WorldWideScience

Sample records for a-dna

  1. A DNA-programmed liposome fusion cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löffler, Philipp M. G.; Ries, Oliver; Rabe, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Chemically engineered and functionalized nanoscale compartments are used in bottom-up synthetic biology to construct compartmentalized chemical processes. Progressively more complex designs demand for spatial and temporal control over entrapped species. Here, we address this demand by a DNA-encod...

  2. A DNA assembly model of sentence generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwan; Chung, Won-Hyong; Lee, Eun Seok; Park, Tai Hyun; Deaton, Russell; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2011-10-01

    Recent results of corpus-based linguistics demonstrate that context-appropriate sentences can be generated by a stochastic constraint satisfaction process. Exploiting the similarity of constraint satisfaction and DNA self-assembly, we explore a DNA assembly model of sentence generation. The words and phrases in a language corpus are encoded as DNA molecules to build a language model of the corpus. Given a seed word, the new sentences are constructed by a parallel DNA assembly process based on the probability distribution of the word and phrase molecules. Here, we present our DNA code word design and report on successful demonstration of their feasibility in wet DNA experiments of a small scale. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A DNA enzyme that cleaves RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Hoyce, G. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several types of RNA enzymes (ribozymes) have been identified in biological systems and generated in the laboratory. Considering the variety of known RNA enzymes and the similarity of DNA and RNA, it is reasonable to imagine that DNA might be able to function as an enzyme as well. No such DNA enzyme has been found in nature, however. We set out to identify a metal-dependent DNA enzyme using in vitro selection methodology. RESULTS: Beginning with a population of 10(14) DNAs containing 50 random nucleotides, we carried out five successive rounds of selective amplification, enriching for individuals that best promote the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of a target ribonucleoside 3'-O-P bond embedded within an otherwise all-DNA sequence. By the fifth round, the population as a whole carried out this reaction at a rate of 0.2 min-1. Based on the sequence of 20 individuals isolated from this population, we designed a simplified version of the catalytic domain that operates in an intermolecular context with a turnover rate of 1 min-1. This rate is about 10(5)-fold increased compared to the uncatalyzed reaction. CONCLUSIONS: Using in vitro selection techniques, we obtained a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester in a reaction that proceeds with rapid turnover. The catalytic rate compares favorably to that of known RNA enzymes. We expect that other examples of DNA enzymes will soon be forthcoming.

  4. Function of BRCA1 at a DNA Replication Origin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieberman, Paul

    2004-01-01

    ... and allow efficient repair of damaged DNA. In this proposal, we present preliminary data that BRCA1 functions in a DNA checkpoint response for the origin of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA replication (Ori P...

  5. Development of a DNA sensor using a molecular logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, D; Dey, Dibyendu; Chakraborty, S; Hussain, Syed Arshad; Sinha, S

    2013-06-01

    This communication reports the increase in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency between two laser dyes in the presence of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Two types of molecular logic gates have been designed where DNA acts as input signal and fluorescence intensity of different bands are taken as output signal. Use of these logic gates as a DNA sensor has been demonstrated.

  6. A DNA Walker as a Fluorescence Signal Amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongfang; Vietz, Carolin; Schröder, Tim; Acuna, Guillermo; Lalkens, Birka; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2017-09-13

    Sensing nucleic acids typically involves the recognition of a specific sequence and reporting by, for example, a fluorogenic reaction yielding one activated dye molecule per detected nucleic acid. Here, we show that after binding to a DNA origami track a bound DNA target (a "DNA walker") can release the fluorescence of many molecules by acting as the catalyst of an enzymatic nicking reaction. As the walking kinetics sensitively depends on the walker sequence, the resulting brightness distribution of DNA origamis is a sequence fingerprint with single-nucleotide sensitivity. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we rationalize that the random self-avoiding walk is mainly terminated when steps to nearest neighbors are exhausted. Finally, we demonstrate that the DNA walker is also active in a plasmonic hotspot for fluorescence enhancement, indicating the potential of combining different amplification mechanisms enabled by the modularity of DNA nanotechnology.

  7. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  8. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnia, S., E-mail: s.behnia@sci.uut.ac.ir; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-05

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I–V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive. - Highlights: • Modeling a DNA based molecular transistor and studying its transport properties. • Choosing the appropriate DNA sequence using the quantum chaos tools. • Choosing the functional interval for voltages via the inverse participation ratio tool. • Detecting the rectifier and negative differential resistance behavior of DNA.

  9. A DNA aptamer recognising a malaria protein biomarker can function as part of a DNA origami assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Maia Godonoga; Ting-Yu Lin; Azusa Oshima; Koji Sumitomo; Marco S. L. Tang; Yee-Wai Cheung; Andrew B. Kinghorn; Roderick M. Dirkzwager; Cunshan Zhou; Akinori Kuzuya; Julian A. Tanner; Jonathan G. Heddle

    2016-01-01

    DNA aptamers have potential for disease diagnosis and as therapeutics, particularly when interfaced with programmable molecular technology. Here we have combined DNA aptamers specific for the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) with a DNA origami scaffold. Twelve aptamers that recognise PfLDH were integrated into a rectangular DNA origami and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the incorporated aptamers preserve their ability to specifically bind target...

  10. Salt-Switchable Artificial Cellulase Regulated by a DNA Aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Mari; Budinova, Geisa Aparecida Lopes Gonçalves; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Mori, Yutaro; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-10-10

    A novel artificial cellulase was developed by conjugating a DNA aptamer to an endoglucanase catalytic domain, thereby substituting the natural carbohydrate-binding module. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and adsorption isotherm showed the binding motif of cellulose-binding DNA aptamer (CelApt) was G-quadruplex and stem-loop structures stabilized in the presence of salts, and CelApt binding preferred the amorphous region of the solid cellulose. By introducing the revealed salt-switchable cellulose-binding nature of CelApt into a catalytic domain of a cellulase, we created CelApt-catalytic domain conjugate possessing both controllable adsorption on the solid substrates and equal enzymatic activity to the wild-type cellulase. Thus potential use of a responsive DNA aptamer for biocatalysis at a solid surface was demonstrated.

  11. A DNA aptamer recognising a malaria protein biomarker can function as part of a DNA origami assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godonoga, Maia; Lin, Ting-Yu; Oshima, Azusa; Sumitomo, Koji; Tang, Marco S L; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kinghorn, Andrew B; Dirkzwager, Roderick M; Zhou, Cunshan; Kuzuya, Akinori; Tanner, Julian A; Heddle, Jonathan G

    2016-02-19

    DNA aptamers have potential for disease diagnosis and as therapeutics, particularly when interfaced with programmable molecular technology. Here we have combined DNA aptamers specific for the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) with a DNA origami scaffold. Twelve aptamers that recognise PfLDH were integrated into a rectangular DNA origami and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the incorporated aptamers preserve their ability to specifically bind target protein. Captured PfLDH retained enzymatic activity and protein-aptamer binding was observed dynamically using high-speed AFM. This work demonstrates the ability of DNA aptamers to recognise a malaria biomarker whilst being integrated within a supramolecular DNA scaffold, opening new possibilities for malaria diagnostic approaches based on DNA nanotechnology.

  12. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization

    KAUST Repository

    Torelli, Emanuela

    2014-03-20

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A DNA barcoding approach to characterize pollen collected by honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Andrea; De Mattia, Fabrizio; Bruni, Ilaria; Scaccabarozzi, Daniela; Sandionigi, Anna; Barbuto, Michela; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Labra, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated DNA barcoding effectiveness to characterize honeybee pollen pellets, a food supplement largely used for human nutrition due to its therapeutic properties. We collected pollen pellets using modified beehives placed in three zones within an alpine protected area (Grigna Settentrionale Regional Park, Italy). A DNA barcoding reference database, including rbcL and trnH-psbA sequences from 693 plant species (104 sequenced in this study) was assembled. The database was used to identify pollen collected from the hives. Fifty-two plant species were identified at the molecular level. Results suggested rbcL alone could not distinguish among congeneric plants; however, psbA-trnH identified most of the pollen samples at the species level. Substantial variability in pollen composition was observed between the highest elevation locality (Alpe Moconodeno), characterized by arid grasslands and a rocky substrate, and the other two sites (Cornisella and Ortanella) at lower altitudes. Pollen from Ortanella and Cornisella showed the presence of typical deciduous forest species; however in samples collected at Ortanella, pollen of the invasive Lonicera japonica, and the ornamental Pelargonium x hortorum were observed. Our results indicated pollen composition was largely influenced by floristic local biodiversity, plant phenology, and the presence of alien flowering species. Therefore, pollen molecular characterization based on DNA barcoding might serve useful to beekeepers in obtaining honeybee products with specific nutritional or therapeutic characteristics desired by food market demands.

  14. A DNA barcoding approach to characterize pollen collected by honeybees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Galimberti

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated DNA barcoding effectiveness to characterize honeybee pollen pellets, a food supplement largely used for human nutrition due to its therapeutic properties. We collected pollen pellets using modified beehives placed in three zones within an alpine protected area (Grigna Settentrionale Regional Park, Italy. A DNA barcoding reference database, including rbcL and trnH-psbA sequences from 693 plant species (104 sequenced in this study was assembled. The database was used to identify pollen collected from the hives. Fifty-two plant species were identified at the molecular level. Results suggested rbcL alone could not distinguish among congeneric plants; however, psbA-trnH identified most of the pollen samples at the species level. Substantial variability in pollen composition was observed between the highest elevation locality (Alpe Moconodeno, characterized by arid grasslands and a rocky substrate, and the other two sites (Cornisella and Ortanella at lower altitudes. Pollen from Ortanella and Cornisella showed the presence of typical deciduous forest species; however in samples collected at Ortanella, pollen of the invasive Lonicera japonica, and the ornamental Pelargonium x hortorum were observed. Our results indicated pollen composition was largely influenced by floristic local biodiversity, plant phenology, and the presence of alien flowering species. Therefore, pollen molecular characterization based on DNA barcoding might serve useful to beekeepers in obtaining honeybee products with specific nutritional or therapeutic characteristics desired by food market demands.

  15. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  16. Untangling taxonomy: a DNA barcode reference library for Canadian spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoev, Gergin A; deWaard, Jeremy R; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; deWaard, Stephanie L; Lu, Liuqiong; Robertson, James; Telfer, Angela C; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1460 species of spiders have been reported from Canada, 3% of the global fauna. This study provides a DNA barcode reference library for 1018 of these species based upon the analysis of more than 30,000 specimens. The sequence results show a clear barcode gap in most cases with a mean intraspecific divergence of 0.78% vs. a minimum nearest-neighbour (NN) distance averaging 7.85%. The sequences were assigned to 1359 Barcode index numbers (BINs) with 1344 of these BINs composed of specimens belonging to a single currently recognized species. There was a perfect correspondence between BIN membership and a known species in 795 cases, while another 197 species were assigned to two or more BINs (556 in total). A few other species (26) were involved in BIN merges or in a combination of merges and splits. There was only a weak relationship between the number of specimens analysed for a species and its BIN count. However, three species were clear outliers with their specimens being placed in 11-22 BINs. Although all BIN splits need further study to clarify the taxonomic status of the entities involved, DNA barcodes discriminated 98% of the 1018 species. The present survey conservatively revealed 16 species new to science, 52 species new to Canada and major range extensions for 426 species. However, if most BIN splits detected in this study reflect cryptic taxa, the true species count for Canadian spiders could be 30-50% higher than currently recognized. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A DNA sieving matrix with thermally tunable mesh size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Cheuk Wai; Barron, Annelise E

    2003-01-01

    We present a "proof-of-concept" study showing that a blend of thermo-responsive and nonthermo-responsive polymers can be used to create a DNA sieving matrix with a thermally tunable mesh size, or "dynamic porosity". Various blends of two well-studied sieving polymers for CE, including hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC), a thermo-responsive polymer, and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), a nonthermo-responsive polymer, were used to separate a double-stranded DNA restriction digest (Phi X174-HaeIII). HPC exhibits a volume-phase transition in aqueous solution which results in a collapse in polymer coil volume at approximately 39 degrees C. Utilizing a blend of HPC and HEC in a ratio of 1:5 by weight, we investigated the effects of changing mesh size on DNA separation, as controlled by temperature. High-resolution DNA separations were obtained with the blended matrix at temperatures ranging from 25 degrees C to 38 degrees C. We evaluated changes in the selectivity of DNA separation with increasing temperature for certain pairs of small and large fragments. A pure HEC (nonthermo-responsive) matrix was used over the same temperature range as a negative control. In the blended matrix, we observe a maximum in selectivity at approximately 31 degrees C for small DNA, while a significant increase in the selectivity of large-DNA separation occurs at approximately 36 degrees C as the polymer mesh "opens". We also demonstrate, through a temperature ramping experiment, that this matrix can be utilized to obtain high-resolution separation of both small and large DNA fragments simultaneously in a single CE run. Blended polymer matrices with "dynamic porosity" have the potential to provide enhanced genomic analysis by capillary array or microchip electrophoresis in microfluidic devices with advanced temperature control.

  18. A DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Assenov, Yassen; Martin-Subero, Jose Ignacio; Balint, Balazs; Siebert, Reiner; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hidalgo, Manuel; Tan, Aik-Choon; Galm, Oliver; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Villanueva, Alberto; Carmona, Javier; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Berdasco, Maria; Moreno, Victor; Capella, Gabriel; Monk, David; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Martinez, Ramon; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Prosper, Felipe; Agirre, Xabier; Fraga, Mario F.; Graña, Osvaldo; Perez-Jurado, Luis; Mora, Jaume; Puig, Susana; Prat, Jaime; Badimon, Lina; Puca, Annibale A.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Lengauer, Thomas; Bridgewater, John; Bock, Christoph; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Most of the studies characterizing DNA methylation patterns have been restricted to particular genomic loci in a limited number of human samples and pathological conditions. Herein, we present a compromise between an extremely comprehensive study of a human sample population with an intermediate level of resolution of CpGs at the genomic level. We obtained a DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples in which we interrogated 1505 CpG sites. The DNA methylation patterns revealed show this epigenetic mark to be critical in tissue-type definition and stemness, particularly around transcription start sites that are not within a CpG island. For disease, the generated DNA methylation fingerprints show that, during tumorigenesis, human cancer cells underwent a progressive gain of promoter CpG-island hypermethylation and a loss of CpG methylation in non-CpG-island promoters. Although transformed cells are those in which DNA methylation disruption is more obvious, we observed that other common human diseases, such as neurological and autoimmune disorders, had their own distinct DNA methylation profiles. Most importantly, we provide proof of principle that the DNA methylation fingerprints obtained might be useful for translational purposes by showing that we are able to identify the tumor type origin of cancers of unknown primary origin (CUPs). Thus, the DNA methylation patterns identified across the largest spectrum of samples, tissues, and diseases reported to date constitute a baseline for developing higher-resolution DNA methylation maps and provide important clues concerning the contribution of CpG methylation to tissue identity and its changes in the most prevalent human diseases. PMID:21613409

  19. Paleoparasitological report on Ascaris aDNA from an ancient East Asian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Seok Oh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Ascaris DNA was extracted and sequenced from a medieval archaeological sample in Korea. While Ascaris eggs were confirmed to be of human origin by archaeological evidence, it was not possible to pinpoint the exact species due to close genetic relationships among them. Despite this shortcoming, this is the first Ascaris ancient DNA (aDNA report from a medieval Asian country and thus will expand the scope of Ascaris aDNA research.

  20. A DNA nanocapsule with aptamer-controlled open-closure function for targeted delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A DNA capsule fitted with aptamer controlled target sensing has been "woven" using a 7308-base single-stranded DNA "thread" and 196 staple oligonucleotides. The capsule enables logic-gated molecular cargo delivery to targeted cell surfaces.......A DNA capsule fitted with aptamer controlled target sensing has been "woven" using a 7308-base single-stranded DNA "thread" and 196 staple oligonucleotides. The capsule enables logic-gated molecular cargo delivery to targeted cell surfaces....

  1. Breather trapping and breather transmission in a DNA model with an interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, A.; Romero, F.R.; Archilla, J.F.R.

    2006-01-01

    We study the dynamics of moving discrete breathers in an interfaced piecewise DNA molecule. This is a DNA chain in which all the base pairs are identical and there exists an interface such that the base pairs dipole moments at each side are oriented in opposite directions. The Hamiltonian of the ...

  2. Q-Bank Phytoplasma: A DNA Barcoding Tool for Phytoplasma Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contaldo, Nicoletta; Paltrinieri, Samanta; Makarova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding is an identification method based on comparison of a short DNA sequence with known sequences from a database. A DNA barcoding tool has been developed for phytoplasma identification. This phytoplasma DNA barcoding protocol based on the tuf gene has been shown to identify phytoplasmas...

  3. A-DNA and B-DNA: Comparing Their Historical X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Amand A.

    2008-01-01

    A-DNA and B-DNA are two secondary molecular conformations (among other allomorphs) that double-stranded DNA drawn into a fiber can assume, depending on the relative water content and other chemical parameters of the fiber. They were the first two forms to be observed by X-ray fiber diffraction in the early 1950s, respectively by Wilkins and…

  4. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  5. [A persistent model of the reptation movement of a DNA molecule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsov, V B; Kamliuk, A N; Shirko, A V

    2010-01-01

    By using a persistent model of the movement of a DNA molecule, the penetration of the DNA molecule into a cell has been described. The method enables one to estimate the time and the rate of the passage of the DNA molecule into the cell nucleus. The effect of the curvature of the molecule on its longitudinal movement was studied. The results obtained can be applied to characterize long chain molecules.

  6. Ninhydrin-dyed latent fingerprints as a DNA source in a murder case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M M; Wehner, H-D; Reichert, W; Graw, M

    2004-08-01

    In this case report, we describe the possibility of using ninhydrin-dyed fingerprints as a DNA source for STR typing. Preliminary tests prove that ninhydrin-dyed material still can be useful for STR typing. The case material consisted of seven ninhydrin-labeled latent fingerprints found at a murder crime site, which could not be typed in a classical manner. We were able to swap DNA from the ninhydrin-treated areas and successfully use it for STR typing.

  7. A DNA Crystal Designed to Contain Two Molecules per Asymmetric Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T Wang; R Sha; J Birktoft; J Zheng; C Mao; N Seeman

    2011-12-31

    We describe the self-assembly of a DNA crystal that contains two tensegrity triangle molecules per asymmetric unit. We have used X-ray crystallography to determine its crystal structure. In addition, we have demonstrated control over the colors of the crystals by attaching either Cy3 dye (pink) or Cy5 dye (blue-green) to the components of the crystal, yielding crystals of corresponding colors. Attaching the pair of dyes to the pair of molecules yields a purple crystal.

  8. Occurrence and sequence of a DnaJ protein in plant (Allium porrum) epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessoule, J J

    1993-05-24

    Antibodies raised against a purified fraction from microsomal membranes of leek epidermal cells were used to screen a lambda zap expression library from epidermal cells of leak plants. A near full-length clone was isolated. This cDNA contains an open reading-frame of 1,191 bp coding for a DnaJ protein (leek DNAJ 1 or LDJ1). Leek DnaJ1 represents the second protein of this type described in a pluricellular organism, the first being that sequenced from human cells.

  9. A DNA-based system for selecting and displaying the combined result of two input variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Huajie; Wang, Jianbang; Song, S

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based technologies for biosensing or bio-regulation produce huge amounts of rich high-dimensional information. There is a consequent need for flexible means to combine diverse pieces of such information to form useful derivative outputs, and to display those immediately. Here we...... demonstrate this capability in a DNA-based system that takes two input numbers, represented in DNA strands, and returns the result of their multiplication, writing this as a number in a display. Unlike a conventional calculator, this system operates by selecting the result from a library of solutions rather...

  10. Production of a DNA Vaccine Specific for the 64 kDa Protective Antigen of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Middlebrooks, Bobby L

    2007-01-01

    The gene for the protective antigen of E. rhusiopathiae will be inserted into a eukaryotic vector both for the production of a DNA vaccine and for large scale production of the recombinant protein (in vitro...

  11. Femtosecond Laser-Inscripted Direct Ultrafast Fabrication of a DNA Distributor Using Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojun Shin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A femtosecond laser can be used for single or multiple writing processes to create sub 10-μm lines or holes directly without the use of masks. In this study, we characterized the depth and width of micro-channels created by femtosecond laser micro-scribing in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS under various energy doses (1%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% and laser beam passes (5, 10 and 15. Based on a microfluidic simulation in a bio-application, a DNA distributor was designed and fabricated based on an energy dose of 5% and a laser beam pass of 5. The simulated depth and width of the micro-channels was 3.58 and 5.27 μm, respectively. The depth and width of the micro-channels were linearly proportional to the energy dose and the number of laser beam passes. In a DNA distribution experiment, a brighter fluorescent intensity for YOYO-1 Iodide with DNA was observed in the middle channels with longer DNA. In addition, the velocity was the lowest as estimated in the computational simulation. The polymer processability of the femtosecond laser and the bio-applicability of the DNA distributor were successfully confirmed. Therefore, a promising technique for the maskless fabrication of sub 10-μm bio-microfluidic channels was demonstrated.

  12. Spectroscopic study of a DNA brush synthesized in situ by surface initiated enzymatic polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Nuruzzaman; Tjong, Vinalia; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Zharnikov, Michael

    2013-08-29

    We used a combination of synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and angle-resolved near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to study the chemical integrity, purity, and possible internal alignment of single-strand (ss) adenine deoxynucleotide (poly(A)) DNA brushes. The brushes were synthesized by surface-initiated enzymatic polymerization (SIEP) on a 25-mer of adenine self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold (A25-SH), wherein the terminal 3'-OH of the A25-SH serve as the initiation sites for SIEP of poly(A). XPS and NEXAFS spectra of poly(A) brushes were found to be almost identical to those of A25-SH initiator, with no unambiguous traces of contamination. Apart from the well-defined chemical integrity and contamination-free character, the brushes were found to have a high degree of orientational order, with an upright orientation of individual strands, despite their large thickness up to ~55 nm, that corresponds to a chain length of at least several hundred nucleotides for individual ssDNA molecules. The orientational order exhibited by these poly(A) DNA brushes, mediated presumably by base stacking, was found to be independent of the brush thickness as long as the packing density was high enough. The well-defined character and orientational ordering of the ssDNA brushes make them a potentially promising system for different applications.

  13. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  14. Biosensing by Tandem Reactions of Structure Switching, Nucleolytic Digestion, and DNA Amplification of a DNA Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Qiang; Brennan, John D; Li, Yingfu

    2015-08-10

    ϕ29 DNA polymerase (ϕ29DP) is able to carry out repetitive rounds of DNA synthesis using a circular DNA template by rolling circle amplification (RCA). It also has the ability to execute 3'-5' digestion of single-stranded but not double-stranded DNA. A biosensor engineering strategy is presented that takes advantage of these two properties of ϕ29DP coupled with structure-switching DNA aptamers. The design employs a DNA assembly made of a circular DNA template, a DNA aptamer, and a pre-primer. The DNA assembly is unable to undergo RCA in the absence of cognate target owing to the formation of duplex structures. The presence of the target, however, triggers a structure-switching event that causes nucleolytic conversion of the pre-primer by ϕ29DP into a mature primer to facilitate RCA. This method relays target detection by the aptamer to the production of massive DNA amplicons, giving rise to dramatically enhanced detection sensitivity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Tdd-4, a DNA transposon of Dictyostelium that encodes proteins similar to LTR retroelement integrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D J

    1999-06-01

    Tdd-4 is the first DNA transposon to be isolated from Dictyostelium discoideum. This element was isolated by insertion into a target plasmid. Two classes of elements were identified which include a 3.8 kb version and a 3.4 kb deleted version. Sequence analysis reveals that the 145 bp inverted terminal repeats contain the 5'-TGellipsisCA-3' conserved terminal dinucleotides found in prokaryotic transposons and integrated LTR retroelement DNA sequences. Tdd-4 open reading frames are assembled by removal of six introns. Introns 1-5 conform to the GT-AG rule, whereas intron 6 appears to be an AT-AA intron. Also, intron 6 undergoes an alternative 5' splicing reaction. The alternatively spliced region encodes 15 tandem SPXX repeats that are proposed to function as a DNA binding motif. By analogy to other transposons that encode two proteins from the same gene, the full-length Tdd-4 protein is the putative transposase and the truncated Tdd-4 protein is the putative transposition inhibitor. Protein database searches demonstrate Tdd-4 encoded proteins are unique for a DNA element by containing similarities to retroviral/retrotransposon integrases. The putative Tdd-4 transposase contains the same structural relationship as integrases by possessing an N-terminal HHCC motif, a central DDE motif and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain composed of the SPXX motif.

  16. Building a DNA barcode library of Alaska's non-marine arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Derek S; Bowser, Matthew; Morton, John M; Bickford, Casey; Meierotto, Sarah; Hildebrandt, Kyndall

    2017-03-01

    Climate change may result in ecological futures with novel species assemblages, trophic mismatch, and mass extinction. Alaska has a limited taxonomic workforce to address these changes. We are building a DNA barcode library to facilitate a metabarcoding approach to monitoring non-marine arthropods. Working with the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding, we obtained DNA barcodes from recently collected and authoritatively identified specimens in the University of Alaska Museum (UAM) Insect Collection and the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge collection. We submitted tissues from 4776 specimens, of which 81% yielded DNA barcodes representing 1662 species and 1788 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs), of primarily terrestrial, large-bodied arthropods. This represents 84% of the species available for DNA barcoding in the UAM Insect Collection. There are now 4020 Alaskan arthropod species represented by DNA barcodes, after including all records in Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) of species that occur in Alaska - i.e., 48.5% of the 8277 Alaskan, non-marine-arthropod, named species have associated DNA barcodes. An assessment of the identification power of the library in its current state yielded fewer species-level identifications than expected, but the results were not discouraging. We believe we are the first to deliberately begin development of a DNA barcode library of the entire arthropod fauna for a North American state or province. Although far from complete, this library will become increasingly valuable as more species are added and costs to obtain DNA sequences fall.

  17. Decreased uv mutagenesis in cdc8, a DNA replication mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, L.; Hinkle, D.; Prakash, S.

    1978-01-01

    A DNA replication mutant of yeast, cdc8, was found to decrease uv-induced reversion of lys2-1, arg4-17, tryl and ural. This effect was observed with all three alleles of cdc8 tested. Survival curves obtained following uv irradiation in cdc8 rad double mutants show that cdc8 is epistatic to rad6, as well as to rad1; cdc8 rad51 double mutants seem to be more sensitive than the single mutants. Since uv-induced reversion in cdc8 rad1 and cdc8 rad51 double mutants is like that of the cdc8 single mutants, we conclude that CDC8 plays a direct role in error-prone repair. To test whether CDC8 codes for a DNA polymerase, we have purified both DNA polymerase I and DNA polymerase II from cdc8 and CDC+ cells. The purified DNA polymerases from cdc8 were no more heat labile than those from CDC+, suggesting that CDC8 is not a structural gene for either enzyme.

  18. Development of a DNA-based macroarray for the detection and identification of Amanita species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Kathryn A; Smart, Christine D; Davis, R Michael

    2011-07-01

    A DNA-based macroarray was designed to quickly and accurately identify certain Amanita mushroom specimens at the species level. The macroarray included probes for Amanita phalloides and Amanita ocreata, toxic species responsible for most mushroom poisonings, and Amanita lanei and Amanita velosa, edible species sometimes confused with toxic species, based on sequences of the highly variable internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA. A cryptic species related to A. ocreata and one related to A. lanei, identifiable by ITS sequences, were also included. Specific multiple oligonucleotide probes were spotted onto nylon membranes and the optimal hybridization temperatures were determined. The Amanita DNA array was highly specific, sensitive (0.5 ng DNA/μL and higher were detected), and reproducible. In two case studies, the method proved useful when only small amounts of mushroom tissue remained after a suspected poisoning. An identification could be completed in 12 h. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  20. Establishment of a DNA methylation marker to evaluate cancer cell fraction in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Liang; Hattori, Naoko; Yoda, Yukie; Yamashita, Satoshi; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Takamasa; Maeda, Masahiro; Katai, Hitoshi; Nanjo, Sohachi; Ando, Takayuki; Seto, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2016-04-01

    Tumor samples are unavoidably contaminated with coexisting normal cells. Here, we aimed to establish a DNA methylation marker to estimate the fraction of gastric cancer (GC) cells in any DNA sample by isolating genomic regions specifically methylated in GC cells. Genome-wide and gene-specific methylation analyses were conducted with an Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array and by quantitative methylation-specific PCR, respectively. Purified cancer and noncancer cells were prepared by laser-capture microdissection. TP53 mutation data were obtained from our previous study using next-generation target sequencing. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of 12 GC cell lines, 30 GCs, six normal gastric mucosae, one sample of peripheral leukocytes, and four noncancerous gastric mucosae identified OSR2, PPFIA3, and VAV3 as barely methylated in normal cells and highly methylated in cancer cells. Quantitative methylation-specific PCR using 26 independent GCs validated that one or more of them was highly methylated in all of the GCs. Using four pairs of purified cells, we confirmed the three genes were highly methylated (85 % or more) in cancer cells and barely methylated (5 % or less) in noncancer cells. The cancer cell fraction assessed by the panel of the three genes showed good correlation with that assessed by the TP53 mutant allele frequency in 13 GCs (r = 0.77). After correction of the GC cell fraction, unsupervised clustering analysis of the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles yielded clearer clustering. A DNA methylation marker-namely, the panel of the three genes-is useful to estimate the cancer cell fraction in GCs.

  1. Structural basis for discriminatory recognition of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase by a DNA aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kwok, Jane; Law, Alan W L; Watt, Rory M; Kotaka, Masayo; Tanner, Julian A

    2013-10-01

    DNA aptamers have significant potential as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, but the paucity of DNA aptamer-target structures limits understanding of their molecular binding mechanisms. Here, we report a distorted hairpin structure of a DNA aptamer in complex with an important diagnostic target for malaria: Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH). Aptamers selected from a DNA library were highly specific and discriminatory for Plasmodium as opposed to human lactate dehydrogenase because of a counterselection strategy used during selection. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed aptamer binding to PfLDH with a dissociation constant of 42 nM and 2:1 protein:aptamer molar stoichiometry. Dissociation constants derived from electrophoretic mobility shift assays and surface plasmon resonance experiments were consistent. The aptamer:protein complex crystal structure was solved at 2.1-Å resolution, revealing two aptamers bind per PfLDH tetramer. The aptamers showed a unique distorted hairpin structure in complex with PfLDH, displaying a Watson-Crick base-paired stem together with two distinct loops each with one base flipped out by specific interactions with PfLDH. Aptamer binding specificity is dictated by extensive interactions of one of the aptamer loops with a PfLDH loop that is absent in human lactate dehydrogenase. We conjugated the aptamer to gold nanoparticles and demonstrated specificity of colorimetric detection of PfLDH over human lactate dehydrogenase. This unique distorted hairpin aptamer complex provides a perspective on aptamer-mediated molecular recognition and may guide rational design of better aptamers for malaria diagnostics.

  2. Enzymatic conjugation of multiple proteins on a DNA aptamer in a tail-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Mari; Hayashi, Kounosuke; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-06-01

    Conjugation of single-strand DNA aptamers and enzymes has been of great significance in bioanalytical and biomedical applications because of the unlimited functions provided by DNA aptamer direction. Therefore, we developed efficient tailing of a DNA aptamer, with end-specific conjugation of multiple enzymes, through enzymatic catalysis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) added multiple Z-Gln-Gly (Z-QG) moieties to the 3'-end of a DNA aptamer via the addition of Z-QG-modified deoxyuridine triphosphate (Z-QG-dUTP) and deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). The resultant (Z-QG)m -(dN)l-aptamer, whose Z-QGs with dN spacers served as stickers for microbial transglutaminase (MTG), were crosslinked between the Z-QGs on the DNA and a substrate peptide sequence containing lysine (K), fused to a recombinant enzyme (i.e. bacterial alkaline phosphatase; BAP) by MTG. The incorporation efficiency of Z-QG moieties on the aptamer tail and the subsequent conjugation efficiency with multiple enzyme molecules were dramatically altered by the presence of dNTPs, revealing that a combination of Z-QG-dUTP/dTTP comprised the best labeling efficiency and corresponding properties during analytical performance. Thus, a novel optimized platform for designing (BAP)n -(dT)l-DNA aptamers was demonstrated for the first time in this article, offering unique opportunities for tailoring new types of covalent protein-nucleic acid conjugates in a controllable way. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. MutL traps MutS at a DNA mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ruoyi; Sakato, Miho; Sacho, Elizabeth J.; Wilkins, Hunter; Zhang, Xingdong; Modrich, Paul; Hingorani, Manju M.; Erie, Dorothy A.; Weninger, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) identifies and corrects errors made during replication. In all organisms except those expressing MutH, interactions between a DNA mismatch, MutS, MutL, and the replication processivity factor (β-clamp or PCNA) activate the latent MutL endonuclease to nick the error-containing daughter strand. This nick provides an entry point for downstream repair proteins. Despite the well-established significance of strand-specific nicking in MMR, the mechanism(s) by which MutS and MutL assemble on mismatch DNA to allow the subsequent activation of MutL’s endonuclease activity by β-clamp/PCNA remains elusive. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, MutS homologs undergo conformational changes to a mobile clamp state that can move away from the mismatch. However, the function of this MutS mobile clamp is unknown. Furthermore, whether the interaction with MutL leads to a mobile MutS–MutL complex or a mismatch-localized complex is hotly debated. We used single molecule FRET to determine that Thermus aquaticus MutL traps MutS at a DNA mismatch after recognition but before its conversion to a sliding clamp. Rather than a clamp, a conformationally dynamic protein assembly typically containing more MutL than MutS is formed at the mismatch. This complex provides a local marker where interaction with β-clamp/PCNA could distinguish parent/daughter strand identity. Our finding that MutL fundamentally changes MutS actions following mismatch detection reframes current thinking on MMR signaling processes critical for genomic stability. PMID:26283381

  4. Development of a DNA barcoding system for the Ixodida (Acari: Ixodida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jizhou; Wu, Shaoqiang; Zhang, Yongning; Zhang, Tianyi; Feng, Chunyan; Jia, Guangle; Lin, Xiangmei

    2014-04-01

    To control the spread of tick-borne diseases, there is an urgent need to develop a reliable technique that can distinguish different species of ticks. DNA barcoding has been proved to be a powerful tool to identify species of arthropods, but this technique has not yet been developed for identifying ticks. Here, we screened and analyzed 1082 sequences of ticks from BOLD system and GenBank, consisting of 647 16S, 325 COI, and 110 18S. These sequences are reported in previous studies and considered to be correctly identified at the species level. Through the analyses of genetic divergences and neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic relationships between the species of ticks, our results show that COI and 16S are reliable in discriminating species of ticks and the 18S could discriminate ticks at the genera level. New universal primers for 16S, 18S, and COI of ticks were designed and a DNA barcoding system for the Ixodida was developed. To assess the performance of this system, 57 specimens of ticks were collected within China. Our results show that DNA barcoding system could correctly identify the species of specimens in adult and subadult stages. This system would assist non-taxonomists to conveniently identify the species of Ixodida based on DNA sequences rather than morphological traits. However, there are still serious deficiencies in the information of 16S and COI of some species of ticks, and additional research is needed to resolve this problem.

  5. HIF3A DNA Methylation Is Associated with Childhood Obesity and ALT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    Full Text Available Gene polymorphisms associated so far with body mass index (BMI can explain only 1.18-1.45% of observed variation in BMI. Recent studies suggest that epigenetic modifications, especially DNA methylation, could contribute to explain part of the missing heritability, and two epigenetic genome-wide analysis studies (EWAS have reported that Hypoxia Inducible Factor 3 Alpha Subunit (HIF3A methylation was associated with BMI or BMI change. We therefore assessed whether the HIF3A methylation is associated with obesity and other obesity-related phenotypes in Chinese children. The subjects included 110 severe obese cases aged 7-17y and 110 normal-weight controls matched by age and gender for measurement of blood DNA methylation levels at the HIF3A gene locus using the Sequenom's MassARRAY system. We observed significantly higher methylation levels in obese children than in controls at positions 46801642 and 46801699 in HIF3A gene (P<0.05, and found positive associations between methylation and alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels adjusted by gender, age and BMI at the position 46801699 (r = 0.226, P = 0.007. These results suggest that HIF3A DNA methylation is associated with childhood obesity, and has a BMI-independent association with ALT. The results provide evidence for identifying epigenetic factors of elivated ALT and may be useful for risk assessment and personalized medicine of liver diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD.

  6. Efficacy of a DNA vaccine carrying Eimeria maxima Gam56 antigen gene against coccidiosis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yan; Tao, Jianping

    2013-04-01

    To control coccidiosis without using prophylactic medications, a DNA vaccine targeting the gametophyte antigen Gam56 from Eimeria maxima in chickens was constructed, and the immunogenicity and protective effects were evaluated. The ORF of Gam56 gene was cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(zeo)+. Expression of Gam56 protein in COS-7 cells transfected with recombinant plasmid pcDNA-Gam56 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The DNA vaccine was injected intramuscularly to yellow feathered broilers of 1-week old at 3 dosages (25, 50, and 100 µg/chick). Injection was repeated once 1 week later. One week after the second injection, birds were challenged orally with 5×10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. maxima, then weighed and killed at day 8 post challenge. Blood samples were collected and examined for specific peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation activity and serum antibody levels. Compared with control groups, the administration of pcDNA-Gam56 vaccine markedly increased the lymphocyte proliferation activity (Pcoccidiosis control.

  7. A DNA Mini-Barcoding System for Authentication of Processed Fish Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokralla, Shadi; Hellberg, Rosalee S; Handy, Sara M; King, Ian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2015-10-30

    Species substitution is a form of seafood fraud for the purpose of economic gain. DNA barcoding utilizes species-specific DNA sequence information for specimen identification. Previous work has established the usability of short DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-for identification of specimens harboring degraded DNA. This study aims at establishing a DNA mini-barcoding system for all fish species commonly used in processed fish products in North America. Six mini-barcode primer pairs targeting short (127-314 bp) fragments of the cytochrome c oxidase I (CO1) DNA barcode region were developed by examining over 8,000 DNA barcodes from species in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Seafood List. The mini-barcode primer pairs were then tested against 44 processed fish products representing a range of species and product types. Of the 44 products, 41 (93.2%) could be identified at the species or genus level. The greatest mini-barcoding success rate found with an individual primer pair was 88.6% compared to 20.5% success rate achieved by the full-length DNA barcode primers. Overall, this study presents a mini-barcoding system that can be used to identify a wide range of fish species in commercial products and may be utilized in high throughput DNA sequencing for authentication of heavily processed fish products.

  8. Intrinsic Dynamics Analysis of a DNA Octahedron by Elastic Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a fundamental component of living systems where it plays a crucial role at both functional and structural level. The programmable properties of DNA make it an interesting building block for the construction of nanostructures. However, molecular mechanisms for the arrangement of these well-defined DNA assemblies are not fully understood. In this paper, the intrinsic dynamics of a DNA octahedron has been investigated by using two types of Elastic Network Models (ENMs. The application of ENMs to DNA nanocages include the analysis of the intrinsic flexibilities of DNA double-helices and hinge sites through the calculation of the square fluctuations, as well as the intrinsic collective dynamics in terms of cross-collective map calculation coupled with global motions analysis. The dynamics profiles derived from ENMs have then been evaluated and compared with previous classical molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The results presented here revealed that ENMs can provide useful insights into the intrinsic dynamics of large DNA nanocages and represent a useful tool in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology.

  9. A DNA-Inspired Encryption Methodology for Secure, Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Users are pushing for greater physical mobility with their network and Internet access. Mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) can provide an efficient mobile network architecture, but security is a key concern. A figure summarizes differences in the state of network security for MANET and fixed networks. MANETs require the ability to distinguish trusted peers, and tolerate the ingress/egress of nodes on an unscheduled basis. Because the networks by their very nature are mobile and self-organizing, use of a Public Key Infra structure (PKI), X.509 certificates, RSA, and nonce ex changes becomes problematic if the ideal of MANET is to be achieved. Molecular biology models such as DNA evolution can provide a basis for a proprietary security architecture that achieves high degrees of diffusion and confusion, and resistance to cryptanalysis. A proprietary encryption mechanism was developed that uses the principles of DNA replication and steganography (hidden word cryptography) for confidentiality and authentication. The foundation of the approach includes organization of coded words and messages using base pairs organized into genes, an expandable genome consisting of DNA-based chromosome keys, and a DNA-based message encoding, replication, and evolution and fitness. In evolutionary computing, a fitness algorithm determines whether candidate solutions, in this case encrypted messages, are sufficiently encrypted to be transmitted. The technology provides a mechanism for confidential electronic traffic over a MANET without a PKI for authenticating users.

  10. Structure of the LexA-DNA complex and implications for SOS box measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Adrianna P.P.; Pigli, Ying Z; Rice, Phoebe A [UC

    2010-09-08

    The eubacterial SOS system is a paradigm of cellular DNA damage and repair, and its activation can contribute to antibiotic resistance. Under normal conditions, LexA represses the transcription of many DNA repair proteins by binding to SOS 'boxes' in their operators. Under genotoxic stress, accumulating complexes of RecA, ATP and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) activate LexA for autocleavage. To address how LexA recognizes its binding sites, we determined three crystal structures of Escherichia coli LexA in complex with SOS boxes. Here we report the structure of these LexA-DNA complexes. The DNA-binding domains of the LexA dimer interact with the DNA in the classical fashion of a winged helix-turn-helix motif. However, the wings of these two DNA-binding domains bind to the same minor groove of the DNA. These wing-wing contacts may explain why the spacing between the two half-sites of E. coli SOS boxes is invariant.

  11. Toxicology and biodistribution study of CIGB-230, a DNA vaccine against hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacardí, Dania; Amador-Cañizares, Yalena; Cosme, Karelia; Urquiza, Dioslaida; Suárez, José; Marante, Jeny; Viña, Ariel; Vázquez, Ariel; Concepción, Joel; Pupo, Maylín; Aldana, Lizet; Soria, Yordanka; Romero, Juan; Madrigal, Roberto; Martínez, Leticia; Hernández, Lourdes; González, Idania; Dueñas-Carrera, Santiago

    2009-08-01

    CIGB-230, a mixture of a DNA plasmid expressing hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural antigens and a HCV recombinant capsid protein, has demonstrated to elicit strong immune responses in animals. The present study evaluated the plasmid biodistribution after the administration of CIGB-230 in mice, as well as toxicity of this vaccine candidate in rats. In the biodistribution study, mice received single or repeated intramuscular injections of CIGB-230, 50 microg of plasmid DNA mixed with 5 microg of Co.120 protein. Plasmid presence was assessed in ovaries, kidney, liver, pancreas, mesenteric ganglion, blood, and muscle of the injection site by a qualitative polymerase chain reaction. The toxicology evaluation included treatment groups receiving doses 5, 15, or 50 times higher, according to the body weight, than the expected therapeutic clinical dose. During the first hour after repeated inoculation, a promiscuous distribution was observed. However, 3 months later, plasmid could not be detected in any tissue. There was an absence of detectable adverse effects on key toxicology parameters and no damage evidenced in inspected organs and tissues. These results indicate that CIGB-230 is nontoxic at local and systemic levels and no concerns about persistence are observed, which support clinical testing of this vaccine candidate against HCV.

  12. A DNA vaccine expressing PB1 protein of influenza A virus protects mice against virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košík, Ivan; Krejnusová, Ingrid; Práznovská, Margaréta; Poláková, Katarína; Russ, Gustáv

    2012-05-01

    Although influenza DNA vaccine research has focused mainly on viral hemagglutinin and has led to promising results, other virion proteins have also shown some protective potential. In this work, we explored the potential of a DNA vaccine based on the PB1 protein to protect BALB/c mice against lethal influenza A virus infection. The DNA vaccine consisted of pTriEx4 plasmid expressing PB1. As a positive control, a pTriEx4 plasmid expressing influenza A virus HA was used. Two weeks after three subcutaneous doses of DNA vaccine, the mice were challenged intranasally with 1 LD50 of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus, and PB1- and HA-specific antibodies, survival rate, body weight change, viral mRNA load, infectious virus titer in the lungs, cytokines IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10, and granzyme-B were measured. The results showed that (i) the PB1-expressing DNA vaccine provided a fair protective immunity in the mouse model and (ii) viral structural proteins such as PB1 represent promising antigens for DNA vaccination against influenza A.

  13. Single-molecule observations of RNA-RNA kissing interactions in a DNA nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yosuke; Endo, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules uniquely form a complex through specific hairpin loops, called a kissing complex. The kissing complex is widely investigated and used for the construction of RNA nanostructures. Molecular switches have also been created by combining a kissing loop and a ligand-binding aptamer to control the interactions of RNA molecules. In this study, we incorporated two kinds of RNA molecules into a DNA origami structure and used atomic force microscopy to observe their ligand-responsive interactions at the single-molecule level. We used a designed RNA aptamer called GTPswitch, which has a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) responsive domain and can bind to the target RNA hairpin named Aptakiss in the presence of GTP. We observed shape changes of the DNA/RNA strands in the DNA origami, which are induced by the GTPswitch, into two different shapes in the absence and presence of GTP, respectively. We also found that the switching function in the nanospace could be improved by using a cover strand over the kissing loop of the GTPswitch or by deleting one base from this kissing loop. These newly designed ligand-responsive aptamers can be used for the controlled assembly of the various DNA and RNA nanostructures.

  14. Horses for courses: a DNA-based test for race distance aptitude in thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Emmeline W; Ryan, Donal P; MacHugh, David E

    2012-12-01

    Variation at the myostatin (MSTN) gene locus has been shown to influence racing phenotypes in Thoroughbred horses, and in particular, early skeletal muscle development and the aptitude for racing at short distances. Specifically, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the first intron of MSTN (g.66493737C/T) is highly predictive of best race distance among Flat racing Thoroughbreds: homozygous C/C horses are best suited to short distance races, heterozygous C/T horses are best suited to middle distance races, and homozygous T/T horses are best suited to longer distance races. Patent applications for this gene marker association, and other linked markers, have been filed. The information contained within the patent applications is exclusively licensed to the commercial biotechnology company Equinome Ltd, which provides a DNA-based test to the international Thoroughbred horse racing and breeding industry. The application of this information in the industry enables informed decision making in breeding and racing and can be used to assist selection to accelerate the rate of change of genetic types among distinct populations (Case Study 1) and within individual breeding operations (Case Study 2).

  15. Selection and analysis of a DNA aptamer binding α-amanitin from Amanita phalloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszyńska, Klaudia; Ostrowska, Dominika; Bartnicki, Filip; Kowalska, Ewa; Bodaszewska-Lubaś, Małgorzata; Hermanowicz, Paweł; Faulstich, Heinz; Strzałka, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Mushroom foraging is very popular in some regions of the world. Sometimes toxic and edible mushrooms are mistaken by mushroom collectors, leading to serious human poisoning. The group of mushrooms highly dangerous for human health includes Amanita phalloides. This mushroom produces a toxic octapeptide called α-amanitin which is an inhibitor of nuclear RNA polymerase II. The inhibition of this polymerase results in the abortion of mRNA synthesis. The ingestion of A. phalloides causes liver failure due to the fact that most of the toxin is uptaken by hepatocytes. The hospitalization of poisoned patients involves the removal of the toxin from the digestive tract, its dilution in the circulatory system and the administration of therapeutic adjuvants. Since there is no effective antidote against amanitin poisoning, in this study we developed a DNA aptamer exhibiting specific binding to α-amanitin. This aptamer was selected using the SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) method. Next, its ability of toxin removal from aqueous solution was confirmed by pull-down assay. The aptamer region sufficient for α-amanitin binding was determined. Finally, the dissociation constant of the α-amanitin/DNA aptamer complex was calculated.

  16. Methods for transforming and expression screening of filamentous fungal cells with a DNA library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Sarah; Lamsa, Michael; Cherry, Joel; Ward, Connie

    2015-06-02

    The present invention relates to methods for expression screening of filamentous fungal transformants, comprising: (a) isolating single colony transformants of a DNA library introduced into E. coli; (b) preparing DNA from each of the single colony E. coli transformants; (c) introducing a sample of each of the DNA preparations of step (b) into separate suspensions of protoplasts of a filamentous fungus to obtain transformants thereof, wherein each transformant contains one or more copies of an individual polynucleotide from the DNA library; (d) growing the individual filamentous fungal transformants of step (c) on selective growth medium, thereby permitting growth of the filamentous fungal transformants, while suppressing growth of untransformed filamentous fungi; and (e) measuring activity or a property of each polypeptide encoded by the individual polynucleotides. The present invention also relates to isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides of interest obtained by such methods, to nucleic acid constructs, expression vectors, and recombinant host cells comprising the isolated polynucleotides, and to methods of producing the polypeptides encoded by the isolated polynucleotides.

  17. Priming of microglia in a DNA-repair deficient model of accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Divya D A; Jaarsma, Dick; Holtman, Inge R; Olah, Marta; Ferreira, Filipa M; Schaafsma, Wandert; Brouwer, Nieske; Meijer, Michel M; de Waard, Monique C; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kreft, Karim L; Laman, Jon D; de Haan, Gerald; Biber, Knut P H; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with reduced function, degenerative changes, and increased neuroinflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence suggests that changes in microglia cells contribute to the age-related deterioration of the CNS. The most prominent age-related change of microglia is enhanced sensitivity to inflammatory stimuli, referred to as priming. It is unclear if priming is due to intrinsic microglia ageing or induced by the ageing neural environment. We have studied this in Ercc1 mutant mice, a DNA repair-deficient mouse model that displays features of accelerated aging in multiple tissues including the CNS. In Ercc1 mutant mice, microglia showed hallmark features of priming such as an exaggerated response to peripheral lipopolysaccharide exposure in terms of cytokine expression and phagocytosis. Specific targeting of the Ercc1 deletion to forebrain neurons resulted in a progressive priming response in microglia exemplified by phenotypic alterations. Summarizing, these data show that neuronal genotoxic stress is sufficient to switch microglia from a resting to a primed state. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a DNA-binding protein capable of destabilizing duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V S; Mikhailova, A L; Iwanaga, M; Gomi, S; Maeda, S

    1998-04-01

    A DNA-binding protein (designated DBP) with an apparent molecular mass of 38 kDa was purified to homogeneity from BmN cells (derived from Bombyx mori) infected with the B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV). Six peptides obtained after digestion of the isolated protein with Achromobacter protease I were partially or completely sequenced. The determined amino acid sequences indicated that DBP was encoded by an open reading frame (ORF16) located at nucleotides (nt) 16189 to 17139 in the BmNPV genome (GenBank accession no. L33180). This ORF (designated dbp) is a homolog of Autographa californica multicapsid NPV ORF25, whose product has not been identified. BmNPV DBP is predicted to contain 317 amino acids (calculated molecular mass of 36.7 kDa) and to have an isoelectric point of 7.8. DBP showed a tendency to multimerization in the course of purification and was found to bind preferentially to single-stranded DNA. When bound to oligonucleotides, DBP protected them from hydrolysis by phage T4 DNA polymerase-associated 3'-->5' exonuclease. The sizes of the protected fragments indicated that a binding site size for DBP is about 30 nt per protein monomer. DBP, but not BmNPV LEF-3, was capable of unwinding partial DNA duplexes in an in vitro system. This helix-destabilizing ability is consistent with the prediction that DBP functions as a single-stranded DNA binding protein in virus replication.

  19. Traditional Mold Analysis Compared to a DNA-based Method of Mold Analysis with Applications in Asthmatics' Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional environmental mold analysis is based-on microscopic observations and counting of mold structures collected from the air on a sticky surface or culturing of molds on growth media for identification and quantification. A DNA-based method of mold analysis called mol...

  20. Aligning an endoglucanase Cel5A from Thermobifida fusca on a DNA scaffold: potent design of an artificial cellulosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yutaro; Ozasa, Shiori; Kitaoka, Momoko; Noda, Shuhei; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Noriho

    2013-08-11

    A novel multi-cellulase conjugate assembled on a double-stranded DNA scaffold, a DNA-(endoglucanase)n conjugate, exhibited unique hydrolytic activity toward crystalline cellulose (Avicel) depending on the cellulase/DNA ratio on the DNA-based artificial cellulosome.

  1. A DNA microarray for the detection of point mutations and copy number variation causing familial hypercholesterolemia in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stef, Marianne A.; Palacios, Lourdes; Olano-Martín, Estibaliz; Foe-A-Man, Carolyn; van de Kerkhof, Laura; Klaaijsen, Lisette N.; Molano, Araitz; Schuurman, Ellen J.; Tejedor, Diego; Defesche, Joep C.

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate genetic cascade screening for familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Europe, two versions (7 and 9) of a DNA microarray were developed to detect the most frequent point mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB), and proprotein convertase

  2. Precise Coating of a Wide Range of DNA Templates by a Protein Polymer with a DNA Binding Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Estrich, Nicole A.; Werten, Marc W.T.; Maarel, van der Johan R.C.; Labean, Thomas H.; Wolf, de Frits A.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Vries, de Renko

    2017-01-01

    Emerging DNA-based nanotechnologies would benefit from the ability to modulate the properties (e.g., solubility, melting temperature, chemical stability) of diverse DNA templates (single molecules or origami nanostructures) through controlled, self-assembling coatings. We here introduce a DNA

  3. Extracellular transmission of a DNA mycovirus and its use as a natural fungicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Li, Bo; Fu, Yanping; Xie, Jiatao; Cheng, Jiasen; Ghabrial, Said A.; Li, Guoqing; Yi, Xianhong; Jiang, Daohong

    2013-01-01

    Mycoviruses are thought not to be infectious as free particles and to lack an extracellular phase in their life cycles, limiting the broad use of hypovirulence-associated mycoviruses in controlling fungal disease. Here, we demonstrate that purified particles of a DNA mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence-associated DNA virus 1 (SsHADV-1), are infectious when applied extracellularly to its host Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Virus particles isolated from an infected host can infect the hyphae of virus-free S. sclerotiorum directly when applied to hyphae grown on potato dextrose agar or sprayed on leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus, regardless of vegetative compatibility affiliation. When applied to leaves, the virus can suppress the development of lesions. SsHADV-1 can also reduce disease severity and enhance rapeseed yield significantly under field conditions. SsHADV-1 has a narrow host range; it can infect Sclerotinia minor and Sclerotinia nivalis, sister species of S. sclerotiorum, and cause debilitation of these two fungi, but cannot infect or transfect other tested fungi, such as Botrytis cinerea, which shares the same family with S. sclerotiorum. Virus particles are likely to be very stable on the leaves of A. thaliana plants because viral DNA could be detected at 15 d postinoculation on unwounded leaves and at 10 d postinoculation on wounded leaves, respectively; however, this virus could not infect and move in plant cells. Our findings may prompt a reconsideration of the generalization that mycoviruses lack an extracellular phase in their life cycles and stimulate the search for other DNA mycoviruses with potential use as natural fungicides. PMID:23297222

  4. Next-generation sequencing reveals recent horizontal transfer of a DNA transposon between divergent mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yupu; Qi, Yumin; Ma, Yajun; Xia, Ai; Sharakhov, Igor; Chen, Xiaoguang; Biedler, Jim; Ling, Erjun; Tu, Zhijian Jake

    2011-02-10

    Horizontal transfer of genetic material between complex organisms often involves transposable elements (TEs). For example, a DNA transposon mariner has been shown to undergo horizontal transfer between different orders of insects and between different phyla of animals. Here we report the discovery and characterization of an ITmD37D transposon, MJ1, in Anopheles sinensis. We show that some MJ1 elements in Aedes aegypti and An. sinensis contain intact open reading frames and share nearly 99% nucleotide identity over the entire transposon, which is unexpectedly high given that these two genera had diverged 145-200 million years ago. Chromosomal hybridization and TE-display showed that MJ1 copy number is low in An. sinensis. Among 24 mosquito species surveyed, MJ1 is only found in Ae. aegypti and the hyrcanus group of anopheline mosquitoes to which An. sinensis belongs. Phylogenetic analysis is consistent with horizontal transfer and provides the basis for inference of its timing and direction. Although report of horizontal transfer of DNA transposons between higher eukaryotes is accumulating, our analysis is one of a small number of cases in which horizontal transfer of nearly identical TEs among highly divergent species has been thoroughly investigated and strongly supported. Horizontal transfer involving mosquitoes is of particular interest because there are ongoing investigations of the possibility of spreading pathogen-resistant genes into mosquito populations to control malaria and other infectious diseases. The initial indication of horizontal transfer of MJ1 came from comparisons between a 0.4x coverage An. sinensis 454 sequence database and available TEs in mosquito genomes. Therefore we have shown that it is feasible to use low coverage sequencing to systematically uncover horizontal transfer events. Expanding such efforts across a wide range of species will generate novel insights into the relative frequency of horizontal transfer of different TEs and

  5. Selection of a DNA barcode for Nectriaceae from fungal whole-genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhaoqing; Zhao, Peng; Luo, Jing; Zhuang, Wenying; Yu, Zhihe

    2012-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a short segment of sequence that is able to distinguish species. A barcode must ideally contain enough variation to distinguish every individual species and be easily obtained. Fungi of Nectriaceae are economically important and show high species diversity. To establish a standard DNA barcode for this group of fungi, the genomes of Neurospora crassa and 30 other filamentous fungi were compared. The expect value was treated as a criterion to recognize homologous sequences. Four candidate markers, Hsp90, AAC, CDC48, and EF3, were tested for their feasibility as barcodes in the identification of 34 well-established species belonging to 13 genera of Nectriaceae. Two hundred and fifteen sequences were analyzed. Intra- and inter-specific variations and the success rate of PCR amplification and sequencing were considered as important criteria for estimation of the candidate markers. Ultimately, the partial EF3 gene met the requirements for a good DNA barcode: No overlap was found between the intra- and inter-specific pairwise distances. The smallest inter-specific distance of EF3 gene was 3.19%, while the largest intra-specific distance was 1.79%. In addition, there was a high success rate in PCR and sequencing for this gene (96.3%). CDC48 showed sufficiently high sequence variation among species, but the PCR and sequencing success rate was 84% using a single pair of primers. Although the Hsp90 and AAC genes had higher PCR and sequencing success rates (96.3% and 97.5%, respectively), overlapping occurred between the intra- and inter-specific variations, which could lead to misidentification. Therefore, we propose the EF3 gene as a possible DNA barcode for the nectriaceous fungi.

  6. ITS1: a DNA barcode better than ITS2 in eukaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Cun; Liu, Chang; Huang, Liang; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Chen, Haimei; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Cai, Dayong; Li, Jian-Qin

    2015-05-01

    A DNA barcode is a short piece of DNA sequence used for species determination and discovery. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS/ITS2) region has been proposed as the standard DNA barcode for fungi and seed plants and has been widely used in DNA barcoding analyses for other biological groups, for example algae, protists and animals. The ITS region consists of both ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Here, a large-scale meta-analysis was carried out to compare ITS1 and ITS2 from three aspects: PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and species discrimination, in terms of the presence of DNA barcoding gaps, species discrimination efficiency, sequence length distribution, GC content distribution and primer universality. In total, 85 345 sequence pairs in 10 major groups of eukaryotes, including ascomycetes, basidiomycetes, liverworts, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, monocotyledons, eudicotyledons, insects and fishes, covering 611 families, 3694 genera, and 19 060 species, were analysed. Using similarity-based methods, we calculated species discrimination efficiencies for ITS1 and ITS2 in all major groups, families and genera. Using Fisher's exact test, we found that ITS1 has significantly higher efficiencies than ITS2 in 17 of the 47 families and 20 of the 49 genera, which are sample-rich. By in silico PCR amplification evaluation, primer universality of the extensively applied ITS1 primers was found superior to that of ITS2 primers. Additionally, shorter length of amplification product and lower GC content was discovered to be two other advantages of ITS1 for sequencing. In summary, ITS1 represents a better DNA barcode than ITS2 for eukaryotic species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Development of a DNA barcoding system for seagrasses: successful but not simple.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Lucas

    Full Text Available Seagrasses, a unique group of submerged flowering plants, profoundly influence the physical, chemical and biological environments of coastal waters through their high primary productivity and nutrient recycling ability. They provide habitat for aquatic life, alter water flow, stabilize the ground and mitigate the impact of nutrient pollution. at the coast region. Although on a global scale seagrasses represent less than 0.1% of the angiosperm taxa, the taxonomical ambiguity in delineating seagrass species is high. Thus, the taxonomy of several genera is unsolved. While seagrasses are capable of performing both, sexual and asexual reproduction, vegetative reproduction is common and sexual progenies are always short lived and epimeral in nature. This makes species differentiation often difficult, especially for non-taxonomists since the flower as a distinct morphological trait is missing. Our goal is to develop a DNA barcoding system assisting also non-taxonomists to identify regional seagrass species. The results will be corroborated by publicly available sequence data. The main focus is on the 14 described seagrass species of India, supplemented with seagrasses from temperate regions. According to the recommendations of the Consortium for the Barcoding of Life (CBOL rbcL and matK were used in this study. After optimization of the DNA extraction method from preserved seagrass material, the respective sequences were amplified from all species analyzed. Tree- and character-based approaches demonstrate that the rbcL sequence fragment is capable of resolving up to family and genus level. Only matK sequences were reliable in resolving species and partially the ecotype level. Additionally, a plastidic gene spacer was included in the analysis to confirm the identification level. Although the analysis of these three loci solved several nodes, a few complexes remained unsolved, even when constructing a combined tree for all three loci. Our approaches

  8. Methods for interpreting lists of affected genes obtained in a DNA microarray experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedegaard Jakob

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper was to describe and compare the methods used and the results obtained by the participants in a joint EADGENE (European Animal Disease Genomic Network of Excellence and SABRE (Cutting Edge Genomics for Sustainable Animal Breeding workshop focusing on post analysis of microarray data. The participating groups were provided with identical lists of microarray probes, including test statistics for three different contrasts, and the normalised log-ratios for each array, to be used as the starting point for interpreting the affected probes. The data originated from a microarray experiment conducted to study the host reactions in broilers occurring shortly after a secondary challenge with either a homologous or heterologous species of Eimeria. Results Several conceptually different analytical approaches, using both commercial and public available software, were applied by the participating groups. The following tools were used: Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, MAPPFinder, LIMMA, GOstats, GOEAST, GOTM, Globaltest, TopGO, ArrayUnlock, Pathway Studio, GIST and AnnotationDbi. The main focus of the approaches was to utilise the relation between probes/genes and their gene ontology and pathways to interpret the affected probes/genes. The lack of a well-annotated chicken genome did though limit the possibilities to fully explore the tools. The main results from these analyses showed that the biological interpretation is highly dependent on the statistical method used but that some common biological conclusions could be reached. Conclusion It is highly recommended to test different analytical methods on the same data set and compare the results to obtain a reliable biological interpretation of the affected genes in a DNA microarray experiment.

