within this putative DNA-binding cleft that are essential for catalytic activity. Additionally, we present a molecular docking model for how this active site can unhook either or both sides of an AZB ICL, providing a basis for understanding the mechanisms of base excision repair of ICLs. Given the prevalence of this protein fold in pathogenic bacteria, this work also lays the foundation for an emerging role of DNA repair in bacteria-host pathogenesis.

  5. Electrochemical control of a DNA Holliday Junction nanoswitch by Mg2+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferapontova, E E; Mountford, C P; Crain, J; Buck, A H; Dickinson, P; Beattie, J S; Ghazal, P; Terry, J G; Walton, A J; Mount, A R

    2008-11-15

    The molecular conformation of a synthetic branched, 4-way DNA Holliday junction (HJ) was electrochemically switched between the open and closed (stacked) conformers. Switching was achieved by electrochemically induced quantitative release of Mg(2+) ions from the oxidised poly(N-methylpyrrole) film (PPy), which contained polyacrylate as an immobile counter anion and Mg(2+) ions as charge compensating mobile cations. This increase in the Mg(2+) concentration screened the electrostatic repulsion between the widely separated arms in the open HJ configuration, inducing switching to the closed conformation. Upon electrochemical reduction of PPy, entrapment of Mg(2+) ions back into the PPy film induced the reverse HJ switching from the closed to open state. The conformational transition was monitored using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor dyes each located at the terminus of one of the arms. The demonstrated electrochemical control of the conformation of the used probe-target HJ complex, previously reported as a highly sequence specific nanodevice for detecting of unlabelled target [Buck, A.H., Campbell, C.J., Dickinson, P., Mountford, C.P., Stoquert, H.C., Terry, J.G., Evans, S.A.G., Keane, L., Su, T.J., Mount, A.R., Walton, A.J., Beattie, J.S., Crain, J., Ghazal, P., 2007. Anal. Chem., 79, 4724-4728], allows the development of electronically addressable DNA nanodevices and label-free gene detection assays.

  6. Bio-recognitive photonics of a DNA-guided organic semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Seung Hyuk; Park, Jin Hyuk; Cui, Chunzhi; Ahn, Dong June

    2016-01-04

    Incorporation of duplex DNA with higher molecular weights has attracted attention for a new opportunity towards a better organic light-emitting diode (OLED) capability. However, biological recognition by OLED materials is yet to be addressed. In this study, specific oligomeric DNA-DNA recognition is successfully achieved by tri (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), an organic semiconductor. Alq3 rods crystallized with guidance from single-strand DNA molecules show, strikingly, a unique distribution of the DNA molecules with a shape of an 'inverted' hourglass. The crystal's luminescent intensity is enhanced by 1.6-fold upon recognition of the perfect-matched target DNA sequence, but not in the case of a single-base mismatched one. The DNA-DNA recognition forming double-helix structure is identified to occur only in the rod's outer periphery. This study opens up new opportunities of Alq3, one of the most widely used OLED materials, enabling biological recognition.

  7. Identification and characterization of a DnaJ gene from red alga Pyropia yezoensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Li, Xianchao; Tang, Xuexi; Zhou, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Members of the DnaJ family are proteins that play a pivotal role in various cellular processes, such as protein folding, protein transport and cellular responses to stress. In the present study, we identified and characterized the full-length DnaJ cDNA sequence from expressed sequence tags of Pyropia yezoensis ( PyDnaJ) via rapid identification of cDNA ends. This cDNA encoded a protein of 429 amino acids, which shared high sequence similarity with other identified DnaJ proteins, such as a heat shock protein 40/DnaJ from Pyropia haitanensis. The relative mRNA expression level of PyDnaJ was investigated using real-time PCR to determine its specific expression during the algal life cycle and during desiccation. The relative mRNA expression level in sporophytes was higher than that in gametophytes and significantly increased during the whole desiccation process. These results indicate that PyDnaJ is an authentic member of the DnaJ family in plants and red algae and might play a pivotal role in mitigating damage to P. yezoensis during desiccation.

  8. A detailed experimental study of a DNA computer with two endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Sebastian; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Sarnik, Joanna; Blasiak, Janusz; Waldmajer, Jacek; Poplawski, Tomasz

    2017-07-14

    Great advances in biotechnology have allowed the construction of a computer from DNA. One of the proposed solutions is a biomolecular finite automaton, a simple two-state DNA computer without memory, which was presented by Ehud Shapiro's group at the Weizmann Institute of Science. The main problem with this computer, in which biomolecules carry out logical operations, is its complexity - increasing the number of states of biomolecular automata. In this study, we constructed (in laboratory conditions) a six-state DNA computer that uses two endonucleases (e.g. AcuI and BbvI) and a ligase. We have presented a detailed experimental verification of its feasibility. We described the effect of the number of states, the length of input data, and the nondeterminism on the computing process. We also tested different automata (with three, four, and six states) running on various accepted input words of different lengths such as ab, aab, aaab, ababa, and of an unaccepted word ba. Moreover, this article presents the reaction optimization and the methods of eliminating certain biochemical problems occurring in the implementation of a biomolecular DNA automaton based on two endonucleases.

  9. Quantitative assessment of phytopathogenic fungi in various substrates using a DNA macroarray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, B.; Brouwer, M.; Vanachter, A.C.R.C.; Lévesque, C.A.; Cammue, B.P.A.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Detection, identification and quantification of plant pathogens are the cornerstones of preventive plant disease management. To detect multiple pathogens in a single assay, DNA array technology currently is the most suitable technique. However, for sensitive detection, polymerase chain reaction

  10. A DNA-Mediated Homogeneous Binding Assay for Proteins and Small Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhao; Hejesen, Christian; Kjelstrup, Michael Brøndum

    2014-01-01

    . The shift occurs upon binding of a protein, for example, an antibody to its target. We demonstrate nanomolar detection of small molecules such as biotin, digoxigenin, vitamin D, and folate, in buffer and in plasma. The method is flexible, and we also show nanomolar detection of the respective antibodies......Optical detection of molecular targets typically requires immobilization, separation, or chemical or enzymatic processing. An important exception is aptamers that allow optical detection in solution based on conformational changes. This method, however, requires the laborious selection of aptamers...

  11. MIC risk in the Halfdan oil export system quantified with a DNA-based diagnostic tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Jan; Rasmussen, Kim; Andersen, Kenneth [Maersk Oil (Denmark); Holmkvist, Lars [DTI Oil and Gas (Denmark)

    2011-07-01

    The paper presents the risk involved due to microbial influenced corrosion (MIC) using the halfdan oil export system. With growth of assets, scale and microbial fouling, corrosion and souring have increased. Some of the consequences to operators include, safety issues and loss of production. An example of the effects caused by MIC is the Valhall platform in the Norwegian sector, which was shut down for 80 days. Some of the factors causing bacterial growth and MIC are O2, CO2, and H2S, solids. Consideration of four objectives, corrosive products, microbiological activities, microbes, and spatially associating microbes is very important for diagnosing MIC. The objective of the halfdan study was to investigate the corrosion mechanism in the oil export spool section. Observations show severe pitting inside the pipelines. Suggestions for the operator, including the risk assessment of MIC, are given along with a summary of results. It can be concluded that there is a certain need in the industry to understand and act upon MIC.

  12. Evidence for glycosylation on a DNA-binding protein of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Igor C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All organisms living under aerobic atmosphere have powerful mechanisms that confer their macromolecules protection against oxygen reactive species. Microorganisms have developed biomolecule-protecting systems in response to starvation and/or oxidative stress, such as DNA biocrystallization with Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells. Dps is a protein that is produced in large amounts when the bacterial cell faces harm, which results in DNA protection. In this work, we evaluated the glycosylation in the Dps extracted from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This Dps was purified from the crude extract as an 18-kDa protein, by means of affinity chromatography on an immobilized jacalin column. Results The N-terminal sequencing of the jacalin-bound protein revealed 100% identity with the Dps of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Methyl-alpha-galactopyranoside inhibited the binding of Dps to jacalin in an enzyme-linked lectin assay, suggesting that the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD of jacalin is involved in the interaction with Dps. Furthermore, monosaccharide compositional analysis showed that Dps contained mannose, glucose, and an unknown sugar residue. Finally, jacalin-binding Dps was detected in larger amounts during the bacterial earlier growth periods, whereas high detection of total Dps was verified throughout the bacterial growth period. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that Dps undergoes post-translational modifications in the pre- and early stationary phases of bacterial growth. There is also evidence that a small mannose-containing oligosaccharide is linked to this bacterial protein.

  13. Interaction of the Sliding Clamp β-Subunit and Hda, a DnaA-Related Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mareike; Dalrymple, Brian; Wijffels, Gene; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2004-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the replication initiation protein DnaA, the β subunit of DNA polymerase III (the sliding clamp protein), and Hda, the recently identified DnaA-related protein, are required to convert the active ATP-bound form of DnaA to an inactive ADP-bound form through the accelerated hydrolysis of ATP. This rapid hydrolysis of ATP is proposed to be the main mechanism that blocks multiple initiations during cell cycle and acts as a molecular switch from initiation to replication. However, the biochemical mechanism for this crucial step in DNA synthesis has not been resolved. Using purified Hda and β proteins in a plate binding assay and Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid pulldown analysis, we show for the first time that Hda directly interacts with β in vitro. A new β-binding motif, a hexapeptide with the consensus sequence QL[SP]LPL, related to the previously identified β-binding pentapeptide motif (QL[SD]LF) was found in the amino terminus of the Hda protein. Mutants of Hda with amino acid changes in the hexapeptide motif are severely defective in their ability to bind β. A 10-amino-acid peptide containing the E. coli Hda β-binding motif was shown to compete with Hda for binding to β in an Hda-β interaction assay. These results establish that the interaction of Hda with β is mediated through the hexapeptide sequence. We propose that this interaction may be crucial to the events that lead to the inactivation of DnaA and the prevention of excess initiation of rounds of replication. PMID:15150238

  14. Interaction of the sliding clamp beta-subunit and Hda, a DnaA-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mareike; Dalrymple, Brian; Wijffels, Gene; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2004-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the replication initiation protein DnaA, the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III (the sliding clamp protein), and Hda, the recently identified DnaA-related protein, are required to convert the active ATP-bound form of DnaA to an inactive ADP-bound form through the accelerated hydrolysis of ATP. This rapid hydrolysis of ATP is proposed to be the main mechanism that blocks multiple initiations during cell cycle and acts as a molecular switch from initiation to replication. However, the biochemical mechanism for this crucial step in DNA synthesis has not been resolved. Using purified Hda and beta proteins in a plate binding assay and Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid pulldown analysis, we show for the first time that Hda directly interacts with beta in vitro. A new beta-binding motif, a hexapeptide with the consensus sequence QL[SP]LPL, related to the previously identified beta-binding pentapeptide motif (QL[SD]LF) was found in the amino terminus of the Hda protein. Mutants of Hda with amino acid changes in the hexapeptide motif are severely defective in their ability to bind beta. A 10-amino-acid peptide containing the E. coli Hda beta-binding motif was shown to compete with Hda for binding to beta in an Hda-beta interaction assay. These results establish that the interaction of Hda with beta is mediated through the hexapeptide sequence. We propose that this interaction may be crucial to the events that lead to the inactivation of DnaA and the prevention of excess initiation of rounds of replication.

  15. Interaction of the Sliding Clamp β-Subunit and Hda, a DnaA-Related Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Kurz, Mareike; Dalrymple, Brian; Wijffels, Gene; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2004-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the replication initiation protein DnaA, the β subunit of DNA polymerase III (the sliding clamp protein), and Hda, the recently identified DnaA-related protein, are required to convert the active ATP-bound form of DnaA to an inactive ADP-bound form through the accelerated hydrolysis of ATP. This rapid hydrolysis of ATP is proposed to be the main mechanism that blocks multiple initiations during cell cycle and acts as a molecular switch from initiation...

  16. Multifunctional energy landscape for a DNA G-quadruplex: An evolved molecular switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Chakraborty, Debayan; Šponer, Jiří; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela; Wales, David J.

    2017-10-01

    We explore the energy landscape for a four-fold telomere repeat, obtaining interconversion pathways between six experimentally characterised G-quadruplex topologies. The results reveal a multi-funnel system, with a variety of intermediate configurations and misfolded states. This organisation is identified with the intrinsically multi-functional nature of the system, suggesting a new paradigm for the classification of such biomolecules and clarifying issues regarding apparently conflicting experimental results.

  17. Design of a DNA chip for detection of unknown genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvold, Håvard; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Berdal, Knut G

    2005-05-01

    Unknown genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have not undergone a risk evaluation, and hence might pose a danger to health and environment. There are, today, no methods for detecting unknown GMOs. In this paper we propose a novel method intended as a first step in an approach for detecting unknown genetically modified (GM) material in a single plant. A model is designed where biological and combinatorial reduction rules are applied to a set of DNA chip probes containing all possible sequences of uniform length n, creating probes capable of detecting unknown GMOs. The model is theoretically tested for Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia, and the probabilities for detecting inserts and receiving false positives are assessed for various parameters for this organism. From a theoretical standpoint, the model looks very promising but should be tested further in the laboratory. The model and algorithms will be available upon request to the corresponding author.

  18. MO-AB-BRA-04: Radiation Measurements with a DNA Double-Strand-Break Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Many types of dosimeters are used to measure radiation, but none of them directly measures the biological effect of this dose. The purpose here is to create a dosimeter that can measure the probability of double-strand breaks (DSB) for DNA, which is directly related to the biological effect of radiation. Methods: The dosimeter has DNA strands, which are labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein. The biotin attaches these strands to magnetic beads. We suspended the DNA dosimeter in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as it matches the internal environment of the body. We placed small volumes (50µL) of the DNA dosimeter into tubes and irradiated these samples in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with several doses (three samples per dose). After irradiating the samples, a magnet was placed against the tubes. The fluorescein attached to broken DNA strands was extracted (called the supernatant) and placed into a different tube. The fluorescein on the unbroken strands remained attached to the beads in the tube and was re-suspended with 50µL of PBS. A fluorescence reader was used to measure the fluorescence for both the re-suspended beads and supernatant. To prove that we are measuring DSB, we tested dosimeter response with two different lengths of attached DNA strands (1 and 4 kilo-base pair). Results: The probability of DSB at the dose levels of 5, 10, 25, and 50 Gy were 0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.19, respectively, while the coefficients of variation were 0.14, 0.07, 0.02, and 0.01, respectively. The 4 kilo-base-pair dosimeter produced 5.3 times the response of the 1 kilo-base-pair dosimeter. Conclusion: The DNA dosimeter yields a measurable response to dose that scales with the DNA strand length. The goal now is to refine the dosimeter fabrication to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation for the lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  19. Complementation of a DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells by transfer of human chromosome 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, G.P.; Athwal, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Complementation of the repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group A was achieved by the transfer of human chromosome 9. A set of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each containing a single Ecogpt-marked human chromosome, was used as a source of donor chromosomes. Chromosome transfer to XPTG-1 cells, a hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient mutant of simian virus 40-transformed complementation group A cells, was achieved by microcell fusion and selection for Ecogpt. Chromosome-transfer clones of XPTG-1 cells, each containing a different human donor chromosome, were analyzed for complementation of sensitivity to UV irradiation. Among all the clones, increased levels of resistance to UV was observed only in clones containing chromosome 9. Since our recipient cell line XPTG-1 is hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient, cultivation of Ecogpt+ clones in medium containing 6-thioguanine permits selection of cells for loss of the marker and, by inference, transferred chromosome 9. Clones isolated for growth in 6-thioguanine, which have lost the Ecogpt-marked chromosome, exhibited a UV-sensitive phenotype, confirming the presence of the repair gene(s) for complementation group A on chromosome 9

  20. Selection and identification of a DNA aptamer targeted to Vibrio parahemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Nuo; Wu, Shijia; Chen, Xiujuan; Huang, Yukun; Wang, Zhouping

    2012-04-25

    A whole-bacterium systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method was applied to a combinatorial library of FAM-labeled single-stranded DNA molecules to identify DNA aptamers demonstrating specific binding to Vibrio parahemolyticus . FAM-labeled aptamer sequences with high binding affinity to V. parahemolyticus were identified by flow cytometric analysis. Aptamer A3P, which showed a particularly high binding affinity in preliminary studies, was chosen for further characterization. This aptamer displayed a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 16.88 ± 1.92 nM. Binding assays to assess the specificity of aptamer A3P showed a high binding affinity (76%) for V. parahemolyticus and a low apparent binding affinity (4%) for other bacteria. Whole-bacterium SELEX is a promising technique for the design of aptamer-based molecular probes for microbial pathogens that does not require the labor-intensive steps of isolating and purifying complex markers or targets.

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana GYRB3 does not encode a DNA gyrase subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M Evans-Roberts

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in all cells. DNA gyrase is unique among the topoisomerases in that it is the only enzyme that can actively supercoil DNA using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. Until recently gyrase was thought to be unique to bacteria, but has now been discovered in plants. The genome of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, is predicted to encode four gyrase subunits: AtGyrA, AtGyrB1, AtGyrB2 and AtGyrB3.We found, contrary to previous data, that AtGyrB3 is not essential to the survival of A. thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis suggests AtGyrB3 is considerably shorter than other gyrase B subunits, lacking part of the ATPase domain and other key motifs found in all type II topoisomerases; but it does contain a putative DNA-binding domain. Partially purified AtGyrB3 cannot bind E. coli GyrA or support supercoiling. AtGyrB3 cannot complement an E. coli gyrB temperature-sensitive strain, whereas AtGyrB2 can. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggests that AtGyrB3 cannot bind to AtGyrA or form a dimer.These data strongly suggest that AtGyrB3 is not a gyrase subunit but has another unknown function. One possibility is that it is a nuclear protein with a role in meiosis in pollen.

  2. Evidence of a genetic instability induced by the incorporation of a DNA precursor marked with tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saintigny, Y.; Laurent, D.; Lahayel, J.B.; Roche, St.; Meynard, D.; Lopez, B.S.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a molecular geno-toxicology investigation which allowed molecular events induced par intracellular incorporation of tritium to be studied, and the genetic instability resulting from a chronic exposure even at low dose to be analysed. For this purpose, they developed cell models (hamster tumorous cells and human fibroblasts) in which they know how to incorporate given quantities of marked nucleotides in the DNA. They show that the incorporation of tritium, even with doses which are said to be non toxic, causes a prolonged exposure of the cell to a genotoxic stress, and maybe a genetic instability due to a too great number of recombination events

  3. Epigenetic control of viral life-cycle by a DNA-methylation dependent transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Flower

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded transcription factor Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1 is the prototype of a class of transcription factor (including C/EBPalpha that interact with CpG-containing DNA response elements in a methylation-dependent manner. The EBV genome undergoes a biphasic methylation cycle; it is extensively methylated during viral latency but is reset to an unmethylated state following viral lytic replication. Zta is expressed transiently following infection and again during the switch between latency and lytic replication. The requirement for CpG-methylation at critical Zta response elements (ZREs has been proposed to regulate EBV replication, specifically it could aid the activation of viral lytic gene expression from silenced promoters on the methylated genome during latency in addition to preventing full lytic reactivation from the non-methylated EBV genome immediately following infection. We developed a computational approach to predict the location of ZREs which we experimentally assessed using in vitro and in vivo DNA association assays. A remarkably different binding motif is apparent for the CpG and non-CpG ZREs. Computational prediction of the location of these binding motifs in EBV revealed that the majority of lytic cycle genes have at least one and many have multiple copies of methylation-dependent CpG ZREs within their promoters. This suggests that the abundance of Zta protein coupled with the methylation status of the EBV genome act together to co-ordinate the expression of lytic cycle genes at the majority of EBV promoters.

  4. A single thiazole orange molecule forms an exciplex in a DNA i-motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baochang; Wu, Xiangyang; Yeow, Edwin K L; Shao, Fangwei

    2014-06-18

    A fluorescent exciplex of thiazole orange (TO) is formed in a single-dye conjugated DNA i-motif. The exciplex fluorescence exhibits a large Stokes shift, high quantum yield, robust response to pH oscillation and little structural disturbance to the DNA quadruplex, which can be used to monitor the folding of high-order DNA structures.

  5. Development of a DNA-liposome complex for gene delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasoulianboroujeni, M. [Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States); Kupgan, G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Oklahoma State University, 423 Engineering North, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Moghadam, F. [School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Tahriri, M. [Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States); Boughdachi, A. [Polymer Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshkenar, P. [Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605 (United States); Ambrose, J.J. [Biomedical Engineering Department, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kiaie, N. [Tissue Engineering Department, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vashaee, D. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Ramsey, J.D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Oklahoma State University, 423 Engineering North, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Tayebi, L., E-mail: lobat.tayebi@marquette.edu [Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The association structures formed by cationic liposomes and DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid)-liposome have been effectively utilized as gene carriers in transfection assays. In this research study, cationic liposomes were prepared using a modified lipid film hydration method consisting of a lyophilization step for gene delivery applications. The obtained results demonstrated that the mean particle size had no significant change while the polydispersity (PDI) increased after lyophilization. The mean particle size slightly reduced after lyophilization (520 ± 12 nm to 464 ± 25 nm) while the PDI increased after lyophilization (0.094 ± 0.017 to 0.220 ± 0.004). In addition. The mean particle size of vesicles increases when DNA is incorporated to the liposomes (673 ± 27 nm). According to the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, the spherical shape of liposomes confirmed their successful preservation and reconstitution from the powder. It was found that liposomal formulation has enhanced transfection considerably compared to the naked DNA as negative control. Finally, liposomal formulation in this research had a better function than Lipofectamine® 2000 as a commercialized product because the cellular activity (cellular protein) was higher in the prepared lipoplex than Lipofectamine® 2000. - Highlights: • Liposomal formulation in this research had a better function than Lipofectamine® 2000. • The average particle size had no significant change while the PDI increased after lyophilization. • LacZ expression of the developed cationic liposomes is approximately equal to the Lipofectamine® 2000.

  6. Facile preparation of a DNA sensor for rapid herpes virus detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Tuan, Mai Anh; Huy, Tran Quang; Le, Anh-Tuan; Hieu, Nguyen Van

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a simple DNA sensor platform was developed for rapid herpes virus detection in real samples. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the herpes simplex virus (DNA probe) were directly immobilized on the surface of interdigitated electrodes by electrochemical polymerization along with pyrrole monomers. The potential was scanned from - 0.7 to + 0.6 V, and the scanning rate was 100 mV/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to verify specific DNA sequence binding and the conducting polymer. The morphology of the conducting polymer doped with DNA strands was characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope. As-obtained DNA sensor was used to detect the herpes virus DNA in the real samples. The results show that the current DNA sensors detected the lowest DNA concentration of 2 nM. This sensitivity appears to be better than that of the DNA sensors prepared by immobilization of the DNA probe on the 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) membrane.

  7. Attenuated Shigella as a DNA Delivery Vehicle for DNA-Mediated Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Donata R.; Branstrom, Arthur A.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1995-10-01

    Direct inoculation of DNA, in the form of purified bacterial plasmids that are unable to replicate in mammalian cells but are able to direct cell synthesis of foreign proteins, is being explored as an approach to vaccine development. Here, a highly attenuated Shigella vector invaded mammalian cells and delivered such plasmids into the cytoplasm of cells, and subsequent production of functional foreign protein was measured. Because this Shigella vector was designed to deliver DNA to colonic mucosa, the method is a potential basis for oral and other mucosal DNA immunization and gene therapy strategies.

  8. A DNA sequence obtained by replacement of the dopamine RNA aptamer bases is not an aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2017-08-05

    A unique specificity of the aptamer-ligand biorecognition and binding facilitates bioanalysis and biosensor development, contributing to discrimination of structurally related molecules, such as dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. The aptamer sequence capable of specific binding of dopamine is a 57 nucleotides long RNA sequence reported in 1997 (Biochemistry, 1997, 36, 9726). Later, it was suggested that the DNA homologue of the RNA aptamer retains the specificity of dopamine binding (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 2009, 388, 732). Here, we show that the DNA sequence obtained by the replacement of the RNA aptamer bases for their DNA analogues is not able of specific biorecognition of dopamine, in contrast to the original RNA aptamer sequence. This DNA sequence binds dopamine and structurally related catecholamine neurotransmitters non-specifically, as any DNA sequence, and, thus, is not an aptamer and cannot be used neither for in vivo nor in situ analysis of dopamine in the presence of structurally related neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparing urban and wildland bear densities with a DNA-based capture-mark-recapture approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fusaro, Jonathan L.; Conner, Mary M.; Conover, Michael R.; Taylor, Timothy J.; Kenyon, Marc W., Jr.; Sherman, Jamie R.; Ernest, Holly B.

    2017-01-01

    California’s black bear (Ursus americanus) population has tripled over the last 3 decades, causing an increased incidence of human–bear conflicts, many of which now occur in urban areas. Consequently, it is imperative that bear managers have the ability to monitor population parameters in both wildland and urban environments to help manage bears. Capture-mark-recapture (CMR) methods using uniquely typed genetic samples (DNA) collected via hair-snares have been widely used to monitor bears in ...

  11. Functional Expression of a DNA-Topoisomerase IB from Cryptosporidium parvum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Ordóñez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium parvum, one of the most important causative organisms of human diarrheas during childhood, contains a monomeric DNA-topoisomerase IB (CpTopIB in chromosome 7. Heterologous expression of CpTopIB gene in a budding yeast strain lacking this activity proves that the cryptosporidial enzyme is functional in vivo. The enzymatic activity is comprised in a single polypeptide, which contains all the structural features defining a fully active TopIB. Relaxation activity of the yeast extracts was detected only when CpTopIB ORF was expressed in a yeast expression system showing time and protein dependence under steady state kinetic conditions. The susceptibility of CpTopIB-transformed yeast to the irreversible inhibitor camptothecin and its water-soluble derivatives (topotecan and SN-38 was assessed.

  12. A DNA biosensor based on the electrocatalytic oxidation of amine by a threading intercalator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zhiqiang; Tansil, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor for the detection of DNA based a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) capture probe (CP) modified indium tin oxide electrode (ITO) is described in this report. After hybridization, a threading intercalator, N,N'-bis[(3-propyl)-imidazole]-1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide (PIND) imidazole complexed with Ru(bpy) 2 Cl (PIND-Ru, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), was introduced to the biosensor. PIND-Ru selectively intercalated to double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) and became immobilized on the biosensor surface. Voltammetric tests showed highly stable and reversible electrochemical oxidation/reduction processes and the peak currents can directly be utilized for DNA quantification. When the tests were conducted in an amine-containing medium, Tris-HCl buffer for example, a remarkable improvement in the voltammetric response and noticeable enhancements of voltammetric and amperometric sensitivities were observed due to the electrocatalytic activity of the [Ru(bpy) 2 Cl] redox moieties. Electrocatalytic current was observed when as little as 3.0 attomoles of DNA was present in the sample solution

  13. Identification of an Unfolding Intermediate for a DNA Lesion Bypass Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrer, Shanen M.; Maxwell, Brian A.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Fiala, Kevin A.; Fowler, Jason D.; Zhang, Jun; Suo, Zucai

    2012-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricusDNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4), a prototype Y-family DNA polymerase, has been well characterized biochemically and biophysically at 37 °C or lower temperatures. However, the physiological temperature of the hyperthermophile S. solfataricus is approximately 80 °C. With such a large discrepancy in temperature, the in vivo relevance of these in vitro studies of Dpo4 has been questioned. Here, we employed circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence-based thermal scanning to investigate the secondary structural changes of Dpo4 over a temperature range from 26 to 119 °C. Dpo4 was shown to display a high melting temperature characteristic of hyperthermophiles. Unexpectedly, the Little Finger domain of Dpo4, which is only found in the Y-family DNA polymerases, was shown to be more thermostable than the polymerase core. More interestingly, Dpo4 exhibited a three-state cooperative unfolding profile with an unfolding intermediate. The linker region between the Little Finger and Thumb domains of Dpo4 was found to be a source of structural instability. Through site-directed mutagenesis, the interactions between the residues in the linker region and the Palm domain were identified to play a critical role in the formation of the unfolding intermediate. Notably, the secondary structure of Dpo4 was not altered when the temperature was increased from 26 to 87.5 °C. Thus, in addition to providing structural insights into the thermal stability and an unfolding intermediate of Dpo4, our work also validated the relevance of the in vitro studies of Dpo4 performed at temperatures significantly lower than 80 °C. PMID:22667759

  14. Force-Induced Rupture of a DNA Duplex: From Fundamentals to Force Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosayebi, Majid; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K; Ouldridge, Thomas E

    2015-12-22

    The rupture of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article, we consider the shear-induced rupture of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that rupture must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to rupture a duplex depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to show that this approach naturally captures the observed dependence of the force required to rupture a duplex within a given time on duplex length. In particular, this critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence of each additional base pair within the duplex is thermodynamically unfavorable rather than allowing for metastability, does not predict a time-scale-dependent critical force and does not naturally incorporate a critical force of zero for the shortest duplexes. We demonstrate that our findings have important consequences for the behavior of a new force-sensing nanodevice, which operates in a mixed mode that interpolates between shearing and unzipping. At a fixed time scale and duplex length, the critical force exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the fraction of the duplex that is subject to shearing.