  9. Development of a DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus type 16 oncoprotein E6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shiwen; Ji, Hongxiu; Trimble, Cornelia; He, Liangmei; Tsai, Ya-Chea; Yeatermeyer, Jessica; Boyd, David A K; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2004-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly type 16 (HPV-16), is present in more than 99% of cervical cancers. The HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 are constantly expressed and therefore represent ideal targets for HPV vaccine development. We previously developed DNA vaccines encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to HPV-16 E7 and generated potent E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell immune responses and antitumor effects against an E7-expressing tumor. Since vaccines targeting E6 also represent an important strategy for controlling HPV-associated lesions, we developed a DNA vaccine encoding CRT linked to E6 (CRT/E6). Our results indicated that the CRT/E6 DNA vaccine, but not a wild-type E6 DNA vaccine, generated significant E6-specific CD8(+) T-cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. Mapping of the immunodominant epitope of E6 revealed that an E6 peptide comprising amino acids (aa) 48 to 57 (E6 aa48-57), presented by H-2K(b), is the optimal peptide and that the region of E6 comprising aa 50 to 57 represents the minimal core sequence required for activating E6-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. We also demonstrated that E6 aa48-57 contains cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes naturally presented by E6-expressing TC-1 cells. Vaccination with a CRT/E6 but not a CRT/mtE6 (lacking aa 50 to 57 of E6) DNA vaccine could protect vaccinated mice from challenge with E6-expressing TC-1 tumors. Thus, our data indicate that E6 aa48-57 contains the immunodominant epitope and that a CRT/E6 DNA vaccine may be useful for control of HPV infection and HPV-associated lesions.

  10. Molecular and immunological characterization of a DNA-launched yellow fever virus 17D infectious clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Lukashevich, Igor S; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Franco, David

    2015-04-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV)-17D is an empirically developed, highly effective live-attenuated vaccine that has been administered to human beings for almost a century. YFV-17D has stood as a paradigm for a successful viral vaccine, and has been exploited as a potential virus vector for the development of recombinant vaccines against other diseases. In this study, a DNA-launched YFV-17D construct (pBeloBAC-FLYF) was explored as a new modality to the standard vaccine to combine the commendable features of both DNA vaccine and live-attenuated viral vaccine. The DNA-launched YFV-17D construct was characterized extensively both in cell culture and in mice. High titres of YFV-17D were generated upon transfection of the DNA into cells, whereas a mutant with deletion in the capsid-coding region (pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC) was restricted to a single round of infection, with no release of progeny virus. Homologous prime-boost immunization of AAD mice with both pBeloBAC-FLYF and pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC elicited specific dose-dependent cellular immune response against YFV-17D. Vaccination of A129 mice with pBeloBAC-FLYF resulted in the induction of YFV-specific neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinated subjects. These promising results underlined the potential of the DNA-launched YFV both as an alternative to standard YFV-17D vaccination and as a vaccine platform for the development of DNA-based recombinant YFV vaccines. © 2015.

  11. Next-generation sequencing reveals recent horizontal transfer of a DNA transposon between divergent mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupu Diao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal transfer of genetic material between complex organisms often involves transposable elements (TEs. For example, a DNA transposon mariner has been shown to undergo horizontal transfer between different orders of insects and between different phyla of animals. Here we report the discovery and characterization of an ITmD37D transposon, MJ1, in Anopheles sinensis. We show that some MJ1 elements in Aedes aegypti and An. sinensis contain intact open reading frames and share nearly 99% nucleotide identity over the entire transposon, which is unexpectedly high given that these two genera had diverged 145-200 million years ago. Chromosomal hybridization and TE-display showed that MJ1 copy number is low in An. sinensis. Among 24 mosquito species surveyed, MJ1 is only found in Ae. aegypti and the hyrcanus group of anopheline mosquitoes to which An. sinensis belongs. Phylogenetic analysis is consistent with horizontal transfer and provides the basis for inference of its timing and direction. Although report of horizontal transfer of DNA transposons between higher eukaryotes is accumulating, our analysis is one of a small number of cases in which horizontal transfer of nearly identical TEs among highly divergent species has been thoroughly investigated and strongly supported. Horizontal transfer involving mosquitoes is of particular interest because there are ongoing investigations of the possibility of spreading pathogen-resistant genes into mosquito populations to control malaria and other infectious diseases. The initial indication of horizontal transfer of MJ1 came from comparisons between a 0.4x coverage An. sinensis 454 sequence database and available TEs in mosquito genomes. Therefore we have shown that it is feasible to use low coverage sequencing to systematically uncover horizontal transfer events. Expanding such efforts across a wide range of species will generate novel insights into the relative frequency of horizontal transfer of

  12. A DNA barcode library for Germany's mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinière, Jérôme; Hendrich, Lars; Balke, Michael; Beermann, Arne J; König, Tobias; Hess, Monika; Koch, Stefan; Müller, Reinhard; Leese, Florian; Hebert, Paul D N; Hausmann, Axel; Schubart, Christoph D; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    Mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera) are prominent representatives of aquatic macroinvertebrates, commonly used as indicator organisms for water quality and ecosystem assessments. However, unambiguous morphological identification of EPT species, especially their immature life stages, is a challenging, yet fundamental task. A comprehensive DNA barcode library based upon taxonomically well-curated specimens is needed to overcome the problematic identification. Once available, this library will support the implementation of fast, cost-efficient and reliable DNA-based identifications and assessments of ecological status. This study represents a major step towards a DNA barcode reference library as it covers for two-thirds of Germany's EPT species including 2,613 individuals belonging to 363 identified species. As such, it provides coverage for 38 of 44 families (86%) and practically all major bioindicator species. DNA barcode compliant sequences (≥500 bp) were recovered from 98.74% of the analysed specimens. Whereas most species (325, i.e., 89.53%) were unambiguously assigned to a single Barcode Index Number (BIN) by its COI sequence, 38 species (18 Ephemeroptera, nine Plecoptera and 11 Trichoptera) were assigned to a total of 89 BINs. Most of these additional BINs formed nearest neighbour clusters, reflecting the discrimination of geographical subclades of a currently recognized species. BIN sharing was uncommon, involving only two species pairs of Ephemeroptera. Interestingly, both maximum pairwise and nearest neighbour distances were substantially higher for Ephemeroptera compared to Plecoptera and Trichoptera, possibly indicating older speciation events, stronger positive selection or faster rate of molecular evolution. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Development of a DNA barcoding system for seagrasses: successful but not simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Christina; Thangaradjou, Thirunavakkarasu; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Seagrasses, a unique group of submerged flowering plants, profoundly influence the physical, chemical and biological environments of coastal waters through their high primary productivity and nutrient recycling ability. They provide habitat for aquatic life, alter water flow, stabilize the ground and mitigate the impact of nutrient pollution. at the coast region. Although on a global scale seagrasses represent less than 0.1% of the angiosperm taxa, the taxonomical ambiguity in delineating seagrass species is high. Thus, the taxonomy of several genera is unsolved. While seagrasses are capable of performing both, sexual and asexual reproduction, vegetative reproduction is common and sexual progenies are always short lived and epimeral in nature. This makes species differentiation often difficult, especially for non-taxonomists since the flower as a distinct morphological trait is missing. Our goal is to develop a DNA barcoding system assisting also non-taxonomists to identify regional seagrass species. The results will be corroborated by publicly available sequence data. The main focus is on the 14 described seagrass species of India, supplemented with seagrasses from temperate regions. According to the recommendations of the Consortium for the Barcoding of Life (CBOL) rbcL and matK were used in this study. After optimization of the DNA extraction method from preserved seagrass material, the respective sequences were amplified from all species analyzed. Tree- and character-based approaches demonstrate that the rbcL sequence fragment is capable of resolving up to family and genus level. Only matK sequences were reliable in resolving species and partially the ecotype level. Additionally, a plastidic gene spacer was included in the analysis to confirm the identification level. Although the analysis of these three loci solved several nodes, a few complexes remained unsolved, even when constructing a combined tree for all three loci. Our approaches contribute to the

  14. Particle integrity, sampling, and application of a DNA-tagged tracer for aerosol transport studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeser, Cynthia Jeanne [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-07-21

    Aerosols are an ever-present part of our daily environment and have extensive effects on both human and environmental health. Particles in the inhalable range (1-10 μm diameter) are of particular concern because their deposition in the lung can lead to a variety of illnesses including allergic reactions, viral or bacterial infections, and cancer. Understanding the transport of inhalable aerosols across both short and long distances is necessary to predict human exposures to aerosols. To assess the transport of hazardous aerosols, surrogate tracer particles are required to measure their transport through occupied spaces. These tracer particles must not only possess similar transport characteristics to those of interest but also be easily distinguished from the background at low levels and survive the environmental conditions of the testing environment. A previously-developed DNA-tagged particle (DNATrax), composed of food-grade sugar and a DNA oligonucleotide as a “barcode” label, shows promise as a new aerosol tracer. Herein, the use of DNATrax material is validated for use in both indoor and outdoor environments. Utilizing passive samplers made of materials commonly found in indoor environments followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for endpoint particle detection, particles detection was achieved up to 90 m from the aerosolization location and across shorter distances with high spatial resolution. The unique DNA label and PCR assay specificity were leveraged to perform multiple simultaneous experiments. This allowed the assessment of experimental reproducibility, a rare occurrence among aerosol field tests. To transition to outdoor testing, the solid material provides some protection of the DNA label when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, with 60% of the DNA remaining intact after 60 minutes under a germicidal lamp and the rate of degradation declining with irradiation time. Additionally, exposure of the DNATrax material using

  15. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Charlotte Wallenhammar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to planting, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 60% of 45 fields on 10 of 18 farms. In 2014, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 44% of 59 fields in 14 of 36 farms, in the main winter OSR producing region in southern Sweden. P. brassicae was present indicative of a risk for >10% yield loss with susceptible cultivars (>1300 DNA copies g soil−1 in 47% and 44% of fields in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Furthermore, P. brassicae DNA was indicative of sites at risk of complete crop failure if susceptible cultivars were grown (>50 000 copies g−1 soil in 14% and 8% of fields in 2013 and 2014, respectively. A survey of all fields at Lanna research station in western Sweden showed that P. brassicae was spread throughout the farm, as only three of the fields (20% showed infection levels below the detection limit for P.brassicae DNA, while the level was >50,000 DNA copies g−1 soil in 20% of the fields. Soil-borne spread is of critical importance and soil scraped off footwear showed levels of up to 682 million spores g−1 soil. Soil testing is an important tool for determining the presence of P. brassicae and providing an indication of potential yield loss, e.g., in advisory work on planning for a sustainable OSR crop rotation. This soil test is gaining acceptance as a tool that increases the likelihood of success in precision agriculture and in applied research conducted in commercial oilseed fields and at research stations. The present application highlights the importance of

  16. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-07-29

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world's attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg(2+) ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species.

  17. Double-strand break repair: are Rad51/RecA--DNA joints barriers to DNA replication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, A

    2001-06-01

    The central step of homologous recombination is the DNA strand exchange reaction catalyzed by bacterial RecA or eukaryotic Rad51. Besides Rad51-mediated synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA), DNA ends can promote replication in Escherichia coli (recombination-dependent replication, RDR) and yeast (break-induced replication, BIR). However, what causes a DNA end to be repaired via SDSA or via BIR/RDR? I propose that Rad51/RecA--DNA plectonemic joints act as barriers to DNA replication and that BIR/RDR is only possible when the DNA polymerase that synthesizes DNA from the invading 3' end does not encounter RecA/Rad51--DNA joints in its path.

  18. Development of a DNA Microarray to Detect Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Identified in the National Center for Biotechnology Information Database

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Jonathan G.; Lindsey, Rebecca L.; Rondeau, Gaelle; Porwollik, Steffen; Long, Fred; McClelland, Michael; Jackson, Charlene R.; Englen, Mark D.; Meinersmann, Richard J.; Berrang, Mark E.; Davis, Johnnie A.; Barrett, John B.; Turpin, Jennifer B.; Thitaram, Sutawee N.; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.

    2010-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance (AR), the genetic elements responsible must be identified. Due to the myriad of possible genes, a high-density genotyping technique is needed for initial screening. To achieve this, AR genes in the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank database were identified by their annotations and compiled into a nonredundant list of 775 genes. A DNA microarray was constructed of 70mer oligonucelotide probes designed...

  19. Simultaneous binding to the tracking strand, displaced strand and the duplex of a DNA fork enhances unwinding by Dda helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarattuthodiyil, Suja; Byrd, Alicia K.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between helicases and the tracking strand of a DNA substrate are well-characterized; however, the role of the displaced strand is a less understood characteristic of DNA unwinding. Dda helicase exhibited greater processivity when unwinding a DNA fork compared to a ss/ds DNA junction substrate. The lag phase in the unwinding progress curve was reduced for the forked DNA compared to the ss/ds junction. Fewer kinetic steps were required to unwind the fork compared to the ss/ds junction, suggesting that binding to the fork leads to disruption of the duplex. DNA footprinting confirmed that interaction of Dda with a fork leads to two base pairs being disrupted whereas no disruption of base pairing was observed with the ss/ds junction. Neutralization of the phosphodiester backbone resulted in a DNA-footprinting pattern similar to that observed with the ss/ds junction, consistent with disruption of the interaction between Dda and the displaced strand. Several basic residues in the 1A domain which were previously proposed to bind to the incoming duplex DNA were replaced with alanines, resulting in apparent loss of interaction with the duplex. Taken together, these results suggest that Dda interaction with the tracking strand, displaced strand and duplex coordinates DNA unwinding. PMID:25249618

  20. Examining the effects of a DNA fingerprinting workshop on science teachers' professional development and student learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Duygu

    behavior. The goal is to understand what factors affect teachers' decision making to implement the new knowledge and skills in their classrooms. For this purpose, the study focuses on the effects of a DNA fingerprinting workshop, which has been developed and is regularly offered by a large Midwestern university in the United States for secondary science teachers and their students through cooperation between the university and a large Midwestern public school district. The workshop focuses on the biotechnology applications of genetics---specifically, use of DNA fingerprinting technology in different areas of social life---while forensic science is emphasized. Results indicate that the teachers' motivation to attend the DNA Fingerprinting professional development workshop was mainly influenced by two variables: (1) the need to improve content knowledge and skills, and (2) requirements associated with current educational policies. Level of content knowledge was also found to be a factor contributing to teachers' motivation to implement the workshop. Concerns related to student maturity and classroom management were also identified as factors influencing teachers' implementation behavior. Evidence that the DNA Fingerprinting workshop can be successfully implemented by classroom teachers was obtained. The DNA fingerprinting workshop was found to be a successful model for packaging professional development experiences for content intensive areas.

  1. Exploring a DNA Sequence for the Three-Dimensional Structure Determination of a Silver(I)-Mediated C-C Base Pair in a DNA Duplex By (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairaku, Takenori; Furuita, Kyoko; Sato, Hajime; Kondo, Yoshinori; Kojima, Chojiro; Ono, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we discovered novel silver(I)-mediated cytosine-cytosine base pair (C-Ag(I)-C) in DNA duplexes. To understand the properties of these base pairs, we searched for a DNA sequence that can be used in NMR structure determination. After extensive sequence optimizations, a non-symmetric 15-base-paired DNA duplex with a single C-Ag(I)-C base pair flanked by 14 A-T base pairs was selected. In spite of its challenging length for NMR measurements (30 independent residues) with small sequence variation, we could assign most non-exchangeable protons (254 out of 270) and imino protons for structure determination.

  2. A DNA Vaccine for Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Protects Against Disease and Death in Two Lethal Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-18

    A DNA vaccine for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever protects against disease and death 1 in two lethal mouse models 2 Aura R. Garrison1¶*, Charles J...TCID50 assay on 219 SW13 cells in 96-well, black -walled, clear-bottom plates (Corning). Plates were incubated with 220 tenfold dilutions of the CCHFVLP...Reed and Muench formula (32). 224 CCHF VLP neutralization assay 225 One day prior to the assay, 50,000 SW13 cells were seeded into a 96 well black

  3. Entrapping of fullerenes, nanotubes, and inorganic nanoparticles by a DNA-chitosan complex: a method for nanomaterials removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Anatoly A; Maeda, Noriko; Pu, Shengyan; Murata, Shizuaki

    2013-05-07

    We report a protocol for entrapping of various water-dispersed nanomaterials: fullerenes, multiwall carbon nanotubes, quantum dots (semiconductor nanoparticles), and gold nanorods, into a DNA-chitosan complex. In contrast to small-size nanomaterial particles, the bulky DNA-chitosan interpolyelectrolyte complex incorporating the dispersed nanomaterials can be easily separated from aqueous media by centrifugation, filtration, or decantation. While the removal of nanoparticles by centrifugation is equally efficient for every type of nanoparticles and reaches 100%, the higher efficiency of the nanomaterials removal by other two methods is favored by larger size of nanoparticles. The application of this entrapping protocol for removal of nanomaterials from water is discussed.

  4. Integrating a DNA barcoding project with an ecological survey: a case study on temperate intertidal polychaete communities in Qingdao, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Zhinan; Chen, Haiyan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hui; Guo, Lei; Pan, Haijian

    2010-07-01

    In this study, we integrated a DNA barcoding project with an ecological survey on intertidal polychaete communities and investigated the utility of CO1 gene sequence as a DNA barcode for the classification of the intertidal polychaetes. Using 16S rDNA as a complementary marker and combining morphological and ecological characterization, some of dominant and common polychaete species from Chinese coasts were assessed for their taxonomic status. We obtained 22 haplotype gene sequences of 13 taxa, including 10 CO1 sequences and 12 16S rDNA sequences. Based on intra- and inter-specific distances, we built phylogenetic trees using the neighbor-joining method. Our study suggested that the mitochondrial CO1 gene was a valid DNA barcoding marker for species identification in polychaetes, but other genes, such as 16S rDNA, could be used as a complementary genetic marker. For more accurate species identification and effective testing of species hypothesis, DNA barcoding should be incorporated with morphological, ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic information. The application of DNA barcoding and molecular identification in the ecological survey on the intertidal polychaete communities demonstrated the feasibility of integrating DNA taxonomy and ecology.

  5. A feasible solution to the beam-angle-optimization problem in radiotherapy planning with a DNA-based genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjie; Lei, Jie

    2010-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is now becoming a powerful clinical technique to improve the therapeutic radio for cancer treatment. It has been demonstrated that selection of suitable beam angles is quite valuable for most of the treatment plans, especially for the complicated tumor cases and when limited number of beams is used. However, beam-angle optimization (BAO) remains a challenging inverse problem mainly due to the huge computation time. This paper introduced a DNA genetic algorithm (DNA-GA) to solve the BAO problem aiming to improve the optimization efficiency. A feasible mapping was constructed between the universal DNA-GA algorithm and the specified engineering problem of BAO. Specifically, a triplet code was used to represent a beam angle, and the angles of several beams in a plan composed a DNA individual. A bit-mutation strategy was designed to set different segments in DNA individuals with different mutation probabilities; and also, the dynamic probability of structure mutation operations was designed to further improve the evolutionary process. The results on simulated and clinical cases showed that DNA-GA is feasible and effective for the BAO problem in IMRT planning, and to some extent, is faster to obtain the optimized results than GA.

  6. The predictive value of the maximum likelihood estimator of the number of contributors to a DNA mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haned, H; Pène, L; Sauvage, F; Pontier, D

    2011-08-01

    We propose to quantify the accuracy of a likelihood-based estimator that was recently proposed for the determination of the number of contributors to a DNA mixture, when genetic data alone is considered [H. Haned, L. Pène, J.R. Lobry, A.B. Dufour, D. Pontier, Estimating the number of contributors to forensic DNA mixtures: does maximum likelihood perform better than maximum allele count? J. Forensic Sci., in press]. Using Bayes' theorem, we derive a formula for the calculation of the predictive value (PV) of the likelihood-based estimator. The PV gives the probability that a DNA stain contains the DNAs of i people given that the maximum likelihood estimator gave an estimate of i contributors for this stain. We illustrate the PV calculations for two different types of DNA evidence: traces and body fluids. The PV varied according to the number of contributors involved in the DNA stain. Setting the maximum number of possible contributors to five, the lowest predictive values were scored for five-person mixtures with a minimum value of 0.26 for traces, but values were always above 0.94 for stains comprising one, two or three contributors, for both traces and body fluids. Values remained relatively high for four-person mixtures with a minimum value of 0.69. These findings confirm that likelihood-maximization is a powerful approach for the determination of the number of contributors to forensic DNA mixtures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The RecQ helicase-topoisomerase III-Rmi1 complex: a DNA structure-specific 'dissolvasome'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    structures, and we propose here that it functions in a coordinated fashion as a DNA structure-specific 'dissolvasome'. Little is known about how the RTR complex might be regulated or targeted to various DNA structures in vivo. Recent findings indicate that the components of the RTR complex might activate......RecQ helicases, together with topoisomerase III and Rmi1 family proteins, form an evolutionarily conserved complex that is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. This complex, which we term RTR, is capable of, or has been implicated in, the processing of a diverse array of DNA...... the cell cycle checkpoint machinery as well as be a target of checkpoint kinases, suggesting that these events are crucial to ensure faithful DNA replication and chromosome segregation....

  8. A DNA vaccine encoding a cell-surface protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans protects gnotobiotic rats from caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, M W; Bian, Z; Peng, Z X; Zhong, Y; Chen, Z; Peng, B; Jia, R

    2002-11-01

    A cell-surface protein antigen (PAc) of Streptococcus mutans is considered a virulence factor because it may mediate initial attachment of Streptococcus mutans to tooth surfaces. Thus, inhibiting PAc is predicted to provide protection against caries. To develop vaccines against dental caries, we constructed a DNA vaccine, pCIA-P, which encodes two high-conservative regions of PAc. Expression of the recombinant protein was obtained in eukaryotic cells in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we provide evidence that fewer caries lesions, and high levels of PAc-specific salivary IgA antibody and serum IgG antibody, were observed in gnotobiotic rats following targeted salivary gland (TSG) administration of pCIA-P. This study shows that the recombinant DNA vaccine pCIA-P could induce protective anti-caries immune responses and that TSG immunization is a promising strategy for the inhibition of dental caries.

  9. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin and Mark Ragan.

  10. A DNA Structural Alphabet Distinguishes Structural Features of DNA Bound to Regulatory Proteins and in the Nucleosome Core Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bohdan; Božíková, Paulína; Čech, Petr; Svozil, Daniel; Černý, Jiří

    2017-10-18

    We analyzed the structural behavior of DNA complexed with regulatory proteins and the nucleosome core particle (NCP). The three-dimensional structures of almost 25 thousand dinucleotide steps from more than 500 sequentially non-redundant crystal structures were classified by using DNA structural alphabet CANA (Conformational Alphabet of Nucleic Acids) and associations between ten CANA letters and sixteen dinucleotide sequences were investigated. The associations showed features discriminating between specific and non-specific binding of DNA to proteins. Important is the specific role of two DNA structural forms, A-DNA, and BII-DNA, represented by the CANA letters AAA and BB2: AAA structures are avoided in non-specific NCP complexes, where the wrapping of the DNA duplex is explained by the periodic occurrence of BB2 every 10.3 steps. In both regulatory and NCP complexes, the extent of bending of the DNA local helical axis does not influence proportional representation of the CANA alphabet letters, namely the relative incidences of AAA and BB2 remain constant in bent and straight duplexes.

  11. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid') built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging' is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein. PMID:28134243

  12. A DNA Vaccine Encoding Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase of Brucella abortus Induces Protective Immunity in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate, Angel A.; Céspedes, Sandra; Cabrera, Alex; Rivers, Rodolfo; González, Andrés; Muñoz, Carola; Folch, Hugo; Andrews, Edilia

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding Brucella abortus Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). Intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA carrying the SOD gene (pcDNA-SOD) into BALB/c mice elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses. Animals injected with pcDNA-SOD developed SOD-specific antibodies which exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the DNA vaccine elicited a T-cell-proliferative response and also induced the production of gamma interferon, but not interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-4, upon restimulation with either recombinant SOD or crude Brucella protein, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in mice. The pcDNA-SOD (but not the control vector) induced a strong, significant level of protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with B. abortus virulent strain 2308; the level of protection was similar to the one induced by B. abortus vaccine strain RB51. Altogether, these data suggest that pcDNA-SOD is a good candidate for use in future studies of vaccination against brucellosis. PMID:12933826

  13. Instability of CTG Repeats is Governed by the Position of a DNA Base Lesion through Base Excision Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zunzhen; Liu, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions and deletions are associated with human neurodegeneration and cancer. However, their underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Recent studies have demonstrated that CAG repeat expansions can be initiated by oxidative DNA base damage and fulfilled by base excision repair (BER), suggesting active roles for oxidative DNA damage and BER in TNR instability. Here, we provide the first evidence that oxidative DNA damage can induce CTG repeat deletions along with limited expansions in human cells. Biochemical characterization of BER in the context of (CTG)20 repeats further revealed that repeat instability correlated with the position of a base lesion in the repeat tract. A lesion located at the 5′-end of CTG repeats resulted in expansion, whereas a lesion located either in the middle or the 3′-end of the repeats led to deletions only. The positioning effects appeared to be determined by the formation of hairpins at various locations on the template and the damaged strands that were bypassed by DNA polymerase β and processed by flap endonuclease 1 with different efficiency. Our study indicates that the position of a DNA base lesion governs whether TNR is expanded or deleted through BER. PMID:23468897

  14. Direct visualization of the reaction transformation and signal amplification in a DNA molecular machine with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rui; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shusheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, as a proof of concept, the signal amplification in an artificial DNA molecular machine was directly visualized via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The molecular machine brought about obvious morphology change in DNA nanostructures as well as signal amplifications. On one hand, through a triggered and autonomically repeated RCA, a DNA nano-complex featuring a "locked" circular DNA template (serving as raw feed) was converted into a long periodically repeated strand, i.e., the RCA products. On the other hand, this RCA was repeated in three controllable reaction phases, bring about progressive signal amplification. It was testified that the RCA products (presented as long thread-like fluorescent objects) can be easily distinguished from the inputted DNA probes (presented as fluorescent dots), thus the transformation in reaction can be visualized. Also, by quantitive counting of the aforementioned fluorescence objects, the progress of the reaction through the phases, along with time, and over the lysozyme concentration can be demonstrated through TIRFM visualization. Overall, it was demonstrated that TIRFM is an efficient approach to quantitatively visualize the biochemical processes at single-molecule level.

  15. ARG1 (altered response to gravity) encodes a DnaJ-like protein that potentially interacts with the cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedbrook, J. C.; Chen, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Gravitropism allows plant organs to direct their growth at a specific angle from the gravity vector, promoting upward growth for shoots and downward growth for roots. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying gravitropic signal transduction. We found that mutations in the ARG1 locus of Arabidopsis thaliana alter root and hypocotyl gravitropism without affecting phototropism, root growth responses to phytohormones or inhibitors of auxin transport, or starch accumulation. The positional cloning of ARG1 revealed a DnaJ-like protein containing a coiled-coil region homologous to coiled coils found in cytoskeleton-interacting proteins. These data suggest that ARG1 participates in a gravity-signaling process involving the cytoskeleton. A combination of Northern blot studies and analysis of ARG1-GUS fusion-reporter expression in transgenic plants demonstrated that ARG1 is expressed in all organs. Ubiquitous ARG1 expression in Arabidopsis and the identification of an ortholog in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that ARG1 is involved in other essential processes.

  16. Building a DNA Barcode Reference Library for the True Butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Peninsula Malaysia: What about the Subspecies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John-James; Sing, Kong-Wah; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and subspecies. Analyses confirmed the capacity of the new DNA barcode reference library to distinguish the vast majority of species (92%) and revealed that most subspecies possessed unique DNA barcodes (84%). In some cases conspecific subspecies exhibited genetic distances between their DNA barcodes that are typically seen between species, and these were often taxa that have previously been regarded as full species. Subspecies designations as shorthand for geographically and morphologically differentiated groups provide a useful heuristic for assessing how such groups correlate with clustering patterns of DNA barcodes, especially as the number of DNA barcodes per species in reference libraries increases. Our study demonstrates the value in attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records as they can reveal a history of taxonomic concepts and expose important units of biodiversity. PMID:24282514

  17. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino (Rutgers); (LBNL); (Connecticut); (TJU); (MSU)

    2017-01-30

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid’) built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging’ is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein.

  18. A DNA polymerase alpha accessory protein, Mcl1, is required for propagation of centromere structures in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoaki Natsume

    Full Text Available Specialized chromatin exists at centromeres and must be precisely transmitted during DNA replication. The mechanisms involved in the propagation of these structures remain elusive. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two chromatin domains: the central CENP-A(Cnp1 kinetochore domain and flanking heterochromatin domains. Here we show that fission yeast Mcl1, a DNA polymerase alpha (Pol alpha accessory protein, is critical for maintenance of centromeric chromatin. In a screen for mutants that alleviate both central domain and outer repeat silencing, we isolated several cos mutants, of which cos1 is allelic to mcl1. The mcl1-101 mutation causes reduced CENP-A(Cnp1 in the central domain and an aberrant increase in histone acetylation in both domains. These phenotypes are also observed in a mutant of swi7(+, which encodes a catalytic subunit of Pol alpha. Mcl1 forms S-phase-specific nuclear foci, which colocalize with those of PCNA and Pol alpha. These results suggest that Mcl1 and Pol alpha are required for propagation of centromere chromatin structures during DNA replication.

  19. Proteomic identification of histone post-translational modifications and proteins enriched at a DNA double-strand break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pingping; Byrum, Stephanie; Fowler, Faith C; Pal, Sangita; Tackett, Alan J; Tyler, Jessica K

    2017-11-02

    Here, we use ChAP-MS (chromatin affinity purification with mass spectrometry), for the affinity purification of a sequence-specific single-copy endogenous chromosomal locus containing a DNA double-strand break (DSB). We found multiple new histone post-translational modifications enriched on chromatin bearing a DSB from budding yeast. One of these, methylation of histone H3 on lysine 125, has not previously been reported. Among over 100 novel proteins enriched at a DSB were the phosphatase Sit4, the RNA pol II degradation factor Def1, the mRNA export protein Yra1 and the HECT E3 ligase Tom1. Each of these proteins was required for resistance to radiomimetics, and many were required for resistance to heat, which we show here to cause a defect in DSB repair in yeast. Yra1 and Def1 were required for DSB repair per se, while Sit4 was required for rapid inactivation of the DNA damage checkpoint after DSB repair. Thus, our unbiased proteomics approach has led to the unexpected discovery of novel roles for these and other proteins in the DNA damage response. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Development of a DNA Array for the Simple Identification of Major Filamentous Fungi in the Beverage Manufacturing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Fuyuki; Miyamoto, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi were isolated from the indoor environment of a soft drink manufacturing plant and ordinary residences. The isolated strains were identified based on morphological observation and the nucleotide sequences of the region near the D2 region of the 26S rDNA. Three genera (Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Cladosporium) accounted for 48.1% of the fungal strains detected in the manufacturing plant and 75.3% in residences. A DNA array for identification of 15 genera and 26 species of filamentous fungi that were most frequently isolated from the manufacturing plant was developed. Genus- and species-specific probes with 13- to 20-mer were designed on the basis of the nucleotide sequences in the D2 region. The probes were affixed to a microscope slide after modifying an amino group at the 5'or 3'end. To prevent erroneous identification, 2 or 3 probes were designed for each of the target genera and species. The developed DNA array method correctly identified 9 genera (Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium, Curvularia, Exophiala, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma, and Trichoderma) and 26 species belonging to 6 genera (Aspergillus, Neosartorya, Byssochlamys, Talaromyces, Paecilomyces, and Purpureocillium) in the strains isolated from the indoor environment. Identification results obtained by this DNA array method of fungi isolated from the manufacturing plant were consistent with those by the conventional method.

  1. Controlling the stoichiometry and strand polarity of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex structure by using a DNA origami frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Arivazhagan; Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Lan Thao Tran, Phong; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Guanine-rich oligonucleotides often show a strong tendency to form supramolecular architecture, the so-called G-quadruplex structure. Because of the biological significance, it is now considered to be one of the most important conformations of DNA. Here, we describe the direct visualization and single-molecule analysis of the formation of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex in KCl solution. The conformational changes were carried out by incorporating two duplex DNAs, with G–G mismatch repeats in the middle, inside a DNA origami frame and monitoring the topology change of the strands. In the absence of KCl, incorporated duplexes had no interaction and laid parallel to each other. Addition of KCl induced the formation of a G-quadruplex structure by stably binding the duplexes to each other in the middle. Such a quadruplex formation allowed the DNA synapsis without disturbing the duplex regions of the participating sequences, and resulted in an X-shaped structure that was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Further, the G-quadruplex formation in KCl solution and its disruption in KCl-free buffer were analyzed in real-time. The orientation of the G-quadruplex is often difficult to control and investigate using traditional biochemical methods. However, our method using DNA origami could successfully control the strand orientations, topology and stoichiometry of the G-quadruplex. PMID:23863846

  2. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Takahashi, Masateru

    2018-01-24

    The deep-sea brines of the Red Sea are remote and unexplored environments characterized by high temperatures, anoxic water, and elevated concentrations of salt and heavy metals. This environment provides a rare system to study the interplay between halophilic and thermophilic adaptation in biologic macromolecules. The present article reports the first DNA polymerase with halophilic and thermophilic features. Biochemical and structural analysis by Raman and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the charge distribution on the protein’s surface mediates the structural balance between stability for thermal adaptation and flexibility for counteracting the salt-induced rigid and nonfunctional hydrophobic packing. Salt bridge interactions via increased negative and positive charges contribute to structural stability. Salt tolerance, conversely, is mediated by a dynamic structure that becomes more fixed and functional with increasing salt concentration. We propose that repulsive forces among excess negative charges, in addition to a high percentage of negatively charged random coils, mediate this structural dynamism. This knowledge enabled us to engineer a halophilic version of KOD DNA polymerase.—Takahashi, M., Takahashi, E., Joudeh, L. I., Marini, M., Das, G., Elshenawy, M. M., Akal, A., Sakashita, K., Alam, I., Tehseen, M., Sobhy, M. A., Stingl, U., Merzaban, J. S., Di Fabrizio, E., Hamdan, S. M. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea.

  3. The Species and Origin of Shark Fins in Taiwan's Fishing Ports, Markets, and Customs Detention: A DNA Barcoding Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Shun Chuang

    Full Text Available The increasing consumption of shark products, along with the shark's fishing vulnerabilities, has led to the decrease in certain shark populations. In this study we used a DNA barcoding method to identify the species of shark landings at fishing ports, shark fin products in retail stores, and shark fins detained by Taiwan customs. In total we identified 23, 24, and 14 species from 231 fishing landings, 316 fin products, and 113 detained shark fins, respectively. All the three sample sources were dominated by Prionace glauca, which accounted for more than 30% of the collected samples. Over 60% of the species identified in the fin products also appeared in the port landings, suggesting the domestic-dominance of shark fin products in Taiwan. However, international trade also contributes a certain proportion of the fin product markets, as four species identified from the shark fin products are not found in Taiwan's waters, and some domestic-available species were also found in the customs-detained sample. In addition to the species identification, we also found geographical differentiation in the cox1 gene of the common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus, the pelagic thresher shark (A. pelagicus, the smooth hammerhead shark (Sphyrna zygaena, and the scalloped hammerhead shark (S. lewini. This result might allow fishing authorities to more effectively trace the origins as well as enforce the management and conservation of these sharks.

  4. Control of gene transfer on a DNA-fibronectin-apatite composite layer by the incorporation of carbonate and fluoride ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Yushin; Oyane, Ayako; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2011-07-01

    Gene transfer techniques are useful tools for controlling cell behavior, such as proliferation and differentiation. We have recently developed an efficient area-specific gene transfer system using a DNA-fibronectin-apatite composite layer (DF-Ap layer). In this system, partial dissolution of the composite layer is likely to be a crucial step for gene transfer. In the present study, layer solubility was adjusted by incorporating various contents of carbonate or fluoride ions into the DF-Ap layer via ionic substitution for the apatite crystals. Carbonate ion incorporation increased the solubility of the DF-Ap layer, thereby increasing the efficiency of gene transfer on the layer. In contrast, the incorporation of fluoride ions decreased the solubility of the DF-Ap layer, thereby decreasing the efficiency and delaying the timing of gene transfer on the layer dose-dependently. The present gene transfer system with controllable efficiency and timing would be useful in tissue engineering applications because cell differentiation can be induced effectively by regulating appropriate gene expression with suitable timing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization, validation and application of a DNA microarray for the detection of mandatory and other waterborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Maria; Vieira, Helena; Vale, Filipa F

    2015-11-01

    Culture methods for the detection of indicator bacteria are currently used for detection of waterborne bacteria. The need for an increased range of analyzed bacteria coupled with the obtainment of rapid and early results justify the development of a DNA microarray for the identification of waterborne pathogens. This DNA microarray has 16 implanted probes with a median size of 147 bases, targeting 12 different parameters, including all mandatory indicator microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, total and fecal coliforms and enterococci. The validation performed with DNA extracted from pure microbial cultures showed the suitability of the probes for detection of the target microorganism. To overcome the high dilution of water samples it was included either a prior culture step of bacterial contaminants retained after filtering 100 ml of water, or a 10-fold increase in the volume of filtered water, that resulted in the increase of the detected bacteria. The analysis of complex environmental water samples using culture methods and the DNA microarray revealed that the latter detected the same parameters plus other bacteria tested only in the DNA microarray. The results show that this DNA microarray may be a useful tool for water microbiological surveillance. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a DNA microarray to detect antimicrobial resistance genes identified in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Jonathan G; Lindsey, Rebecca L; Rondeau, Gaelle; Porwollik, Steffen; Long, Fred; McClelland, Michael; Jackson, Charlene R; Englen, Mark D; Meinersmann, Richard J; Berrang, Mark E; Davis, Johnnie A; Barrett, John B; Turpin, Jennifer B; Thitaram, Sutawee N; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J

    2010-03-01

    To understand the mechanisms and epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance (AR), the genetic elements responsible must be identified. Due to the myriad of possible genes, a high-density genotyping technique is needed for initial screening. To achieve this, AR genes in the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank database were identified by their annotations and compiled into a nonredundant list of 775 genes. A DNA microarray was constructed of 70mer oligonucelotide probes designed to detect these genes encoding resistances to aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, chloramphenicols, glycopeptides, heavy metals, lincosamides, macrolides, metronidazoles, polyketides, quaternary ammonium compounds, streptogramins, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprims as well as resistance transfer genes. The microarray was validated with two fully sequenced control strains of Salmonella enterica: Typhimurium LT2 (sensitive) and Typhi CT18 (multidrug resistance [MDR]). All resistance genes encoded on the MDR plasmid, pHCM1, harbored by CT18 were detected in that strain, whereas no resistance genes were detected in LT2. The microarray was also tested with a variety of bacteria, including MDR Salmonella enterica serovars, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp., Enterococcus spp., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria spp., and Clostridium difficile. The results presented here demonstrate that a microarray can be designed to detect virtually all AR genes found in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database, thus reducing the subsequent assays necessary to identify specific resistance gene alleles.

  7. The Species and Origin of Shark Fins in Taiwan's Fishing Ports, Markets, and Customs Detention: A DNA Barcoding Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Po-Shun; Hung, Tzu-Chiao; Chang, Hung-An; Huang, Chien-Kang; Shiao, Jen-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    The increasing consumption of shark products, along with the shark's fishing vulnerabilities, has led to the decrease in certain shark populations. In this study we used a DNA barcoding method to identify the species of shark landings at fishing ports, shark fin products in retail stores, and shark fins detained by Taiwan customs. In total we identified 23, 24, and 14 species from 231 fishing landings, 316 fin products, and 113 detained shark fins, respectively. All the three sample sources were dominated by Prionace glauca, which accounted for more than 30% of the collected samples. Over 60% of the species identified in the fin products also appeared in the port landings, suggesting the domestic-dominance of shark fin products in Taiwan. However, international trade also contributes a certain proportion of the fin product markets, as four species identified from the shark fin products are not found in Taiwan's waters, and some domestic-available species were also found in the customs-detained sample. In addition to the species identification, we also found geographical differentiation in the cox1 gene of the common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus), the pelagic thresher shark (A. pelagicus), the smooth hammerhead shark (Sphyrna zygaena), and the scalloped hammerhead shark (S. lewini). This result might allow fishing authorities to more effectively trace the origins as well as enforce the management and conservation of these sharks.

  8. Development of a DNA Macroarray for the Detection and Identification of Fungal Pathogens Causing Decline of Young Grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Úrbez-Torres, J R; Haag, P; Bowen, P; Lowery, T; O'Gorman, D T

    2015-10-01

    Young vine decline (YVD) is a complex disease caused by at least 51 different fungi and responsible for important economic losses to the grapevine industry worldwide. YVD fungi are known to occur in planting material. Hence, detection prior to planting is critical to assure longevity of newly established vineyards. A DNA macroarray based on reverse dot-blot hybridization containing 102 oligonucleotides complementary to portions of the β-tubulin region was developed for detection of YVD fungi. Specificity of the array was first evaluated against 138 pure fungal cultures representing 72 different taxa from nine genera, including 37 YVD species. In total, 61 species, including 34 YVD pathogens, were detected and identified by the array. The detection limit of the array was below 0.1 pg of genomic DNA. The array was validated against artificially inoculated canes and soil and commercial planting material, with the latter showing a high incidence of YVD fungi in nursery plants otherwise not detected by traditional plating and culturing. This DNA array proved to be a rapid and specific tool to simultaneously detect and identify most YVD fungi in a single test, which has the potential to be used in commercial diagnostics or by the grapevine nursery industry to determine the health status of the planting material.

  9. The protective effect of a DNA vaccine encoding the Toxoplasma gondii cyclophilin gene in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, P; Huang, X; Yu, Q; Li, Y; Huang, J; Li, J; Yang, J; Li, H; Zhang, G; Ren, W; Zhang, X

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a world-wide zoonosis that causes significant public health and veterinary problems. The study of vaccines remains the most promising method for the future prevention and control of toxoplasmosis. Recombinant Toxoplasma gondii cyclophilin has been shown to have potent PPIase and IL-12-inducing activities, thus promoting the stabilization of T. gondii's life cycle and maintaining the survival of its host during evolution. In this study, the T. gondii cyclophilin gene was used to construct a DNA vaccine (pVAX1-TgCyP). The immune response and protective efficacy of the vaccine against T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice were evaluated. All BALB/c mice that were vaccinated with pVAX1-TgCyP developed a high response with TgCyP-specific antibodies, and significant splenocyte proliferation (P < 0·05) compared with pVAX1 vector and PBS groups. pVAX1-TgCyP also induced a significant Th1 type immune response, indicated by the higher production of IL-2 and IFN-γ (P < 0·05). The survival rate of BALB/c mice increased significantly after vaccination with pVAX1-TgCyP (37·5%) (P < 0·05). These results indicate that TgCyP is a highly efficacious vaccine candidate that can generate protective immunity against T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. A new assay format for NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altevogt, Dominik; Hrenn, Andrea; Kern, Claudia; Clima, Lilia; Bannwarth, Willi; Merfort, Irmgard

    2009-10-07

    Herein we report a feasibility study for a new concept to detect DNA binding protein NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix formation in combination with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The new principle avoids expensive antibodies and radioactivity and might have implications for assays of other DNA binding proteins.

  11. The anti-tumour effect of a DNA vaccine carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Wen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of tumour dependence on angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic therapy has become the most attractive area of basic and clinical study in the field of cancer research. In order to create a synergistic effect on angiogenesis and immune regulation, we designed and constructed a new type of DNA vaccine that can express VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and the prostate cancer antigen IL-12 (interleukin 12 in the same reading frame. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-tumour activity of a eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12. According to the gene sequences in GenBank, we synthesized the human VEGFR2 and IL-12 genes. VEGFR2 and IL-12 were joined by a sequence encoding a Furin recognition site and a 2A cleavage site, and the resulting fusion gene was cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to construct the expression plasmid pVAX1-VEGFR2-F2A-IL-12. The expression of VEGFR2 and IL-12 could be detected in 293T cells transfected with pVAX1-VEGFR2-F2A-IL-12 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these proteins, and in particular co-expression of both proteins, can result in humoral and cellular immune responses in C57BL/6 mice. After injection into the tumour-bearing mouse model, the plasmid showed stronger inhibition of tumour growth than a plasmid expressing VEGFR2 alone. Our results demonstrate that a DNA vaccine carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12 could represent a promising approach for tumour immunotherapy.

  12. In vivo and in vitro characterization of DdrC, a DNA damage response protein in Deinococcus radiodurans bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Mathieu, Martine; Meyer, Laura; Dupaigne, Pauline; Passot, Fanny; Servant, Pascale; Sommer, Suzanne; Le Cam, Eric; Confalonieri, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans possesses a set of Deinococcus-specific genes highly induced after DNA damage. Among them, ddrC (dr0003) was recently re-annotated, found to be in the inverse orientation and called A2G07_00380. Here, we report the first in vivo and in vitro characterization of the corrected DdrC protein to better understand its function in irradiated cells. In vivo, the ΔddrC null mutant is sensitive to high doses of UV radiation and the ddrC deletion significantly increases UV-sensitivity of ΔuvrA or ΔuvsE mutant strains. We show that the expression of the DdrC protein is induced after γ-irradiation and is under the control of the regulators, DdrO and IrrE. DdrC is rapidly recruited into the nucleoid of the irradiated cells. In vitro, we show that DdrC is able to bind single- and double-stranded DNA with a preference for the single-stranded DNA but without sequence or shape specificity and protects DNA from various nuclease attacks. DdrC also condenses DNA and promotes circularization of linear DNA. Finally, we show that the purified protein exhibits a DNA strand annealing activity. Altogether, our results suggest that DdrC is a new DNA binding protein with pleiotropic activities. It might maintain the damaged DNA fragments end to end, thus limiting their dispersion and extensive degradation after exposure to ionizing radiation. DdrC might also be an accessory protein that participates in a single strand annealing pathway whose importance in DNA repair becomes apparent when DNA is heavily damaged.

  13. ThrR, a DNA-binding transcription factor involved in controlling threonine biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Müller, Peter; Lentes, Sabine; Thiele, Martin J; Zeigler, Daniel R; Tödter, Dominik; Paulus, Henry; Brantl, Sabine; Stülke, Jörg; Commichau, Fabian M

    2016-09-01

    The threonine dehydratase IlvA is part of the isoleucine biosynthesis pathway in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Consequently, deletion of ilvA causes isoleucine auxotrophy. It has been reported that ilvA pseudo-revertants having a derepressed hom-thrCB operon appear in the presence of threonine. Here we have characterized two classes of ilvA pseudo-revertants. In the first class the hom-thrCB operon was derepressed unmasking the threonine dehydratase activity of the threonine synthase ThrC. In the second class of mutants, threonine biosynthesis was more broadly affected. The first class of ilvA pseudo-revertants had a mutation in the Phom promoter (P*hom ), resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. In the second class of ilvA pseudo-revertants, the thrR gene encoding a putative DNA-binding protein was inactivated, also resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. Here we demonstrate that ThrR is indeed a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates the hom-thrCB operon and the thrD aspartokinase gene. DNA binding assays uncovered the DNA-binding site of ThrR and revealed that the repressor competes with the RNA polymerase for DNA binding. This study also revealed that ThrR orthologs are ubiquitous in genomes from the Gram-positive phylum Firmicutes and in some Gram-negative bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Isothermal amplified detection of ATP using Au nanocages capped with a DNA molecular gate and its application in cell lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Na; Li, Xiaoxiao; Wan, Jun; Luo, Xiliang

    2015-03-07

    A novel controlled-release biosensor for isothermal amplified detection of ATP using Au nanocages (AuNCs) capped with a DNA molecular gate is reported for the first time, and has been successfully tested in intracellular ATP detection. Two kinds of SH-modified short strand DNAs S1 and S2 were assembled on the surface of the AuNCs by means of Au-thiolate bonding. The hybridization of a long-strand DNA S3 with the two immobilized SH-DNAs leads to the formation of molecular gates. The molecular gates were designed to inhibit the release of the fluorescent molecules such as Rhodamine-B (RhB), which were filled in the hollow interiors of AuNCs. The primer S4 was employed to play the role of a recognition moiety. The specificity recognition reaction between ATP and ATP aptamer gave rise to the primer S4 released from a double-stranded hybrid formed with the ATP aptamer. The released S4 will initiate the autonomous replication-scission-displacement process with the assistance of DNA polymerase and nicking endonuclease. As a result, the DNA synthesis and the DNA cycle achieved the opening of the DNA-based molecular gates and the significant amplification of the release of the guest molecules from AuNCs. In order to realize the cyclic enzymatic amplification of the release of the guest molecules from AuNCs, the long-strand S3 is ingeniously designed in such a way that it contains a Nb.Bpu10I nicking endonuclease recognition sequence and a sequence complementary to the primer S4. The fabricated system was demonstrated to be an efficient biosensor for target molecule detection qualitatively and quantitatively.

  15. In vivo and in vitro characterization of DdrC, a DNA damage response protein in Deinococcus radiodurans bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Bouthier de la Tour

    Full Text Available The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans possesses a set of Deinococcus-specific genes highly induced after DNA damage. Among them, ddrC (dr0003 was recently re-annotated, found to be in the inverse orientation and called A2G07_00380. Here, we report the first in vivo and in vitro characterization of the corrected DdrC protein to better understand its function in irradiated cells. In vivo, the ΔddrC null mutant is sensitive to high doses of UV radiation and the ddrC deletion significantly increases UV-sensitivity of ΔuvrA or ΔuvsE mutant strains. We show that the expression of the DdrC protein is induced after γ-irradiation and is under the control of the regulators, DdrO and IrrE. DdrC is rapidly recruited into the nucleoid of the irradiated cells. In vitro, we show that DdrC is able to bind single- and double-stranded DNA with a preference for the single-stranded DNA but without sequence or shape specificity and protects DNA from various nuclease attacks. DdrC also condenses DNA and promotes circularization of linear DNA. Finally, we show that the purified protein exhibits a DNA strand annealing activity. Altogether, our results suggest that DdrC is a new DNA binding protein with pleiotropic activities. It might maintain the damaged DNA fragments end to end, thus limiting their dispersion and extensive degradation after exposure to ionizing radiation. DdrC might also be an accessory protein that participates in a single strand annealing pathway whose importance in DNA repair becomes apparent when DNA is heavily damaged.

  16. A DNA Vaccine That Targets Hemagglutinin to Antigen-Presenting Cells Protects Mice against H7 Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Tor Kristian; Zhou, Fan; Cox, Rebecca; Bogen, Bjarne; Grødeland, Gunnveig

    2017-12-01

    Zoonotic influenza H7 viral infections have a case fatality rate of about 40%. Currently, no or limited human to human spread has occurred, but we may be facing a severe pandemic threat if the virus acquires the ability to transmit between humans. Novel vaccines that can be rapidly produced for global distribution are urgently needed, and DNA vaccines may be the only type of vaccine that allows for the speed necessary to quench an emerging pandemic. Here, we constructed DNA vaccines encoding the hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A/chicken/Italy/13474/99 (H7N1). In order to increase the efficacy of DNA vaccination, HA was targeted to either major histocompatibility complex class II molecules or chemokine receptors 1, 3, and 5 (CCR1/3/5) that are expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APC). A single DNA vaccination with APC-targeted HA significantly increased antibody levels in sera compared to nontargeted control vaccines. The antibodies were confirmed neutralizing in an H7 pseudotype-based neutralization assay. Furthermore, the APC-targeted vaccines increased the levels of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, and a single DNA vaccination could confer protection against a lethal challenge with influenza A/turkey/Italy/3889/1999 (H7N1) in mice. In conclusion, we have developed a vaccine that rapidly could contribute protection against a pandemic threat from avian influenza. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic avian influenza H7 constitute a pandemic threat that can cause severe illness and death in infected individuals. Vaccination is the main method of prophylaxis against influenza, but current vaccine strategies fall short in a pandemic situation due to a prolonged production time and insufficient production capabilities. In contrast, a DNA vaccine can be rapidly produced and deployed to prevent the potential escalation of a highly pathogenic influenza pandemic. We here demonstrate that a single DNA delivery of hemagglutinin from an H7 influenza could mediate full

  17. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Kang, H.N.; Babiuk, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immunogenicity of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 DNA vaccine alone or with a protein vaccine boost in murine and porcine animal models. METHODS: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein was constructed and used to vaccinate mice and piglets with or without...... boosting with a recombinant E2 protein vaccine formulated with CpG ODN and 10% Emulsigen. The immunogenicity of HCV E2 vaccines was analyzed by ELISA for antibody responses, MTT assay for lymphocyte proliferation, ELISPOT for the number of interferon-gamma secreting cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays....... RESULTS: Intradermal injection of E2 DNA vaccine induced strong Th1-like immune responses in mice. In piglets, E2 DNA vaccine elicited moderate and more balanced immune responses. A DNA vaccine prime and protein boost vaccination, strategy induced significantly higher E2-specific antibody levels...

  18. Public involvement in pharmacogenomics research: a national survey on public attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research and the willingness to donate DNA samples to a DNA bank in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eriko; Satoh, Nobunori

    2009-11-01

    To assess the attitudes of the Japanese general public towards pharmacogenomics research and a DNA bank for identifying genomic markers associated with ADRs and their willingness to donate DNA samples, we conducted a national survey for 1,103 Japanese adults from the general public, not a patient population. The response rate was 36.8%. The majority of the respondents showed a positive attitude towards pharmacogenomics research (81.0%) and a DNA bank (70.4%). Considering fictitious clinical situations such as taking medications and experiencing ADRs, the willingness to donate DNA samples when experiencing ADRs (61.7%) was higher than when taking medications (45.3%). Older generations were significantly associated with a decreased willingness to donate (OR = 0.45, CI 0.28-0.72 in 50s. OR = 0.49, CI: 0.31-0.77 in 60s). Positive attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research, a DNA bank, blood/bone marrow/organ donation were significantly associated with an increased willingness. However, the respondents had the following concerns regarding a DNA bank: the confidentiality of their personal information, the manner by which research results were utilized and simply the use of their own DNA for research. In order to attain public understanding to overcome these concerns, a process of public awareness should be put into place to emphasize the beneficial aspects of identifying genomic markers associated with ADRs and to address these concerns raised in our study. Further study is needed to assess the willingness of actual patients taking medications in real situations, since the respondents in our study were from the general public, not a patient population, and their willingness was assessed on the condition of assuming that they were patients taking medications.

  19. The Species and Origin of Shark Fins in Taiwan?s Fishing Ports, Markets, and Customs Detention: A DNA Barcoding Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Po-Shun Chuang; Tzu-Chiao Hung; Hung-An Chang; Chien-Kang Huang; Jen-Chieh Shiao

    2016-01-01

    The increasing consumption of shark products, along with the shark's fishing vulnerabilities, has led to the decrease in certain shark populations. In this study we used a DNA barcoding method to identify the species of shark landings at fishing ports, shark fin products in retail stores, and shark fins detained by Taiwan customs. In total we identified 23, 24, and 14 species from 231 fishing landings, 316 fin products, and 113 detained shark fins, respectively. All the three sample sources w...

  20. Public involvement in pharmacogenomics research: a national survey on patients' attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research and the willingness to donate DNA samples to a DNA bank in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eriko; Sakurada, Tomoya; Ueda, Shiro; Satoh, Nobunori

    2011-05-01

    To assess the attitude of Japanese patients towards pharmacogenomics research and a DNA bank for identifying genomic markers associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their willingness to donate DNA samples, we conducted a survey of 550 male and female patients. The majority of the respondents showed a positive attitude towards pharmacogenomics research (87.6%) and a DNA bank (75.1%). The willingness to donate DNA samples when experiencing severe ADRs (55.8%) was higher than when taking medications (40.4%). Positive attitudes towards a DNA bank and organ donation were significantly associated with an increased willingness to donate. Though the level of positive attitude in the patient population was higher than that in the general public in our former study (81.0 and 70.4%, respectively), the level of the willingness of patients to donate was 40.4% when taking medications and 55.8% when experiencing severe ADRs which was lower than that of the general public in our former study (45.3 and 61.7%). The results suggested that the level of true willingness in the patient population was lower than that of the general public considering the fictitious situation presented to the public (to suppose that they were patients receiving medication). It is important to assess the willingness of patients who are true potential donors, not the general public.

  1. Crystal structure and conformation of a DNA-RNA hybrid duplex with a polypurine RNA strand: d(TTCTTBr5CTTC)-r(GAAGAAGAA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Y; Sundaralingam, M

    1998-12-15

    . DNA-RNA hybrids are substrates for RNase H. This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of the RNA strand in the hybrid form. The polypurine tract (PPT) in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is a short stretch of purines ( approximately 15 bases) located at the 3'-end of the U3 region of the RNA genome. The PPT has the unique ability to resist digestion by RNase H and serves as a primer for plus-strand DNA synthesis. . The crystal structure of a DNA-RNA hybrid duplex containing a polypurine RNA strand, d(TTCTTBr5CTTC)-r(GAAGAAGAA), has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement methods and refined to a final R factor of 20.1% (R free 23.7%). The hybrid duplex adopts a standard A-form conformation. All of the sugar rings and glycosidic torsion angles are found in the standard C3'-endo/anti conformation, as seen in A-RNA or A-DNA. The crystal packing is dominated by the DNA strand, where the terminal base pairs of the hybrid abut the neighboring A-DNA sugar-phosphate backbone on the minor groove side. . The present DNA-RNA hybrid duplex containing a polypurine RNA strand exhibits standard A-form geometry. This observation might suggest that the RNA PPT resists the RNase H activity of HIV reverse transcriptase as a result of its A-form conformation. In addition, there appears to be a correlation between the percentage purine content of the RNA and the DNA backbone conformation.

  2. Measurement of changes in impedance of DNA nanowires due to radiation induced structural damage. A novel approach for a DNA-based radiosensitive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbach, Florian; Arndt, Alexander; Nettelbeck, Heidi; Langner, Frank; Giesen, Ulrich; Rabus, Hans; Sellner, Stefan; Toppari, Jussi; Shen, Boxuan; Baek, Woon Yong

    2017-08-01

    The ability of DNA to conduct electric current has been the topic of numerous investigations over the past few decades. Those investigations indicate that this ability is dependent on the molecular structure of the DNA. Radiation-induced damages, which lead to an alteration of the molecular structure, should therefore change the electrical impedance of a DNA molecule. In this paper, the damage due to ionising radiation is shown to have a direct effect on the electrical transport properties of DNA. Impedance measurements of DNA samples were carried out by an AC impedance spectrometer before, during and after irradiation. The samples comprised of DNA segments, which were immobilized between gold electrodes with a gap of 12 μm. The impedance of all DNA samples exhibited rising capacitive behaviour with increasing absorbed dose.

  3. Quantitative methods of analysis of footprinting diagrams for the complexes formed by a ligand with a DNA fragment of known sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechipurenko, Yurii D; Jovanovic, Bosko; Riabokon, Vadim F; Gursky, Georgii V

    2005-06-01

    The regulation of gene expression is based on the interaction of DNA with different ligands. A model of adsorption was considered that can be applied to the quantitative analysis of footprinting diagrams for the complexes formed by a ligand with a DNA fragment of known structure. This model allows the probabilities of ligand binding to DNA sites with a known sequence to be calculated and the variance of probabilities of ligand binding with a specified binding site to be estimated. The model was used for quantitative analysis of diagrams of DNAse footprinting for the complexes of the dimeric analogue of the antitumor antibiotic netropsin. Experimental and theoretically calculated profiles of distribution of netropsin bound on DNA are in good agreement with one another.

  4. DVC1 (C1orf124) is a DNA damage-targeting p97 adaptor that promotes ubiquitin-dependent responses to replication blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Anna; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Kagias, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated processes orchestrate critical DNA-damage signaling and repair pathways. We identify human DVC1 (C1orf124; Spartan) as a cell cycle-regulated anaphase-promoting complex (APC) substrate that accumulates at stalled replication forks. DVC1 recruitment to sites of replication stress...... requires its ubiquitin-binding UBZ domain and PCNA-binding PIP box motif but is independent of RAD18-mediated PCNA monoubiquitylation. Via a conserved SHP box, DVC1 recruits the ubiquitin-selective chaperone p97 to blocked replication forks, which may facilitate p97-dependent removal of translesion...... synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase η (Pol η) from monoubiquitylated PCNA. DVC1 knockdown enhances UV light-induced mutagenesis, and depletion of human DVC1 or the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog DVC-1 causes hypersensitivity to replication stress-inducing agents. Our findings establish DVC1 as a DNA damage...

  5. Enzymatic Reaction with Unnatural Substrates: DNA Photolyase (Escherichia coli) Recognizes and Reverses Thymine [2+2] Dimers in the DNA Strand of a DNA/PNA Hybrid Duplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaiah, Danaboyina; Kan, Yongzhi; Koch, Troels; Orum, Henrik; Schuster, Gary B.