  15. PARP-1 modulation of mTOR signaling in response to a DNA alkylating agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Ethier

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is widely involved in cell death responses. Depending on the degree of injury and on cell type, PARP activation may lead to autophagy, apoptosis or necrosis. In HEK293 cells exposed to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanine (MNNG, we show that PARP-1 activation triggers a necrotic cell death response. The massive poly(ADP-ribose (PAR synthesis following PARP-1 activation leads to the modulation of mTORC1 pathway. Shortly after MNNG exposure, NAD⁺ and ATP levels decrease, while AMP levels drastically increase. We characterized at the molecular level the consequences of these altered nucleotide levels. First, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is activated and the mTORC1 pathway is inhibited by the phosphorylation of Raptor, in an attempt to preserve cellular energy. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 target S6 is decreased as well as the phosphorylation of the mTORC2 component Rictor on Thr1135. Finally, Akt phosphorylation on Ser473 is lost and then, cell death by necrosis occurs. Inhibition of PARP-1 with the potent PARP inhibitor AG14361 prevents all of these events. Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC can also abrogate all the signaling events caused by MNNG exposure suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS production is involved in PARP-1 activation and modulation of mTOR signaling. In this study, we show that PARP-1 activation and PAR synthesis affect the energetic status of cells, inhibit the mTORC1 signaling pathway and possibly modulate the mTORC2 complex affecting cell fate. These results provide new evidence that cell death by necrosis is orchestrated by the balance between several signaling pathways, and that PARP-1 and PAR take part in these events.

  16. A DNA-based registry for all animal species: the barcode index number (BIN system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeevan Ratnasingham

    Full Text Available Because many animal species are undescribed, and because the identification of known species is often difficult, interim taxonomic nomenclature has often been used in biodiversity analysis. By assigning individuals to presumptive species, called operational taxonomic units (OTUs, these systems speed investigations into the patterning of biodiversity and enable studies that would otherwise be impossible. Although OTUs have conventionally been separated through their morphological divergence, DNA-based delineations are not only feasible, but have important advantages. OTU designation can be automated, data can be readily archived, and results can be easily compared among investigations. This study exploits these attributes to develop a persistent, species-level taxonomic registry for the animal kingdom based on the analysis of patterns of nucleotide variation in the barcode region of the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene. It begins by examining the correspondence between groups of specimens identified to a species through prior taxonomic work and those inferred from the analysis of COI sequence variation using one new (RESL and four established (ABGD, CROP, GMYC, jMOTU algorithms. It subsequently describes the implementation, and structural attributes of the Barcode Index Number (BIN system. Aside from a pragmatic role in biodiversity assessments, BINs will aid revisionary taxonomy by flagging possible cases of synonymy, and by collating geographical information, descriptive metadata, and images for specimens that are likely to belong to the same species, even if it is undescribed. More than 274,000 BIN web pages are now available, creating a biodiversity resource that is positioned for rapid growth.

  17. Emergence of DNA-encapsulating liposomes from a DNA-lipid blend film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimobayashi, Shunsuke; Hishida, Mafumi; Kurimura, Tomo; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    A Micro-scale giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) densely encapsulating molecular systems is one of the simplest life-mimicking model systems. The dehydration-rehydration process proposed by Deamer et al. more than 30 years ago generates vesicles to satisfy the constraints of micro-scale size, unilamellarity and densely polymer-encapsulation. Nevertheless, the physico-chemical mechanism of a set of dehydration-rehydration process has been poorly understood. The present study reveals crucial factors on the process through fluorescent microscopic observation and small angle x-ray scattering. From the results, we propose a plausible physical mechanism for the process, making it possible to optimize the encapsulation of any agent This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows Grant (No. 25-1270) and by KAKENHI (Nos. 26707020, 25103012, and 26115709).

  18. The fragile X chromosome (GCC) repeat folds into a DNA tetraplex at neutral pH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtík, Petr; Vorlíčková, Michaela

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 22 (2001), s. 4684-4690 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/0561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : Parallel-stranded DNA * circular dichroism spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.373, year: 2001

  19. A High Phosphorus Diet Affects Lipid Metabolism in Rat Liver: A DNA Microarray Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunwoo Chun

    Full Text Available A high phosphorus (HP diet causes disorders of renal function, bone metabolism, and vascular function. We previously demonstrated that DNA microarray analysis is an appropriate method to comprehensively evaluate the effects of a HP diet on kidney dysfunction such as calcification, fibrillization, and inflammation. We reported that type IIb sodium-dependent phosphate transporter is significantly up-regulated in this context. In the present study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to investigate the effects of a HP diet on the liver, which plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA isolated from the livers of rats fed a control diet (containing 0.3% phosphorus or a HP diet (containing 1.2% phosphorus. Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs revealed that the HP diet induced down-regulation of genes involved in hepatic amino acid catabolism and lipogenesis, while genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation process were up-regulated. Although genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated in HP diet-fed rats, genes important for the elongation and desaturation reactions of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids were up-regulated. Concentrations of hepatic arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were increased in HP diet-fed rats. These essential fatty acids activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα, a transcription factor for fatty acid β-oxidation. Evaluation of the upstream regulators of DEGs using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that PPARα was activated in the livers of HP diet-fed rats. Furthermore, the serum concentration of fibroblast growth factor 21, a hormone secreted from the liver that promotes fatty acid utilization in adipose tissue as a PPARα target gene, was higher (p = 0.054 in HP diet-fed rats than in control diet-fed rats. These data suggest that a HP diet enhances energy expenditure through the utilization of free fatty acids released via lipolysis of white adipose tissue.

  20. Unfolding and Targeting Thermodynamics of a DNA Intramolecular Complex with Joined Triplex-Duplex Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah E; Reiling-Steffensmeier, Calliste; Lee, Hui-Ting; Marky, Luis A

    2018-01-25

    Our laboratory is interested in developing methods that can be used for the control of gene expression. In this work, we are investigating the reaction of an intramolecular complex containing a triplex-duplex junction with partially complementary strands. We used a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and spectroscopy techniques to determine standard thermodynamic profiles for these targeting reactions. Specifically, we have designed single strands to target one loop (CTTTC) or two loops (CTTTC and GCAA) of this complex. Both reactions yielded exothermic enthalpies of -66.3 and -82.8 kcal/mol by ITC, in excellent agreement with the reaction enthalpies of -72.7 and -88.7 kcal/mol, respectively, obtained from DSC Hess cycles. The favorable heat contributions result from the formation of base-pair stacks involving mainly the unpaired bases of the loops. This shows that each complementary strand is able to invade and disrupt the secondary structure. The simultaneous targeting of two loops yielded a more favorable reaction free energy, by approximately -8 kcal/mol, which corresponds to the formation of roughly four base-pair stacks involving the unpaired bases of the 5'-GCAA loop. The main conclusion is that the targeting of loops with a large number of unpaired bases results in a more favorable reaction free energy.

  1. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    Full Text Available A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  2. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  3. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A

    OpenAIRE

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for moni...

  4. Genetic variation in a DNA double strand break repair gene in saudi population: a comparative study with worldwide ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeshi, Mohammed Yahya

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair capacity is crucial in maintaining cellular functions and homeostasis. However, it can be altered based on DNA sequence variations in DNA repair genes and this may lead to the development of many diseases including malignancies. Identification of genetic polymorphisms responsible for reduced DNA repair capacity is necessary for better prevention. Homologous recombination (HR), a major double strand break repair pathway, plays a critical role in maintaining the genome stability. The present study was performed to determine the frequency of the HR gene XRCC3 Exon 7 (C18067T, rs861539) polymorphisms in Saudi Arabian population in comparison with epidemiological studies by "MEDLINE" search to equate with global populations. The variant allelic (T) frequency of XRCC3 (C>T) was found to be 39%. Our results suggest that frequency of XRCC3 (C>T) DNA repair gene exhibits distinctive patterns compared with the Saudi Arabian population and this might be attributed to ethnic variation. The present findings may help in high-risk screening of humans exposed to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition in different ethnic groups.

  5. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ?procapsid') built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: a...

  6. Validation of a DNA IQ-based extraction method for TECAN robotic liquid handling workstations for processing casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Fourney, Ron M

    2010-10-01

    A semi-automated DNA extraction process for casework samples based on the Promega DNA IQ™ system was optimized and validated on TECAN Genesis 150/8 and Freedom EVO robotic liquid handling stations configured with fixed tips and a TECAN TE-Shake™ unit. The use of an orbital shaker during the extraction process promoted efficiency with respect to DNA capture, magnetic bead/DNA complex washes and DNA elution. Validation studies determined the reliability and limitations of this shaker-based process. Reproducibility with regards to DNA yields for the tested robotic workstations proved to be excellent and not significantly different than that offered by the manual phenol/chloroform extraction. DNA extraction of animal:human blood mixtures contaminated with soil demonstrated that a human profile was detectable even in the presence of abundant animal blood. For exhibits containing small amounts of biological material, concordance studies confirmed that DNA yields for this shaker-based extraction process are equivalent or greater to those observed with phenol/chloroform extraction as well as our original validated automated magnetic bead percolation-based extraction process. Our data further supports the increasing use of robotics for the processing of casework samples. Crown Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The extension of a DNA double helix by an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Sharma, P. K.; Madsen, Charlotte S.

    2013-01-01

    Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand.......Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand....

  8. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Fernando J. A. L.; Pablo, Juan J. de; Mota, José P. B.

    2014-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5′-D( * CP * GP * CP * GP * AP * AP * TP * TP * CP * GP * CP * G)-3′, is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA's end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a ∼0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termini. The canonical Watson-Crick H-bond network is essentially conserved throughout encapsulation, showing that the contact between the DNA segment and the hydrophobic carbon walls results in minor rearrangements of the nucleotides H-bonding. The results obtained here are paramount to the usage of carbon nanotubes as encapsulation media for next generation drug delivery technologies

  9. The extension of a DNA double helix by an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Madsen, Charlotte S; Petersen, Michael; Nielsen, Poul

    2013-06-17

    Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Identification of maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) and its adulterants by a DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Lan; Zha, Sheng-Hua; Zhao, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii) is an herbaceous plant that grows in high plateaus and has been used as both food and folk medicine for centuries because of its benefits to human health. In the present study, ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequences of forty-three maca samples, collected from different regions or vendors, were amplified and analyzed. The ITS sequences of nineteen potential adulterants of maca were also collected and analyzed. The results indicated that the ITS sequence of maca was consistent in all samples and unique when compared with its adulterants. Therefore, this DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence can be used for the molecular identification of maca and its adulterants. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.M.; Wietstock, S.M.; Ruyechan, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4 degree C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, the authors believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA

  12. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  13. Immunization with a DNA Vaccine Cocktail Induces a Th1 Response and Protects Mice Against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several novel antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have been studied as vaccine components and their immunogenicity has been evaluated. Previously, we reported that 85 antigen complex (85A, 85B, and 85C), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 35kDa protein could induce significant lymph...

  14. Quantifying species diversity with a DNA barcoding-based method: Tibetan moth species (Noctuidae on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Jin

    Full Text Available With the ongoing loss of biodiversity, there is a great need for fast and effective ways to assess species richness and diversity: DNA barcoding provides a powerful new tool for this. We investigated this approach by focusing on the Tibetan plateau, which is one of the world's top biodiversity hotspots. There have been few studies of its invertebrates, although they constitute the vast majority of the region's diversity. Here we investigated species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae, across different environmental gradients, using measurements based on traditional morphology as well as on DNA barcoding. The COI barcode showed an average interspecific K2P distance of 9.45±2.08%, which is about four times larger than the mean intraspecific distance (1.85±3.20%. Using six diversity indices, we did not detect any significant differences in estimated species diversity between measurements based on traditional morphology and on DNA barcoding. Furthermore, we found strong positive correlations between them, indicating that barcode-based measures of species diversity can serve as a good surrogate for morphology-based measures in most situations tested. Eastern communities were found to have significantly higher diversity than Western ones. Among 22 environmental factors tested, we found that three (precipitation of driest month, precipitation of driest quarter, and precipitation of coldest quarter were significantly correlated with species diversity. Our results indicate that these factors could be the key ecological factors influencing the species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae on the Tibetan plateau.

  15. Developing a DNA barcode library for perciform fishes in the South China Sea: Species identification, accuracy and cryptic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gang; Chen, Wei-Tao; Lu, Huo-Sheng; Cheng, Fei; Xie, Song-Guang

    2018-01-01

    DNA barcodes were studied for 1,353 specimens representing 272 morphological species belonging to 149 genera and 55 families of Perciformes from the South China Sea (SCS). The average Kimura 2-parameter (K2P) distances within species, genera and families were 0.31%, 8.71% and 14.52%, respectively. A neighbour-joining (NJ) tree, Bayesian inference (BI) and maximum-likelihood (ML) trees and Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) revealed 260, 253 and 259 single-species-representing clusters, respectively. Barcoding gap analysis (BGA) demonstrated that barcode gaps were present for 178 of 187 species analysed with multiple specimens (95.2%), with the minimum interspecific distance to the nearest neighbour larger than the maximum intraspecific distance. A group of three Thunnus species (T. albacares, T. obesus and T. tonggol), a pair of Gerres species (G. oyena and G. japonicus), a pair of Istiblennius species (I. edentulous and I. lineatus) and a pair of Uranoscopus species (U. oligolepis and U. kaianus) were observed with low interspecific distances and overlaps between intra- and interspecific genetic distances. Three species (Apogon ellioti, Naucrates ductor and Psenopsis anomala) showed deep intraspecific divergences and generated two lineages each, suggesting the possibility of cryptic species. Our results demonstrated that DNA barcodes are highly reliable for delineating species of Perciformes in the SCS. The DNA barcode library established in this study will shed light on further research on the diversity of Perciformes in the SCS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A DNA barcode library for ground beetles of Germany: the genus Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Insecta, Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Michael J.; Hannig, Karsten; Moriniére, Jérôme; Hendrich, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The genus Amara Bonelli, 1810 is a very speciose and taxonomically difficult genus of the Carabidae. The identification of many of the species is accomplished with considerable difficulty, in particular for females and immature stages. In this study the effectiveness of DNA barcoding, the most popular method for molecular species identification, was examined to discriminate various species of this genus from Central Europe. DNA barcodes from 690 individuals and 47 species were analysed, including sequences from previous studies and more than 350 newly generated DNA barcodes. Our analysis revealed unique BINs for 38 species (81%). Interspecific K2P distances below 2.2% were found for three species pairs and one species trio, including haplotype sharing between Amara alpina/Amara torrida and Amara communis/Amara convexior/Amara makolskii. This study represents another step in generating an extensive reference library of DNA barcodes for carabids, highly valuable bioindicators for characterizing disturbances in various habitats. PMID:29853775

  17. Species identification of medicinal pteridophytes by a DNA barcode marker, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin-Ye; Xie, Cai-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Song, Jing-Yuan; Yao, Hui; Luo, Kun; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Gao, Ting; Pang, Xiao-Hui; Qian, Jun; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Medicinal pteridophytes are an important group used in traditional Chinese medicine; however, there is no simple and universal way to differentiate various species of this group by morphological traits. A novel technology termed "DNA barcoding" could discriminate species by a standard DNA sequence with universal primers and sufficient variation. To determine whether DNA barcoding would be effective for differentiating pteridophyte species, we first analyzed five DNA sequence markers (psbA-trnH intergenic region, rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1, and matK) using six chloroplast genomic sequences from GeneBank and found psbA-trnH intergenic region the best candidate for availability of universal primers. Next, we amplified the psbA-trnH region from 79 samples of medicinal pteridophyte plants. These samples represented 51 species from 24 families, including all the authentic pteridophyte species listed in the Chinese pharmacopoeia (2005 version) and some commonly used adulterants. We found that the sequence of the psbA-trnH intergenic region can be determined with both high polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification efficiency (94.1%) and high direct sequencing success rate (81.3%). Combined with GeneBank data (54 species cross 12 pteridophyte families), species discriminative power analysis showed that 90.2% of species could be separated/identified successfully by the TaxonGap method in conjunction with the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool 1 (BLAST1) method. The TaxonGap method results further showed that, for 37 out of 39 separable species with at least two samples each, between-species variation was higher than the relevant within-species variation. Thus, the psbA-trnH intergenic region is a suitable DNA marker for species identification in medicinal pteridophytes.

  18. An Assessment of Whole Blood and Fractions by Nested PCR as a DNA Source for Diagnosing Canine Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Emmanuelle de Farias Rotondano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis are tick-borne diseases. Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys infect mainly white cells and platelets, respectively. The main DNA source for PCR is peripheral blood, but the potential of blood cell fractions has not been extensively investigated. This study aims at assessment of whole blood (WB and blood fractions potential in nested PCR (nPCR to diagnose canine ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified in 71.4, 17.8, 31.57, and 30% of the WB, granulocyte (G, mononuclear cells (M, and buffy coat (BC samples. Compared to the WB, the sensitivity of the PCR was 42.86% for the M, and BC fractions, 21.43% for the G, and 33.33% for the blood clot (C. There was fair agreement between the WB and M, BC and C, and slight with the G. Fair agreement occurred between the nPCR and morulae in the blood smear. One animal was coinfected with A. platys and E. canis. This study provided the first evidence of A. platys infection in dogs in Paraíba, Brazil, and demonstrated that WB is a better DNA source than blood fractions to detect Ehrlichia and Anaplasma by nPCR, probably because of the plasma bacterial concentration following host cell lysis.

  19. Quantifying Species Diversity with a DNA Barcoding-Based Method: Tibetan Moth Species (Noctuidae) on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qian; Han, Huilin; Hu, XiMin; Li, XinHai; Zhu, ChaoDong; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Ward, Robert D.; Zhang, Ai-bing

    2013-01-01

    With the ongoing loss of biodiversity, there is a great need for fast and effective ways to assess species richness and diversity: DNA barcoding provides a powerful new tool for this. We investigated this approach by focusing on the Tibetan plateau, which is one of the world's top biodiversity hotspots. There have been few studies of its invertebrates, although they constitute the vast majority of the region's diversity. Here we investigated species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae, across different environmental gradients, using measurements based on traditional morphology as well as on DNA barcoding. The COI barcode showed an average interspecific K2P distance of , which is about four times larger than the mean intraspecific distance (). Using six diversity indices, we did not detect any significant differences in estimated species diversity between measurements based on traditional morphology and on DNA barcoding. Furthermore, we found strong positive correlations between them, indicating that barcode-based measures of species diversity can serve as a good surrogate for morphology-based measures in most situations tested. Eastern communities were found to have significantly higher diversity than Western ones. Among 22 environmental factors tested, we found that three (precipitation of driest month, precipitation of driest quarter, and precipitation of coldest quarter) were significantly correlated with species diversity. Our results indicate that these factors could be the key ecological factors influencing the species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae on the Tibetan plateau. PMID:23741330

  20. Fanconi anemia proteins localize to chromatin and the nuclear matrix in a DNA damage- and cell cycle-regulated manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, F; Moss, A; Kupfer, G M

    2001-06-29

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Cells from patients with FA exhibit genomic instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross linking agents such as mitomycin C. Despite the identification of seven complementation groups and the cloning of six genes, the function of the encoded gene products remains elusive. The FancA (Fanconi anemia complementation group A), FancC, and FancG proteins have been detected within a nuclear complex, but no change in level, binding, or localization has been reported as a result of drug treatment or cell cycle. We show that in immunofluorescence studies, FancA appears as a non-nucleolar nuclear protein that is excluded from condensed, mitotic chromosomes. Biochemical fractionation reveals that the FA proteins are found in nuclear matrix and chromatin and that treatment with mitomycin C results in increase of the FA proteins in nuclear matrix and chromatin fractions. This induction occurs in wild-type cells and mutant FA-D (Fanconi complementation group D) cells but not in mutant FA-A cells. Immunoprecipitation of FancA protein in chromatin demonstrates the coprecipitation of FancA, FancC, and FancG, showing that the FA proteins move together as a complex. Also, fractionation of mitotic cells confirms the lack of FA proteins in chromatin or the nuclear matrix. Furthermore, phosphorylation of FancG was found to be temporally correlated with exit of the FA complex from chromosomes at mitosis. Taken together, these findings suggest a role for FA proteins in chromatin and nuclear matrix.

  1. A DNA Fingerprinting Simulation Laboratory for Biology Students: Hands-on Experimentation To Solve a Mock Forensic Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Michael A.; Cosentino, Emily

    2001-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to DNA fingerprinting. Demonstrates how undergraduate students can be involved in many aspects of this type of experiment and how DNA fingerprinting experiments can be incorporated into the laboratory curriculum of courses for majors and nonmajors. (NB)

  2. Effects of ingested turmeric oleoresin on glucose and lipid metabolisms in obese diabetic mice: a DNA microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shinichi; Aoki, Fumiki; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kishida, Hideyuki; Nishiyama, Tozo; Okada, Shinji; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko; Mae, Tatsumasa

    2006-11-29

    Turmeric, the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., has a wide range of effects on human health. Turmeric oleoresin, an extract of turmeric, is often used for flavoring and coloring. Curcuminoids and turmeric essential oil are both contained in turmeric oleoresin, and both of these fractions have hypoglycemic effects. In the present study, we comprehensively assessed the effect of turmeric oleoresin on hepatic gene expression in obese diabetic KK-Ay mice using DNA microarray analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Female KK-Ay mice aged 6 weeks (n = 6/group) were fed a high-fat diet containing turmeric oleoresin, curcuminoids, and essential oil for 5 weeks. The same diet without any of these fractions was used as a control diet. Ingestion of turmeric oleoresin and essential oil inhibited the development of increased blood glucose and abdominal fat mass, while curcuminoids only inhibited the increase in blood glucose. DNA microarray analysis indicated that turmeric oleoresin ingestion up-regulated the expression of genes related to glycolysis, beta-oxidation, and cholesterol metabolism in the liver of KK-Ay mice, while expression of gluconeogenesis-related genes was down-regulated. Real-time PCR analysis was conducted to assess the contribution of the curcuminoids and essential oil in turmeric oleoresin to the changes in expression of representative genes selected by DNA microarray analysis. This analysis suggested that curcuminoids regulated turmeric oleoresin ingestion-induced expression of glycolysis-related genes and also that curcuminoids and turmeric essential oil acted synergistically to regulate the peroxisomal beta-oxidation-related gene expression induced by turmeric oleoresin ingestion. These changes in gene expression were considered to be the mechanism by which the turmeric oleoresin affected the control of both blood glucose levels and abdominal adipose tissue masses. All of these results suggest that the use of whole turmeric oleoresin is more effective than the use of either curcuminoids or the essential oil alone.

  3. [Serologic response to a DNA recombinant vaccine against hepatitis B in natives of the Peruvian Amazonian jungle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colichón, A; Vildósola, H; Sjogren, M; Cantella, R; Rojas, C

    1990-01-01

    Large areas of the Amazon basin in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and in the nonoriental region of the peruvian jungle have been found to be hyperendemic to Hepatitis B with high prevalence of asymptomatic carriers (11 to 25%) and, in more selected areas, Hepatitis Delta has been also reported. In the present report, we have studied 108 volunteers from six different Jivaroes communities living in a hyperendemic Hepatitis B area. They received 2 doses of DNA recombinant yeast derivated HBV vaccine. All the selected persons were HBsAb negatives, but many (80%) had antibodies to HBc. Following immunization schedule, 80% responded with the formation of HBsAb; a better seroconversion was achieved in those negatives to anticore IgG compared with those having HBcAb. We obtained 90% of seroconversion in spite of the fact that our vaccination schedule was prolonged up to 10 months from the one recommended by the manufacturer. The vaccination schedule 0,4, 14 months, and the schedule 0,4 months, had 76 and 29% of seroconversion, respectively. We want to point out three observations: 1) It is quite possible that many of the Anti-core positives, that did not respond to vaccination were carriers of HBsAg undetectable by the conventional EIA test carried out; 2) The seroconversion rate in these natives was low (up to six months after the vaccination schedule); and 3) Many of the HBcAb were false positives and many of them were recently infected. We conclude: A) It is highly important to assess the anti-HBs hyperendemic areas before attempting vaccinations; B) All persons negative to anti-HBs should be vaccinated in spite to anticore antibodies; C) Areas with difficult access could be vaccinated even until 10 months without affecting good results, and D) DNA recombinant vaccine (ENGERIX B) was well tolerated. No side effects were observed.

  4. A Phase-1 Clinical Trial of a DNA Vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Delivered by Intramuscular or Intradermal Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    by the Aspire Institutional Review Board (IRB) http://aspire-irb.com and the Western IRB institutional biosafety committee was the Western IRB IBC...antibodies at each scheduled time point. Geometric mean titers, standard errors, and 95% CIs were calculated using log-transformed titers, replacing any

  5. Interferon antagonist NSs of La Crosse virus triggers a DNA damage response-like degradation of transcribing RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Paul; Ruf, Marius; Blakqori, Gjon; Överby, Anna K; Heidemann, Martin; Eick, Dirk; Weber, Friedemann

    2011-02-04

    La Crosse encephalitis virus (LACV) is a mosquito-borne member of the negative-strand RNA virus family Bunyaviridae. We have previously shown that the virulence factor NSs of LACV is an efficient inhibitor of the antiviral type I interferon system. A recombinant virus unable to express NSs (rLACVdelNSs) strongly induced interferon transcription, whereas the corresponding wt virus (rLACV) suppressed it. Here, we show that interferon induction by rLACVdelNSs mainly occurs through the signaling pathway leading from the pattern recognition receptor RIG-I to the transcription factor IRF-3. NSs expressed by rLACV, however, acts downstream of IRF-3 by specifically blocking RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription. Further investigations revealed that NSs induces proteasomal degradation of the mammalian RNA polymerase II subunit RPB1. NSs thereby selectively targets RPB1 molecules of elongating RNA polymerase II complexes, the so-called IIo form. This phenotype has similarities to the cellular DNA damage response, and NSs was indeed found to transactivate the DNA damage response gene pak6. Moreover, NSs expressed by rLACV boosted serine 139 phosphorylation of histone H2A.X, one of the earliest cellular reactions to damaged DNA. However, other DNA damage response markers such as up-regulation and serine 15 phosphorylation of p53 or serine 1524 phosphorylation of BRCA1 were not triggered by LACV infection. Collectively, our data indicate that the strong suppression of interferon induction by LACV NSs is based on a shutdown of RNA polymerase II transcription and that NSs achieves this by exploiting parts of the cellular DNA damage response pathway to degrade IIo-borne RPB1 subunits.

  6. A DNA vaccine against chikungunya virus is protective in mice and induces neutralizing antibodies in mice and nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Mallilankaraman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus indigenous to tropical Africa and Asia. Acute illness is characterized by fever, arthralgias, conjunctivitis, rash, and sometimes arthritis. Relatively little is known about the antigenic targets for immunity, and no licensed vaccines or therapeutics are currently available for the pathogen. While the Aedes aegypti mosquito is its primary vector, recent evidence suggests that other carriers can transmit CHIKV thus raising concerns about its spread outside of natural endemic areas to new countries including the U.S. and Europe. Considering the potential for pandemic spread, understanding the development of immunity is paramount to the development of effective counter measures against CHIKV. In this study, we isolated a new CHIKV virus from an acutely infected human patient and developed a defined viral challenge stock in mice that allowed us to study viral pathogenesis and develop a viral neutralization assay. We then constructed a synthetic DNA vaccine delivered by in vivo electroporation (EP that expresses a component of the CHIKV envelope glycoprotein and used this model to evaluate its efficacy. Vaccination induced robust antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses, which individually were capable of providing protection against CHIKV challenge in mice. Furthermore, vaccine studies in rhesus macaques demonstrated induction of nAb responses, which mimicked those induced in convalescent human patient sera. These data suggest a protective role for nAb against CHIKV disease and support further study of envelope-based CHIKV DNA vaccines.