    1998-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are mimics with normal bases connected to a pseudopeptide chain that obey Watson--Crick rules to form stable duplexes with itself and natural nucleic acids. This has focused attention on PNA as therapeutic or diagnostic reagents. Duplexes formed with PNA mirror some but not all properties of DNA. One fascinating aspect of PNA biochemistry is their reaction with enzymes. Here we show an enzyme reaction that operates effectively on a PNA/DNA hybrid duplex. A DNA oligonucleotide containing a cis, syn-thymine [2+2] dimer forms a stable duplex with PNA. The hybrid duplex is recognized by photolyase, and irradiation of the complex leads to the repair of the thymine dimer. This finding provides insight into the enzyme mechanism and provides a means for the selective repair of thymine photodimers.

  6. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Goto, Yamafumi [Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Takata, Minoru [Department of Dermatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medical Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Zervos, Antonis S., E-mail: azervos@mail.ucf.edu [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  7. Cancer immunotherapy using a DNA vaccine encoding a single-chain trimer of MHC class I linked to an HPV-16 E6 immunodominant CTL epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-H; Peng, S; He, L; Tsai, Y-C; Boyd, D A K; Hansen, T H; Wu, T-C; Hung, C-F

    2005-08-01

    The potency of DNA vaccines may be affected by the efficiency of intracellular processing and MHC class I presentation of encoded antigens. Since a single-chain trimer (SCT) composed of peptide, beta2-microglobulin (beta2m), and MHC class I heavy chain has been shown to bypass antigen processing and lead to stable presentation of peptides, we investigated the efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding a SCT composed of an immunodominant CTL epitope of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 antigen, beta2m, and H-2Kb MHC class I heavy chain (pIRES-E6-beta2m-Kb). Transfection of 293 cells with pIRES-E6-beta2m-Kb can bypass antigen processing and lead to stable presentation of E6 peptide. Furthermore, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with pIRES-E6-beta2m-Kb exhibited significantly increased E6 peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses compared to mice vaccinated with DNA encoding wild-type E6. Most importantly, 100% of mice vaccinated with pIRES-E6-beta2m-Kb DNA were protected against a lethal challenge of E6-expressing TC-1 tumor cells. In contrast, all mice vaccinated with wild-type E6 DNA or control plasmid DNA grew tumors. Our data indicate that a DNA vaccine encoding a SCT can lead to stable enhanced MHC class I presentation of encoded antigenic peptide and may be useful for improving DNA vaccine potency to control tumors or infectious diseases.

  8. Induction of antigen-positive cell death by the expression of perforin, but not DTa, from a DNA vaccine enhances the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargett, Tessa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Garrod, Tamsin J; Yu, Wenbo; Miller, Darren; Major, Lee; Wesselingh, Steve; Suhrbier, Andreas; Gowans, Eric J

    2014-04-01

    The failure of traditional protein-based vaccines to prevent infection by viruses such as HIV or hepatitis C highlights the need for novel vaccine strategies. DNA vaccines have shown promise in small animal models, and are effective at generating anti-viral T cell-mediated immune responses; however, they have proved to be poorly immunogenic in clinical trials. We propose that the induction of necrosis will enhance the immune response to vaccine antigens encoded by DNA vaccines, as necrotic cells are known to release a range of intracellular factors that lead to dendritic cell (DC) activation and enhanced cross-presentation of antigen. Here we provide evidence that induction of cell death in DNA vaccine-targeted cells provides an adjuvant effect following intradermal vaccination of mice; however, this enhancement of the immune response is dependent on both the mechanism and timing of cell death after antigen expression. We report that a DNA vaccine encoding the cytolytic protein, perforin, resulted in DC activation, enhanced broad and multifunctional CD8 T-cell responses to the HIV-1 antigen GAG and reduced viral load following challenge with a chimeric virus, EcoHIV, compared with the canonical GAG DNA vaccine. This effect was not observed for a DNA vaccine encoding an apoptosis-inducing toxin, DTa, or when the level of perforin expression was increased to induce cell death sooner after vaccination. Thus, inducing lytic cell death following a threshold level of expression of a viral antigen can improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines, whereas apoptotic cell death has an inhibitory effect on the immune response.

  9. A DNA virus of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Unckless

    Full Text Available Little is known about the viruses infecting most species. Even in groups as well-studied as Drosophila, only a handful of viruses have been well-characterized. A viral metagenomic approach was used to explore viral diversity in 83 wild-caught Drosophila innubila, a mushroom feeding member of the quinaria group. A single fly that was injected with, and died from, Drosophila C Virus (DCV was added to the sample as a control. Two-thirds of reads in the infected sample had DCV as the best BLAST hit, suggesting that the protocol developed is highly sensitive. In addition to the DCV hits, several sequences had Oryctes rhinoceros Nudivirus, a double-stranded DNA virus, as a best BLAST hit. The virus associated with these sequences was termed Drosophila innubila Nudivirus (DiNV. PCR screens of natural populations showed that DiNV was both common and widespread taxonomically and geographically. Electron microscopy confirms the presence of virions in fly fecal material similar in structure to other described Nudiviruses. In 2 species, D. innubila and D. falleni, the virus is associated with a severe (∼80-90% loss of fecundity and significantly decreased lifespan.

  10. The Species and Origin of Shark Fins in Taiwan’s Fishing Ports, Markets, and Customs Detention: A DNA Barcoding Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Po-Shun; Hung, Tzu-Chiao; Chang, Hung-An; Huang, Chien-Kang; Shiao, Jen-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    The increasing consumption of shark products, along with the shark’s fishing vulnerabilities, has led to the decrease in certain shark populations. In this study we used a DNA barcoding method to identify the species of shark landings at fishing ports, shark fin products in retail stores, and shark fins detained by Taiwan customs. In total we identified 23, 24, and 14 species from 231 fishing landings, 316 fin products, and 113 detained shark fins, respectively. All the three sample sources were dominated by Prionace glauca, which accounted for more than 30% of the collected samples. Over 60% of the species identified in the fin products also appeared in the port landings, suggesting the domestic-dominance of shark fin products in Taiwan. However, international trade also contributes a certain proportion of the fin product markets, as four species identified from the shark fin products are not found in Taiwan’s waters, and some domestic-available species were also found in the customs-detained sample. In addition to the species identification, we also found geographical differentiation in the cox1 gene of the common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus), the pelagic thresher shark (A. pelagicus), the smooth hammerhead shark (Sphyrna zygaena), and the scalloped hammerhead shark (S. lewini). This result might allow fishing authorities to more effectively trace the origins as well as enforce the management and conservation of these sharks. PMID:26799827

  11. Utilization of an automated pipetting system in the cell line-based screening of the activity of a DNA-damaging anti-tumour drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchánková, T; Ovesná, P; Samadder, P; Souček, K

    2014-01-01

    The principles of large screening strategies, which are developed by industrial companies, have been recently adopted by researchers in the fields of molecular biology and oncology as invaluable tools for translational medicine. The declining costs of laboratory robotic machines have allowed high-throughput screening to become more available to academic centres with limited resources. Here, we describe how a robotic conventional liquid handling system could be used on a daily basis in laboratories to obtain consistent and reproducible results. Our approach allowed us to quickly screen a panel of more than 20 tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cell lines for their responses to hydroxyurea, which is a DNA-damaging anticancer therapeutic drug. The format of 384-well microplates was used for manual cell seeding, and the effect of hydroxyurea was screened at multiple concentrations. The fluorescence-based CyQuant assay was employed as the readout method to analyse the cellular DNA content. The effectiveness of our approach was demonstrated in the experimental results.

  12. Application of a DNA analysis method for the cultivar identification of grape musts and experimental and commercial wines of Vitis vinifera L. using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Beneytez, Eva; Moreno-Arribas, María V; Borrego, Joaquín; Polo, María C; Ibáñez, Javier

    2002-10-09

    A DNA-based method has been applied to the identification of several musts and wines using microsatellite markers. DNA was extracted from the solid phases of sixteen monovarietal and five multivarietal musts (mixtures of two musts down to a 4:1 proportion) and they were genotyped at seven microsatellites through a multiplex PCR reaction and automated fluorescent detection. PCR multiplexing was successful in monovarietal musts, but should be used with caution with at least some markers and in multivarietal musts. The same extraction and detection methods were unsuccessfully applied to the solid and liquid phases of five monovarietal commercial wines, even after using different concentration procedures. Nucleic acids presence was then studied in a recent must, during the fermentation process, and during the subsequent steps of winemaking. Genotyping was possible in the resulting experimental wine until decanting, when the particles in suspension were removed. These results suggest that wine authentication through DNA analysis is not possible in commercial wines, in the tested conditions.

  13. A Turn-on Fluorescence Sensor for Heparin Detection Based on a Release of Taiwan Cobra Cardiotoxin from a DNA Aptamer or Adenosine-Based Molecular Beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi-Jun; Wang, Liang-Jun; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Huang, Chia-Hui; Hu, Wan-Ping; Chang, Long-Sen

    2018-02-19

    This study presents two sensitive fluorescent assays for sensing heparin on the basis of the electrostatic interaction between heparin and Naja naja atra cardiotoxin 3 (CTX3). Owing to CTX3-induced folded structure of an adenosine-based molecular beacon (MB) or a DNA aptamer against CTX3, a reduction in the fluorescent signal of the aptamer or MB 5'-end labeled with carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and 3'-end labeled with 4-([4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo)-benzoic acid (DABCYL) was observed upon the addition of CTX3. The presence of heparin and formation of the CTX3-heparin complex caused CTX3 detachment from the MB or aptamer, and restoration of FAM fluorescence of the 5'-FAM-and-3'-DABCYL-labeled MB and aptamer was subsequently noted. Moreover, the detection of heparin with these CTX3-aptamer and CTX3-MB sensors showed high sensitivity and selectivity toward heparin over chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid regardless of the presence of plasma. The limit of detection for heparin in plasma was determined to be 16 ng/mL and 15 ng/mL, respectively, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This study validates the practical utility of the CTX3-aptamer and CTX3-MB systems for determining the concentration of heparin in a biological matrix.

  14. Characterization of the paclitaxel loaded chitosan graft Pluronic F127 copolymer micelles conjugate with a DNA aptamer targeting HER-2 overexpressing breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach Nguyen, Kim; Nguyen, Thu Ha; Do, Dinh Ho; Huan Le, Quang

    2017-03-01

    In this work we report the isolation of DNA aptamer that is specifically bound to a HER-2 overexpressing SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cell line, using SELEX strategy. Paclitaxel (PTX) loaded chitosan graft Pluronic F127 copolymer micelles conjugate with a DNA aptamer was synthesized and its structure was confirmed by TEM image. This binary mixed system consisting of DNA aptamer modified Pluronic F127 and chitosan could enhance PTX loading capacity and increase micelle stability. Morphology images confirmed the existence of PTX micelles, with an average size of approximately 86.22 ± 1.45 nm diameters. Drug release profile showed that the PTX conjugate maintained a sustained PTX release. From in vitro cell experiment it was shown that 89%-93%, 50%-58%, 55%-62%, 24%-28% and 2%-7% of the SK-BR-3, NS-VN-67, LH-VN-48, HT-VN-26 and NV-VN-31, respectively, were dead after 6-48 h. These results demonstrated a novel DNA aptamer-micelle assembly for efficient detection and a system for the delivery of PTX targeting specific HER-2 overexpressing. We have also successfully cultivated cancer tissues of explants from Vietnamese patients on a type I collagen substrate. The NS-VN-67, LH-VN-48, HT-VN-26 and NV-VN-31cell lines were used as cellular model sources for the study of chemotherapy drug in cancer.

  15. Lactococcus lactis carrying a DNA vaccine coding for the ESAT-6 antigen increases IL-17 cytokine secretion and boosts the BCG vaccine immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, V B; da Cunha, V P; Preisser, T M; Souza, B M; Turk, M Z; De Castro, C P; Azevedo, M S P; Miyoshi, A

    2017-06-01

    A regimen utilizing Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and another vaccine system as a booster may represent a promising strategy for the development of an efficient tuberculosis vaccine for adults. In a previous work, we confirmed the ability of Lactococcus lactis fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA+) (pValac:ESAT-6), a live mucosal DNA vaccine, to produce a specific immune response in mice after oral immunization. In this study, we examined the immunogenicity of this strain as a booster for the BCG vaccine in mice. After immunization, cytokine and immunoglobulin profiles were measured. The BCG prime L. lactis FnBPA+ (pValac:ESAT-6) boost group was the most responsive group, with a significant increase in splenic pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-17, IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α compared with the negative control. Based on the results obtained here, we demonstrated that L. lactis FnBPA+ (pValac:ESAT-6) was able to increase the BCG vaccine general immune response. This work is of great scientific and social importance because it represents the first step towards the development of a booster to the BCG vaccine using L. lactis as a DNA delivery system. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy against Murine Tuberculosis of a Prime-Boost Regimen with BCG and a DNA Vaccine Expressing ESAT-6 and Ag85A Fusion Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterologous prime-boost regimens utilizing BCG as a prime vaccine probably represent the best hope for the development of novel tuberculosis (TB vaccines. In this study, we examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine (pcD685A expressing the fusion protein of Ag85A and ESAT-6 (r685A and its booster effects in BCG-immunized mice. The recombinant r685A fusion protein stimulated higher level of antigen-specific IFN-γ release in tuberculin skin test- (TST- positive healthy household contacts of active pulmonary TB patients than that in TST-negative population. Vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with pcD685A resulted in significant protection against challenge with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared with the control group. Most importantly, pcD685A could act as a BCG booster and amplify Th1-type cell-mediated immunity in the lung of BCG-vaccinated mice as shown the increased expression of IFN-γ. The most significant reduction in bacterial load of both spleen and lung was obtained in mice vaccinated with BCG prime and pcD685A DNA booster when compared with BCG or pcD685A alone. Thus, our study indicates that pcD685A may be an efficient booster vaccine against TB with a strong ability to enhance prior BCG immunity.

  17. Gene Gun Bombardment with DNA-Coated Golden Particles Enhanced the Protective Effect of a DNA Vaccine Based on Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase of Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with Schistosoma species, remains an important parasitic zoonosis. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjTGR plays an important role in the development of the parasite and for its survival. Here we present a recombinant plasmid DNA vaccine, pVAX1/SjTGR, to estimate its protection against S. japonicum in BALB/c mice. The DNA vaccine administrated by particle bombardment induced higher protection than by intramuscular injection. All animals vaccinated with pVAX1/SjTGR developed significant specific anti-SjTGR antibodies than control groups. Moreover, animals immunized by gene gun exhibited a splenocyte proliferative response, with an increase in IFN-γ and IL-4. The recombinant plasmid administrated by gene gun achieved a medium protective efficacy of 27.83–38.83% ( of worm reduction and 40.38–44.51% ( of liver egg count reduction. It suggests that different modes of administering a DNA vaccine can influence the protective efficacy induced by the vaccine. Interestingly, from the enzymatic activity results, we found that worms obtained from pVAX1/SjTGR-vaccinated animals expressed lower enzymatic activity than the control group and the antibodies weakened the enzymatic activity of SjTGR in vitro, too. It implies that the high-level antibodies may contribute to the protective effects.

  18. The SET-domain protein SUVR5 mediates H3K9me2 deposition and silencing at stimulus response genes in a DNA methylation-independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Caro

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, environmental and developmental signals alter chromatin structure and modulate gene expression. Heterochromatin constitutes the transcriptionally inactive state of the genome and in plants and mammals is generally characterized by DNA methylation and histone modifications such as histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9 methylation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DNA methylation and H3K9 methylation are usually colocated and set up a mutually self-reinforcing and stable state. Here, in contrast, we found that SUVR5, a plant Su(var3-9 homolog with a SET histone methyltransferase domain, mediates H3K9me2 deposition and regulates gene expression in a DNA methylation-independent manner. SUVR5 binds DNA through its zinc fingers and represses the expression of a subset of stimulus response genes. This represents a novel mechanism for plants to regulate their chromatin and transcriptional state, which may allow for the adaptability and modulation necessary to rapidly respond to extracellular cues.

  19. A new fluorescence turn-on nanobiosensor for the detection of micro-RNA-21 based on a DNA-gold nanocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Morteza; Ahmadi, Elnaz; Borghei, Yasaman-Sadat; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-03-01

    In this study, DNA/gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) were used to develop an AuNC-based turn-on fluorescence probe for the analysis of mi-RNA-21, which is a potential screening biomarker for cancer detection. AuNCs on a DNA scaffold were prepared through a one-pot wet-chemical route and evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Experiments revealed that the fluorescence intensity of the DNA-AuNCs showed a gradual increase with the addition of the target species in a concentration range from 1pM to 10 nM. The method had a detection limit of 0.7 pM and was able to discriminate the target species from mismatched mi-RNAs very efficiently. The method was used for the determination of mi-RNA spiked human plasma samples, and was evaluated as a promising nanobiosensor for application in the selective detection of mi-RNA in various biomedical and clinical tests.

  20. Combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics dynamics simulation of A-DNA double strands irradiated by ultra-low-energy carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngaojampa, C.; Nimmanpipug, P. [Computer Simulation and Modeling Laboratory (CSML), Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.t [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Lee, V.S., E-mail: vannajan@gmail.co [Computer Simulation and Modeling Laboratory (CSML), Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2011-02-15

    In order to promote understanding of the fundamentals of ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA, molecular dynamics simulations using combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics of poly-AT and poly-GC A-DNA double strands irradiated by <200 eV carbon ions were performed to investigate the molecular implications of mutation bias. The simulations were focused on the responses of the DNA backbones and nitrogenous bases to irradiation. Analyses of the root mean square displacements of the backbones and non-hydrogen atoms of base rings of the simulated DNA structure after irradiation revealed a potential preference of DNA double strand separation, dependent on the irradiating energy. The results show that for the backbones, the large difference in the displacement between poly-GC and poly-AT in the initial time period could be the reason for the backbone breakage; for the nitrogenous base pairs, A-T is 30% more sensitive or vulnerable to ion irradiation than G-C, demonstrating a preferential, instead of random, effect of irradiation-induced mutation.

  1. Glucopyranosyl lipid A adjuvant significantly enhances HIV specific T and B cell responses elicited by a DNA-MVA-protein vaccine regimen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul F McKay

    Full Text Available Using a unique vaccine antigen matched and single HIV Clade C approach we have assessed the immunogenicity of a DNA-poxvirus-protein strategy in mice and rabbits, administering MVA and protein immunizations either sequentially or simultaneously and in the presence of a novel TLR4 adjuvant, GLA-AF. Mice were vaccinated with combinations of HIV env/gag-pol-nef plasmid DNA followed by MVA-C (HIV env/gag-pol-nef with HIV CN54gp140 protein (+/-GLA-AF adjuvant and either co-administered in different muscles of the same animal with MVA-C or given sequentially at 3-week intervals. The DNA prime established a population of B cells that were able to mount a statistically significant anamnestic response to the boost vaccines. The greatest antigen-specific antibody response was observed in animals that received all vaccine components. Moreover, a high proportion of the total mucosal IgG (20 - 50% present in the vaginal vault of these vaccinated animals was vaccine antigen-specific. The potent elicitation of antigen-specific immune responses to this vaccine modality was also confirmed in rabbits. Importantly, co-administration of MVA-C with the GLA-AF adjuvanted HIV CN54gp140 protein significantly augmented the antigen-specific T cell responses to the Gag antigen, a transgene product expressed by the MVA-C vector in a separate quadriceps muscle. We have demonstrated that co-administration of MVA and GLA-AF adjuvanted HIV CN54gp140 protein was equally effective in the generation of humoral responses as a sequential vaccination modality thus shortening and simplifying the immunization schedule. In addition, a significant further benefit of the condensed vaccination regime was that T cell responses to proteins expressed by the MVA-C were potently enhanced, an effect that was likely due to enhanced immunostimulation in the presence of systemic GLA-AF.

  2. A high-resolution structure of a DNA-chromomycin-Co(II) complex determined from pseudocontact shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochin, M

    2000-04-15

    The drug chromomycin-A(3) binds to the minor groove of DNA and requires a divalent metal ion for complex formation. (1)H, (31)P and (13)C pseudocontact shifts occurring in the presence of a tightly bound divalent cobalt ion in the complex between d(TTGGCCAA)(2) and chromomycin-A(3) have been used to determine the structure of the complex. The accuracy of the structure was verified by validation with nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) and J-coupling constants not used in the structure calculation. The final structure was determined to 0.7 A resolution. The structure was compared with a structure obtained in an earlier study using NOEs, in order to assess the accuracy of NOEs in giving global structural information for a DNA complex. Although some basic features of the structures agreed, they differed substantially in the fine structural details and in the DNA axis curvature generated by the drug. The distortion of base-pair planarity that was observed in the NOE structure was not seen in our structure. Differences in drug orientation and hydrogen bonding also occurred. The curvature and elongation of the DNA that was obtained previously was not found to occur in our study. The use of pseudocontact shifts has enabled us to obtain a high-precision global structure of the chromomycin-DNA complex, which provides an accurate template on which to consider targeting minor groove binding drugs. The effect of such binding is not propagated far along the helix but is restricted to a local kink in the axis that reverts to its original direction within four base pairs.

  3. Does risk of endometrial cancer for women without a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair gene depend on family history of endometrial cancer or colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Rajani; Jenkins, Mark A; Lindor, Noralane M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung Ko

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether risk of endometrial cancer for women without a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene depends on family history of endometrial or colorectal cancer. We retrospectively followed a cohort of 79,166 women who were recruited to the Colon Cancer Family Registry, after exclusion of women who were relatives of a carrier of a MMR gene mutation. The Kaplan-Meier failure method was used to estimate the cumulative risk of endometrial cancer. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for association between family history of endometrial or colorectal cancer and risk of endometrial cancer. A total of 628 endometrial cancer cases were observed, with mean age at diagnosis of 54.4 (standard deviation: 15.7) years. The cumulative risk of endometrial cancer to age 70 years was estimated to be 0.94% (95% CI 0.83-1.05) for women with no family history of endometrial cancer, and 3.80% (95% CI 2.75-4.98) for women with at least one first- or second-degree relative with endometrial cancer. Compared with women without family history, we found an increased risk of endometrial cancer for women with at least one first- or second-degree relative with endometrial cancer (HR 3.66, 95% CI 2.63-5.08), and for women with one first-degree relative with colorectal cancer diagnosed at age cancer is associated with a family history of endometrial cancer or early-onset colorectal cancer for women without a MMR gene mutation, indicating for potential underlying genetic and environmental factors shared by colorectal and endometrial cancers other than caused by MMR gene mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters/graphene oxide-based platform for the sensitive detection of DNA through hybridization chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siqi; Wang, Kun; Li, Kai-Bin; Shi, Wei; Jia, Wen-Ping; Chen, Xiaoying; Sun, Ting; Han, De-Man

    2017-05-15

    A silver nanoclusters (AgNCs)/graphene oxide (GO)-based fluorescence sensor was developed for label-free DNA detection through hybridization chain reaction (HCR). A DNA sequence associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was selected as a model target. Two DNA probes, hairpin probe 1 (H 1 ) and hairpin probe 2 (H 2 ), were partially complementary. GO was used as an adsorption material to capture the hairpin probes and a selective fluorescence quencher was used to reduce the background signal. Upon addition of AgNO 3 and NaBH 4 , the AgNCs were synthesized at the terminals of the H 1 and H 2 probes. In the absence of target DNA (T HIV ), hybridization chain reaction (HCR) could not be triggered due to the stability of H 1 and H 2 probes. The hairpin probe-protected AgNCs attached to the GO surface, efficiently quenching fluorescence of the AgNCs. Therefore, the system showed very low background. In presence of T HIV , the target triggered the chain-like assembly of H 1 and H 2 through HCR, generating a long chain of H 1 and H 2 complexes. The HCR product (AgNCs nanowires) could not be adsorbed on the surface of GO; hence, it generated a strong fluorescent signal based on the concentration of the target. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the fluorescence sensor was 1.18nM, and hence it can be applied to clinical samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A) Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Manuel; Corvo, Laura; Garde, Esther; Ramírez, Laura; Iniesta, Virginia; Bonay, Pedro; Gómez-Nieto, Carlos; González, Víctor M; Martín, M Elena; Alonso, Carlos; Coelho, Eduardo A F; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Iborra, Salvador

    2015-05-01

    Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A) binding proteins (LiPABPs). Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid. The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses) by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis.

  6. A DNA Barcoding Method to Discriminate between the Model Plant Brachypodium distachyon and Its Close Relatives B. stacei and B. hybridum (Poaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alvarez, Diana; López-Herranz, Maria Luisa; Betekhtin, Alexander; Catalán, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachypodium distachyon s. l. has been widely investigated across the world as a model plant for temperate cereals and biofuel grasses. However, this annual plant shows three cytotypes that have been recently recognized as three independent species, the diploids B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20) and their derived allotetraploid B. hybridum (2n = 30). Methodology/Principal Findings We propose a DNA barcoding approach that consists of a rapid, accurate and automatable species identification method using the standard DNA sequences of complementary plastid (trnLF) and nuclear (ITS, GI) loci. The highly homogenous but largely divergent B. distachyon and B. stacei diploids could be easily distinguished (100% identification success) using direct trnLF (2.4%), ITS (5.5%) or GI (3.8%) sequence divergence. By contrast, B. hybridum could only be unambiguously identified through the use of combined trnLF+ITS sequences (90% of identification success) or by cloned GI sequences (96.7%) that showed 5.4% (ITS) and 4% (GI) rate divergence between the two parental sequences found in the allopolyploid. Conclusion/Significance Our data provide an unbiased and effective barcode to differentiate these three closely-related species from one another. This procedure overcomes the taxonomic uncertainty generated from methods based on morphology or flow cytometry identifications that have resulted in some misclassifications of the model plant and its allies. Our study also demonstrates that the allotetraploid B. hybridum has resulted from bi-directional crosses of B. distachyon and B. stacei plants acting either as maternal or paternal parents. PMID:23240000

  7. NMR study of the effects of some bleomycin C-termini on the structure of a DNA hairpin with the 5'-GC-3' binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Teresa E; Murray, Sally A; Ingersoll, Azure D; Reilly, Teresa M; Follett, Shelby E; Macartney, Kevin E; Harpster, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    The antibiotics known as bleomycins constitute a family of natural products clinically employed for the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. The drug acts as an antitumor agent by virtue of the ability of a metal complex of the antibiotic to cleave DNA. Bleomycins are differentiated by their C-terminal regions. Previous structural studies involving metal-bleomycin-DNA triads have allowed the identification of the bithiazole-(C-terminus substituent) segment in this molecule as the one that most closely interacts with DNA. Three different modes of binding of metallo-bleomycins to DNA (partial or total intercalation of the bithiazole unit between DNA bases, or binding to the minor groove) have been proposed in the literature. The therapeutic use of bleomycin is frequently associated with the development of pulmonary fibrosis. The severity of this side effect has been attributed to the C-terminus of the antibiotic by some researchers. The degree of pulmonary toxicity of bleomycin-A2 and -A5, were found to be higher than those of bleomycin-B2 and peplomycin. Since the introduction of Blenoxane to clinical medicine in 1972, attempts have been made at modifying the basic bleomycin structure at the C-terminus to improve its therapeutic index. However, the pharmacological and toxicological importance of particular C-termini on bleomycin remains unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effect of Zn(II)bleomycin-A2, -A5, -B2, and Zn(II)peplomycin on the structure of a DNA hairpin containing the 5'-GC-3' binding site. We provide evidence that different Zn(II)bleomycins affect the structure of the tested DNA segment in different fashions.

  8. A DNA vaccine co-expressing Trichinella spiralis MIF and MCD-1 with murine ubiquitin induces partial protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, F; Xu, L; Yan, R; Song, X; Li, X

    2013-03-01

    Co-expression of Trichinella spiralis macrophage migration inhibitory factor (TsMIF) with T. spiralis cystatin-like domain protein (TsMCD-1) in a DNA vaccine induces a Th1 immune response and partial protection against T. spiralis infection. The present study evaluated whether co-expression of mouse ubiquitin (Ub) with TsMIF and TsMCD-1 might improve the immune response against T. spiralis infection. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized twice at 2-week intervals with 100 μg of plasmid DNA encoding either a TsMIF-TsMCD-1 fusion protein (pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1) or an Ub-co-expressing triple fusion protein Ub-TsMIF-TsMCD-1 (pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1). Control animals were immunized with pVAX1-Ub or blank vector plasmid. Specific antibody levels (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgM, IgA, IgE) against the recombinant protein TsMIF-TsMCD-1, serum cytokines (interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-17), CD4+/CD8+ T cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses were monitored. Challenge infection was performed 2 weeks after the second immunization and worm burden was assayed at 35 days post-challenge. Antibody responses induced by pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 were significantly lower than for TsMIF-TsMCD-1, but the vaccine induced increased levels of Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and increased T-cell cytotoxicity. The reduction of worm burden (37.95%) following immunization with pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 was significantly greater than that induced by the pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 vaccine (23.17%; P< 0.05).

  9. Direct Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis of Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilized in a DNA/Chitosan-Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticle Bio-Complex Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Gu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A DNA/chitosan-Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle bio-complex film was constructed for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on a glassy carbon electrode. HRP was simply mixed with DNA, chitosan and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and then applied to the electrode surface to form an enzyme-incorporated polyion complex film. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to study the surface features of DNA/chitosan/Fe3O4/HRP layer. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS show that Fe3O4 and enzyme were successfully immobilized on the electrode surface by the DNA/chitosan bio-polyion complex membrane. Direct electron transfer (DET and bioelectrocatalysis of HRP in the DNA/chitosan/Fe3O4 film were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV and constant potential amperometry. The HRP-immobilized electrode was found to undergo DET and exhibited a fast electron transfer rate constant of 3.7 s−1. The CV results showed that the modified electrode gave rise to well-defined peaks in phosphate buffer, corresponding to the electrochemical redox reaction between HRP(Fe(III and HRP(Fe(II. The obtained electrode also displayed an electrocatalytic reduction behavior towards H2O2. The resulting DNA/chitosan/Fe3O4/HRP/glassy carbon electrode (GCE shows a high sensitivity (20.8 A·cm−2·M−1 toward H2O2. A linear response to H2O2 measurement was obtained over the range from 2 µM to 100 µM (R2 = 0.99 and an amperometric detection limit of 1 µM (S/N = 3. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of HRP immobilized on the electrode was 0.28 mM. Furthermore, the electrode exhibits both good operational stability and storage stability.

  10. Immunization with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii Superoxide dismutase (TgSOD) induces partial immune protection against acute toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Cao, Aiping; Li, Yawen; Li, Xun; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2017-06-07

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects all warm-blooded animals including humans and causes toxoplasmosis. An effective vaccine could be an ideal choice for preventing and controlling toxoplasmosis. T. gondii Superoxide dismutase (TgSOD) might participate in affecting the intracellular growth of both bradyzoite and tachyzoite forms. In the present study, the TgSOD gene was used to construct a DNA vaccine (pEGFP-SOD). TgSOD gene was amplified and inserted into eukaryotic vector pEGFP-C1 and formed the DNA vaccine pEGFP-SOD. Then the BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with the DNA vaccine and those injected with pEGFP-C1, PBS or nothing were treated as controls. Four weeks after the last immunization, all mouse groups followed by challenging intraperitoneally with tachyzoites of T. gondii ME49 strain. Results showed higher levels of total IgG, IgG2α in the sera and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in the splenocytes from pEGFP-SOD inoculated mice than those unvaccinated, or inoculated with either empty plasmid vector or PBS. The proportions of CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells in the spleen from pEGFP-SOD inoculated mice were significantly (p < 0.05) increased compared to control groups. In addition, the survival time of mice immunized with pEGFP-SOD was significantly prolonged as compared to the controls (p < 0.05) although all the mice died. The present study revealed that the DNA vaccine triggered strong humoral and cellular immune responses, and aroused partial protective immunity against acute T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice. The collective data suggests the SOD may be a potential vaccine candidate for further development.

  11. Comparative analysis and molecular characterization of a gene BANF1 encoded a DNA-binding protein during mitosis from the Giant Panda and Black Bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yichun; Hou, Yi-Ling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wan-Ru; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Barrier to autointegration factor 1 (BANF1) is a DNA-binding protein found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells that functions to establish nuclear architecture during mitosis. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of BANF1 were cloned from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus mupinensis) using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cDNA of the BANF1 cloned from Giant Panda and Black Bear is 297 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 270 bp encoding 89 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence from Giant Panda is 521 bp, from Black Bear is 536 bp, which were found both to possess 2 exons. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved to some mammalian species studied. Topology prediction showed there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Casein kinase II phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Giant Panda, and there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Black Bear. The BANF1 gene can be readily expressed in E. coli. Results showed that the protein BANF1 fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 14 kD polypeptide that formed inclusion bodies. The expression products obtained could be used to purify the proteins and study their function further.

  12. Multiple Electronic and Structural Factors Control Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer and 6-4 Thymine-Thymine Photodimerization in a DNA Duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Irene; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Esposito, Luciana; Hofinger, Siegfried; Nenov, Artur; Garavelli, Marco; Improta, Roberto

    2017-10-26

    The T-T photodimerization paths leading to the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and 6-4 pyrimidine pyrimidone (64-PP), the two main DNA photolesions, have been resolved for a T-T step in a DNA duplex by two complementary state-of-the-art quantum mechanical approaches: QM(CASPT2//CASSCF)/MM and TD-DFT/PCM. Based on the analysis of several different representative structures, we define a new-ensemble of cooperating geometrical and electronic factors (besides the distance between the reacting bonds) ruling T-T photodimerization in DNA. CPD is formed by a barrierless path on an exciton state delocalized over the two bases. Large interbase stacking and shift values, together with a small pseudorotation phase angle for T at the 3'-end, favor this reaction. The oxetane intermediate, leading to a 64-PP adduct, is formed on a singlet T→T charge-transfer state and is favored by a large interbase angle and slide values. A small energy barrier (<0.3 eV) is associated to this path, likely contributing to the smaller quantum yield observed for this process. Eventually, a clear directionality is always shown by the electronic excitation characterizing the singlet photoactive state driving the photodimerization process: an exciton that is more localized on T(3) and a 5'-T→3'-T charge transfer for CPD and oxetane formation, respectively, thus calling for specific electronic constraints. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Interaction of Zn(II)bleomycin-A2and Zn(II)peplomycin with a DNA hairpin containing the 5'-GT-3' binding site in comparison with the 5'-GC-3' binding site studied by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Shelby E; Ingersoll, Azure D; Murray, Sally A; Reilly, Teresa M; Lehmann, Teresa E

    2017-10-01

    Bleomycins are a group of glycopeptide antibiotics synthesized by Streptomyces verticillus that are widely used for the treatment of various neoplastic diseases. These antibiotics have the ability to chelate a metal center, mainly Fe(II), and cause site-specific DNA cleavage. Bleomycins are differentiated by their C-terminal regions. Although this antibiotic family is a successful course of treatment for some types of cancers, it is known to cause pulmonary fibrosis. Previous studies have identified that bleomycin-related pulmonary toxicity is linked to the C-terminal region of these drugs. This region has been shown to closely interact with DNA. We examined the binding of Zn(II)peplomycin and Zn(II)bleomycin-A 2 to a DNA hairpin of sequence 5'-CCAGTATTTTTACTGG-3', containing the binding site 5'-GT-3', and compared the results with those obtained from our studies of the same MBLMs bound to a DNA hairpin containing the binding site 5'-GC-3'. We provide evidence that the DNA base sequence has a strong impact in the final structure of the drug-target complex.

  14. The association between metabolic rate, immune parameters, and growth performance of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), following the injection of a DNA vaccine alone and concurrently with a polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Lisa A; Schulte, P M; Balfry, S K; McKinley, R S; LaPatra, S E

    2010-02-01

    This research demonstrates a significant increase in routine metabolic rate (RMR) following injection of a DNA vaccine concurrently with a polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine. The increase in RMR was transient and associated with increased activity of both the non-specific and specific immune responses. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were injected with a DNA vaccine (DV), a commercially available polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine (AV), or the two vaccines in combination and sampled at 203, 305, and 406 days (dd) post-vaccine injection (pvi) for RMR and key immune parameters (serum lysozyme activity, serum neutralization antibody titres). The RMR of fish that received both the DV and the AV was significantly higher at 203 dd pvi, compared to fish from all other treatment groups which included the control, the AV, and the DV groups. The increased RMR corresponded to elevated levels of serum lysozyme activity and an earlier seroconversion of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. To determine if growth performance was affected by the transient increase in RMR, specific growth rate (SGR), percent daily weight gain (WG), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were determined at 798, 1204, and 1610 dd pvi. Although fish in all three vaccine groups showed significant increases in SGR and WG at 798 and 1610 dd pvi compared to the control group, the overall weight of the fish was not different at the end of the experiment. In summary, this study shows that concurrent injection of a DV and an AV transiently increases the RMR of rainbow trout and changes the manner in which the immune response occurs, but does not affect the overall growth performance of the fish. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A DNA Crosslinker Collects Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Heald, Rebecca

    2017-09-11

    Incorporating each set of daughter chromosomes into a single nucleus at the end of mitosis is essential for genome stability. In a recent Cell paper, Samwer et al. (2017) show that by non-covalently crosslinking DNA, BAF promotes chromosome coalescence, preventing nuclear membranes from enwrapping individual chromosomes to form micronuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of S-[2,3-bispalmitoyiloxy-(2R)-propyl]-R-cysteinyl-amido-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol as an adjuvant improved protective immunity associated with a DNA vaccine encoding Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase of Brucella abortus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal-Díaz, Angello; Riquelme-Neira, Roberto; Sáez, Darwin; Rivera, Alejandra; Fernández, Pablo; Cabrera, Alex; Guzmán, Carlos A; Oñate, Angel

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding Brucella abortus Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) using the Toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist S-[2,3-bispalmitoyiloxy-(2R)-propyl]-R-cysteinyl-amido-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (BPPcysMPEG) as an adjuvant. Intranasal coadministration of BPPcysMPEG with a plasmid carrying the SOD-encoding gene (pcDNA-SOD) into BALB/c mice elicited antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Humoral responses were characterized by the stimulation of IgG2a and IgG1 and by the presence of SOD-specific secretory IgA in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Furthermore, T-cell proliferative responses and increased production of gamma interferon were also observed upon splenocyte restimulation with recombinant SOD. Cytotoxic responses were also stimulated, as demonstrated by the lysis of RB51-SOD-infected J774.A1 macrophages by cells recovered from immunized mice. The pcDNA-SOD/BPPcysMPEG formulation induced improved protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 in BALB/c mice over that provided by pcDNA-SOD, suggesting the potential of this vaccination strategy against Brucella infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. The DNA/RNA-dependent RNA polymerase QDE-1 generates aberrant RNA and dsRNA for RNAi in a process requiring replication protein A and a DNA helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Chi Lee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The production of aberrant RNA (aRNA is the initial step in several RNAi pathways. How aRNA is produced and specifically recognized by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs to generate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA is not clear. We previously showed that in the filamentous fungus Neurospora, the RdRP QDE-1 is required for rDNA-specific aRNA production, suggesting that QDE-1 may be important in aRNA synthesis. Here we show that a recombinant QDE-1 is both an RdRP and a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (DdRP. Its DdRP activity is much more robust than the RdRP activity and occurs on ssDNA but not dsDNA templates. We further show that Replication Protein A (RPA, a single-stranded DNA-binding complex that interacts with QDE-1, is essential for aRNA production and gene silencing. In vitro reconstitution assays demonstrate that QDE-1 can produce dsRNA from ssDNA, a process that is strongly promoted by RPA. Furthermore, the interaction between QDE-1 and RPA requires the RecQ DNA helicase QDE-3, a homolog of the human Werner/Bloom Syndrome proteins. Together, these results suggest a novel small RNA biogenesis pathway in Neurospora and a new mechanism for the production of aRNA and dsRNA in RNAi pathways.

  18. Comparative assessment of a DNA and protein Leishmania donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase vaccine to cross-protect against murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major or L. mexicana infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S A; Alawa, J; Doro, B; Henriquez, F L; Roberts, C W; Nok, A; Alawa, C B I; Alsaadi, M; Mullen, A B; Carter, K C

    2012-02-08

    Leishmaniasis is a major health problem and it is estimated that 12 million people are currently infected. A vaccine which could cross-protect people against different Leishmania spp. would facilitate control of this disease as more than one species of Leishmania may be present. In this study the ability of a DNA vaccine, using the full gene sequence for L. donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γGCS) incorporated in the pVAX vector (pVAXγGCS), and a protein vaccine, using the corresponding recombinant L. donovani γGCS protein (LdγGCS), to protect against L. major or L. mexicana infection was evaluated. DNA vaccination gave transient protection against L. major and no protection against L. mexicana despite significantly enhancing specific antibody titres in vaccinated infected mice compared to infected controls. Vaccination with the LdγGCS protected against both species but only if the protein was incorporated into non-ionic surfactant vesicles for L. mexicana. The results of this study indicate that a L. donovani γGCS vaccine could be used to vaccinate against more than one Leishmania species but only if the recombinant protein is used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of a DNA vaccine candidate co-expressing GP3 and GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) with interferon α/γ in immediate and long-lasting protection against HP-PRRSV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yijun; Qi, Jing; Lu, Yu; Wu, Jiaqiang; Yoo, Dongwan; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Xiumei; Li, Jun; Sun, Wenbo; Cong, Xiaoyan; Shi, Jianli; Wang, Jinbao

    2012-12-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has become one of the most economically important diseases to the global pork industry. Current vaccination strategies only provide a limited protective efficacy. In this study, a DNA vaccine, pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35, co-expressing GP3 and GP5 of PRRSV with interferon α/γ was constructed, and its immediate and long-lasting protection against highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) challenge were examined in pigs. For immediate protection, the results showed that pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 could provide partially protective efficacy, which was similar to the pVAX1(©)-α-γ (expressing interferon α/γ). For long-lasting protection, pigs inoculated with pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 developed significantly higher PRRSV-specific antibody response, T cell proliferation, IFN-γ, and IL-4, than those vaccinated with pVAX1(©)-GP35 (expressing GP3 and GP5 of PRRSV). Following homologous challenge with HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN, pigs inoculated with pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 showed almost no clinical signs, no lung lesions, and significantly lower viremia, as compared to those in pVAX1(©)-GP35 group. It indicated that pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 could induce enhanced immune responses and provide both immediate and long-lasting protection against HP-PRRSV challenge in pigs. The DNA vaccine pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 might be an attractive candidate vaccine for the prevention and control of HP-PRRSV infections.

  20. A DNA Vaccine Encoding the Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli Shiga-Like Toxin 2 A2 and B Subunits Confers Protective Immunity to Shiga Toxin Challenge in the Murine Model▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentancor, Leticia V.; Bilen, Marcos; Brando, Romina J. Fernández; Ramos, María Victoria; Ferreira, Luis C. S.; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2009-01-01

    Production of verocytotoxin or Shiga-like toxin (Stx), particularly Stx2, is the basis of hemolytic uremic syndrome, a frequently lethal outcome for subjects infected with Stx2-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains. The toxin is formed by a single A subunit, which promotes protein synthesis inhibition in eukaryotic cells, and five B subunits, which bind to globotriaosylceramide at the surface of host cells. Host enzymes cleave the A subunit into the A1 peptide, endowed with N-glycosidase activity to the 28S rRNA, and the A2 peptide, which confers stability to the B pentamer. We report the construction of a DNA vaccine (pStx2ΔAB) that expresses a nontoxic Stx2 mutated form consisting of the last 32 amino acids of the A2 sequence and the complete B subunit as two nonfused polypeptides. Immunization trials carried out with the DNA vaccine in BALB/c mice, alone or in combination with another DNA vaccine encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, resulted in systemic Stx-specific antibody responses targeting both A and B subunits of the native Stx2. Moreover, anti-Stx2 antibodies raised in mice immunized with pStx2ΔAB showed toxin neutralization activity in vitro and, more importantly, conferred partial protection to Stx2 challenge in vivo. The present vector represents the second DNA vaccine so far reported to induce protective immunity to Stx2 and may contribute, either alone or in combination with other procedures, to the development of prophylactic or therapeutic interventions aiming to ameliorate EHEC infection-associated sequelae. PMID:19176691

  1. A DNA pooling-based case-control study of myopia candidate genes COL11A1, COL18A1, FBN1, and PLOD1 in a Chinese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kim Hung; Fung, Wai Yan; Ng, Po Wah; Sham, Pak Chung; Yap, Maurice K.H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship between high myopia and common polymorphisms in four candidate genes: collagen, type XI, alpha 1 (COL11A1); collagen, type XVIII, alpha 1 (COL18A1); fibrillin 1 (FBN1); and procollagen-lysine 1,2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 1 (PLOD1). These genes were selected because rare pathogenic mutations in these genes cause disease syndromes that have myopia, usually high myopia, as one of the common presenting features. Methods This study recruited 600 unrelated Han Chinese subjects including 300 cases with high myopia (spherical equivalent or SE≤-8.00 diopters) and 300 controls (SE within ±1.00 diopter). A total of 66 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected for study from these four candidate genes. The study adopted a DNA pooling strategy with an initial screen of DNA pools to identify putatively positive SNPs and then confirmed the “positive” SNPs by genotyping individual samples forming the original DNA pools. DNA pools were each constructed by mixing equal amounts of DNA from 50 individuals with the same phenotype status. Six case pools were prepared from 300 cases and six control pools from 300 controls. Allele frequencies of DNA pools were estimated by analyzing the primer-extended products with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and compared between case pools and control pools with nested ANOVA. Results In the first stage, 60 SNPs from the 4 candidate genes were successfully screened using the DNA pooling approach. Of these, 6 SNPs showed a statistical significant difference in estimated allele frequencies between case pools and controls at pmyopia. PMID:21527992

  2. A dnaN Plasmid Shuffle Strain for Rapid In Vivo Analysis of Mutant Escherichia coli β Clamps Provides Insight Into the Role of Clamp in umuDC-Mediated Cold Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli umuDC gene products participate in two temporally distinct roles: UmuD2C acts in a DNA damage checkpoint control, while UmuD'2C, also known as DNA polymerase V (Pol V), catalyzes replication past DNA lesions via a process termed translesion DNA synthesis. These different roles of the umuDC gene products are managed in part by the dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein. Co-overexpression of the β clamp and Pol V severely blocked E. coli growth at 30°C. We previously used a genetic assay that was independent of the ability of β clamp to support E. coli viability to isolate 8 mutant clamp proteins (βQ61K, βS107L, βD150N, βG157S, βV170M, βE202K, βM204K and βP363S) that failed to block growth at 30°C when co-overexpressed with Pol V. It was unknown whether these mutant clamps were capable of supporting E. coli viability and normal umuDC functions in vivo. The goals of this study were to answer these questions. To this end, we developed a novel dnaN plasmid shuffle assay. Using this assay, βD150N and βP363S were unable to support E. coli viability. The remaining 6 mutant clamps, each of which supported viability, were indistinguishable from β+ with respect to umuDC functions in vivo. In light of these findings, we analyzed phenotypes of strains overexpressing either β clamp or Pol V alone. The strain overexpressing β+, but not those expressing mutant β clamps, displayed slowed growth irrespective of the incubation temperature. Moreover, growth of the Pol V-expressing strain was modestly slowed at 30°, but not 42°C. Taken together, these results suggest the mutant clamps were identified due to their inability to slow growth rather than an inability to interact with Pol V. They further suggest that cold sensitivity is due, at least in part, to the combination of their individual effects on growth at 30°C. PMID:24896652

  3. Prediction and cloning linear Tcell epitopes of P14-3-3 antigen into pEGFP–N1 as a DNA vaccine model to induse immuno response against hydatidosis and it\\'s expression in CHO cell line

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    R mesri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background & purpose: Hydatidosis is a zoonotic disease that caused by infection with the larvae of Echinococcus granulosus. Different antigens produced in larval stage of this parasite that recombinant vaccine base these antigens created significant immunity in infected animals. One of the important antigens is p14-3-3 that it's recombinant antigen created considerable immunity in mouse models. In this study according to the high immunity of antigen epitopes region the coding sequence of T-cell epitopes of P14-3-3 was cloned into pEGFP-N1vector in order to produce an effective DNA vaccine model to stimulate high level of Th1 immune response.   Material and method: In this study bioinformatics tools were used to prediction of linear T-Cell epitopes of Echinococcus granulosus P14-3-3 &zeta antigen. The nucleotide coding sequence of these epitopes was synthesized by PCR. the ampliqon was digested with XhoI restriction enzyme and cloned into pEGFP–N1 vector That has been purificated by modified sambrook method with CaCl2 and PEG6000..Positive colony was selected by direct colony PCR and confirmed by the sequencing.and evaluation of it's expression in Eukaryotic cells was done by transformed to CHO cell line with electroporation. Results: Linear T-cell epitopes of Echinococcus granulosus P14-3-3 after prediction,synthesis and amplification wae successfully cloned into pEGFP-N1 vector that purificated by new method with maximum vector and minimum RNA concentration.The expression of new constract in CHO cell line as a eukaryotic cells achivment by fluorescent microscope and will be used as a DNA vaccine model to evaluation immuno response in mouse models.   Discussion: Successfully cloning of The linear T-cell epitppes coding sequence of Echinococcus granulosus P14-3-3&zeta antigen into pEGFP-N1 verificated by sequencing and fluorscent microscope images demonstrated expression of recombinant protein in CHO cell line

  4. Influência do biofármaco DNA-hsp65 na lesão pulmonar induzida por bleomicina Influence of a DNA-hsp65 vaccine on bleomycin-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ignacio de Padua

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência do biofármaco DNA-hsp65 em um modelo de distúrbio fibrosante pulmonar experimental. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 120 camundongos machos C57BL/6, divididos em quatro grupos: grupo SS, animais tratados com salina (placebo e injetados com salina intratraqueal (IT; grupo SB, tratados com salina (placebo e injetados com bleomicina IT; grupo PB, tratados com plasmídeo, sem gene bacteriano, e injetados com bleomicina IT; e grupo BB, tratados com DNA-hsp65 e injetados com bleomicina IT. A bleomicina foi injetada 15 dias após a última imunização, e os animais sacrificados seis semanas após o uso da droga IT. O pulmão esquerdo retirado foi utilizado para análise morfológica, e o pulmão direito para dosagens de hidroxiprolina. RESULTADOS: A proporção de camundongos que apresentaram morte não-programada depois de 48 h da injeção IT foi maior no grupo SB em comparação ao grupo SS (57,7% vs. 11,1%. A área percentual média de interstício septal foi maior nos grupos SB e PB (53,1 ± 8,6% e 53,6 ± 9,3%, respectivamente em comparação aos grupos SS e BB (32,9 ± 2,7% e 34,3 ± 6,1%, respectivamente. Os grupos SB, PB e BB mostraram aumentos nos valores médios da área de interstício septal corada por picrosirius em comparação ao grupo SS (SS: 2,0 ± 1,4%; SB: 8,2 ± 4,9%; PB: 7,2 ± 4,2%; e BB:6,6±4,1%.O conteúdo pulmonar de hidroxiprolina no grupo SS foi inferior ao dos demais grupos (SS: 104,9 ± 20,9 pg/pulmão; SB: 160,4 ±47,8 pg/pulmão; PB:170,0 ± 72,0 pg/pulmão; e BB: 162,5 ± 39,7 pg/pulmão. CONCLUSÕES: A imunização com o biofármaco DNA-hsp65 interferiu na deposição de matriz não-colágena em um modelo de lesão pulmonar induzida por bleomicina.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of immunization with a DNA-hsp65 vaccine in an experimental model of pulmonary fibrosis. METHODS: A total of 120 male C57BL/6 mice were distributed into four groups: SS, injected with saline (placebo and then

  5. Long-Range Photoinduced Electron Transfer Through a DNA Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C. J.; Arkin, M. R.; Jenkins, Y.; Ghatlia, N. D.; Bossmann, S. H.; Turro, N. J.; Barton, J. K.

    1993-11-01

    Rapid photoinduced electron transfer is demonstrated over a distance of greater than 40 angstroms between metallointercalators that are tethered to the 5' termini of a 15-base pair DNA duplex. An oligomeric assembly was synthesized in which the donor is Ru(phen)_2dppz^2+ (phen, phenanthroline, and dppz, dipyridophenazine) and the acceptor is Rh(phi)_2phen^3+ (phi, phenanthrenequinone diimine). These metal complexes are intercalated either one or two base steps m from the helix termini. Although the ruthenium-modified oligonucleotide hybridized to an unmodified complement luminesces intensely, the ruthenium-modified oligomer hybridized to the rhodium-modified oligomer shows no detectable luminescence. Time-resolved studies point to a lower limit of 109 per second for the quenching rate. No quenching was observed upon metallation of two complementary octamers by Ru(phen)_32+ and Rh(phen)_33+ under conditions where the phen complexes do not intercalate. The stacked aromatic heterocycles of the DNA duplex therefore serve as an efficient medium for coupling electron donors and acceptors over very long distances.

  6. Long-range photoinduced electron transfer through a DNA helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.J.; Arkin, M.R.; Jenkins, Y.; Barton, J.K. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)); Ghatlia, N.D.; Bossmann, S.H.; Turro, N.J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1993-11-12

    Rapid photoinduced electron transfer is demonstrated over a distance of greater than 40 angstroms between metallointercalators that are tethered to the 5' termini of a 15-base pair DNA duplex. An oligomeric assembly was synthesized in which the donor is Ru(phen)[sub 2]dppz[sup 2+] (phen, phenanthroline, and dppz, dipyridophenazine) and the acceptor is Rh(phi)[sub 2]phen[sup 3+] (phi, phenanthrenequinone diimine). These metal complexes are intercalated either one or two base steps in from the helix termini. Although the ruthenium-modified oligonucleotide hybridized to an unmodified complement luminesces intensely, the ruthenium-modified oligomer hybridized to the rhodium-modified oligomer shows no detectable luminescence. Time-resolved studies point to a lower limit of 10[sup 9] per second for the quenching rate. No quenching was observed upon metallation of two complementary octamers by Ru(phen)[sub 3][sup 2+] and Rh(phen)[sub 3][sup 3+] under conditions where the phen complexes do not intercalate. The stacked aromatic heterocycles of the DNA duplex therefore serve as an efficient medium for coupling electron donors and acceptors over very long distances.

  7. Divergent Requirement for a DNA Repair Enzyme during Enterovirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maciejewski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Viruses of the Enterovirus genus of picornaviruses, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, and human rhinovirus, commandeer the functions of host cell proteins to aid in the replication of their small viral genomic RNAs during infection. One of these host proteins is a cellular DNA repair enzyme known as 5′ tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2. TDP2 was previously demonstrated to mediate the cleavage of a unique covalent linkage between a viral protein (VPg and the 5′ end of picornavirus RNAs. Although VPg is absent from actively translating poliovirus mRNAs, the removal of VPg is not required for the in vitro translation and replication of the RNA. However, TDP2 appears to be excluded from replication and encapsidation sites during peak times of poliovirus infection of HeLa cells, suggesting a role for TDP2 during the viral replication cycle. Using a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line lacking TDP2, we found that TDP2 is differentially required among enteroviruses. Our single-cycle viral growth analysis shows that CVB3 replication has a greater dependency on TDP2 than does poliovirus or human rhinovirus replication. During infection, CVB3 protein accumulation is undetectable (by Western blot analysis in the absence of TDP2, whereas poliovirus protein accumulation is reduced but still detectable. Using an infectious CVB3 RNA with a reporter, CVB3 RNA could still be replicated in the absence of TDP2 following transfection, albeit at reduced levels. Overall, these results indicate that TDP2 potentiates viral replication during enterovirus infections of cultured cells, making TDP2 a potential target for antiviral development for picornavirus infections.

  8. Contribution towards the development of a DNA barcode reference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA barcoding is a widely used molecular approach for species cataloging for unambiguous identification and conservation. In the present study, DNA barcoding of some West African mammals were performed with six new mitochondrial CO1 sequences for Civettictis civetta, Tadarida nigeriae, Orycteropus afer, ...

  9. 3D-DART: a DNA structure modelling server

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Dijk, Marc; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J

    2009-01-01

    .... Often, 3D-structural models of DNA are required, for instance, to serve as templates for homology modeling, as starting structures for macro-molecular docking or as scaffold for NMR structure calculations...

  10. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  11. How a DNA polymerase clamp loader opens a sliding clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, Brian A.; Makino, Debora L.; O’Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    2012-01-01

    Processive chromosomal replication relies on sliding DNA clamps, which are loaded onto DNA by pentameric clamp loader complexes belonging to the AAA+ family of ATPases. We present structures for the ATP-bound state of the clamp loader complex from bacteriophage T4, bound to an open clamp and primer-template DNA. The clamp loader traps a spiral conformation of the open clamp so that both the loader and the clamp match the helical symmetry of DNA. One structure reveals that ATP has been hydrolyzed in one subunit, and suggests that clamp closure and ejection of the loader involves disruption of the ATP-dependent match in symmetry. The structures explain how synergy between the loader, the clamp and DNA can trigger ATP hydrolysis and release of the closed clamp on DNA. PMID:22194570

  12. How a DNA polymerase clamp loader opens a sliding clamp

    OpenAIRE

    Kelch, Brian A.; Makino, Debora L.; O’Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    2011-01-01

    Processive chromosomal replication relies on sliding DNA clamps, which are loaded onto DNA by pentameric clamp loader complexes belonging to the AAA+ family of ATPases. We present structures for the ATP-bound state of the clamp loader complex from bacteriophage T4, bound to an open clamp and primer-template DNA. The clamp loader traps a spiral conformation of the open clamp so that both the loader and the clamp match the helical symmetry of DNA. One structure reveals that ATP has been hydroly...

  13. A DNA mini-barcode for land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Damon P

    2014-05-01

    Small portions of the barcode region - mini-barcodes - may be used in place of full-length barcodes to overcome DNA degradation for samples with poor DNA preservation. 591,491,286 rbcL mini-barcode primer combinations were electronically evaluated for PCR universality, and two novel highly universal sets of priming sites were identified. Novel and published rbcL mini-barcode primers were evaluated for PCR amplification [determined with a validated electronic simulation (n = 2765) and empirically (n = 188)], Sanger sequence quality [determined empirically (n = 188)], and taxonomic discrimination [determined empirically (n = 30,472)]. PCR amplification for all mini-barcodes, as estimated by validated electronic simulation, was successful for 90.2-99.8% of species. Overall Sanger sequence quality for mini-barcodes was very low - the best mini-barcode tested produced sequences of adequate quality (B20 ≥ 0.5) for 74.5% of samples. The majority of mini-barcodes provide correct identifications of families in excess of 70.1% of the time. Discriminatory power noticeably decreased at lower taxonomic levels. At the species level, the discriminatory power of the best mini-barcode was less than 38.2%. For samples believed to contain DNA from only one species, an investigator should attempt to sequence, in decreasing order of utility and probability of success, mini-barcodes F (rbcL1/rbcLB), D (F52/R193) and K (F517/R604). For samples believed to contain DNA from more than one species, an investigator should amplify and sequence mini-barcode D (F52/R193). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Assessment of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Burkholderia pseudomallei Bacterioferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    determining the immune responses in melioidosis, rheumatic fever , poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis and Q fever ...Research Group at James Cook University. He graduated with his MD at the Vinnitsa Medical Institute in 1985, and completed his PhD at the University of

  15. Contribution towards the development of a DNA barcode reference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SGeorge

    2013-11-27

    Nov 27, 2013 ... Key words: mtDNA, West African mammals, conservation, biodiversity. INTRODUCTION. West Africa is endowed with ... strategies for conservation efforts (Burgess-Herbert et al.,. 2010). The nomenclature of ... the identification of amphibians (Smith et al., 2008), North. American birds (Hebert et al., 2004; ...

  16. Encapsulation of Gold Nanoparticles in a DNA Origami Cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhao; Jacovetty, Erica L.; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-01-21

    A critical challenge in nanoparticle (NP) surface functionalization is to label the NP surface with a single copy of a functional group or to display multiple, unique molecules on the NP surface with control of the orientation and intermolecular distance. This challenge was addressed with the construction of a spatially addressable, self-assembling DNA origami nanocage that encapsulates gold nanoparticles and interrupts its surface symmetry

  17. Contribution towards the development of a DNA barcode reference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SGeorge

    2013-11-27

    Nov 27, 2013 ... Full Length Research Paper. Contribution towards the ... bridging taxonomical research between other disciplines of science catering for ..... From Science to. Action: Taking DNA Barcoding to Battle Against the Bush meat Crisis. “Speed Presentation” 24th Annual Meeting of the Society for. Conservation ...

  18. BIOLOG - a DNA sequence analysis system in PROLOG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, A; Hammond, P; Brough, D; Glover, D

    1984-01-11

    BIOLOG contains facilities for the analysis of nucleic acid sequences. These facilities are available through queries and commands of the underlying implementation language PROLOG. Familiarity with PROLOG is gained by using the built-in BIOLOG functions. This experience should enable the user to extend the current system and define new facilities.

  19. A DNA Melting Exercise for a Large Laboratory Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lauren A.; Junker, Matthew; Stark, Myranda; Greenleaf, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    A simple and economical experimental setup is described that enables multiple individuals or groups within a laboratory class to measure the thermal melting of double stranded DNA simultaneously. The setup utilizes a basic spectrophotometer capable of measuring absorbance at 260 nm, UV plastic cuvettes, and a stirring hot plate. Students measure…

  20. Identification of Meconopsis species by a DNA barcode sequence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcoding is a novel technology that uses a standard DNA sequence to facilitate species identification. Species identification is necessary for the authentication of traditional plant based medicines. Although a consensus has not been agreed regarding which DNA sequences can be used as ...

  1. A DNA enzyme with Mg(2+)-Dependent RNA Phosphoesterase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA can act as an enzyme in the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester. This is a facile reaction, with an uncatalyzed rate for a typical RNA phosphoester of approx. 10(exp -4)/ min in the presence of 1 mM Pb(OAc)2 at pH 7.0 and 23 C. The Mg(2+) - dependent reaction is more difficult, with an uncatalyzed rate of approx. 10(exp -7)/ min under comparable conditions. Mg(2+) - dependent cleavage has special relevance to biology because it is compatible with intracellular conditions. Using in vitro selection, we sought to develop a family of phosphoester-cleaving DNA enzymes that operate in the presence of various divalent metals, focusing particularly on the Mg(2+) - dependent reaction. Results: We generated a population of greater than 10(exp 13) DNAs containing 40 random nucleotides and carried out repeated rounds of selective amplification, enriching for molecules that cleave a target RNA phosphoester in the presence of 1 mM Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Pb(2+). Examination of individual clones from the Mg(2+) lineage after the sixth round revealed a catalytic motif comprised of a three-stem junction.This motif was partially randomized and subjected to seven additional rounds of selective amplification, yielding catalysts with a rate of 0.01/ min. The optimized DNA catalyst was divided into separate substrate and enzyme domains and shown to have a similar level of activity under multiple turnover conditions. Conclusions: We have generated a Mg(2+) - dependent DNA enzyme that cleaves a target RNA phosphoester with a catalytic rate approx. 10(exp 5) - fold greater than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. This activity is compatible with intracellular conditions, raising the possibility that DNA enzymes might be made to operate in vivo.

  2. Telomerase RNA is more than a DNA template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2016-08-02

    The addition of telomeric DNA to chromosome ends is an essential cellular activity that compensates for the loss of genomic DNA that is due to the inability of the conventional DNA replication apparatus to duplicate the entire chromosome. The telomerase reverse transcriptase and its associated RNA bind to the very end of the telomere via a sequence in the RNA and specific protein-protein interactions. Telomerase RNA also provides the template for addition of new telomeric repeats by the reverse-transcriptase protein subunit. In addition to the template, there are 3 other conserved regions in telomerase RNA that are essential for normal telomerase activity. Here we briefly review the conserved core regions of telomerase RNA and then focus on a recent study in fission yeast that determined the function of another conserved region in telomerase RNA called the Stem Terminus Element (STE). (1) The STE is distant from the templating core of telomerase in both the linear and RNA secondary structure, but, nonetheless, affects the fidelity of telomere sequence addition and, in turn, the ability of telomere binding proteins to bind and protect chromosome ends. We will discuss possible mechanisms of STE action and the suitability of the STE as an anti-cancer target.

  3. 3D-DART: a DNA structure modelling server

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325811113; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in structural studies of DNA by both experimental and computational approaches. Often, 3D-structural models of DNA are required, for instance, to serve as templates for homology modeling, as starting structures for macro-molecular docking or as scaffold for NMR structure

  4. Rapid development of a DNA vaccine for Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Kimberly A; Ko, Sung-Youl; Morabito, Kaitlyn M; Yang, Eun Sung; Pelc, Rebecca S; DeMaso, Christina R; Castilho, Leda R; Abbink, Peter; Boyd, Michael; Nityanandam, Ramya; Gordon, David N; Gallagher, John Robert; Chen, Xuejun; Todd, John-Paul; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Harris, Audray; Huang, Yan-Jang S; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Andersen, Hanne; Lewis, Mark G; De La Barrera, Rafael; Eckels, Kenneth H; Jarman, Richard G; Nason, Martha C; Barouch, Dan H; Roederer, Mario; Kong, Wing-Pui; Mascola, John R; Pierson, Theodore C; Graham, Barney S

    2016-10-14

    Zika virus (ZIKV) was identified as a cause of congenital disease during the explosive outbreak in the Americas and Caribbean that began in 2015. Because of the ongoing fetal risk from endemic disease and travel-related exposures, a vaccine to prevent viremia in women of childbearing age and their partners is imperative. We found that vaccination with DNA expressing the premembrane and envelope proteins of ZIKV was immunogenic in mice and nonhuman primates, and protection against viremia after ZIKV challenge correlated with serum neutralizing activity. These data not only indicate that DNA vaccination could be a successful approach to protect against ZIKV infection, but also suggest a protective threshold of vaccine-induced neutralizing activity that prevents viremia after acute infection. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. A DNA delivery system targeting dendritic cells for use in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA-based vaccination has emerged as a promising method of immunisation since the first demonstration of this technology. Improving the antibody responses is desirable for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of these vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity of a Plasmodium-based DNA vaccine that ...

  6. Hydrophobic actuation of a DNA origami bilayer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Jonathan; Weber, Michael; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-04-14

    Amphiphilic compounds have a strong tendency to form aggregates in aqueous solutions. It is shown that such aggregation can be utilized to fold cholesterol-modified, single-layered DNA origami structures into sandwich-like bilayer structures, which hide the cholesterol modifications in their interior. The DNA bilayer structures unfold after addition of the surfactant Tween 80, and also in the presence of lipid bilayer membranes, with opening kinetics well described by stretched exponentials. It is also demonstrated that by combination with an appropriate lock and key mechanism, hydrophobic actuation of DNA sandwiches can be made conditional on the presence of an additional molecular input such as a specific DNA sequence. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Operation kinetics of a DNA-based molecular switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Friedrich C; Yurke, Bernard; Sanyal, Rishi J

    2002-01-01

    The influence of temperature variation, salt concentration, and pH on the operation kinetics of a simple DNA-based molecular switch is investigated. The device shows robust behavior over a wide range of temperatures, pH, and salt concentrations. In particular, the device operates well under physiological conditions. The experimental data can be qualitatively understood in terms of the influence temperature, salt concentration, and pH have on DNA strand interactions.

  8. A DNA barcoding approach in the study of tardigrades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cesari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding is a technique proposed by Hebert and co-workers in 2003 for discriminating species through analysis of a single gene barcode locus. It aims to obtain a better taxonomic resolution than that achieved through morphological studies, and to avoid the decline in taxonomic knowledge. Today DNA barcoding is a global enterprise, and the implementation of the idea has seen a rapid rise (more than 1900 papers published to date on different organisms. Nonetheless, controversy still arises regarding barcoding and taxonomy. It is important to note that DNA barcoding does not focus on building a tree-of-life or on doing DNA taxonomy, even though sometimes it has been used for these purposes. DNA barcoding rather focuses on producing a universal molecular identification key based on strong taxonomic knowledge that should be included in the barcode reference library. In the phylum Tardigrada, DNA barcoding represents a recent approach to species identification and to help in solving taxonomic problems, especially considering the diminutive size of these animals and the paucity of morphological characters useful for taxonomy. In the framework of the MoDNA Project (Morphology and DNA, carried out by our research group in collaboration with several colleagues, we are combining the study of a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1 with morphological data, in a wide sense (cuticular structures, chromosomes, data on sex ratio and reproduction, to form an integrative taxonomy approach for tardigrade species identification. We believe that without verified reference sequences from voucher specimens that have been authenticated by qualified taxonomists, there is no reliable library for newly generated sequences with which to be compared. Methods and protocols for standardized results are focused on obtaining tight correspondence between tardigrade morphology (and egg shell morphology, when useful, possibly both light and scanning electron microscopy images, and molecular sequence. This approach is particularly useful in describing new species, and important when applied on material collected in species type localities. Results using this approach are presented, primarily focusing on a number of species from the so-called Macrobiotus hufelandi group.

  9. ATM kinase: Much more than a DNA damage responsive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Ayushi; Chandna, Sudhir

    2016-03-01

    ATM, mutation of which causes Ataxia telangiectasia, has emerged as a cardinal multifunctional protein kinase during past two decades as evidenced by various studies from around the globe. Further to its well established and predominant role in DNA damage response, ATM has also been understood to help in maintaining overall functional integrity of cells; since its mutation, inactivation or deficiency results in a variety of pathological manifestations besides DNA damage. These include oxidative stress, metabolic syndrome, mitochondrial dysfunction as well as neurodegeneration. Recently, high throughput screening using proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomic studies revealed several proteins which might be acting as substrates of ATM. Studies that can help in identifying effective regulatory controls within the ATM-mediated pathways/mechanisms can help in developing better therapeutics. In fact, more in-depth understanding of ATM-dependent cellular signals could also help in the treatment of variety of other disease conditions since these pathways seem to control many critical cellular functions. In this review, we have attempted to put together a detailed yet lucid picture of the present-day understanding of ATM's role in various pathophysiological conditions involving DNA damage and beyond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Collective helicity switching of a DNA-coat assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongju; Li, Huichang; He, Ying; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xiaoteng; Lee, Myongsoo

    2017-07-01

    Hierarchical assemblies of biomolecular subunits can carry out versatile tasks at the cellular level with remarkable spatial and temporal precision. As an example, the collective motion and mutual cooperation between complex protein machines mediate essential functions for life, such as replication, synthesis, degradation, repair and transport. Nucleic acid molecules are far less dynamic than proteins and need to bind to specific proteins to form hierarchical structures. The simplest example of these nucleic acid-based structures is provided by a rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus, which consists of genetic material surrounded by coat proteins. Inspired by the complexity and hierarchical assembly of viruses, a great deal of effort has been devoted to design similarly constructed artificial viruses. However, such a wrapping approach makes nucleic acid dynamics insensitive to environmental changes. This limitation generally restricts, for example, the amplification of the conformational dynamics between the right-handed B form to the left-handed Z form of double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Here we report a virus-like hierarchical assembly in which the native DNA and a synthetic coat undergo repeated collective helicity switching triggered by pH change under physiological conditions. We also show that this collective helicity inversion occurs during translocation of the DNA-coat assembly into intracellular compartments. Translating DNA conformational dynamics into a higher level of hierarchical dynamics may provide an approach to create DNA-based nanomachines.

  11. Production optimisation of a DNA vaccine candidate against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccines are promising means to prevent and treat infectious diseases, such as leishmaniasis, but immunisation protocols require large amounts of supercoiled plasmid DNA (scpDNA). Although pDNA can be produced at a reasonable cost in bioreactors; this scale of production may not be the best ...

  12. A DNA element regulates drug tolerance and withdrawal in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Li

    Full Text Available Drug tolerance and withdrawal are insidious responses to drugs of abuse; the first increases drug consumption while the second punishes abstention. Drosophila generate functional tolerance to benzyl alcohol sedation by increasing neural expression of the slo BK-type Ca(2+ activated K(+ channel gene. After drug clearance this change produces a withdrawal phenotype-increased seizure susceptibility. The drug-induced histone modification profile identified the 6b element (60 nt as a drug responsive element. Genomic deletion of 6b produces the allele, slo (Δ6b, that reacts more strongly to the drug with increased induction, a massive increase in the duration of tolerance, and an increase in the withdrawal phenotype yet does not alter other slo-dependent behaviors. The 6b element is a homeostatic regulator of BK channel gene expression and is the first cis-acting DNA element shown to specifically affect the duration of a drug action.

  13. Scaffolded DNA Origami of a DNA Tetrahedron Molecular Container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Yongang; Sharma, Jaswinder; Liu, Minghui

    2009-01-01

    We describe a strategy of scaffolded DNA origami to design and construct 3D molecular cages of tetrahedron geometry with inside volume closed by triangular faces. Each edge of the triangular face is ∼54 nm in dimension. The estimated total external volume and the internal cavity of the triangular...... pyramid are about 1.8 × 10-23 and 1.5 × 10-23 m3, respectively. Correct formation of the tetrahedron DNA cage was verified by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering techniques....

  14. A universal design for a DNA probe providing ratiometric fluorescence detection by generation of silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Vong, Daniel; Pennathur, Sumita; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    2016-08-14

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the presence of Ag(+) ions. The utility of AgNC-MBs has been limited, however, because changing the target binding sequence unpredictably alters cluster fluorescence. Here we show that the original AgNC-MB design depends on bases in the target-binding (loop) domain to stabilize its AgNC. We then rationally alter the design to overcome this limitation. By separating and lengthening the AgNC-stabilizing domain, we create an AgNC-hairpin probe with consistent performance for arbitrary target sequence. This new design supports ratiometric fluorescence measurements of DNA target concentration, thereby providing a more sensitive, responsive and stable signal compared to turn-on AgNC probes. Using the new design, we demonstrate AgNC-MBs with nanomolar sensitivity and singe-nucleotide specificity, expanding the breadth of applicability of these cost-effective probes for biomolecular detection.

  15. Structural and mechanistic investigations into a DNA polymerase from Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diffley, J.F.X.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for isolating DNA polymerase ..cap alpha.. (DNAP..cap alpha..) from Drosophila melanogaster embryos is described. A novel affinity chromatographic step exploits the differential binding affinity exhibited by this enzyme for poly A and poly G agarose. DNAP..cap alpha.. isolated from embryos of 9 hour average age appears identical to an enzyme previously described. A potentially larger form of the enzyme is isolated from 2.5 hour average age embryos. Two independent methods were used to demonstrate that DNAP..cap alpha.. obeys a rigidly ordered substrate binding mechanism with template-primer binding being prerequisite to dNTP binding. One method, utilizing alternative pathway kinetics, is described here for the first time. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) was found to inhibit DNAP..cap alpha.. reversibly, at low stoichiometry and with a saturation effect, all criteria for an affinity label. Furthermore, PLP inhibition is dependent on pH and MgCl/sub 2/ concentration in the range of optimal DNAP activity. From protection experiments with normal substrates and dideoxyterminated primers and from the effects of substrates and PLP on initial velocities, it was conclusively shown that PLP inhibits DNAP by binding at two different sites. A procedure for the isolation of a pyridoxal kinase from Lactobacillus casei, optimal reaction conditions of the purified enzyme and its use in the synthesis of /sup 32/P PLP are all described.

  16. A DNA minor groove electronegative potential genome map based on photo-chemical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Hansen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA of the genome contains both sequence information directly relating to the protein and RNA coding as well as functional and structural information relating to protein recognition. Only recently is the importance of DNA shape in this recognition process being fully appreciated...... of any given sequence. We have validated this model on a series of protein-DNA binding sites known to involve minor groove electrostatic recognition as well as on stable nucleosome core complexes. The algorithm allows for the first time a full minor groove electrostatic description at the nucleotide...

  17. Within and transgenerational immune priming in an insect to a DNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidbury, Hannah J.; Pedersen, Amy B.; Boots, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrates mount a sophisticated immune response with the potential to exhibit a form of immune memory through ‘priming’. Increased immune protection following early exposure to bacteria has been found both later in life (within generation priming) and in the next generation (transgeneration priming) in a number of invertebrates. However, it is unclear how general immune priming is and whether immune priming occurs in response to different parasites, including viruses. Here, using Plodia interpuctella (Lepidoptera) and its natural DNA virus, Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, we find evidence for both within generation and transgeneration immune priming. Individuals previously exposed to low doses of virus, as well as the offspring of exposed individuals, are subsequently less susceptible to viral challenge. Relatively little is known about the mechanisms that underpin viral immunity but it is probable that the viral immune response is somewhat different to that of bacteria. We show that immune priming may, however, be a characteristic of both responses, mediated through different mechanisms, suggesting that immune memory may be a general phenomenon of insect immunity. This is important because immune priming may influence both host–parasite population and evolutionary dynamics. PMID:20861049

  18. Development of a DNA Sensor Based on Nanoporous Pt-Rich Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hao, Pham; Thanh, Pham Duc; Xuan, Chu Thi; Hai, Nguyen Hoang; Tuan, Mai Anh

    2017-06-01

    Nanoporous Pt-rich electrodes with 72 at.% Pt composition were fabricated by sputtering a Pt-Ag alloy, followed by an electrochemical dealloying process to selectively etch away Ag atoms. The surface properties of nanoporous membranes were investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), a documentation system, and a gel image system (Gel Doc Imager). A single strand of probe deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was immobilized onto the electrode surface by physical adsorption. The DNA probe and target hybridization were measured using a lock-in amplifier and an electrochemical impedance spectroscope (EIS). The nanoporous Pt-rich electrode-based DNA sensor offers a fast response time of 3.7 s, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.35 × 10-10 M of DNA target.

  19. Solving the SAT problem using a DNA computing algorithm based on ligase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Wang, Shi; Zhan, Aibin

    2008-01-01

    A new DNA computing algorithm based on a ligase chain reaction is demonstrated to solve an SAT problem. The proposed DNA algorithm can solve an n-variable m-clause SAT problem in m steps and the computation time required is O (3m+n). Instead of generating the full-solution DNA library, we start with an empty test tube and then generate solutions that partially satisfy the SAT formula. These partial solutions are then extended step by step by the ligation of new variables using Taq DNA ligase. Correct strands are amplified and false strands are pruned by a ligase chain reaction (LCR) as soon as they fail to satisfy the conditions. If we score and sort the clauses, we can use this algorithm to markedly reduce the number of DNA strands required throughout the computing process. In a computer simulation, the maximum number of DNA strands required was 2(0.48n) when n=50, and the exponent ratio varied inversely with the number of variables n and the clause/variable ratio m/n. This algorithm is highly space-efficient and error-tolerant compared to conventional brute-force searching, and thus can be scaled-up to solve large and hard SAT problems.

  20. A label-free electrochemical biosensor based on a DNA aptamer against codeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liangliang; Yang, Xiaojuan; Qi, Cui; Niu, Xiaofang; Zhao, Chunling; Zhao, Xiaohui; Shangguan, Dihua; Yang, Yunhui

    2013-07-17

    In order to develop a sensor for opium alkaloid codeine detection, DNA aptamers against codeine were generated by SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technique. An aptamer HL7-14, which is a 37-mer sequence with Kd values of 0.91 μM, was optimized by the truncation-mutation assay. The specificity investigation shows that HL7-14 exhibits high specificity to codeine over morphine, and almost cannot bind to other small molecule. With this new selected aptamer, a novel electrochemical label-free codeine aptamer biosensor based on Au-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Au-MSN) as immobilized substrate has been proposed using [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) as electroactive redox probe. The linear range covered from 10 pM to 100 nM with correlation coefficient of 0.9979 and the detection limit was 3 pM. Our study demonstrates that the biosensor has good specificity, stability and well regeneration. It can be used to detect codeine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Designing and Construction of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Tb10.4 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Samira; Teimourpour, Roghayeh; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a major cause of death. Construction of a new vaccine against tuberculosis is an effective way to control it. Several vaccines against this disease have been developed. The aim of the present study was to cloning of tb10.4 gene in pcDNA3.1(+) plasmid and evaluation of its expression in eukaryotic cells. Firstly, tb10.4 fragment was amplified by PCR and the PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes. Next, it was cloned into pcDNA3.1(+) plasmid. Following that, pcDNA3.1(+)/tb10.4 recombinant plasmid was transfected into eukaryotic cells. 5700 bp band for pcDNA3.1(+)/tb10.4 recombinant plasmid and 297 bp fragment for tb10.4 were observed. Cloning and transfection were successful. Successful cloning provides a basis for the development of new DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

  2. Determining plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions: a DNA barcoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derocles, Stéphane A P; Evans, Darren M; Nichols, Paul C; Evans, S Aifionn; Lunt, David H

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in network ecology is to describe the full-range of species interactions in a community to create highly-resolved food-webs. We developed a molecular approach based on DNA full barcoding and mini-barcoding to describe difficult to observe plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions, consisting of animals commonly regarded as agricultural pests and their natural enemies. We tested the ability of universal primers to amplify the remaining DNA inside leaf miner mines after the emergence of the insect. We compared the results of a) morphological identification of adult specimens; b) identification based on the shape of the mines; c) the COI Mini-barcode (130 bp) and d) the COI full barcode (658 bp) fragments to accurately identify the leaf-miner species. We used the molecular approach to build and analyse a tri-partite ecological network of plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions. We were able to detect the DNA of leaf-mining insects within their feeding mines on a range of host plants using mini-barcoding primers: 6% for the leaves collected empty and 33% success after we observed the emergence of the leaf miner. We suggest that the low amplification success of leaf mines collected empty was mainly due to the time since the adult emerged and discuss methodological improvements. Nevertheless our approach provided new species-interaction data for the ecological network. We found that the 130 bp fragment is variable enough to identify all the species included in this study. Both COI fragments reveal that some leaf miner species could be composed of cryptic species. The network built using the molecular approach was more accurate in describing tri-partite interactions compared with traditional approaches based on morphological criteria.

  3. Determining plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions: a DNA barcoding approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane A P Derocles

    Full Text Available A major challenge in network ecology is to describe the full-range of species interactions in a community to create highly-resolved food-webs. We developed a molecular approach based on DNA full barcoding and mini-barcoding to describe difficult to observe plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions, consisting of animals commonly regarded as agricultural pests and their natural enemies. We tested the ability of universal primers to amplify the remaining DNA inside leaf miner mines after the emergence of the insect. We compared the results of a morphological identification of adult specimens; b identification based on the shape of the mines; c the COI Mini-barcode (130 bp and d the COI full barcode (658 bp fragments to accurately identify the leaf-miner species. We used the molecular approach to build and analyse a tri-partite ecological network of plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions. We were able to detect the DNA of leaf-mining insects within their feeding mines on a range of host plants using mini-barcoding primers: 6% for the leaves collected empty and 33% success after we observed the emergence of the leaf miner. We suggest that the low amplification success of leaf mines collected empty was mainly due to the time since the adult emerged and discuss methodological improvements. Nevertheless our approach provided new species-interaction data for the ecological network. We found that the 130 bp fragment is variable enough to identify all the species included in this study. Both COI fragments reveal that some leaf miner species could be composed of cryptic species. The network built using the molecular approach was more accurate in describing tri-partite interactions compared with traditional approaches based on morphological criteria.

  4. Evaluation of a DNA fingerprinting method for determining the species origin of meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partis, L; Croan, D; Guo, Z; Clark, R; Coldham, T; Murby, J

    2000-04-01

    This study describes an investigation into the use of a PCR-RFLP technique as a routine analytical tool for species testing. The technique was used to generate DNA fingerprints for 22 animal species by amplifying a 359 bp region within the cytochrome b gene and digesting the amplified product using Hae III and Hinf I. All species could be discriminated using the two restriction enzymes with the exception of kangaroo and buffalo. Cooking the tissues did not affect the DNA extractions or the profiles generated. When mixtures were investigated, pig was preferentially amplified and dominated over all species tested, even at levels of 1%. Another set of cytochrome b primers which amplified 464 bp, was also tested for the analysis of these mixtures. Beef was found to be favourably amplified over the other species. Anomolous results where the digested products exceeded 359 bp was also investigated. Co-amplification was found to occur in the species investigated. Results of this study suggest that the CytB PCR-RFLP method shows promise for the identification of both cooked and uncooked tissues, although the method is unsuitable for analysing meat mixtures.

  5. Clinical testing for the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome in a DNA diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Roger D; Dykas, Daniel J; Bale, Allen E

    2005-01-01

    This study determines which clinical features predict positive test results among samples submitted for DNA-based diagnostic nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) testing, and further defines the mutational spectrum of the PTCH gene. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and polymerase chain reaction products from exons 1 to 23 of the PTCH gene were directly sequenced. Pedigree phenotypic information was obtained by written questionnaire. Among 106 presumably unrelated pedigrees, 44 independent mutations were found in 47 families. There were 11 nonsense mutations; 1 in-frame deletion; 17 deletions, 6 insertions, and 1 deletion-insertion that generated frameshifts; 5 splice-site mutations; 1 in-frame duplication; and 2 presumptive missense mutations. Twenty-seven of 46 pedigrees (58.7%) with two or more typical radiographic or pathologic features of NBCCS tested positive for PTCH mutations. Of these, 26 had jaw cysts in combination with other characteristics or neoplasms including basal cell carcinomas, palmar pits, skeletal abnormalities, ocular abnormalities, medulloblastomas, cardiac or ovarian fibromas, calcification of the falx cerebri, polydactyly, cleft lip and/or palate, and agenesis of the corpus callosum or other central nervous system malformations. None of the 13 pedigrees solely affected by multiple or early-onset basal cell carcinomas and none of the four pedigrees with jaw cysts alone had PTCH mutations. Pedigrees with multiple features of NBCCS were most likely to test positive for PTCH mutations. Pedigrees with multiple or early-onset basal cell carcinomas without other features of the disease did not test positive for PTCH mutations.

  6. Towards the development of a DNA-sequence based approach to serotyping of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Julie MJ

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fliC and fljB genes in Salmonella code for the phase 1 (H1 and phase 2 (H2 flagellin respectively, the rfb cluster encodes the majority of enzymes for polysaccharide (O antigen biosynthesis, together they determine the antigenic profile by which Salmonella are identified. Sequencing and characterisation of fliC was performed in the development of a molecular serotyping technique. Results FliC sequencing of 106 strains revealed two groups; the g-complex included those exhibiting "g" or "m,t" antigenic factors, and the non-g strains which formed a second more diverse group. Variation in fliC was characterised and sero-specific motifs identified. Furthermore, it was possible to identify differences in certain H antigens that are not detected by traditional serotyping. A rapid short sequencing assay was developed to target serotype-specific sequence motifs in fliC. The assay was evaluated for identification of H1 antigens with a panel of 55 strains. Conclusion FliC sequences were obtained for more than 100 strains comprising 29 different H1 alleles. Unique pyrosequencing profiles corresponding to the H1 component of the serotype were generated reproducibly for the 23 alleles represented in the evaluation panel. Short read sequence assays can now be used to identify fliC alleles in approximately 97% of the 50 medically most important Salmonella in England and Wales. Capability for high throughput testing and automation give these assays considerable advantages over traditional methods.

  7. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Díaz-Badillo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  8. Swelling Dynamics of a DNA-Polymer Hybrid Hydrogel Prepared Using Polyethylene Glycol as a Porogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Gao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA-polyacrylamide hybrid hydrogels designed with covalent and double-stranded (dsDNA crosslinks respond to specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA probes by adapting new equilibrium swelling volume. The ssDNA probes need to be designed with a base pair sequence that is complementary to one of the strands in a dsDNA supported network junction. This work focuses on tuning the hydrogel swelling kinetics by introducing polyethylene glycol (PEG as a pore-forming agent. Adding PEG during the preparation of hydrogels, followed by removal after polymerization, has been shown to improve the swelling dynamics of DNA hybrid hydrogels upon specific ssDNA probe recognition. The presence of porogen did not influence the kinetics of osmotic pressure-driven (2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid-co-acrylamide (AMPSA-co-AAm hydrogels’ swelling, which is in contrast to the DNA-sensitive hydrogels. The difference in the effect of using PEG as a porogen in these two cases is discussed in view of processes leading to the swelling of the gels.

  9. A DNA Barcode Library for Korean Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) and Indexes for Defining Barcode Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungmin; Song, Kyo-Hong; Ree, Han-Il; Kim, Won

    2012-01-01

    Non-biting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae) are a diverse population that commonly causes respiratory allergies in humans. Chironomid larvae can be used to indicate freshwater pollution, but accurate identification on the basis of morphological characteristics is difficult. In this study, we constructed a mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)-based DNA barcode library for Korean chironomids. This library consists of 211 specimens from 49 species, including adults and unidentified larvae. The interspecies and intraspecies COI sequence variations were analyzed. Sophisticated indexes were developed in order to properly evaluate indistinct barcode gaps that are created by insufficient sampling on both the interspecies and intraspecies levels and by variable mutation rates across taxa. In a variety of insect datasets, these indexes were useful for re-evaluating large barcode datasets and for defining COI barcode gaps. The COI-based DNA barcode library will provide a rapid and reliable tool for the molecular identification of Korean chironomid species. Furthermore, this reverse-taxonomic approach will be improved by the continuous addition of other speceis’ sequences to the library. PMID:22138764

  10. Structural and Dynamical Impact of a Universal Fluorescent Nucleoside Analogue Inserted Into a DNA Duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Ben Imeddourene, Akli; Gavvala, Krishna; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoit Y; Kenfack, Cyril A; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Fossé, Philippe; Burger, Alain; Mély, Yves; Mauffret, Olivier

    2017-12-21

    Recently, a 3-hydroxychromone based nucleoside 3HCnt has been developed as a highly environment-sensitive nucleoside surrogate to investigate protein-DNA interactions. When it is incorporated in DNA, the probe is up to 50-fold brighter than 2-aminopurine, the reference fluorescent nucleoside. Although the insertion of 3HCnt in DNA was previously shown to not alter the overall DNA structure, the possibility of the probe inducing local effects cannot be ruled out. Hence, a systematic structural and dynamic study is required to unveil the 3HCnt's limitations and to properly interpret the data obtained with this universal probe. Here, we investigated by NMR a 12-mer duplex, in which a central adenine was replaced by 3HCnt. The chemical shifts variations and nOe contacts revealed that the 3HCnt is well inserted in the DNA double helix with extensive stacking interactions with the neighbor base pairs. These observations are in excellent agreement with the steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence properties indicating that the 3HCnt fluorophore is protected from the solvent and does not exhibit rotational motion. The 3HCnt insertion in DNA is accompanied by the extrusion of the opposite nucleobase from the double helix. Molecular dynamics simulations using NMR-restraints demonstrated that 3HCnt fluorophore exhibits only translational dynamics. Taken together, our data showed an excellent intercalation of 3HCnt in the DNA double helix, which is accompanied by localized perturbations. This confirms 3HCnt as a highly promising tool for nucleic acid labeling and sensing.

  11. Specific incorporation of an artificial nucleotide opposite a mutagenic DNA adduct by a DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Laura A; Nilforoushan, Arman; Eichenseher, Fritz; Suter, Ursina; Blatter, Nina; Marx, Andreas; Sturla, Shana J

    2015-01-14

    The ability to detect DNA modification sites at single base resolution could significantly advance studies regarding DNA adduct levels, which are extremely difficult to determine. Artificial nucleotides that are specifically incorporated opposite a modified DNA site offer a potential strategy for detection of such sites by DNA polymerase-based systems. Here we investigate the action of newly synthesized base-modified benzimidazole-derived 2'-deoxynucleoside-5'-O-triphosphates on DNA polymerases when performing translesion DNA synthesis past the pro-mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BnG). We found that a mutated form of KlenTaq DNA polymerase, i.e., KTqM747K, catalyzed O(6)-BnG adduct-specific processing of the artificial BenziTP in favor of the natural dNTPs. Steady-state kinetic parameters revealed that KTqM747K catalysis of BenziTP is 25-fold more efficient for template O(6)-BnG than G, and 5-fold more efficient than natural dTMP misincorporation in adduct bypass. Furthermore, the nucleotide analogue BenziTP is required for full-length product formation in O(6)-BnG bypass, as without BenziTP the polymerase stalls at the adduct site. By combining the KTqM747K polymerase and BenziTP, a first round of DNA synthesis enabled subsequent amplification of Benzi-containing DNA. These results advance the development of technologies for detecting DNA adducts.

  12. Identification and Characterization of uvrA, a DNA Repair Gene of Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    heavenly beings and crowned him with glory and honor. You made him ruler over the works of your hands; you pul everything under his feet all nocks and...the more common lysine or pimelic acid (Works. 1964; Works and Griffiths, 1968). The holes or " fenestrations " in this layer are about 10 om in diameter...MraI BstEIl* Drol NO NO endonucleases PvuI* Droll XhoI* Drt,rn Fenestrated peptidoglycan + + Natural plasmids pSI6 (RI) pUE30 pUEI pUE20 pUEI5 pUEIO

  13. Single Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Behavior on a DNA Origami Template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmig, Sarah Wendelboe; Rotaru, Alexandru; Arian, Dumitru

    2010-01-01

    DNA origami, the folding of a long single-stranded DNA sequence (scaffold strand) by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides (staple strands) into parallel aligned helices, is a highly efficient method to form advanced self-assembled DNA-architectures. Since molecules and various materials can...... be conjugated to each of the short staple strands, the origami method offers a unique possibility of arranging molecules and materials in well-defined positions on a structured surface. Here we combine the action of light with AFM and DNA nanostructures to study the production of singlet oxygen from a single...... photosensitizer molecule conjugated to a selected DNA origami staple strand on an origami structure. We demonstrate a distance-dependent oxidation of organic moieties incorporated in specific positions on DNA origami by singlet oxygen produced from a single photosensitizer located at the center of each origami....

  14. Single Molecule FRET Analysis of the 11 Discrete Steps of a DNA Actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Lasse; Preus, Søren; Zhang, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    and nonautonomously. The 11 states of the actuator were investigated by single molecule Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) microscopy to obtain information on the static and dynamic heterogeneities of the device. Our results show that the DNA actuator can be effectively locked in several conformations...... of the dynamic DNA-based device and shows that complex DNA-based devices are inherently heterogeneous. Our results also demonstrate that single molecule techniques are a powerful tool for structural dynamics studies and provide a stringent test for the performance of molecular devices made out of DNA....

  15. Multifunctional energy landscape for a DNA G-quadruplex: An evolved molecular switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Chakraborty, Debayan; Šponer, Jiří; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela; Wales, David J.

    2017-10-01

    We explore the energy landscape for a four-fold telomere repeat, obtaining interconversion pathways between six experimentally characterised G-quadruplex topologies. The results reveal a multi-funnel system, with a variety of intermediate configurations and misfolded states. This organisation is identified with the intrinsically multi-functional nature of the system, suggesting a new paradigm for the classification of such biomolecules and clarifying issues regarding apparently conflicting experimental results.

  16. A DNA 3′-phosphatase functions in active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Qian, Weiqiang; Miki, Daisuke; Pontes, Olga; Liu, Yunhua; Tang, Kai; Liu, Renyi; Morales-Ruiz, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R.; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark established by the combined actions of methylation and demethylation reactions. Plants use a base excision repair pathway for active DNA demethylation. After 5-methylcytosine removal, the Arabidopsis DNA glycosylase/lyase ROS1 incises the DNA backbone and part of the product has a single-nucleotide gap flanked by 3′- and 5′-phosphate termini. Here we show that the DNA phosphatase ZDP removes the blocking 3′-phosphate, allowing subsequent DNA pol...

  17. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  18. The Role of Cytosine Methylation on Charge Transport through a DNA Strand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M.P.

    2015-09-04

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modifi-cation remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. Specifically, we compare the results generated with the widely used B3LYP exchange-correlation (XC) functional and CAM-B3LYP based tuned range-separated hybrid density functional. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that with both functionals, the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and interstrand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with both functionals. We also study the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. Our results suggest that the effect of the two different functionals is to alter the on-site energies of the DNA bases at the HOMO level, while the transport properties don't depend much on the two functionals.

  19. The Replication Focus Targeting Sequence (RFTS) Domain Is a DNA-competitive Inhibitor of Dnmt1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syeda, Farisa; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Wean, Matthew; Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Brenner, Charles (Iowa); (Toronto)

    2015-11-30

    Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) is the principal enzyme responsible for maintenance of cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome. The N-terminal replication focus targeting sequence (RFTS) domain of Dnmt1 has been implicated in subcellular localization, protein association, and catalytic function. However, progress in understanding its function has been limited by the lack of assays for and a structure of this domain. Here, we show that the naked DNA- and polynucleosome-binding activities of Dnmt1 are inhibited by the RFTS domain, which functions by virtue of binding the catalytic domain to the exclusion of DNA. Kinetic analysis with a fluorogenic DNA substrate established the RFTS domain as a 600-fold inhibitor of Dnmt1 enzymatic activity. The crystal structure of the RFTS domain reveals a novel fold and supports a mechanism in which an RFTS-targeted Dnmt1-binding protein, such as Uhrf1, may activate Dnmt1 for DNA binding.

  20. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Jianqing, E-mail: jqqi@uw.edu; Anantram, M. P., E-mail: anantmp@uw.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2500 (United States); Govind, Niranjan, E-mail: niri.govind@pnnl.gov [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2015-09-07

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  1. Epigenetic control of viral life-cycle by a DNA-methylation dependent transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Flower

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded transcription factor Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1 is the prototype of a class of transcription factor (including C/EBPalpha that interact with CpG-containing DNA response elements in a methylation-dependent manner. The EBV genome undergoes a biphasic methylation cycle; it is extensively methylated during viral latency but is reset to an unmethylated state following viral lytic replication. Zta is expressed transiently following infection and again during the switch between latency and lytic replication. The requirement for CpG-methylation at critical Zta response elements (ZREs has been proposed to regulate EBV replication, specifically it could aid the activation of viral lytic gene expression from silenced promoters on the methylated genome during latency in addition to preventing full lytic reactivation from the non-methylated EBV genome immediately following infection. We developed a computational approach to predict the location of ZREs which we experimentally assessed using in vitro and in vivo DNA association assays. A remarkably different binding motif is apparent for the CpG and non-CpG ZREs. Computational prediction of the location of these binding motifs in EBV revealed that the majority of lytic cycle genes have at least one and many have multiple copies of methylation-dependent CpG ZREs within their promoters. This suggests that the abundance of Zta protein coupled with the methylation status of the EBV genome act together to co-ordinate the expression of lytic cycle genes at the majority of EBV promoters.

  2. The fragile X chromosome (GCC) repeat folds into a DNA tetraplex at neutral pH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtík, Petr; Vorlíčková, Michaela

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 22 (2001), s. 4684-4690 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/0561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : Parallel-stranded DNA * circular dichroism spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.373, year: 2001

  3. Identification of a DNA methylation signature in blood cells from persons with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Gentilini, Davide; Boattini, Alessio; Giampieri, Enrico; Pirazzini, Chiara; Giuliani, Cristina; Fontanesi, Elisa; Scurti, Maria; Remondini, Daniel; Capri, Miriam; Cocchi, Guido; Ghezzo, Alessandro; Del Rio, Alberto; Luiselli, Donata; Vitale, Giovanni; Mari, Daniela; Castellani, Gastone; Fraga, Mario; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio; Garagnani, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical signs, which include segmental premature aging of central nervous and immune systems. Although it is well established that the causative defect of DS is the trisomy of chromosome 21, the molecular bases of its phenotype are still largely unknown. We used the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to investigate DNA methylation patterns in whole blood from 29 DS persons, using their relatives (mothers and unaffected siblings) as controls. This family-based model allowed us to monitor possible confounding effects on DNA methylation patterns deriving from genetic and environmental factors. Although differentially methylated regions (DMRs) displayed a genome-wide distribution, they were enriched on chromosome 21. DMRs mapped in genes involved in developmental functions, including embryonic development (HOXA family) and haematological (RUNX1 and EBF4) and neuronal (NCAM1) development. Moreover, genes involved in the regulation of chromatin structure (PRMD8, KDM2B, TET1) showed altered methylation. The data also showed that several pathways are affected in DS, including PI3K-Akt signaling. In conclusion, we identified an epigenetic signature of DS that sustains a link between developmental defects and disease phenotype, including segmental premature aging.

  4. Calcinea of the Red Sea: providing a DNA barcode inventory with description of four new species

    KAUST Repository

    Voigt, Oliver

    2017-03-29

    The Red Sea is a biodiversity hotspot with a considerable percentage of endemic species for many marine animals. Little is known about the diversity and distribution of calcareous sponges (Porifera, Class Calcarea) in this marginal sea. Here we analysed calcareous sponges of the subclass Calcinea that were collected between 2009 and 2013 at 20 localities in the Red Sea, ranging from the Gulf of Aqaba in the north to the Farasan Islands in the south, to document the species of this region. For this, we applied an integrative approach: We defined OTUs based on the analyses of a recently suggested standard DNA marker, the LSU C-region. The analysis was complemented with a second marker, the internal transcribed spacer, for selected specimens. Ten OTUs were identified. Specimens of each OTU were morphologically examined with spicule preparations and histological sections. Accordingly, our ten OTUs represent ten species, which cover taxonomically a broad range of the subclass. By combining molecular and morphological data, we describe four new species from the Red Sea: Soleneiscus hamatus sp. nov., Ernstia arabica sp. nov., Clathrina rotundata sp. nov., and Clathrina rowi sp. nov.. One additional small specimen was closely related to “Clathrina” adusta, but due to the small size it could not be properly analysed morphologically. By providing the DNA sequences for the morphologically documented specimens in the Sponge Barcoding Database (www.spongebarcoding.org) we facilitate future DNA-assisted species identification of Red Sea Calcinea, even for small or incomplete samples, which would be insufficient for morphological identification. Application of DNA barcode methods in the subclass will help to further investigate the distribution of Calcinea in the Red Sea and adjacent regions.

  5. PICH: a DNA translocase specially adapted for processing anaphase bridge DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biebricher, A.S.; Hirano, S.; Enzlin, J.; Wiechens, N.; Streicher, W.W.; Huttner, D.; Wang, L.H.C.; Nigg, E.A.; Owen-Hughes, T.; Liu, Y.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Hickson, I.D.

    2013-01-01

    The Plk1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) protein localizes to ultrafine anaphase bridges (UFBs) in mitosis alongside a complex of DNA repair proteins, including the Bloom's syndrome protein (BLM). However, very little is known about the function of PICH orhow it is recruited to UFBs. Using a

  6. Antibody-powered nucleic acid release using a DNA-based nanomachine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranallo, Simona; Prévost-Tremblay, Carl; Idili, Andrea; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Ricci, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    A wide range of molecular devices with nanoscale dimensions have been recently designed to perform a variety of functions in response to specific molecular inputs. Only limited examples, however, utilize antibodies as regulatory inputs. In response to this, here we report the rational design of a modular DNA-based nanomachine that can reversibly load and release a molecular cargo on binding to a specific antibody. We show here that, by using three different antigens (including one relevant to HIV), it is possible to design different DNA nanomachines regulated by their targeting antibody in a rapid, versatile and highly specific manner. The antibody-powered DNA nanomachines we have developed here may thus be useful in applications like controlled drug-release, point-of-care diagnostics and in vivo imaging.

  7. A DNA sequence obtained by replacement of the dopamine RNA aptamer bases is not an aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2017-08-05

    A unique specificity of the aptamer-ligand biorecognition and binding facilitates bioanalysis and biosensor development, contributing to discrimination of structurally related molecules, such as dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. The aptamer sequence capable of specific binding of dopamine is a 57 nucleotides long RNA sequence reported in 1997 (Biochemistry, 1997, 36, 9726). Later, it was suggested that the DNA homologue of the RNA aptamer retains the specificity of dopamine binding (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 2009, 388, 732). Here, we show that the DNA sequence obtained by the replacement of the RNA aptamer bases for their DNA analogues is not able of specific biorecognition of dopamine, in contrast to the original RNA aptamer sequence. This DNA sequence binds dopamine and structurally related catecholamine neurotransmitters non-specifically, as any DNA sequence, and, thus, is not an aptamer and cannot be used neither for in vivo nor in situ analysis of dopamine in the presence of structurally related neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Selection, Characterization and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer for the Detection of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lujun; Wang, Linlin; Lu, Wenwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2017-04-25

    A whole-bacterium-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) procedure was adopted in this study for the selection of an ssDNA aptamer that binds to Bifidobacterium bifidum . After 12 rounds of selection targeted against B. bifidum , 30 sequences were obtained and divided into seven families according to primary sequence homology and similarity of secondary structure. Four FAM (fluorescein amidite) labeled aptamer sequences from different families were selected for further characterization by flow cytometric analysis. The results reveal that the aptamer sequence CCFM641-5 demonstrated high-affinity and specificity for B. bifidum compared with the other sequences tested, and the estimated K d value was 10.69 ± 0.89 nM. Additionally, sequence truncation experiments of the aptamer CCFM641-5 led to the conclusion that the 5'-primer and 3'-primer binding sites were essential for aptamer-target binding. In addition, the possible component of the target B. bifidum , bound by the aptamer CCFM641-5, was identified as a membrane protein by treatment with proteinase. Furthermore, to prove the potential application of the aptamer CCFM641-5, a colorimetric bioassay of the sandwich-type structure was used to detect B. bifidum . The assay had a linear range of 10⁴ to 10⁷ cfu/mL ( R ² = 0.9834). Therefore, the colorimetric bioassay appears to be a promising method for the detection of B. bifidum based on the aptamer CCFM641-5.

  9. A DNA-Mediated Homogeneous Binding Assay for Proteins and Small Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhao; Hejesen, Christian; Kjelstrup, Michael Brøndum

    2014-01-01

    Optical detection of molecular targets typically requires immobilization, separation, or chemical or enzymatic processing. An important exception is aptamers that allow optical detection in solution based on conformational changes. This method, however, requires the laborious selection of aptamers...... or protein targets of these molecules. The detection scheme provides a generic alternative to aptamers for detection of analytes....

  10. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5’-end including the 5’-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer. PMID:26221730

  11. Selection, Characterization and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer for the Detection of Bifidobacterium bifidum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lujun Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A whole-bacterium-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment procedure was adopted in this study for the selection of an ssDNA aptamer that binds to Bifidobacterium bifidum. After 12 rounds of selection targeted against B. bifidum, 30 sequences were obtained and divided into seven families according to primary sequence homology and similarity of secondary structure. Four FAM (fluorescein amidite labeled aptamer sequences from different families were selected for further characterization by flow cytometric analysis. The results reveal that the aptamer sequence CCFM641-5 demonstrated high-affinity and specificity for B. bifidum compared with the other sequences tested, and the estimated Kd value was 10.69 ± 0.89 nM. Additionally, sequence truncation experiments of the aptamer CCFM641-5 led to the conclusion that the 5′-primer and 3′-primer binding sites were essential for aptamer-target binding. In addition, the possible component of the target B. bifidum, bound by the aptamer CCFM641-5, was identified as a membrane protein by treatment with proteinase. Furthermore, to prove the potential application of the aptamer CCFM641-5, a colorimetric bioassay of the sandwich-type structure was used to detect B. bifidum. The assay had a linear range of 104 to 107 cfu/mL (R2 = 0.9834. Therefore, the colorimetric bioassay appears to be a promising method for the detection of B. bifidum based on the aptamer CCFM641-5.

  12. Modified processing techniques of a DNA biopolymer for enhanced performance in photonics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchen, Fahima; Sotzing, Gregory A.; Miller, Trisha L.; Singh, Kristi M.; Telek, Brian A.; Lesko, Alyssa C.; Aga, Roberto; Fehrman-Cory, Emily M.; Yaney, Perry P.; Grote, James G.; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Heckman, Emily M.

    2012-10-01

    Significant modifications have been made in the processing techniques developed to transform purified, marine-based deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into a biopolymer suitable for optical and electronic device fabrication. This technique employs a modified soxhlet-dialysis rinsing process to completely remove excess ionic contaminants from the DNA biopolymer, resulting in a material with greater mechanical stability and enhanced performance reproducibility.

  13. Structure of a DNA glycosylase that unhooks interstrand cross-links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Warren, Garrett M.; Bradley, Noah P.; Eichman, Brandt F. (Vanderbilt)

    2017-04-10

    DNA glycosylases are important editing enzymes that protect genomic stability by excising chemically modified nucleobases that alter normal DNA metabolism. These enzymes have been known only to initiate base excision repair of small adducts by extrusion from the DNA helix. However, recent reports have described both vertebrate and microbial DNA glycosylases capable of unhooking highly toxic interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and bulky minor groove adducts normally recognized by Fanconi anemia and nucleotide excision repair machinery, although the mechanisms of these activities are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of Streptomyces sahachiroi AlkZ (previously Orf1), a bacterial DNA glycosylase that protects its host by excising ICLs derived from azinomycin B (AZB), a potent antimicrobial and antitumor genotoxin. AlkZ adopts a unique fold in which three tandem winged helix-turn-helix motifs scaffold a positively charged concave surface perfectly shaped for duplex DNA. Through mutational analysis, we identified two glutamine residues and a β-hairpin within this putative DNA-binding cleft that are essential for catalytic activity. Additionally, we present a molecular docking model for how this active site can unhook either or both sides of an AZB ICL, providing a basis for understanding the mechanisms of base excision repair of ICLs. Given the prevalence of this protein fold in pathogenic bacteria, this work also lays the foundation for an emerging role of DNA repair in bacteria-host pathogenesis.

  14. A DNA-Assembled Fe3O4@Ag Nanorod in Silica Matrix for Cholesterol Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satvekar, R. K.; Tiwari, A. P.; Rohiwal, S. S.; Tiwale, B. M.; Pawar, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    A novel nanocomposite having DNA-assembled Fe3O4@Ag nanorods in silica matrix has been proposed for fabrication of bienzymatic cholesterol nanobiosensor. Cholesterol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase have been co-encapsulated in Silica/Fe3O4@Ag-DNA nanocomposite deposited on the indium tin oxide electrode. Cyclic voltammetry was employed for the electrochemical behavior of proposed biosensor and used to estimate cholesterol with a linear range of 5-195 mg/dL.

  15. Designing a DNA Vaccine-based Leishmania major Polytope (Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam JEIBOUEI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The treatment of the disease is hampered due to high cost, toxicity and the crisis of drug resistance. Polytope approaches of genetic immunization could be a strategy for prevention of infectious diseases. Furthermore, the identification of Leishmania genome sequence and the application of bioinformatics assist us to devise an effective vaccine’s candidate.Methods: A linear sequence from predicted epitopes of GP63, LACK and CPC antigens was designed and was optimized using online available algorithms. The synthesized sequence (LAKJB93 was ligated to pEGFP-N1 plasmid. Results: The 264bp sequence was cloned at N terminal of GFP into pEGFP_N1 expression vector and transfect into CHO cell line. Construct was efficient expressed in CHO cells.Conclusion: The protein of LAKJB93 cosnstruct was expressed in CHO cells successfully.

  16. A DNA sequence recognition loop on APOBEC3A controls substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Logue

    Full Text Available APOBEC3A (A3A, one of the seven-member APOBEC3 family of cytidine deaminases, lacks strong antiviral activity against lentiviruses but is a potent inhibitor of adeno-associated virus and endogenous retroelements. In this report, we characterize the biochemical properties of mammalian cell-produced and catalytically active E. coli-produced A3A. The enzyme binds to single-stranded DNA with a Kd of 150 nM and forms dimeric and monomeric fractions. A3A, unlike APOBEC3G (A3G, deaminates DNA substrates nonprocessively. Using a panel of oligonucleotides that contained all possible trinucleotide contexts, we identified the preferred target sequence as TC (A/G. Based on a three-dimensional model of A3A, we identified a putative binding groove that contains residues with the potential to bind substrate DNA and to influence target sequence specificity. Taking advantage of the sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of A3G, we generated A3A/A3G chimeric proteins and analyzed their target site preference. We identified a recognition loop that altered A3A sequence specificity, broadening its target sequence preference. Mutation of amino acids in the predicted DNA binding groove prevented substrate binding, confirming the role of this groove in substrate binding. These findings shed light on how APOBEC3 proteins bind their substrate and determine which sites to deaminate.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana GYRB3 does not encode a DNA gyrase subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M Evans-Roberts

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in all cells. DNA gyrase is unique among the topoisomerases in that it is the only enzyme that can actively supercoil DNA using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. Until recently gyrase was thought to be unique to bacteria, but has now been discovered in plants. The genome of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, is predicted to encode four gyrase subunits: AtGyrA, AtGyrB1, AtGyrB2 and AtGyrB3.We found, contrary to previous data, that AtGyrB3 is not essential to the survival of A. thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis suggests AtGyrB3 is considerably shorter than other gyrase B subunits, lacking part of the ATPase domain and other key motifs found in all type II topoisomerases; but it does contain a putative DNA-binding domain. Partially purified AtGyrB3 cannot bind E. coli GyrA or support supercoiling. AtGyrB3 cannot complement an E. coli gyrB temperature-sensitive strain, whereas AtGyrB2 can. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggests that AtGyrB3 cannot bind to AtGyrA or form a dimer.These data strongly suggest that AtGyrB3 is not a gyrase subunit but has another unknown function. One possibility is that it is a nuclear protein with a role in meiosis in pollen.

  18. Optimization of a DNA nicking assay to evaluate Oenocarpus bataua and Camellia sinensis antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leba, Louis-Jérôme; Brunschwig, Christel; Saout, Mona; Martial, Karine; Vulcain, Emmanuelle; Bereau, Didier; Robinson, Jean-Charles

    2014-10-09

    This study was aimed at assessing the DNA damage protective activity of different types of extracts (aqueous, methanolic and acetonic) using an in vitro DNA nicking assay. Several parameters were optimized using the pUC18 plasmid, especially FeSO4, EDTA, solvent concentrations and incubation time. Special attention has been paid to removing the protective and damaging effect of the solvent and FeSO4 respectively, as well as to identifying the relevant positive and negative controls. For each solvent, the optimal conditions were determined: (i) for aqueous extracts, 0.33 mM of FeSO4 and 0.62 mM of EDTA were incubated for 20 min at 37 °C; (ii) for acetone extracts, 1.16% solvent were incubated for 15 min at 37 °C with 1.3 mM of FeSO4 and 2.5 mM of EDTA and (iii) for methanol extracts, 0.16% solvent, were incubated for 1.5 h at 37 °C with 0.33 mM of FeSO4 and 0.62 mM of EDTA. Using the optimized conditions, the DNA damage protective activity of aqueous, methanolic and acetonic extracts of an Amazonian palm berry (Oenocarpus bataua) and green tea (Camellia sinensis) was assessed. Aqueous and acetonic Oenocarpus bataua extracts were protective against DNA damage, whereas aqueous, methanolic and acetonic extracts of Camellia sinensis extracts induced DNA damage.

  19. MO-AB-BRA-04: Radiation Measurements with a DNA Double-Strand-Break Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Many types of dosimeters are used to measure radiation, but none of them directly measures the biological effect of this dose. The purpose here is to create a dosimeter that can measure the probability of double-strand breaks (DSB) for DNA, which is directly related to the biological effect of radiation. Methods: The dosimeter has DNA strands, which are labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein. The biotin attaches these strands to magnetic beads. We suspended the DNA dosimeter in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as it matches the internal environment of the body. We placed small volumes (50µL) of the DNA dosimeter into tubes and irradiated these samples in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with several doses (three samples per dose). After irradiating the samples, a magnet was placed against the tubes. The fluorescein attached to broken DNA strands was extracted (called the supernatant) and placed into a different tube. The fluorescein on the unbroken strands remained attached to the beads in the tube and was re-suspended with 50µL of PBS. A fluorescence reader was used to measure the fluorescence for both the re-suspended beads and supernatant. To prove that we are measuring DSB, we tested dosimeter response with two different lengths of attached DNA strands (1 and 4 kilo-base pair). Results: The probability of DSB at the dose levels of 5, 10, 25, and 50 Gy were 0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.19, respectively, while the coefficients of variation were 0.14, 0.07, 0.02, and 0.01, respectively. The 4 kilo-base-pair dosimeter produced 5.3 times the response of the 1 kilo-base-pair dosimeter. Conclusion: The DNA dosimeter yields a measurable response to dose that scales with the DNA strand length. The goal now is to refine the dosimeter fabrication to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation for the lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  20. A novel approach on fluid dispensing for a DNA/RNA extraction chip package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ling; Premachandran, C. S.; Chew, Michelle; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Diao; Pinjala, D.

    2008-02-01

    Micro fluidic package with integrated reservoirs has been developed for DNA /RNA extraction application. A membrane based pump which consists of a reservoir to store reagents and a pin valve to control the fluid is developed to dispense the reagents into the chip. A programmable external actuator is fabricated to dispense the fluid from the membrane pump into the DNA chip. An elastic and high elongation thin rubber membrane is used to seal the membrane pump and at the same time prevent actuator from mixing with different reagents in the micro fluidic package. Break displacement during actuation of membrane pump sealing material is studied with different ratios of PDMS and other types of rubber materials. The fluid flow from the reservoir to the chip is controlled by a pin valve which is activated during the external actuation. A CFD simulation is performed to study the pumping action dusting the external actuation and is validated with experimental results.

  1. Study on Electrochemical Insulin Sensing Utilizing a DNA Aptamer-Immobilized Gold Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Kubo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated an insulin-sensing method by utilizing an insulin-binding aptamer IGA3, which forms an anti-parallel G-quadruplex with folded single strands. Spectroscopic observation indicates that some anti-parallel G-quadruplex bind hemin and show peroxidase activity. In this study, the peroxidase activity of IGA3 with hemin was confirmed by spectrophotometric measurements, i.e., the activity was three-times higher than hemin itself. IGA3 was then immobilized onto a gold electrode to determine its electrochemical activity. The peroxidase activity of the immobilized IGA3-hemin complex was determined by cyclic voltammetry, and a cathodic peak current of the electrode showed a dependence on the concentration of H2O2. The cathodic peak current of the IGA3-hemin complex decreased by binding it to insulin, and this decrease depended on the concentration of insulin.

  2. Towards a DNA Barcode Reference Database for Spiders and Harvestmen of Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrin, Jonas J; Höfer, Hubert; Spelda, Jörg; Holstein, Joachim; Bayer, Steffen; Hendrich, Lars; Huber, Bernhard A; Kielhorn, Karl-Hinrich; Krammer, Hans-Joachim; Lemke, Martin; Monje, Juan Carlos; Morinière, Jérôme; Rulik, Björn; Petersen, Malte; Janssen, Hannah; Muster, Christoph

    As part of the German Barcode of Life campaign, over 3500 arachnid specimens have been collected and analyzed: ca. 3300 Araneae and 200 Opiliones, belonging to almost 600 species (median: 4 individuals/species). This covers about 60% of the spider fauna and more than 70% of the harvestmen fauna recorded for Germany. The overwhelming majority of species could be readily identified through DNA barcoding: median distances between closest species lay around 9% in spiders and 13% in harvestmen, while in 95% of the cases, intraspecific distances were below 2.5% and 8% respectively, with intraspecific medians at 0.3% and 0.2%. However, almost 20 spider species, most notably in the family Lycosidae, could not be separated through DNA barcoding (although many of them present discrete morphological differences). Conspicuously high interspecific distances were found in even more cases, hinting at cryptic species in some instances. A new program is presented: DiStats calculates the statistics needed to meet DNA barcode release criteria. Furthermore, new generic COI primers useful for a wide range of taxa (also other than arachnids) are introduced.

  3. UVI31+ is a DNA endonuclease that dynamically localizes to chloroplast pyrenoids in C. reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Shukla

    Full Text Available UVI31+ is an evolutionarily conserved BolA family protein. In this study we examine the presence, localization and possible functions of this protein in the context of a unicellular alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. UVI31+ in C. reinhardtii exhibits DNA endonuclease activity and is induced upon UV stress. Further, UVI31+ that normally localizes to the cell wall and pyrenoid regions gets redistributed into punctate foci within the whole chloroplast, away from the pyrenoid, upon UV stress. The observed induction upon UV-stress as well as the endonuclease activity suggests plausible role of this protein in DNA repair. We have also observed that UV31+ is induced in C. reinhardtii grown in dark conditions, whereby the protein localization is enhanced in the pyrenoid. Biomolecular interaction between the purified pyrenoids and UVI31+ studied by NMR demonstrates the involvement of the disordered loop domain of the protein in its interaction.

  4. Application of graphene–pyrenebutyric acid nanocomposite as probe oligonucleotide immobilization platform in a DNA biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan; Gao, Feng; Cai, Xili; Zheng, Meixia [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Gao, Fei, E-mail: fgao@fjzs.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Jiang, Shulian [Zhangzhou Product Quality Supervision and Inspection Institute, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Wang, Qingxiang, E-mail: axiang236@126.com [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2013-10-15

    A stable and uniform organic–inorganic nanocomposite that consists of graphene (GR) and pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was obtained by ultrasonication, which was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV–vis absorption spectra. The dispersion was dropped onto a gold electrode surface to obtain GR–PBA modified electrode (GR–PBA/Au). Electrochemical behaviors of the modified electrode were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy using [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−/4−} as the electroactive probe. A novel DNA biosensor was constructed based on the covalent coupling of amino modified oligonucleotides with the carboxylic group on PBA. By using methylene blue (MB) as a redox-active hybridization indicator, the biosensor was applied to electrochemically detect the complementary sequence, and the results suggested that the peak currents of MB showed a good linear relationship with the logarithm values of target DNA concentrations in the range from 1.0 × 10{sup −15} to 5.0 × 10{sup −12} M with a detection limit of 3.8 × 10{sup −16} M. The selectivity experiment also showed that the biosensor can well distinguish the target DNA from the non-complementary sequences. - Highlights: • A nanocomposite containing graphene and pyrenebutyric acid was prepared. • The nanocomposite was applied as a function platform for DNA immobilization platform. • The developed biosensor shows excellent selectivity and sensitivity for target DNA detection.

  5. Crystal structure of a DNA polymerase sliding clamp from a Gram-positive bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnell Mike

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sliding DNA clamps are processivity factors that are required for efficient DNA replication. DNA polymerases maintain proximity to nucleic acid templates by interacting with sliding clamps that encircle DNA and thereby link the polymerase enzyme to the DNA substrate. Although the structures of sliding clamps from Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, eukaryotes, archaea, and T4-like bacteriophages are well-known, the structure of a sliding clamp from Gram-positive bacteria has not been reported previously. Results We have determined the crystal structure of the dimeric β subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of Streptococcus pyogenes. The sliding clamp from this Gram-positive organism forms a ring-shaped dimeric assembly that is similar in overall structure to that of the sliding clamps from Gram-negative bacteria, bacteriophage T4, eukaryotes and archaea. The dimer has overall dimensions of ~90 Å × ~70 Å × ~25 Å with a central chamber that is large enough to accommodate duplex DNA. In comparison to the circular shape of other assemblies, the S. pyogenes clamp adopts a more elliptical structure. Conclusion The sequences of sliding clamps from S. pyogenes and E. coli are only 23% identical, making the generation of structural models for the S. pyogenes clamp difficult in the absence of direct experimental information. Our structure of the S. pyogenes β subunit completes the catalog of clamp structures from all the major sequence grouping of sliding clamps. The more elliptical rather than circular structure of the S. pyogenes clamp implies that the topological nature of encircling DNA, rather than a precise geometric shape, is the most conserved aspect for this family of proteins.