  7. Sub-nuclear irradiation, in-vivo microscopy and single-molecule imaging to study a DNA Polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, G; Mansilla, S; Belluscio, L; Speroni, J; D' Alessio, C; Gottifredi, V [Fundacion Leloir, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Essers, J; Kanaar, R [Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    When the DNA is damaged in cells progressing through S phase, replication blockage can be avoided by TLS (Translesion DNA synthesis). This is an auxiliary replication mechanism that relies on the function of specialized polymerases that accomplish DNA damage bypass. An example of a classical TLS polymerase is Pol {eta} ({eta}). The current model implies that Pol {eta} activity is circumscribed to S-phase. Here we perform a systematic characterization of Pol {eta} behaviour after DNA-damage. We show that Pol {eta} is recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions in cells outside S phase including cells permanently arrested in G1. This observation was confirmed by different sub-nuclear damage strategies including global UV irradiation, local UV irradiation and local multi-photon laser irradiation of single nuclei in living cells. By local UV irradiation and alpha particle irradiation we evaluated the potential connection between Pol h recruitment to DNA lesions outside S phase and Homologous recombination repair (HRR) or Nucleotide excision repair (NER). Finally, we employ a single-molecule imaging approach (known as DNA fiber-assay) to determine how Pol h influences the progression of the replication fork. Our data reveals that the re-localization of Pol {eta} to DNA lesions might be temporally and mechanistically uncoupled from replicative DNA synthesis and from DNA damage processing. (authors)

  8. Prevalence, identification by a DNA microarray-based assay of human and food isolates Listeria spp. from Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmaïed, F; Helel, S; Le Berre, V; François, J-M; Leclercq, A; Lecuit, M; Smaoui, H; Kechrid, A; Boudabous, A; Barkallah, I

    2014-02-01

    We aimed at evaluating the prevalence of Listeria species isolated from food samples and characterizing food and human cases isolates. Between 2005 and 2007, one hundred food samples collected in the markets of Tunis were analysed in our study. Five strains of Listeria monocytogenes responsible for human listeriosis isolated in hospital of Tunis were included. Multiplex PCR serogrouping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) applying the enzyme AscI and ApaI were used for the characterization of isolates of L. monocytogenes. We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay to a reliable discrimination of species within the Listeria genus. The prevalence of Listeria spp. in food samples was estimated at 14% by using classical biochemical identification. Two samples were assigned to L. monocytogenes and 12 to L. innocua. DNA microarray allowed unambiguous identification of Listeria species. Our results obtained by microarray-based assay were in accordance with the biochemical identification. The two food L. monocytogenes isolates were assigned to the PCR serogroup IIa (serovar 1/2a). Whereas human L. monocytogenes isolates were of PCR serogroup IVb, (serovars 4b). These isolates present a high similarity in PFGE. Food L. monocytogenes isolates were classified into two different pulsotypes. These pulsotypes were different from that of the five strains responsible for the human cases. We confirmed the presence of Listeria spp. in variety of food samples in Tunis. Increased food and clinical surveillance must be taken into consideration in Tunisia to identify putative infections sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Recombinase polymerase and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as a DNA amplification-detection strategy for food analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago-Felipe, S.; Tortajada-Genaro, L.A.; Puchades, R.; Maquieira, A., E-mail: amaquieira@qim.upv.es

    2014-02-06

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Recombinase polymerase amplification is a powerful DNA method operating at 40 °C. •The combination RPA–ELISA gives excellent performances for high-throughput analysis. •Screening of food safety threats has been done using standard laboratory equipment. •Allergens, GMOs, bacteria, and fungi have been successfully determined. -- Abstract: Polymerase chain reaction in conjunction with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR–ELISA) is a well-established technique that provides a suitable rapid, sensitive, and selective method for a broad range of applications. However, the need for precise rapid temperature cycling of PCR is an important drawback that can be overcome by employing isothermal amplification reactions such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The RPA–ELISA combination is proposed for amplification at a low, constant temperature (40 °C) in a short time (40 min), for the hybridisation of labelled products to specific 5′-biotinylated probes/streptavidin in coated microtiter plates at room temperature, and for detection by colorimetric immunoassay. RPA–ELISA was applied to screen common safety threats in foodstuffs, such as allergens (hazelnut, peanut, soybean, tomato, and maize), genetically modified organisms (P35S and TNOS), pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella sp. and Cronobacter sp.), and fungi (Fusarium sp.). Satisfactory sensitivity and reproducibility results were achieved for all the targets. The RPA–ELISA technique does away with thermocycling and provides a suitable sensitive, specific, and cost-effective method for routine applications, and proves particularly useful for resource-limited settings.

  10. Hindering the illegal trade in dog and cat furs through a DNA-based protocol for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Garofalo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In Western countries dogs and cats are the most popular pets, and people are increasingly opposed to their rearing for the fur industry. In 2007, a Regulation of the European Union (EU banned the use and trade of dog and cat furs, but an official analytical protocol to identify them as source species was not provided, and violations of law are still frequent in all Member States. In this paper we report on the development and validation of a simple and affordable DNA method for species detection in furs to use as an effective tool to combat illegal trade in fur products. A set of mitochondrial primers was designed for amplification of partial cytochrome b, control region and ND1 gene in highly degraded samples, like furs and pelts. Our amplification workflow involved the use of a non-specific primer pair to perform a first test to identify the species through sequencing, then the application of species-specific primer pairs to use in singleplex end-point PCRs as confirmation tests. The advantage of this two-step procedure is twofold: on the one hand it minimises the possibility of negative test results from degraded samples, since failure of amplification with a first set of primers can be offset by successful amplification of the second, and on the other it adds confidence and reliability to final authentication of species. All designed primers were validated on a reference collection of tissue samples, obtaining solid results in terms of specificity, sensitivity, repeatability and reproducibility. Application of the protocol on real caseworks from seized furs yielded successful results also from old and dyed furs, suggesting that age and chemical staining do not necessarily affect positive amplifications. Major pros of this approach are: (1 sensitive and informative primer sets for detection of species; (2 short PCR amplicons for the analysis of poor quality DNA; (3 binding primers that avoid contamination from human DNA; (4 user-friendly protocol for any laboratory equipped for analysis of low-copy-number DNA. Our molecular procedure proved to be a good starting point for enforcing the EU Regulation against dog and cat fur trade in forensic contexts where source attribution is essential to the assignment of responsibilities.

  11. Sequence-selective single-molecule alkylation with a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide visualized in a DNA nanoscaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Tomofumi; Endo, Masayuki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Hidaka, Kumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-03-14

    We demonstrate a novel strategy for visualizing sequence-selective alkylation of target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using a synthetic pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide in a designed DNA origami scaffold. Doubly functionalized PI polyamide was designed by introduction of an alkylating agent 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI) and biotin for sequence-selective alkylation at the target sequence and subsequent streptavidin labeling, respectively. Selective alkylation of the target site in the substrate DNA was observed by analysis using sequencing gel electrophoresis. For the single-molecule observation of the alkylation by functionalized PI polyamide using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the target position in the dsDNA (∼200 base pairs) was alkylated and then visualized by labeling with streptavidin. Newly designed DNA origami scaffold named "five-well DNA frame" carrying five different dsDNA sequences in its cavities was used for the detailed analysis of the sequence-selectivity and alkylation. The 64-mer dsDNAs were introduced to five individual wells, in which target sequence AGTXCCA/TGGYACT (XY = AT, TA, GC, CG) was employed as fully matched (X = G) and one-base mismatched (X = A, T, C) sequences. The fully matched sequence was alkylated with 88% selectivity over other mismatched sequences. In addition, the PI polyamide failed to attach to the target sequence lacking the alkylation site after washing and streptavidin treatment. Therefore, the PI polyamide discriminated the one mismatched nucleotide at the single-molecule level, and alkylation anchored the PI polyamide to the target dsDNA.

  12. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A DNA-Based Assessment of the Phylogenetic Position of a Morphologically Distinct, Anchialine-Lake-Restricted Seahorse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Emily; Masonjones, Heather D; Jones, Adam G

    2016-11-01

    Isolated populations provide special opportunities to study local adaptation and incipient speciation. In some cases, however, morphological evolution can obscure the taxonomic status of recently founded populations. Here, we use molecular markers to show that an anchialine-lake-restricted population of seahorses, originally identified as Hippocampus reidi, appears on the basis of DNA data to be Hippocampus erectus We collected seahorses from Sweetings Pond, on Eleuthera Island, Bahamas, during the summer of 2014. We measured morphological traits and sequenced 2 genes, cytochrome b and ribosomal protein S7, from 19 seahorses in our sample. On the basis of morphology, Sweetings Pond seahorses could not be assigned definitively to either of the 2 species of seahorse, H. reidi and H. erectus, that occur in marine waters surrounding the Bahamas. However, our DNA-based phylogenetic analysis showed that the Sweetings Pond fish were firmly nested within the H. erectus clade with a Bayesian posterior probability greater than 0.99. Thus, Sweetings Pond seahorses most recently shared a common ancestor with H. erectus populations from the Western Atlantic. Interestingly, the seahorses from Sweetings Pond differ morphologically from other marine populations of H. erectus in having a more even torso to tail length ratio. The substantial habitat differences between Sweetings Pond and the surrounding coastal habitat make Sweetings Pond seahorses particularly interesting from the perspectives of conservation, local adaptation, and incipient speciation. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Loss of long term protection with the inclusion of HIV pol to a DNA vaccine encoding gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, Tamsin J; Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Major, Lee; Burrell, Christopher J; Wesselingh, Steven; Suhrbier, Andreas; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J

    2014-11-04

    Traditional vaccine strategies that induce antibody responses have failed to protect against HIV infection in clinical trials, and thus cell-mediated immunity is now an additional criterion. Recent clinical trials that aimed to induce strong T cell responses failed to do so. Therefore, to enhance induction of protective T cell responses, it is crucial that the optimum antigen combination is chosen. Limited research has been performed into the number of antigens selected for an HIV vaccine. This study aimed to compare DNA vaccines encoding either a single HIV antigen or a combination of two antigens, using intradermal vaccination of C57BL/6 mice. Immune assays were performed on splenocytes, and in vivo protection was examined by challenge with a chimeric virus, EcoHIV, able to infect mouse but not human leukocytes, at 10 days (short term) and 60 days (long term) post final vaccination. At 60 days there was significantly lower frequency of induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in the spleens of pCMVgag-pol-vaccinated mice compared with mice which received pCMVgag only. Most importantly, short term viral control of EcoHIV was similar for pCMVgag and pCMVgag-pol-vaccinated mice at day 10, but only the pCMVgag-vaccinated significantly controlled EcoHIV at day 60 compared with pCMV-vaccinated mice, showing that control was reduced with the inclusion of the HIV pol gene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancing T cell activation and antiviral protection by introducing the HIV-1 protein transduction domain into a DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifert, J A; Lindencrona, J A; Charo, J; Whitton, J L

    2001-10-10

    Protein transduction domains (PTD), which can transport proteins or peptides across biological membranes, have been identified in several proteins of viral, invertebrate, and vertebrate origin. Here, we evaluate the immunological and biological consequences of including PTD in synthetic peptides and in DNA vaccines that contain CD8(+) T cell epitopes from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Synthetic PTD-peptides did not induce detectable CD8(+) T cell responses. However, fusion of an open reading frame encoding a PTD to an epitope minigene caused transfected tissue culture cells to stimulate epitope-specific T cells much more effectively. Kinetic studies indicated that the epitope reached the surface of transfected cells more rapidly and that the number of transfected cells needed to stimulate T cell responses was reduced by 35- to 50-fold when compared to cells transfected with a standard minigene plasmid. The mechanism underlying the effect of PTD linkage is not clear, but transit of the PTD-attached epitope from transfected cells to nontransfected cells (cross presentation) seemed to play, at most, a minimal role. Mice immunized once with the plasmid encoding the PTD-linked epitope showed a markedly accelerated CD8(+) T cell response and, unlike mice immunized with a standard plasmid, were completely protected against a normally lethal LCMV challenge administered only 8 days post-immunization.

  16. Genetic Variability of Beauveria bassiana and a DNA Marker for Environmental Monitoring of a Highly Virulent Isolate Against Cosmopolites sordidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, D V; Munhoz, C F; Neves, P M O; Ferracin, L M; Sartori, D; Vieira, M L C; Fungaro, M H P

    2012-12-01

    The banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) is one of a number of pests that attack banana crops. The use of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana as a biological control agent for this pest may contribute towards reducing the application of chemical insecticides on banana crops. In this study, the genetic variability of a collection of Brazilian isolates of B. bassiana was evaluated. Samples were obtained from various geographic regions of Brazil, and from different hosts of the Curculionidae family. Based on the DNA fingerprints generated by RAPD and AFLP, we found that 92 and 88 % of the loci were polymorphic, respectively. The B. bassiana isolates were attributed to two genotypic clusters based on the RAPD data, and to three genotypic clusters, when analyzed with AFLP. The nucleotide sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers confirmed that all isolates are in fact B. bassiana. Analysis of molecular variance showed that variability among the isolates was not correlated with geographic origin or hosts. A RAPD-specific marker for isolate CG 1024, which is highly virulent to C. sordidus, was cloned and sequenced. Based on the sequences obtained, specific PCR primers BbasCG1024F (5'-TGC GGC TGA GGA GGA CT-3') and BbasCG1024R (5'-TGC GGC TGA GTG TAG AAC-3') were designed for detecting and monitoring this isolate in the field.

  17. A DNA methylation microarray-based study identifies ERG as a gene commonly methylated in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Jacob; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Gibbs, Angela; Gao, Lina; Corless, Christopher L; Jin, Jennifer; Zarour, Luai; Higano, Celestia; True, Lawrence D; Vessella, Robert L; Wilmot, Beth; Bottomly, Daniel; McWeeney, Shannon K; Bova, G Steven; Partin, Alan W; Mori, Motomi; Alumkal, Joshi

    2011-10-01

    DNA methylation of promoter regions is a common event in prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in men worldwide. Because prior reports demonstrating that DNA methylation is important in prostate cancer studied a limited number of genes, we systematically quantified the DNA methylation status of 1505 CpG dinucleotides for 807 genes in 78 paraffin-embedded prostate cancer samples and three normal prostate samples. The ERG gene, commonly repressed in prostate cells in the absence of an oncogenic fusion to the TMPRSS2 gene, was one of the most commonly methylated genes, occurring in 74% of prostate cancer specimens. In an independent group of patient samples, we confirmed that ERG DNA methylation was common, occurring in 57% of specimens, and cancer-specific. The ERG promoter is marked by repressive chromatin marks mediated by polycomb proteins in both normal prostate cells and prostate cancer cells, which may explain ERG's predisposition to DNA methylation and the fact that tumors with ERG DNA methylation were more methylated, in general. These results demonstrate that bead arrays offer a high-throughput method to discover novel genes with promoter DNA methylation such as ERG, whose measurement may improve our ability to more accurately detect prostate cancer.

  18. High-Resolution Profiling of Drosophila Replication Start Sites Reveals a DNA Shape and Chromatin Signature of Metazoan Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Comoglio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  19. A DNA barcode library of the beetle reference collection (Insecta: Coleoptera in the National Science Museum, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woo Jung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coleoptera is a group of insects that are most diverse among insect resources. Although used as indicator species and applied in developing new drugs, it is difficult to identify them quickly. Since the development of a method using mitochondrial DNA information for identification, studies have been conducted in Korea to swiftly and accurately identify species. The National Science Museum of Korea (NSMK has been collecting and morphologically identifying domestic reference insects since 2013, and building a database of DNA barcodes with digital images. The NSMK completed construction of a database of digital images and DNA barcodes of 60 beetle species in the Korean National Research Information System. A total of 179 specimens and 60 species were used for the analysis, and the averages of intraspecific and interspecific variations were 0.70±0.45% and 26.34±6.01%, respectively, with variation rates ranging from 0% to 1.45% and 9.83% to 56.23%, respectively.

  20. A DNA Structural Alphabet Distinguishes Structural Features of DNA Bound to Regulatory Proteins and in the Nucleosome Core Particle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneider, Bohdan; Bozikova, Paulina; Čech, P.; Svozil, D.; Černý, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 278. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001777 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA * DNA-protein recognition * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  1. The MiAge Calculator: a DNA methylation-based mitotic age calculator of human tissue types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Ahrim; Wang, Shuang

    2018-01-01

    Cell division is important in human aging and cancer. The estimation of the number of cell divisions (mitotic age) of a given tissue type in individuals is of great interest as it allows not only the study of biological aging (using a new molecular aging target) but also the stratification of prospective cancer risk. Here, we introduce the MiAge Calculator, a mitotic age calculator based on a novel statistical framework, the MiAge model. MiAge is designed to quantitatively estimate mitotic age (total number of lifetime cell divisions) of a tissue using the stochastic replication errors accumulated in the epigenetic inheritance process during cell divisions. With the MiAge model, the MiAge Calculator was built using the training data of DNA methylation measures of 4,020 tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples from eight TCGA cancer types and was tested using the testing data of DNA methylation measures of 2,221 tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples of five other TCGA cancer types. We showed that within each of the thirteen cancer types studied, the estimated mitotic age is universally accelerated in tumor tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. Across the thirteen cancer types, we showed that worse cancer survivals are associated with more accelerated mitotic age in tumor tissues. Importantly, we demonstrated the utility of mitotic age by showing that the integration of mitotic age and clinical information leads to improved survival prediction in six out of the thirteen cancer types studied. The MiAge Calculator is available at http://www.columbia.edu/∼sw2206/softwares.htm .

  2. Sub-nuclear irradiation, in-vivo microscopy and single-molecule imaging to study a DNA Polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, G.; Mansilla, S.; Belluscio, L.; Speroni, J.; D'Alessio, C.; Gottifredi, V.; Essers, J.; Kanaar, R.

    2009-01-01

    When the DNA is damaged in cells progressing through S phase, replication blockage can be avoided by TLS (Translesion DNA synthesis). This is an auxiliary replication mechanism that relies on the function of specialized polymerases that accomplish DNA damage bypass. An example of a classical TLS polymerase is Pol η (eta). The current model implies that Pol η activity is circumscribed to S-phase. Here we perform a systematic characterization of Pol η behaviour after DNA-damage. We show that Pol η is recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions in cells outside S phase including cells permanently arrested in G1. This observation was confirmed by different sub-nuclear damage strategies including global UV irradiation, local UV irradiation and local multi-photon laser irradiation of single nuclei in living cells. By local UV irradiation and alpha particle irradiation we evaluated the potential connection between Pol h recruitment to DNA lesions outside S phase and Homologous recombination repair (HRR) or Nucleotide excision repair (NER). Finally, we employ a single-molecule imaging approach (known as DNA fiber-assay) to determine how Pol h influences the progression of the replication fork. Our data reveals that the re-localization of Pol η to DNA lesions might be temporally and mechanistically uncoupled from replicative DNA synthesis and from DNA damage processing. (authors)

  3. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Fernando J. A. L., E-mail: fj.cruz@fct.unl.pt [Requimte/CQFB, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica 2829-516 (Portugal); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Pablo, Juan J. de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Institute of Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Mota, José P. B. [Requimte/CQFB, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica 2829-516 (Portugal)

    2014-06-14

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5′-D({sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}AP{sup *}AP{sup *}TP{sup *}TP{sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}CP{sup *}G)-3′, is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA's end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a ∼0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termini. The canonical Watson-Crick H-bond network is essentially conserved throughout encapsulation, showing that the contact between the DNA segment and the hydrophobic carbon walls results in minor rearrangements of the nucleotides H-bonding. The results obtained here are paramount to the usage of carbon nanotubes as encapsulation media for next generation drug delivery technologies.

  4. Development of a DNA-Based Method for Distinguishing the Malaria Vectors, Anopheles gambiae From Anopheles arabiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    our preliminary studies hybridization with the Droso- phila actin probe required such low stringency conditions that the signal to noise ratio made...Balabacensis complex of Southeast Asia (Diptera: Culicidae). Genetica 57:81-86. (14) Mahon RJ and PM Miethke. 1982. Anopheles farauti No. 3, a hitherto un

  5. Phenotyping of VIGS-mediated gene silencing in rice using a vector derived from a DNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2017-07-01

    Target genes in rice can be optimally silenced if inserted in antisense or hairpin orientation in the RTBV-derived VIGS vector and plants grown at 28 °C and 80% humidity after inoculation. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a method used to transiently silence genes in dicot as well as monocot plants. For the important monocot species rice, the Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV)-derived VIGS system (RTBV-VIGS), which uses agroinoculation to initiate silencing, has not been standardized for optimal use. Here, using RTBV-VIGS, three sets of conditions were tested to achieve optimal silencing of the rice marker gene phytoene desaturase (pds). The effect of orientation of the insert in the RTBV-VIGS plasmid (sense, antisense and hairpin) on the silencing of the target gene was then evaluated using rice magnesium chelatase subunit H (chlH). Finally, the rice Xa21 gene, conferring resistance against bacterial leaf blight disease (BLB) was silenced using RTBV-VIGS system. In each case, real-time PCR-based assessment indicated approximately 40-80% fall in the accumulation levels of the transcripts of pds, chlH and Xa21. In the case of pds, the appearance of white streaks in the emerging leaves, and for chlH, chlorophyll levels and F v /F m ratio were assessed as phenotypes for silencing. For Xa21, the resistance levels to BLB were assessed by measuring the lesion length and the percent diseased areas of leaves, following challenge inoculation with Xanthomonas oryzae. In each case, the RTBV-MVIGS system gave rise to a discernible phenotype indicating the silencing of the respective target gene using condition III (temperature 28 °C, humidity 80% and 1 mM MES and 20 µM acetosyringone in secondary agrobacterium culture), which revealed the robustness of this gene silencing system for rice.

  6. A DNA Vaccine for Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Protects Against Disease and Death in Two Lethal Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-18

    as above. Data were analyzed as previously reported using 238 GraphPad Prism software (GraphPad Software) (33). 239 CCHFVLP ELISA 240 High Bind... ELISA plates (Corning) were coated overnight at 4°C with approximately 1 ng N 241 equivalent of CCHFVLP diluted in PBS per 96-well plate. The...deep anesthesia, and sera were collected for post-challenge 276 analysis. 277 N ELISA 278 N antibodies in challenged mice were detected by ELISA

  7. Recombinase polymerase and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as a DNA amplification-detection strategy for food analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago-Felipe, S.; Tortajada-Genaro, L.A.; Puchades, R.; Maquieira, A.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Recombinase polymerase amplification is a powerful DNA method operating at 40 °C. •The combination RPA–ELISA gives excellent performances for high-throughput analysis. •Screening of food safety threats has been done using standard laboratory equipment. •Allergens, GMOs, bacteria, and fungi have been successfully determined. -- Abstract: Polymerase chain reaction in conjunction with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR–ELISA) is a well-established technique that provides a suitable rapid, sensitive, and selective method for a broad range of applications. However, the need for precise rapid temperature cycling of PCR is an important drawback that can be overcome by employing isothermal amplification reactions such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The RPA–ELISA combination is proposed for amplification at a low, constant temperature (40 °C) in a short time (40 min), for the hybridisation of labelled products to specific 5′-biotinylated probes/streptavidin in coated microtiter plates at room temperature, and for detection by colorimetric immunoassay. RPA–ELISA was applied to screen common safety threats in foodstuffs, such as allergens (hazelnut, peanut, soybean, tomato, and maize), genetically modified organisms (P35S and TNOS), pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella sp. and Cronobacter sp.), and fungi (Fusarium sp.). Satisfactory sensitivity and reproducibility results were achieved for all the targets. The RPA–ELISA technique does away with thermocycling and provides a suitable sensitive, specific, and cost-effective method for routine applications, and proves particularly useful for resource-limited settings

  8. The use of a DNA stabilizer in human dental tissues stored under different temperature conditions and time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    TERADA, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; da SILVA, Luiz Antonio Ferreira; GALO, Rodrigo; de AZEVEDO, Aline; GERLACH, Raquel Fernanda; da SILVA, Ricardo Henrique Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study evaluated the use of a reagent to stabilize the DNA extracted from human dental tissues stored under different temperature conditions and time intervals. Material and Methods A total of 161 teeth were divided into two distinct groups: intact teeth and isolated dental pulp tissue. The samples were stored with or without the product at different time intervals and temperature. After storage, DNA extraction and genomic DNA quantification were performed using real-time PCR; the fragments of the 32 samples that represented each possible condition were analyzed to find the four pre-selected markers in STR analysis. Results The results of the quantification showed values ranging from 0.01 to 10,246.88 ng/μL of DNA. The statistical difference in the quantity of DNA was observed when the factors related to the time and temperature of storage were analyzed. In relation to the use of the specific reagent, its use was relevant in the group of intact teeth when they were at room temperature for 30 and 180 days. The analysis of the fragments in the 32 selected samples was possible irrespective of the amount of DNA, confirming that the STR analysis using an automated method yields good results. Conclusions The use of a specific reagent showed a significant difference in stabilizing DNA in samples of intact human teeth stored at room temperature for 30 and 180 days, while the results showed no justification for using the product under the other conditions tested. PMID:25141206

  9. Rapid detection and identification of viral and bacterial fish pathogens using a DNA array‐based multiplex assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lievens, B.; Frans, I.; Heusdens, C.

    2011-01-01

    for the simultaneous detection and identification of all cyprinid herpesviruses (CyHV‐1, CyHV‐2 and CyHV‐3) and some of the most important fish pathogenic Flavobacterium species, including F. branchiophilum, F. columnare and F. psychrophilum. For virus identification, the DNA polymerase and helicase genes were...

  10. A DNA barcode library for ground beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera, Carabidae) of Germany: The genus Bembidion Latreille, 1802 and allied taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Michael J; Hannig, Karsten; Morinière, Jérome; Hendrich, Lars

    2016-01-01

    As molecular identification method, DNA barcoding based on partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) sequences has been proven to be a useful tool for species determination in many insect taxa including ground beetles. In this study we tested the effectiveness of DNA barcodes to discriminate species of the ground beetle genus Bembidion and some closely related taxa of Germany. DNA barcodes were obtained from 819 individuals and 78 species, including sequences from previous studies as well as more than 300 new generated DNA barcodes. We found a 1:1 correspondence between BIN and traditionally recognized species for 69 species (89%). Low interspecific distances with maximum pairwise K2P values below 2.2% were found for three species pairs, including two species pairs with haplotype sharing (Bembidion atrocaeruleum/Bembidion varicolor and Bembidion guttula/Bembidion mannerheimii). In contrast to this, deep intraspecific sequence divergences with distinct lineages were revealed for two species (Bembidion geniculatum/Ocys harpaloides). Our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of the analyzed ground beetles species and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for the Carabidae in Germany and Central Europe as well.

  11. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA damage responsive murine endogenous retrovirus of GLN family involved in cell growth regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Wu

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512, whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs, but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs. Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV. However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions.

  12. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application......Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...... the DNA-binding preferences of individual members. Here, we present a TF-target gene identification workflow based on the integration of novel protein binding microarray data with gene expression and multi-species promoter sequence conservation to identify the DNA-binding specificities and the gene...