  6. Towards a DNA Barcode Reference Database for Spiders and Harvestmen of Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrin, Jonas J.; Höfer, Hubert; Spelda, Jörg; Holstein, Joachim; Bayer, Steffen; Hendrich, Lars; Huber, Bernhard A.; Kielhorn, Karl-Hinrich; Krammer, Hans-Joachim; Lemke, Martin; Monje, Juan Carlos; Morinière, Jérôme; Rulik, Björn; Petersen, Malte; Janssen, Hannah; Muster, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    As part of the German Barcode of Life campaign, over 3500 arachnid specimens have been collected and analyzed: ca. 3300 Araneae and 200 Opiliones, belonging to almost 600 species (median: 4 individuals/species). This covers about 60% of the spider fauna and more than 70% of the harvestmen fauna recorded for Germany. The overwhelming majority of species could be readily identified through DNA barcoding: median distances between closest species lay around 9% in spiders and 13% in harvestmen, while in 95% of the cases, intraspecific distances were below 2.5% and 8% respectively, with intraspecific medians at 0.3% and 0.2%. However, almost 20 spider species, most notably in the family Lycosidae, could not be separated through DNA barcoding (although many of them present discrete morphological differences). Conspicuously high interspecific distances were found in even more cases, hinting at cryptic species in some instances. A new program is presented: DiStats calculates the statistics needed to meet DNA barcode release criteria. Furthermore, new generic COI primers useful for a wide range of taxa (also other than arachnids) are introduced. PMID:27681175

  7. Towards a DNA Barcode Reference Database for Spiders and Harvestmen of Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas J Astrin

    Full Text Available As part of the German Barcode of Life campaign, over 3500 arachnid specimens have been collected and analyzed: ca. 3300 Araneae and 200 Opiliones, belonging to almost 600 species (median: 4 individuals/species. This covers about 60% of the spider fauna and more than 70% of the harvestmen fauna recorded for Germany. The overwhelming majority of species could be readily identified through DNA barcoding: median distances between closest species lay around 9% in spiders and 13% in harvestmen, while in 95% of the cases, intraspecific distances were below 2.5% and 8% respectively, with intraspecific medians at 0.3% and 0.2%. However, almost 20 spider species, most notably in the family Lycosidae, could not be separated through DNA barcoding (although many of them present discrete morphological differences. Conspicuously high interspecific distances were found in even more cases, hinting at cryptic species in some instances. A new program is presented: DiStats calculates the statistics needed to meet DNA barcode release criteria. Furthermore, new generic COI primers useful for a wide range of taxa (also other than arachnids are introduced.

  8. Identification of a Staphylococcus aureus Efflux Pump Regulator Using a DNA-Protein Affinity Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Hooper, David C

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the step-by-step identification of a putative regulator protein and demonstrate the function of this protein as a repressor of the expression of a specific efflux pump, causing resistance to quinolones in Staphylococcus aureus. We show that the knockout gene mutant has an increase in transcript levels of the target efflux pump when compared to that of the S. aureus parental strain RN6390. We provide a detailed protocol that includes the identification of the DNA-binding transcriptional regulatory protein from S. aureus cell extracts using DNA sequences linked to magnetic beads. In addition, we describe the real-time qRT-PCR assays and MIC testing to evaluate the effects of the regulator on S. aureus drug resistance phenotype.

  9. A contamination assessment of the CI carbonaceous meteorite Orgueil using a DNA-directed approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, J. W.; Elsaesser, A.; Röling, Wilfred F M; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Orgueil meteorite has become one of the most well-studied carbonaceous meteorites, after it fell in France 150 yr ago. Extraterrestrial organic compounds such as amino acids and nucleobases in the parts per billion ranges were identified in Orgueil samples with supporting isotopic analyses.

  10. Using eggshell membranes as a DNA source for population genetic research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trimbos, Krijn Baptist; Broekman, Joyce; Kentie, Rosemarie; Musters, Cees J. M.; de Snoo, Geert R.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of population genetic research, a faster and less invasive method of DNA sampling would allow large-scale assessments of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation with the help of volunteer observers. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of eggshell membranes as

  11. A contamination assessment of the CI carbonaceous meteorite Orgueil using a DNA-directed approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, J. W.; Elsaesser, A.; RöLing, W. F. M.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Orgueil meteorite has become one of the most well-studied carbonaceous meteorites, after it fell in France 150 yr ago. Extraterrestrial organic compounds such as amino acids and nucleobases in the parts per billion ranges were identified in Orgueil samples with supporting isotopic analyses. However, speculations of terrestrial contamination such as organic inclusions in the form of microbes and seeds accompanied the analyses of the Orgueil meteorite ever since its fall. By using molecular analysis, we performed DNA extractions and spiking experiments combined with 16S and 18S rRNA gene targeted PCR amplification to quantify the level of terrestrial biocontamination. Our results indicate that terrestrial contamination with DNA was insignificant in the investigated meteorite fraction. We also remeasured and confirmed concentrations of amino acids found in previous studies and conclude that their rather high concentrations and distribution cannot be explained by terrestrial contamination with microorganisms alone. These results represent the first analysis using DNA-directed tools in the analysis of the Orgueil meteorite to determine trace levels of biomarkers.

  12. In vitro selection of a DNA aptamer targeted against Shigella dysenteriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Nuo; Ding, Xiaoying; Wu, Shijia; Xia, Yu; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Zhouping; Chen, Jie

    2013-09-01

    To identify DNA aptamers demonstrating binding specificity for Shigella dysenteriae, a whole-bacterium Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) method was applied to a combinatorial library of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules. After several rounds of selection using S. dysenteriae as the target, the highly enriched oligonucleotide pool was sequenced and then grouped into different families based on primary sequence homologies and similarities in the secondary structures. Aptamer S 1, which showed particularly high binding affinity in preliminary studies, was chosen for further characterisation. This aptamer displayed a dissociation constant (Kd value) of 23.47 ± 2.48 nM. Binding assays to assess the specificity of aptamer S 1 showed high binding affinity for S. dysenteriae and low apparent binding affinity for other bacteria. The ssDNA aptamers generated may serve as a new type of molecular probe for microbial pathogens, as it has the potential to overcome the tedious isolation and purification requirements for complex targets. © 2013.

  13. PPARGC1A DNA methylation in subcutaneous adipose tissue in low birth weight subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillberg, Linn; Jacobsen, Stine; Rönn, Tina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Increased DNA methylation of the metabolic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1A) has been reported in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects and from low birth weight (LBW) subjects with an increased risk of T2D. High...

  14. Blocking Blood Supply to Breast Carcinoma With a DNA Vaccine Encoding VEGF Receptor-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    vaccination: an update. Methods Mol Med 2003;87:377–90. 14. Ambrosini G, Adida C, Altieri DC. A novel anti- apoptosis gene, survivin, expressed in cancer...endothelial cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1999;264:781–8. 26. O’Connor DS, Schechner JS, Adida C, et al. Control of apoptosis during angiogenesis by...minigene DNA vaccine protects mice from tumors of different origins by inducing a T cell-mediated suppression of tumor angiogenesis. From the Department of

  15. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Ahsan; Waseem, Hassan; Williams, Maggie R; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Gulari, Erdogan; Tiedje, James M; Hashsham, Syed A

    2017-05-29

    Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics) to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs). Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R² = 0.8131).

  17. Organic light emitting diode with a DNA biopolymer electron blocking layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Joshua A.; Grote, James G.; Li, Wayne X.; Steckl, Andrew J.; Diggs, Darnell E.; Zetts, John S.; Nelson, Robert L.; Hopkins, F. Kenneth

    2006-08-01

    Enhanced electroluminescent efficiency using a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based biopolymer complex as an electron blocking layer has been demonstrated in both green- and blue-emitting organic light emitting diodes. The resulting bio organic light emitting diodes, or BioLEDs, achieved a maximum luminous efficiency of 8.2 and 0.8 cd/A, respectively, resulting in as much as 10× higher efficiency, 30× brighter output and 3× longer lifetime than their OLED counterparts. In this paper we describe the device fabrication and present the performance of these new structures.

  18. Methods for interpreting lists of affected genes obtained in a DNA microarray experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Jakob; Arce, Christina; Bicciato, Silvio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe and compare the methods used and the results obtained by the participants in a joint EADGENE (European Animal Disease Genomic Network of Excellence) and SABRE (Cutting Edge Genomics for Sustainable Animal Breeding) workshop focusing on post analysis of microa...

  19. Development of a DNA Bar-coding Project as a Biology Laboratory Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dunbar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended for faculty who are looking for new techniques for teaching a genetics or molecular ecology lab. We have used the bar-coding protocol for both a non-majors watershed ecology lab and a majors-specific genetics lab with equal success. The exercise involves extracting mitochondrial DNA from animal tissue, amplifying a portion of the mitochondrial DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and sequencing the amplified DNA to determine the animal to the species level. Logistically, time spent on the DNA bar-coding procedure could be as short as 2–3 weeks or last an entire semester, depending on course outcomes and time availability.

  20. Association of childhood chronic physical aggression with a DNA methylation signature in adult human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Provençal

    Full Text Available Chronic physical aggression (CPA is characterized by frequent use of physical aggression from early childhood to adolescence. Observed in approximately 5% of males, CPA is associated with early childhood adverse environments and long-term negative consequences. Alterations in DNA methylation, a covalent modification of DNA that regulates genome function, have been associated with early childhood adversity.To test the hypothesis that a trajectory of chronic physical aggression during childhood is associated with a distinct DNA methylation profile during adulthood.We analyzed genome-wide promoter DNA methylation profiles of T cells from two groups of adult males assessed annually for frequency of physical aggression between 6 and 15 years of age: a group with CPA and a control group. Methylation profiles covering the promoter regions of 20 000 genes and 400 microRNAs were generated using MeDIP followed by hybridization to microarrays.In total, 448 distinct gene promoters were differentially methylated in CPA. Functionally, many of these genes have previously been shown to play a role in aggression and were enriched in biological pathways affected by behavior. Their locations in the genome tended to form clusters spanning millions of bases in the genome.This study provides evidence of clustered and genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation in young adults that associates with a history of chronic physical aggression from 6 to 15 years of age. However, longitudinal studies of methylation during early childhood will be necessary to determine if and how this methylation variation in T cells DNA plays a role in early development of chronic physical aggression.

  1. Association of Childhood Chronic Physical Aggression with a DNA Methylation Signature in Adult Human T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Claire; Vitaro, Frank; Côté, Sylvana M.; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic physical aggression (CPA) is characterized by frequent use of physical aggression from early childhood to adolescence. Observed in approximately 5% of males, CPA is associated with early childhood adverse environments and long-term negative consequences. Alterations in DNA methylation, a covalent modification of DNA that regulates genome function, have been associated with early childhood adversity. Aims To test the hypothesis that a trajectory of chronic physical aggression during childhood is associated with a distinct DNA methylation profile during adulthood. Methods We analyzed genome-wide promoter DNA methylation profiles of T cells from two groups of adult males assessed annually for frequency of physical aggression between 6 and 15 years of age: a group with CPA and a control group. Methylation profiles covering the promoter regions of 20 000 genes and 400 microRNAs were generated using MeDIP followed by hybridization to microarrays. Results In total, 448 distinct gene promoters were differentially methylated in CPA. Functionally, many of these genes have previously been shown to play a role in aggression and were enriched in biological pathways affected by behavior. Their locations in the genome tended to form clusters spanning millions of bases in the genome. Conclusions This study provides evidence of clustered and genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation in young adults that associates with a history of chronic physical aggression from 6 to 15 years of age. However, longitudinal studies of methylation during early childhood will be necessary to determine if and how this methylation variation in T cells DNA plays a role in early development of chronic physical aggression. PMID:24691403

  2. A DNA Logic Gate Automaton for Detection of Rabies and Other Lyssaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Pavithra; Macdonald, Joanne

    2017-07-05

    Immediate activation of biosensors is not always desirable, particularly if activation is due to non-specific interactions. Here we demonstrate the use of deoxyribozyme-based logic gate networks arranged into visual displays to precisely control activation of biosensors, and demonstrate a prototype molecular automaton able to discriminate between seven different genotypes of Lyssaviruses, including Rabies virus. The device uses novel mixed-base logic gates to enable detection of the large diversity of Lyssavirus sequence populations, while an ANDNOT logic gate prevents non-specific activation across genotypes. The resultant device provides a user-friendly digital-like, but molecule-powered, dot-matrix text output for unequivocal results read-out that is highly relevant for point of care applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties. PMID:24031959

  4. Effect of Moderate Hypothermia on Gene Expression by THP-1 Cells: A DNA Microarray Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    adhesion to artificial surfaces with over 24 h of exposure to 32 vs. 37°C. Fourth, as noted, our post hoc filter criteria were designed to reduce false...Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 27: 125–132, 2002. 11. Marion DW, Penrod LE, Kelsey SF, Obrist WD, Kochanek PM, Palmer AM, Wisniewski SR, and DeKosky ST...899 –908, 1997. 15. Polderman KH. Application of therapeutic hypothermia in the ICU : opportunities and pitfalls of a promising treatment modality

  5. Good Manufacturing Practices production and analysis of a DNA vaccine against dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-ping; Li, Yu-hong; Zhang, Ai-hua; Bi, Lan; Fan, Ming-wen

    2009-11-01

    To prepare a clinical-grade anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P/VAX and explore its immune effect and protective efficacy against a cariogenic bacterial challenge. A large-scale industrial production process was developed under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) by combining and optimizing common unit operations such as alkaline lysis, precipitation, endotoxin removal and column chromatography. Quality controls of the purified bulk and final lyophilized vaccine were conducted according to authoritative guidelines. Mice and gnotobiotic rats were intranasally immunized with clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX with chitosan. Antibody levels of serum IgG and salivary SIgA were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and caries activity was evaluated by the Keyes method. pGJA-P/VAX and pVAX1 prepared by a laboratory-scale commercial kit were used as controls. The production process proved to be scalable and reproducible. Impurities including host protein, residual RNA, genomic DNA and endotoxin in the purified plasmid were all under the limits of set specifications. Intranasal vaccination with clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX induced higher serum IgG and salivary SIgA in both mice and gnotobiotic rats. While in the experimental caries model, the enamel (E), dentinal slight (Ds), and dentinal moderate (Dm) caries lesions were reduced by 21.1%, 33.0%, and 40.9%, respectively. The production process under GMP was efficient in preparing clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX with high purity and intended effectiveness, thus facilitating future clinical trials for the anti-caries DNA vaccine.

  6. Self-assembly of two-dimensional binary quasicrystals: A possible route to a DNA quasicrystal

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2016-01-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations and free-energy techniques to show that binary solutions of penta- and hexavalent two-dimensional patchy particles can form thermodynamically stable quasicrystals even at very narrow patch widths, provided their patch interactions are chosen in an appropriate way. Such patchy particles can be thought of as a coarse-grained representation of DNA multi-arm `star' motifs, which can be chosen to bond with one another very specifically by tuning the DNA sequences of the protruding arms. We explore several possible design strategies and conclude that DNA star tiles that are designed to interact with one another in a specific but not overly constrained way could potentially be used to construct soft quasicrystals in experiment. We verify that such star tiles can form stable dodecagonal motifs using oxDNA, a realistic coarse-grained model of DNA.

  7. Thermal and mechanical denaturation properties of a DNA model with three sites per nucleotide

    CERN Document Server

    Florescu, Ana-Maria; 10.1063/1.3626870

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we show that the coarse grain model for DNA, which has been proposed recently by Knotts, Rathore, Schwartz and de Pablo (J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084901 (2007)), can be adapted to describe the thermal and mechanical denaturation of long DNA sequences by adjusting slightly the base pairing contribution. The adjusted model leads to (i) critical temperatures for long homogeneous sequences that are in good agreement with both experimental ones and those obtained from statistical models, (ii) a realistic step-like denaturation behaviour for long inhomogeneous sequences, and (iii) critical forces at ambient temperature of the order of 10 pN, close to measured values. The adjusted model furthermore supports the conclusion that the thermal denaturation of long homogeneous sequences corresponds to a first-order phase transition and yields a critical exponent for the critical force equal to sigma=0.70. This model is both geometrically and energetically realistic, in the sense that the helical structure and th...

  8. Overexpression of DEMETER, a DNA demethylase, promotes early apical bud maturation in poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Daniel; Moreno-Cortés, Alicia; Dervinis, Christopher; Ramos-Sánchez, José M; Kirst, Matias; Perales, Mariano; González-Melendi, Pablo; Allona, Isabel

    2017-11-01

    The transition from active growth to dormancy is critical for the survival of perennial plants. We identified a DEMETER-like (CsDML) cDNA from a winter-enriched cDNA subtractive library in chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.), an economically and ecologically important species. Next, we characterized this DNA demethylase and its putative ortholog in the more experimentally tractable hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × alba), under the signals that trigger bud dormancy in trees. We performed phylogenetic and protein sequence analysis, gene expression profiling, and 5-methyl-cytosine methylation immunodetection studies to evaluate the role of CsDML and its homolog in poplar, PtaDML6. Transgenic hybrid poplars overexpressing CsDML were produced and analysed. Short days and cold temperatures induced CsDML and PtaDML6. Overexpression of CsDML accelerated short-day-induced bud formation, specifically from Stages 1 to 0. Buds acquired a red-brown coloration earlier than wild-type plants, alongside with the up-regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis enzymes and accumulation of flavonoids in the shoot apical meristem and bud scales. Our data show that the CsDML gene induces bud formation needed for the survival of the apical meristem under the harsh conditions of winter. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Attenuated Shigella as a DNA Delivery Vehicle for DNA-Mediated Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Donata R.; Branstrom, Arthur A.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1995-10-01

    Direct inoculation of DNA, in the form of purified bacterial plasmids that are unable to replicate in mammalian cells but are able to direct cell synthesis of foreign proteins, is being explored as an approach to vaccine development. Here, a highly attenuated Shigella vector invaded mammalian cells and delivered such plasmids into the cytoplasm of cells, and subsequent production of functional foreign protein was measured. Because this Shigella vector was designed to deliver DNA to colonic mucosa, the method is a potential basis for oral and other mucosal DNA immunization and gene therapy strategies.

  10. A DNA-Based Procedure for In Planta Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Santos, Fernando M; Ramos, Brisa; García-Sánchez, M Asunción; Eslava, Arturo P; Díaz-Mínguez, José María

    2002-03-01

    ABSTRACT We have characterized strains of Fusarium oxysporum from common bean fields in Spain that were nonpathogenic on common bean, as well as F. oxysporum strains (F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli) pathogenic to common bean by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. We identified a RAPD marker (RAPD 4.12) specific for the highly virulent pathogenic strains of the seven races of F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli. Sequence analysis of RAPD 4.12 allowed the design of oligonucleotides that amplify a 609-bp sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker (SCAR-B310A280). Under controlled environmental and greenhouse conditions, detection of the pathogen by polymerase chain reaction was 100% successful in root samples of infected but still symptomless plants and in stem samples of plants with disease severity of >/=4 in the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT; Cali, Colombia) scale. The diagnostic procedure can be completed in 5 h and allows the detection of all known races of the pathogen in plant samples at early stages of the disease with no visible symptoms.

  11. Design of a DNA chip for detection of unknown genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvold, Håvard; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Berdal, Knut G

    2005-05-01

    Unknown genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have not undergone a risk evaluation, and hence might pose a danger to health and environment. There are, today, no methods for detecting unknown GMOs. In this paper we propose a novel method intended as a first step in an approach for detecting unknown genetically modified (GM) material in a single plant. A model is designed where biological and combinatorial reduction rules are applied to a set of DNA chip probes containing all possible sequences of uniform length n, creating probes capable of detecting unknown GMOs. The model is theoretically tested for Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia, and the probabilities for detecting inserts and receiving false positives are assessed for various parameters for this organism. From a theoretical standpoint, the model looks very promising but should be tested further in the laboratory. The model and algorithms will be available upon request to the corresponding author.

  12. The use of Listeria monocytogenes as a DNA delivery vector for cancer gene therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen that lyses the phagosomal vacuole of infected cells, proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm and can actively enter adjacent cells. The pathogen is therefore well suited to exploitation as a vector for the delivery of DNA to target cells as the lifecycle favors cellular targeting with vector amplification and the potential for cell-to-cell spread. We have recently demonstrated DNA transfer by L. monocytogenes in growing tumors in murine models. Our approach exploited an ampicillin sensitive stain of L. monocytogenes which can be lysed through systemic administration of ampicillin to facilitate release of plasmid DNA for expression by infected mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the implications of this technology and the potential for future improvements of the system.

  13. A DNA sequence obtained by replacement of the dopamine RNA aptamer bases is not an aptamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    of dopamine is a 57 nucleotides long RNA sequence reported in 1997 (Biochemistry, 1997, 36, 9726). Later, it was suggested that the DNA homologue of the RNA aptamer retains the specificity of dopamine binding (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 2009, 388, 732). Here, we show that the DNA sequence obtained...... by the replacement of the RNA aptamer bases for their DNA analogues is not able of specific biorecognition of dopamine, in contrast to the original RNA aptamer sequence. This DNA sequence binds dopamine and structurally related catecholamine neurotransmitters non-specifically, as any DNA sequence, and, thus...

  14. Determining Plant – Leaf Miner – Parasitoid Interactions: A DNA Barcoding Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derocles, Stéphane A. P.; Evans, Darren M.; Nichols, Paul C.; Evans, S. Aifionn; Lunt, David H.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in network ecology is to describe the full-range of species interactions in a community to create highly-resolved food-webs. We developed a molecular approach based on DNA full barcoding and mini-barcoding to describe difficult to observe plant – leaf miner – parasitoid interactions, consisting of animals commonly regarded as agricultural pests and their natural enemies. We tested the ability of universal primers to amplify the remaining DNA inside leaf miner mines after the emergence of the insect. We compared the results of a) morphological identification of adult specimens; b) identification based on the shape of the mines; c) the COI Mini-barcode (130 bp) and d) the COI full barcode (658 bp) fragments to accurately identify the leaf-miner species. We used the molecular approach to build and analyse a tri-partite ecological network of plant – leaf miner – parasitoid interactions. We were able to detect the DNA of leaf-mining insects within their feeding mines on a range of host plants using mini-barcoding primers: 6% for the leaves collected empty and 33% success after we observed the emergence of the leaf miner. We suggest that the low amplification success of leaf mines collected empty was mainly due to the time since the adult emerged and discuss methodological improvements. Nevertheless our approach provided new species-interaction data for the ecological network. We found that the 130 bp fragment is variable enough to identify all the species included in this study. Both COI fragments reveal that some leaf miner species could be composed of cryptic species. The network built using the molecular approach was more accurate in describing tri-partite interactions compared with traditional approaches based on morphological criteria. PMID:25710377

  15. Babesia bigemina: quantitation of infection in nymphal and adult Boophilus microplus using a DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, J L; Stiller, D; Jasmer, D P; Buening, G M; Wagner, G G; McGuire, T C

    1992-02-01

    Candidates for a subunit vaccine against bovine babesiosis include surface proteins of infective forms found in the salivary glands of tick vectors. However, low numbers of infective forms are present within ticks and hinder analysis of this stage. To solve this problem, conditions which yield high numbers of infective forms were investigated with the use of a Babesia bigemina-specific DNA probe. DNA from progeny of female Boophilus microplus infected with B. bigemina was hybridized to probe DNA to detect and quantitate infection. There was no difference in the prevalence of infection in progeny of three strains of Bo. microplus. However, within a strain, prevalence could be increased to 30% by combining selection of progeny from heavily (3+) infected female ticks and selection of eggs laid 120 hr postengorgement. Quantitation of infective forms within pooled salivary gland preparations of 10 infected nymphal and adult Bo. microplus demonstrated that Day 9 and 10 nymphal ticks contained the highest numbers of parasites and represented approximately 10(6) infective forms. This number of infective forms is suitable for isolation and further characterization.

  16. Quantitative assessment of phytopathogenic fungi in various substrates using a DNA macroarray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, B.; Brouwer, M.; Vanachter, A.C.R.C.; Lévesque, C.A.; Cammue, B.P.A.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Detection, identification and quantification of plant pathogens are the cornerstones of preventive plant disease management. To detect multiple pathogens in a single assay, DNA array technology currently is the most suitable technique. However, for sensitive detection, polymerase chain reaction

  17. The 75-kilodalton cytoplasmic Chlamydia trachomatis L2 polypeptide is a DnaK-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Lundemose, AG; Christiansen, Gunna

    1990-01-01

    The gene coding for the 75-kilodalton cytoplasmic Chlamydia trachomatis L2 polypeptide has been cloned in Escherichia coli, and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The cloned DNA fragment contained the coding region as well as the putative promoter. The deduced amino acid sequence of the 1......,980-base-pair open reading frame revealed 94% homology with a 75-kilodalton protein from C. trachomatis serovar D and 57% homology with the DnaK proteins of E. coli and of Bacillus megaterium, while amino acid homology with human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) was 42%. The promoter region was identified...... by computer search and by primer extension of mRNA synthesized in recombinant E. coli. The promoter region which differed from the putative promoter region in serovar D was shown to be a mixed promoter type in which the -10 region showed a regular TATA box configuration while the -35 region showed high...

  18. Biochemical analysis of a DNA replication origin in the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainge, Ian; Gaudier, Martin; Schuwirth, Barbara S; Westcott, Sarah L; Sandall, Jane; Atanassova, Neli; Wigley, Dale B

    2006-10-20

    We have characterised the interaction of the Aeropyrum pernix origin recognition complex proteins (ORC1 and ORC2) with DNA using DNase I footprinting. Each protein binds upstream of its respective gene. However, ORC1 protein alone interacts more tightly with an additional region containing multiple origin recognition box (ORB) sites that we show to be a replication origin. At this origin, there are four ORB elements disposed either side of an A+T-rich region. An ORC1 protein dimer binds at each of these ORB sites. Once all four ORB sites have bound ORC1 protein, there is a transition to a higher-order assembly with a defined alteration in topology and superhelicity. Furthermore, after this transition, the A+T-rich region becomes sensitive to digestion by DNase I and P1 nuclease, revealing that the transition promotes distortion of the DNA in this region, presumably as a prelude to loading of MCM helicase.

  19. Diffusive transport of molecular cargo tethered to a DNA origami platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperger, Enzo; Pirzer, Tobias; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2015-04-08

    Fast and efficient transport of molecular cargoes along tracks or on supramolecular platforms is an important prerequisite for the development of future nanorobotic systems and assembly lines. Here, we study the diffusive transport of DNA cargo strands bound to a supramolecular DNA origami structure via an extended tether arm. For short distances (on the order of a few nanometers), transport from a start to a target site is found to be less efficient than for direct transfer without tether. For distances on the scale of the origami platform itself, however, cargo transfer mediated by a rigid tether arm occurs very fast and robust, whereas a more flexible, hinged tether is found to be considerably less efficient. Our results suggest diffusive motion on a molecular tether as a highly efficient mechanism for fast transfer of cargoes over long distances.

  20. Catalytic enantioselective syn hydration of enones in water using a DNA-based catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Arnold J.; Coquière, David; Geerdink, Danny; Rosati, Fiora; Roelfes, Gerard; Feringa, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The enantioselective addition of water to olefins in an aqueous environment is a common transformation in biological systems, but was beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Here, we present the first examples of a non-enzymatic catalytic enantioselective hydration of enones, for which we used a

  1. A DNA 'barcode blitz': rapid digitization and sequencing of a natural history collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Paul D N; Dewaard, Jeremy R; Zakharov, Evgeny V; Prosser, Sean W J; Sones, Jayme E; McKeown, Jaclyn T A; Mantle, Beth; La Salle, John

    2013-01-01

    DNA barcoding protocols require the linkage of each sequence record to a voucher specimen that has, whenever possible, been authoritatively identified. Natural history collections would seem an ideal resource for barcode library construction, but they have never seen large-scale analysis because of concerns linked to DNA degradation. The present study examines the strength of this barrier, carrying out a comprehensive analysis of moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera) species in the Australian National Insect Collection. Protocols were developed that enabled tissue samples, specimen data, and images to be assembled rapidly. Using these methods, a five-person team processed 41,650 specimens representing 12,699 species in 14 weeks. Subsequent molecular analysis took about six months, reflecting the need for multiple rounds of PCR as sequence recovery was impacted by age, body size, and collection protocols. Despite these variables and the fact that specimens averaged 30.4 years old, barcode records were obtained from 86% of the species. In fact, one or more barcode compliant sequences (>487 bp) were recovered from virtually all species represented by five or more individuals, even when the youngest was 50 years old. By assembling specimen images, distributional data, and DNA barcode sequences on a web-accessible informatics platform, this study has greatly advanced accessibility to information on thousands of species. Moreover, much of the specimen data became publically accessible within days of its acquisition, while most sequence results saw release within three months. As such, this study reveals the speed with which DNA barcode workflows can mobilize biodiversity data, often providing the first web-accessible information for a species. These results further suggest that existing collections can enable the rapid development of a comprehensive DNA barcode library for the most diverse compartment of terrestrial biodiversity - insects.

  2. A DNA 'barcode blitz': rapid digitization and sequencing of a natural history collection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D N Hebert

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding protocols require the linkage of each sequence record to a voucher specimen that has, whenever possible, been authoritatively identified. Natural history collections would seem an ideal resource for barcode library construction, but they have never seen large-scale analysis because of concerns linked to DNA degradation. The present study examines the strength of this barrier, carrying out a comprehensive analysis of moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera species in the Australian National Insect Collection. Protocols were developed that enabled tissue samples, specimen data, and images to be assembled rapidly. Using these methods, a five-person team processed 41,650 specimens representing 12,699 species in 14 weeks. Subsequent molecular analysis took about six months, reflecting the need for multiple rounds of PCR as sequence recovery was impacted by age, body size, and collection protocols. Despite these variables and the fact that specimens averaged 30.4 years old, barcode records were obtained from 86% of the species. In fact, one or more barcode compliant sequences (>487 bp were recovered from virtually all species represented by five or more individuals, even when the youngest was 50 years old. By assembling specimen images, distributional data, and DNA barcode sequences on a web-accessible informatics platform, this study has greatly advanced accessibility to information on thousands of species. Moreover, much of the specimen data became publically accessible within days of its acquisition, while most sequence results saw release within three months. As such, this study reveals the speed with which DNA barcode workflows can mobilize biodiversity data, often providing the first web-accessible information for a species. These results further suggest that existing collections can enable the rapid development of a comprehensive DNA barcode library for the most diverse compartment of terrestrial biodiversity - insects.

  3. Sequence of a DNA probe specific for Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D W; Cockburn, A F; Seawright, J A

    1993-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined for a portion of a 12-kb genomic DNA clone specific for Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A. Four short, internally repeated sequences were identified. Synthetic oligonucleotide probes were prepared based on these four repeats. The oligonucleotides are highly specific and can be reliably used to separate individuals of An. quadrimaculatus species A from members of other species of the complex.

  4. A DNA sequence element that advances replication origin activation time in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Thomas J; Kolor, Katherine; Fangman, Walton L; Brewer, Bonita J; Raghuraman, M K

    2013-11-06

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication undergo activation at various times in S-phase, allowing the genome to be duplicated in a temporally staggered fashion. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation times of individual origins are not intrinsic to those origins but are instead governed by surrounding sequences. Currently, there are two examples of DNA sequences that are known to advance origin activation time, centromeres and forkhead transcription factor binding sites. By combining deletion and linker scanning mutational analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to measure fork direction in the context of a two-origin plasmid, we have identified and characterized a 19- to 23-bp and a larger 584-bp DNA sequence that are capable of advancing origin activation time.

  5. Identification of the vascular plants of Churchill, Manitoba, using a DNA barcode library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmina Maria L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because arctic plant communities are highly vulnerable to climate change, shifts in their composition require rapid, accurate identifications, often for specimens that lack diagnostic floral characters. The present study examines the role that DNA barcoding can play in aiding floristic evaluations in the arctic by testing the effectiveness of the core plant barcode regions (rbcL, matK and a supplemental ribosomal DNA (ITS2 marker for a well-studied flora near Churchill, Manitoba. Results This investigation examined 900 specimens representing 312 of the 354 species of vascular plants known from Churchill. Sequencing success was high for rbcL: 95% for fresh specimens and 85% for herbarium samples (mean age 20 years. ITS2 worked equally well for the fresh and herbarium material (89% and 88%. However, sequencing success was lower for matK, despite two rounds of PCR amplification, which reflected less effective primer binding and sensitivity to the DNA degradation (76% of fresh, 45% of herbaria samples. A species was considered as taxonomically resolved if its members showed at least one diagnostic difference from any other taxon in the study and formed a monophyletic clade. The highest species resolution (69% was obtained by combining information from all three genes. The joint sequence information for rbcL and matK distinguished 54% of 286 species, while rbcL and ITS2 distinguished 63% of 285 species. Discrimination of species within Salix, which constituted 8% of the flora, was particularly problematic. Despite incomplete resolution, the barcode results revealed 22 misidentified herbarium specimens, and enabled the identification of field specimens which were otherwise too immature to identify. Although seven cases of ITS2 paralogy were noted in the families Cyperaceae, Juncaceae and Juncaginaceae, this intergenic spacer played an important role in resolving congeneric plant species at Churchill. Conclusions Our results provided fast and cost-effective solution to create a comprehensive, effective DNA barcode reference library for a local flora.

  6. A DNA-based registry for all animal species: the barcode index number (BIN system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeevan Ratnasingham

    Full Text Available Because many animal species are undescribed, and because the identification of known species is often difficult, interim taxonomic nomenclature has often been used in biodiversity analysis. By assigning individuals to presumptive species, called operational taxonomic units (OTUs, these systems speed investigations into the patterning of biodiversity and enable studies that would otherwise be impossible. Although OTUs have conventionally been separated through their morphological divergence, DNA-based delineations are not only feasible, but have important advantages. OTU designation can be automated, data can be readily archived, and results can be easily compared among investigations. This study exploits these attributes to develop a persistent, species-level taxonomic registry for the animal kingdom based on the analysis of patterns of nucleotide variation in the barcode region of the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene. It begins by examining the correspondence between groups of specimens identified to a species through prior taxonomic work and those inferred from the analysis of COI sequence variation using one new (RESL and four established (ABGD, CROP, GMYC, jMOTU algorithms. It subsequently describes the implementation, and structural attributes of the Barcode Index Number (BIN system. Aside from a pragmatic role in biodiversity assessments, BINs will aid revisionary taxonomy by flagging possible cases of synonymy, and by collating geographical information, descriptive metadata, and images for specimens that are likely to belong to the same species, even if it is undescribed. More than 274,000 BIN web pages are now available, creating a biodiversity resource that is positioned for rapid growth.

  7. 78 FR 58514 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ..., Section Leader, Operational Support Section, Center for Veterinary Biologics, Policy, Evaluation, and Licensing, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 148, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231; phone (301) 851-3426, fax (301... (with confidential business information redacted), contact Dr. Patricia Foley, Risk Manager, Center for...

  8. Bacillus halodurans RecA-DNA binding and RecA- mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... is that the external environment and the internal pH of the bacteria are alkaline; here also the bacteria may have developed ... RecA-mediated cleavage in this bacterium strain. To achieve this ..... At this pH 7.4 the introduction of inducible mutation in cI101-229DM did not increase the cleavage rate. cI101-.

  9. Good Manufacturing Practices production and analysis of a DNA vaccine against dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-ping; Li, Yu-hong; Zhang, Ai-hua; Bi, Lan; Fan, Ming-wen

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To prepare a clinical-grade anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P/VAX and explore its immune effect and protective efficacy against a cariogenic bacterial challenge. Methods: A large-scale industrial production process was developed under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) by combining and optimizing common unit operations such as alkaline lysis, precipitation, endotoxin removal and column chromatography. Quality controls of the purified bulk and final lyophilized vaccine were conducted according to authoritative guidelines. Mice and gnotobiotic rats were intranasally immunized with clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX with chitosan. Antibody levels of serum IgG and salivary SIgA were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and caries activity was evaluated by the Keyes method. pGJA-P/VAX and pVAX1 prepared by a laboratory-scale commercial kit were used as controls. Results: The production process proved to be scalable and reproducible. Impurities including host protein, residual RNA, genomic DNA and endotoxin in the purified plasmid were all under the limits of set specifications. Intranasal vaccination with clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX induced higher serum IgG and salivary SIgA in both mice and gnotobiotic rats. While in the experimental caries model, the enamel (E), dentinal slight (Ds), and dentinal moderate (Dm) caries lesions were reduced by 21.1%, 33.0%, and 40.9%, respectively. Conclusion: The production process under GMP was efficient in preparing clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX with high purity and intended effectiveness, thus facilitating future clinical trials for the anti-caries DNA vaccine. PMID:19890359

  10. A checklist of the bats of Peninsular Malaysia and progress towards a DNA barcode reference library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voon-Ching Lim

    Full Text Available Several published checklists of bat species have covered Peninsular Malaysia as part of a broader region and/or in combination with other mammal groups. Other researchers have produced comprehensive checklists for specific localities within the peninsula. To our knowledge, a comprehensive checklist of bats specifically for the entire geopolitical region of Peninsular Malaysia has never been published, yet knowing which species are present in Peninsular Malaysia and their distributions across the region are crucial in developing suitable conservation plans. Our literature search revealed that 110 bat species have been documented in Peninsular Malaysia; 105 species have precise locality records while five species lack recent and/or precise locality records. We retrieved 18 species from records dated before the year 2000 and seven species have only ever been recorded once. Our search of Barcode of Life Datasystems (BOLD found that 86 (of the 110 species have public records of which 48 species have public DNA barcodes available from bats sampled in Peninsular Malaysia. Based on Neighbour-Joining tree analyses and the allocation of DNA barcodes to Barcode Index Number system (BINs by BOLD, several DNA barcodes recorded under the same species name are likely to represent distinct taxa. We discuss these cases in detail and highlight the importance of further surveys to determine the occurences and resolve the taxonomy of particular bat species in Peninsular Malaysia, with implications for conservation priorities.

  11. A DNA vaccine delivered by dermal electroporation fully protects cynomolgus macaques against Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Wilkinson, Eric R; Shaia, Carl I; Facemire, Paul R; Bell, Todd M; Bearss, Jeremy J; Shamblin, Joshua D; Wollen, Suzanne E; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2017-12-02

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an ambisense RNA virus in the Arenaviridae family and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe hemorrhagic disease endemic to West and Central Africa. 1,2 There are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccines available to prevent Lassa fever. 1,2 in our previous studies, we developed a gene-optimized DNA vaccine that encodes the glycoprotein precursor gene of LASV (Josiah strain) and demonstrated that 3 vaccinations accompanied by dermal electroporation protected guinea pigs from LASV-associated illness and death. Here, we describe an initial efficacy experiment in cynomolgus macaque nonhuman primates (NHPs) in which we followed an identical 3-dose vaccine schedule that was successful in guinea pigs, and a follow-on experiment in which we used an accelerated vaccination strategy consisting of 2 administrations, spaced 4 weeks apart. In both studies, all of the LASV DNA-vaccinated NHPs survived challenge and none of them had measureable, sustained viremia or displayed weight loss or other disease signs post-exposure. Three of 10 mock-vaccinates survived exposure to LASV, but all of them became acutely ill post-exposure and remained chronically ill to the study end point (45 d post-exposure). Two of the 3 survivors experienced sensorineural hearing loss (described elsewhere). These results clearly demonstrate that the LASV DNA vaccine combined with dermal electroporation is a highly effective candidate for eventual use in humans.

  12. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxycytidine: a DNA building block with a 'clickable' side chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seela, Frank; Mei, Hui; Xiong, Hai; Budow, Simone; Eickmeier, Henning; Reuter, Hans

    2012-10-01

    The title compound [systematic name: 4-amino-1-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-5-ethynylpyrimidin-2(1H)-one], C(11)H(13)N(3)O(4), shows two conformations in the crystalline state. The N-glycosylic bonds of both conformers adopt similar conformations, with χ = -149.2 (1)° for conformer (I-1) and -151.4 (1)° for conformer (I-2), both in the anti range. The sugar residue of (I-1) shows a C2'-endo envelope conformation ((2)E, S-type), with P = 164.7 (1)° and τ(m) = 36.9 (1)°, while (I-2) shows a major C3'-exo sugar pucker (C3'-exo-C2'-endo, (3)T(2), S-type), with P = 189.2 (1)° and τ(m) = 33.3 (1)°. Both conformers participate in the formation of a layered three-dimensional crystal structure with a chain-like arrangement of the conformers. The ethynyl groups do not participate in hydrogen bonding, but are arranged in proximal positions.

  14. Facile preparation of a DNA sensor for rapid herpes virus detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh, E-mail: tampd-hast@mail.hut.edu.vn [Hanoi Advanced School of Science and Technology, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Tuan, Mai Anh, E-mail: tuanma-itims@mail.hut.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Huy, Tran Quang [National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), 01 Yersin, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Le, Anh-Tuan [Hanoi Advanced School of Science and Technology, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Hieu, Nguyen Van, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam)

    2010-10-12

    In this paper, a simple DNA sensor platform was developed for rapid herpes virus detection in real samples. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the herpes simplex virus (DNA probe) were directly immobilized on the surface of interdigitated electrodes by electrochemical polymerization along with pyrrole monomers. The potential was scanned from - 0.7 to + 0.6 V, and the scanning rate was 100 mV/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to verify specific DNA sequence binding and the conducting polymer. The morphology of the conducting polymer doped with DNA strands was characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope. As-obtained DNA sensor was used to detect the herpes virus DNA in the real samples. The results show that the current DNA sensors detected the lowest DNA concentration of 2 nM. This sensitivity appears to be better than that of the DNA sensors prepared by immobilization of the DNA probe on the 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) membrane.

  15. Bacillus halodurans RecA-DNA binding and RecAmediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is critical for normal cellular function under conditions that lead to altered. DNA metabolism and DNA damage. The RecA proteins of E. coli and Bacillus halodurans both can bind to DNA and catalyze the specific proteolytic cleavage of LexA and lambda repressor which induces. SOS response. At neutral pH ...

  16. Priming of microglia in a DNA-repair deficient model of accelerated aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, Divya D. A.; Jaarsma, Dick; Holtman, Inge R.; Olah, Marta; Ferreira, Filipa M.; Schaafsma, Wandert; Brouwer, Nieske; Meijer, Michel M.; de Waard, Monique C.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kreft, Karim L.; Laman, Jon D.; de Haan, Gerald; Biber, Knut P. H.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    Aging is associated with reduced function, degenerative changes, and increased neuroinflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence suggests that changes in microglia cells contribute to the age-related deterioration of the CNS. The most prominent age-related change of

  17. Identification and characterization of a DnaJ gene from red alga Pyropia yezoensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Li, Xianchao; Tang, Xuexi; Zhou, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Members of the DnaJ family are proteins that play a pivotal role in various cellular processes, such as protein folding, protein transport and cellular responses to stress. In the present study, we identified and characterized the full-length DnaJ cDNA sequence from expressed sequence tags of Pyropia yezoensis ( PyDnaJ) via rapid identification of cDNA ends. This cDNA encoded a protein of 429 amino acids, which shared high sequence similarity with other identified DnaJ proteins, such as a heat shock protein 40/DnaJ from Pyropia haitanensis. The relative mRNA expression level of PyDnaJ was investigated using real-time PCR to determine its specific expression during the algal life cycle and during desiccation. The relative mRNA expression level in sporophytes was higher than that in gametophytes and significantly increased during the whole desiccation process. These results indicate that PyDnaJ is an authentic member of the DnaJ family in plants and red algae and might play a pivotal role in mitigating damage to P. yezoensis during desiccation.

  18. Development of a DNA-liposome complex for gene delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulianboroujeni, M; Kupgan, G; Moghadam, F; Tahriri, M; Boughdachi, A; Khoshkenar, P; Ambrose, J J; Kiaie, N; Vashaee, D; Ramsey, J D; Tayebi, L

    2017-06-01

    The association structures formed by cationic liposomes and DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid)-liposome have been effectively utilized as gene carriers in transfection assays. In this research study, cationic liposomes were prepared using a modified lipid film hydration method consisting of a lyophilization step for gene delivery applications. The obtained results demonstrated that the mean particle size had no significant change while the polydispersity (PDI) increased after lyophilization. The mean particle size slightly reduced after lyophilization (520±12nm to 464±25nm) while the PDI increased after lyophilization (0.094±0.017 to 0.220±0.004). In addition. The mean particle size of vesicles increases when DNA is incorporated to the liposomes (673±27nm). According to the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, the spherical shape of liposomes confirmed their successful preservation and reconstitution from the powder. It was found that liposomal formulation has enhanced transfection considerably compared to the naked DNA as negative control. Finally, liposomal formulation in this research had a better function than Lipofectamine® 2000 as a commercialized product because the cellular activity (cellular protein) was higher in the prepared lipoplex than Lipofectamine® 2000. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Emergence of DNA-encapsulating liposomes from a DNA-lipid blend film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimobayashi, Shunsuke; Hishida, Mafumi; Kurimura, Tomo; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    A Micro-scale giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) densely encapsulating molecular systems is one of the simplest life-mimicking model systems. The dehydration-rehydration process proposed by Deamer et al. more than 30 years ago generates vesicles to satisfy the constraints of micro-scale size, unilamellarity and densely polymer-encapsulation. Nevertheless, the physico-chemical mechanism of a set of dehydration-rehydration process has been poorly understood. The present study reveals crucial factors on the process through fluorescent microscopic observation and small angle x-ray scattering. From the results, we propose a plausible physical mechanism for the process, making it possible to optimize the encapsulation of any agent This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows Grant (No. 25-1270) and by KAKENHI (Nos. 26707020, 25103012, and 26115709).

  20. Synaptic proteome changes in a DNA repair deficient Ercc1 mouse model of accelerated aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Végh (Marlene); M.C. de Waard (Monique); I. van der Pluijm (Ingrid); Y. Ridwan (Yanto); M.J.M. Sassen (Marion J.); P. van Nierop (Pim); R.C. van der Schors (Roel); K.W. Li (Ka Wan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.B. Smit (August); R.E. van Kesteren (Ronald)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCognitive decline is one of the earliest hallmarks of both normal and pathological brain aging. Here we used Ercc1 mutant mice, which are impaired in multiple DNA repair systems and consequently show accelerated aging and progressive memory deficits, to identify changes in the levels of

  1. Synaptic proteome changes in a DNA repair deficient ercc1 mouse model of accelerated aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegh, M.J.; de Waard, M.C.; van der Pluijm, I.; Ridwan, Y; Sassen, M.J.M.; van Nierop, P.; van der Schors, R.C.; Li, K.W.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Smit, A.B.; van Kesteren, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the earliest hallmarks of both normal and pathological brain aging. Here we used Ercc1 mutant mice, which are impaired in multiple DNA repair systems and consequently show accelerated aging and progressive memory deficits, to identify changes in the levels of hippocampal

  2. Optimization of a DNA Nicking Assay to Evaluate Oenocarpus bataua and Camellia sinensis Antioxidant Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Jérôme Leba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at assessing the DNA damage protective activity of different types of extracts (aqueous, methanolic and acetonic using an in vitro DNA nicking assay. Several parameters were optimized using the pUC18 plasmid, especially FeSO4, EDTA, solvent concentrations and incubation time. Special attention has been paid to removing the protective and damaging effect of the solvent and FeSO4 respectively, as well as to identifying the relevant positive and negative controls. For each solvent, the optimal conditions were determined: (i for aqueous extracts, 0.33 mM of FeSO4 and 0.62 mM of EDTA were incubated for 20 min at 37 °C; (ii for acetone extracts, 1.16% solvent were incubated for 15 min at 37 °C with 1.3 mM of FeSO4 and 2.5 mM of EDTA and (iii for methanol extracts, 0.16% solvent, were incubated for 1.5 h at 37 °C with 0.33 mM of FeSO4 and 0.62 mM of EDTA. Using the optimized conditions, the DNA damage protective activity of aqueous, methanolic and acetonic extracts of an Amazonian palm berry (Oenocarpus bataua and green tea (Camellia sinensis was assessed. Aqueous and acetonic Oenocarpus bataua extracts were protective against DNA damage, whereas aqueous, methanolic and acetonic extracts of Camellia sinensis extracts induced DNA damage.

  3. Optimization of a DNA Nicking Assay to Evaluate Oenocarpus bataua and Camellia sinensis Antioxidant Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leba, Louis-Jérôme; Brunschwig, Christel; Saout, Mona; Martial, Karine; Vulcain, Emmanuelle; Bereau, Didier; Robinson, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the DNA damage protective activity of different types of extracts (aqueous, methanolic and acetonic) using an in vitro DNA nicking assay. Several parameters were optimized using the pUC18 plasmid, especially FeSO4, EDTA, solvent concentrations and incubation time. Special attention has been paid to removing the protective and damaging effect of the solvent and FeSO4 respectively, as well as to identifying the relevant positive and negative controls. For each solvent, the optimal conditions were determined: (i) for aqueous extracts, 0.33 mM of FeSO4 and 0.62 mM of EDTA were incubated for 20 min at 37 °C; (ii) for acetone extracts, 1.16% solvent were incubated for 15 min at 37 °C with 1.3 mM of FeSO4 and 2.5 mM of EDTA and (iii) for methanol extracts, 0.16% solvent, were incubated for 1.5 h at 37 °C with 0.33 mM of FeSO4 and 0.62 mM of EDTA. Using the optimized conditions, the DNA damage protective activity of aqueous, methanolic and acetonic extracts of an Amazonian palm berry (Oenocarpus bataua) and green tea (Camellia sinensis) was assessed. Aqueous and acetonic Oenocarpus bataua extracts were protective against DNA damage, whereas aqueous, methanolic and acetonic extracts of Camellia sinensis extracts induced DNA damage. PMID:25302614

  4. Differentiating a diverse range of volatile organic compounds with polyfluorophore sensors built on a DNA scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samain, Florent; Dai, Nan; Kool, Eric T

    2011-01-03

    Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which DNA bases are replaced with fluorophores. A preliminary study reported that some sequences of ODFs were able to respond to a few organic small molecules in the vapor phase, giving a change in fluorescence. Here, we follow up on this finding by investigating a larger range of volatile organic analytes, and a considerably larger set of sensors. A library of tetramer ODFs of 2401 different sequences was prepared by using combinatorial methods, and was screened in air for fluorescence responses to a set of ten different volatile organics, including multiple aromatic and aliphatic compounds, acids and bases, varied functional groups, and closely related structures. Nineteen responding sensors were selected and characterized. These sensors were cross-screened against all ten analytes, and responses were measured qualitatively (by changes in color and intensity) and quantitatively (by measuring ΔR, ΔG, and ΔB values averaged over five to six sensor beads; R=red, G=green, B=blue). The results show that sensor responses were diverse, with a single sensor responding differently to as many as eight of the ten analytes; multiple classes of responses were seen, including quenching, lighting-up, and varied shifts in wavelength. Responses were strong, with raw ΔR, ΔG, and ΔB values of as high as >200 on a 256-unit scale and unamplified changes in many cases apparent to the naked eye. Sensors were identified that could distinguish clearly between even very closely related compounds such as acrolein and acrylonitrile. Statistical methods were applied to select a small set of four sensors that, as a pattern response, could distinguish between all ten analytes with high confidence. Sequence analysis of the full set of sensors suggested that sequence/order of the monomer components, and not merely composition, was highly important in the responses. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Differentiating a Diverse Range of Volatile Organic Compounds with Polyfluorophore Sensors Built on a DNA Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Samain, Florent; Dai, Nan; Kool, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which DNA bases are replaced with fluorophores. A preliminary study reported that some sequences of ODFs were able to respond to a few organic small molecules in the vapor phase, giving a change in fluorescence. Here we follow up on this finding by investigating a larger range of volatile organic analytes, and a considerably larger set of sensors. A library of tetramer ODFs of 2401 different sequences was prepared using combinatoria...

  6. Prevention and synergistic control of Ph(+) ALL by a DNA vaccine and 6-mercaptopurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köchling, Joachim; Rott, Yvonne; Arndt, Stefanie; Marschke, Christina; Schmidt, Manuel; Wittig, Burghardt; Kalies, Katrin; Westermann, Jürgen; Henze, Günter

    2012-09-07

    Although the outcome of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been improved continuously by chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, prognosis of patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph(+)) ALL still remains poor. Since further intensification of chemotherapy is limited by toxic side effects and patients with high risk of transplant-related mortality are not eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation new treatment strategies are urgently needed for the prevention of Ph(+) ALL relapse. There is increasing evidence that the immune system plays an essential role for the eradication or immunologic control of remaining leukemia cells. We developed several DNA-based vaccines encoding a BCR-ABL(p185) specific peptide and GM-CSF, and CD40-L, IL-27 or IL-12 and evaluated the preventive and therapeutic efficacy against a lethal challenge of syngeneic Ph(+) ALL in Balb/c mice. In vivo cell depletion assays and cytokine expression studies were performed and the efficacy of the DNA vaccine was compared with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) alone and the combination of the DNA vaccine and 6-MP. Preventive immunization with the vaccine BCR-ABL/GM-CSF/IL-12 and the TLR-9 agonist dSLIM induced an innate and adaptive immune response mediated by NK-cells, CD4(+) T-cells and CD8(+) T-cells leading to a survival rate of 80%. Therapeutic vaccination resulted in a significantly longer leukemia-free survival (40.7 days vs. 20.4 days) and a higher survival rate (56% vs. 10%) compared to chemotherapy with 6-MP. Remarkably, in combination with the vaccine 6-MP acted synergistically and led to 100% survival. These results demonstrate that minimal residual disease of Ph(+) ALL can be significantly better controlled by a combined treatment approach of immunotherapy and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for improving maintenance therapy in order to reduce the relapse rate in patients with Ph(+) ALL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Munir

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs. Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R2 = 0.8131.

  8. Assessment of species diversity and distribution of an ancient diatom lineage using a DNA metabarcoding approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Nanjappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Continuous efforts to estimate actual diversity and to trace the species distribution and ranges in the natural environments have gone in equal pace with advancements of the technologies in the study of microbial species diversity from microscopic observations to DNA-based barcoding. DNA metabarcoding based on Next Generation Sequencing (NGS constitutes the latest advancement in these efforts. Here we use NGS data from different sites to investigate the geographic range of six species of the diatom family Leptocylindraceae and to identify possible new taxa within the family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the V4 and V9 regions of the nuclear-encoded SSU rDNA gene region in the NGS database of the European ERA-Biodiversa project BioMarKs, collected in plankton and sediments at six coastal sites in European coastal waters, as well as environmental sequences from the NCBI database. All species known in the family Leptocylindraceae were detected in both datasets, but the much larger Illumina V9 dataset showed a higher species coverage at the various sites than the 454 V4 dataset. Sequences identical or similar to the references of Leptocylindrus aporus, L. convexus, L. danicus/hargravesii and Tenuicylindrus belgicus were found in the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and Black Sea as well as at locations outside Europe. Instead, sequences identical or close to that of L. minimus were found in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Black Sea but not in the Mediterranean Sea, while sequences belonging to a yet undescribed taxon were encountered only in Oslo Fjord and Baffin Bay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of Leptocylindraceae species in NGS datasets has expanded our knowledge of the species biogeographic distribution and of the overall diversity of this diatom family. Individual species appear to be widespread, but not all of them are found everywhere. Despite the sequencing depth allowed by NGS and the wide geographic area covered by this study, the diversity of this ancient diatom family appears to be low, at least at the level of the marker used in this study.

  9. Crystal structure of a DNA decamer containing a cis-syn thymine dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, HaJeung; Zhang, Kaijiang; Ren, Yingjie; Nadji, Sourena; Sinha, Nanda; Taylor, John-Stephen; Kang, ChulHee

    2002-12-10

    It is well known that exposure to UV induces DNA damage, which is the first step in mutagenesis and a major cause of skin cancer. Among a variety of photoproducts, cyclobutane-type pyrimidine photodimers (CPD) are the most abundant primary lesion. Despite its biological importance, the precise relationship between the structure and properties of DNA containing CPD has remained to be elucidated. Here, we report the free (unbound) crystal structure of duplex DNA containing a CPD lesion at a resolution of 2.0 A. Our crystal structure shows that the overall helical axis bends approximately 30 degrees toward the major groove and unwinds approximately 9 degrees, in remarkable agreement with some previous theoretical and experimental studies. There are also significant differences in local structure compared with standard B-DNA, including pinching of the minor groove at the 3' side of the CPD lesion, a severe change of the base pair parameter in the 5' side, and serious widening of both minor and major groves both 3' and 5' of the CPD. Overall, the structure of the damaged DNA differs from undamaged DNA to an extent that DNA repair proteins may recognize this conformation, and the various components of the replicational and transcriptional machinery may be interfered with due to the perturbed local and global structure.

  10. Electrochemical detection of dihydromyricetin using a DNA immobilized ethylenediamine/polyglutamic modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lina; Xu, Ying; Luo, Peili; Zhang, Shusheng; Ye, Baoxian

    2012-01-21

    A novel voltammetric sensor, based on DNA immobilized on the surface of an ethylenediamine/polyglutamic (En/PGA) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE), was constructed and used for determination of dihydromyricetin (DMY). The electrochemical behaviour of DMY at this sensor was investigated in pH 3.6 NaAc-HAc buffer solutions by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse anodic voltammetry (DPV). The oxidation of DMY is an adsorption-controlled irreversible process. The oxidation mechanism was proposed and discussed. It was found that the modified electrode exhibited a linear voltammetric response for DMY in the range of 4.0 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) to 2 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), with a detection limit of 2 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The method was also applied successfully to detect DMY in an ampelopsis sample with satisfactory results.

  11. Molecular Mechanism of Dioxin Action: Molecular Cloning of the Ah Receptor Using a DNA Recognition Site Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-13

    subunit), affinity labeled with [1 2 5 I]-2-azido-3- iodo -7,8- dibromodibenzo-p-dioxin, a high affinity agonist for the AhR, has recently been reported...hydrocarbon receptor. BSA, bovine serum albumin. DMSO, dimethylsulfoxide. DRE, dioxin responsive element. DTT, dithiothreitol. HEDG, 25 mM Hepes, pH 7.5, 1...method of Bradford (1976) using bovine serum albumin as the standard. Synthetic Oligonucleotides A complementary pair of synthetic DNA fragments

  12. Validation of a DNA IQ-based extraction method for TECAN robotic liquid handling workstations for processing casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Fourney, Ron M

    2010-10-01

    A semi-automated DNA extraction process for casework samples based on the Promega DNA IQ™ system was optimized and validated on TECAN Genesis 150/8 and Freedom EVO robotic liquid handling stations configured with fixed tips and a TECAN TE-Shake™ unit. The use of an orbital shaker during the extraction process promoted efficiency with respect to DNA capture, magnetic bead/DNA complex washes and DNA elution. Validation studies determined the reliability and limitations of this shaker-based process. Reproducibility with regards to DNA yields for the tested robotic workstations proved to be excellent and not significantly different than that offered by the manual phenol/chloroform extraction. DNA extraction of animal:human blood mixtures contaminated with soil demonstrated that a human profile was detectable even in the presence of abundant animal blood. For exhibits containing small amounts of biological material, concordance studies confirmed that DNA yields for this shaker-based extraction process are equivalent or greater to those observed with phenol/chloroform extraction as well as our original validated automated magnetic bead percolation-based extraction process. Our data further supports the increasing use of robotics for the processing of casework samples. Crown Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Examining the relationship between hemolymph phenoloxidase and resistance to a DNA virus, Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saejeng, A; Tidbury, H; Siva-Jothy, M T; Boots, M

    2010-09-01

    We have a detailed understanding of invertebrate immune responses to bacteria and fungal pathogens, but we know less about how insects respond to virus challenge. Phenoloxidase (PO) functions as an important immune response against many parasites and pathogens and is routinely used as a measure of immune competance. We examine the role of haemolymph PO activity in Plodia interpuncetella's response to its natural granulosis virus (PiGV). Larvae were challenged with virus by both oral inoculation of occluded virus (the natural infection route) and direct intrahaemocoelic injection of budded virus. Haemolymph was collected at time points post-viral challenge using a novel method that allows the volume of haemolymph to be quanitified. The haemolmyph was collected without killing the larvae so that haemolymph samples from individuals that developed viral disease could be distinguished from samples collected from those that fought off infection. The level of haemolymph PO activity in resistant larvae did not differ from control larvae. Therefore we have no evidence that PO is involved in resistance to virus in the haemocoel whether larvae are challenged naturally by oral innoculation or directly by intraheamocoelic injection. Phenoloxidase may therefore not be a relevant metric of immunocompetence for viral infection.

  14. A DNA vaccine directed against a rainbow trout rhabdovirus induces early protection against a nodavirus challenge in turbot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerset, I.; Lorenzen, Ellen; Lorenzen, Niels

    2003-01-01

    encoding the capsid protein of AHNV revealed no protective properties against the nodavirus challenge. Histological examination of muscle tissue sections from the vaccine injection site showed that the DNA vaccine against VHSV triggered a pronounced inflammatory response in turbot similar to what has...

  15. A Phase-1 Clinical Trial of a DNA Vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Delivered by Intramuscular or Intradermal Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    concerns associated with pWRG/VEE or delivery method identified during the Phase 1 study. 3.4. Tolerability of Vaccine Procedures To assess the...results of the Phase I clinical study of EP-mediated pWRG/VEE delivery demonstrate an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile for the DNA vaccine...11] Hooper JW, Moon JE, Paolino KM, Newcomer R, McLain DE, Josleyn M, et al. A Phase 1 clinical trial of Hantaan virus and Puumala virus M-segment

  16. An Assessment of Whole Blood and Fractions by Nested PCR as a DNA Source for Diagnosing Canine Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Emmanuelle de Farias Rotondano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis are tick-borne diseases. Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys infect mainly white cells and platelets, respectively. The main DNA source for PCR is peripheral blood, but the potential of blood cell fractions has not been extensively investigated. This study aims at assessment of whole blood (WB and blood fractions potential in nested PCR (nPCR to diagnose canine ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified in 71.4, 17.8, 31.57, and 30% of the WB, granulocyte (G, mononuclear cells (M, and buffy coat (BC samples. Compared to the WB, the sensitivity of the PCR was 42.86% for the M, and BC fractions, 21.43% for the G, and 33.33% for the blood clot (C. There was fair agreement between the WB and M, BC and C, and slight with the G. Fair agreement occurred between the nPCR and morulae in the blood smear. One animal was coinfected with A. platys and E. canis. This study provided the first evidence of A. platys infection in dogs in Paraíba, Brazil, and demonstrated that WB is a better DNA source than blood fractions to detect Ehrlichia and Anaplasma by nPCR, probably because of the plasma bacterial concentration following host cell lysis.