  13. Failure to induce a DNA repair gene, RAD54, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not affect DNA repair or recombination phenotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD54 gene is transcriptionally regulated by a broad spectrum of DNA-damaging agents. Induction of RAD54 by DNA-damaging agents is under positive control. Sequences responsible for DNA damage induction (the DRS element) lie within a 29-base-pair region from -99 to -70 from the most proximal transcription start site. This inducible promoter element is functionally separable from a poly(dA-dT) region immediately downstream which is required for constitutive expression. Deletions which eliminate induction of RAD54 transcription by DNA damage but do not affect constitutive expression have no effect on growth or survival of noninducible strains relative to wild-type strains in the presence of DNA-damaging agents. The DRS element is also not required for homothallic mating type switching, transcriptional induction of RAD54 during meiosis, meiotic recombination, or spontaneous or X-ray-induced mitotic recombination. We find no phenotype for a lack of induction of RAD54 message via the damage-inducible DRS, which raises significant questions about the physiology of DNA damage induction in S. cerevisiae

  14. Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii ROP54 induces protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zou, Yang; Chen, Kai; Liu, Qing; Wang, Jin-Lei; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2017-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligatory intracellular protozoan, which infects most of the warm-blooded animals, causing serious public health problems and enormous economic losses worldwide. The rhoptry effector protein 54 (ROP54) has been indicated as a virulence factor that promotes Toxoplasma infection by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles, which can modulate some aspects of the host immune response. In order to evaluate the immuno-protective value of ROP54, we constructed a eukaryotic recombinant plasmid expressing T. gondii ROP54 and intramuscularly immunized Kunming mice with this recombinant plasmid against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. All mice immunized with pVAX-ROP54 elicited a high level of specific antibody responses, a significant increase of lymphocyte proliferation, and a significant level of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12p70), in addition to an increased production of Th2-type cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). These results demonstrated that pVAX-ROP54 induced significant cellular and humoral (Th1/Th2) immune responses, which extended the survival time (13.0±1.15days for pVAX-ROP54 vs 6.7±0.48days for pVAX I, 6.8±0.42days for PBS and 6.5±0.53 for blank control) and significantly reduced cyst burden (35.9% for pVAX-ROP54, 1% for pVAX I and 2% for PBS, compared with blank control) of immunized mice. These results indicate that the recombinant ROP54 plasmid can provide partial protection and might be a potential vaccine candidate against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Solution structure of a DNA mimicking motif of an RNA aptamer against transcription factor AML1 Runt domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Fukunaga, Jun-ichi; Fujiwara, Kazuya; Chiba, Manabu; Iibuchi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Kozu, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Taiichi

    2013-12-01

    AML1/RUNX1 is an essential transcription factor involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. AML1 binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. In a previous study, we obtained RNA aptamers against the AML1 Runt domain by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment and revealed that RNA aptamers exhibit higher affinity for the Runt domain than that for RDE and possess the 5'-GCGMGNN-3' and 5'-N'N'CCAC-3' conserved motif (M: A or C; N and N' form Watson-Crick base pairs) that is important for Runt domain binding. In this study, to understand the structural basis of recognition of the Runt domain by the aptamer motif, the solution structure of a 22-mer RNA was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance. The motif contains the AH(+)-C mismatch and base triple and adopts an unusual backbone structure. Structural analysis of the aptamer motif indicated that the aptamer binds to the Runt domain by mimicking the RDE sequence and structure. Our data should enhance the understanding of the structural basis of DNA mimicry by RNA molecules.

  16. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-07-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5'-NNCCAC-3' and 5'-GCGMGN'N'-3' (M:A or C; N and N' form Watson-Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences.

  17. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring the Feasibility of a DNA Computer: Design of an ALU Using Sticker-Based DNA Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Mayukh; Ghosal, Prasun; Mohanty, Saraju P

    2017-09-01

    Since its inception, DNA computing has advanced to offer an extremely powerful, energy-efficient emerging technology for solving hard computational problems with its inherent massive parallelism and extremely high data density. This would be much more powerful and general purpose when combined with other existing well-known algorithmic solutions that exist for conventional computing architectures using a suitable ALU. Thus, a specifically designed DNA Arithmetic and Logic Unit (ALU) that can address operations suitable for both domains can mitigate the gap between these two. An ALU must be able to perform all possible logic operations, including NOT, OR, AND, XOR, NOR, NAND, and XNOR; compare, shift etc., integer and floating point arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division). In this paper, design of an ALU has been proposed using sticker-based DNA model with experimental feasibility analysis. Novelties of this paper may be in manifold. First, the integer arithmetic operations performed here are 2s complement arithmetic, and the floating point operations follow the IEEE 754 floating point format, resembling closely to a conventional ALU. Also, the output of each operation can be reused for any next operation. So any algorithm or program logic that users can think of can be implemented directly on the DNA computer without any modification. Second, once the basic operations of sticker model can be automated, the implementations proposed in this paper become highly suitable to design a fully automated ALU. Third, proposed approaches are easy to implement. Finally, these approaches can work on sufficiently large binary numbers.

  19. Rapid One-Step Selection Method for Generating Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Development of a DNA Aptamer against alpha-Bungarotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Lasse Holm; Shamaileh, Hadi A.; Edwards, Stacey L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nucleic acids based therapeutic approaches have gained significant interest in recent years towards the development of therapeutics against many diseases. Recently, research on aptamers led to the marketing of Macugen (R), an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF......) for the treatment of age related macular degeneration (AMD). Aptamer technology may prove useful as a therapeutic alternative against an array of human maladies. Considering the increased interest in aptamer technology globally that rival antibody mediated therapeutic approaches, a simplified selection, possibly...... in one-step, technique is required for developing aptamers in limited time period. Principal Findings: Herein, we present a simple one-step selection of DNA aptamers against alpha-bungarotoxin. A toxin immobilized glass coverslip was subjected to nucleic acid pool binding and extensive washing followed...

  20. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn C. Thomason

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion.

  1. Detecting single-abasic residues within a DNA strand immobilized in a biological nanopore using an integrated CMOS sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsuk; Maitra, Raj D; Pedrotti, Ken; Dunbar, William B

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the application of a novel current-measuring sensor (CMS) customized for nanopore applications. The low-noise CMS is fabricated in a 0.35μm CMOS process and is implemented in experiments involving DNA captured in an α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore. Specifically, the CMS is used to build a current amplitude map as a function of varying positions of a single-abasic residue within a homopolymer cytosine single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is captured and held in the pore. Each ssDNA is immobilized using a biotin-streptavidin linkage. Five different DNA templates are measured and compared: one all-cytosine ssDNA, and four with a single-abasic residue substitution that resides in or near the ~1.5nm aperture of the α-HL channel when the strand is immobilized. The CMOS CMS is shown to resolves the ~5Å displacements of the abasic residue within the varying templates. The demonstration represents an advance in application-specific circuitry that is optimized for small-footprint nanopore applications, including genomic sequencing.

  2. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2016-09-13

    Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. Bacteriophage homologous recombination systems are widely used for in vivo genetic engineering in bacteria. Single- or double-stranded linear DNA substrates containing short flanking homologies to chromosome targets are used to generate precise and accurate genetic modifications when introduced into bacteria expressing phage recombinases. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these recombination systems will facilitate improvements in the technology. Here, two phage-specific systems are shown to require exposure of complementary single-strand homologous targets for efficient recombination; these single-strand regions may be created during DNA replication or by single-strand exonuclease digestion of linear duplex DNA. Previously, in vitro studies reported that these recombinases promote the single-strand annealing of two complementary DNAs and also strand invasion of a single DNA strand into duplex DNA to create a three-stranded region. Here, in vivo experiments show that recombinase-mediated annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA is the predominant recombination pathway in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Thomason et al.

  3. Dog Days on the Plains : A Preliminary aDNA Analysis of Canid Bones from Southern Alberta and Saskatchewan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholdy, B.P.; Murchie, T.J.; Hacking, K.; Verwoerd, C.

    2017-01-01

    Dogs were an important component of lifeways on the Northern Plains until the reintroduction of the horse following European contact. There has been little investigation into the variability of domesticcanids on the Prairies and the potential of that variability as a proxy for identifying

  4. Ebola Vaccination Using a DNA Vaccine Coated on PLGA-PLL/γPGA Nanoparticles Administered Using a Microneedle Patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Ye, Ling; Guo, Xin Dong; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    Ebola DNA vaccine is incorporated into PLGA-PLL/γPGA nanoparticles and administered to skin using a microneedle (MN) patch. The nanoparticle delivery system increases vaccine thermostability and immunogenicity compared to free vaccine. Vaccination by MN patch produces stronger immune responses than intramuscular administration. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Spontaneous germline excision of Tol1, a DNA-based transposable element naturally occurring in the medaka fish genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Koga, Hajime; Nakamura, Kodai; Fujita, Akiko; Hattori, Akimasa; Matsuda, Masaru; Koga, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    DNA-based transposable elements are ubiquitous constituents of eukaryotic genomes. Vertebrates are, however, exceptional in that most of their DNA-based elements appear to be inactivated. The Tol1 element of the medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, is one of the few elements for which copies containing an undamaged gene have been found. Spontaneous transposition of this element in somatic cells has previously been demonstrated, but there is only indirect evidence for its germline transposition. Here, we show direct evidence of spontaneous excision in the germline. Tyrosinase is the key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. In an albino laboratory strain of medaka fish, which is homozygous for a mutant tyrosinase gene in which a Tol1 copy is inserted, we identified de novo reversion mutations related to melanin pigmentation. The gamete-based reversion rate was as high as 0.4%. The revertant fish carried the tyrosinase gene from which the Tol1 copy had been excised. We previously reported the germline transposition of Tol2, another DNA-based element that is thought to be a recent invader of the medaka fish genome. Tol1 is an ancient resident of the genome. Our results indicate that even an old element can contribute to genetic variation in the host genome as a natural mutator.

  6. A DNA based method to detect the grapevine root-rotting fungus Roesleria subterranea in soil and root samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Neuhauser

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Roesleria subterranea causes root rot in grapevine and fruit trees. The fungus has long been underestimated as a weak parasite, but during the last years it has been reported to cause severe damages in German vineyards. Direct, observation-based detection of the parasite is time consuming and destructive, as large parts of the rootstocks have to be uprooted and screened for the tiny, stipitate, hypogeous ascomata of R. subterranea. To facilitate rapid detection in vineyards, protocols to extract DNA from soil samples and grapevine roots, and R.-subterranea-specific PCR primers were designed. Twelve DNA-extraction protocols for soil samples were tested in small-scale experiments, and selected parameters were optimised. A protocol based on ball-mill homogenization, DNA extraction with SDS, skim milk, chloroform, and isopropanol, and subsequent purifi cation of the raw extracts with PVPP-spin-columns was most effective. This DNA extraction protocol was found to be suitable for a wide range of soil-types including clay, loam and humic-rich soils. For DNA extraction from grapevine roots a CTAB-based protocol was more reliable for various grapevine rootstock varieties. Roesleria-subterranea-specific primers for the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA region were developed and tested for their specifi city to DNA extracts from eleven R. subterranea strains isolated from grapevine and fruit trees. No cross reactions were detected with DNA extracts from 44 different species of fungi isolated from vineyard soils. The sensitivity of the species-specifi c primers in combination with the DNA extraction method for soil was high: as little as 100 fg μl-1 R.-subterranea-DNA was suffi cient for a detection in soil samples and plant material. Given that specifi c primers are available, the presented method will also allow quick and large-scale testing for other root pathogens.

  7. Bright Two-Photon Emission and Ultra-Fast Relaxation Dynamics in a DNA-Templated Nanocluster Investigated by Ultra-Fast Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Research Office (Materials program) and the National Science Foundation ( Polymer program) for support of this work. Reference (1) Mie, G. Beiträge...Quantum Effects in Optical Spectra. The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 1997, 101, 7885–7891. (6) Jin, R. Quantum sized, thiolate -protected gold...Physics Letters 1997, 266, 91–98. (13) Ackerson, C. J.; Jadzinsky, P. D.; Kornberg, R. D. Thiolate ligands for synthesis of water-soluble gold clusters

  8. A DNA Barcode-Based RPA Assay (BAR-RPA) for Rapid Identification of the Dry Root of Ficus hirta (Wuzhimaotao).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Enwei; Liu, Qianqian; Ye, Haoting; Li, Fang; Chao, Zhi

    2017-12-18

    Background: Wuzhimaotao (the dry root of Ficus hirta ) is used as both medicine and food ingredient by the locals in areas around Nanling Mountains of China. Due to its very similar external morphologies with Duanchangcao (the root of Gelsemium elegans , which contains gelsemine that is extremely neurotoxic) and the associated growth of these two plants, incidents of food poisoning and even death frequently occur, resulting from the misuse of Duanchangcao as Wuzhimaotao. The aim of this study is to develop a fast, even, on-spot approach to identification of Wuzhimaotao. Methods: We used DNA barcode-based recombinase polymerase amplification (BAR-RPA) with species-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rDNA of F. hirta. BAR-RPA reaction time and temperature were optimized and the specificity and sensitivity of BAR-RPA species-specific primers were assessed. Results: This technique showed a high specificity and sensitivity to amplify the genomic DNA of F. hirta and allowed for rapid amplification (within 15 min) of the ITS region under a constant and mild temperature range of 37-42 °C without using thermocyclers. Conclusions: The BAR-RPA assay with a fast DNA extraction protocol provides a simple, energy-saving, and rapid method for identification of Wuzhimaotao in both laboratory and field settings.

  9. In vivo excision of pyrimidine dimers is mediated by a DNA N-glycosylase in Micrococcus luteus but not in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Belle, M.; Linn, S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been previously shown that Micrococcus luteus possesses a pyrimidine dimer-specific endonuclease which in vitro, functions as both an endonuclease and DNA-glycosylase. To determine if these combined activities function in vivo, the excision products of UV-irradiated M. luteus were isolated and examined. In addition, a procedure was devised to isolate and examine the excision products from UV-irradiated human fibroblasts to determine if an endonuclease/glycosylase activity functions in the excision of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in human fibroblasts. It was shown that, in vivo, an endonuclease/glycosylase mechanism is utilized extensively in the repair of pyrimidine dimers by M. luteus, but that human fibroblasts do not appear to use this mechanism. (author)

  10. In vivo excision of pyrimidine dimers is mediated by a DNA N-glycosylase in Micrococcus luteus but not in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Belle, M; Linn, S [California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1982-09-01

    It has been previously shown that Micrococcus luteus possesses a pyrimidine dimer-specific endonuclease which in vitro, functions as both an endonuclease and DNA-glycosylase. To determine if these combined activities function in vivo, the excision products of UV-irradiated M. luteus were isolated and examined. In addition, a procedure was devised to isolate and examine the excision products from UV-irradiated human fibroblasts to determine if an endonuclease/glycosylase activity functions in the excision of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in human fibroblasts. It was shown that, in vivo, an endonuclease/glycosylase mechanism is utilized extensively in the repair of pyrimidine dimers by M. luteus, but that human fibroblasts do not appear to use this mechanism.

  11. Molecular Identification of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus, Scombridae Larvae and Development of a DNA Character-Based Identification Key for Mediterranean Scombrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Neils Puncher

    Full Text Available The Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is a commercially important species that has been severely over-exploited in the recent past. Although the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock is now showing signs of recovery, its current status remains very uncertain and as a consequence their recovery is dependent upon severe management informed by rigorous scientific research. Monitoring of early life history stages can inform decision makers about the health of the species based upon recruitment and survival rates. Misidentification of fish larvae and eggs can lead to inaccurate estimates of stock biomass and productivity which can trigger demands for increased quotas and unsound management conclusions. Herein we used a molecular approach employing mitochondrial and nuclear genes (CO1 and ITS1, respectively to identify larvae (n = 188 collected from three spawning areas in the Mediterranean Sea by different institutions working with a regional fisheries management organization. Several techniques were used to analyze the genetic sequences (sequence alignments using search algorithms, neighbour joining trees, and a genetic character-based identification key and an extensive comparison of the results is presented. During this process various inaccuracies in related publications and online databases were uncovered. Our results reveal important differences in the accuracy of the taxonomic identifications carried out by different ichthyoplanktologists following morphology-based methods. While less than half of larvae provided were bluefin tuna, other dominant taxa were bullet tuna (Auxis rochei, albacore (Thunnus alalunga and little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus. We advocate an expansion of expertise for a new generation of morphology-based taxonomists, increased dialogue between morphology-based and molecular taxonomists and increased scrutiny of public sequence databases.

  12. A DNA fragment from Xq21 replaces a deleted region containing the entire FVIII gene in a severe hemophilia A patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murru, S.; Casula, L.; Moi, P. [Insituto di Clinica e Biologia dell` Eta Evolutiva, Cagliari (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    In this paper the authors report the molecular characterization of a large deletion that removes the entire Factor VIII gene in a severe hemophilia A patient. Accurate DNA analysis of the breakpoint region revealed that a large DNA fragment replaced the 300-kb one, which was removed by the deletion. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the size of the inserted fragment is about 550 kb. In situ hybridization demonstrated that part of the inserted region normally maps to Xq21 and to the tip of the short arm of the Y chromosome (Yp). In this patient this locus is present both in Xq21 and in Xq28, in addition to the Yp, being thus duplicated in the X chromosome. Sequence analysis of the 3` breakpoint suggested that an illegitimate recombination is probably the cause of this complex rearrangement. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  13. The predominant WT1 isoform (+KTS) encodes a DNA-binding protein targeting the planar cell polarity gene Scribble in renal podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Julie; Rivera, Miguel N; Kim, Woo Jae; Starbuck, Kristen; Haber, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    WT1 encodes a tumor suppressor first identified by its inactivation in Wilms' Tumor. Although one WT1 splicing variant encodes a well-characterized zinc finger transcription factor, little is known about the function of the most prevalent WT1 isoform, whose DNA binding domain is disrupted by a three-amino acid (KTS) insertion. Using cells that conditionally express WT1(+KTS), we undertook a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and cloning analysis to identify candidate WT1(+KTS)-regulated promoters. We identified the planar cell polarity gene Scribble (SCRB) as the first WT1(+KTS) target gene in podocytes of the kidney. WT1 and SCRB expression patterns overlap precisely in developing renal glomeruli of mice, and WT1(+KTS) binds to a 33-nucleotide region within the Scribble promoter in mouse and human cell lines and kidneys. Together, our results support a role for the predominant WT1(+KTS) isoform in transcriptional regulation and suggest a link between the WT1-dependent tumor suppressor pathway and a key component of the planar cell polarity pathway.

  14. The predominant WT1 isoform (+KTS) encodes a DNA binding protein targeting the planar cell polarity gene Scribble in renal podocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Julie; Rivera, Miguel N.; Kim, Woo Jae; Starbuck, Kristen; Haber, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    WT1 encodes a tumor suppressor, first identified by its inactivation in Wilms Tumor. While one WT1 splicing variant encodes a well-characterized zinc finger transcription factor, little is known about the function of the most prevalent WT1 isoform, whose DNA binding domain is disrupted by a three amino acid (KTS) insertion. Using cells which conditionally express WT1(+KTS), we undertook a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and cloning (ChIP-cloning) analysis to identify candidate WT1(+KTS) regulated promoters. We identified the planar cell polarity (PCP) gene Scribble (SCRB) as the first WT1(+KTS) target gene in podocytes of the kidney. WT1 and SCRB expression patterns overlap precisely in developing renal glomeruli of mice, and WT1(+KTS) binds to a 33 nucleotide region within the Scribble promoter in both mouse and human cell lines and kidneys. Together, our results support a role for the predominant WT1(+KTS) isoform in transcriptional regulation and suggest a link between the WT1-dependent tumor suppressor pathway and a key component of the planar cell polarity pathway. PMID:20571064

  15. Comparison of four species-delimitation methods applied to a DNA barcode data set of insect larvae for use in routine bioassessment for use in routine bioassessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species delimitation (grouping individuals into distinct taxonomic groups) is an essential part of evolutionary, conservation, and molecular ecology. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcodes, short fragments of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, are being used in environm...

  16. Building-Up of a DNA Barcode Library for True Bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera) of Germany Reveals Taxonomic Uncertainties and Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Michael J.; Hendrich, Lars; Küchler, Stefan M.; Deister, Fabian; Morinière, Jérome; Gossner, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years, DNA barcoding has become an efficient method for the identification of species. In the case of insects, most published DNA barcoding studies focus on species of the Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Hymenoptera and especially Lepidoptera. In this study we test the efficiency of DNA barcoding for true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera), an ecological and economical highly important as well as morphologically diverse insect taxon. As part of our study we analyzed DNA barcodes for 1742 specimens of 457 species, comprising 39 families of the Heteroptera. We found low nucleotide distances with a minimum pairwise K2P distance 2.2% were detected for 16 traditionally recognized and valid species. With a successful identification rate of 91.5% (418 species) our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of true bugs and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for true bugs in Germany and Central Europe as well. Our study also highlights the urgent necessity of taxonomic revisions for various taxa of the Heteroptera, with a special focus on various species of the Miridae. In this context we found evidence for on-going hybridization events within various taxonomically challenging genera (e.g. Nabis Latreille, 1802 (Nabidae), Lygus Hahn, 1833 (Miridae), Phytocoris Fallén, 1814 (Miridae)) as well as the putative existence of cryptic species (e.g. Aneurus avenius (Duffour, 1833) (Aradidae) or Orius niger (Wolff, 1811) (Anthocoridae)). PMID:25203616

  17. Design and performance testing of a DNA extraction assay for sensitive and reliable quantification of acetic acid bacteria directly in red wine using real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eLONGIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although strategies exist to prevent AAB contamination, the increased interest for wines with low sulfite addition leads to greater AAB spoilage. Hence there is a real need for a rapid, specific, sensitive and reliable method for detecting these spoilage bacteria. All these requirements are met by real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (or quantitative PCR; qPCR. Here, we compare existing methods of isolating DNA and their adaptation to a red wine matrix. Two different protocols for isolating DNA and three PCR mix compositions were tested to select the best method. The addition of insoluble polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP at 1% (v/v during DNA extraction using a protocol succeeded in eliminating PCR inhibitors from red wine. We developed a bacterial internal control which was efficient in avoiding false negative results due to decreases in the efficiency of DNA isolation and/or amplification. The specificity, linearity, repeatability and reproducibility of the method were evaluated. A standard curve was established for the enumeration of AAB inoculated into red wines. The limit of quantification in red wine was 3.7 log AAB/mL and about 2.8 log AAB/mL when the volume of the samples was increased from 1 mL to 10 mL. Thus the DNA extraction method developed in this paper allows sensitive and reliable AAB quantification without underestimation thanks to the presence of an internal control. Moreover, monitoring of both the AAB population and the amount of acetic acid in ethanol medium and red wine highlighted that a minimum about 6.0 log cells/mL of AAB is needed to significantly increase the production of acetic acid leading to spoilage.

  18. Evaluation of humoral and cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhao; Juan, Long; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of effective therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is finding a method for the specific inhibition of the inflammatory disease processes without the induction of generalized immunosuppression. Of note, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters that may restore immunological tolerance remains a high priority. pcDNA-CCOL2A1 is a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen(CCII). This vaccine was developed by our laboratory and has been shown to exhibit efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard" treatment, methotrexate (MTX). Here, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with anti-CII IgG antibodies, quantified the expression levels of Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, and performed flow cytometric analyses of different T-cell subsets, including Th1, Th2, Th17, Tc, Ts, Treg, and CD4(+)CD29(+)T cells to systemically evaluate humoral and cellular immune responses to pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal rats. Similar to our observations at maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, vaccination of normal rats with 300 μg/kg pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine did not induce the production of anti-CII IgG. Furthermore, no significant changes were observed in the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12(IL-23p40), monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in vaccinated normal rats relative to that in controls(P > 0.05). However, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were significantly increased on days 10 and 14, while interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were significantly decreased on days 28 and 35 after vaccination(P 0.05), with the exception of Treg cells, which were significantly reduced on days 14 and 21 after vaccination (P < 0.05), and CD4(+)CD29(+)T cells, which were significantly increased on days 7 and 14 after vaccination(P < 0.05).Taken together, these results suggested that pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine did not markedly affect the balance of immune system components in vaccinated normal rats, indicating that this DNA vaccine may have clinical applications in the treatment of RA.

  19. Ultraviolet radiation-induced interleukin 6 release in HeLa cells is mediated via membrane events in a DNA damage-independent way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulms, D; Pöppelmann, B; Schwarz, T

    2000-05-19

    Evidence exists that ultraviolet radiation (UV) affects molecular targets in the nucleus or at the cell membrane. UV-induced apoptosis was found to be mediated via DNA damage and activation of death receptors, suggesting that nuclear and membrane effects are not mutually exclusive. To determine whether participation of nuclear and membrane components is also essential for other UV responses, we studied the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by UV. Exposing HeLa cells to UV at 4 degrees C, which inhibits activation of surface receptors, almost completely prevented IL-6 release. Enhanced repair of UV-mediated DNA damage by addition of the DNA repair enzyme photolyase did not affect UV-induced IL-6 production, suggesting that in this case membrane events predominant over nuclear effects. UV-induced IL-6 release is mediated via NFkappaB since the NFkappaB inhibitor MG132 or transfection of cells with a super-repressor form of the NFkappaB inhibitor IkappaB reduced IL-6 release. Transfection with a dominant negative mutant of the signaling protein TRAF-2 reduced IL-6 release upon exposure to UV, indicating that UV-induced IL-6 release is mediated by activation of the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1. These data demonstrate that UV can exert biological effects mainly by affecting cell surface receptors and that this is independent of its ability to induce nuclear DNA damage.

  20. Use of LH-PCR as a DNA fingerprint technique to trace sediment-associated microbial communities from various land uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe-Strack, J. A.; Petticrew, E. L.

    2012-04-01

    The search for new techniques to effectively and efficiently trace sediment from its source along catchment pathways continues, with a range of new methods being developed and tested annually. A relatively recent approach marries genetic techniques to sediment analysis in order to characterize and differentiate the bacterial populations associated with soil and/or sediment originating from specific locations. Here we present the preliminary results of DNA fingerprint profiles of soil and sediment-associated bacterial communities in and around two different industrial land uses in the central interior of British Columbia, a feedlot and a copper/gold mining site. We assessed the naturally varying 16S rDNA gene using amplicon length heterogeneity-polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR). Statistical differences between bacterial community profiles were investigated using a suite of methods of which non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) and indicator species analysis (ISA) were the most useful. Stronger statistical results were observed for the feedlot data set with spatial differences observed from the source location and within the adjacent creek. Results from the mine site were more difficult to assess although responses were detected in downstream waterways. While bacterial DNA fingerprinting of soil and sediment appears to be a promising tracing technique issues of scale and transferability may limit its use. Lessons learned from this preliminary study will be presented.

  1. Targeting Herpes Simplex Virus-1 gD by a DNA Aptamer Can Be an Effective New Strategy to Curb Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejabhiram Yadavalli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 is an important factor for vision loss in developed countries. A challenging aspect of the ocular infection by HSV-1 is that common treatments, such as acyclovir, fail to provide effective topical remedies. Furthermore, it is not very clear whether the viral glycoproteins, required for HSV-1 entry into the host, can be targeted for an effective therapy against ocular herpes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that HSV-1 envelope glycoprotein gD, which is essential for viral entry and spread, can be specifically targeted by topical applications of a small DNA aptamer to effectively control ocular infection by the virus. Our 45-nt-long DNA aptamer showed high affinity for HSV-1 gD (binding affinity constant [Kd] = 50 nM, which is strong enough to disrupt the binding of gD to its cognate host receptors. Our studies showed significant restriction of viral entry and replication in both in vitro and ex vivo studies. In vivo experiments in mice also resulted in loss of ocular infection under prophylactic treatment and statistically significant lower infection under therapeutic modality compared to random DNA controls. Thus, our studies validate the possibility that targeting HSV-1 entry glycoproteins, such as gD, can locally reduce the spread of infection and define a novel DNA aptamer-based approach to control HSV-1 infection of the eye.

  2. Evaluation of a DNA-based method for spice/herb authentication, so you do not have to worry about what is in your curry, buon appetito!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Ounjai, Sarawut; Osathanunkul, Rossarin; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    It is long believed that some spices may help protect against certain chronic conditions. Spices are usually parts of plants that have been powdered into small pieces. Have you ever wondered what the curry powder in your dish is made of? The aim of this work was to develop an appropriate DNA-based method for assessment of spice identity. Selecting the best marker for species recognition in the Zingiberaceae family. Six DNA regions were investigated in silico, including ITS, matK, rbcL, rpoC, trnH-psbA and trnL. Then, only four regions (ITS, matK, rbcL and trnH-psbA) were included in the simulated HRM (High-resolution Melting) analysis as the results from previous analysis showed that rpoC and trnL may not be suitable to be used to identify Zingiberaceae species in HRM analysis based on both the percentage of nucleotide variation and GC content. Simulated HRM analysis was performed to test the feasibility of Bar-HRM. We found that ITS2 is the most effective region to be used for identification of the studied species and thus was used in laboratory HRM analysis. All seven tested Zingiberaceae plants were then able to be distinguished using the ITS2 primers in laboratory HRM. Most importantly the melting curves gained from fresh and dried tissue overlapped, which is a crucial outcome for the applicability of the analysis. The method could be used in an authentication test for dried products. In the authentication test, only one of seven store-sold Zingiberaceae products that were tested contained the species listed on their labels, while we found substitution/contamination of the tested purchased products in the rest.

  3. A DNA Barcode-Based RPA Assay (BAR-RPA for Rapid Identification of the Dry Root of Ficus hirta (Wuzhimaotao

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enwei Tian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wuzhimaotao (the dry root of Ficus hirta is used as both medicine and food ingredient by the locals in areas around Nanling Mountains of China. Due to its very similar external morphologies with Duanchangcao (the root of Gelsemium elegans, which contains gelsemine that is extremely neurotoxic and the associated growth of these two plants, incidents of food poisoning and even death frequently occur, resulting from the misuse of Duanchangcao as Wuzhimaotao. The aim of this study is to develop a fast, even, on-spot approach to identification of Wuzhimaotao. Methods: We used DNA barcode-based recombinase polymerase amplification (BAR-RPA with species–specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of the rDNA of F. hirta. BAR-RPA reaction time and temperature were optimized and the specificity and sensitivity of BAR-RPA species–specific primers were assessed. Results: This technique showed a high specificity and sensitivity to amplify the genomic DNA of F. hirta and allowed for rapid amplification (within 15 min of the ITS region under a constant and mild temperature range of 37–42 °C without using thermocyclers. Conclusions: The BAR-RPA assay with a fast DNA extraction protocol provides a simple, energy-saving, and rapid method for identification of Wuzhimaotao in both laboratory and field settings.

  4. Excited-State Dynamics of a DNA Duplex in a Deep Eutectic Solvent Probed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Harpe, Kimberly; Kohl, Forrest R; Zhang, Yuyuan; Kohler, Bern

    2018-03-08

    To better understand how the solvent influences excited-state deactivation in DNA strands, femtosecond time-resolved IR (fs-TRIR) pump-probe measurements were performed on a d(AT) 9 ·d(AT) 9 duplex dissolved in a deep eutectic solvent (DES) made from choline chloride and ethylene glycol in a 1:2 mol ratio. This solvent, known as ethaline, is a member of a class of ionic liquids capable of solubilizing DNA with minimal disruption to its secondary structure. UV melting analysis reveals that the duplex studied here melts at 18 °C in ethaline compared to 50 °C in aqueous solution. Ethaline has an excellent transparency window that facilitates TRIR measurements in the double-bond stretching region. Transient spectra recorded in deuterated ethaline at room temperature indicate that photoinduced intrastrand charge transfer occurs from A to T, yielding the same exciplex state previously detected in aqueous solution. This state decays via charge recombination with a lifetime of 380 ± 10 ps compared to the 300 ± 10 ps lifetime measured earlier in D 2 O solution. The TRIR data strongly suggest that the long-lived exciplex forms exclusively in the solvated duplex, and not in the denatured single strands, which appear to have little, if any, base stacking. The longer lifetime of the exciplex state in the DES compared to aqueous solution is suggested to arise from reduced stabilization of the charge transfer state, resulting in slower charge recombination on account of Marcus inverted behavior.

  5. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Didier J; Hain, Karolina O; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies.

  6. Application of a DNA-based luminescence switch-on method for the detection of mercury(II) ions in water samples from Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Zhang; Leung, Ka-Ho; Fu, Wai-Chung; Shiu-Hin Chan, Daniel; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic environmental contaminant that damages the endocrine and central nervous systems. In view of the contamination of Hong Kong territorial waters with anthropogenic pollutants such as trace heavy metals, we have investigated the application of our recently developed DNA-based luminescence methodology for the rapid and sensitive detection of mercury(II) ions in real water samples. The assay was applied to water samples from Shing Mun River, Nam Sang Wai and Lamma Island sea water, representing natural river, wetland and sea water media, respectively. The results showed that the system could function effectively in real water samples under conditions of low turbidity and low metal ion concentrations. However, high turbidity and high metal ion concentrations increased the background signal and reduced the performance of this assay.

  7. Exploring the Structure of a DNA Hairpin with the Help of NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants: An Experimental and Quantum Chemical Investigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Vacek, Jaroslav; Hobza, Pavel; Žídek, L.; Sklenář, V.; Cremer, D.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 106, - (2002), s. 10242-10250 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : DNA * help of NMR spin-spin coupling constants * quantum chemical investigation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.765, year: 2002

  8. The RecJ2 protein in the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum is a 3'-5' exonuclease that associates with a DNA replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Hiromi; Ishino, Sonoko; Kohda, Daisuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2017-05-12

    RecJ/cell division cycle 45 (Cdc45) proteins are widely conserved in the three domains of life, i.e. in bacteria, Eukarya, and Archaea. Bacterial RecJ is a 5'-3' exonuclease and functions in DNA repair pathways by using its 5'-3' exonuclease activity. Eukaryotic Cdc45 has no identified enzymatic activity but participates in the CMG complex, so named because it is composed of Cdc45, minichromosome maintenance protein complex (MCM) proteins 2-7, and GINS complex proteins (Sld5, Psf11-3). Eukaryotic Cdc45 and bacterial/archaeal RecJ share similar amino acid sequences and are considered functional counterparts. In Archaea, a RecJ homolog in Thermococcus kodakarensis was shown to associate with GINS and accelerate its nuclease activity and was, therefore, designated GAN ( G INS- a ssociated n uclease); however, to date, no archaeal RecJ·MCM·GINS complex has been isolated. The thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum has two RecJ-like proteins, designated TaRecJ1 and TaRecJ2. TaRecJ1 exhibited DNA-specific 5'-3' exonuclease activity, whereas TaRecJ2 had 3'-5' exonuclease activity and preferred RNA over DNA. TaRecJ2, but not TaRecJ1, formed a stable complex with TaGINS in a 2:1 molar ratio. Furthermore, the TaRecJ2·TaGINS complex stimulated activity of TaMCM ( T. acidophilum MCM) helicase in vitro , and the TaRecJ2·TaMCM·TaGINS complex was also observed in vivo However, TaRecJ2 did not interact with TaMCM directly and was not required for the helicase activation in vitro These findings suggest that the function of archaeal RecJ in DNA replication evolved divergently from Cdc45 despite conservation of the CMG-like complex formation between Archaea and Eukarya. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Opening the treasure chest: A DNA-barcoding primer set for most higher taxa of Central European birds and mammals from museum collections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Schäffer

    Full Text Available DNA-barcoding is a rapidly developing method for efficiently identifying samples to species level by means of short standard DNA sequences. However, reliable species assignment requires the availability of a comprehensive DNA barcode reference library, and hence numerous initiatives aim at generating such barcode databases for particular taxa or geographic regions. Historical museum collections represent a potentially invaluable source for the DNA-barcoding of many taxa. This is particularly true for birds and mammals, for which collecting fresh (voucher material is often very difficult to (nearly impossible due to the special animal welfare and conservation regulations that apply to vertebrates in general, and birds and mammals in particular. Moreover, even great efforts might not guarantee sufficiently complete sampling of fresh material in a short period of time. DNA extracted from historical samples is usually degraded, such that only short fragments can be amplified, rendering the recovery of the barcoding region as a single fragment impossible. Here, we present a new set of primers that allows the efficient amplification and sequencing of the entire barcoding region in most higher taxa of Central European birds and mammals in six overlapping fragments, thus greatly increasing the value of historical museum collections for generating DNA barcode reference libraries. Applying our new primer set in recently established NGS protocols promises to further increase the efficiency of barcoding old bird and mammal specimens.

  10. Utilization of a DNA enzyme immunoassay for the detection of proviral DNA of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zella, D; Cavicchini, A; Cattaneo, E; Cimarelli, A; Bertazzoni, U

    1995-02-01

    The detection of proviral DNA by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is regarded as an important tool in the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection, specially among adults at risk of AIDS and children born to seropositive mothers. However, application of PCR in routine testing is hampered by the need to use radioactive probes. In this study, a non-radioactive test based on a microtiter plate (DNA Enzyme ImmunoAssay, DEIA) was used for the detection of proviral sequences of HIV-1 in peripheral blood cells of different patients. The results of the PCR-DEIA assay were compared to those obtained by liquid hybridization (PCR-LH), virus isolation (VI) and Western blot (WB). The study population included 92 patients belonging to three different groups: seropositive subjects with a well-defined clinical status and WB profile; adults at risk of infection with negative or indeterminate WB; children born to seropositive mothers with still unestablished HIV-1 infection. In the seropositive subjects, both PCR-LH and PCR-DEIA confirmed infection and gave the same results as WB. In adults at risk of infection, PCR with both methods anticipated the seroconversion in one patient with indeterminate WB and confirmed the absence of infection among seronegative and other indeterminate patients. In children born to seropositive mothers, both PCR systems as well as VI permitted an early diagnosis of infection, as confirmed by the clinical follow-up. This study has shown that in subjects at risk of AIDS and in children born to seropositive mothers, the non-isotopic DEIA method presents the same sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HIV-1 infection as the radioactive procedure. The DEIA method appears to be particularly useful for the detection of PCR products in routine diagnostic analyses.

  11. Modular Nuclease-Responsive DNA Three-Way Junction-Based Dynamic Assembly of a DNA Device and Its Sensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2016-04-05

    Here, we explored a modular strategy for rational design of nuclease-responsive three-way junctions (TWJs) and fabricated a dynamic DNA device in a "plug-and-play" fashion. First, inactivated TWJs were designed, which contained three functional domains: the inaccessible toehold and branch migration domains, the specific sites of nucleases, and the auxiliary complementary sequence. The actions of different nucleases on their specific sites in TWJs caused the close proximity of the same toehold and branch migration domains, resulting in the activation of the TWJs and the formation of a universal trigger for the subsequent dynamic assembly. Second, two hairpins (H1 and H2) were introduced, which could coexist in a metastable state, initially to act as the components for the dynamic assembly. Once the trigger initiated the opening of H1 via TWJs-driven strand displacement, the cascade hybridization of hairpins immediately switched on, resulting in the formation of the concatemers of H1/H2 complex appending numerous integrated G-quadruplexes, which were used to obtain label-free signal readout. The inherent modularity of this design allowed us to fabricate a flexible DNA dynamic device and detect multiple nucleases through altering the recognition pattern slightly. Taking uracil-DNA glycosylase and CpG methyltransferase M.SssI as models, we successfully realized the butt joint between the uracil-DNA glycosylase and M.SssI recognition events and the dynamic assembly process. Furthermore, we achieved ultrasensitive assay of nuclease activity and the inhibitor screening. The DNA device proposed here will offer an adaptive and flexible tool for clinical diagnosis and anticancer drug discovery.

  12. Genome-wide Anaplasma phagocytophilum AnkA-DNA interactions are enriched in intergenic regions and gene promoters and correlate with infection-induced differential gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Stephen Dumler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular prokaryote, infects neutrophils and alters cardinal functions via reprogrammed transcription. Large contiguous regions of neutrophil chromosomes are differentially expressed during infection. Secreted A. phagocytophilum effector AnkA transits into the neutrophil or granulocyte nucleus to complex with DNA in heterochromatin across all chromosomes. AnkA binds to gene promoters to dampen cis-transcription and also has features of matrix attachment region (MAR-binding proteins that regulate three-dimensional chromatin architecture and coordinate transcriptional programs encoded in topologically-associated chromatin domains. We hypothesize that identification of additional AnkA binding sites will better delineate how A. phagocytophilum infection results in reprogramming of the neutrophil genome. Using AnkA-binding ChIP-seq, we showed that AnkA binds broadly throughout all chromosomes in a reproducible pattern, especially at: i intergenic regions predicted to be matrix attachment regions (MARs; ii within predicted lamina-associated domains; and iii at promoters ≤3,000 bp upstream of transcriptional start sites. These findings provide genome-wide support for AnkA as a regulator of cis-gene transcription. Moreover, the dominant mark of AnkA in distal intergenic regions known to be AT-enriched, coupled with frequent enrichment in the nuclear lamina, provides strong support for its role as a MAR-binding protein and genome re-organizer. AnkA must be considered a prime candidate to promote neutrophil reprogramming and subsequent functional changes that belie improved microbial fitness and pathogenicity.

  13. A DNA Microarray Analysis of Chemokine and Receptor Genes in the Rat Dental Follicle – Role of Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein-1 in Osteoclastogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dawen; Wise, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    The dental follicle, a loose connective tissue sac that surrounds the unerupted tooth, appears to regulate the osteoclastogenesis needed for eruption; i.e., bone resorption to form an eruption pathway. Thus, DNA microarray studies were conducted to determine which chemokines and their receptors were expressed chronologically in the dental follicle, chemokines that might attract osteoclast precursors. In the rat first mandibular molar, a major burst of osteoclastogenesis occurs at day 3 with a minor burst at day 10. The results of the microarray confirmed our previous studies showing the gene expression of molecules such as CSF-1 and MCP-1 in the dental follicle cells. Other new genes also were detected, including secreted frizzled-related protein-1 (SFRP-1), which was found to be down-regulated at days 3 and 9. Using rat bone marrow cultures to conduct in vitro osteoclastogenic assays, it was demonstrated that SFRP-1 inhibited osteoclast formation in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, with increasing concentrations of SFRP-1, the number of TRAP-positive mononuclear cells increased suggesting that SFRP-1 inhibits osteoclast formation by inhibiting the fusion of mononuclear cells (osteoclast precursors). Co-culturing bone marrow mononuclear cells and dental follicle cells demonstrated that the dental follicle cells were secreting a product(s) that inhibited osteoclastogenesis, as measured by counting of TRAP-positive osteoclasts. Adding an antibody either to SFRP-1 or OPG partially restored osteoclastogenesis. Adding both anti-SFRP-1 and anti-OPG fully negated the inhibitory effect of the follicle cells upon osteoclastogenesis. These results strongly suggest that SFRP-1 and OPG, both secreted by the dental follicle cells, use different pathways to exert their inhibitory effect on osteoclastogenesis. Based on these in vitro studies of osteoclastogenesis, it is likely that the down-regulation of SFRP-1 gene expression in the dental follicle at days 3 and 9 is a contributory factor in allowing the major and minor bursts of osteoclastogenesis to occur. Thus, inhibition of SFRP-1 gene expression in combination with inhibition of OPG gene expression likely are critical events in enabling alveolar bone resorption to occur such that teeth will erupt. PMID:17540629

  14. Bifidobacterium breve B-3 exerts metabolic syndrome-suppressing effects in the liver of diet-induced obese mice: a DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, S; Kamei, A; Xiao, J Z; Iwatsuki, K; Abe, K

    2013-09-01

    We previously reported that supplementation with Bifidobacterium breve B-3 reduced body weight gain and accumulation of visceral fat in a dose-dependent manner, and improved serum levels of total cholesterol, glucose and insulin in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. In this study, we investigated the expression of genes in the liver using DNA microarray analysis and q-PCR to reveal the mechanism of these anti-obesity effects in this mouse model. Administration of B. breve B-3 led to regulated gene expression of pathways involved in lipid metabolism and response to stress. The results indicate that these regulations in the liver are related to the anti-metabolic syndrome effects of B. breve B-3.

  15. A polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine induces heterologous immunity and protects pigs against pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Mette Sif

    2013-01-01

    seasonal and emerging influenza viruses. We have developed an alternative influenza vaccine based on DNA expressing selected influenza proteins of pandemic and seasonal origin. In the current study, we investigated the protection of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in pigs. We immunised pigs...... intradermally with a combination of influenza DNA vaccine components based on the pandemic 1918 H1N1 (M and NP genes), pandemic 2009 H1N1pdm09 (HA and NA genes) and seasonal 2005 H3N2 genes (HA and NA genes) and investigated the protection against infection with virus both homologous and heterologous to the DNA...... of this DNA vaccine to limit virus shedding may have an impact on virus spread among pigs which could possibly extend to humans as well, thereby diminishing the risk for epidemics and pandemics to evolve....

  16. Molecular forensics in avian conservation: a DNA-based approach for identifying mammalian predators of ground-nesting birds and eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopken, Matthew W; Orning, Elizabeth K; Young, Julie K; Piaggio, Antoinette J

    2016-01-07

    The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a ground-nesting bird from the Northern Rocky Mountains and a species at risk of extinction in in multiple U.S. states and Canada. Herein we report results from a proof of concept that mitochondrial and nuclear DNAs from mammalian predator saliva could be non-invasively collected from depredated greater sage-grouse eggshells and carcasses and used for predator species identification. Molecular forensic approaches have been applied to identify predators from depredated remains as one strategy to better understand predator-prey dynamics and guide management strategies. This can aid conservation efforts by correctly identifying predators most likely to impact threatened and endangered species. DNA isolated from non-invasive samples around nesting sites (e.g. fecal or hair samples) is one method that can increase the success and accuracy of predator species identification when compared to relying on nest remains alone. Predator saliva DNA was collected from depredated eggshells and carcasses using swabs. We sequenced two partial fragments of two mitochondrial genes and obtained microsatellite genotypes using canid specific primers for species and individual identification, respectively. Using this multilocus approach we were able to identify predators, at least down to family, from 11 out of 14 nests (79%) and three out of seven carcasses (47%). Predators detected most frequently were canids (86%), while other taxa included rodents, a striped skunk, and cattle. We attempted to match the genotypes of individual coyotes obtained from eggshells and carcasses with those obtained from fecal samples and coyotes collected in the areas, but no genotype matches were found. Predation is a main cause of nest failure in ground-nesting birds and can impact reproduction and recruitment. To inform predator management for ground-nesting bird conservation, accurate identification of predator species is necessary. Considering predation can have a high impact on recruitment, predation events are very difficult to observe, and predator species are difficult to identify visually from nest remains, molecular approaches that reduce the need to observe or handle animals offer an additional tool to better understand predator-prey dynamics at nesting sites.

  17. A DNA biosensor based on gold nanoparticle decorated on carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gender determination of Arowana fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedfar, Kasra; Heng, Lee Yook; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2017-12-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified to design a new DNA biosensor. Functionalized MWCNTs were equipped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) (~15nm) (GNP-MWCNTCOOH) to construct DNA biosensors based on carbon-paste screen-printed (SPE) electrodes. GNP attachment onto functionalized MWCNTs was carried out by microwave irradiation and was confirmed by spectroscopic studies and surface analysis. DNA biosensors based on differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were constructed by immobilizing thiolated single-stranded DNA probes onto GNP-MWCNTCOOH. Ruthenium (III) chloride hexaammoniate [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ,2Cl - ] (RuHex) was used as hybridization redox indicator. RuHex and MWCNT interaction was low in compared to other organic redox hybridization indicators. The linear response range for DNA determination was 1×10 -21 to 1×10 -9 M with a lower detection limit of 1.55×10 -21 M. Thus, the attachment of GNPs onto functionalized MWCNTs yielded sensitive DNA biosensor with low detection limit and stability more than 30days. Constructed electrode was used to determine gender of arowana fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Activity of levofloxacin alone and in combination with a DnaK inhibitor against gram-negative rods, including levofloxacin-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2009-02-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of > or =4 microg/ml).

  19. Activity of Levofloxacin Alone and in Combination with a DnaK Inhibitor against Gram-Negative Rods, Including Levofloxacin-Resistant Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml). PMID:19015359

  20. Protection of Rhesus Monkeys by a DNA Prime/Poxvirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Depends on Optimal DNA Priming and Inclusion of Blood Stage Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Walter R.; Kumar, Anita; Jiang, George; Williams, Jackie; Bostick, Anthony; Conteh, Solomon; Fryauff, David; Aguiar, Joao; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T.; Ulmer, Jeffery B.; Richie, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    Background We have previously described a four antigen malaria vaccine consisting of DNA plasmids boosted by recombinant poxviruses which protects a high percentage of rhesus monkeys against Plasmodium knowlesi (Pk) malaria. This is a multi-stage vaccine that includes two pre-erythrocytic antigens, PkCSP and PkSSP2(TRAP), and two erythrocytic antigens, PkAMA-1 and PkMSP-1(42kD). The present study reports three further experiments where we investigate the effects of DNA dose, timing, and formulation. We also compare vaccines utilizing only the pre-erythrocytic antigens with the four antigen vaccine. Methodology In three experiments, rhesus monkeys were immunized with malaria vaccines using DNA plasmid injections followed by boosting with poxvirus vaccine. A variety of parameters were tested, including formulation of DNA on poly-lactic co-glycolide (PLG) particles, varying the number of DNA injections and the amount of DNA, varying the interval between the last DNA injection to the poxvirus boost from 7 to 21 weeks, and using vaccines with from one to four malaria antigens. Monkeys were challenged with Pk sporozoites given iv 2 to 4 weeks after the poxvirus injection, and parasitemia was measured by daily Giemsa stained blood films. Immune responses in venous blood samples taken after each vaccine injection were measured by ELIspot production of interferon-γ, and by ELISA. Conclusions 1) the number of DNA injections, the formulation of the DNA plasmids, and the interval between the last DNA injection and the poxvirus injection are critical to vaccine efficacy. However, the total dose used for DNA priming is not as important; 2) the blood stage antigens PkAMA-1 and PkMSP-1 were able to protect against high parasitemias as part of a genetic vaccine where antigen folding is not well defined; 3) immunization with PkSSP2 DNA inhibited immune responses to PkCSP DNA even when vaccinations were given into separate legs; and 4) in a counter-intuitive result, higher interferon-γ ELIspot responses to the PkCSP antigen correlated with earlier appearance of parasites in the blood, despite the fact that PkCSP vaccines had a protective effect. PMID:17957247

  1. Toward a DNA taxonomy of Alpine Rhithrogena (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae using a mixed Yule-coalescent analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Vuataz

    Full Text Available Aquatic larvae of many Rhithrogena mayflies (Ephemeroptera inhabit sensitive Alpine environments. A number of species are on the IUCN Red List and many recognized species have restricted distributions and are of conservation interest. Despite their ecological and conservation importance, ambiguous morphological differences among closely related species suggest that the current taxonomy may not accurately reflect the evolutionary diversity of the group. Here we examined the species status of nearly 50% of European Rhithrogena diversity using a widespread sampling scheme of Alpine species that included 22 type localities, general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC model analysis of one standard mtDNA marker and one newly developed nDNA marker, and morphological identification where possible. Using sequences from 533 individuals from 144 sampling localities, we observed significant clustering of the mitochondrial (cox1 marker into 31 GMYC species. Twenty-one of these could be identified based on the presence of topotypes (expertly identified specimens from the species' type locality or unambiguous morphology. These results strongly suggest the presence of both cryptic diversity and taxonomic oversplitting in Rhithrogena. Significant clustering was not detected with protein-coding nuclear PEPCK, although nine GMYC species were congruent with well supported terminal clusters of nDNA. Lack of greater congruence in the two data sets may be the result of incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphism. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of both gene regions recovered four of the six recognized Rhithrogena species groups in our samples as monophyletic. Future development of more nuclear markers would facilitate multi-locus analysis of unresolved, closely related species pairs. The DNA taxonomy developed here lays the groundwork for a future revision of the important but cryptic Rhithrogena genus in Europe.

  2. A DNA probe combination for improved detection of MLL/11q23 breakpoints by double-color interphase-FISH in acute leukemias.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergh, A. von; Emanuel, B.; Zelderen-Bhola, S. van; Smetsers, A.F.C.M.; Soest, R. van; Stul, M.; Vranckx, H.; Schuuring, E.; Hagemeijer, A.; Kluin, P.

    2000-01-01

    Reciprocal translocations involving the MLL gene on chromosome band 11q23 have been observed in both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In AML, identification of MLL breakpoints is an important prognostic factor. Breakpoints are clustered in an 8 kb DNA fragment

  3. Simultaneous Detection of CDC Category "A" DNA and RNA Bioterrorism Agents by Use of Multiplex PCR & RT-PCR Enzyme Hybridization Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J. Henrickson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Assays to simultaneously detect multiple potential agents of bioterrorism are limited. Two multiplex PCR and RT-PCR enzyme hybridization assays (mPCR-EHA, mRT-PCR-EHA were developed to simultaneously detect many of the CDC category “A” bioterrorism agents. The “Bio T” DNA assay was developed to detect: Variola major (VM, Bacillus anthracis (BA, Yersinia pestis (YP, Francisella tularensis (FT and Varicella zoster virus (VZV. The “Bio T” RNA assay (mRT-PCR-EHA was developed to detect: Ebola virus (Ebola, Lassa fever virus (Lassa, Rift Valley fever (RVF, Hantavirus Sin Nombre species (HSN and dengue virus (serotypes 1-4. Sensitivity and specificity of the 2 assays were tested by using genomic DNA, recombinant plasmid positive controls, RNA transcripts controls, surrogate (spiked clinical samples and common respiratory pathogens. The analytical sensitivity (limit of detection (LOD of the DNA asssay for genomic DNA was 1×100~1×102 copies/mL for BA, FT and YP. The LOD for VZV whole organism was 1×10-2 TCID50/mL. The LOD for recombinant controls ranged from 1×102~1×103copies/mL for BA, FT, YP and VM. The RNA assay demonstrated LOD for RNA transcript controls of 1×104~1×106 copies/mL without extraction and 1×105~1×106 copies/mL with extraction for Ebola, RVF, Lassa and HSN. The LOD for dengue whole organisms was ~1×10-4 dilution for dengue 1 and 2, 1×104 LD50/mL and 1×102 LD50/mL for dengue 3 and 4. The LOD without extraction for recombinant plasmid DNA controls was ~1×103 copies/mL (1.5 input copies/reaction for Ebola, RVF, Lassa and HSN. No cross-reactivity of primers and probes used in both assays was detected with common respiratory pathogens or between targeted analytes. Clinical sensitivity was estimated using 264 surrogate clinical samples tested with the BioT DNA assay and 549 samples tested with the BioT RNA assay. The clinical specificity is 99.6% and 99.8% for BioT DNA assay and BioT RNA assay, respectively. The surrogate sensitivities of these two assays were 100% (95%CI 83-100 for FT, BA (pX02, YP, VM, VZV, dengue 2,3,4 and 95% (95%CI 75-100 for BA (pX01 and dengue 1 using spiked clinical specimens. The specificity of both BioT multiplex assays on spiked specimens was 100% (95% CI 99-100. Compared to other available assays (culture, serology, PCR, etc. both the BioT DNA mPCR-EHA and BioT RNA mRT-PCR-EHA are rapid, sensitive and specific assays for detecting many category “A” Bioterrorism agents using a standard thermocycler.

  4. Identification and characterization of PhbF: a DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Marco A S; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Rego, Fabiane G M; Souza, Emanuel M; Yates, Marshall G; Monteiro, Rose A; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Chubatsu, Leda S; Steffens, Maria B R

    2011-10-14

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta.

  5. Identification and characterization of PhbF: A DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrosa Fabio O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. Results In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Conclusions Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta.

  6. Construction of a DNA library representing 15q11-13 by subtraction of two flow sorted marker chromosome-specific libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, E.; Werelius, B.; Nordenskjoeld, M. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Constitutional extra {open_quotes}marker chromosomes{close_quotes} are found in {approx}0.5/1000 of newborns. Of these, 50% are inverted duplications of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15, including two variants; (1) inv dup(15)(pter{yields}q11:q11{yields}pter) and (2) inv dup(15) (pter{yields}q12-13::q12-13{yields}pter). Variant (1) is found in phenotypically normal individuals, whereas variant (2) will produce a typical clinical picture including mental retardation, autism, hyperactivity and discrete dysmorphic features. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using single copy probes from the Prader-Willi region confirms these observations as well as chromosome painting using a flow-sorted marker chromosome-specific library from a variant (1) marker, hybridized to the chromosomes of a patient with a variant (2) marker chromosome. Followingly, a flow-sorted biotinylated variant (1) library was subtracted from a non-labeled variant (2) library using magnetic beads and subsequent amplification by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). The successful result was demonstrated by using the amplified material for chromosome painting on chromosome slides from variant (1) and variant (2) patients. We have constructed a library from 15q11-13. This region contains genes producing a specific abnormal phenotype when found in a tri- or tetrasomic state. The region also contains the genes responsible for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes when the paternal/maternal copy is missing, respectively. It is therefore a region where parental imprinting plays an important role. The isolated library may be used to isolate single copy clones which will allow further investigations of this region.