  17. Differentially Methylated Loci Distinguish Ovarian Carcinoma Histological Types: Evaluation of a DNA Methylation Assay in FFPE Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda E. Kelemen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenomic markers can identify tumor subtypes, but few platforms can accommodate formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumor tissue. We tested different amounts of bisulfite-converted (bs DNA from six FFPE ovarian carcinomas (OC of serous, endometrioid, and clear cell histologies and two HapMap constitutional genomes to evaluate the performance of the GoldenGate methylation assay. Methylation status at each 1,505 CpG site was expressed as β-values. Comparing 400 ng versus 250 ng bsDNA, reproducibility of the assay ranged from Spearman r2=0.41 to 0.90, indicating that β-values obtained with a lower DNA amount did not always correlate well with the higher amount. Average methylation for the six samples was higher using 250 ng (β-value = 0.45, SD=0.29 than with 400 ng (β-value = 0.36, SD=0.32. Reproducibility between duplicate HapMap samples (r2=0.76 to 0.92 was also variable. Using 400 ng input bsDNA, THBS2 and ERG were differentially methylated across all histologic types and between endometrioid and clear cell types at <0.1% false discovery rate. Methylation did not always correlate with gene expression (r2=-0.70 to 0.15. We found that lower bsDNA overestimates methylation, and, using higher bsDNA amounts, we confirmed a previous report of higher methylation of THBS2 in clear cell OC, which could provide new insight into biological pathways that distinguish OC histological types.

  18. A search for obligatory paternal alleles in a DNA database to find an alleged rapist in a fatherless paternity case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, Mark; Reshef, Ayeleth; Voskoboinik, Lev; Zamir, Ashira; Motro, Uzi; Gafny, Ron

    2012-07-01

    A sexual assault case resulted in a pregnancy, which was subsequently aborted. The alleged father of the fetus was unknown. Maternal and fetal types were obtained using the 11-locus AmpFℓSTR(®) SGM Plus(®) kit. The national DNA database was searched for the paternal obligatory alleles and detected two suspects who could not be excluded as father of the male fetus. Additional typing using the AmpFℓSTR(®) Minifiler(™) kit, containing three additional autosomal loci, was not sufficient to exclude either suspect. Subsequent typing using the PowerPlex(®) 16, containing four additional loci, and Y-Filer(™) kits resulted in excluding one suspect. Searching a database for paternal obligatory alleles can be fruitful, but is fraught with possible false positive results so that finding a match must be taken as only preliminary evidence. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. A DNA sequence-based study of the Schistosoma indicum (Trematoda: Digenea) group: population phylogeny, taxonomy and historical biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, S W; Fatih, F A; Mondal, M M H; Alim, M A; Fadjar, S; Rajapakse, R P V J; Rollinson, D

    2007-12-01

    Partial (DNA) sequences were collected for 2 mitochondrial loci (Srrna and Lrrna, the rrnS and rrnL rRNA genes respectively) for Schistosoma indicum group species from 4 Southeast Asian countries. The samples included 7 populations, 4 of which were previously unstudied. In 11 cases the combination of locus and population was new. The aim of the study was to provide a phylogeny based on new independent data and multiple populations (earlier studies had mostly used a common set of field samples or laboratory lines) and to examine interrelationships and phylogeography within this species group. Paraphyly of the S. indicum group was confirmed, as was the basal position of Schistosoma incognitum in the Schistosoma phylogeny. Southeast Asian Schistosoma spindale and S. incognitum populations were shown to fall into their respective con-specific cohesive groupings. Estimated divergence times for these taxa were shown to be related to Pleistocene changes in sea level and the radiation of definitive host groups. A revised phylogeographical model is proposed in the light of these findings.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of ER2796, a DNA Methyltransferase-Deficient Strain of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P Anton

    Full Text Available We report the complete sequence of ER2796, a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli K-12 that is completely defective in DNA methylation. Because of its lack of any native methylation, it is extremely useful as a host into which heterologous DNA methyltransferase genes can be cloned and the recognition sequences of their products deduced by Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT sequencing. The genome was itself sequenced from a long-insert library using the SMRT platform, resulting in a single closed contig devoid of methylated bases. Comparison with K-12 MG1655, the first E. coli K-12 strain to be sequenced, shows an essentially co-linear relationship with no major rearrangements despite many generations of laboratory manipulation. The comparison revealed a total of 41 insertions and deletions, and 228 single base pair substitutions. In addition, the long-read approach facilitated the surprising discovery of four gene conversion events, three involving rRNA operons and one between two cryptic prophages. Such events thus contribute both to genomic homogenization and to bacteriophage diversification. As one of relatively few laboratory strains of E. coli to be sequenced, the genome also reveals the sequence changes underlying a number of classical mutant alleles including those affecting the various native DNA methylation systems.

  1. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  2. TnpA product encoded by the transposable element En-1 of Zea mays is a DNA binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Gierl, A.; Lütticke, S; Saedler, H

    1988-01-01

    TnpA protein, the function encoded by the most abundant transcript of En-1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA binding experiments with partially purified tnpA protein revealed that it binds to the subterminal repetitive region of En-1. TnpA protein recognizes a 12-bp-long sequence motif which is reiterated several times at the termini of En-1. Binding is reduced if the cytosine residues of CG dinucleotides and CNG trinucleotides within the motif are methylated. These data suggest a model ...

  3. Rapid detection and identification of viral and bacterial fish pathogens using a DNA array‐based multiplex assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lievens, B.; Frans, I.; Heusdens, C.

    2011-01-01

    for the simultaneous detection and identification of all cyprinid herpesviruses (CyHV‐1, CyHV‐2 and CyHV‐3) and some of the most important fish pathogenic Flavobacterium species, including F. branchiophilum, F. columnare and F. psychrophilum. For virus identification, the DNA polymerase and helicase genes were......Fish diseases can be caused by a variety of diverse organisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa, and pose a universal threat to the ornamental fish industry and aquaculture. The lack of rapid, accurate and reliable means by which fish pathogens can be detected and identified has been...... one of the main limitations in fish pathogen diagnosis and fish disease management and has consequently stimulated the search for alternative diagnostic techniques. Here, we describe a method based on multiplex and broad‐range PCR amplification combined with DNA array hybridization...

  4. A DNA damage checkpoint pathway coordinates the division of dikaryotic cells in the ink cap mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sena-Tomás, Carmen; Navarro-González, Mónica; Kües, Ursula; Pérez-Martín, José

    2013-09-01

    The fungal fruiting body or mushroom is a multicellular structure essential for sexual reproduction. It is composed of dikaryotic cells that contain one haploid nucleus from each mating partner sharing the same cytoplasm without undergoing nuclear fusion. In the mushroom, the pileus bears the hymenium, a layer of cells that includes the specialized basidia in which nuclear fusion, meiosis, and sporulation occur. Coprinopsis cinerea is a well-known model fungus used to study developmental processes associated with the formation of the fruiting body. Here we describe that knocking down the expression of Atr1 and Chk1, two kinases shown to be involved in the response to DNA damage in a number of eukaryotic organisms, dramatically impairs the ability to develop fruiting bodies in C. cinerea, as well as other developmental decisions such as sclerotia formation. These developmental defects correlated with the impairment in silenced strains to sustain an appropriated dikaryotic cell cycle. Dikaryotic cells in which chk1 or atr1 genes were silenced displayed a higher level of asynchronous mitosis and as a consequence aberrant cells carrying an unbalanced dose of nuclei. Since fruiting body initiation is dependent on the balanced mating-type regulator doses present in the dikaryon, we believe that the observed developmental defects were a consequence of the impaired cell cycle in the dikaryon. Our results suggest a connection between the DNA damage response cascade, cell cycle regulation, and developmental processes in this fungus.

  5. A DNA Barcoding Based Study to Identify Main Mosquito Species in Taiwan and its Difference from Those in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Fang, Yiliang; Zhang, Jianqing; Wu, Rongquan; Xu, Baohai; Xie, Lianhui

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes can transmit many types of viruses such as West Nile virus and Zika virus and are responsible for a number of virus-causing diseases including malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, lymphatic filariasis, and Japanese B encephalitis. On January 19, 2016, the first case of Zika virus infection was identified in Taiwan, which presents the need for studying the mosquito species in the Taiwan Strait and evaluating the risk of the outbreak of this infection. In this study, we have collected 144 mosquito specimens from 42 species belonging to nine genera from both sides of the Taiwan Strait during 2013 and 2014. We then applied the COI DNA Barcoding technique to classify the specimens and performed a phylogenetic analysis to infer the evolutionary history of these mosquitoes. Based on the analyses, we found that though the mosquitoes from different sides of the Taiwan Strait share a lot of commonality, they have a few regional specificities. Our results also suggested a very small divergences (1%~9%) between specimens from the same mosquito species and relatively large divergences (8%~25%) between specimens from different mosquito species. Within the same species, the divergence of specimens from the same region is significantly smaller than that between two regions. A few highly divergent species between Fujian and Taiwan (e.g., An.maculatus and Ae.elsiae) might be formed due to the so-called "cryptic evolutionary events", in which the species has differentiation into cryptic species due to geographical differences without changing morphological characteristics. In conclusion, the phylogenetic analyses showed a very similar taxonomy to the historical one based on morphological characteristics, validating again the application of COI DNA Barcoding technique in classifying mosquito species. However, there are also some inconsistencies between COI DNA Barcoding and historical taxonomy, which points out the differences between mosquito DNA and morphological characteristics and suggests the possibility to improve mosquito taxonomy based on DNA techniques. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Recombinase polymerase and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as a DNA amplification-detection strategy for food analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago-Felipe, S.; Tortajada-Genaro, L.A.; Puchades, R.; Maquieira, A., E-mail: amaquieira@qim.upv.es

    2014-02-06

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Recombinase polymerase amplification is a powerful DNA method operating at 40 °C. •The combination RPA–ELISA gives excellent performances for high-throughput analysis. •Screening of food safety threats has been done using standard laboratory equipment. •Allergens, GMOs, bacteria, and fungi have been successfully determined. -- Abstract: Polymerase chain reaction in conjunction with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR–ELISA) is a well-established technique that provides a suitable rapid, sensitive, and selective method for a broad range of applications. However, the need for precise rapid temperature cycling of PCR is an important drawback that can be overcome by employing isothermal amplification reactions such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The RPA–ELISA combination is proposed for amplification at a low, constant temperature (40 °C) in a short time (40 min), for the hybridisation of labelled products to specific 5′-biotinylated probes/streptavidin in coated microtiter plates at room temperature, and for detection by colorimetric immunoassay. RPA–ELISA was applied to screen common safety threats in foodstuffs, such as allergens (hazelnut, peanut, soybean, tomato, and maize), genetically modified organisms (P35S and TNOS), pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella sp. and Cronobacter sp.), and fungi (Fusarium sp.). Satisfactory sensitivity and reproducibility results were achieved for all the targets. The RPA–ELISA technique does away with thermocycling and provides a suitable sensitive, specific, and cost-effective method for routine applications, and proves particularly useful for resource-limited settings.

  7. High-throughput glycosylation analysis of therapeutic immunoglobulin G by capillary gel electrophoresis using a DNA analyzer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusch, D.; Haberger, M.; Kailich, T.; Heidenreich, A.K.; Kampe, M.; Bulau, P.; Wuhrer, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Fc glycosylation of therapeutic antibodies is crucial for their effector functions and their behavior in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. To monitor the Fc glycosylation in bioprocess development and characterization, high-throughput techniques for glycosylation analysis are needed. Here,

  8. Development of a DNA-Based Method for Distinguishing the Malaria Vectors, Anopheles gambiae From Anopheles arabiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    concerning MR7 is whether it actually represents mitochondrial DNA. One possibility would be that it is actually a nuclear DNA sequence containing a , tRNA...either nuclear or mitochondrial sequence. We found that the fragment of pOyHC 02 (shown above in green) also hybridizes to MR7, which indicates that...Balabacensis complex of Southeast Asia (Diptera: Culicidae). Genetica 57:81-86. (14) Mahon RJ and PM Miethke. 1982. Anopheles farauti No. 3, a hitherto un

  9. A DNA vaccine encoding p39 and sp41 of Brucella melitensis induces protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    OpenAIRE

    A Al-Mariri; R Akel; AQ Abbady

    2014-01-01

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular gram-negative bacteria that can multiply within phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells of humans or animals as end hosts. B. melitensis causes abortion in pregnant animals and undulant fever in humans. A 41 kDa surface protein (sp41) is associated with bacterial adherence and invasion of HeLa cells. The role of this protein a is important for the interaction with host cells. Previously, the putative periplasmic binding protein p39 had been described...

  10. A DNA Structural Alphabet Distinguishes Structural Features of DNA Bound to Regulatory Proteins and in the Nucleosome Core Particle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneider, Bohdan; Bozikova, Paulina; Čech, P.; Svozil, D.; Černý, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 278. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001777 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA * DNA-protein recognition * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  11. Human RECQ1 is a DNA damage responsive protein required for genotoxic stress resistance and suppression of sister chromatid exchanges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Sharma

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA helicases are ubiquitous enzymes that unwind DNA in an ATP-dependent and directionally specific manner. Unwinding of double-stranded DNA is essential for the processes of DNA repair, recombination, transcription, and DNA replication. Five human DNA helicases sharing sequence similarity with the E. coli RecQ helicase have been identified. Three of the human RecQ helicases are implicated in hereditary diseases (Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome which display clinical symptoms of premature aging and cancer. RECQ1 helicase is the most highly expressed of the human RecQ helicases; however, a genetic disease has yet not been linked to mutations in the RECQ1 gene, and the biological functions of human RECQ1 in cellular DNA metabolism are not known.In this study, we report that RECQ1 becomes phosphorylated upon DNA damage and forms irradiation-induced nuclear foci that associate with chromatin in human cells. Depletion of RECQ1 renders human cells sensitive to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation or the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin, and results in spontaneous gamma-H2AX foci and elevated sister chromatid exchanges, indicating aberrant repair of DNA breaks. Consistent with a role in homologous recombinational repair, endogenous RECQ1 is associated with the strand exchange protein Rad51 and the two proteins directly interact with high affinity.Collectively, these results provide the first evidence for a role of human RECQ1 in the response to DNA damage and chromosomal stability maintenance and point to the vital importance of RECQ1 in genome homeostasis.

  12. In silico design of a DNA-based HIV-1 multi-epitope vaccine for Chinese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Sun, Weilai; Guo, Jingjing; Zhao, Guangyu; Sun, Shihui; Yu, Hong; Guo, Yan; Li, Jungfeng; Jin, Xia; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-01-01

    The development of an HIV-1 vaccine that is capable of inducing effective and broadly cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses remains a challenging task because of the extensive diversity of HIV-1, the difference of virus subtypes (clades) in different geographical regions, and the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigens (HLA). We performed an in silico design of 3 DNA vaccines, designated pJW4303-MEG1, pJW4303-MEG2 and pJW4303-MEG3, encoding multi-epitopes that are highly conserved within the HIV-1 subtypes most prevalent in China and can be recognized through HLA alleles dominant in China. The pJW4303-MEG1-encoded protein consisted of one Th epitope in Env, and one, 2, and 6 epitopes in Pol, Env, and Gag proteins, respectively, with a GGGS linker sequence between epitopes. The pJW4303-MEG2-encoded protein contained similar epitopes in a different order, but with the same linker as pJW4303-MEG1. The pJW4303-MEG3-encoded protein contained the same epitopes in the same order as that of pJW4303-MEG2, but with a different linker sequence (AAY). To evaluate immunogenicity, mice were immunized intramuscularly with these DNA vaccines. Both pJW4303-MEG1 and pJW4303-MEG2 vaccines induced equally potent humoral and cellular immune responses in the vaccinated mice, while pJW4303-MEG3 did not induce immune responses. These results indicate that both epitope and linker sequences are important in designing effective epitope-based vaccines against HIV-1 and other viruses.

  13. Quantifying species diversity with a DNA barcoding-based method: Tibetan moth species (Noctuidae on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Jin

    Full Text Available With the ongoing loss of biodiversity, there is a great need for fast and effective ways to assess species richness and diversity: DNA barcoding provides a powerful new tool for this. We investigated this approach by focusing on the Tibetan plateau, which is one of the world's top biodiversity hotspots. There have been few studies of its invertebrates, although they constitute the vast majority of the region's diversity. Here we investigated species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae, across different environmental gradients, using measurements based on traditional morphology as well as on DNA barcoding. The COI barcode showed an average interspecific K2P distance of 9.45±2.08%, which is about four times larger than the mean intraspecific distance (1.85±3.20%. Using six diversity indices, we did not detect any significant differences in estimated species diversity between measurements based on traditional morphology and on DNA barcoding. Furthermore, we found strong positive correlations between them, indicating that barcode-based measures of species diversity can serve as a good surrogate for morphology-based measures in most situations tested. Eastern communities were found to have significantly higher diversity than Western ones. Among 22 environmental factors tested, we found that three (precipitation of driest month, precipitation of driest quarter, and precipitation of coldest quarter were significantly correlated with species diversity. Our results indicate that these factors could be the key ecological factors influencing the species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae on the Tibetan plateau.

  14. Rapid One-Step Selection Method for Generating Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Development of a DNA Aptamer against alpha-Bungarotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Lasse Holm; Shamaileh, Hadi A.; Edwards, Stacey L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nucleic acids based therapeutic approaches have gained significant interest in recent years towards the development of therapeutics against many diseases. Recently, research on aptamers led to the marketing of Macugen (R), an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF......) for the treatment of age related macular degeneration (AMD). Aptamer technology may prove useful as a therapeutic alternative against an array of human maladies. Considering the increased interest in aptamer technology globally that rival antibody mediated therapeutic approaches, a simplified selection, possibly...... in one-step, technique is required for developing aptamers in limited time period. Principal Findings: Herein, we present a simple one-step selection of DNA aptamers against alpha-bungarotoxin. A toxin immobilized glass coverslip was subjected to nucleic acid pool binding and extensive washing followed...

  15. Spontaneous germline excision of Tol1, a DNA-based transposable element naturally occurring in the medaka fish genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Koga, Hajime; Nakamura, Kodai; Fujita, Akiko; Hattori, Akimasa; Matsuda, Masaru; Koga, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    DNA-based transposable elements are ubiquitous constituents of eukaryotic genomes. Vertebrates are, however, exceptional in that most of their DNA-based elements appear to be inactivated. The Tol1 element of the medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, is one of the few elements for which copies containing an undamaged gene have been found. Spontaneous transposition of this element in somatic cells has previously been demonstrated, but there is only indirect evidence for its germline transposition. Here, we show direct evidence of spontaneous excision in the germline. Tyrosinase is the key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. In an albino laboratory strain of medaka fish, which is homozygous for a mutant tyrosinase gene in which a Tol1 copy is inserted, we identified de novo reversion mutations related to melanin pigmentation. The gamete-based reversion rate was as high as 0.4%. The revertant fish carried the tyrosinase gene from which the Tol1 copy had been excised. We previously reported the germline transposition of Tol2, another DNA-based element that is thought to be a recent invader of the medaka fish genome. Tol1 is an ancient resident of the genome. Our results indicate that even an old element can contribute to genetic variation in the host genome as a natural mutator.

  16. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Species identification of medicinal pteridophytes by a DNA barcode marker, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin-Ye; Xie, Cai-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Song, Jing-Yuan; Yao, Hui; Luo, Kun; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Gao, Ting; Pang, Xiao-Hui; Qian, Jun; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Medicinal pteridophytes are an important group used in traditional Chinese medicine; however, there is no simple and universal way to differentiate various species of this group by morphological traits. A novel technology termed "DNA barcoding" could discriminate species by a standard DNA sequence with universal primers and sufficient variation. To determine whether DNA barcoding would be effective for differentiating pteridophyte species, we first analyzed five DNA sequence markers (psbA-trnH intergenic region, rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1, and matK) using six chloroplast genomic sequences from GeneBank and found psbA-trnH intergenic region the best candidate for availability of universal primers. Next, we amplified the psbA-trnH region from 79 samples of medicinal pteridophyte plants. These samples represented 51 species from 24 families, including all the authentic pteridophyte species listed in the Chinese pharmacopoeia (2005 version) and some commonly used adulterants. We found that the sequence of the psbA-trnH intergenic region can be determined with both high polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification efficiency (94.1%) and high direct sequencing success rate (81.3%). Combined with GeneBank data (54 species cross 12 pteridophyte families), species discriminative power analysis showed that 90.2% of species could be separated/identified successfully by the TaxonGap method in conjunction with the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool 1 (BLAST1) method. The TaxonGap method results further showed that, for 37 out of 39 separable species with at least two samples each, between-species variation was higher than the relevant within-species variation. Thus, the psbA-trnH intergenic region is a suitable DNA marker for species identification in medicinal pteridophytes.

  18. A Kernel-Based Intuitionistic Fuzzy C-Means Clustering Using a DNA Genetic Algorithm for Magnetic Resonance Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenke Zang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available MRI segmentation is critically important for clinical study and diagnosis. Existing methods based on soft clustering have several drawbacks, including low accuracy in the presence of image noise and artifacts, and high computational cost. In this paper, we introduce a new formulation of the MRI segmentation problem as a kernel-based intuitionistic fuzzy C-means (KIFCM clustering problem and propose a new DNA-based genetic algorithm to obtain the optimal KIFCM clustering. While this algorithm searches the solution space for the optimal model parameters, it also obtains the optimal clustering, therefore the optimal MRI segmentation. We perform empirical study by comparing our method with six state-of-the-art soft clustering methods using a set of UCI (University of California, Irvine datasets and a set of synthetic and clinic MRI datasets. The preliminary results show that our method outperforms other methods in both the clustering metrics and the computational efficiency.

  19. Prevalence, identification by a DNA microarray-based assay of human and food isolates Listeria spp. from Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmaïed, F; Helel, S; Le Berre, V; François, J-M; Leclercq, A; Lecuit, M; Smaoui, H; Kechrid, A; Boudabous, A; Barkallah, I

    2014-02-01

    We aimed at evaluating the prevalence of Listeria species isolated from food samples and characterizing food and human cases isolates. Between 2005 and 2007, one hundred food samples collected in the markets of Tunis were analysed in our study. Five strains of Listeria monocytogenes responsible for human listeriosis isolated in hospital of Tunis were included. Multiplex PCR serogrouping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) applying the enzyme AscI and ApaI were used for the characterization of isolates of L. monocytogenes. We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay to a reliable discrimination of species within the Listeria genus. The prevalence of Listeria spp. in food samples was estimated at 14% by using classical biochemical identification. Two samples were assigned to L. monocytogenes and 12 to L. innocua. DNA microarray allowed unambiguous identification of Listeria species. Our results obtained by microarray-based assay were in accordance with the biochemical identification. The two food L. monocytogenes isolates were assigned to the PCR serogroup IIa (serovar 1/2a). Whereas human L. monocytogenes isolates were of PCR serogroup IVb, (serovars 4b). These isolates present a high similarity in PFGE. Food L. monocytogenes isolates were classified into two different pulsotypes. These pulsotypes were different from that of the five strains responsible for the human cases. We confirmed the presence of Listeria spp. in variety of food samples in Tunis. Increased food and clinical surveillance must be taken into consideration in Tunisia to identify putative infections sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Oversized AAV transductifon is mediated via a DNA-PKcs-independent, Rad51C-dependent repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Li, Chengwen; Bellon, Isabella; Yin, Chaoying; Chavala, Sai; Pryadkina, Marina; Richard, Isabelle; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2013-12-01

    A drawback of gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the DNA packaging restriction of the viral capsid (AAV genome transduction through an unknown mechanism. Herein, AAV production using an oversized reporter (6.2 kb) resulted in chloroform and DNase-resistant particles harboring distinct "fragment" AAV (fAAV) genomes (5.0, 2.4, and 1.6 kb). Fractionation experiments determined that only the larger "fragments" mediated transduction in vitro, and relatively efficient transduction was also demonstrated in the muscle, the eye, and the liver. In contrast with concatemerization-dependent large-gene delivery by split AAV, fAAV transduction is independent of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in vitro and in vivo while disproportionately reliant on the DNA strand-annealing protein Rad51C. Importantly, fAAV's unique dependence on DNA repair proteins, compared with intact AAV, strongly suggests that the majority of oversized AAV transduction is mediated by fragmented genomes. Although fAAV transduction is less efficient than intact AAV, it is enhanced fourfold in muscle and sevenfold in the retina compared with split AAV transduction. Furthermore, fAAV carrying codon-optimized therapeutic dysferlin cDNA in a 7.5 kb expression cassette restored dysferlin levels in a dystrophic model. Collectively, oversized AAV genome transduction requires unique DNA repair pathways and offers an alternative, more efficient strategy for large-gene therapy.

  1. Molecular characterization of a DNA fragment harboring the replicon of pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ziniu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus thuringiensis belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of Gram-positive and spore-forming bacteria. Most isolates of B. thuringiensis can bear many endogenous plasmids, and the number and size of these plasmids can vary widely among strains or subspecies. As far as we know, the replicon of the plasmid pBMB165 is the first instance of a plasmid replicon being isolated from subsp. tenebrionis and characterized. Results A 20 kb DNA fragment containing a plasmid replicon was isolated from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 and characterized. By Southern blot analysis, this replicon region was determined to be located on pBMB165, the largest detected plasmid (about 82 kb of strain YBT-1765. Deletion analysis revealed that a replication initiation protein (Rep165, an origin of replication (ori165 and an iteron region were required for replication. In addition, two overlapping ORFs (orf6 and orf10 were found to be involved in stability control of plasmid. Sequence comparison showed that the replicon of pBMB165 was homologous to the pAMβ1 family replicons, indicating that the pBMB165 replicon belongs to this family. The presence of five transposable elements or remnants thereof in close proximity to and within the replicon control region led us to speculate that genetic exchange and recombination are potentially responsible for the divergence among the replicons of this plasmid family. Conclusion The replication and stability features of the pBMB165 from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 were identified. Of particular interest is the homology and divergence shared between the pBMB165 replicon and other pAMβ1 family replicons.

  2. Molecular characterization of a DNA fragment harboring the replicon of pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp tenebrionis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Ziniu; Han Dongmei; Wang Li; Van der Auwera Géraldine A; Mahillon Jacques; Guo Suxia; Huang Junyan; Sun Ming

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Bacillus thuringiensis belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of Gram-positive and spore-forming bacteria. Most isolates of B. thuringiensis can bear many endogenous plasmids, and the number and size of these plasmids can vary widely among strains or subspecies. As far as we know, the replicon of the plasmid pBMB165 is the first instance of a plasmid replicon being isolated from subsp. tenebrionis and characterized. Results A 20 kb DNA fragment containing a plasmi...

  3. Molecular characterization of a DNA fragment harboring the replicon of pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junyan; Guo, Suxia; Mahillon, Jacques; Van der Auwera, Géraldine A; Wang, Li; Han, Dongmei; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2006-10-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of Gram-positive and spore-forming bacteria. Most isolates of B. thuringiensis can bear many endogenous plasmids, and the number and size of these plasmids can vary widely among strains or subspecies. As far as we know, the replicon of the plasmid pBMB165 is the first instance of a plasmid replicon being isolated from subsp. tenebrionis and characterized. A 20 kb DNA fragment containing a plasmid replicon was isolated from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 and characterized. By Southern blot analysis, this replicon region was determined to be located on pBMB165, the largest detected plasmid (about 82 kb) of strain YBT-1765. Deletion analysis revealed that a replication initiation protein (Rep165), an origin of replication (ori165) and an iteron region were required for replication. In addition, two overlapping ORFs (orf6 and orf10) were found to be involved in stability control of plasmid. Sequence comparison showed that the replicon of pBMB165 was homologous to the pAMbeta1 family replicons, indicating that the pBMB165 replicon belongs to this family. The presence of five transposable elements or remnants thereof in close proximity to and within the replicon control region led us to speculate that genetic exchange and recombination are potentially responsible for the divergence among the replicons of this plasmid family. The replication and stability features of the pBMB165 from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 were identified. Of particular interest is the homology and divergence shared between the pBMB165 replicon and other pAMbeta1 family replicons.

  4. Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii ROP54 induces protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zou, Yang; Chen, Kai; Liu, Qing; Wang, Jin-Lei; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2017-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligatory intracellular protozoan, which infects most of the warm-blooded animals, causing serious public health problems and enormous economic losses worldwide. The rhoptry effector protein 54 (ROP54) has been indicated as a virulence factor that promotes Toxoplasma infection by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles, which can modulate some aspects of the host immune response. In order to evaluate the immuno-protective value of ROP54, we constructed a eukaryotic recombinant plasmid expressing T. gondii ROP54 and intramuscularly immunized Kunming mice with this recombinant plasmid against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. All mice immunized with pVAX-ROP54 elicited a high level of specific antibody responses, a significant increase of lymphocyte proliferation, and a significant level of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12p70), in addition to an increased production of Th2-type cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). These results demonstrated that pVAX-ROP54 induced significant cellular and humoral (Th1/Th2) immune responses, which extended the survival time (13.0±1.15days for pVAX-ROP54 vs 6.7±0.48days for pVAX I, 6.8±0.42days for PBS and 6.5±0.53 for blank control) and significantly reduced cyst burden (35.9% for pVAX-ROP54, 1% for pVAX I and 2% for PBS, compared with blank control) of immunized mice. These results indicate that the recombinant ROP54 plasmid can provide partial protection and might be a potential vaccine candidate against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Validation of DESS as a DNA Preservation Method for the Detection of Strongyloides spp. in Canine Feces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meruyert Beknazarova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode with a life cycle that includes free-living and parasitic forms. For both clinical (diagnostic and environmental evaluation, it is important that we can detect Strongyloides spp. in both human and non-human fecal samples. Real-time PCR is the most feasible method for detecting the parasite in both clinical and environmental samples that have been preserved. However, one of the biggest challenges with PCR detection is DNA degradation during the postage time from rural and remote areas to the laboratory. This study included a laboratory assessment and field validation of DESS (dimethyl sulfoxide, disodium EDTA, and saturated NaCl preservation of Strongyloides spp. DNA in fecal samples. The laboratory study investigated the capacity of 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios to preserve Strongyloides ratti in spike canine feces. It was found that both ratios of DESS significantly prevented DNA degradation compared to the untreated sample. This method was then validated by applying it to the field-collected canine feces and detecting Strongyloides DNA using PCR. A total of 37 canine feces samples were collected and preserved in the 1:3 ratio (sample: DESS and of these, 17 were positive for Strongyloides spp. The study shows that both 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios were able to preserve the Strongyloides spp. DNA in canine feces samples stored at room temperature for up to 56 days. This DESS preservation method presents the most applicable and feasible method for the Strongyloides DNA preservation in field-collected feces.

  6. Validation of DESS as a DNA Preservation Method for the Detection of Strongyloides spp. in Canine Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beknazarova, Meruyert; Millsteed, Shelby; Robertson, Gemma; Whiley, Harriet; Ross, Kirstin

    2017-06-09

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode with a life cycle that includes free-living and parasitic forms. For both clinical (diagnostic) and environmental evaluation, it is important that we can detect Strongyloides spp. in both human and non-human fecal samples. Real-time PCR is the most feasible method for detecting the parasite in both clinical and environmental samples that have been preserved. However, one of the biggest challenges with PCR detection is DNA degradation during the postage time from rural and remote areas to the laboratory. This study included a laboratory assessment and field validation of DESS (dimethyl sulfoxide, disodium EDTA, and saturated NaCl) preservation of Strongyloides spp. DNA in fecal samples. The laboratory study investigated the capacity of 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios to preserve Strongyloides ratti in spike canine feces. It was found that both ratios of DESS significantly prevented DNA degradation compared to the untreated sample. This method was then validated by applying it to the field-collected canine feces and detecting Strongyloides DNA using PCR. A total of 37 canine feces samples were collected and preserved in the 1:3 ratio (sample: DESS) and of these, 17 were positive for Strongyloides spp. The study shows that both 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios were able to preserve the Strongyloides spp. DNA in canine feces samples stored at room temperature for up to 56 days. This DESS preservation method presents the most applicable and feasible method for the Strongyloides DNA preservation in field-collected feces.

  7. The human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase processivity factor UL44 is modified by SUMO in a DNA-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Sinigalia

    Full Text Available During the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV genome, the viral DNA polymerase subunit UL44 plays a key role, as by binding both DNA and the polymerase catalytic subunit it confers processivity to the holoenzyme. However, several lines of evidence suggest that UL44 might have additional roles during virus life cycle. To shed light on this, we searched for cellular partners of UL44 by yeast two-hybrid screenings. Intriguingly, we discovered the interaction of UL44 with Ubc9, an enzyme involved in the covalent conjugation of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier to cellular and viral proteins. We found that UL44 can be extensively sumoylated not only in a cell-free system and in transfected cells, but also in HCMV-infected cells, in which about 50% of the protein resulted to be modified at late times post-infection, when viral genome replication is accomplished. Mass spectrometry studies revealed that UL44 possesses multiple SUMO target sites, located throughout the protein. Remarkably, we observed that binding of UL44 to DNA greatly stimulates its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we showed that overexpression of SUMO alters the intranuclear distribution of UL44 in HCMV-infected cells, and enhances both virus production and DNA replication, arguing for an important role for sumoylation in HCMV life cycle and UL44 function(s. These data report for the first time the sumoylation of a viral processivity factor and show that there is a functional interplay between the HCMV UL44 protein and the cellular sumoylation system.

  8. Direct single-molecule observations of local denaturation of a DNA double helix under a negative supercoil state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Motooka, Shinya; Usui, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Shohei; Miyata, Hidefumi; Kurita, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Takeshi; Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Mizuno, Akira; Oshige, Masahiko; Katsura, Shinji

    2015-03-17

    Effects of a negative supercoil on the local denaturation of the DNA double helix were studied at the single-molecule level. The local denaturation in λDNA and λDNA containing the SV40 origin of DNA replication (SV40ori-λDNA) was directly observed by staining single-stranded DNA regions with a fusion protein comprising the ssDNA binding domain of a 70-kDa subunit of replication protein A and an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (RPA-YFP) followed by staining the double-stranded DNA regions with YOYO-1. The local denaturation of λDNA and SV40ori-λDNA under a negative supercoil state was observed as single bright spots at the single-stranded regions. When negative supercoil densities were gradually increased to 0, -0.045, and -0.095 for λDNA and 0, -0.047, and -0.1 for SV40ori-λDNA, single bright spots at the single-stranded regions were frequently induced under higher negative supercoil densities of -0.095 for λDNA and -0.1 for SV40ori-λDNA. However, single bright spots of the single-stranded regions were rarely observed below a negative supercoil density of -0.045 and -0.047 for λDNA and SV40ori-λDNA, respectively. The probability of occurrence of the local denaturation increased with negative superhelicity for both λDNA and SV40ori-λDNA.

  9. Stability, denaturation and refolding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MfpA, a DNA mimicking protein that confers antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapunov, Sergei; Brenowitz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    MfpA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a founding member of the pentapeptide repeat class of proteins (PRP) that is believed to confer bacterial resistance to the drug fluoroquinolone by mimicking the size, shape and surface charge of duplex DNA. We show that phenylalanine side chain stacking stabilizes the N-terminus of MfpA’s pentapeptide thus extending the DNA mimicry analogy. The Lumry-Eyring model was applied to multiple spectral measures of MfpA denaturation revealing that the MfpA dimer dissociates to monomers which undergo a structural transition that leads to aggregation. MfpA retains high secondary and tertiary structure content under denaturing conditions. Dimerization stabilizes MfpA’s pentapeptide repeat fold. The high Arrhenius activation energy of the barrier to aggregate formation rationalizes its stability. The mechanism of MfpA denaturation and refolding is a ‘double funnel’ energy landscape where the ‘native’ and ‘aggregate’ funnels are separated by the high barrier that is not overcome during in vitro refolding. PMID:21605934

  10. Developing a DNA barcode library for perciform fishes in the South China Sea: Species identification, accuracy and cryptic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gang; Chen, Wei-Tao; Lu, Huo-Sheng; Cheng, Fei; Xie, Song-Guang

    2017-09-15

    DNA barcodes were studied for 1,353 specimens representing 272 morphological species belonging to 149 genera and 55 families of Perciformes from the South China Sea (SCS). The average Kimura 2-parameter (K2P) distances within species, genera and families were 0.31%, 8.71% and 14.52%, respectively. A neighbour-joining (NJ) tree, Bayesian inference (BI) and maximum-likelihood (ML) trees and Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) revealed 260, 253 and 259 single-species-representing clusters, respectively. Barcoding gap analysis (BGA) demonstrated that barcode gaps were present for 178 of 187 species analysed with multiple specimens (95.2%), with the minimum interspecific distance to the nearest neighbour larger than the maximum intraspecific distance. A group of three Thunnus species (T. albacares, T. obesus and T. tonggol), a pair of Gerres species (G. oyena and G. japonicus), a pair of Istiblennius species (I. edentulous and I. lineatus) and a pair of Uranoscopus species (U. oligolepis and U. kaianus) were observed with low interspecific distances and overlaps between intra- and interspecific genetic distances. Three species (Apogon ellioti, Naucrates ductor and Psenopsis anomala) showed deep intraspecific divergences and generated two lineages each, suggesting the possibility of cryptic species. Our results demonstrated that DNA barcodes are highly reliable for delineating species of Perciformes in the SCS. The DNA barcode library established in this study will shed light on further research on the diversity of Perciformes in the SCS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. High-Resolution Profiling of Drosophila Replication Start Sites Reveals a DNA Shape and Chromatin Signature of Metazoan Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Comoglio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  12. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Allison E; Rogovskyy, Artem S; Crowley, Michael A; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence.

  13. Quantifying species diversity with a DNA barcoding-based method: Tibetan moth species (Noctuidae) on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qian; Han, Huilin; Hu, XiMin; Li, XinHai; Zhu, ChaoDong; Ho, Simon Y W; Ward, Robert D; Zhang, Ai-bing

    2013-01-01

    With the ongoing loss of biodiversity, there is a great need for fast and effective ways to assess species richness and diversity: DNA barcoding provides a powerful new tool for this. We investigated this approach by focusing on the Tibetan plateau, which is one of the world's top biodiversity hotspots. There have been few studies of its invertebrates, although they constitute the vast majority of the region's diversity. Here we investigated species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae, across different environmental gradients, using measurements based on traditional morphology as well as on DNA barcoding. The COI barcode showed an average interspecific K2P distance of 9.45±2.08%, which is about four times larger than the mean intraspecific distance (1.85±3.20%). Using six diversity indices, we did not detect any significant differences in estimated species diversity between measurements based on traditional morphology and on DNA barcoding. Furthermore, we found strong positive correlations between them, indicating that barcode-based measures of species diversity can serve as a good surrogate for morphology-based measures in most situations tested. Eastern communities were found to have significantly higher diversity than Western ones. Among 22 environmental factors tested, we found that three (precipitation of driest month, precipitation of driest quarter, and precipitation of coldest quarter) were significantly correlated with species diversity. Our results indicate that these factors could be the key ecological factors influencing the species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae on the Tibetan plateau.

  14. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene as a DNA barcode for discriminating Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs and closely related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marina Silva; Morelli, Karina Alessandra; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2017-10-16

    The DNA barcoding system using the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial gene (cox1 or COI) is highly efficient for discriminating vertebrate and invertebrate species. In the present study, we examined the suitability of cox1 as a marker for Trypanosoma cruzi identification from other closely related species. Additionally, we combined the sequences of cox1 and the nuclear gene glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) to evaluate the occurrence of mitochondrial introgression and the presence of hybrid genotypes. Sixty-two isolates of Trypanosoma spp. obtained from five of the six Brazilian biomes (Amazon Forest, Atlantic Forest, Caatinga, Cerrado and Pantanal) were sequenced for cox1 and GPI gene fragments. Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed using neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. Molecular species delimitation was evaluated through pairwise intraspecific and interspecific distances, Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery, single-rate Poisson Tree Processes and multi-rate Poisson Tree Processes. Both cox1 and GPI genes recognized and differentiated T. cruzi, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii and Trypanosoma rangeli. Cox1 discriminated Tcbat, TcI, TcII, TcIII and TcIV. Additionally, TcV and TcVI were identified as a single group. Cox1 also demonstrated diversity in the discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII and TcIII and in T. c. marinkellei and T. rangeli. Cox1 and GPI demonstrated TcI and TcII as the most genetically distant branches, and the position of the other T. cruzi DTUs differed according to the molecular marker. The tree reconstructed with concatenated cox1 and GPI sequences confirmed the separation of the subgenus Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) sp. and the T. cruzi DTUs TcI, TcII, TcIII and TcIV. The evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was informative for DTU differentiation using both genes. In the cox1 analysis, one SNP differentiated heterozygous hybrids from TcIV sequences. In the GPI analysis one SNP discriminated Tcbat from TcI, while another SNP distinguished TcI from TcIII. DNA barcoding using the cox1 gene is a reliable tool to distinguish T. cruzi from T. c. marinkellei, T. dionisii and T. rangeli and identify the main T. cruzi genotypes.

  15. Identification of maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) and its adulterants by a DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Lan; Zha, Sheng-Hua; Zhao, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii) is an herbaceous plant that grows in high plateaus and has been used as both food and folk medicine for centuries because of its benefits to human health. In the present study, ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequences of forty-three maca samples, collected from different regions or vendors, were amplified and analyzed. The ITS sequences of nineteen potential adulterants of maca were also collected and analyzed. The results indicated that the ITS sequence of maca was consistent in all samples and unique when compared with its adulterants. Therefore, this DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence can be used for the molecular identification of maca and its adulterants. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  17. Analysis of a DNA polymorphic region in the gtfB and gtfC genes of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, J S; Lin, S W; Hsu, T Y; Chen, J Y; Kwan, H W; Yang, C S

    1993-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated the existence of DNA polymorphisms at the 5' coding regions of the gtfB and gtfC genes specifying the streptococcal glucosyltransferases (J.S. Chia, T.Y. Hsu, L.J. Teng, J.Y. Chen, L.J. Hahn, and C.S. Yang, Infect. Immun. 59:1656-1660, 1991). DNA sequence analysis by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing revealed that while several nucleotide changes were identified, accounting for the polymorphisms, the amino acids which they code for remain unchanged. The polymorphic region is located in a highly conserved amino terminus of the glucosyltransferases. A peptide of 19 amino acids from this region reversed the inhibiting activity of an antiserum raised against the proteins coded for by the gtfB and gtfC genes. The results suggest that the polymorphic region, varying in DNA but not in amino acid sequences, might specify some biological function.

  18. IL-1alpha is a DNA damage sensor linking genotoxic stress signaling to sterile inflammation and innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idan, C.; Peleg, R.; Elena, V.; Martin, T.; Cicerone, T.; Mareike, W.; Lydia, B.; Marina, F.; Gerhard, M.; Elisa, F.M.; Dinarello, C.A.; Ron, A.N.; Robert, S.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental signals can be translated into chromatin changes, which alter gene expression. Here we report a novel concept that cells can signal chromatin damage from the nucleus back to the surrounding tissue through the cytokine interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha). Thus, in addition to its role as a

  19. Dual detection of ultraviolet and visible lights using a DNA-CTMA/GaN photodiode with electrically different polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M Siva Pratap; Kim, Bong-Joong; Jang, Ja-Soon

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrated the dual-detectable DNA-CTMA/n-GaN photodiode (DG-PD) for ultraviolet and visible lights. Halogen and UV lamps are employed to recognize the visible and UV wavelength, respectively. The DG-PD under dark condition has a negative-bias shift of current-voltage (I-V) curves by 0.78 V compared to reference diode without DNA. However, the I-V curves move towards positive bias side by 0.75 V and 1.02 V for the halogen- and UV-exposed photodiode, respectively. These cause electrically different polarity and amount for halogen- and UV-induced photocurrents, indicating that the DNA-CTMA on n-GaN is quite effective for recognizing visible and UV lights as a dual-detectable photodiode. The formation and charge transport mechanisms are also discussed.

  20. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA damage responsive murine endogenous retrovirus of GLN family involved in cell growth regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Wu

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512, whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs, but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs. Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV. However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions.

  1. A DNA Fingerprinting Simulation Laboratory for Biology Students: Hands-on Experimentation To Solve a Mock Forensic Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Michael A.; Cosentino, Emily

    2001-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to DNA fingerprinting. Demonstrates how undergraduate students can be involved in many aspects of this type of experiment and how DNA fingerprinting experiments can be incorporated into the laboratory curriculum of courses for majors and nonmajors. (NB)

  2. Ion-dependent conformational switching by a DNA aptamer that induces remyelination in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smestad, John; Maher, L. James

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that a guanosine-rich 40-mer DNA aptamer (LJM-3064) mediates remyelination in the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Here, we characterize the G-quadruplex forms of this aptamer in vitro, and demonstrate using circular dichroism spectroscopy that LJM-3064 undergoes a monovalent ion-dependent conformational switch. In the presence of sodium ions and no potassium ions, LJM-3064 adopts an antiparallel-stranded G-quadruplex structure. When presented with low concentrations of potassium ions in a buffer that mimics the composition of interstitial fluid and blood plasma, LJM-3064 rapidly switches to a parallel-stranded G-quadruplex conformation, which is presumably the physiologically active folded form. We characterize these conformational states using dimethyl sulfate reactivity studies and Bal 31 nuclease probing. Our analysis indicates that only the 5′-terminal 26 nucleotides are involved in G-quadruplex formation. Thermodynamic characterization of LJM-3064 at physiologically relevant ion concentrations reveals the G-quadruplex to be metastable at human body temperature. These data provide important structural and thermodynamic insights that may be valuable in optimizing LJM-3064 as a therapeutic remyelinating agent. PMID:23175609

  3. Effects of ingested turmeric oleoresin on glucose and lipid metabolisms in obese diabetic mice: a DNA microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shinichi; Aoki, Fumiki; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kishida, Hideyuki; Nishiyama, Tozo; Okada, Shinji; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko; Mae, Tatsumasa

    2006-11-29

    Turmeric, the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., has a wide range of effects on human health. Turmeric oleoresin, an extract of turmeric, is often used for flavoring and coloring. Curcuminoids and turmeric essential oil are both contained in turmeric oleoresin, and both of these fractions have hypoglycemic effects. In the present study, we comprehensively assessed the effect of turmeric oleoresin on hepatic gene expression in obese diabetic KK-Ay mice using DNA microarray analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Female KK-Ay mice aged 6 weeks (n = 6/group) were fed a high-fat diet containing turmeric oleoresin, curcuminoids, and essential oil for 5 weeks. The same diet without any of these fractions was used as a control diet. Ingestion of turmeric oleoresin and essential oil inhibited the development of increased blood glucose and abdominal fat mass, while curcuminoids only inhibited the increase in blood glucose. DNA microarray analysis indicated that turmeric oleoresin ingestion up-regulated the expression of genes related to glycolysis, beta-oxidation, and cholesterol metabolism in the liver of KK-Ay mice, while expression of gluconeogenesis-related genes was down-regulated. Real-time PCR analysis was conducted to assess the contribution of the curcuminoids and essential oil in turmeric oleoresin to the changes in expression of representative genes selected by DNA microarray analysis. This analysis suggested that curcuminoids regulated turmeric oleoresin ingestion-induced expression of glycolysis-related genes and also that curcuminoids and turmeric essential oil acted synergistically to regulate the peroxisomal beta-oxidation-related gene expression induced by turmeric oleoresin ingestion. These changes in gene expression were considered to be the mechanism by which the turmeric oleoresin affected the control of both blood glucose levels and abdominal adipose tissue masses. All of these results suggest that the use of whole turmeric oleoresin is more effective than the use of either curcuminoids or the essential oil alone.

  4. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resol...... with the workflow associated with functional modules offer a strong resource to unravel the regulatory potential of NAC genes and that this workflow could be used to study other families of transcription factors.......Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...... regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application...

  5. Phenotyping of VIGS-mediated gene silencing in rice using a vector derived from a DNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2017-07-01

    Target genes in rice can be optimally silenced if inserted in antisense or hairpin orientation in the RTBV-derived VIGS vector and plants grown at 28 °C and 80% humidity after inoculation. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a method used to transiently silence genes in dicot as well as monocot plants. For the important monocot species rice, the Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV)-derived VIGS system (RTBV-VIGS), which uses agroinoculation to initiate silencing, has not been standardized for optimal use. Here, using RTBV-VIGS, three sets of conditions were tested to achieve optimal silencing of the rice marker gene phytoene desaturase (pds). The effect of orientation of the insert in the RTBV-VIGS plasmid (sense, antisense and hairpin) on the silencing of the target gene was then evaluated using rice magnesium chelatase subunit H (chlH). Finally, the rice Xa21 gene, conferring resistance against bacterial leaf blight disease (BLB) was silenced using RTBV-VIGS system. In each case, real-time PCR-based assessment indicated approximately 40-80% fall in the accumulation levels of the transcripts of pds, chlH and Xa21. In the case of pds, the appearance of white streaks in the emerging leaves, and for chlH, chlorophyll levels and F v /F m ratio were assessed as phenotypes for silencing. For Xa21, the resistance levels to BLB were assessed by measuring the lesion length and the percent diseased areas of leaves, following challenge inoculation with Xanthomonas oryzae. In each case, the RTBV-MVIGS system gave rise to a discernible phenotype indicating the silencing of the respective target gene using condition III (temperature 28 °C, humidity 80% and 1 mM MES and 20 µM acetosyringone in secondary agrobacterium culture), which revealed the robustness of this gene silencing system for rice.

  6. Serum cytokine profiles associated with specific adjuvants used in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccination strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Buglione-Corbett

    Full Text Available In recent years, heterologous prime-boost vaccines have been demonstrated to be an effective strategy for generating protective immunity, consisting of both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against a variety of pathogens including HIV-1. Previous reports of preclinical and clinical studies have shown the enhanced immunogenicity of viral vector or DNA vaccination followed by heterologous protein boost, compared to using either prime or boost components alone. With such approaches, the selection of an adjuvant for inclusion in the protein boost component is expected to impact the immunogenicity and safety of a vaccine. In this study, we examined in a mouse model the serum cytokine and chemokine profiles for several candidate adjuvants: QS-21, Al(OH3, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA and ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, in the context of a previously tested pentavalent HIV-1 Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation, DP6-001. Our data revealed that the candidate adjuvants in the context of the DP6-001 formulation are characterized by unique serum cytokine and chemokine profiles. Such information will provide valuable guidance in the selection of an adjuvant for future AIDS vaccine development, with the ultimate goal of enhancing immunogenicity while minimizing reactogenicity associated with the use of an adjuvant. More significantly, results reported here will add to the knowledge on how to include an adjuvant in the context of a heterologous prime-protein boost vaccination strategy in general.

  7. A DNA hybridization system for labeling of neural stem cells with SPIO nanoparticles for MRI monitoring post-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Edgar Y; Kitamura, Narufumi; Nakai, Ryusuke; Arima, Yusuke; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) demonstrate encouraging results in cell replacement therapy for neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic injury in the central nervous system. Monitor the survival and migration of transplanted cells would provide us important information concerning the performance and integration of the graft during the therapy time course. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow us to monitor the transplanted cells in a non-invasive way. The only requirement is to use an appropriate contrast agent to label the transplanted cells. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are one of the most commonly used contrast agent for MRI detection of transplanted cells. SPIO nanoparticles demonstrated to be suitable for labeling several types of cells including NSCs. However, the current methods for SPIO labeling are non-specific, depending mostly on electrostatic interactions, demanding relatively high SPIO concentration, and long incubation time, which can affect the viability of cells. In this study, we propose a specific and relatively fast method to label NSCs with SPIO nanoparticles via DNA hybridization. Two short single stranded DNAs (ssDNAs), oligo[dT]20 and oligo[dA]20 were conjugated with a lipid molecule and SPIO nanoparticle respectively. The labeling process comprises two simple steps; first the cells are modified to present oligo[dT]20 ssDNA on the cell surface, then the oligo[dA]20 ssDNA conjugated with SPIO nanoparticles are presented to the modified cells to allow the oligo[dT]20-oligo[dA]20 hybridization. The method showed to be non-toxic at concentrations up to 50 μg/mL oligo[dA]20-SPIO nanoparticles. Presence of SPIO nanoparticles at cell surface and cell cytoplasm was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SPIO labeling via DNA hybridization demonstrated to not interfere on NSCs proliferation, aggregates formation, and differentiation. NSCs labeled with SPIO nanoparticles via DNA hybridization system were successfully detected by MRI in vitro as well in vivo. Cells transplanted into the rat brain striatum could be detected by MRI scanning up to 1 month post-transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2016-09-13

    Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. Bacteriophage homologous recombination systems are widely used for in vivo genetic engineering in bacteria. Single- or double-stranded linear DNA substrates containing short flanking homologies to chromosome targets are used to generate precise and accurate genetic modifications when introduced into bacteria expressing phage recombinases. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these recombination systems will facilitate improvements in the technology. Here, two phage-specific systems are shown to require exposure of complementary single-strand homologous targets for efficient recombination; these single-strand regions may be created during DNA replication or by single-strand exonuclease digestion of linear duplex DNA. Previously, in vitro studies reported that these recombinases promote the single-strand annealing of two complementary DNAs and also strand invasion of a single DNA strand into duplex DNA to create a three-stranded region. Here, in vivo experiments show that recombinase-mediated annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA is the predominant recombination pathway in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Thomason et al.

  9. Whole genome semiconductor based sequencing of farmed European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Mediterranean genetic stocks using a DNA pooling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Geraci, Claudia; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Sardina, Maria Teresa; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is an important marine species for commercial and sport fisheries and aquaculture production. Recently, the European sea bass genome has been sequenced and assembled. This resource can open new opportunities to evaluate and monitor variability and identify variants that could contribute to the adaptation to farming conditions. In this work, two DNA pools constructed from cultivated European sea bass were sequenced using a next generation semiconductor sequencing approach based on Ion Proton sequencer. Using the first draft version of the D. labrax genome as reference, sequenced reads obtained a total of about 1.6 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), spread all over the chromosomes. Transition/transversion (Ti/Tv) was equal to 1.28, comparable to what was already reported in Salmon species. A pilot homozygosity analysis across the D. labrax genome using DNA pool sequence datasets indicated that this approach can identify chromosome regions with putative signatures of selection, including genes involved in ion transport and chloride channel functions, amino acid metabolism and circadian clock and related neurological systems. This is the first study that reported genome wide polymorphisms in a fish species obtained with the Ion Proton sequencer. Moreover, this study provided a methodological approach for selective sweep analysis in this species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  11. Dog Days on the Plains : A Preliminary aDNA Analysis of Canid Bones from Southern Alberta and Saskatchewan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholdy, B.P.; Murchie, T.J.; Hacking, K.; Verwoerd, C.

    2017-01-01

    Dogs were an important component of lifeways on the Northern Plains until the reintroduction of the horse following European contact. There has been little investigation into the variability of domesticcanids on the Prairies and the potential of that variability as a proxy for identifying

  12. A DNA based method to detect the grapevine root-rotting fungus Roesleria subterranea in soil and root samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Neuhauser

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Roesleria subterranea causes root rot in grapevine and fruit trees. The fungus has long been underestimated as a weak parasite, but during the last years it has been reported to cause severe damages in German vineyards. Direct, observation-based detection of the parasite is time consuming and destructive, as large parts of the rootstocks have to be uprooted and screened for the tiny, stipitate, hypogeous ascomata of R. subterranea. To facilitate rapid detection in vineyards, protocols to extract DNA from soil samples and grapevine roots, and R.-subterranea-specific PCR primers were designed. Twelve DNA-extraction protocols for soil samples were tested in small-scale experiments, and selected parameters were optimised. A protocol based on ball-mill homogenization, DNA extraction with SDS, skim milk, chloroform, and isopropanol, and subsequent purifi cation of the raw extracts with PVPP-spin-columns was most effective. This DNA extraction protocol was found to be suitable for a wide range of soil-types including clay, loam and humic-rich soils. For DNA extraction from grapevine roots a CTAB-based protocol was more reliable for various grapevine rootstock varieties. Roesleria-subterranea-specific primers for the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA region were developed and tested for their specifi city to DNA extracts from eleven R. subterranea strains isolated from grapevine and fruit trees. No cross reactions were detected with DNA extracts from 44 different species of fungi isolated from vineyard soils. The sensitivity of the species-specifi c primers in combination with the DNA extraction method for soil was high: as little as 100 fg μl-1 R.-subterranea-DNA was suffi cient for a detection in soil samples and plant material. Given that specifi c primers are available, the presented method will also allow quick and large-scale testing for other root pathogens.

  13. The extension of a DNA double helix by an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Sharma, P. K.; Madsen, Charlotte S.

    2013-01-01

    Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand.......Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand....

  14. A DNA investigation into the mysterious disappearance of the Rocky Mountain grasshopper, mega-pest of the 1800s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapco, W; Litzenberger, G

    2004-03-01

    The mysterious extinction of the Rocky Mountain Grasshopper, Melanoplus spretus, a major pest species on the prairies and plains of the 1800s, is truly a remarkable event in the history of agriculture. Recently, we obtained specimens of M. spretus from museums and from 400-year-old glacial deposits in Wyoming. We report success in obtaining mitochondrial DNA sequences from both sources. This permitted us to examine two issues surrounding the species' disappearance. First, a long-standing view that M. spretus and the extant species Melanoplus sanguinipes are (if not phase transforms of one another) sister taxa, is disputed, but cannot be rejected with certainty. Interestingly, there is some evidence that suggests there may be a closer affinity with another member of the Mexicanus species-group, Melanoplus bruneri. Second, because M. spretus still possesses considerable nucleotide diversity (1.15+/-0.19%), a depletion of variation cannot be considered a factor contributing to its demise.

  15. A first prototype of an Invertebrate Chip: Development and Assessment of a DNA microarray as an analytical tool to identify selected marine invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Chitipothu, Srujana

    2008-01-01

    A prototype microarray to identify marine invertebrates was developed. 15 invertebrates belonging to crustacea, mollusca and annelida were collected from the North Sea, Adriatic and the Mediterranean Sea. To extract DNA from different tissues 21 methods were checked and FTA Elute was found out to be the best. Oligonucleotide probes were designed from 16S and COI genes. Two genes are amplified from single DNA template by simplified multiplex PCR. Specificity and sensitivity of the captures was...

  16. A DNA vaccine encoding mutated HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen and GM-CSF and B7.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available He Wang,1 Jiyun Yu,2 Li Li1 1Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, 2Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV is a predominant cause of cervical cancer, and HPV58 is the third most common virus detected in the patients with cervical cancer in Asia. E6 and E7 are the viral oncogenes which are constitutively expressed in HPV-associated tumor cells and can be used as target antigens for related immunotherapy. In this study, we modified the HPV58 E6 and E7 oncogenes to eliminate their oncogenic potential and constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine that coexpresses the sig-HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen in addition to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and B7.1 as molecular adjuvants (PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB for the treatment of HPV58 (+ cancer. Methods: PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB recombinant DNA vaccine was constructed to express a fusion protein containing a signal peptide, a modified HPV58 mE6E7 gene, and human IgG Fc and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchoring sequences using the modified DNA vaccine vector PVAX1-IRES-GM/B7.1 that coexpresses GM-CSF, and B7.1. C57BL/6 mice were challenged by HPV58 E6E7-expressing B16-HPV58 E6E7 cells, followed by immunization by PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB vaccine on days 7, 14, 21 after tumor challenge. The cellular immune responses in immunized mice were assessed by measuring IFN-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation by HPV58 E6E7-GST protein and the lysis of B16-HPV58 E6E7 target cells by splenocytes after restimulation with HPV58 E6E7-GST protein. The antitumor efficacy was evaluated by monitoring the growth of the tumor. Results: PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB elicited varying levels of IFN-lsgdB58onn T-cell immune responses and lysis of target cell in mice in response to the recombinant antigen HPV58 E6E7-GST. Furthermore, the vaccine also induced antitumor responses in the HPV58 (+ B16-HPV58 E6E7 tumor challenge model as evidenced by delayed tumor development. Conclusion: The recombinant DNA vaccine PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB efficiently generates cellular immunity and antitumor efficacy in immunized mice. These data provide a basis for the further study of this recombinant vaccine as a potential candidate vaccine. Keywords: human papillomavirus type 58, E6 gene, E7 gene, DNA vaccine, immunogenicity

  17. UV radiation effects on a DNA repair enzyme: conversion of a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster into a [2Fe-2S] (2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgosa, Filipe; Camacho, Inês; Penas, Daniela; Guilherme, Márcia; Fróis, João; Ribeiro, Paulo A; Tavares, Pedro; Pereira, Alice S

    2015-03-01

    Organisms are often exposed to different types of ionizing radiation that, directly or not, will promote damage to DNA molecules and/or other cellular structures. Because of that, organisms developed a wide range of response mechanisms to deal with these threats. Endonuclease III is one of the enzymes responsible to detect and repair oxidized pyrimidine base lesions. However, the effect of radiation on the structure/function of these enzymes is not clear yet. Here, we demonstrate the effect of UV-C radiation on E. coli endonuclease III through several techniques, namely UV-visible, fluorescence and Mössbauer spectroscopies, as well as SDS-PAGE and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We demonstrate that irradiation with a UV-C source has dramatic consequences on the absorption, fluorescence, structure and functionality of the protein, affecting its [4Fe-4S] cluster and its DNA-binding ability, which results in its inactivation. An UV-C radiation-induced conversion of the [4Fe-4S](2+) into a [2Fe-2S](2+) was observed for the first time and proven by Mössbauer and UV-visible analysis. This work also shows that the DNA-binding capability of endonuclease III is highly dependent of the nuclearity of the endogenous iron-sulfur cluster. Thus, from our point of view, in a cellular context, these results strengthen the argument that cellular sensitivity to radiation can also be due to loss of radiation-induced damage repair ability.