  7. The effect of S-substitution at the O6-guanine site on the structure and dynamics of a DNA oligomer containing a G:T mismatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Ann Moore

    Full Text Available The effect of S-substitution on the O6 guanine site of a 13-mer DNA duplex containing a G:T mismatch is studied using molecular dynamics. The structure, dynamic evolution and hydration of the S-substituted duplex are compared with those of a normal duplex, a duplex with S-substitution on guanine, but no mismatch and a duplex with just a G:T mismatch. The S-substituted mismatch leads to cell death rather than repair. One suggestion is that the G:T mismatch recognition protein recognises the S-substituted mismatch (GS:T as G:T. This leads to a cycle of futile repair ending in DNA breakage and cell death. We find that some structural features of the helix are similar for the duplex with the G:T mismatch and that with the S-substituted mismatch, but differ from the normal duplex, notably the helical twist. These differences arise from the change in the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the base pair. However a marked feature of the S-substituted G:T mismatch duplex is a very large opening. This showed considerable variability. It is suggested that this enlarged opening would lend support to an alternative model of cell death in which the mismatch protein attaches to thioguanine and activates downstream damage-response pathways. Attack on the sulphur by reactive oxygen species, also leading to cell death, would also be aided by the large, variable opening.

  8. Evaluation of a DNA-based method for spice/herb authentication, so you do not have to worry about what is in your curry, buon appetito!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslin Osathanunkul

    Full Text Available It is long believed that some spices may help protect against certain chronic conditions. Spices are usually parts of plants that have been powdered into small pieces. Have you ever wondered what the curry powder in your dish is made of? The aim of this work was to develop an appropriate DNA-based method for assessment of spice identity. Selecting the best marker for species recognition in the Zingiberaceae family. Six DNA regions were investigated in silico, including ITS, matK, rbcL, rpoC, trnH-psbA and trnL. Then, only four regions (ITS, matK, rbcL and trnH-psbA were included in the simulated HRM (High-resolution Melting analysis as the results from previous analysis showed that rpoC and trnL may not be suitable to be used to identify Zingiberaceae species in HRM analysis based on both the percentage of nucleotide variation and GC content. Simulated HRM analysis was performed to test the feasibility of Bar-HRM. We found that ITS2 is the most effective region to be used for identification of the studied species and thus was used in laboratory HRM analysis. All seven tested Zingiberaceae plants were then able to be distinguished using the ITS2 primers in laboratory HRM. Most importantly the melting curves gained from fresh and dried tissue overlapped, which is a crucial outcome for the applicability of the analysis. The method could be used in an authentication test for dried products. In the authentication test, only one of seven store-sold Zingiberaceae products that were tested contained the species listed on their labels, while we found substitution/contamination of the tested purchased products in the rest.

  9. Miscoding properties of 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine, a DNA adduct derived from reaction with antitumor agent 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, Bo; Guliaev, Anton B.; Chenna, Ahmed; Singer, B.

    2003-03-05

    1,N{sup 6}-Ethanoadenine (EA) is an exocyclic adduct formed from DNA reaction with the antitumor agent, 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). To understand the role of this adduct in the mechanism of mutagenicity or carcinogenicity by BCNU, an oligonucleotide with a site-specific EA was synthesized using phosphoramidite chemistry. We now report the in vitro miscoding properties of EA in translesion DNA synthesis catalyzed by mammalian DNA polymerases (pols) {alpha}, {beta}, {eta} and {iota}. These data were also compared with those obtained for the structurally related exocyclic adduct, 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using a primer extension assay, both pols {alpha} and {beta} were primarily blocked by EA or {var_epsilon}A with very minor extension. Pol {eta} a member of the Y family of polymerases, was capable of catalyzing a significant amount of bypass across both adducts. Pol {eta} incorporated all four nucleotides opposite EA and {var_epsilon}A, but with differential preferences and mainly in an error-prone manner. Human pol {iota}, a paralog of human pol {eta}, was blocked by both adducts with a very small amount of synthesis past {var_epsilon}A. It incorporated C and, to a much lesser extent, T, opposite either adduct. In addition, the presence of an A adduct, e.g. {var_epsilon}A, could affect the specificity of pol {iota} toward the template T immediately 3 feet to the adduct. In conclusion, the four polymerases assayed on templates containing an EA or {var_epsilon}A showed differential bypass capacity and nucleotide incorporation specificity, with the two adducts not completely identical in influencing these properties. Although there was a measurable extent of error-free nucleotide incorporation, all these polymerases primarily misincorporated opposite EA, indicating that the adduct, similar to {var_epsilon}A, is a miscoding lesion.

  10. Zinc finger nuclease-mediated precision genome editing of an endogenous gene in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) using a DNA repair template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yidong; Patron, Nicola; Kay, Pippa; Wong, Debbie; Buchanan, Margaret; Cao, Ying-Ying; Sawbridge, Tim; Davies, John P; Mason, John; Webb, Steven R; Spangenberg, German; Ainley, William M; Walsh, Terence A; Hayden, Matthew J

    2018-05-07

    Sequence-specific nucleases have been used to engineer targeted genome modifications in various plants. While targeted gene knockouts resulting in loss of function have been reported with relatively high rates of success, targeted gene editing using an exogenously supplied DNA repair template and site-specific transgene integration has been more challenging. Here, we report the first application of zinc finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-directed editing of a native gene in allohexaploid bread wheat to introduce, via a supplied DNA repair template, a specific single amino acid change into the coding sequence of acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) to confer resistance to imidazolinone herbicides. We recovered edited wheat plants having the targeted amino acid modification in one or more AHAS homoalleles via direct selection for resistance to imazamox, an AHAS-inhibiting imidazolinone herbicide. Using a cotransformation strategy based on chemical selection for an exogenous marker, we achieved a 1.2% recovery rate of edited plants having the desired amino acid change and a 2.9% recovery of plants with targeted mutations at the AHAS locus resulting in a loss-of-function gene knockout. The latter results demonstrate a broadly applicable approach to introduce targeted modifications into native genes for nonselectable traits. All ZFN-mediated changes were faithfully transmitted to the next generation. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 sensitizes PC-3 prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by a DNA-PK-independent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajonk, Frank; Ophoven, Arndt van; Weissenberger, Christian; McBride, William H

    2005-01-01

    By modulating the expression levels of specific signal transduction molecules, the 26S proteasome plays a central role in determining cell cycle progression or arrest and cell survival or death in response to stress stimuli, including ionizing radiation. Inhibition of proteasome function by specific drugs results in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and radiosensitization of many cancer cell lines. This study investigates whether there is also a concomitant increase in cellular radiosensitivity if proteasome inhibition occurs only transiently before radiation. Further, since proteasome inhibition has been shown to activate caspase-3, which is involved in apoptosis, and caspase-3 can cleave DNA-PKcs, which is involved in DNA-double strand repair, the hypothesis was tested that caspase-3 activation was essential for both apoptosis and radiosensitization following proteasome inhibition. Prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells were treated with the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG-132. Cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, DNA-PKcs protein levels and DNA-PK activity were monitored. Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Inhibition of proteasome function caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis but this did not involve early activation of caspase-3. Short-time inhibition of proteasome function also caused radiosensitization but this did not involve a decrease in DNA-PKcs protein levels or DNA-PK activity. We conclude that caspase-dependent cleavage of DNA-PKcs during apoptosis does not contribute to the radiosensitizing effects of MG-132

  12. The ANGULATA7 gene encodes a DnaJ-like zinc finger-domain protein involved in chloroplast function and leaf development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Nortes, Tamara; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Ponce, María Rosa; Candela, Héctor; Micol, José Luis

    2017-03-01

    The characterization of mutants with altered leaf shape and pigmentation has previously allowed the identification of nuclear genes that encode plastid-localized proteins that perform essential functions in leaf growth and development. A large-scale screen previously allowed us to isolate ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants with small rosettes and pale green leaves with prominent marginal teeth, which were assigned to a phenotypic class that we dubbed Angulata. The molecular characterization of the 12 genes assigned to this phenotypic class should help us to advance our understanding of the still poorly understood relationship between chloroplast biogenesis and leaf morphogenesis. In this article, we report the phenotypic and molecular characterization of the angulata7-1 (anu7-1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which we found to be a hypomorphic allele of the EMB2737 gene, which was previously known only for its embryonic-lethal mutations. ANU7 encodes a plant-specific protein that contains a domain similar to the central cysteine-rich domain of DnaJ proteins. The observed genetic interaction of anu7-1 with a loss-of-function allele of GENOMES UNCOUPLED1 suggests that the anu7-1 mutation triggers a retrograde signal that leads to changes in the expression of many genes that normally function in the chloroplasts. Many such genes are expressed at higher levels in anu7-1 rosettes, with a significant overrepresentation of those required for the expression of plastid genome genes. Like in other mutants with altered expression of plastid-encoded genes, we found that anu7-1 exhibits defects in the arrangement of thylakoidal membranes, which appear locally unappressed. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A DNA and morphology based phylogenetic framework of the ant genus Lasius with hypotheses for the evolution of social parasitism and fungiculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stauffer Christian

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ants of the genus Lasius are ecologically important and an important system for evolutionary research. Progress in evolutionary research has been hindered by the lack of a well-founded phylogeny of the subgenera, with three previous attempts disagreeing. Here we employed two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 16S ribosomal RNA, comprising 1,265 bp, together with 64 morphological characters, to recover the phylogeny of Lasius by Bayesian and Maximum Parsimony inference after exploration of potential causes of phylogenetic distortion. We use the resulting framework to infer evolutionary pathways for social parasitism and fungiculture. Results We recovered two well supported major lineages. One includes Acanthomyops, Austrolasius, Chthonolasius, and Lasius pallitarsis, which we confirm to represent a seventh subgenus, the other clade contains Dendrolasius, and Lasius sensu stricto. The subgenus Cautolasius, displaying neither social parasitism nor fungiculture, probably belongs to the second clade, but its phylogenetic position is not resolved at the cutoff values of node support we apply. Possible causes for previous problems with reconstructing the Lasius phylogeny include use of other reconstruction techniques, possibly more prone to instabilities in some instances, and the inclusion of phylogenetically distorting characters. Conclusion By establishing an updated phylogenetic framework, our study provides the basis for a later formal taxonomic revision of subgenera and for studying the evolution of various ecologically and sociobiologically relevant traits of Lasius, although there is need for future studies to include nuclear genes and additional samples from the Nearctic. Both social parasitism and fungiculture evolved twice in Lasius, once in each major lineage, which opens up new opportunities for comparative analyses. The repeated evolution of social parasitism has been established for other groups of ants, though not for temporary social parasitism as found in Lasius. For fungiculture, the independent emergence twice in a monophyletic group marks a novel scenario in ants. We present alternative hypotheses for the evolution of both traits, with one of each involving loss of the trait. Though less likely for both traits than later evolution without reversal, we consider reversal as sufficiently plausible to merit independent testing.

  14. A DNA and morphology based phylogenetic framework of the ant genus Lasius with hypotheses for the evolution of social parasitism and fungiculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Munetoshi; Steiner, Florian M; Stauffer, Christian; Akino, Toshiharu; Crozier, Ross H; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C

    2008-08-19

    Ants of the genus Lasius are ecologically important and an important system for evolutionary research. Progress in evolutionary research has been hindered by the lack of a well-founded phylogeny of the subgenera, with three previous attempts disagreeing. Here we employed two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 16S ribosomal RNA), comprising 1,265 bp, together with 64 morphological characters, to recover the phylogeny of Lasius by Bayesian and Maximum Parsimony inference after exploration of potential causes of phylogenetic distortion. We use the resulting framework to infer evolutionary pathways for social parasitism and fungiculture. We recovered two well supported major lineages. One includes Acanthomyops, Austrolasius, Chthonolasius, and Lasius pallitarsis, which we confirm to represent a seventh subgenus, the other clade contains Dendrolasius, and Lasius sensu stricto. The subgenus Cautolasius, displaying neither social parasitism nor fungiculture, probably belongs to the second clade, but its phylogenetic position is not resolved at the cutoff values of node support we apply. Possible causes for previous problems with reconstructing the Lasius phylogeny include use of other reconstruction techniques, possibly more prone to instabilities in some instances, and the inclusion of phylogenetically distorting characters. By establishing an updated phylogenetic framework, our study provides the basis for a later formal taxonomic revision of subgenera and for studying the evolution of various ecologically and sociobiologically relevant traits of Lasius, although there is need for future studies to include nuclear genes and additional samples from the Nearctic. Both social parasitism and fungiculture evolved twice in Lasius, once in each major lineage, which opens up new opportunities for comparative analyses. The repeated evolution of social parasitism has been established for other groups of ants, though not for temporary social parasitism as found in Lasius. For fungiculture, the independent emergence twice in a monophyletic group marks a novel scenario in ants. We present alternative hypotheses for the evolution of both traits, with one of each involving loss of the trait. Though less likely for both traits than later evolution without reversal, we consider reversal as sufficiently plausible to merit independent testing.

  15. Recombinant Invasive Lactococcus lactis Carrying a DNA Vaccine Coding the Ag85A Antigen Increases INF-γ, IL-6, and TNF-α Cytokines after Intranasal Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Mancha-Agresti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major threat throughout the world and in 2015 it caused the death of 1.4 million people. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin is the only existing vaccine against this ancient disease; however, it does not provide complete protection in adults. New vaccines against TB are eminently a global priority. The use of bacteria as vehicles for delivery of vaccine plasmids is a promising vaccination strategy. In this study, we evaluated the use of, an engineered invasive Lactococcus lactis (expressing Fibronectin-Binding Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus for the delivery of DNA plasmid to host cells, especially to the mucosal site as a new DNA vaccine against tuberculosis. One of the major antigens documented that offers protective responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the Ag85A. L. lactis FnBPA+ (pValac:Ag85A which was obtained and used for intranasal immunization of C57BL/6 mice and the immune response profile was evaluated. In this study we observed that this strain was able to produce significant increases in the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the stimulated spleen cell supernatants, showing a systemic T helper 1 (Th1 cell response. Antibody production (IgG and sIgA anti-Ag85A was also significantly increased in bronchoalveolar lavage, as well as in the serum of mice. In summary, these findings open new perspectives in the area of mucosal DNA vaccine, against specific pathogens using a Lactic Acid Bacteria such as L. lactis.

  16. Leading-edge forensic DNA analyses and the necessity of including crime scene investigators, police officers and technicians in a DNA elimination database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Martine; Rogic, Anita; Bourgoin, Sarah; Jolicoeur, Christine; Séguin, Diane

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, sophisticated technology has significantly increased the sensitivity and analytical power of genetic analyses so that very little starting material may now produce viable genetic profiles. This sensitivity however, has also increased the risk of detecting unknown genetic profiles assumed to be that of the perpetrator, yet originate from extraneous sources such as from crime scene workers. These contaminants may mislead investigations, keeping criminal cases active and unresolved for long spans of time. Voluntary submission of DNA samples from crime scene workers is fairly low, therefore we have created a promotional method for our staff elimination database that has resulted in a significant increase in voluntary samples since 2011. Our database enforces privacy safeguards and allows for optional anonymity to all staff members. We also offer information sessions at various police precincts to advise crime scene workers of the importance and success of our staff elimination database. This study, a pioneer in its field, has obtained 327 voluntary submissions from crime scene workers to date, of which 46 individual profiles (14%) have been matched to 58 criminal cases. By implementing our methods and respect for individual privacy, forensic laboratories everywhere may see similar growth and success in explaining unidentified genetic profiles in stagnate criminal cases. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Archaeal DNA Polymerase-B as a DNA Template Guardian: Links between Polymerases and Base/Alternative Excision Repair Enzymes in Handling the Deaminated Bases Uracil and Hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Abellón-Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Archaea repair of uracil and hypoxanthine, which arise by deamination of cytosine and adenine, respectively, is initiated by three enzymes: Uracil-DNA-glycosylase (UDG, which recognises uracil; Endonuclease V (EndoV, which recognises hypoxanthine; and Endonuclease Q (EndoQ, (which recognises both uracil and hypoxanthine. Two archaeal DNA polymerases, Pol-B and Pol-D, are inhibited by deaminated bases in template strands, a feature unique to this domain. Thus the three repair enzymes and the two polymerases show overlapping specificity for uracil and hypoxanthine. Here it is demonstrated that binding of Pol-D to primer-templates containing deaminated bases inhibits the activity of UDG, EndoV, and EndoQ. Similarly Pol-B almost completely turns off EndoQ, extending earlier work that demonstrated that Pol-B reduces catalysis by UDG and EndoV. Pol-B was observed to be a more potent inhibitor of the enzymes compared to Pol-D. Although Pol-D is directly inhibited by template strand uracil, the presence of Pol-B further suppresses any residual activity of Pol-D, to near-zero levels. The results are compatible with Pol-D acting as the replicative polymerase and Pol-B functioning primarily as a guardian preventing deaminated base-induced DNA mutations.

  18. Mapping recessive ophthalmic diseases: linkage of the locus for Usher syndrome type II to a DNA marker on chromosome 1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R A; Otterud, B; Stauffer, D; Lalouel, J M; Leppert, M

    1990-06-01

    Usher syndrome is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders that combines variably severe congenital neurosensory hearing impairment with progressive night-blindness and visual loss similar to that in retinitis pigmentosa. Usher syndrome type I is distinguished by profound congenital (preverbal) deafness and retinal disease with onset in the first decade of life. Usher syndrome type II is characterized by partial hearing impairment and retinal dystrophy that occurs in late adolescence or early adulthood. The chromosomal assignment and the regional localization of the genetic mutation(s) causing the Usher syndromes are unknown. We analyzed a panel of polymorphic genomic markers for linkage to the disease gene among six families with Usher syndrome type I and 22 families with Usher syndrome type II. Significant linkage was established between Usher syndrome type II and the DNA marker locus THH33 (D1S81), which maps to chromosome 1q. The most likely location of the disease gene is at a map distance of 9 cM from THH33 (lod score 6.5). The same marker failed to show linkage in families segregating an allele for Usher syndrome type I. These data confirm the provisional assignment of the locus for Usher syndrome type II to the distal end of chromosome 1q and demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity between Usher types I and II is caused by mutational events at different genetic loci. Regional localization has the potential to improve carrier detection and to provide antenatal diagnosis in families at risk for the disease.

  19. Utilization of an Automated Pipetting System in the Cell Line-Based Screening of the Activity of a DNA-Damaging Anti-Tumour Drug

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchánková, Tereza; Ovesná, P.; Samadder, P.; Souček, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2014), s. 50-55 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : cell line screen * drug treatment * liquid handling station Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  20. Three-dimensional solution structure of a DNA duplex containing the BclI restriction sequence: Two-dimensional NMR studies, distance geometry calculations, and refinement by back-calculation of the NOESY spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, K.M.; Hare, D.R.; Reid, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional solution structure for the self-complementary dodecanucleotide [(d-GCCTGATCAGGC)] 2 has been determined by distance geometry with further refinements being performed after back-calculation of the NOESY spectrum. This DNA dodecamer contains the hexamer [d(TGATCA)] 2 recognized and cut by the restriction endonuclease BclI, and its structure was determined in hopes of obtaining a better understanding of the sequence-specific interactions which occur between proteins and DNA. Preliminary examination of the structure indicates the structure is underwound with respect to idealized B-form DNA though some of the local structural parameters (glycosyl torsion angle and pseudorotation angle) suggest a B-family type of structure is present. This research demonstrates the requirements (resonance assignments, interproton distance measurements, distance geometry calculations, and NOESY spectra back-calculation) to generate experimentally self-consistent solution structures for short DNA sequences

  1. NMR studies of the exocyclic 1,N6-ethenodeoxyadenosine adduct (εdA) opposite thymidine in a DNA duplex. Nonplanar alignment of εdA(anti) and dT(anti) at the lesion site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouchakdjian, M.; Patel, D.J.; Eisenberg, M.; Yarema, K.; Basu, A.; Essigmann, J.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional proton NMR studies are reported on the complementary d(C-A-T-G-T-G-T-A-C)·d(G-T-A-C-εA-C-A-T-G) nonanucleotide duplex (designated εdA·dT 9-mer duplex) containing 1,N 6 -ethenodeoxyadenosine (εdA), a carcinogen-DNA adduct, positioned opposite thymidine in the center of the helix. The authors NMR studies have focused on the conformation of the εdA·dT 9-mer duplex at neutral pH with emphasis on defining the alignment at the dT5·εdA14 lesion site. The through-space NOE distance connectivities establish that both dT5 and εdA14 adopt anti glycosidic torsion angles, are directed into the interior of the helix, and stack with flanking Watson-Crick dG4·dC15 and dG6·dC13 pairs. Furthermore, the d(G4-T5-G6)·d(C13-εA14-C15) trinucleotide segment centered about the dT5·εdA14 lesion site adopts a right-handed helical conformation in solution. Energy minimization computations were undertaken starting from six different alignments of dT5(anti) and εdA14(anti) at the lesion site and were guided by distance constraints defined by lower and upper bounds estimated from NOESY data sets on the εdA·dT 9-mer duplex. The NMR data are consistent with a nonplanar alignment of εdA14(anti) and dT5(anti) with dT5 displaced toward the flanking dG4·dC15 base pair within the d(G4-T5-G6)·d(C13-εA14-C15) segment of the εdA·dT 9-mer duplex

  2. A preliminary study of cross-amplified microsatellite loci using molted feathers from a near-threatened Painted Stork (Mycteria leucocephala) population of north India as a DNA source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bharat Bhushan; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Urfi, Abdul Jamil

    2017-11-21

    In continuation of an earlier study in which we reported the cross-amplification of Wood stork microsatellites on the DNA obtained from molted feathers of Painted stork (Mycteria leucocephala), here we investigated the nature of cross-amplified microsatellites and the effect of non-invasive samples on cross-amplification success. In a limited manner, we also addressed the genetic diversity and differentiation in a north Indian population of the Painted Stork examined over three nesting seasons. Among the nine cross-amplified loci, only 5 were polymorphic. Three and 6 loci exhibited low ( 80), respectively. For 36 of 145 samples most of the loci failed to amplify. For genetic diversity, only 3 loci could be used since others exhibited low amplification and linkage disequilibrium. Probability of identity (0.034) was not low enough to develop a confidence that the similar genotypes originate from the same individual. Forty-two unique genotypes were identified. In 3 loci, a low to moderate level of genetic diversity (mean He = 0.435) was reported. Non-significant Fst (0.003, P = 0.230), G'stH (0.005, P = 0.247) and Dest (0.003, P = 0.250) values indicate a lack of structuring in temporally distributed populations of Delhi Zoo. The limitations and uniqueness of this study are discussed.

  3. Código de barras del ADN y sus posibles aplicaciones en el campo de la Entomología DNA barcoding and its possible applications to the field of Entomology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía A. Lanteri

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se abordan algunos aspectos de la controversia sobre la iniciativa «Código de barras del ADN», y se hace hincapié en sus potenciales aplicaciones en Entomología. Esta iniciativa propone emplear información dentro de una misma región génica (gen mitocondrial de la Citocromo c Oxidasa I = COI, en todas las especies vivientes y con condiciones de secuenciación universalmente aceptadas y estandarizadas. En la actualidad, no pretende sustituir la taxonomía alfa y la filogenia sino agilizar las tareas de identificación, especialmente en el campo de la Biomedicina (identificación de patógenos, parásitos y vectores, el control de plagas (intercepción de especies invasoras, cualquiera sea su estado de desarrollo ontogenético y los estudios sobre conservación de la biodiversidad. Para arribar a una correcta delimitación de las especies biológicas es preciso contar con las secuencias de COI de numerosos individuos a lo largo de todo su rango geográfico y además, secuencias de genes nucleares e información morfológica y biológica detallada. Las «Unidades Evolutivas Significativas», identificadas sobre la base del «código de barras», podrían corresponder tanto a morfoespecies como a especies crípticas y a subespecies o linajes con diferentes preferencias de huéspedes. La integración del «código de barras del ADN», el trabajo de campo, las colecciones de museos y la investigación científica resultan imprescindibles para que esta herramienta redunde en avances significativos en el campo de la Sistemática Entomológica.This article deals with some of the most controversial issues of the DNA barcode initiative, focusing on its potential applications to Entomology. The barcoding proposes using information within the same gene region (Cytocrome c Oxidase I= COI mitochondrial gene, in all living species and under standard conditions of sequencing. At present, it does not attempt to replace alpha taxonomy or phylogeny, but to accelerate the task of identification, particularly, in the fields of Biomedicine (identification of pathogens, parasites and vectors, Pest Control (interception of all ontogenetic stages of alien invasive insects and studies on Biodiversity Conservation. For an accurate delimitation of biological species, it is necessary to undertake exhaustive sampling of COI sequences along their geographical range, as well as to sequence nuclear genes, and to accomplish detailed morphological and biological information. The «Evolutionary Significant Units» based on «DNA barcoding» might correspond to morphospecies, cryptic species, subspecies or lineages with different host preferences. The integration of «DNA barcode», field work, collections of museums and scientific research are essential for this tool to make a fruitful impact on the field of Systematic Entomology.

  4. Sampling the potential energy surface of a DNA duplex damaged by a food carcinogen: Force field parameterization by ab initio quantum calculations and conformational searching using molecular mechanics computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangyang

    1999-07-01

    The heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo (4, 5-f) quinoline (IQ) is one of a number of carcinogens found in barbecued meat and fish. It induces tumors in mammals and is probably involved in human carcinogenesis, because of great exposure to such food carcinogens. IQ is biochemically activated to a derivative which reacts with DNA to form a covalent adduct. This adduct may deform the DNA and consequently cause a mutation. which may initiate carcinogenesis. To understand this cancer initiating event, it is necessary to obtain atomic resolution structures of the damaged DNA. No such structures are available experimentally due to synthesis difficulties. Therefore, we employ extensive molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations for this purpose. The major IQ-DNA adduct in the specific DNA sequence d(5'G1G2C G3CCA3') - d(5'TGGCGCC3') with IQ modified at G3 is studied. The d(5'G1G2C G3CC3') sequence has recently been shown to be a hot-spot for mutations when IQ modification is at G3. Although this sequence is prone to -2 deletions via a ``slippage mechanism'' even when unmodified, a key question is why IQ increases the mutation frequency of the unmodified DNA by about 104 fold. Is there a structural feature imposed by IQ that is responsible? The molecular mechanics and dynamics program AMBER for nucleic acids with the latest force field was chosen for this work. This force field has been demonstrated to reproduce well the B-DNA structure. However, some parameters, the partial charges, bond lengths and angles, dihedral parameters of the modified residue, are not available in the AMBER database. We parameterized the force field using high level ab initio quantum calculations. We created 800 starting conformations which uniformly sampled in combination at 18° intervals three torsion angles that govern the IQ-DNA orientations, and energy minimized them. The most important structures are abnormal; the IQ damaged guanine is rotated out of its standard B-DNA orientations, compromising its ability to act as a faithful template during DNA replication.

  5. Tlys, a newly identified Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 transcript expressed in the lysogenic state, encodes a DNA-binding protein interacting at the promoters of the early genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusco, Salvatore; She, Qunxin; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    -binding motif. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the recombinant F55, purified from Escherichia coli, is indeed a putative transcription factor able to recognize site specifically target sequences in the promoters of the early induced T5, T6, and Tind transcripts, as well as of its own promoter. Binding...... the growth of the lysogenic host. The correponding gene f55 lies between two transcriptional units (T6 and Tind) that are upregulated upon UV irradiation. The open reading frame f55 encodes a 6.3-kDa protein which shows sequence identity with negative regulators that fold into the ribbon-helix-helix DNA....... Taking together the transcriptional analysis data and the biochemical evidences, we surmise that the protein F55 is involved in the regulation of the lysogenic state of SSV1....

  6. Vaccination of mice using the West Nile virus E-protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects mice against a lethal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina De Filette

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that is endemic in Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the United States. There is currently no antiviral treatment or human vaccine available to treat or prevent WNV infection. DNA plasmid-based vaccines represent a new approach for controlling infectious diseases. In rodents, DNA vaccines have been shown to induce B cell and cytotoxic T cell responses and protect against a wide range of infections. In this study, we formulated a plasmid DNA vector expressing the ectodomain of the E-protein of WNV into nanoparticles by using linear polyethyleneimine (lPEI covalently bound to mannose and examined the potential of this vaccine to protect against lethal WNV infection in mice. Mice were immunized twice (prime--boost regime with the WNV DNA vaccine formulated with lPEI-mannose using different administration routes (intramuscular, intradermal and topical. In parallel a heterologous boost with purified recombinant WNV envelope (E protein was evaluated. While no significant E-protein specific humoral response was generated after DNA immunization, protein boosting of DNA-primed mice resulted in a marked increase in total neutralizing antibody titer. In addition, E-specific IL-4 T-cell immune responses were detected by ELISPOT after protein boost and CD8(+ specific IFN-γ expression was observed by flow cytometry. Challenge experiments using the heterologous immunization regime revealed protective immunity to homologous and virulent WNV infection.

  7. Spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and sleep deprivation differently induce Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a DNA methylation and transcripts levels in the basal forebrain and frontal cortex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventskovska, Olena; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Karpova, Nina N

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) regulates neuronal plasticity, slow wave activity and sleep homeostasis. Environmental stimuli control Bdnf expression through epigenetic mechanisms, but there are no data on epigenetic regulation of Bdnf by sleep or sleep deprivation. Here we investigated whether 5-methylcytosine (5mC) DNA modification at Bdnf promoters p1, p4 and p9 influences Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a expression during the normal inactive phase or after sleep deprivation (SD) (3, 6 and 12 h, end-times being ZT3, ZT6 and ZT12) in rats in two brain areas involved in sleep regulation, the basal forebrain and cortex. We found a daytime variation in cortical Bdnf expression: Bdnf1 expression was highest at ZT6 and Bdnf4 lowest at ZT12. Such variation was not observed in the basal forebrain. Also Bdnf p1 and p9 methylation levels differed only in the cortex, while Bdnf p4 methylation did not vary in either area. Factorial analysis revealed that sleep deprivation significantly induced Bdnf1 and Bdnf4 with the similar pattern for Bdnf9a in both basal forebrain and cortex; 12 h of sleep deprivation decreased 5mC levels at the cortical Bdnf p4 and p9. Regression analysis between the 5mC promoter levels and the corresponding Bdnf transcript expression revealed significant negative correlations for the basal forebrain Bdnf1 and cortical Bdnf9a transcripts in only non-deprived rats, while these correlations were lost after sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that Bdnf transcription during the light phase of undisturbed sleep-wake cycle but not after SD is regulated at least partially by brain site-specific DNA methylation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  8. The Triple Roles of Glutathione for a DNA-Cleaving DNAzyme and Development of a Fluorescent Glutathione/Cu2+-Dependent DNAzyme Sensor for Detection of Cu2+ in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijin; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Guiying; Sheng, Yongjie; Sun, Yanhong; Rui, Hongyue; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Jiacui; Jiang, Dazhi

    2017-03-24

    Pistol-like DNAzyme (PLDz) is an oxidative DNA-cleaving catalytic DNA with ascorbic acid as cofactor. Herein, glutathione was induced into the reaction system to maintain reduced ascorbic acid levels for higher efficient cleavage. However, data indicated that glutathione played triple roles in PLDz-catalyzed reactions. Glutathione alone had no effect on PLDz, and showed inhibitory effect on ascorbic acid-induced PLDz catalysis, but exhibited stimulating effect on Cu 2+ -promoted self-cleavage of PLDz. Further analysis of the effect of glutathione/Cu 2+ on PLDz indicated that H 2 O 2 played a key role in PLDz catalysis. Finally, we developed a fluorescent Cu 2+ sensor (PL-Cu 1.0) based on the relationship between glutathione/Cu 2+ and catalytic activity of PLDz. The fluorescent intensity showed a linear response toward the logarithm concentration of Cu 2+ over the range from 80 nM to 30 μM, with a detection limit of 21.1 nM. PL-Cu 1.0 provided only detection of Cu 2+ over other divalent metal ions. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ could not interfere with Cu 2+ detection even at a 1000-fold concentration. We further applied PL-Cu 1.0 for Cu 2+ detection in tap and bottled water. Water stored in copper taps overnight had relatively high Cu 2+ concentrations, with a maximum 22.3 μM. Trace Cu 2+ (52.2 nM) in deep spring was detected among the tested bottled water. Therefore, PL-Cu 1.0 is feasible to detect Cu 2+ in drinking water, with a practical application.

  9. High In Vitro Activity of the Novel Spiropyrimidinetrione AZD0914, a DNA Gyrase Inhibitor, against Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates Suggests a New Effective Option for Oral Treatment of Gonorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Golparian, Daniel; Alm, Richard A.; Huband, Michael; Mueller, John; Jensen, Jorgen Skov; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the activity of the novel spiropyrimidinetrione AZD0914 (DNA gyrase inhibitor) against clinical gonococcal isolates and international reference strains (n = 250), including strains with diverse multidrug resistance and extensive drug resistance. The AZD0914 MICs were substantially lower than those of most other currently or previously recommended antimicrobials. AZD0914 should be further evaluated, including in vitro selection, in vivo emergence and mechanisms of resistance, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in humans, optimal dosing, and performance, in appropriate randomized and controlled clinical trials. PMID:24982070

  10. Characterization of the CrbS/R Two-Component System in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveals a New Set of Genes under Its Control and a DNA Motif Required for CrbR-Mediated Transcriptional Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Sepulveda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The CrbS/R system is a two-component signal transduction system that regulates acetate utilization in Vibrio cholerae, P. aeruginosa, and P. entomophila. CrbS is a hybrid histidine kinase that belongs to a recently identified family, in which the signaling domain is fused to an SLC5 solute symporter domain through aSTAC domain. Upon activation by CrbS, CrbR activates transcription of the acs gene, which encodes an acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS, and the actP gene, which encodes an acetate/solute symporter. In this work, we characterized the CrbS/R system in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. Through the quantitative proteome analysis of different mutants, we were able to identify a new set of genes under its control, which play an important role during growth on acetate. These results led us to the identification of a conserved DNA motif in the putative promoter region of acetate-utilization genes in the Gammaproteobacteria that is essential for the CrbR-mediated transcriptional activation of genes under acetate-utilizing conditions. Finally, we took advantage of the existence of a second SLC5-containing two-component signal transduction system in P. fluorescens, CbrA/B, to demonstrate that the activation of the response regulator by the histidine kinase is not dependent on substrate transport through the SLC5 domain.

  11. A single dose of a DNA vaccine encoding apa coencapsulated with 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate in microspheres confers long-term protection against tuberculosis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-primed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlétti, Dyego; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Masson, Ana Paula; Weijenborg Campos, Lívia; Leite, Luciana C C; Rodrigues Pires, Andréa; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Lopes Silva, Célio; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon; Horn, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime DNA (Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes)-booster vaccinations have been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. This heterologous prime-boost strategy is perhaps the most realistic vaccination for the future of TB infection control, especially in countries where TB is endemic. Moreover, a prime-boost regimen using biodegradable microspheres seems to be a promising immunization to stimulate a long-lasting immune response. The alanine proline antigen (Apa) is a highly immunogenic glycoprotein secreted by M. tuberculosis. This study investigated the immune protection of Apa DNA vaccine against intratracheal M. tuberculosis challenge in mice on the basis of a heterologous prime-boost regimen. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously primed with BCG and intramuscularly boosted with a single dose of plasmid carrying apa and 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate (TDM) adjuvant, coencapsulated in microspheres (BCG-APA), and were evaluated 30 and 70 days after challenge. This prime-boost strategy (BCG-APA) resulted in a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs, thus leading to better preservation of the lung parenchyma, 70 days postinfection compared to BCG vaccinated mice. The profound effect of this heterologous prime-boost regimen in the experimental model supports its development as a feasible strategy for prevention of TB.

  12. Correlation of mRNA Profiles, miRNA Profiles, and Functional Immune Response in Rainbow Trout (Oncorrhynkus Mykiss) Infected With Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) and in Fish Vaccinated With a DNA Vaccine Against VHSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Jørgensen, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    and are incorporated into the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC), which target specific mRNA sequences, causing either mRNA degradation or translation repression. This results in altered mRNA and protein profiles characteristic of a particular cellular phenotype or physiological state. By targeting immune relevant m...

  13. NMR structural studies of the ionizing radiation adduct 7-hydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-7H-dG) opposite deoxyadenosine in a DNA duplex. 8-oxo-7H-dG(syn)·dA(anti) alignment at lesion site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouchakdjian, M.; Patel, D.J.; Bodepudi, V.; Shibutani, S.; Eisenberg, M.; Johnson, F.; Grollman, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    Proton NMR studies are reported on the complementary d(C1-C2-A3-C4-T5-A6-oxo-G7-T8-C9-A10-C11-C12)·d(G13-G14-T15-G16-A17-A18-T19-A20-G21-T22-G23-G24) dodecanucleotide duplex (designated 8-oxo-7H-dG·dA 12-mer), which contains a centrally located 7-hydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-7H-dG) residue, a group commonly found in DNA that has been exposed to ionizing radiation or oxidizing free radicals. From the NMR spectra it can be deduced that this moiety exists as two tautomers, or gives rise to two DNA conformations, that are in equilibrium and that exchange slowly. The present study focuses on the major component of the equilibrium that originates in the 6,8-dioxo tautomer of 8-oxo-7H-dG. The authors have assigned the exchangeable NH1, NH7, and NH 2 -2 base protons located on the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen edges of 8-oxo-7H-dG7 in the 8-oxo-7H-dG·dA 12-mer duplex, using an analysis of one- and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) data in H 2 O solution. They were able to detect a set of intra- and interstrand NOEs between protons (exchangeable and nonexchangeable) on adjacent residues in the d(A6-oxo-G7-T8)·d(A17-A18-T19) trinucleotide segment centered about the lesion site that establishes stacking of the oxo-dG7(syn)·dA(anti) pair between stable Watson-Crick dA6·dT19 and dT8·A17 base pairs with minimal perturbation of the helix. The structural studies demonstrate that 8-oxo-7H-dG(syn)·dA(anti) forms a stable pair in the interior of the helix, providing a basis for the observed incorporation of dA opposite 8-oxo-7H-dG when readthrough occurs past this oxidized nucleoside base

  14. Evidence of a genetic instability induced by the incorporation of a DNA precursor marked with tritium; Mise en evidence d'une instabilite genetique induite par l'incorporation d'un precurseur de L'ADN marque au tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saintigny, Y.; Laurent, D.; Lahayel, J.B. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, IRCM-LRTS, U967 - CEA/INSERM/Universites Paris 7 and Paris-11, 92 (France); Roche, St.; Meynard, D.; Lopez, B.S. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, LMR - UMR 217 - CEA/CNRS, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et moleculaire, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, 92 (France)

    2009-07-01

    The authors report a molecular geno-toxicology investigation which allowed molecular events induced par intracellular incorporation of tritium to be studied, and the genetic instability resulting from a chronic exposure even at low dose to be analysed. For this purpose, they developed cell models (hamster tumorous cells and human fibroblasts) in which they know how to incorporate given quantities of marked nucleotides in the DNA. They show that the incorporation of tritium, even with doses which are said to be non toxic, causes a prolonged exposure of the cell to a genotoxic stress, and maybe a genetic instability due to a too great number of recombination events

  15. Re-wiring of energy metabolism promotes viability during hyperreplication stress in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Campion, Christopher; Chan, Siu Hung Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated by DnaA. DnaA binds ATP which is essential for formation of a DnaA-oriC nucleoprotein complex that promotes strand opening, helicase loading and replisome assembly. Following initiation, DnaAATP is converted to DnaAADP primarily by the Regul......Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated by DnaA. DnaA binds ATP which is essential for formation of a DnaA-oriC nucleoprotein complex that promotes strand opening, helicase loading and replisome assembly. Following initiation, DnaAATP is converted to DnaAADP primarily...

  16. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. Engelward (Bevin); G. Weeda (Geert); M.D. Wyatt; J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); J. de Wit (Jan); I. Donker (Ingrid); J.M. Allan (James); B. Gold (Bert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1997-01-01

    textabstract3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA

  17. Pyrovanadolysis, a Pyrophosphorolysis-like Reaction Mediated by Pyrovanadate, Mn2+, and DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akabayov, Barak; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Akabayov, Sabine R.; Theile, Christopher; McLaughlin, Larry W.; Beauchamp, Benjamin; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    DNA polymerases catalyze the 3'-5'-pyrophosphorolysis of a DNA primer annealed to a DNA template in the presence of pyrophosphate (PPi). In this reversal of the polymerization reaction, deoxynucleotides in DNA are converted to deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates. Based on the charge, size, and geometry

  18. The effect of ancient DNA damage on inferences of demographic histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Erik; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, Marcus Thomas Pius

    2008-01-01

    The field of ancient DNA (aDNA) is casting new light on many evolutionary questions. However, problems associated with the postmortem instability of DNA may complicate the interpretation of aDNA data. For example, in population genetic studies, the inclusion of damaged DNA may inflate estimates o...... for a change in effective population size in this data set vanishes once the effects of putative damage are removed. Our results suggest that population genetic analyses of aDNA sequences, which do not accurately account for damage, should be interpreted with great caution....

  19. Evaluation of cellular responses for a chimeric HBsAg-HCV core DNA vaccine in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yazdanian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Fusion of HBsAg to HCVcp in the context of a DNA vaccine modality could augment Th1-oriented cellular and CTL responses toward a protective epitope, comparable to that of HCVcp (subunit HCV vaccine immunization.

  20. DNA barcoding of vouchered xylarium wood specimens of nine endangered Dalbergia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Yu; Lichao Jiao; Juan Guo; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Tuo He; Xiaomei Jiang; Yafang Yin

    2017-01-01

    ITS2+trnH-psbA was the best combination of DNA barcode to resolve the Dalbergia wood species studied. We demonstrate the feasibility of building a DNA barcode reference database using xylarium wood specimens.

  1. Comparison of the Protective Efficacy of DNA and Baculovirus-Derived Protein Vaccines for EBOLA Virus in Guinea Pigs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mellquist-Riemenschneider, Jenny L; Garrison, Aura R; Geisbert, Joan B; Saikh, Kamal U; Heidebrink, Kelli D

    2003-01-01

    .... Previously, a priming dose of a DNA vaccine expressing the glycoprotein (GP) gene of MARV followed by boosting with recombinant baculovirus-derived GP protein was found to confer protective immunity to guinea pigs (Hevey et al., 2001...

  2. Canine Paternity Testing--Using Personal Experiences To Teach Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascati, Ralph J.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines how an example from the field of animal husbandry is used in a DNA Technology course to motivate students to take a deeper interest in the material. Focuses on paternity testing in dogs. (DDR)

  3. Microgravity Cell Counter: A Simple Hand-held Low-cost Device for In-flight WBC/Differential

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to monitor hematology parameters during spaceflight is currently an unmet medical requirement (NASA-STD-3001). This project evaluated a DNA stain/CCD...

  4. Cytosine hypomethylation at CHG and CHH sites in the pleiotropic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-12-16

    Dec 16, 2013 ... The abasic gap left behind by the demethylase action is filled by any of the DNA ...... Inactivation of a DNA methylation pathway in maize reproduc- tive organs ... of diversity for morphological and yield related traits among.

  5. Evaluation and improvement of LAMP assays for detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... principle of the reaction per- formed by a DNA polymerase with strand displacement ... target sequence in the later stage of the LAMP reaction. Under an isothermal ..... Mutation detec- tion and single-molecule counting using isothermal roll-.

  6. Genetic diversity analysis of various red spider mite- resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-02

    May 2, 2011 ... 3Key Laboratory of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya'an, 625014, P. R. ... Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) is a DNA ..... spider mite-resistant, bumper, high-quality and disease-.

  7. Inability of 'Whole Genome Amplification' to Improve Success Rates for the Biomolecular Detection of Tuberculosis in Archaeological Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannine Forst

    Full Text Available We assessed the ability of whole genome amplification (WGA to improve the efficiency of downstream polymerase chain reactions (PCRs directed at ancient DNA (aDNA of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. Using extracts from a variety of bones and a tooth from human skeletons with or without lesions indicative of tuberculosis, from multiple time periods, we obtained inconsistent results. We conclude that WGA does not provide any advantage in studies of MTBC aDNA. The sporadic nature of our results are probably due to the fact that WGA is itself a PCR-based procedure which, although designed to deal with fragmented DNA, might be inefficient with the low concentration of templates in an aDNA extract. As such, WGA is subject to similar, if not the same, restrictions as PCR when applied to aDNA.

  8. Endogenous and exogenous reinfections by Haemophilus influenzae in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the effect of antibiotic treatment on persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, K.; van Alphen, L.; Eijk, P. P.; Visschers, G.; Jansen, H. M.; Zanen, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    To analyze whether exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) coincide with reinfection by Haemophilus influenzae, 16 COPD patients were studied longitudinally for 3 years. Exacerbations coincided with reinfection by H. influenzae, either endogenous, by a strain with a DNA

  9. Tanzania Journal of Health Research - Vol 7, No 3 (2005)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A DNA delivery system targeting dendritic cells for use in immunization against ... peel (Citrus sinensis) oil extract on larvae of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes ... Enhancing disease surveillance reporting using public transport in Dodoma ...

  10. Tyrosine Kinase Gene Expression Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  11. Expression Profiling of Tyrosine Kinase Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz

    2000-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  12. Tyrosine Kinase Gene Expression Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  13. Three Big Hands-On Noncomputer Models for the Biology Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James E.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes models for the lichen symbiosis, genomic, and plasmid DNA and fluid mosaic membrane structure. The models operate at the classroom level with the classroom becoming the cell in a DNA exercise with students as interactive components. (DDR)

  14. Polymorphisms of the prion protein gene Arabi sheep breed in Iran

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Novin

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... Key words: Prion protein gene (Prnp), polymorphisms, susceptibility, scrapie. INTRODUCTION. Scrapie is an invariably fatal .... consists of a DNA denaturation step (5 min at 95°C), followed by 30 amplification cycles ...

  15. Sensing Conformational Changes in DNA upon Ligand Binding Using QCM-D. Polyamine Condensation and Rad51 Extension of DNA Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Lu; Frykholm, Karolin; Fornander, Louise H.; Svedhem, Sofia; Westerlund, Fredrik; Å kerman, Bjö rn

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Biosensors, in which binding of ligands is detected through changes in the optical or electrochemical properties of a DNA layer confined to the sensor surface, are important tools for investigating DNA interactions

  16. Detection and Identification of Bursaphelenchus Species with DNA Fingerprinting and Polymerase Chain Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Harmey, Judith H.; Harmey, Matthew A.

    1993-01-01

    We have evaluated the potential of DNA-based methods to identify and differentiate Bursaphelenchus spp. and isolates. The isolation of a DNA probe, designated X14, and development of a DNA fingerprinting method for the identification and differentiation of Bursaphelenchus species and strains is described. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA isolated from Bursaphelenchus species using two primers derived from the sequence of the cloned repetitive DNA fragment X14 resulted in m...

  17. Optical dating of perennially frozen deposits associated with preserved ancient plant and animal DNA in north-central Siberia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, L.J.; Roberts, R.G.; Macphee, R.D.E.

    2008-01-01

    We present chronological constraints on a suite of permanently frozen fluvial deposits which contain ancient DNA (aDNA) from the Taimyr Peninsula of north-central Siberia. The luminescence phenomenology of these samples is first discussed, focusing on the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) d...... of providing a reliable chronometric framework for sedimentary aDNA records in permafrost environments. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  18. Anthropology. Response to Comment on "Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brian M; Lindo, John; Bolnick, Deborah A; Malhi, Ripan S; Chatters, James C

    2015-02-20

    Prüfer and Meyer raise concerns over the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) results we reported for the Hoyo Negro individual, citing failure of a portion of these data to conform to their expectations of ancient DNA (aDNA). Because damage patterns in aDNA vary, outright rejection of our findings on this basis is unwarranted, especially in light of our other observations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Solid-Phase Synthesis of Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing N4-[2-(t-butyldisulfanylethyl]-5-methylcytosine Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Pérez-Rentero

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An efficient route for the synthesis of the phosphoramidite derivative of 5-methylcytosine bearing a tert-butylsulfanyl group protected thiol is described. This building block is used for the preparation of oligonucleotides carrying a thiol group at the nucleobase at the internal position of a DNA sequence. The resulting thiolated oligonucleotides are useful intermediates to generate oligonucleotide conjugates carrying molecules of interest at internal positions of a DNA sequence.

  20. Ancestral polymorphisms and sex-biased migration shaped the demographic history of brown bears and polar bears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Nakagome

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported discordant gene trees in the evolution of brown bears and polar bears. Genealogical histories are different among independent nuclear loci and between biparentally inherited autosomal DNA (aDNA and matrilineal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. Based on multi-locus genomic sequences from aDNA and mtDNA, we inferred the population demography of brown and polar bears and found that brown bears have 6 times (aDNA or more than 14 times (mtDNA larger population sizes than polar bears and that polar bear lineage is derived from within brown bear diversity. In brown bears, the effective population size ratio of mtDNA to aDNA was at least 0.62, which deviated from the expected value of 0.25, suggesting matriarchal population due to female philopatry and male-biased migration. These results emphasize that ancestral polymorphisms and sex-biased migration may have contributed to conflicting branching patterns in brown and polar bears across aDNA genes and mtDNA.

  1. Ancestral polymorphisms and sex-biased migration shaped the demographic history of brown bears and polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagome, Shigeki; Mano, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported discordant gene trees in the evolution of brown bears and polar bears. Genealogical histories are different among independent nuclear loci and between biparentally inherited autosomal DNA (aDNA) and matrilineal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Based on multi-locus genomic sequences from aDNA and mtDNA, we inferred the population demography of brown and polar bears and found that brown bears have 6 times (aDNA) or more than 14 times (mtDNA) larger population sizes than polar bears and that polar bear lineage is derived from within brown bear diversity. In brown bears, the effective population size ratio of mtDNA to aDNA was at least 0.62, which deviated from the expected value of 0.25, suggesting matriarchal population due to female philopatry and male-biased migration. These results emphasize that ancestral polymorphisms and sex-biased migration may have contributed to conflicting branching patterns in brown and polar bears across aDNA genes and mtDNA.

  2. Ancient DNA from marine mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David; Hofreiter, Michael; Morin, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    such as bone, tooth, baleen, skin, fur, whiskers and scrimshaw using ancient DNA (aDNA) approaches provide an oppor- tunity for investigating such changes over evolutionary and ecological timescales. Here, we review the application of aDNA techniques to the study of marine mammals. Most of the studies have...... focused on detecting changes in genetic diversity following periods of exploitation and environmental change. To date, these studies have shown that even small sample sizes can provide useful information on historical genetic diversity. Ancient DNA has also been used in investigations of changes...... in distribution and range of marine mammal species; we review these studies and discuss the limitations of such ‘presence only’ studies. Combining aDNA data with stable isotopes can provide further insights into changes in ecology and we review past studies and suggest future potential applications. We also...

  3. Damage and repair of ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, David; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders

    2005-01-01

    degradation, these studies are limited to species that lived within the past 10(4)-10(5) years (Late Pleistocene), although DNA sequences from 10(6) years have been reported. Ancient DNA (aDNA) has been used to study phylogenetic relationships of protists, fungi, algae, plants, and higher eukaryotes...... such as extinct horses, cave bears, the marsupial wolf, the moa, and Neanderthal. In the past few years, this technology has been extended to the study of infectious disease in ancient Egyptian and South American mummies, the dietary habits of ancient animals, and agricultural practices and population dynamics......, and extensive degradation. In the course of this review, we will discuss the current aDNA literature describing the importance of aDNA studies as they relate to important biological questions and the difficulties associated with extracting useful information from highly degraded and damaged substrates derived...

  4. Protein Cofactors Are Essential for High-Affinity DNA Binding by the Nuclear Factor κB RelA Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulero, Maria Carmen; Shahabi, Shandy; Ko, Myung Soo; Schiffer, Jamie M; Huang, De-Bin; Wang, Vivien Ya-Fan; Amaro, Rommie E; Huxford, Tom; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2018-05-22

    Transcription activator proteins typically contain two functional domains: a DNA binding domain (DBD) that binds to DNA with sequence specificity and an activation domain (AD) whose established function is to recruit RNA polymerase. In this report, we show that purified recombinant nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) RelA dimers bind specific κB DNA sites with an affinity significantly lower than that of the same dimers from nuclear extracts of activated cells, suggesting that additional nuclear cofactors might facilitate DNA binding by the RelA dimers. Additionally, recombinant RelA binds DNA with relatively low affinity at a physiological salt concentration in vitro. The addition of p53 or RPS3 (ribosomal protein S3) increases RelA:DNA binding affinity 2- to >50-fold depending on the protein and ionic conditions. These cofactor proteins do not form stable ternary complexes, suggesting that they stabilize the RelA:DNA complex through dynamic interactions. Surprisingly, the RelA-DBD alone fails to bind DNA under the same solution conditions even in the presence of cofactors, suggesting an important role of the RelA-AD in DNA binding. Reduced RelA:DNA binding at a physiological ionic strength suggests that multiple cofactors might be acting simultaneously to mitigate the electrolyte effect and stabilize the RelA:DNA complex in vivo. Overall, our observations suggest that the RelA-AD and multiple cofactor proteins function cooperatively to prime the RelA-DBD and stabilize the RelA:DNA complex in cells. Our study provides a mechanism for nuclear cofactor proteins in NF-κB-dependent gene regulation.

  5. Characterization of Ofloxacin Interaction with Mutated (A91V) Quinolone Resistance Determining Region of DNA Gyrase in Mycobacterium Leprae through Computational Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, J; Shanthi, V

    2018-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causal agent of leprosy is non-cultivable in vitro. Thus, the assessment of antibiotic activity against Mycobacterium leprae depends primarily upon the time-consuming mouse footpad system. The GyrA protein of Mycobacterium leprae is the target of the antimycobacterial drug, Ofloxacin. In recent times, the GyrA mutation (A91V) has been found to be resistant to Ofloxacin. This phenomenon has necessitated the development of new, long-acting antimycobacterial compounds. The underlying mechanism of drug resistance is not completely known. Currently, experimentally crystallized GyrA-DNA-OFLX models are not available for highlighting the binding and mechanism of Ofloxacin resistance. Hence, we employed computational approaches to characterize the Ofloxacin interaction with both the native and mutant forms of GyrA complexed with DNA. Binding energy measurements obtained from molecular docking studies highlights hydrogen bond-mediated efficient binding of Ofloxacin to Asp47 in the native GyrA-DNA complex in comparison with that of the mutant GyrA-DNA complex. Further, molecular dynamics studies highlighted the stable binding of Ofloxacin with native GyrA-DNA complex than with the mutant GyrA-DNA complex. This mechanism provided a plausible reason for the reported, reduced effect of Ofloxacin to control leprosy in individuals with the A91V mutation. Our report is the first of its kind wherein the basis for the Ofloxacin drug resistance mechanism has been explored with the help of ternary Mycobacterium leprae complex, GyrA-DNA-OFLX. These structural insights will provide useful information for designing new drugs to target the Ofloxacin-resistant DNA gyrase.

  6. Paleogenetic investigations of hominin diversity and dispersals in Eurasian prehistory

    OpenAIRE

    Posth, Cosimo

    2017-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is able to provide genetic snapshots into the human past that can be linked together to study evolutionary processes and demographic patterns impossible to uncover with the study of modern-day DNA alone. In this thesis I make use of major methodological “game changers” in the field of aDNA in order to reconstruct complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as well as genome-wide nuclear data (nDNA) from ancient human specimens. The combination of next generation sequencing (NGS) te...