  18. Protective immunity conferred by a DNA adenine methylase deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine when delivered in-water to sheep challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, V L; Heithoff, D M; Mahan, M J; Walker, K H; Hornitzky, M A; Gabor, L; Thomson, P C; Thompson, A; House, J K

    2011-04-27

    Stimulation of acquired immunity to Salmonella in livestock is not feasible in neonates (which can be infected within 24h of birth) and is challenging in feedlots, which typically source animals from diverse locations and vendors. Induction of innate immune mechanisms through mass vaccination of animals upon arrival to feedlots is an alternative approach. Transport, environmental conditions, changes in social grouping, and further handling during feedlot assembly are significant stressors. These factors, as well as concurrent exposure to a diversity of pathogens, contribute to the risk of disease. We have shown that oral immunization of calves with a modified live Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strain, which lacks the DNA adenine methylase gene (S. Typhimurium dam), attenuates the severity of clinical disease, reduces fecal shedding, and promotes clearance of salmonellae following virulent homologous and heterologous challenge. This study examines the safety and efficacy of a S. Typhimurium dam vaccine in sheep via oral delivery in drinking water (ad libitum), as a means to effectively vaccinate large groups of animals. Adult merino sheep were vaccinated in drinking water -28 days, -7 days and 24h pre and 24h post-virulent Salmonella Typhimurium challenge which was administered via the oral route. Significant attenuation of clinical disease (temperature, appetite, and attitude) and reduction in mortality and virulent Salmonella Typhimurium fecal shedding and tissue colonization was observed in animals that received the vaccine 28 and 7 days pre-challenge. Further, vaccination did not pose a risk to stock previously infected with virulent salmonellae as mortalities and clinical disease in sheep vaccinated prior to or following virulent challenge did not differ significantly from the non-vaccinated controls. The capacity of S. Typhimurium dam vaccines delivered in drinking water to protect livestock from virulent Salmonella challenge offers an effective, economical, stressor free Salmonella prophylaxis for intensive livestock production systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome-wide profiling identifies a DNA methylation signature that associates with TET2 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Fazila; Punj, Vasu; Christensen, Jesper Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that the Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) hydroxylases cause DNA demethylation has fundamentally changed the notion of how DNA methylation is regulated. Clonal analysis of the hematopoetic stem cell compartment suggests that TET2 mutations can be early events in hematologic cancers...... and recent investigations have shown TET2 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the detection rates and the types of TET2 mutations vary, and the relation to global methylation patterns has not been investigated. Here, we show TET2 mutations in 12 of 100 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with 7...

  20. A SILAC-based screen for Methyl-CpG binding proteins identifies RBP-J as a DNA methylation and sequence-specific binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie J J Bartels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Methylated DNA is specifically bound by Methyl-CpG Binding Proteins (MBPs. Three different types of MBPs have been identified so far: the Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD family proteins, three BTB/POZ-Zn-finger proteins, and UHRF1. Most of the known MBPs have been identified via homology with the MBD and Zn-finger domains as present in MeCP2 and Kaiso, respectively. It is conceivable that other proteins are capable of recognizing methylated DNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the purpose of identifying novel 'readers' we set up a methyl-CpG pull-down assay combined with stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. In a methyl-CpG pull-down with U937 nuclear extracts, we recovered several known MBPs and almost all subunits of the MBD2/NuRD complex as methylation specific binders, providing proof-of-principle. Interestingly, RBP-J, the transcription factor downstream of Notch receptors, also bound the DNA in a methylation dependent manner. Follow-up pull-downs and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs showed that RBP-J binds methylated DNA in the context of a mutated RBP-J consensus motif. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The here described SILAC/methyl-CpG pull-down constitutes a new approach to identify potential novel DNAme readers and will advance unraveling of the complete methyl-DNA interactome.

  1. The cycad genotoxin MAM modulates brain cellular pathways involved in neurodegenerative disease and cancer in a DNA damage-linked manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen E Kisby

    Full Text Available Methylazoxymethanol (MAM, the genotoxic metabolite of the cycad azoxyglucoside cycasin, induces genetic alterations in bacteria, yeast, plants, insects and mammalian cells, but adult nerve cells are thought to be unaffected. We show that the brains of adult C57BL6 wild-type mice treated with a single systemic dose of MAM acetate display DNA damage (O⁶-methyldeoxyguanosine lesions, O⁶-mG that remains constant up to 7 days post-treatment. By contrast, MAM-treated mice lacking a functional gene encoding the DNA repair enzyme O⁶-mG DNA methyltransferase (MGMT showed elevated O⁶-mG DNA damage starting at 48 hours post-treatment. The DNA damage was linked to changes in the expression of genes in cell-signaling pathways associated with cancer, human neurodegenerative disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. These data are consistent with the established developmental neurotoxic and carcinogenic properties of MAM in rodents. They also support the hypothesis that early-life exposure to MAM-glucoside (cycasin has an etiological association with a declining, prototypical neurodegenerative disease seen in Guam, Japan, and New Guinea populations that formerly used the neurotoxic cycad plant for food or medicine, or both. These findings suggest environmental genotoxins, specifically MAM, target common pathways involved in neurodegeneration and cancer, the outcome depending on whether the cell can divide (cancer or not (neurodegeneration. Exposure to MAM-related environmental genotoxins may have relevance to the etiology of related tauopathies, notably, Alzheimer's disease.

  2. A* protein of bacteriophage [phi]X174 carries an oligonucleotide which it can transfer to the 3-OH of a DNA chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansfeld, A.D.M. van; Teeffelen, H.A.A.M. van; Zandberg, J.; Baas, P.D.; Jansz, H.S.; Veeneman, G.H.; Boom, J.H. van

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriophage φX174 gene A encodes two proteins: gene A protein and A* protein. Purified A* protein acts as a single-stranded, DNA-specific endonuclease which remains covalently attached to the 5′-end of the cleavage site. Incubation of A* protein with the synthetic heptamer CAACTTG or with

  3. Ultrasensitive High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a DNA Adduct of the Carcinogen Benzo[a]pyrene in Human Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, Peter W; Hochalter, J Bradley; Hecht, Stephen S

    2017-12-05

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), an archetypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is classified as "carcinogenic to humans" and is ubiquitous in the environment, as evident by the measurable levels of BaP metabolites in virtually all human urine samples examined. BaP carcinogenicity is believed to occur mainly through its covalent modification of DNA, resulting in the formation of BPDE-N2-dG, an adduct formed between deoxyguanosine and a diol epoxide metabolite of BaP, with subsequent mutation of critical growth control genes. In spite of the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based detection of BPDE-N2-dG in BaP-treated rodents, and indirectly through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence detection of BaP-7,8,9,10-tetraols released from human DNA upon acid hydrolysis, BPDE-N2-dG adducts have rarely if ever been observed directly in human samples using LC-MS techniques, even though sophisticated methodologies have been employed which should have had sufficient sensitivity. With this in mind, we developed a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) methodology employing high-resolution/accurate mass analysis for detecting ultratrace levels of these adducts. These efforts are directly translatable to the development of sensitive detection of other small molecules using trap-based LC-ESI-MS/MS detection. The developed methodology had a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 amol of BPDE-N2-dG on-column, corresponding to 1 BPDE-N2-dG adduct per 1011 nucleotides (1 adduct per 10 human lung cells) using 40 μg of human lung DNA. To our knowledge, this is the most sensitive DNA adduct quantitation method yet reported, exceeding the sensitivity of the 32P-postlabeling assay (∼1 adduct per 1010 nucleotides). Twenty-nine human lung DNA samples resulted in 20 positive measurements above the LOD, with smoker and nonsmoker DNA containing 3.1 and 1.3 BPDE-N2-dG adducts per 1011 nucleotides, respectively.

  4. Interplay of nonlinearity and geometry in a DNA-related, Klein-Gordon model with long-range dipole-dipole interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archilla, J. F.R.; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2002-01-01

    Most of the studies on mathematical models of DNA are limited to next neighbor interaction. However, the coupling between base pairs is thought to be caused by dipole interaction, and, when the DNA strand is bent, the distances between base pairs become shorter, therefore the interactions with di...

  5. Studies of monocytopoiesis in patients with malignant disease and after imunostimulation with BCG, using /sup 3/H-thymidine as a DNA-label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, E.; Meuret, G.; Waldermann, F.; Hoffmann, G.

    1982-04-01

    Monocytopoiesis and blood monocytes were investigated in patients with Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, mycosis fungoides, breast cancer or melanoma. The investigation was carried out before surgery and just before each application of BCG. Monocyte production was increased in untreated patients. Postoperative prophylactic BCG-vaccination gave rise to increased proliferation activity. However monocyte production returned to normal between the 4th and 6th month of BCG immunotherapy. These results indicate that monocytopoiesis is stimulated by human tumors. BCG immunostimulation is able to increase proliferation activity during the first month of treatment only.

  6. Suppression of thermosensitive initiation of DNA replication in a dnaR mutant of Escherichia coli by a rifampin resistance mutation in the rpoB gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakakibara, Y

    1995-01-01

    The thermosensitivity of the Escherichia coli dnaR130 mutant in initiation of DNA replication was suppressed by a spontaneous rifampin resistance mutation in rpoB, the gene for the beta subunit of RNA polymerase. Among the dnaR-suppressing rpoB alleles obtained was rpoB22, which was able to suppress the thermosensitivity of the dnaA46 or dnaA167 mutant, but not that of the dnaA5 mutant, in initiation of replication. Some dnaA-suppressing rpoB alleles obtained from rifampin-resistant derivativ...

  7. Comparison of four species-delimitation methods applied to a DNA barcode data set of insect larvae for use in routine bioassessment for use in routine bioassessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species delimitation (grouping individuals into distinct taxonomic groups) is an essential part of evolutionary, conservation, and molecular ecology. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcodes, short fragments of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, are being used in environm...

  8. Opening the treasure chest: A DNA-barcoding primer set for most higher taxa of Central European birds and mammals from museum collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffer, Sylvia; Zachos, Frank E; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    DNA-barcoding is a rapidly developing method for efficiently identifying samples to species level by means of short standard DNA sequences. However, reliable species assignment requires the availability of a comprehensive DNA barcode reference library, and hence numerous initiatives aim at generating such barcode databases for particular taxa or geographic regions. Historical museum collections represent a potentially invaluable source for the DNA-barcoding of many taxa. This is particularly true for birds and mammals, for which collecting fresh (voucher) material is often very difficult to (nearly) impossible due to the special animal welfare and conservation regulations that apply to vertebrates in general, and birds and mammals in particular. Moreover, even great efforts might not guarantee sufficiently complete sampling of fresh material in a short period of time. DNA extracted from historical samples is usually degraded, such that only short fragments can be amplified, rendering the recovery of the barcoding region as a single fragment impossible. Here, we present a new set of primers that allows the efficient amplification and sequencing of the entire barcoding region in most higher taxa of Central European birds and mammals in six overlapping fragments, thus greatly increasing the value of historical museum collections for generating DNA barcode reference libraries. Applying our new primer set in recently established NGS protocols promises to further increase the efficiency of barcoding old bird and mammal specimens.

  9. [Decreased survivability and a DNA repair defect in the cells of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome under the action of radiation and chemical mutagens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, I M; Pleskach, N M; Mikhel'son, V M; Bootsma, D; Kolman, A

    1997-01-01

    The action of ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens--epoxides (ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, epichlorohydrin)--upon survival and repair processes in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP2SP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS1SP) patients' cells was studied, compared to healthy donor's cells VH-10 and C5RO. Ionizing radiation was demonstrated to enhance significantly higher survival decrease of XP2SP and CS1SP fibroblasts, compared to healthy donor's cells, according to the cloning efficiency criterion. In contrast to this, no significant difference between XP2SP and healthy donor's cells was found, according to cells' ability to replicative DNA synthesis after gamma irradiation. Differences in survival of mutant cells and healthy donor's cells after treatment by epoxides were found significant only following XP2SP being treated by ethylene oxide. DNA single-string breaks in XP2SP and in CS1SP cells treated by mutagens studied were proved to occur with the same frequency as in the DNA of the control cells; however the DNA repair according to this criterion was significantly suppressed in mutant cells.

  10. A polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine induces heterologous immunity and protects pigs against pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Mette Sif

    2013-01-01

    The composition of current influenza protein vaccines has to be reconsidered every season to match the circulating influenza viruses, continuously changing antigenicity. Thus, influenza vaccines inducing a broad cross-reactive immune response would be a great advantage for protection against both...... seasonal and emerging influenza viruses. We have developed an alternative influenza vaccine based on DNA expressing selected influenza proteins of pandemic and seasonal origin. In the current study, we investigated the protection of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in pigs. We immunised pigs...... intradermally with a combination of influenza DNA vaccine components based on the pandemic 1918 H1N1 (M and NP genes), pandemic 2009 H1N1pdm09 (HA and NA genes) and seasonal 2005 H3N2 genes (HA and NA genes) and investigated the protection against infection with virus both homologous and heterologous to the DNA...

  11. Building-Up of a DNA Barcode Library for True Bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera) of Germany Reveals Taxonomic Uncertainties and Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Michael J.; Hendrich, Lars; Küchler, Stefan M.; Deister, Fabian; Morinière, Jérome; Gossner, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years, DNA barcoding has become an efficient method for the identification of species. In the case of insects, most published DNA barcoding studies focus on species of the Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Hymenoptera and especially Lepidoptera. In this study we test the efficiency of DNA barcoding for true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera), an ecological and economical highly important as well as morphologically diverse insect taxon. As part of our study we analyzed DNA barcodes for 1742 specimens of 457 species, comprising 39 families of the Heteroptera. We found low nucleotide distances with a minimum pairwise K2P distance 2.2% were detected for 16 traditionally recognized and valid species. With a successful identification rate of 91.5% (418 species) our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of true bugs and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for true bugs in Germany and Central Europe as well. Our study also highlights the urgent necessity of taxonomic revisions for various taxa of the Heteroptera, with a special focus on various species of the Miridae. In this context we found evidence for on-going hybridization events within various taxonomically challenging genera (e.g. Nabis Latreille, 1802 (Nabidae), Lygus Hahn, 1833 (Miridae), Phytocoris Fallén, 1814 (Miridae)) as well as the putative existence of cryptic species (e.g. Aneurus avenius (Duffour, 1833) (Aradidae) or Orius niger (Wolff, 1811) (Anthocoridae)). PMID:25203616

  12. Development of a DNA-extraction method from cereal samples for PCR-detection and identification of potentially thricothecene-producing Fusarium species.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammar, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Unwanted fungal growth is one of the most common causes of food spoilage throughout the world, and is causing health risks for both humans and animals and economical losses for the food- and agricultural industries. In Europe the mycotoxin producing Fusarium species F. sporotrichioides, F. culmorum, F. poae and F. graminearum is of greatest importance, due to their production of the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) among other mycotoxins. Today’s conventional determination methods of these ...

  13. Intraspleen Delivery of a DNA Vaccine Coding for Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) of Brucella abortus Induces SOD-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Montesino, Carola; Andrews, Edilia; Rivers, Rodolfo; González-Smith, Andrés; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Folch, Hugo; Céspedes, Sandra; Oñate, Angel A.

    2004-01-01

    In the development of vaccines capable of providing immunity against brucellosis, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been demonstrated to be one of the protective immunogens of Brucella abortus. In an earlier study, we provided strong evidence that intramuscular injection with a plasmid DNA carrying the SOD gene (pcDNA-SOD) was able to induce a protective immune response. The present study was designed to characterize T-cell immune responses after an intraspleen (i.s.) vaccination of BALB/c mice with pcDNA-SOD. Animals vaccinated with pcDNA-SOD did not develop SOD-specific antibodies, at least until week 4 after immunization (the end of the experiment), and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with either recombinant Cu-Zn SOD or crude Brucella protein induced the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), but not interleukin-4, and elicited the induction of cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte activity. Upon analyzing the SOD-specific T-cell responses, the pcDNA-SOD vaccination was found to be stimulating both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell populations. However, only the CD4+ population was able to produce IFN-γ and only the CD8+ population was able to induce cytotoxic activity. Nevertheless, although i.s. route vaccination induces a significant level of protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with the virulent B. abortus strain 2308, vaccination by the intramuscular route with a similar amount of plasmid DNA does not protect. Based on these results, we conclude that i.s. immunization with pcDNA-SOD vaccine efficiently induced a Th1 type of immune response and a protective response that could be related to IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity against infected cells by SOD-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. PMID:15039330

  14. A DNA fragment from the human X chromosome short arm which detects a partially homologous sequence on the Y chromosomes long arm.

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, M; Camerino, G.; Heilig, R; Mandel, J L

    1984-01-01

    An X linked human DNA fragment (named DXS31 ) which detects partially homologous sequences on the Y chromosome has been isolated. Regional localisation of the two sex linked sequences was determined using a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. The X specific sequence is located at the tip of the short arm ( Xp22 .3-pter), i.e. within or close to the region which pairs with the Y chromosome short arm at meiosis. However the Y specific sequence is located in the heterochromatic region of...

  15. A DNA fragment from the human X chromosome short arm which detects a partially homologous sequence on the Y chromosomes long arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M; Camerino, G; Heilig, R; Mandel, J L

    1984-05-25

    An X linked human DNA fragment (named DXS31 ) which detects partially homologous sequences on the Y chromosome has been isolated. Regional localisation of the two sex linked sequences was determined using a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. The X specific sequence is located at the tip of the short arm ( Xp22 .3-pter), i.e. within or close to the region which pairs with the Y chromosome short arm at meiosis. However the Y specific sequence is located in the heterochromatic region of the long arm ( Yq11 -qter) and lies outside from the pairing region. DNAs from several XX male subjects were probed with DXS31 and in all cases a double dose of the X linked fragment was found, and the Y specific fragment was absent. DXS31 detects in chimpanzee a male-female differential pattern identical to that found in man. However results obtained in a more distantly related species, the brown lemur, suggest that the sequences detected by DXS31 in this species might be autosomally coded. The features observed with these X-Y related sequences do not fit with that expected from current hypotheses of homology between the pairing regions of the two sex chromosomes, nor with the pattern observed with other X-Y homologous sequences recently characterized. Our results suggest also that the rule of conservation of X linkage in mammals might not apply to sequences present on the tip of the X chromosome short arm, in bearing with the controversial issue of steroid sulfatase localisation in mouse.

  16. Targeting Herpes Simplex Virus-1 gD by a DNA Aptamer Can Be an Effective New Strategy to Curb Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejabhiram Yadavalli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 is an important factor for vision loss in developed countries. A challenging aspect of the ocular infection by HSV-1 is that common treatments, such as acyclovir, fail to provide effective topical remedies. Furthermore, it is not very clear whether the viral glycoproteins, required for HSV-1 entry into the host, can be targeted for an effective therapy against ocular herpes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that HSV-1 envelope glycoprotein gD, which is essential for viral entry and spread, can be specifically targeted by topical applications of a small DNA aptamer to effectively control ocular infection by the virus. Our 45-nt-long DNA aptamer showed high affinity for HSV-1 gD (binding affinity constant [Kd] = 50 nM, which is strong enough to disrupt the binding of gD to its cognate host receptors. Our studies showed significant restriction of viral entry and replication in both in vitro and ex vivo studies. In vivo experiments in mice also resulted in loss of ocular infection under prophylactic treatment and statistically significant lower infection under therapeutic modality compared to random DNA controls. Thus, our studies validate the possibility that targeting HSV-1 entry glycoproteins, such as gD, can locally reduce the spread of infection and define a novel DNA aptamer-based approach to control HSV-1 infection of the eye.

  17. A DNA enzyme targeting Egr-1 inhibits rat vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by down-regulation of cyclin D1 and TGF-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that a synthetic DNA enzyme targeting early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1 can inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following vascular injury. However, the detailed mechanism of this inhibition is not known. Thus, the objective of the present study was to further investigate potential inhibitory mechanisms. Catalytic DNA (ED5 and scrambled control DNA enzyme (ED5SCR were synthesized and transfected into primary cultures of rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. VSMC proliferation and DNA synthesis were analyzed by the MTT method and BrdU staining, respectively. Egr-1, TGF-β1, p53, p21, Bax, and cyclin D1 expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Apoptosis and cell cycle assays were performed by FACS. Green fluorescence could be seen localized in the cytoplasm of 70.6 ± 1.52 and 72 ± 2.73% VSMCs 24 h after transfection of FITC-labeled ED5 and ED5SCR, respectively. We found that transfection with ED5 significantly inhibited cultured VSMC proliferation in vitro after 24, 48, and 72 h of serum stimulation, and also effectively decreased the uptake of BrdU by VSMC. ED5 specifically reduced serum-induced Egr-1 expression in VSMCs, further down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1 and TGF-β1, and arrested the cells at G0/G1, inhibiting entry into the S phase. FACS analysis indicated that there was no significant difference in the rate of apoptosis between ED5- and ED5SCR-transfected cells. Thus, ED5 can specifically inhibit Egr-1 expression, and probably inhibits VSMC proliferation by down-regulating the expressions of cyclin D1 and TGF-β1. However, ED5 has no effect on VSMC apoptosis.

  18. Genome-wide Anaplasma phagocytophilum AnkA-DNA interactions are enriched in intergenic regions and gene promoters and correlate with infection-induced differential gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Stephen Dumler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular prokaryote, infects neutrophils and alters cardinal functions via reprogrammed transcription. Large contiguous regions of neutrophil chromosomes are differentially expressed during infection. Secreted A. phagocytophilum effector AnkA transits into the neutrophil or granulocyte nucleus to complex with DNA in heterochromatin across all chromosomes. AnkA binds to gene promoters to dampen cis-transcription and also has features of matrix attachment region (MAR-binding proteins that regulate three-dimensional chromatin architecture and coordinate transcriptional programs encoded in topologically-associated chromatin domains. We hypothesize that identification of additional AnkA binding sites will better delineate how A. phagocytophilum infection results in reprogramming of the neutrophil genome. Using AnkA-binding ChIP-seq, we showed that AnkA binds broadly throughout all chromosomes in a reproducible pattern, especially at: i intergenic regions predicted to be matrix attachment regions (MARs; ii within predicted lamina-associated domains; and iii at promoters ≤3,000 bp upstream of transcriptional start sites. These findings provide genome-wide support for AnkA as a regulator of cis-gene transcription. Moreover, the dominant mark of AnkA in distal intergenic regions known to be AT-enriched, coupled with frequent enrichment in the nuclear lamina, provides strong support for its role as a MAR-binding protein and genome re-organizer. AnkA must be considered a prime candidate to promote neutrophil reprogramming and subsequent functional changes that belie improved microbial fitness and pathogenicity.

  19. Selection and characterization of a DNA aptamer that can discriminate between cJun/cJun and cJun/cFos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D Walters

    Full Text Available The AP-1 family of transcriptional activators plays pivotal roles in regulating a wide range of biological processes from the immune response to tumorigenesis. Determining the roles of specific AP-1 dimers in cells, however, has remained challenging because common molecular biology techniques are unable to distinguish between the role of, for example, cJun/cJun homodimers versus cJun/cFos heterodimers. Here we used SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment to identify and characterize DNA aptamers that are >100-fold more specific for binding cJun/cJun compared to cJun/cFos, setting the foundation to investigate the biological functions of different AP-1 dimer compositions.

  20. Search for genes essential for pneumococcal transformation : The RadA DNA repair protein plays a role in genomic recombination of donor DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghout, Peter; Bootsma, Hester J.; Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.; de Jongh, Christa E.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    We applied a novel negative selection strategy called genomic array footprinting (GAF) to identify genes required for genetic transformation of the gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Genome-wide mariner transposon mutant libraries in S. pneumoniae strain R6 were challenged by

  1. A DNA-Encapsulated and Fluorescent Ag 10 6+ Cluster with a Distinct Metal-Like Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, Jeffrey T.; Ganguly, Mainak; Rankine, Ian J.; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Zhang, Peng (Dalhousie U.); (Furman)

    2017-06-29

    Silver cluster–DNA complexes are optical chromophores, and pairs of these conjugates can be toggled from fluorescently dim to bright states using DNA hybridization. This paper highlights spectral and structural differences for a specific cluster pair. We have previously characterized a cluster with low emission and violet absorption that forms a compact structure with single-stranded oligonucleotides. We now consider its counterpart with blue absorption and strong green emission. This cluster develops with a single-stranded/duplex DNA construct and is favored by low silver concentrations with ≲8 Ag+:DNA, an oxygen atmosphere, and neutral pH. The resulting cluster displays key signatures of a molecular metal with well-defined absorption/emission bands at 490/550 nm, and with a fluorescence quantum yield of 15% and lifetime of 2.4 ns. The molecular cluster conjugates with the larger DNA host because it chromatographically elutes with the DNA and it exhibits circular dichroism. The silver cluster is identified as Ag106+ using two modes of mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. Our key finding is that it adopts a low-dimensional shape, as determined from a Ag K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The Ag0 in this oxidized cluster segregates from the Ag+ via a sparse number of metal-like bonds and a denser network of silver–DNA bonds. This structure contrasts with the compact, octahedral-like shape of the violet counterpart to the blue cluster, which is also a Ag106+ species. We consider that the blue- and violet-absorbing clusters may be isomers with shapes that are controlled by the secondary structures of their DNA templates.

  2. Unbiased mutagenesis of MHV68 LANA reveals a DNA-binding domain required for LANA function in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton R Paden

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA, encoded by ORF73, is a conserved gene among the γ2-herpesviruses (rhadinoviruses. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV LANA is consistently expressed in KSHV-associated malignancies. In the case of the rodent γ2-herpesvirus, murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68, the LANA homolog (mLANA is required for efficient virus replication, reactivation from latency and immortalization of murine fetal liver-derived B cells. To gain insights into mLANA function(s, knowing that KSHV LANA binds DNA and can modulate transcription of a variety of promoters, we sought out and identified a mLANA-responsive promoter which maps to the terminal repeat (TR of MHV68. Notably, mLANA strongly repressed activity from this promoter. We extended these analyses to demonstrate direct, sequence-specific binding of recombinant mLANA to TR DNA by DNase I footprinting. To assess whether the DNA-binding and/or transcription modulating function is important in the known mLANA phenotypes, we generated an unbiased library of mLANA point mutants using error-prone PCR, and screened a large panel of mutants for repression of the mLANA-responsive promoter to identify loss of function mutants. Notably, among the mutant mLANA proteins recovered, many of the mutations are in a predicted EBNA-1-like DNA-binding domain. Consistent with this prediction, those tested displayed loss of DNA binding activity. We engineered six of these mLANA mutants into the MHV68 genome and tested the resulting mutant viruses for: (i replication fitness; (ii efficiency of latency establishment; and (iii reactivation from latency. Interestingly, each of these mLANA-mutant viruses exhibited phenotypes similar to the mLANA-null mutant virus, indicating that DNA-binding is critical for mLANA function.

  3. Solution-state Structure of a DNA Dodecamer Duplex Containing a Cis-syn Thymine Cyclobutane Dimer, the Major UV Photoproduct of DNA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAteer, Kathleen; Jing, Y; Kao, J; Taylor, J S.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    1998-10-09

    The solution structures of a duplex DNA dodecamer containing a cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimer d(GCACGAAT[cs]TAAG).d(CTTAATTCG TGC) and its native parent sequence were determined using NMR data collected at 750 MHz. The dodecamer sequence corresponds to the section of a site-specific cis-syn dimer containing 49-mer that was found to be the binding site for the dimer-specific T4 denV endonuclease V repair enzyme by chemical and enzymatic footprinting experiments. Structures of both sequences were derived from NOE restrained molecular dynamics/simulated annealing calculations using a fixed outer layer of water and an inner dynamic layer of water with sodium counterions. The resulting structures reveal a subtle distortion to the phosphodiester backbone in the dimer-containing sequence which includes a BII phosphate at the T9pA10 junction immediately 3' to the dimer. The BII phosphate, established experimentally by analysis of the 31P chemical shifts and interpretation of the 3JP-H3' values using an optimized Karplus relationship, enables the DNA helix to accommodate the dimer by destacking the base 3' to the dimer. Furthermore, the structures provide explanations for the unusually shifted T8-N3H imino, A16-H2 and T8-Me proton resonances and T9pA10 (31)P NMR resonance and are consistent with bending, unwinding, and thermodynamic data.

  4. Identification and characterization of PhbF: A DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrosa Fabio O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. Results In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Conclusions Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta.

  5. The effect of S-substitution at the O6-guanine site on the structure and dynamics of a DNA oligomer containing a G:T mismatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Ann Moore

    Full Text Available The effect of S-substitution on the O6 guanine site of a 13-mer DNA duplex containing a G:T mismatch is studied using molecular dynamics. The structure, dynamic evolution and hydration of the S-substituted duplex are compared with those of a normal duplex, a duplex with S-substitution on guanine, but no mismatch and a duplex with just a G:T mismatch. The S-substituted mismatch leads to cell death rather than repair. One suggestion is that the G:T mismatch recognition protein recognises the S-substituted mismatch (GS:T as G:T. This leads to a cycle of futile repair ending in DNA breakage and cell death. We find that some structural features of the helix are similar for the duplex with the G:T mismatch and that with the S-substituted mismatch, but differ from the normal duplex, notably the helical twist. These differences arise from the change in the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the base pair. However a marked feature of the S-substituted G:T mismatch duplex is a very large opening. This showed considerable variability. It is suggested that this enlarged opening would lend support to an alternative model of cell death in which the mismatch protein attaches to thioguanine and activates downstream damage-response pathways. Attack on the sulphur by reactive oxygen species, also leading to cell death, would also be aided by the large, variable opening.

  6. Methyl thiophanate as a DNA minor groove binder produces MT-Cu(II)-DNA ternary complex preferably with AT rich region for initiation of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Alarifi, Saud A; Dutta, Sansa; Dasgupta, Swagata; Musarrat, Javed

    2010-07-01

    Interaction of a genotoxic fungicide methyl thiophanate (MT) has been studied in vitro with calf thymus DNA. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (K(a)=3.23 x 10(4)M(-1)) and binding capacity (n=1.1) of MT with ctDNA. Ligand displacement studies using specific probes suggested the MT binding at DNA minor groove. The docking analysis further substantiated MT interaction with at least three AT base pairs within the DNA groove. A discernable change in E(0)' value with decreased peak currents in cyclic voltammogram, and peak shifts in CD spectra reflected the formation of MT-ctDNA and MT-ctDNA-Cu(II) complexes. The results elucidate the significance of specific MT-DNA interactions as an initiating event in MT-induced DNA damage. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Genomic "dactyloscopy" with the use of bacteriophage M13 as a DNA probe (the expertise of material evidence and personal identification)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, P L; Gurtovaia, S V; Plaksin, V O; Verbovaia, L V; Ryskov, A P

    1989-01-01

    In this article the authors give a scientific evaluation of genetic dactyloscopy method in which the sites of human chromosomal DNA, possessing structural polymorphism, act as genetic markers. Technology of genome "dactyloscopy" including both the series of standard conventional methods and new methods is presented. The method is highly sensitive and requires small amounts of material for investigation. A practical case is described when genome "dactyloscopy" gave positive results which led to a conclusion on suspect's involvement in the crime.

  8. A DNA fragment from Xq21 replaces a deleted region containing the entire FVIII gene in a severe hemophilia A patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murru, S.; Casula, L.; Moi, P. [Insituto di Clinica e Biologia dell` Eta Evolutiva, Cagliari (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    In this paper the authors report the molecular characterization of a large deletion that removes the entire Factor VIII gene in a severe hemophilia A patient. Accurate DNA analysis of the breakpoint region revealed that a large DNA fragment replaced the 300-kb one, which was removed by the deletion. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the size of the inserted fragment is about 550 kb. In situ hybridization demonstrated that part of the inserted region normally maps to Xq21 and to the tip of the short arm of the Y chromosome (Yp). In this patient this locus is present both in Xq21 and in Xq28, in addition to the Yp, being thus duplicated in the X chromosome. Sequence analysis of the 3` breakpoint suggested that an illegitimate recombination is probably the cause of this complex rearrangement. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Didier J; Hain, Karolina O; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies.

  10. Design and performance testing of a DNA extraction assay for sensitive and reliable quantification of acetic acid bacteria directly in red wine using real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eLONGIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although strategies exist to prevent AAB contamination, the increased interest for wines with low sulfite addition leads to greater AAB spoilage. Hence there is a real need for a rapid, specific, sensitive and reliable method for detecting these spoilage bacteria. All these requirements are met by real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (or quantitative PCR; qPCR. Here, we compare existing methods of isolating DNA and their adaptation to a red wine matrix. Two different protocols for isolating DNA and three PCR mix compositions were tested to select the best method. The addition of insoluble polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP at 1% (v/v during DNA extraction using a protocol succeeded in eliminating PCR inhibitors from red wine. We developed a bacterial internal control which was efficient in avoiding false negative results due to decreases in the efficiency of DNA isolation and/or amplification. The specificity, linearity, repeatability and reproducibility of the method were evaluated. A standard curve was established for the enumeration of AAB inoculated into red wines. The limit of quantification in red wine was 3.7 log AAB/mL and about 2.8 log AAB/mL when the volume of the samples was increased from 1 mL to 10 mL. Thus the DNA extraction method developed in this paper allows sensitive and reliable AAB quantification without underestimation thanks to the presence of an internal control. Moreover, monitoring of both the AAB population and the amount of acetic acid in ethanol medium and red wine highlighted that a minimum about 6.0 log cells/mL of AAB is needed to significantly increase the production of acetic acid leading to spoilage.

  11. Development and applications of a DNA labeling method with magnetic nanoparticles to study the role of horizontal gene transfer events between bacteria in soil pollutant bioremediation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetal, J; Frénéa-Robin, M; Haddour, N; Vézy, C; Zanini, L F; Ciuta, G; Dempsey, N M; Dumas-Bouchiat, F; Reyne, G; Bégin-Colin, S; Felder-Flesh, D; Ghobril, C; Pourroy, G; Simonet, P

    2015-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfers are critical mechanisms of bacterial evolution and adaptation that are involved to a significant level in the degradation of toxic molecules such as xenobiotic pesticides. However, understanding how these mechanisms are regulated in situ and how they could be used by man to increase the degradation potential of soil microbes is compromised by conceptual and technical limitations. This includes the physical and chemical complexity and heterogeneity in such environments leading to an extreme bacterial taxonomical diversity and a strong redundancy of genes and functions. In addition, more than 99 % of soil bacteria fail to develop colonies in vitro, and even new DNA-based investigation methods (metagenomics) are not specific and sensitive enough to consider lysis recalcitrant bacteria and those belonging to the rare biosphere. The objective of the ANR funded project “Emergent” was to develop a new culture independent approach to monitor gene transfer among soil bacteria by labeling plasmid DNA with magnetic nanoparticles in order to specifically capture and isolate recombinant cells using magnetic microfluidic devices. We showed the feasibility of the approach by using electrotransformation to transform a suspension of Escherichia coli cells with biotin-functionalized plasmid DNA molecules linked to streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Our results have demonstrated that magnetically labeled cells could be specifically retained on micromagnets integrated in a microfluidic channel and that an efficient selective separation can be achieved with the microfluidic device. Altogether, the project offers a promising alternative to traditional culture-based approaches for deciphering the extent of horizontal gene transfer events mediated by electro or natural genetic transformation mechanisms in complex environments such as soil.

  12. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 sensitizes PC-3 prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by a DNA-PK-independent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McBride William H

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By modulating the expression levels of specific signal transduction molecules, the 26S proteasome plays a central role in determining cell cycle progression or arrest and cell survival or death in response to stress stimuli, including ionizing radiation. Inhibition of proteasome function by specific drugs results in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and radiosensitization of many cancer cell lines. This study investigates whether there is also a concomitant increase in cellular radiosensitivity if proteasome inhibition occurs only transiently before radiation. Further, since proteasome inhibition has been shown to activate caspase-3, which is involved in apoptosis, and caspase-3 can cleave DNA-PKcs, which is involved in DNA-double strand repair, the hypothesis was tested that caspase-3 activation was essential for both apoptosis and radiosensitization following proteasome inhibition. Methods Prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells were treated with the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG-132. Cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, DNA-PKcs protein levels and DNA-PK activity were monitored. Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Results Inhibition of proteasome function caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis but this did not involve early activation of caspase-3. Short-time inhibition of proteasome function also caused radiosensitization but this did not involve a decrease in DNA-PKcs protein levels or DNA-PK activity. Conclusion We conclude that caspase-dependent cleavage of DNA-PKcs during apoptosis does not contribute to the radiosensitizing effects of MG-132.

  13. Archaeal DNA Polymerase-B as a DNA Template Guardian: Links between Polymerases and Base/Alternative Excision Repair Enzymes in Handling the Deaminated Bases Uracil and Hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Abellón-Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Archaea repair of uracil and hypoxanthine, which arise by deamination of cytosine and adenine, respectively, is initiated by three enzymes: Uracil-DNA-glycosylase (UDG, which recognises uracil; Endonuclease V (EndoV, which recognises hypoxanthine; and Endonuclease Q (EndoQ, (which recognises both uracil and hypoxanthine. Two archaeal DNA polymerases, Pol-B and Pol-D, are inhibited by deaminated bases in template strands, a feature unique to this domain. Thus the three repair enzymes and the two polymerases show overlapping specificity for uracil and hypoxanthine. Here it is demonstrated that binding of Pol-D to primer-templates containing deaminated bases inhibits the activity of UDG, EndoV, and EndoQ. Similarly Pol-B almost completely turns off EndoQ, extending earlier work that demonstrated that Pol-B reduces catalysis by UDG and EndoV. Pol-B was observed to be a more potent inhibitor of the enzymes compared to Pol-D. Although Pol-D is directly inhibited by template strand uracil, the presence of Pol-B further suppresses any residual activity of Pol-D, to near-zero levels. The results are compatible with Pol-D acting as the replicative polymerase and Pol-B functioning primarily as a guardian preventing deaminated base-induced DNA mutations.

  14. MicroRNA expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein gene of Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia caused by a fish rhabdovirus, Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), results in significant mortality in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum). Although the disease had been eradicated in Denmark, wildlife marine reservoir of VHSV poses a threat parti...

  15. Construction of a DNA library representing 15q11-13 by subtraction of two flow sorted marker chromosome-specific libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, E.; Werelius, B.; Nordenskjoeld, M. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Constitutional extra {open_quotes}marker chromosomes{close_quotes} are found in {approx}0.5/1000 of newborns. Of these, 50% are inverted duplications of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15, including two variants; (1) inv dup(15)(pter{yields}q11:q11{yields}pter) and (2) inv dup(15) (pter{yields}q12-13::q12-13{yields}pter). Variant (1) is found in phenotypically normal individuals, whereas variant (2) will produce a typical clinical picture including mental retardation, autism, hyperactivity and discrete dysmorphic features. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using single copy probes from the Prader-Willi region confirms these observations as well as chromosome painting using a flow-sorted marker chromosome-specific library from a variant (1) marker, hybridized to the chromosomes of a patient with a variant (2) marker chromosome. Followingly, a flow-sorted biotinylated variant (1) library was subtracted from a non-labeled variant (2) library using magnetic beads and subsequent amplification by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). The successful result was demonstrated by using the amplified material for chromosome painting on chromosome slides from variant (1) and variant (2) patients. We have constructed a library from 15q11-13. This region contains genes producing a specific abnormal phenotype when found in a tri- or tetrasomic state. The region also contains the genes responsible for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes when the paternal/maternal copy is missing, respectively. It is therefore a region where parental imprinting plays an important role. The isolated library may be used to isolate single copy clones which will allow further investigations of this region.

  16. Characterization of a DNA sequence family in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, B.; Knoblauch, H.; Buiting, K.; Horsthemke, B. (Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany))

    1993-04-01

    IR4-3R (D15S11) is an anonymous DNA sequence from human chromosome 15. Using YAC cloning and restriction enzyme analysis, the authors have found that IR4-3R detects five related DNA sequences, which are spread over 700 kb within the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q 13. The RsaI and StyI polymorphisms, which were described previously, are associated with the most proximal copy of IR4-3R and are in strong linkage disequilibrium. IR4-3R represents the third DNA sequence family that has been identified in 15q11-q13. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Recombinant Invasive Lactococcus lactis Carrying a DNA Vaccine Coding the Ag85A Antigen Increases INF-γ, IL-6, and TNF-α Cytokines after Intranasal Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Mancha-Agresti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major threat throughout the world and in 2015 it caused the death of 1.4 million people. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin is the only existing vaccine against this ancient disease; however, it does not provide complete protection in adults. New vaccines against TB are eminently a global priority. The use of bacteria as vehicles for delivery of vaccine plasmids is a promising vaccination strategy. In this study, we evaluated the use of, an engineered invasive Lactococcus lactis (expressing Fibronectin-Binding Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus for the delivery of DNA plasmid to host cells, especially to the mucosal site as a new DNA vaccine against tuberculosis. One of the major antigens documented that offers protective responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the Ag85A. L. lactis FnBPA+ (pValac:Ag85A which was obtained and used for intranasal immunization of C57BL/6 mice and the immune response profile was evaluated. In this study we observed that this strain was able to produce significant increases in the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the stimulated spleen cell supernatants, showing a systemic T helper 1 (Th1 cell response. Antibody production (IgG and sIgA anti-Ag85A was also significantly increased in bronchoalveolar lavage, as well as in the serum of mice. In summary, these findings open new perspectives in the area of mucosal DNA vaccine, against specific pathogens using a Lactic Acid Bacteria such as L. lactis.

  18. A DNA Vaccine Encoding a Fatty Acid‐Binding Protein of Clonorchis sinensis Induces Protective Immune Response in Sprague–Dawley Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, J.‐S; Kim, I. S; Sohn, W.‐M; Lee, J; Yong, T.‐S

    2006-01-01

    ..., there is need for alternative, cost‐effective and sustainable strategies, such as a vaccine, for the control of clonorchiasis. Protein‐based vaccines are usually coadministered with immunologic adjuvants which deposit the antigen and stimulate a nonspecific inflammatory response. The most effective adjuvants are often unsuitable for human use because of their to...

  19. Target-stimulated metallic HgS nanostructures on a DNA-based polyion complex membrane for highly efficient impedimetric detection of dissolved hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Junyang; Fu, Libing; Lai, Wenqiang; Tang, Dianping; Chen, Guonan

    2013-12-11

    Target-stimulated metallic HgS nanostructures formed on the DNA-based polyion complex (PIC) membrane were for the first time utilized as an efficient scheme for impedimetric detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by coupling insoluble precipitation with sensitivity enhancement.

  20. Synthesis of Bacteriophage M13-Specific Proteins in a DNA-Dependent Cell-Free System II. In Vitro Synthesis of Biologically Active Gene 5 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Ruud N. H.; Jansen, Josephine; Cuypers, Theo; Schoenmakers, John G. G.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that gene 5 protein of bacteriophage M13 is one of the major proteins synthesized in vitro under the direction of M13 replicative-form DNA. By means of DNA-cellulose chromatography, this protein has been purified to homogeneity and its biological characteristics have been compared with those of its native counterpart. Like native gene 5 protein, the purified, in vitro-synthesized protein binds tightly and selectively to single-stranded, but not to double-stranded, DNAs. These results suggest that truly functional gene 5 protein is made in the cell-free system. Images PMID:4586780

  1. Miscoding properties of 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine, a DNA adduct derived from reaction with antitumor agent 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, Bo; Guliaev, Anton B.; Chenna, Ahmed; Singer, B.

    2003-03-05

    1,N{sup 6}-Ethanoadenine (EA) is an exocyclic adduct formed from DNA reaction with the antitumor agent, 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). To understand the role of this adduct in the mechanism of mutagenicity or carcinogenicity by BCNU, an oligonucleotide with a site-specific EA was synthesized using phosphoramidite chemistry. We now report the in vitro miscoding properties of EA in translesion DNA synthesis catalyzed by mammalian DNA polymerases (pols) {alpha}, {beta}, {eta} and {iota}. These data were also compared with those obtained for the structurally related exocyclic adduct, 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using a primer extension assay, both pols {alpha} and {beta} were primarily blocked by EA or {var_epsilon}A with very minor extension. Pol {eta} a member of the Y family of polymerases, was capable of catalyzing a significant amount of bypass across both adducts. Pol {eta} incorporated all four nucleotides opposite EA and {var_epsilon}A, but with differential preferences and mainly in an error-prone manner. Human pol {iota}, a paralog of human pol {eta}, was blocked by both adducts with a very small amount of synthesis past {var_epsilon}A. It incorporated C and, to a much lesser extent, T, opposite either adduct. In addition, the presence of an A adduct, e.g. {var_epsilon}A, could affect the specificity of pol {iota} toward the template T immediately 3 feet to the adduct. In conclusion, the four polymerases assayed on templates containing an EA or {var_epsilon}A showed differential bypass capacity and nucleotide incorporation specificity, with the two adducts not completely identical in influencing these properties. Although there was a measurable extent of error-free nucleotide incorporation, all these polymerases primarily misincorporated opposite EA, indicating that the adduct, similar to {var_epsilon}A, is a miscoding lesion.

  2. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline

    2015-01-01

    to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages...... expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations...

  3. Targeted delivery and pH-triggered release of a saporin toxin conjugated to transferrin via a DNA i-motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    mechanism was studied by immobilizing the saporin i-motif conjugates on DNA origami, where the release was imaged by atomic force microscopy. In vitro studies demonstrated that the DNA-linked saporin-transferrin conjugates dramatically enhanced cell uptake and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, conjugates that were...

  4. Comparison of monovalent and divalent ion distributions around a DNA duplex with molecular dynamics simulation and a Poisson-Boltzmann approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Timothy J; Ziebarth, Jesse D; Wang, Yongmei

    2014-08-01

    The ion atmosphere created by monovalent (Na(+) ) or divalent (Mg(2+) ) cations surrounding a B-form DNA duplex were examined using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. The ion distributions predicted by the two methods were compared using plots of radial and two-dimensional cation concentrations and by calculating the total number of cations and net solution charge surrounding the DNA. Na(+) ion distributions near the DNA were more diffuse in PB calculations than in corresponding MD simulations, with PB calculations predicting lower concentrations near DNA groove sites and phosphate groups and a higher concentration in the region between these locations. Other than this difference, the Na(+) distributions generated by the two methods largely agreed, as both predicted similar locations of high Na(+) concentration and nearly identical values of the number of cations and the net solution charge at all distances from the DNA. In contrast, there was greater disagreement between the two methods for Mg(2+) cation concentration profiles, as both the locations and magnitudes of peaks in Mg(2+) concentration were different. Despite experimental and simulation observations that Mg(2+) typically maintains its first solvation shell when interacting with nucleic acids, modeling Mg(2+) as an unsolvated ion during PB calculations improved the agreement of the Mg(2+) ion atmosphere predicted by the two methods and allowed for values of the number of bound ions and net solution charge surrounding the DNA from PB calculations that approached the values observed in MD simulations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Activity of Levofloxacin Alone and in Combination with a DnaK Inhibitor against Gram-Negative Rods, Including Levofloxacin-Resistant Strains▿

    OpenAIRE

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml).

  6. A DNA biosensor based on gold nanoparticle decorated on carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gender determination of Arowana fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedfar, Kasra; Heng, Lee Yook; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2017-12-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified to design a new DNA biosensor. Functionalized MWCNTs were equipped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) (~15nm) (GNP-MWCNTCOOH) to construct DNA biosensors based on carbon-paste screen-printed (SPE) electrodes. GNP attachment onto functionalized MWCNTs was carried out by microwave irradiation and was confirmed by spectroscopic studies and surface analysis. DNA biosensors based on differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were constructed by immobilizing thiolated single-stranded DNA probes onto GNP-MWCNTCOOH. Ruthenium (III) chloride hexaammoniate [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ,2Cl - ] (RuHex) was used as hybridization redox indicator. RuHex and MWCNT interaction was low in compared to other organic redox hybridization indicators. The linear response range for DNA determination was 1×10 -21 to 1×10 -9 M with a lower detection limit of 1.55×10 -21 M. Thus, the attachment of GNPs onto functionalized MWCNTs yielded sensitive DNA biosensor with low detection limit and stability more than 30days. Constructed electrode was used to determine gender of arowana fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial transformation: ComFA is a DNA-dependent ATPase that forms complexes with ComFC and DprA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Amy; Foster, Hannah R; Gromek, Katarzyna A; Perry, Thomas N; Dujeancourt, Annick; Krasteva, Petya V; Gubellini, Francesca; Falbel, Tanya G; Burton, Briana M; Fronzes, Rémi

    2017-09-01

    Pneumococcal natural transformation contributes to genomic plasticity, antibiotic resistance development and vaccine escape. Streptococcus pneumoniae, like many other naturally transformable species, has evolved sophisticated protein machinery for the binding and uptake of DNA. Two proteins encoded by the comF operon, ComFA and ComFC, are involved in transformation but their exact molecular roles remain unknown. In this study, we provide experimental evidence that ComFA binds to single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and has ssDNA-dependent ATPase activity. We show that both ComFA and ComFC are essential for the transformation process in pneumococci. Moreover, we show that these proteins interact with each other and with other proteins involved in homologous recombination, such as DprA, thus placing the ComFA-ComFC duo at the interface between DNA uptake and DNA recombination during transformation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Molecular Identification of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus, Scombridae Larvae and Development of a DNA Character-Based Identification Key for Mediterranean Scombrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Neils Puncher

    Full Text Available The Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is a commercially important species that has been severely over-exploited in the recent past. Although the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock is now showing signs of recovery, its current status remains very uncertain and as a consequence their recovery is dependent upon severe management informed by rigorous scientific research. Monitoring of early life history stages can inform decision makers about the health of the species based upon recruitment and survival rates. Misidentification of fish larvae and eggs can lead to inaccurate estimates of stock biomass and productivity which can trigger demands for increased quotas and unsound management conclusions. Herein we used a molecular approach employing mitochondrial and nuclear genes (CO1 and ITS1, respectively to identify larvae (n = 188 collected from three spawning areas in the Mediterranean Sea by different institutions working with a regional fisheries management organization. Several techniques were used to analyze the genetic sequences (sequence alignments using search algorithms, neighbour joining trees, and a genetic character-based identification key and an extensive comparison of the results is presented. During this process various inaccuracies in related publications and online databases were uncovered. Our results reveal important differences in the accuracy of the taxonomic identifications carried out by different ichthyoplanktologists following morphology-based methods. While less than half of larvae provided were bluefin tuna, other dominant taxa were bullet tuna (Auxis rochei, albacore (Thunnus alalunga and little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus. We advocate an expansion of expertise for a new generation of morphology-based taxonomists, increased dialogue between morphology-based and molecular taxonomists and increased scrutiny of public sequence databases.

  9. Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia is phenocopied by the autosomal recessive inheritance of a DNA-binding domain mutation in FLI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, William S; Rabbolini, David J; Beutler, Lucinda; Chen, Qiang; Gabrielli, Sara; Mackay, Joel P; Brighton, Timothy A; Ward, Christopher M; Morel-Kopp, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-22

    Hemizygous deletion of a variable region on chromosome 11q containing FLI1 causes an inherited platelet-related bleeding disorder in Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia and Jacobsen syndrome. These multisystem disorders are also characterized by heart anomalies, changes in facial structure, and intellectual disability. We have identified a consanguineous family with autosomal recessive inheritance of a bleeding disorder that mimics Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia but has no other features of the 11q23 deletion syndrome. Affected individuals in this family have moderate thrombocytopenia; absent collagen-induced platelet aggregation; and large, fused α-granules in 1% to 5% of circulating platelets. This phenotype was caused by a FLI1 homozygous c.970C>T-point mutation that predicts an arginine-to-tryptophan substitution in the conserved ETS DNA-binding domain of FLI1. This mutation caused a transcription defect at the promoter of known FLI1 target genes GP6, GP9, and ITGA2B, as measured by luciferase assay in HEK293 cells, and decreased the expression of these target proteins in affected members of the family as measured by Western blotting of platelet lysates. This kindred suggests abnormalities in FLI1 as causative of Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia and confirms the important role of FLI1 in normal platelet development. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. A novel AP2/ERF family transcription factor from Glycine soja, GsERF71, is a DNA binding protein that positively regulates alkaline stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Duan, Xiangbo; Ding, Xiaodong; Chen, Chao; Zhu, Dan; Yin, Kuide; Cao, Lei; Song, Xuewei; Zhu, Pinghui; Li, Qiang; Nisa, Zaib Un; Yu, Jiyang; Du, Jianying; Song, Yu; Li, Huiqing; Liu, Beidong; Zhu, Yanming

    2017-07-01

    Here we first found that GsERF71, an ERF factor from wild soybean could increase plant alkaline stress tolerance by up-regulating H+-ATPase and by modifing the accumulation of Auxin. Alkaline soils are widely distributed all over the world and greatly limit plant growth and development. In our previous transcriptome analyses, we have identified several ERF (ethylene-responsive factor) genes that responded strongly to bicarbonate stress in the roots of wild soybean G07256 (Glycine soja). In this study, we cloned and functionally characterized one of the genes, GsERF71. When expressed in epidermal cells of onion, GsERF71 localized to the nucleus. It can activate the reporters in yeast cells, and the C-terminus of 170 amino acids is essential for its transactivation activity. Yeast one-hybrid and EMSA assays indicated that GsERF71 specifically binds to the cis-acting elements of the GCC-box, suggesting that GsERF71 may participate in the regulation of transcription of the relevant biotic and abiotic stress-related genes. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GsERF71 showed significantly higher tolerance to bicarbonate stress generated by NaHCO3 or KHCO3 than the wild type (WT) plants, i.e., the transgenic plants had greener leaves, longer roots, higher total chlorophyll contents and lower MDA contents. qRT-PCR and rhizosphere acidification assays indicated that the expression level and activity of H+-ATPase (AHA2) were enhanced in the transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Further analysis indicated that the expression of auxin biosynthetic genes and IAA contents were altered to a lower extent in the roots of transgenic plants than WT plants under alkaline stress in a short-term. Together, our data suggest that GsERF71 enhances the tolerance to alkaline stress by up-regulating the expression levels of H+-ATPase and by modifying auxin accumulation in transgenic plants.

  11. A DNA-Based Encryption Method Based on Two Biological Axioms of DNA Chip and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Amplification Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Wang, Zhiwen; Wang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Xin; Yuan, Xiaojing

    2017-09-27

    Researchers have gained a deeper understanding of DNA-based encryption and its effectiveness in enhancing information security in recent years. However, there are many theoretical and technical issues about DNA-based encryption that need to be addressed before it can be effectively used in the field of security. Currently, the most popular DNA-based encryption schemes are based on traditional cryptography and the integration of existing DNA technology. These schemes are not completely based on DNA computing and biotechnology. Herein, as inspired by nature, encryption based on DNA has been developed, which is, in turn, based on two fundamental biological axioms about DNA sequencing: 1) DNA sequencing is difficult under the conditions of not knowing the correct sequencing primers and probes, and 2) without knowing the correct probe, it is difficult to decipher precisely and sequence the information of unknown and mixed DNA/peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes, which only differ in nucleotide sequence, arranged on DNA chips (microarrays). In essence, when creating DNA-based encryption by means of biological technologies, such as DNA chips and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, the encryption method discussed herein cannot be decrypted, unless the DNA/PNA probe or PCR amplification is known. The biological analysis, mathematical analysis, and simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the method, which provides much stronger security and reliability than that of traditional encryption methods. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Leading-edge forensic DNA analyses and the necessity of including crime scene investigators, police officers and technicians in a DNA elimination database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Martine; Rogic, Anita; Bourgoin, Sarah; Jolicoeur, Christine; Séguin, Diane

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, sophisticated technology has significantly increased the sensitivity and analytical power of genetic analyses so that very little starting material may now produce viable genetic profiles. This sensitivity however, has also increased the risk of detecting unknown genetic profiles assumed to be that of the perpetrator, yet originate from extraneous sources such as from crime scene workers. These contaminants may mislead investigations, keeping criminal cases active and unresolved for long spans of time. Voluntary submission of DNA samples from crime scene workers is fairly low, therefore we have created a promotional method for our staff elimination database that has resulted in a significant increase in voluntary samples since 2011. Our database enforces privacy safeguards and allows for optional anonymity to all staff members. We also offer information sessions at various police precincts to advise crime scene workers of the importance and success of our staff elimination database. This study, a pioneer in its field, has obtained 327 voluntary submissions from crime scene workers to date, of which 46 individual profiles (14%) have been matched to 58 criminal cases. By implementing our methods and respect for individual privacy, forensic laboratories everywhere may see similar growth and success in explaining unidentified genetic profiles in stagnate criminal cases. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A DNA vaccine expressing CFP21 and MPT64 fusion protein enhances BCG-induced protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Chen, Zhenhua; Fu, Ruiling; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Lingxia; Huang, Li; Li, Jinjin; Shi, Chunwei; Fan, Xionglin

    2011-08-01

    The efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in preventing adult tuberculosis (TB) is highly variable. Genetic differences between BCG vaccine substrains, which can be divided into early strains and late strains based on the loss of region of difference two (RD2), may result in the variability and BCG substrains. The effect of lack of RD2 on the protective efficacy of BCG substrains against TB remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that CFP21 and MPT64(rCM) fusion protein, encoded by RD2 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could stimulate higher level of interferon (IFN)-γ in tuberculin skin test (TST)-positive healthy population than in TST-negative healthy population. Compared with naive mice challenged with virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with pcD2164 DNA expressing rCM protein resulted in a greater decrease in the bacterial load of lung. Moreover, pcD2164 could boost the protective immunity in mice primed by BCG than BCG alone or DNA vaccination alone, as evidenced by lower bacterial load in the lung tissue and reduced lung pathology. The protection induced by BCG prime-DNA vaccine boost strategy was associated with significant increases in rCM protein-specific IFN-γ. Therefore, our results clearly indicate that the loss of RD2 has an important influence on the protective efficacy of different BCG substrains. These findings will benefit the optimal choice of BCG substrain for neonatal immunization and rational design of new vaccines for the prevention of TB.

  14. Overall structure and sugar dynamics of a DNA dodecamer from homo- and heteronuclear dipolar couplings and {sup 31}P chemical shift anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Zhengrong; Delaglio, Frank [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States); Tjandra, Nico [National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry (United States); Zhurkin, Victor B. [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Experimental and Computational Biology (United States); Bax, Ad [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2003-08-15

    The solution structure of d(CGCGAATTCGCG){sub 2} has been determined on the basis of an exceptionally large set of residual dipolar couplings. In addition to the heteronuclear {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H and qualitative homonuclear {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, previously measured in bicelle medium, more than 300 quantitative {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and 22 {sup 31}P-{sup 1}H dipolar restraints were obtained in liquid crystalline Pf1 medium, and 22 {sup 31}P chemical shift anisotropy restraints. High quality DNA structures can be obtained solely on the basis of these new restraints, and these structures are in close agreement with those calculated previously on the basis of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings. In the newly calculated structures, {sup 31}P-{sup 1}H dipolar and {sup 3}JsubH3{sup '}Psub couplings and {sup 31}P CSA data restrain the phosphodiester backbone torsion angles. The final structure represents a quite regular B-form helix with a modest bending of {approx}10 deg., which is essentially independent of whether or not electrostatic terms are used in the calculation. Combined, the number of homo- and heteronuclear dipolar couplings significantly exceeds the number of degrees of freedom in the system. Results indicate that the dipolar coupling data cannot be fit by a single structure, but are compatible with the presence of rapid equilibria between C2{sup '}-endo and C3{sup '}-endo deoxyribose puckers (sugar switching). The C2{sup '}-H2{sup '}/H2{sup ''} dipolar couplings in B-form DNA are particularly sensitive to sugar pucker and yield the largest discrepancies when fit to a single structure. To resolve these discrepancies, we suggest a simplified dipolar coupling analysis that yields N/S equilibria for the ribose sugar puckers, which are in good agreement with previous analyses of NMR J{sub HH} couplings, with a population of the minor C3{sup '}-endo form higher for pyrimidines than for purines.

  15. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as delivery vehicles enhance the immunoprotective effect of a DNA vaccine against spring viremia of carp virus in common carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Zhao; Zha, Ji-Wei; Wang, Gao-Xue; Zhu, Bin

    2017-12-01

    Spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) is highly contagious and pathogenic to cyprinid fish, causing enormous economic losses in aquaculture. Efficient and economic prophylactic measure against is the most pressing desired for the common carp farming industry. In this research, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a candidate DNA vaccine carrier was administrated via bath (1, 5, 10, 20, 40 mg L-1) or injection (1, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg) in common carp juvenile, and the different immune treatments to induce immunoprotective effect was analyzed. The results showed that higher levels of transcription and expression of G gene could be detected in muscle, spleen and kidney tissues via bath administration or intramuscular injection in SWCNTs-pEGFP-G treatment groups compared with naked pEGFP-G treatment groups. Meanwhile, complement activity, superoxide dismutase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, immune-related genes (especially the TNF-α) and antibody levels were significantly enhanced in fish immunized with DNA vaccine combined with SWCNTs. The relative percentage survival were significantly enhanced in fish bathed with SWCNTs-pEGFP-G vaccine and the relative percentage survival reached to 57.5% in SWCNTs-pEGFP-G group than that of naked pEGFP-G (40.0%) at the highest vaccine dose (40 mg L-1) after 22 days of post infection, and fish in bath immunization group at a concentration of 40 mg L-1 could reach the similar relative percentage survival in injection group at a dose of 12 μg. This study suggest that ammonium-functionalized SWCNTs is the promising carrier for DNA vaccine and might be used to vaccinate large-scale juvenile fish by bath administration approach in aquaculture. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Estimating Baseline Population Parameters of Urban and Wildland Black Bear Populations Using a DNA-Based Capture -Mark-Recapture Approach in Mono County, California

    OpenAIRE

    Fusaro, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to European settlement, black bear (Ursus americanus) were far less abundant in the state of California. Estimates from statewide harvest data indicate the California black bear population has tripled in the last 3 decades. Bears inhabit areas they formally never occurred (e.g., urban environments) and populations that were at historically low densities are now at high densities. Though harvest data are useful and widely used as an index for black bear population size and population dem...