  7. In vivo repair of methylation damage in Aag 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase null mouse cells

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Stephen A.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2000-01-01

    3-Methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases initiate base excision repair by removing 3MeA. These glycosylases also remove a broad spectrum of spontaneous and environmentally induced base lesions in vitro. Mouse cells lacking the Aag 3MeA DNA glycosylase (also known as the Mpg, APNG or ANPG DNA glycosylase) are susceptible to 3MeA-induced S phase arrest, chromosome aberrations and apoptosis, but it is not known if Aag is solely responsible for repair of 3MeA in vivo. Here we show that in Aag–/– c...

  8. Characterization of a Xenopus laevis mitochondrial protein with a high affinity for supercoiled DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Mignotte, B; Barat, M

    1986-01-01

    A DNA binding protein of 31 Kd -mtDBPC- has been isolated from X. laevis oocyte mitochondria. It is present in large amounts in the organelle and does not show any enzymatic activity. Its binding to the superhelical form of a DNA is higher than for any other form, or for RNA. No sequence specificity could be found for any mtDNA fragments tested, including both origins of replication. It is able to introduce superhelical turns into relaxed circular DNA in the presence of a topoisomerase I acti...

  9. Optimization of DNA recovery and amplification from non-carbonized archaeobotanical remains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wales, Nathan; Andersen, Kenneth; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from archaeobotanical remains can provide key insights into many prominent archaeological research questions, including processes of domestication, past subsistence strategies, and human interactions with the environment. However, it is often difficult to isolate a...... extracted from non-charred ancient plant remains. Based upon the criteria of resistance to enzymatic inhibition, behavior in quantitative real-time PCR, replication fidelity, and compatibility with aDNA damage, we conclude these polymerases have nuanced properties, requiring researchers to make educated...... on the interactions between humans and past plant communities....

  10. Developing T lymphocytes are uniquely sensitive to a lack of topoisomerase III alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mönnich, Maren; Hess, Isabell; Wiest, Waltraud

    2010-01-01

    All organisms possess at least one type IA DNA topoisomerase. These topoisomerases function as part of a DNA structure-specific "dissolvasome," also known as the RTR complex, which has critical functions in faithful DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation. In humans, the hetero......All organisms possess at least one type IA DNA topoisomerase. These topoisomerases function as part of a DNA structure-specific "dissolvasome," also known as the RTR complex, which has critical functions in faithful DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation. In humans...

  11. More on contamination: the use of asymmetric molecular behavior to identify authentic ancient human DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Svensson, Emma M; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2007-01-01

    concerning the authenticity of such data. Although several methods have been developed to the purpose of authenticating ancient DNA (aDNA) results, while they are useful in faunal research, most of the methods have proven complicated to apply to ancient human DNA. Here, we investigate in detail...... the reliability of one of the proposed criteria, that of appropriate molecular behavior. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing, we have quantified the relative levels of authentic aDNA and contaminant human DNA sequences recovered from archaeological dog and cattle remains. In doing...

  12. Life after the synthetic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self-replicating ......Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self...

  13. Alteration of lysine 178 in the hinge region of the Escherichia coli ada protein interferes with activation of ada, but not alkA, transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Saget, B M; Shevell, D E; Walker, G C

    1995-01-01

    The ada gene of Escherichia coli K-12 encodes the 39-kDa Ada protein, which consists of two domains joined by a hinge region that is sensitive to proteolytic cleavage in vitro. The amino-terminal domain has a DNA methyltransferase activity that repairs the S-diastereoisomer of methylphosphotriesters while the carboxyl-terminal domain has a DNA methyltransferase activity that repairs O6-methylguanine and O4-methylthymine lesions. Transfer of a methyl group to Cys-69 by repair of a methylphosph...

  14. DNA repair: keeping it together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2004-01-01

    A protein scaffold has been identified that holds a chromosome together in the event of a DNA double-strand break. This scaffold is dependent on Rad52 and the Rad50-Mre11-Xrs2 complex and withstands the pulling forces of the mitotic spindle during DNA damage checkpoint arrest.......A protein scaffold has been identified that holds a chromosome together in the event of a DNA double-strand break. This scaffold is dependent on Rad52 and the Rad50-Mre11-Xrs2 complex and withstands the pulling forces of the mitotic spindle during DNA damage checkpoint arrest....

  15. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) is a DNA polymorphism assay based on the amplification of random DNA segments with single primers of arbitrary nucleotide sequence. Despite the fact that the RAPD technique has become a very powerful tool and has found use in numerous applications, yet, the nature of ...

  16. DNA N-glycosylases and uv repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demple, B; Linn, S

    1980-09-18

    Repair of some DNA photoproducts can be mediated by glycosylic bond hydrolysis. Thus, Escherichia coli endonuclease III releases 5,6-hydrated thymines as free bases, while T4 uv endonuclease releases one of two glycosylic bonds holding pyrimidine dimers in DNA. In contrast, uninfected E. coli apparently does not excise pyrimidine dimers via a DNA glycosylase.

  17. 76 FR 4921 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... detection of other (protein, tissue, biochemical, or chemical) microarrays. Applications: DNA microarrays... patients, but it often ultimately fails to cure the disease since cancer cells can become resistant to the... effect of antitumor agents. Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (Tdp1) is a DNA repair enzyme involved in the...

  18. DNA replication: stalling a fork for imprinting and switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast has long been known to be directed by a DNA 'imprint'. This imprint has now been firmly characterized as a protected site-specific and strand-specific nick. New work also links the widely conserved Swi1-Swi3 complex to the protection of stalled replication...

  19. Performance of two quantitative PCR methods for microbial source tracking of human sewage and implications for microbial risk assessment in recreational waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before new, rapid quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods for recreational water quality assessment and microbial source tracking (MST) can be useful in a regulatory context, an understanding of the ability of the method to detect a DNA target (marker) when the contaminant soure has been...

  20. MtDNA haplotype identification of aurochs remains originating from the Czech Republic (Central Europe)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselý, René; Hájek, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2012), s. 118-125 ISSN 1461-4103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : wild cattle (Bos primigenius) * aDNA * haplotype P * domestication Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  1. Biallelic targeting of expressed genes in mouse embryonic stem cells using the Cas9 system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yu; Vanoli, Fabio; LaRocque, Jeannine R.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.; Jasin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting - homologous recombination between transfected DNA and a chromosomal locus - is greatly stimulated by a DNA break in the target locus. Recently, the RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease, involved in bacterial adaptive immunity, has been modified to function in mammalian cells. Unlike other

  2. Functions and Dynamics of DNA Repair Proteins in Mitosis and Meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uringa

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMy PhD project encompassed studies on the functions of several different proteins, all involved in DNA repair, in somatic and germ-line cells. Hr6b and Rad18Sc are involved in a DNA repair mechanism called ‘Replicative Damage Bypass’ (RDB), and function as ubiquitin conjugating

  3. Custom-Designed MLPA Using Multiple Short Synthetic Probes Application to Methylation Analysis of Five Promoter CpG Islands in Tumor and Urine Specimens from Patients with Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, R.R.; Ralfkiaer, U.; Dahl, C.

    2010-01-01

    Ligation of two oligonucleotide probes hybridized adjacently to a DNA template has been widely used for detection of genome alterations. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique allows simultaneous screening of multiple target sequences in a single reaction by using p...

  4. Effects of Rosiglitazone on the Expression of PPAR-γ and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2011-03-15

    Mar 15, 2011 ... and the Production of IL-6 and IL-8 in Acute Lung. Injury Model ... pathophysiology of ALI [2,3]. Peroxisome .... view in the pathophysiologic mechanism of. ALI is that it is a ... DNA synthesis in breast cancer-derived cell lines.

  5. A novel TPR-BEN domain interaction mediates PICH-BEND3 association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitchai, Ganesha P; Kaulich, Manuel; Bizard, Anna H

    2017-01-01

    PICH is a DNA translocase required for the maintenance of chromosome stability in human cells. Recent data indicate that PICH co-operates with topoisomerase IIα to suppress pathological chromosome missegregation through promoting the resolution of ultra-fine anaphase bridges (UFBs). Here, we iden...

  6. Identification and characterization of a RAPD-PCR marker for distinguishing Asian and North American gypsy moths

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.J. Garner; J.M. Slavicek

    1996-01-01

    The recent introduction of the Asian gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) into North America has necessitated the development of genetic markers to distinguish Asian moths from the established North American population, which originated in Europe. We used RAPD-PCR to identify a DNA length polymorphism that is diagnostic for the two moth strains. The...

  7. Diba et al., Afr. J. Infect. Dis. (2014) 8(1): 1 – 4 .11i8v.ajid/ .4314 10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    ventilation systems, false ceiling dust, contaminated dust dislodged during hospital ... unequivocal evidence of invasive disease, and blood cultures are usually ... Genomic DNA was extracted from Aspergillus mycelia mass by glass beads in a .... DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms to analyze the diversity of the.

  8. Branched oligosaccharide structures on HBV prevent interaction with both DC-SIGN and L-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Op den Brouw, M. L.; de Jong, M. A. W. P.; Ludwig, I. S.; van der Molen, R. G.; Janssen, H. L. A.; Geijtenbeek, T. B. H.; Woltman, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that infects the liver as primary target. Currently, a high affinity receptor for HBV is still unknown. The dendritic cell specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is involved in pathogen recognition through mannose and fucose containing carbohydrates leading to the

  9. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus among immunocompromised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B is an infectious inflammatory illness of the liver caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) which is transmitted to a large population through blood transfusion or by exposure to other body fluids. HBV is a member of the family Hepadnaviridae and also a DNA virus. In this study, the prevalence of hepatitis B infection ...

  10. Methyl DNA adducts, DNA repair, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase mutations in peripheral white blood cells from patients with malignant melanoma treated with dacarbazine and hydroxyurea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philip, P.A.; Souliotis, V.L.; Harris, A.L.; Salisbury, A.; Tates, A.D.; Mitchell, K.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Ganesan, T.S.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Dacarbazine (DTIC) is a DNA-methylating drug used in the treatment of malignant melanoma. Among the DNA dducts induced by DTIC are N7-methylguanine (N7-meG) and O6-methylguamne (O6-meG). The latter adduct, in particular, may be important in the mutagenic as well as the cytotoxic activity of DTIC.

  11. A screening-corrected additivity rule for the calculation of electron scattering from macro-molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F; Garcia, G

    2009-01-01

    A simplified form of the well-known screening-corrected additivity rule procedure for the calculation of electron-molecule cross sections is proposed for the treatment of some very large macro-molecules. While the comparison of the standard and simplified treatments for a DNA dodecamer reveals very similar results, the new treatment presents some important advantages for large molecules.

  12. The Effect of Chronotype on Emotional Memory, Sustained Attention and Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    purify DNA from cells through the disruption of the cells and removal of membrane lipids, proteins, and RNA. PCR then amplifies a single copy of a DNA...comparison. The current study also did not collect data on female participants’ menstrual cycles to control for any hormonal influences on any of the

  13. 5-AZA-2'-DEOXYCYTIDINE INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY AND LONG BONE REDUCTION DEFECTS IN THE MURINE LIMB

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antineoplastic drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (dAZA) is a DNA hypomethylating agent that can be used to induce hind limb phocomelia in the offspring of CD-1 Swiss Webster mice. Previously, our laboratory investigated the possibility that dAZA induced alterations in gene express...

  14. Human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The field of human ancient DNA (aDNA) has moved from mitochondrial sequencing that suffered from contamination and provided limited biological insights, to become a fully genomic discipline that is changing our conception of human history. Recent successes include the sequencing of extinct homini...

  15. DNA secondary structure of the released strand stimulates WRN helicase action on forked duplexes without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byungchan, E-mail: bbccahn@mail.ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Life Sciences, University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Bohr, Vilhelm A. [Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology, Biomedical Research Center, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} In this study, we investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities. {yields} We found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. {yields} These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently. -- Abstract: Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive premature aging disorder characterized by aging-related phenotypes and genomic instability. WS is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a nuclear protein, Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ helicase family, that interestingly possesses both helicase and exonuclease activities. Previous studies have shown that the two activities act in concert on a single substrate. We investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities and found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently, and we propose that the uncoordinated action may be relevant to the in vivo activity of WRN.

  16. The neotype barcode of the cotton aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae: Aphis gossypii Glover, 1877) and a proposal for type barcodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A type barcode is a DNA barcode unequivocally tied to an authoritatively identified specimen, preferably the primary type specimen. Type barcodes are analogous, albeit subordinate, to type specimens, providing a stable reference to which other barcodes can be compared. We here designate and describe...

  17. Detection of a new submicroscopic Norrie disease deletion interval with a novel DNA probe isolated by differential Alu PCR fingerprint cloning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, A. A.; Wapenaar, M. C.; Schuurman, E. J.; Diergaarde, P. J.; Lerach, H.; Monaco, A. P.; Bakker, E.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Differential Alu PCR fingerprint cloning was used to isolate a DNA probe from the Xp11.4-->p11.21 region of the human X chromosome. This novel sequence, cpXr318 (DXS742), detects a new submicroscopic deletion interval at the Norrie disease locus (NDP). Combining our data with the consensus genetic

  18. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Lindner; Tor Carlsen; Henrik Nilsson; Marie Davey; Trond Schumacher; Havard. Kauserud

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular...

  19. Visualizing phosphodiester-bond hydrolysis by an endonuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Stella, Stefano; Redondo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA phosphodiester bonds has been widely studied, but the chemical reaction has not yet been observed. Here we follow the generation of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by the Desulfurococcus mobilis homing endonuclease I-DmoI, trapping sequential stages of a two-metal-...

  20. Applications of DNA-Stable Isotope Probing in Bioremediation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Vohra, Jyotsna; Murrell, J. Colin

    DNA-stable isotope probing, a method to identify active microorganisms without the prerequisite of cultivation, has been widely applied in the study of microorganisms involved in the degradation of environmental pollutants. Recent advances and technique considerations in applying DNA-SIP in bioremediation are highlighted. A detailed protocol of a DNA-SIP experiment is provided.

  1. Expression of active recombinant human alpha 1-antitrypsin in transgenic rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massoud, M.; Bischoff, Rainer; Dalemans, W.; Pointu, H.; Attal, J.; Schultz, H.; Clesse, D.; Stinnakre, M.G.; Pavirani, A.; Houdebine, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    A DNA construct containing the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene including 1.5 and 4 kb of 5' and 3' flanking sequences, was microinjected into the pronucleus of rabbit embryos. The recombinant human protein was (a) expressed in the blood circulation of F0 and F1 transgenic rabbits at an average

  2. The whole truth and nothing but the truth, but what is the truth?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. van den Boer-van den Berg; A.A. Maat-Kievit (Anneke)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe moral aspects of genetic counselling are explored in situations where the outcome of a DNA test does not lead to certain knowledge. The most frequent type of interaction between counsellor and counsellee is when factual information is given, but

  3. Rapid identification of the medicinal plant Taraxacum formosanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original identification of medicinal plants is essential for quality control. In this study, the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) nuclear ribosomal DNA served as a DNA barcode and was amplified by allele-specific PCR. This approach was exploited to differentiate Taraxacum formosanum from five related adulterants. Using a ...

  4. A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meetei, AR; Winter, de J.P.; Medhurst, A.L. dr.; Wallisch, M; Waisfisz, Q.; Vrugt, van der H.J.; Oostra, A.B.; Yan, Z; Ling, C; Bishop, CE; Hoatlin, M.E.; Joenje, H.

    2003-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage

  5. Author template for journal articles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conacyt2010

    2013-07-31

    Jul 31, 2013 ... Full Length Research Paper. Production optimisation of a DNA vaccine candidate against leishmaniasis in flask culture. Myriam Sanchez-Casco1, Eric Dumonteil2 and Jaime Ortega-Lopez1*. 1Departamento de Biotecnología y Bioingeniería, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto.

  6. ALIS-FLP: Amplified ligation selected fragment-length polymorphism method for microbial genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brillowska-Dabrowska, A.; Wianecka, M.; Dabrowski, Slawomir

    2008-01-01

    A DNA fingerprinting method known as ALIS-FLP (amplified ligation selected fragment-length polymorphism) has been developed for selective and specific amplification of restriction fragments from TspRI restriction endonuclease digested genomic DNA. The method is similar to AFLP, but differs...

  7. Divide and control: split design of multi-input DNA logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2015-01-18

    Logic gates made of DNA have received significant attention as biocompatible building blocks for molecular circuits. The majority of DNA logic gates, however, are controlled by the minimum number of inputs: one, two or three. Here we report a strategy to design a multi-input logic gate by splitting a DNA construct.

  8. A TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay for porcine parvovirus 4 detection and quantification in reproductive tissues of sows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine parvovirus 4 (PPV4) is a DNA virus, and a member of the Parvoviridae family within the Bocavirus genera. It was recently detected in swine, but its epidemiology and pathology remain unclear. A TaqMan-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay targeting a conserved region of the O...

  9. Genes Are Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Alexandra; Smith, David; Harrop, Brenda; Lamit, Louis; Schroer, Melanie; Wymore, Adam; Ueckert, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Almost all living organisms, including plants, fungi, insects, and humans, have DNA. Variation in DNA, or genetic variation, is responsible for most of the diversity one sees in nature. By analyzing DNA, it is possible to create a DNA fingerprint that is unique to an organism. DNA fingerprinting is used in several disciplines of science, including…

  10. Brh2-Dss1 interplay enables properly controlled recombination in Ustilago maydis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kojic, Milorad; Zhou, Qingwen; Lisby, Michael

    2005-01-01

    after DNA damage was almost fully restored by a chimeric form of Brh2 having a DNA-binding domain from RPA70 fused to the Brh2 N-terminal domain, but Rad51 focus formation and mitotic recombination were elevated above wild-type levels. The results provide evidence for a mechanism in which Dss1 activates...

  11. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  12. DNA synapsis through transient tetramerization triggers cleavage by Ecl18kI restriction enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaremba, M.; Lyubchenko, Y.L.; Laurens, N.; van den Broek, B.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Siksnys, V.

    2010-01-01

    To cut DNA at their target sites, restriction enzymes assemble into different oligomeric structures. The Ecl18kI endonuclease in the crystal is arranged as a tetramer made of two dimers each bound to a DNA copy. However, free in solution Ecl18kI is a dimer. To find out whether the Ecl18kI dimer or

  13. Close sequence identity between ribosomal DNA episomes of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The restriction map of the E. dispar rDNA circle showed close simi- larity to EhR1 .... for 30 cycles in a DNA Thermal cycler (MJ Research,. USA). 3. .... by asterisk. The gaps show the variation between E. dispar and E. histolytica sequences.

  14. Localization and Differential Expression of the Krüppel-Associated Box Zinc Finger Proteins 1 and 54 in Early Mouse Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Maria; Teperek, Marta; Elholm, Grethe

    2010-01-01

    -fused reporter gene into zygotes demonstrated the intracellular distribution of ZFP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and ZFP54-GFP colocalized with a DNA marker in the two-cell embryo. The KRAB domain was essential to colocalize with DNA, and deletion of the KRAB domain in ZFP1-GFP and ZFP54-GFP localized...

  15. Theory and Application of DNA Histogram Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, Charles Bruce

    The underlying principles and assumptions associated with DNA histograms are discussed along with the characteristics of fluorescent probes. Information theory was described and used to calculate the information content of a DNA histogram. Two major types of DNA histogram analyses are proposed: parametric and nonparametric analysis. Three levels…

  16. Application and comparison of large-scale solution-based DNA capture-enrichment methods on ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen; Cappellini, Enrico; Romero-Navarro, J. Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The development of second-generation sequencing technologies has greatly benefitted the field of ancient DNA (aDNA). Its application can be further exploited by the use of targeted capture-enrichment methods to overcome restrictions posed by low endogenous and contaminating DNA in ancient samples...

  17. In-silico single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) mining of Sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be considered the ultimate genetic markers as they represent the finest resolution of a DNA sequence (a single nucleotide), and are generally abundant in populations with a low mutation rate. SNPs are important tools in studying complex genetic traits and genome evolution.

  18. An easy 'one tube' method to estimate viability of Cryptosporidium oocysts using real-time qPCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paziewska-Harris, A.; Schoone, G.; Schallig, H. D. F. H.

    2016-01-01

    Viability estimation of the highly resistant oocysts of Cryptosporidium remains a key issue for the monitoring and control of this pathogen. We present here a simple 'one tube' quantitative PCR (qPCR) protocol for viability estimation using a DNA extraction protocol which preferentially solubilizes

  19. Confirmation of the occurrence of a second killer whale morphotype ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although dietary information is scant, one stomach contained the remains of several elasmobranchs, identified from a DNA subsample as blue sharks Prionace glauca, a dietary item that, if habitual, might account for the tooth wear. This morphotype, referred to here as 'flat-toothed' and which in several respects resembles ...

  20. A laboratory information management system for DNA barcoding workflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu, D.; Eberhardt, U.; Szöke, S.; Groenewald, M.; Robert, V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a laboratory information management system for DNA sequences (LIMS) created and based on the needs of a DNA barcoding project at the CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre (Utrecht, the Netherlands). DNA barcoding is a global initiative for species identification through simple DNA

  1. extraction of high quality dna from polysaccharides-secreting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cistvr

    A DNA extraction method using CTAB was used for the isolation of genomic DNA from ten. Xanthomonas campestris pathovars, ten isolates of Xanthomonas albilineans and one isolate of. Pseudomonas rubrisubalbicans. High quality DNA was obtained that was ideal for molecular analy- ses. Extracellular polysaccharides ...

  2. DNA Sequences of RAPD Fragments in the Egyptian cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) is a DNA polymorphism assay based on the amplification of random DNA segments with single primers of arbitrary nucleotide sequence. Despite the fact that the RAPD technique has become a very powerful tool and has found use in numerous applications, yet, the nature of ...

  3. Ancient pathogen DNA in human teeth and petrous bones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margaryan, Ashot; Hansen, Henrik B.; Rasmussen, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Recent ancient DNA (aDNA) studies of human pathogens have provided invaluable insights into their evolutionary history and prevalence in space and time. Most of these studies were based on DNA extracted from teeth or postcranial bones. In contrast, no pathogen DNA has been reported from the petro...

  4. Identification of RAPD markers linked to salinity tolerance in wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity can be measured by a number of ways, including pedigree, phenotype and allelic diversity at loci controlling phenotypes of interest. A DNA marker for root length in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was identified. The individual plants from F2 population segregation for salinity tolerance and the parents (S-24 ...

  5. 77 FR 5489 - Identification of Human Cell Lines Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... individual or species. With the advent of standardized, simple, and rapid methods for human cell line... project will undergo STR profiling, a DNA profiling method that examines/screens for STRs (DNA elements 2... distinct DNA profile and when the STR DNA fragment sizes are converted to numeric values, the DNA profiles...

  6. Two cases of leprosy from Žatec (Bohemia), dated to the turn of the 12th century and confirmed by DNA analysis for Mycobacterium leprae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Likovský, Jakub; Urbanová, M.; Hájek, Martin; Černý, Viktor; Čech, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 9 (2006), s. 1276-1283 ISSN 0305-4403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : Leprosy * mediaeval * aDNA * Mycobacterium leprae * Paleopathology Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 1.322, year: 2006

  7. Detection of genetic diversity of Anaplasma marginale isolates in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pohl, A.E.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; Ribeiro, M.F.B.; Goncalves da Silvera, J.; Silaghi, C.; Pfister, K.; Friche Passos, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2013), s. 129-135 ISSN 1984-2961 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Anaplasma marginale * MSP1a * DNA sequencing * microsatellites * tandem repeats * Brazil Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.961, year: 2013

  8. Conformations of MutS in DNA mismatch repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.S. Groothuizen (Flora)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Prior to cell division, the DNA containing the genetic information of a cell has to be copied. During this process, errors are sometimes incorporated (so-called mismatches), which may cause genetic abnormalities in future cells. To prevent this, cells contain a DNA

  9. PJA-BP expression and TCR delta deletion during human T cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.M. Verschuren (Martie); B. Blom (Bianca); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); H. Spits (Hergen); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractRecombination of deltaRec to psiJalpha will delete the TCR delta gene, which is thought to play an important role in the bifurcation of the TCR alphabeta versus TCR gammadelta differentiation lineages. We recently detected a DNA-binding protein in human

  10. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  11. ISOLATION OF THE CANDIDA TROPICALIS GENE FOR P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN SACCAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have isolated the gene for cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis. This was accomplished by screening genomic libraries of strain ATCC750 in E. coli using a DNA fragment containing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14DM gene. Identi...

  12. The double par locus of virulence factor pB171: DNA segregation is correlated with oscillation of ParA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, G; Gerdes, K; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2001-01-01

    Prokaryotic plasmids and chromosomes encode partitioning (par) loci that segregate DNA to daughter cells before cell division. Recent database analyses showed that almost all known par loci encode an ATPase and a DNA-binding protein, and one or more cis-acting regions where the proteins act. All...

  13. Evaluation of DNA dosimetry to assess ozone-mediated variability of biologically harmful radiation in Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, AL; Peat, HJ; Buma, AGJ

    In this study we investigated the use of a DNA dosimeter to accurately measure changes in ultraviolet B radiation (UVBR; 280-315 nm) under Antarctic ozone hole conditions. Naked DNA solution in quartz tubes was exposed to ambient solar radiation at Rothera Research Station, Antarctica, between

  14. The entire β-globin gene cluster is deleted in a form of τδβ-thalassemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Fearon; H.H.Jr. Kazazian; P.G. Waber (Pamela); J.I. Lee (Joseph); S.E. Antonarakis; S.H. Orkin (Stuart); E.F. Vanin; P.S. Henthorn; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.F. Scott; G.R. Buchanan

    1983-01-01

    textabstractWe have used restriction endonuclease mapping to study a deletion involving the beta-globin gene cluster in a Mexican-American family with gamma delta beta-thalassemia. Analysis of DNA polymorphisms demonstrated deletion of the beta-globin gene from the affected chromosome. Using a DNA

  15. The smt-0 mutation which abolishes mating-type switching in fission yeast is a deletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrkársdóttir, U; Egel, R; Nielsen, O

    1993-01-01

    Mating-type switching in the fission yeast, S. pombe, is initiated by a DNA double-strand break (DSB) between the mat1 cassette and the H1 homology box. The mat1-cis-acting mutant, smt-0, abolishes mating-type switching and is shown here to be a 263-bp deletion. This deletion starts in the middle...

  16. cis-acting elements involved in replication of alfalfa mosaic virus RNAs in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, A. C.; Langereis, K.; Houwing, C. J.; Jaspars, E. M.; Bol, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    A DNA copy of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) RNA3 was transcribed in vitro in two different orientations with T7 RNA polymerase and the transcripts were used as templates for a virus-specific RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) purified from AIMV-infected bean plants. Minus-stranded templates were

  17. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potentially new strains were isolated from 11 sponge species ... several times in sterile seawater to remove any tran- ... broth via a DNA Isolation Kit (UltraClean Microbial, ... Media composition for the isolation of actinomycetes from Neopetrosia exigua and Spheciospongia vagabunda. ...... Chapman and Hall, New York.

  18. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AUTOIMMUNE ANTIBODIES AND HCG TREATMENT 1N HABITUAL ABORTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGPei-Zhong; WUJin-Zhi; BAOChun-De; CHENShun-Le

    1989-01-01

    The antibodies to cardiolipin (aCL), double stranded DNA (aDNA) and to nuclear axttigcns(Sm, SSA, SSB, Ribonucleoprotein) were prospe, ctivcly investigated in 86 patients of habitual abortion without abilormaiity in their reprodutive system and karyotypes. All

  19. Ancient DNA investigations: A review on their significance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, its degradation and post-mortem chemical alteration make difficult its quantification and amplification. Moreover the study of aDNA is challenging due to the contamination by exogenous current DNA. Recently, the progress of molecular techniques and the use of sophisticated approaches greatly improved the ratio ...

  20. Chromatin domains and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.; Meier, I.

    2009-01-01

    The inheritance of biological traits involves not only the transfer of genetic information in the form of DNA, but also epigenetic information. The latter is encrypted in a DNA component, methylation of cytosine residues, and in non-DNA components such as histone modifications, non-histone proteins,