  17. A DNA barcode-based survey of terrestrial arthropods in the Society Islands of French Polynesia: host diversity within the SymbioCode Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Ramage

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report here on the taxonomic and molecular diversity of 10 929 terrestrial arthropod specimens, collected on four islands of the Society Archipelago, French Polynesia. The survey was part of the ‘SymbioCode Project’ that aims to establish the Society Islands as a natural laboratory in which to investigate the flux of bacterial symbionts (e.g., Wolbachia and other genetic material among branches of the arthropod tree. The sample includes an estimated 1127 species, of which 1098 included at least one DNA-barcoded specimen and 29 were identified to species level using morphological traits only. Species counts based on molecular data emphasize that some groups have been understudied in this region and deserve more focused taxonomic effort, notably Diptera, Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera. Some taxa that were also subjected to morphological scrutiny reveal a consistent match between DNA and morphology-based species boundaries in 90% of the cases, with a larger than expected genetic diversity in the remaining 10%. Many species from this sample are new to this region or are undescribed. Some are under description, but many await inspection by motivated experts, who can use the online images or request access to ethanol-stored specimens.

  18. Stabilizing contributions of sulfur-modified nucleotides: crystal structure of a DNA duplex with 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl]-2-thiothymidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diop-Frimpong, Benjamin; Prakash, Thazha P.; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Egli, Martin (Isis Pharm.); (Alnylam Pharm.); (Vanderbilt)

    2010-03-05

    Substitution of oxygen atoms by sulfur at various locations in the nucleic acid framework has led to analogs such as the DNA phosphorothioates and 4'-thio RNA. The phosphorothioates are excellent mimics of DNA, exhibit increased resistance to nuclease degradation compared with the natural counterpart, and have been widely used as first-generation antisense nucleic acid analogs for applications in vitro and in vivo. The 4'-thio RNA analog exhibits significantly enhanced RNA affinity compared with RNA, and shows potential for incorporation into siRNAs. 2-Thiouridine (s{sup 2}U) and 5-methyl-2-thiouridine (m{sup 5}s{sup 2}U) are natural nucleotide analogs. s{sup 2}U in tRNA confers greater specificity of codon-anticodon interactions by discriminating more strongly between A and G compared with U. 2-Thio modification preorganizes the ribose and 2'-deoxyribose sugars for a C3'-endo conformation, and stabilizes heteroduplexes composed of modified DNA and complementary RNA. Combination of the 2-thio and sugar 2'-O-modifications has been demonstrated to boost both thermodynamic stability and nuclease resistance. Using the 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl]-2-thiothymidine (m{sup 5}s{sup 2}Umoe) analog, we have investigated the consequences of the replacement of the 2-oxygen by sulfur for base-pair geometry and duplex conformation. The crystal structure of the A-form DNA duplex with sequence GCGTAT*ACGC (T* = m{sup 5}s{sup 2}Umoe) was determined at high resolution and compared with the structure of the corresponding duplex with T* = m{sup 5}Umoe. Notable changes as a result of the incorporation of sulfur concern the base-pair parameter 'opening', an improvement of stacking in the vicinity of modified nucleotides as measured by base overlap, and a van der Waals interaction between sulfur atoms from adjacent m{sup 5}s{sup 2}Umoe residues in the minor groove. The structural data indicate only minor adjustments in the water structure as a result of the presence of sulfur. The observed small structural perturbations combined with the favorable consequences for pairing stability and nuclease resistance (when combined with 2'-O-modification) render 2-thiouracil-modified RNA a promising candidate for applications in RNAi.

  19. Simultaneous Detection of CDC Category "A" DNA and RNA Bioterrorism Agents by Use of Multiplex PCR & RT-PCR Enzyme Hybridization Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J. Henrickson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Assays to simultaneously detect multiple potential agents of bioterrorism are limited. Two multiplex PCR and RT-PCR enzyme hybridization assays (mPCR-EHA, mRT-PCR-EHA were developed to simultaneously detect many of the CDC category “A” bioterrorism agents. The “Bio T” DNA assay was developed to detect: Variola major (VM, Bacillus anthracis (BA, Yersinia pestis (YP, Francisella tularensis (FT and Varicella zoster virus (VZV. The “Bio T” RNA assay (mRT-PCR-EHA was developed to detect: Ebola virus (Ebola, Lassa fever virus (Lassa, Rift Valley fever (RVF, Hantavirus Sin Nombre species (HSN and dengue virus (serotypes 1-4. Sensitivity and specificity of the 2 assays were tested by using genomic DNA, recombinant plasmid positive controls, RNA transcripts controls, surrogate (spiked clinical samples and common respiratory pathogens. The analytical sensitivity (limit of detection (LOD of the DNA asssay for genomic DNA was 1×100~1×102 copies/mL for BA, FT and YP. The LOD for VZV whole organism was 1×10-2 TCID50/mL. The LOD for recombinant controls ranged from 1×102~1×103copies/mL for BA, FT, YP and VM. The RNA assay demonstrated LOD for RNA transcript controls of 1×104~1×106 copies/mL without extraction and 1×105~1×106 copies/mL with extraction for Ebola, RVF, Lassa and HSN. The LOD for dengue whole organisms was ~1×10-4 dilution for dengue 1 and 2, 1×104 LD50/mL and 1×102 LD50/mL for dengue 3 and 4. The LOD without extraction for recombinant plasmid DNA controls was ~1×103 copies/mL (1.5 input copies/reaction for Ebola, RVF, Lassa and HSN. No cross-reactivity of primers and probes used in both assays was detected with common respiratory pathogens or between targeted analytes. Clinical sensitivity was estimated using 264 surrogate clinical samples tested with the BioT DNA assay and 549 samples tested with the BioT RNA assay. The clinical specificity is 99.6% and 99.8% for BioT DNA assay and BioT RNA assay, respectively. The surrogate sensitivities of these two assays were 100% (95%CI 83-100 for FT, BA (pX02, YP, VM, VZV, dengue 2,3,4 and 95% (95%CI 75-100 for BA (pX01 and dengue 1 using spiked clinical specimens. The specificity of both BioT multiplex assays on spiked specimens was 100% (95% CI 99-100. Compared to other available assays (culture, serology, PCR, etc. both the BioT DNA mPCR-EHA and BioT RNA mRT-PCR-EHA are rapid, sensitive and specific assays for detecting many category “A” Bioterrorism agents using a standard thermocycler.

  20. Embryonic neural inducing factor churchill is not a DNA-binding zinc finger protein: solution structure reveals a solvent-exposed beta-sheet and zinc binuclear cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian M; Buck-Koehntop, Bethany A; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2007-08-31

    Churchill is a zinc-containing protein that is involved in neural induction during embryogenesis. At the time of its discovery, it was thought on the basis of sequence alignment to contain two zinc fingers of the C4 type. Further, binding of an N-terminal GST-Churchill fusion protein to a particular DNA sequence was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation selection assay, suggesting that Churchill may function as a transcriptional regulator by sequence-specific DNA binding. We show by NMR solution structure determination that, far from containing canonical C4 zinc fingers, the protein contains three bound zinc ions in novel coordination sites, including an unusual binuclear zinc cluster. The secondary structure of Churchill is also unusual, consisting of a highly solvent-exposed single-layer beta-sheet. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and backbone relaxation measurements reveal that Churchill is unusually dynamic on a number of time scales, with the exception of regions surrounding the zinc coordinating sites, which serve to stabilize the otherwise unstructured N terminus and the single-layer beta-sheet. No binding of Churchill to the previously identified DNA sequence could be detected, and extensive searches using DNA sequence selection techniques could find no other DNA sequence that was bound by Churchill. Since the N-terminal amino acids of Churchill form part of the zinc-binding motif, the addition of a fusion protein at the N terminus causes loss of zinc and unfolding of Churchill. This observation most likely explains the published DNA-binding results, which would arise due to non-specific interaction of the unfolded protein in the immunoprecipitation selection assay. Since Churchill does not appear to bind DNA, we suggest that it may function in embryogenesis as a protein-interaction factor.

  1. The Recent-Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains among Iranian and Afghan Relapse Cases: a DNA-fingerprinting using RFLP and spoligotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarifi Abolhasan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relapse of tuberculosis (TB may develop as the result of reactivation of the endogenous primary infection, or as a result of a exogenous reinfection. This survey evaluated the rate of reactivation versus recent transmission among Iranian and Afghan relapse cases. Methods The sputum specimens were digested, examined microscopically for acid-fast bacilli, and inoculated into Löwenstein-Jensen slants by standard procedures. Thereafter, the susceptibility and identification tests were performed on culture positive specimens. Subsequently, the strains that were identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (258 isolates were subjected to IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and spoligotyping. Additional patient's information was collected for further epidemiological analysis. Patients whose isolates had identical genotyping patterns were considered a cluster with recent transmission episode. Results Out of 258 available isolates, 72(28% had multi-drug resistant (MDR-TB in ratio and 42 (16.2% had other resistant. Notably, 38 of MDR-TB cases (52% were isolated from Afghan patients. By IS6110-RFLP typing method, 65 patients (25% were clustered in 29 clusters. In cluster cases, the intra-community transmissions between Iranian and Afghan patients were 41%. All MDR-TB patients in clusters had either Haarlem I or Beijing characteristic. The risk factors like sex, family history, close contact, living condition, PPD test result and site of TB infection were not associated with clustering. Although, the MDR-TB strains were more frequent in non-cluster cases (31% than cluster one(18% (P M. tuberculosis strains isolated from non-cluster cases were belong to EAI3 (51; 30% and CASI(32;18.6% superfamilies. Conclusion During the studied period, reactivation of a previous infection remain the more probable cause of recurrence. Although, the evidence of intra- community transmission between Iranian and Afghan TB cases, highlighted the impact of afghan immigrants in national tuberculosis control program (NTP of Iran.

  2. Building-up of a DNA barcode library for true bugs (insecta: hemiptera: heteroptera) of Germany reveals taxonomic uncertainties and surprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Michael J; Hendrich, Lars; Küchler, Stefan M; Deister, Fabian; Morinière, Jérome; Gossner, Martin M

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years, DNA barcoding has become an efficient method for the identification of species. In the case of insects, most published DNA barcoding studies focus on species of the Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Hymenoptera and especially Lepidoptera. In this study we test the efficiency of DNA barcoding for true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera), an ecological and economical highly important as well as morphologically diverse insect taxon. As part of our study we analyzed DNA barcodes for 1742 specimens of 457 species, comprising 39 families of the Heteroptera. We found low nucleotide distances with a minimum pairwise K2P distance 2.2% were detected for 16 traditionally recognized and valid species. With a successful identification rate of 91.5% (418 species) our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of true bugs and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for true bugs in Germany and Central Europe as well. Our study also highlights the urgent necessity of taxonomic revisions for various taxa of the Heteroptera, with a special focus on various species of the Miridae. In this context we found evidence for on-going hybridization events within various taxonomically challenging genera (e.g. Nabis Latreille, 1802 (Nabidae), Lygus Hahn, 1833 (Miridae), Phytocoris Fallén, 1814 (Miridae)) as well as the putative existence of cryptic species (e.g. Aneurus avenius (Duffour, 1833) (Aradidae) or Orius niger (Wolff, 1811) (Anthocoridae)).

  3. Targeted DNA Methylation by a DNA Methyltransferase Coupled to a Triple Helix Forming Oligonucleotide To Down-Regulate the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, Bernardina T. F.; Maluszynska-Hoffman, Maria; Kiss, Antal; Arendzen, Alice J.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.; Weinhold, Elmar; Rots, Marianne G.

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a membrane glycoprotein that has been identified as a marker of cancer-initiating cells. EpCAM is highly expressed on most carcinomas, and transient silencing of EpCAM expression leads to reduced oncogenic potential. To silence (he EpCAM gene in a

  4. Use of a DNA-based test for the mutation associated with porcine stress syndrome (malignant hyperthermia) in 10,000 breeding swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P J; Shen, H; Cory, C R; Zhang, X

    1993-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that the mutation associated with porcine stress syndrome (PSS; malignant hyperthermia) was present in a large proportion of North American and English swine, a simple and rapid laboratory protocol was used for cost-effective, large-scale diagnosis of susceptibility to PSS. This PSS test was applied to 10,245 breeding swine of various breeds from 129 farms in the United States, Canada, and England. Approximately 1 of 5 swine was a heterozygous carrier of the PSS mutation, with approximately 1% being homozygotes. Prevalence of the PSS mutation was 97% for 58 Pietrain, 35% for 1,962 Landrace, 15% for 718 Duroc, 19% for 720 Large White, 14% for 496 Hampshire, 19% for 1,727 Yorkshire, and 16% for 3,446 crossbred swine. The PPS gene frequencies for these breeds were 0.72, 0.19, 0.08, 0.10, 0.07, 0.10, and 0.09, respectively. In addition to these breeds, we have identified the PSS mutation in Poland China and Berkshire breeds. These gene frequencies were 30 to 75% lower in Canadian swine than in US swine, with the exception of Yorkshires, for which the gene frequency was threefold higher in Canadian swine. English swine were similarly, or more so, affected than were US swine. Accuracy was estimated at > 99%. Cost to perform the test was < $20/animal. Depending on the perceived net balance of deleterious and beneficial effects of the mutation, the PSS test could be used to eradicate the PSS mutation from herds, or for controlled expression of the mutation.

  5. A DNA repair variant in POLQ (c.-1060A > G) is associated to hereditary breast cancer patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandalize, Ana Paula Carneiro; Schüler-Faccini, Lavínia; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien; Caleffi, Maira; Cazaux, Christophe; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2014-11-19

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is the occurrence of high levels of chromosomal rearrangements as a result of inaccurate repair of double-strand breaks (DSB). Germline mutations in BRCA and RAD51 genes, involved in DSB repair, are strongly associated with hereditary breast cancer. Pol θ, a translesional DNA polymerase specialized in the replication of damaged DNA, has been also shown to contribute to DNA synthesis associated to DSB repair. It is noteworthy that POLQ is highly expressed in breast tumors and this expression is able to predict patient outcome. The objective of this study was to analyze genetic variants related to POLQ as new population biomarkers of risk in hereditary (HBC) and sporadic (SBC) breast cancer. We analyzed through case-control study nine SNPs of POLQ in hereditary (HBC) and sporadic (SBC) breast cancer patients using Taqman Real Time PCR assays. Polymorphisms were systematically identified through the NCBI database and are located within exons or promoter regions. We recruited 204 breast cancer patients (101 SBC and 103 HBC) and 212 unaffected controls residing in Southern Brazil. The rs581553 SNP located in the promoter region was strongly associated with HBC (c.-1060A > G; HBC GG = 15, Control TT = 8; OR = 5.67, CI95% = 2.26-14.20; p Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome. Furthermore, 12 of them developed bilateral breast cancer and one had a familial history of bilateral breast cancer. This polymorphism was also associated with bilateral breast cancer in 67 patients (OR = 9.86, CI95% = 3.81-25.54). There was no statistically significant difference of age at breast cancer diagnosis between SNP carriers and non-carriers. Considering that Pol θ is involved in DBS repair, our results suggest that this polymorphism may contribute to the etiology of HBC, particularly in patients with bilateral breast cancer.

  6. Toward a DNA taxonomy of Alpine Rhithrogena (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae using a mixed Yule-coalescent analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Vuataz

    Full Text Available Aquatic larvae of many Rhithrogena mayflies (Ephemeroptera inhabit sensitive Alpine environments. A number of species are on the IUCN Red List and many recognized species have restricted distributions and are of conservation interest. Despite their ecological and conservation importance, ambiguous morphological differences among closely related species suggest that the current taxonomy may not accurately reflect the evolutionary diversity of the group. Here we examined the species status of nearly 50% of European Rhithrogena diversity using a widespread sampling scheme of Alpine species that included 22 type localities, general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC model analysis of one standard mtDNA marker and one newly developed nDNA marker, and morphological identification where possible. Using sequences from 533 individuals from 144 sampling localities, we observed significant clustering of the mitochondrial (cox1 marker into 31 GMYC species. Twenty-one of these could be identified based on the presence of topotypes (expertly identified specimens from the species' type locality or unambiguous morphology. These results strongly suggest the presence of both cryptic diversity and taxonomic oversplitting in Rhithrogena. Significant clustering was not detected with protein-coding nuclear PEPCK, although nine GMYC species were congruent with well supported terminal clusters of nDNA. Lack of greater congruence in the two data sets may be the result of incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphism. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of both gene regions recovered four of the six recognized Rhithrogena species groups in our samples as monophyletic. Future development of more nuclear markers would facilitate multi-locus analysis of unresolved, closely related species pairs. The DNA taxonomy developed here lays the groundwork for a future revision of the important but cryptic Rhithrogena genus in Europe.

  7. The Daughterless N-terminus directly mediates synergistic interactions with Notch transcription complexes via the SPS+A DNA transcription code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-specific expression of a subset of Enhancer of split (E(spl-C genes in proneural clusters is mediated by synergistic interactions between bHLH A (basic Helix-Loop-Helix Activator and Notch-signalling transcription complex (NTC proteins. For a some of these E(spl-C genes, such as m8, these synergistic interactions are programmed by an "SPS+A" transcription code in the cis-regulatory regions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this synergistic interaction between NTCs and proneural bHLH A proteins are not fully understood. Findings Using cell transcription assays, we show that the N-terminal region of the Daughterless (Da bHLH A protein is critical for synergistic interactions with NTCs that activate the E(spl-C m8 promoter. These assays also show that this interaction is dependent on the specific inverted repeat architecture of Suppressor of Hairless (Su(H binding sites in the SPS+A transcription code. Using protein-protein interaction assays, we show that two distinct regions within the Da N-terminus make a direct physical interaction with the NTC protein Su(H. Deletion of these interaction domains in Da creates a dominant negative protein that eliminates NTC-bHLH A transcriptional synergy on the m8 promoter. In addition, over-expression of this dominant negative Da protein disrupts Notch-mediated lateral inhibition during mechanosensory bristle neurogenesis in vivo. Conclusion These findings indicate that direct physical interactions between Da-N and Su(H are critical for the transcriptional synergy between NTC and bHLH A proteins on the m8 promoter. Our results also indicate that the orientation of the Su(H binding sites in the SPS+A transcription code are critical for programming the interaction between Da-N and Su(H proteins. Together, these findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms by which the NTC synergistically interacts with bHLH A proteins to mediate Notch target gene expression in proneural clusters.

  8. A novel electrochemiluminescence biosensor for the detection of microRNAs based on a DNA functionalized nitrogen doped carbon quantum dots as signal enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiao; Ma, Cheng; Liu, Xing-Pei; Wei, Yu-Pin; Mao, Chang-Jie; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2017-06-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of microRNA was developed based on nicking enzymes Nb.BbvCI mediated signal amplification (NESA). First, the hairpin probe1-N-CQDs with assistant probe and microRNA (miRNA) formed Y junction structure which was cleaved with the addition of nicking enzymes Nb.BbvCI to release miRNA and assistant probe. Subsequently, the released miRNA and assistant probe can initiate the next recycling process. The generation of numerous intermediate sequences nitrogen doped carbon quantum dots-DNA (N-CQDs-DNA) can further hybridize with hairpin probe2 immobilized on GO/Au composite modified electrode surface, the initial ECL intensity was enhanced. The ECL intensity would increase with increasing concentration of the target miRNA, and the sensitivity of biosensor would be promoted because of the efficient signal amplification of the target induced cycling reaction. The novel designed biosensor provided a highly sensitive and selective detection of miRNA-21 from 10 aM to10(4) fM with a relatively low detection limit of 10 aM. Thus, our strategy has a potential application in the clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The dose-dependent effect on protection and humoral response to a DNA vaccine against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis (IHN) virus in subyearling rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPatra, Scott E.; Corbeil, Serge; Jones, Gerald R.; Shewmaker, William D.; Kurath, Gael

    2000-01-01

    A dose–response study that used the DNA vaccine pIHNw-G against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) showed that complete and highly significant (P old) 6 weeks after a single intramuscular injection with doses as low as 1 μg. Complete protection was also reproducibly demonstrated at higher vaccine doses; however, no protection was observed with a 0.1-μg dose. Virus-neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish that had been vaccinated with different doses of the DNA vaccine and then sham-infected; there appeared to be a dose-dependent effect, with higher titers obtained with higher doses of vaccine. The DNA-vaccinated animals that survived virus challenge had significantly (P < 0.05) higher neutralizing antibody titers than sham-infected, DNA-vaccinated control fish. Additionally, the titers detected in the IHN survivors exhibited a significant (P < 0.05) dose-dependent effect, with the highest titers being present in fish that received the highest vaccine doses.

  10. Solution-state structure of a DNA dodecamer duplex containing a Cis-syn thymine cyclobutane dimer, the major UV photoproduct of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, K; Jing, Y; Kao, J; Taylor, J S; Kennedy, M A

    1998-10-09

    The solution structures of a duplex DNA dodecamer containing a cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimer d(GCACGAAT[cs]TAAG).d(CTTAATTCG TGC) and its native parent sequence were determined using NMR data collected at 750 MHz. The dodecamer sequence corresponds to the section of a site-specific cis-syn dimer containing 49-mer that was found to be the binding site for the dimer-specific T4 denV endonuclease V repair enzyme by chemical and enzymatic footprinting experiments. Structures of both sequences were derived from NOE restrained molecular dynamics/simulated annealing calculations using a fixed outer layer of water and an inner dynamic layer of water with sodium counterions. The resulting structures reveal a subtle distortion to the phosphodiester backbone in the dimer-containing sequence which includes a BII phosphate at the T9pA10 junction immediately 3' to the dimer. The BII phosphate, established experimentally by analysis of the 31P chemical shifts and interpretation of the 3JP-H3' values using an optimized Karplus relationship, enables the DNA helix to accommodate the dimer by destacking the base 3' to the dimer. Furthermore, the structures provide explanations for the unusually shifted T8-N3H imino, A16-H2 and T8-Me proton resonances and T9pA10 (31)P NMR resonance and are consistent with bending, unwinding, and thermodynamic data. The implications of the structural data for the mechanism by which cis-syn dimers are recognized by repair enzymes and bypassed by DNA polymerases are also discussed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  11. Tlys, a newly identified Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 transcript expressed in the lysogenic state, encodes a DNA-binding protein interacting at the promoters of the early genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusco, Salvatore; She, Qunxin; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    the growth of the lysogenic host. The correponding gene f55 lies between two transcriptional units (T6 and Tind) that are upregulated upon UV irradiation. The open reading frame f55 encodes a 6.3-kDa protein which shows sequence identity with negative regulators that fold into the ribbon-helix-helix DNA......-binding motif. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the recombinant F55, purified from Escherichia coli, is indeed a putative transcription factor able to recognize site specifically target sequences in the promoters of the early induced T5, T6, and Tind transcripts, as well as of its own promoter. Binding...... sites of F55 are included within a tandem-repeated sequence overlapping the transcription start sites and/or the B recognition element of the pertinent genes. The strongest binding was observed with the promoters of T5 and T6, and an apparent cooperativity in binding was observed with the Tind promoter...

  12. holE, the gene coding for the theta subunit of DNA polymerase III of Escherichia coli: characterization of a holE mutant and comparison with a dnaQ (epsilon-subunit) mutant.

    OpenAIRE

    Slater, S C; Lifsics, M R; O'Donnell, M; Maurer, R

    1994-01-01

    DNA polymerase III holoenzyme is a multiprotein complex responsible for the bulk of chromosomal replication in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The catalytic core of the holoenzyme is an alpha epsilon theta heterotrimer that incorporates both a polymerase subunit (alpha; dnaE) and a proofreading subunit (epsilon; dnaQ). The role of theta is unknown. Here, we describe a null mutation of holE, the gene for theta. A strain carrying this mutation was fully viable and displayed no muta...

  13. Código de barras del ADN y sus posibles aplicaciones en el campo de la Entomología DNA barcoding and its possible applications to the field of Entomology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía A. Lanteri

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se abordan algunos aspectos de la controversia sobre la iniciativa «Código de barras del ADN», y se hace hincapié en sus potenciales aplicaciones en Entomología. Esta iniciativa propone emplear información dentro de una misma región génica (gen mitocondrial de la Citocromo c Oxidasa I = COI, en todas las especies vivientes y con condiciones de secuenciación universalmente aceptadas y estandarizadas. En la actualidad, no pretende sustituir la taxonomía alfa y la filogenia sino agilizar las tareas de identificación, especialmente en el campo de la Biomedicina (identificación de patógenos, parásitos y vectores, el control de plagas (intercepción de especies invasoras, cualquiera sea su estado de desarrollo ontogenético y los estudios sobre conservación de la biodiversidad. Para arribar a una correcta delimitación de las especies biológicas es preciso contar con las secuencias de COI de numerosos individuos a lo largo de todo su rango geográfico y además, secuencias de genes nucleares e información morfológica y biológica detallada. Las «Unidades Evolutivas Significativas», identificadas sobre la base del «código de barras», podrían corresponder tanto a morfoespecies como a especies crípticas y a subespecies o linajes con diferentes preferencias de huéspedes. La integración del «código de barras del ADN», el trabajo de campo, las colecciones de museos y la investigación científica resultan imprescindibles para que esta herramienta redunde en avances significativos en el campo de la Sistemática Entomológica.This article deals with some of the most controversial issues of the DNA barcode initiative, focusing on its potential applications to Entomology. The barcoding proposes using information within the same gene region (Cytocrome c Oxidase I= COI mitochondrial gene, in all living species and under standard conditions of sequencing. At present, it does not attempt to replace alpha taxonomy or phylogeny, but to accelerate the task of identification, particularly, in the fields of Biomedicine (identification of pathogens, parasites and vectors, Pest Control (interception of all ontogenetic stages of alien invasive insects and studies on Biodiversity Conservation. For an accurate delimitation of biological species, it is necessary to undertake exhaustive sampling of COI sequences along their geographical range, as well as to sequence nuclear genes, and to accomplish detailed morphological and biological information. The «Evolutionary Significant Units» based on «DNA barcoding» might correspond to morphospecies, cryptic species, subspecies or lineages with different host preferences. The integration of «DNA barcode», field work, collections of museums and scientific research are essential for this tool to make a fruitful impact on the field of Systematic Entomology.

  14. Binding of Co(III) to a DNA oligomer via reaction of [Co(NH3)5(OH2)]3+ with (5medC-dG)4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, D M; Mantilla, E J; Hicks, M; Huchital, D H; Murphy, W R; Sheardy, R D

    1995-10-24

    The interaction specificities of cobalt(III) ammines with the self-complementary eight-base pair DNA oligomer (5medC-dG)4 have been investigated. Standard protocol for preparing DNA samples calls for heat annealing the DNA oligomer in phosphate buffer in the absence or presence of cobalt(III) ammine complex for 2 min at 80 degrees C, followed by slow cooling to 25 degrees C. An alternative method for DNA preparation is incubation of the oligomer in the presence of the cobalt(III) complex at 37 degrees C followed by exhaustive dialysis. The conformational properties of the thus-treated DNA oligomer were determined by inspection of the UV and CD spectra at 25 and 95 degrees C and thermal denaturation studies. With heat annealing in the absence of any cobalt(III) complex, (5medC-dG)4 assumes a double-stranded, right-handed B conformation at 25 degrees C. Upon heat annealing in the presence of 200 microM [Co(NH3)6]3+, (5medC-dG)4 assumes a double-stranded, left-handed Z conformation at 25 degrees C. In contrast, the CD and UV spectra of (5medC-dG)4 heat annealed in the presence of 200 microM [Co(NH3)5(OH2)]3+ are consistent with a distorted B-like conformation at 25 degrees C. Incubation of the oligomer in the presence of [Co(NH3)5(OH2)]3+ results in modification of the conformational properties of the oligomer at both 25 and 95 degrees C relative to the untreated oligomer. The extent of modification depends upon the incubation concentration of [Co(NH3)5-(OH2)]3+ and the reaction time. Atomic absorption (AA) analyses of these treated DNA samples indicate a high degree of cobalt association to the oligomer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A single dose of a DNA vaccine encoding apa coencapsulated with 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate in microspheres confers long-term protection against tuberculosis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-primed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlétti, Dyego; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Masson, Ana Paula; Weijenborg Campos, Lívia; Leite, Luciana C C; Rodrigues Pires, Andréa; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Lopes Silva, Célio; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon; Horn, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime DNA (Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes)-booster vaccinations have been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. This heterologous prime-boost strategy is perhaps the most realistic vaccination for the future of TB infection control, especially in countries where TB is endemic. Moreover, a prime-boost regimen using biodegradable microspheres seems to be a promising immunization to stimulate a long-lasting immune response. The alanine proline antigen (Apa) is a highly immunogenic glycoprotein secreted by M. tuberculosis. This study investigated the immune protection of Apa DNA vaccine against intratracheal M. tuberculosis challenge in mice on the basis of a heterologous prime-boost regimen. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously primed with BCG and intramuscularly boosted with a single dose of plasmid carrying apa and 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate (TDM) adjuvant, coencapsulated in microspheres (BCG-APA), and were evaluated 30 and 70 days after challenge. This prime-boost strategy (BCG-APA) resulted in a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs, thus leading to better preservation of the lung parenchyma, 70 days postinfection compared to BCG vaccinated mice. The profound effect of this heterologous prime-boost regimen in the experimental model supports its development as a feasible strategy for prevention of TB.

  16. Characterization of the CrbS/R Two-Component System in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveals a New Set of Genes under Its Control and a DNA Motif Required for CrbR-Mediated Transcriptional Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Sepulveda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The CrbS/R system is a two-component signal transduction system that regulates acetate utilization in Vibrio cholerae, P. aeruginosa, and P. entomophila. CrbS is a hybrid histidine kinase that belongs to a recently identified family, in which the signaling domain is fused to an SLC5 solute symporter domain through aSTAC domain. Upon activation by CrbS, CrbR activates transcription of the acs gene, which encodes an acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS, and the actP gene, which encodes an acetate/solute symporter. In this work, we characterized the CrbS/R system in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. Through the quantitative proteome analysis of different mutants, we were able to identify a new set of genes under its control, which play an important role during growth on acetate. These results led us to the identification of a conserved DNA motif in the putative promoter region of acetate-utilization genes in the Gammaproteobacteria that is essential for the CrbR-mediated transcriptional activation of genes under acetate-utilizing conditions. Finally, we took advantage of the existence of a second SLC5-containing two-component signal transduction system in P. fluorescens, CbrA/B, to demonstrate that the activation of the response regulator by the histidine kinase is not dependent on substrate transport through the SLC5 domain.

  17. Estudio del dominio de unión a DNA de la proteína terminal del bacteriófago [phi]29 y su papel en la replicación del DNA viral

    OpenAIRE

    Holguera López, Isabel María

    2015-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Biología Molecular. Fecha de lectura: 17-07-2015 El mecanismo de replicación iniciada con proteína terminal (TP) del bacteriófago ϕ29 ha sido extensamente estudiado in vitro. Sin embargo, se conoce muy poco sobre la organización espacial y temporal de la replicación de ϕ29 in vivo. En la presente Tesis se ha estudiado la localización subcelular de los principales componentes de...

  18. Radiation-sensitive Gene A (RadA) Targets DisA, DNA Integrity Scanning Protein A, to Negatively Affect Cyclic Di-AMP Synthesis Activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Zheng-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP has been recognized as a ubiquitous second messenger involved in the regulation of bacterial signal transduction. However, little is known about the control of its synthesis and its physiological role in bacteria. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of control of c-di-AMP synthesis and its effects on bacterial growth in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We identified a DisA homolog in M. smegmatis, MsDisA, as an enzyme involved in c-di-AMP synthesis. Furthermore, MsRadA, a RadA homolog in M. smegmatis was found to act as an antagonist of the MsDisA protein. MsRadA can physically interact with MsDisA and inhibit the c-di-AMP synthesis activity of MsDisA. Overexpression of MsdisA in M. smegmatis led to cell expansion and bacterial aggregation as well as loss of motility. However, co-expression of MsradA and MsdisA rescued these abnormal phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that the interaction between RadA and DisA and its role in inhibiting c-di-AMP synthesis may be conserved in bacteria. Our findings enhance our understanding of the control of c-di-AMP synthesis and its physiological roles in bacteria. PMID:23760274

  19. Radiation-sensitive gene A (RadA) targets DisA, DNA integrity scanning protein A, to negatively affect cyclic Di-AMP synthesis activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Zheng-Guo

    2013-08-02

    Cyclic di-AMP has been recognized as a ubiquitous second messenger involved in the regulation of bacterial signal transduction. However, little is known about the control of its synthesis and its physiological role in bacteria. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of control of c-di-AMP synthesis and its effects on bacterial growth in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We identified a DisA homolog in M. smegmatis, MsDisA, as an enzyme involved in c-di-AMP synthesis. Furthermore, MsRadA, a RadA homolog in M. smegmatis was found to act as an antagonist of the MsDisA protein. MsRadA can physically interact with MsDisA and inhibit the c-di-AMP synthesis activity of MsDisA. Overexpression of MsdisA in M. smegmatis led to cell expansion and bacterial aggregation as well as loss of motility. However, co-expression of MsradA and MsdisA rescued these abnormal phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that the interaction between RadA and DisA and its role in inhibiting c-di-AMP synthesis may be conserved in bacteria. Our findings enhance our understanding of the control of c-di-AMP synthesis and its physiological roles in bacteria.

  20. Correlation of mRNA Profiles, miRNA Profiles, and Functional Immune Response in Rainbow Trout (Oncorrhynkus Mykiss) Infected With Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) and in Fish Vaccinated With a DNA Vaccine Against VHSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Jørgensen, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are a diverse class of small (18-22 nucleotides) endogenous RNAs that potently mediate post-transcriptional silencing of a wide range of genes and are emerging as critical regulators of cellular processes. They are transcribed and processed from larger precursors ...

  1. High In Vitro Activity of the Novel Spiropyrimidinetrione AZD0914, a DNA Gyrase Inhibitor, against Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates Suggests a New Effective Option for Oral Treatment of Gonorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Golparian, Daniel; Alm, Richard A.; Huband, Michael; Mueller, John; Jensen, Jorgen Skov; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the activity of the novel spiropyrimidinetrione AZD0914 (DNA gyrase inhibitor) against clinical gonococcal isolates and international reference strains (n = 250), including strains with diverse multidrug resistance and extensive drug resistance. The AZD0914 MICs were substantially lower than those of most other currently or previously recommended antimicrobials. AZD0914 should be further evaluated, including in vitro selection, in vivo emergence and mechanisms of resistance, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in humans, optimal dosing, and performance, in appropriate randomized and controlled clinical trials. PMID:24982070

  2. A DNA logic gate based on strand displacement reaction and rolling circle amplification, responding to multiple low-abundance DNA fragment input signals, and its application in detecting miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuqi; Song, Yanyan; Wu, Fan; Liu, Wenting; Fu, Boshi; Feng, Bingkun; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-04-25

    A conveniently amplified DNA AND logic gate platform was designed for the highly sensitive detection of low-abundance DNA fragment inputs based on strand displacement reaction and rolling circle amplification strategy. Compared with others, this system can detect miRNAs in biological samples. The success of this strategy demonstrates the potential of DNA logic gates in disease diagnosis.

  3. Vaccination of mice using the West Nile virus E-protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects mice against a lethal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina De Filette

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that is endemic in Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the United States. There is currently no antiviral treatment or human vaccine available to treat or prevent WNV infection. DNA plasmid-based vaccines represent a new approach for controlling infectious diseases. In rodents, DNA vaccines have been shown to induce B cell and cytotoxic T cell responses and protect against a wide range of infections. In this study, we formulated a plasmid DNA vector expressing the ectodomain of the E-protein of WNV into nanoparticles by using linear polyethyleneimine (lPEI covalently bound to mannose and examined the potential of this vaccine to protect against lethal WNV infection in mice. Mice were immunized twice (prime--boost regime with the WNV DNA vaccine formulated with lPEI-mannose using different administration routes (intramuscular, intradermal and topical. In parallel a heterologous boost with purified recombinant WNV envelope (E protein was evaluated. While no significant E-protein specific humoral response was generated after DNA immunization, protein boosting of DNA-primed mice resulted in a marked increase in total neutralizing antibody titer. In addition, E-specific IL-4 T-cell immune responses were detected by ELISPOT after protein boost and CD8(+ specific IFN-γ expression was observed by flow cytometry. Challenge experiments using the heterologous immunization regime revealed protective immunity to homologous and virulent WNV infection.

  4. Sampling the potential energy surface of a DNA duplex damaged by a food carcinogen: Force field parameterization by ab initio quantum calculations and conformational searching using molecular mechanics computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangyang

    1999-07-01

    The heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo (4, 5-f) quinoline (IQ) is one of a number of carcinogens found in barbecued meat and fish. It induces tumors in mammals and is probably involved in human carcinogenesis, because of great exposure to such food carcinogens. IQ is biochemically activated to a derivative which reacts with DNA to form a covalent adduct. This adduct may deform the DNA and consequently cause a mutation. which may initiate carcinogenesis. To understand this cancer initiating event, it is necessary to obtain atomic resolution structures of the damaged DNA. No such structures are available experimentally due to synthesis difficulties. Therefore, we employ extensive molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations for this purpose. The major IQ-DNA adduct in the specific DNA sequence d(5'G1G2C G3CCA3') - d(5'TGGCGCC3') with IQ modified at G3 is studied. The d(5'G1G2C G3CC3') sequence has recently been shown to be a hot-spot for mutations when IQ modification is at G3. Although this sequence is prone to -2 deletions via a ``slippage mechanism'' even when unmodified, a key question is why IQ increases the mutation frequency of the unmodified DNA by about 104 fold. Is there a structural feature imposed by IQ that is responsible? The molecular mechanics and dynamics program AMBER for nucleic acids with the latest force field was chosen for this work. This force field has been demonstrated to reproduce well the B-DNA structure. However, some parameters, the partial charges, bond lengths and angles, dihedral parameters of the modified residue, are not available in the AMBER database. We parameterized the force field using high level ab initio quantum calculations. We created 800 starting conformations which uniformly sampled in combination at 18° intervals three torsion angles that govern the IQ-DNA orientations, and energy minimized them. The most important structures are abnormal; the IQ damaged guanine is rotated out of its standard B-DNA orientations, compromising its ability to act as a faithful template during DNA replication.

  5. Spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and sleep deprivation differently induce Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a DNA methylation and transcripts levels in the basal forebrain and frontal cortex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventskovska, Olena; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Karpova, Nina N

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) regulates neuronal plasticity, slow wave activity and sleep homeostasis. Environmental stimuli control Bdnf expression through epigenetic mechanisms, but there are no data on epigenetic regulation of Bdnf by sleep or sleep deprivation. Here we investigated whether 5-methylcytosine (5mC) DNA modification at Bdnf promoters p1, p4 and p9 influences Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a expression during the normal inactive phase or after sleep deprivation (SD) (3, 6 and 12 h, end-times being ZT3, ZT6 and ZT12) in rats in two brain areas involved in sleep regulation, the basal forebrain and cortex. We found a daytime variation in cortical Bdnf expression: Bdnf1 expression was highest at ZT6 and Bdnf4 lowest at ZT12. Such variation was not observed in the basal forebrain. Also Bdnf p1 and p9 methylation levels differed only in the cortex, while Bdnf p4 methylation did not vary in either area. Factorial analysis revealed that sleep deprivation significantly induced Bdnf1 and Bdnf4 with the similar pattern for Bdnf9a in both basal forebrain and cortex; 12 h of sleep deprivation decreased 5mC levels at the cortical Bdnf p4 and p9. Regression analysis between the 5mC promoter levels and the corresponding Bdnf transcript expression revealed significant negative correlations for the basal forebrain Bdnf1 and cortical Bdnf9a transcripts in only non-deprived rats, while these correlations were lost after sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that Bdnf transcription during the light phase of undisturbed sleep-wake cycle but not after SD is regulated at least partially by brain site-specific DNA methylation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  6. GM-CSF DNA: an adjuvant for higher avidity IgG, rectal IgA, and increased protection against the acute phase of a SHIV-89.6P challenge by a DNA/MVA immunodeficiency virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lilin; Vödrös, Dalma; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; Wilson, Robert L; Akerstrom, Vicki L; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Yu, Tianwei; Kannanganat, Sunil; Ofielu, Lazarus; Villinger, Francois; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard; Amara, Rama Rao; Robinson, Harriet L

    2007-12-05

    Single intradermal or intramuscular inoculations of GM-CSF DNA with the DNA prime for a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-89.6 vaccine, which consists of DNA priming followed by modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boosting, increased protection of both the blood and intestines against the acute phase of an intrarectal SHIV-89.6P challenge. GM-CSF appeared to contribute to protection by enhancing two antibody responses: the avidity maturation of anti-Env IgG in blood (p=oranti-viral IgA in rectal secretions (p<0.01). The avidity of anti-Env IgG showed strong correlations with protection both pre and post challenge. Animals with the highest avidity anti-Env Ab had 1000-fold reductions in peak viremia over those with the lowest avidity anti-Env Ab. The enhanced IgA response was associated with the best protection, but did not achieve significance.

  7. The Triple Roles of Glutathione for a DNA-Cleaving DNAzyme and Development of a Fluorescent Glutathione/Cu2+-Dependent DNAzyme Sensor for Detection of Cu2+ in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijin; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Guiying; Sheng, Yongjie; Sun, Yanhong; Rui, Hongyue; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Jiacui; Jiang, Dazhi

    2017-03-24

    Pistol-like DNAzyme (PLDz) is an oxidative DNA-cleaving catalytic DNA with ascorbic acid as cofactor. Herein, glutathione was induced into the reaction system to maintain reduced ascorbic acid levels for higher efficient cleavage. However, data indicated that glutathione played triple roles in PLDz-catalyzed reactions. Glutathione alone had no effect on PLDz, and showed inhibitory effect on ascorbic acid-induced PLDz catalysis, but exhibited stimulating effect on Cu2+-promoted self-cleavage of PLDz. Further analysis of the effect of glutathione/Cu2+ on PLDz indicated that H2O2 played a key role in PLDz catalysis. Finally, we developed a fluorescent Cu2+ sensor (PL-Cu 1.0) based on the relationship between glutathione/Cu2+ and catalytic activity of PLDz. The fluorescent intensity showed a linear response toward the logarithm concentration of Cu2+ over the range from 80 nM to 30 μM, with a detection limit of 21.1 nM. PL-Cu 1.0 provided only detection of Cu2+ over other divalent metal ions. Ca2+ and Mg2+ could not interfere with Cu2+ detection even at a 1000-fold concentration. We further applied PL-Cu 1.0 for Cu2+ detection in tap and bottled water. Water stored in copper taps overnight had relatively high Cu2+ concentrations, with a maximum 22.3 μM. Trace Cu2+ (52.2 nM) in deep spring was detected among the tested bottled water. Therefore, PL-Cu 1.0 is feasible to detect Cu2+ in drinking water, with a practical application.

  8. Binding sequences for RdgB, a DNA damage-responsive transcriptional activator, and temperature-dependent expression of bacteriocin and pectin lyase genes in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuteru; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2008-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum strain Er simultaneously produces the phage tail-like bacteriocin carotovoricin (Ctv) and pectin lyase (Pnl) in response to DNA-damaging agents. The regulatory protein RdgB of the Mor/C family of proteins activates transcription of pnl through binding to the promoter. However, the optimal temperature for the synthesis of Ctv (23 degrees C) differs from that for synthesis of Pnl (30 degrees C), raising the question of whether RdgB directly activates ctv transcription. Here we report that RdgB directly regulates Ctv synthesis. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated RdgB binding to the P(0), P(1), and P(2) promoters of the ctv operons, and DNase I footprinting determined RdgB-binding sequences (RdgB boxes) on these and on the pnl promoters. The RdgB box of the pnl promoter included a perfect 7-bp inverted repeat with high binding affinity to the regulator (K(d) [dissociation constant] = 150 nM). In contrast, RdgB boxes of the ctv promoters contained an imperfect inverted repeat with two or three mismatches that consequently reduced binding affinity (K(d) = 250 to 350 nM). Transcription of the rdgB and ctv genes was about doubled at 23 degrees C compared with that at 30 degrees C. In contrast, the amount of pnl transcription tripled at 30 degrees C. Thus, the inverse synthesis of Ctv and Pnl as a function of temperature is apparently controlled at the transcriptional level, and reduced rdgB expression at 30 degrees C obviously affected transcription from the ctv promoters with low-affinity RdgB boxes. Pathogenicity toward potato tubers was reduced in an rdgB knockout mutant, suggesting that the RdgAB system contributes to the pathogenicity of this bacterium, probably by activating pnl expression.

  9. A two-step stimulus-response cell-SELEX method to generate a DNA aptamer to recognize inflamed human aortic endothelial cells as a potential in vivo molecular probe for atherosclerosis plaque detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kaili; Lim, Wee Siang; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Bhakoo, Kishore

    2013-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides that are capable of binding wide classes of targets with high affinity and specificity. Their unique three-dimensional structures present numerous possibilities for recognizing virtually any class of target molecules, making them a promising alternative to antibodies used as molecular probes in biomedical analysis and clinical diagnosis. In recent years, cell-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) has been used extensively to select aptamers for various cell targets. However, aptamers that have evolved from cell-SELEX to distinguish the "stimulus-response cell" have not previously been reported. Moreover, a number of cumbersome and time-consuming steps involved in conventional cell-SELEX reduce the efficiency and efficacy of the aptamer selection. Here, we report a "two-step" methodology of cell-SELEX that successfully selected DNA aptamers specifically against "inflamed" endothelial cells. This has been termed as stimulus-response cell-SELEX (SRC-SELEX). The SRC-SELEX enables the selection of aptamers to distinguish the cells activated by stimulus of healthy cells or cells isolated from diseased tissue. We report a promising aptamer, N55, selected by SRC-SELEX, which can bind specifically to inflamed endothelial cells both in cell culture and atherosclerotic plaque tissue. This aptamer probe was demonstrated as a potential molecular probe for magnetic resonance imaging to target inflamed endothelial cells and atherosclerotic plaque detection.

  10. Evidence of a genetic instability induced by the incorporation of a DNA precursor marked with tritium; Mise en evidence d'une instabilite genetique induite par l'incorporation d'un precurseur de L'ADN marque au tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saintigny, Y.; Laurent, D.; Lahayel, J.B. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, IRCM-LRTS, U967 - CEA/INSERM/Universites Paris 7 and Paris-11, 92 (France); Roche, St.; Meynard, D.; Lopez, B.S. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, LMR - UMR 217 - CEA/CNRS, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et moleculaire, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, 92 (France)

    2009-07-01

    The authors report a molecular geno-toxicology investigation which allowed molecular events induced par intracellular incorporation of tritium to be studied, and the genetic instability resulting from a chronic exposure even at low dose to be analysed. For this purpose, they developed cell models (hamster tumorous cells and human fibroblasts) in which they know how to incorporate given quantities of marked nucleotides in the DNA. They show that the incorporation of tritium, even with doses which are said to be non toxic, causes a prolonged exposure of the cell to a genotoxic stress, and maybe a genetic instability due to a too great number of recombination events

  11. Experiment list: SRX186703 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available binding a DNA sequence element called the neuron-restrictive silencer element (N...factor family. Represses transcription by binding a DNA sequence element called the neuron-restrictive

  12. Comparative performance of two whole-genome capture methodologies on ancient DNA Illumina libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila-Arcos María C; Sandoval-Velasco Marcela; Schroeder Hannes; Carpenter Meredith L.; Malaspinas Anna-Sapfo; Wales Nathan; Peñaloza Fernando; Bustamante Carlos D.; Gilbert M. Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Application of whole genome capture (WGC) methods to ancient DNA (aDNA) promises to increase efficiency of ancient genome sequencing. We compared the performance of two recent WGC methods in enriching human aDNA within Illumina libraries built using both double stranded and single stranded build protocols. Although both methods effectively enriched aDNA we observed consistent differences between the methods providing the opportunity to further explore parameters influencing WGC experiments. ...

  13. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. Engelward (Bevin); G. Weeda (Geert); M.D. Wyatt; J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); J. de Wit (Jan); I. Donker (Ingrid); J.M. Allan (James); B. Gold (Bert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1997-01-01

    textabstract3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA

  14. Repair and genetic consequences of DNA double strand breaks during animal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmens, Bennie Benjamin Lodewijk Gerardus

    2014-01-01

    The genetic code of life is stored in DNA molecules that consist of two parallel strands of coupled nucleotides that form a DNA double helix. One of the most deleterious forms of DNA damage is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) in which both strands of the helix are broken. When not repaired adequately

  15. Predicting the effect of ions on the conformation of the H-NS dimerization domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, J.; Dame, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    The histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) is a DNA-organizing protein in bacteria. It contains a DNA-binding domain and a dimerization domain, connected by a flexible linker region. Dimerization occurs through the formation of a helical bundle, including a coiled-coil interaction motif.

  16. DNA-directed growth of ultrafine CoAuPd nanoparticles on graphene as efficient catalysts for formic acid dehydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Wang, Hong-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Ping, Yun; O, Song-Il; Li, Si-Jia; Jiang, Qing

    2014-03-14

    Ultrafine and well dispersed CoAuPd nanoparticles grown on a DNA-reduced-graphene-oxide (DNA-rGO) composite have been successfully synthesized using a DNA-directed method. The resultant CoAuPd/DNA-rGO composite exhibits high activity and 100% H2 selectivity toward the dehydrogenation of formic acid without any additive at 298 K.

  17. Ancient DNA sheds new light on the Svalbard foraminiferal fossil record of the last millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, J; Lejzerowicz, F; Esling, P; Szczuciński, W; Zajączkowski, M; Pawlowski, J

    2014-07-01

    Recent palaeogenetic studies have demonstrated the occurrence of preserved ancient DNA (aDNA) in various types of fossilised material. Environmental aDNA sequences assigned to modern species have been recovered from marine sediments dating to the Pleistocene. However, the match between the aDNA and the fossil record still needs to be evaluated for the environmental DNA approaches to be fully exploited. Here, we focus on foraminifera in sediments up to one thousand years old retrieved from the Hornsund fjord (Svalbard). We compared the diversity of foraminiferal microfossil assemblages with the diversity of aDNA sequenced from subsurface sediment samples using both cloning and high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Our study shows that 57% of the species archived in the fossil record were also detected in the aDNA data. However, the relative abundance of aDNA sequence reads and fossil specimens differed considerably. We also found a limited match between the stratigraphic occurrence of some fossil species and their aDNA sequences, especially in the case of rare taxa. The aDNA data comprised a high proportion of non-fossilised monothalamous species, which are known to dominate in modern foraminiferal communities of the Svalbard region. Our results confirm the relevance of HTS for studying past micro-eukaryotic diversity and provide insight into its ability to reflect fossil assemblages. Palaeogenetic studies including aDNA analyses of non-fossilised groups expand the range of palaeoceanographical proxies and therefore may increase the accuracy of palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikić, Aleksandar M

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350-1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl(-1) of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide.

  19. The effect of ancient DNA damage on inferences of demographic histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Erik; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, Marcus Thomas Pius

    2008-01-01

    The field of ancient DNA (aDNA) is casting new light on many evolutionary questions. However, problems associated with the postmortem instability of DNA may complicate the interpretation of aDNA data. For example, in population genetic studies, the inclusion of damaged DNA may inflate estimates o...... for a change in effective population size in this data set vanishes once the effects of putative damage are removed. Our results suggest that population genetic analyses of aDNA sequences, which do not accurately account for damage, should be interpreted with great caution....

  20. Beta Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anemia or failure to thrive. If the doctor suspects beta thalassemia, he or she will take a ... test called a hemoglobin electrophoresis and/or a DNA test for abnormal hemoglobin genes. If both parents ...

  1. DNA Barcoding Applied to Invasive Leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) in the Philippines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sonja J. Scheffer; Matthew L. Lewis; Ravindra C. Joshi

    2006-01-01

    .... We applied a DNA barcoding approach to outbreak populations of invasive Liriomyza spp. leafminer pests in the Philippines to explore the use of barcoding in a relatively well studied, economically important group...

  2. A comparative study for selectivity of micronuclei in oral exfoliated epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Grover

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Feulgen being a DNA-specific stain gave the least counts, although statistically significant results from the comparison of MNi frequency between cases and controls were obtained with all the three stains.

  3. ATM modulates the loading of recombination proteins onto a chromosomal translocation breakpoint hotspot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Sun (Jiying); Y. Oma (Yukako); M. Harata (Masahiko); K. Kono (Kazuteru); H. Shima (Hiroki); A. Kinomura (Aiko); T. Ikura (Tsuyoshi); H. Suzuki (Hidekazu); S. Mizutani (Shuki); R. Kanaar (Roland); S. Tashiro (Satoshi)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChromosome translocations induced by DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation and certain chemotherapies, alter genetic information resulting in malignant transformation. Abrogation or loss of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein, a DNA damage signaling regulator,

  4. EPA Scientists Develop Research Methods for Studying Mold Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2002, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency researchers developed a DNA-based Mold Specific Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction method (MSQPCR) for identifying and quantifying over 100 common molds and fungi.

  5. Evaluation of cellular responses for a chimeric HBsAg-HCV core DNA vaccine in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yazdanian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Fusion of HBsAg to HCVcp in the context of a DNA vaccine modality could augment Th1-oriented cellular and CTL responses toward a protective epitope, comparable to that of HCVcp (subunit HCV vaccine immunization.

  6. Method of inactivation of an end product of energy metabolism in Zymomonas mobilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min [Lakewood, CO; Chou, Yat-Chen [Lakewood, CO

    2008-05-20

    The present invention briefly provides a method of site-specific insertion in Zymomonas, comprising, providing a Zymomonas gene fragment, interrupting a DNA sequence the fragment, and transforming the Zymomonas through homologous recombination with the interrupted fragment.

  7. Application and comparison of large-scale solution-based DNA capture-enrichment methods on ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen; Cappellini, Enrico; Romero-Navarro, J. Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The development of second-generation sequencing technologies has greatly benefitted the field of ancient DNA (aDNA). Its application can be further exploited by the use of targeted capture-enrichment methods to overcome restrictions posed by low endogenous and contaminating DNA in ancient samples....... We tested the performance of Agilent's SureSelect and Mycroarray's MySelect in-solution capture systems on Illumina sequencing libraries built from ancient maize to identify key factors influencing aDNA capture experiments. High levels of clonality as well as the presence of multiple-copy sequences...... of capturing aDNA from ancient plant material, our results also enable us to provide useful recommendations for those planning targeted-sequencing on aDNA....

  8. Inability of 'Whole Genome Amplification' to Improve Success Rates for the Biomolecular Detection of Tuberculosis in Archaeological Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannine Forst

    Full Text Available We assessed the ability of whole genome amplification (WGA to improve the efficiency of downstream polymerase chain reactions (PCRs directed at ancient DNA (aDNA of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. Using extracts from a variety of bones and a tooth from human skeletons with or without lesions indicative of tuberculosis, from multiple time periods, we obtained inconsistent results. We conclude that WGA does not provide any advantage in studies of MTBC aDNA. The sporadic nature of our results are probably due to the fact that WGA is itself a PCR-based procedure which, although designed to deal with fragmented DNA, might be inefficient with the low concentration of templates in an aDNA extract. As such, WGA is subject to similar, if not the same, restrictions as PCR when applied to aDNA.

  9. DNA barcoding of vouchered xylarium wood specimens of nine endangered Dalbergia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Yu; Lichao Jiao; Juan Guo; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Tuo He; Xiaomei Jiang; Yafang Yin

    2017-01-01

    ITS2+trnH-psbA was the best combination of DNA barcode to resolve the Dalbergia wood species studied. We demonstrate the feasibility of building a DNA barcode reference database using xylarium wood specimens.

  10. Detection of Multiple Waterborne Pathogens Using Microsequencing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: A microarray was developed to simultaneously detect Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus anthracis and Francisella tularensis in water. Methods and Results: A DNA microarray was designed to contain probes that specifically dete...

  11. 78 FR 21614 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... epigenetic mechanisms that control the pathogenesis of AMD. A DNA methylation study identified sites on....D. at [email protected] . Epigenetic Factors Associated with the Development of Age-related...

  12. Boosting of DNA Vaccine-Elicited Gamma Interferon Responses in Humans by Exposure to Malaria Parasites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Ruobing; Richie, Thomas L; Baraceros, Maria F; Rahardjo, Nancy; Gay, Tanya; Banania, Jo-Glenna; Charoenvit, Yupin; Epstein, Judith E; Luke, Thomas; Freilich, Daniel A; Norman, Jon; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2004-01-01

    A mixture of DNA plasmids expressing five Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocyte-stage antigens was administered with or without a DNA plasmid encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF...

  13. Comparison of the Protective Efficacy of DNA and Baculovirus-Derived Protein Vaccines for EBOLA Virus in Guinea Pigs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mellquist-Riemenschneider, Jenny L; Garrison, Aura R; Geisbert, Joan B; Saikh, Kamal U; Heidebrink, Kelli D

    2003-01-01

    .... Previously, a priming dose of a DNA vaccine expressing the glycoprotein (GP) gene of MARV followed by boosting with recombinant baculovirus-derived GP protein was found to confer protective immunity to guinea pigs (Hevey et al., 2001...

  14. ycf1, the most promising plastid DNA barcode of land plants

    OpenAIRE

    Wenpan Dong; Chao Xu; Changhao Li; Jiahui Sun; Yunjuan Zuo; Shuo Shi; Tao Cheng; Junjie Guo; Shiliang Zhou

    2015-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a DNA fragment used to identify species. For land plants, DNA fragments of plastid genome could be the primary consideration. Unfortunately, most of the plastid candidate barcodes lack species-level resolution. The identification of DNA barcodes of high resolution at species level is critical to the success of DNA barcoding in plants. We searched the available plastid genomes for the most variable regions and tested the best candidates using both a large number of tree specie...

  15. Time to Spread Your Wings: A Review of the Avian Ancient DNA Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grealy, Alicia; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Bunce, Michael

    2017-07-18

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) has the ability to inform the evolutionary history of both extant and extinct taxa; however, the use of aDNA in the study of avian evolution is lacking in comparison to other vertebrates, despite birds being one of the most species-rich vertebrate classes. Here, we review the field of "avian ancient DNA" by summarising the past three decades of literature on this topic. Most studies over this time have used avian aDNA to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and clarify taxonomy based on the sequencing of a few mitochondrial loci, but recent studies are moving toward using a comparative genomics approach to address developmental and functional questions. Applying aDNA analysis with more practical outcomes in mind (such as managing conservation) is another increasingly popular trend among studies that utilise avian aDNA, but the majority of these have yet to influence management policy. We find that while there have been advances in extracting aDNA from a variety of avian substrates including eggshell, feathers, and coprolites, there is a bias in the temporal focus; the majority of the ca. 150 studies reviewed here obtained aDNA from late Holocene (100-1000 yBP) material, with few studies investigating Pleistocene-aged material. In addition, we identify and discuss several other issues within the field that require future attention. With more than one quarter of Holocene bird extinctions occurring in the last several hundred years, it is more important than ever to understand the mechanisms driving the evolution and extinction of bird species through the use of aDNA.

  16. Time to Spread Your Wings: A Review of the Avian Ancient DNA Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Grealy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ancient DNA (aDNA has the ability to inform the evolutionary history of both extant and extinct taxa; however, the use of aDNA in the study of avian evolution is lacking in comparison to other vertebrates, despite birds being one of the most species-rich vertebrate classes. Here, we review the field of “avian ancient DNA” by summarising the past three decades of literature on this topic. Most studies over this time have used avian aDNA to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and clarify taxonomy based on the sequencing of a few mitochondrial loci, but recent studies are moving toward using a comparative genomics approach to address developmental and functional questions. Applying aDNA analysis with more practical outcomes in mind (such as managing conservation is another increasingly popular trend among studies that utilise avian aDNA, but the majority of these have yet to influence management policy. We find that while there have been advances in extracting aDNA from a variety of avian substrates including eggshell, feathers, and coprolites, there is a bias in the temporal focus; the majority of the ca. 150 studies reviewed here obtained aDNA from late Holocene (100–1000 yBP material, with few studies investigating Pleistocene-aged material. In addition, we identify and discuss several other issues within the field that require future attention. With more than one quarter of Holocene bird extinctions occurring in the last several hundred years, it is more important than ever to understand the mechanisms driving the evolution and extinction of bird species through the use of aDNA.

  17. Map of Life: Measuring and Visualizing Species' Relatedness with "Molecular Distance Maps"

    OpenAIRE

    Kari, Lila; Hill, Kathleen A.; Sayem, Abu Sadat; Bryans, Nathaniel; Davis, Katelyn; Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods that (i) portrays quantitative characteristics of a DNA sequence as an image, (ii) computes distances between these images, and (iii) uses these distances to output a map wherein each sequence is a point in a common Euclidean space. In the resulting "Molecular Distance Map" each point signifies a DNA sequence, and the geometric distance between any two points reflects the degree of relatedness between the corresponding sequences and species. Molecular...

  18. Immune-enhancing effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides on DNA vaccine expressing Bordetella avium ompA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujie eZhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS, a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund's incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7 and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 days to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund’s adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine.

  19. Genome data from a sixteenth century pig illuminate modern breed relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Ram?rez, O; Burgos-Paz, W; Casas, E; Ballester, M; Bianco, E; Olalde, I; Santpere, G; Novella, V; Gut, M; Lalueza-Fox, C; Sa?a, M; P?rez-Enciso, M

    2014-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) provides direct evidence of historical events that have modeled the genome of modern individuals. In livestock, resolving the differences between the effects of initial domestication and of subsequent modern breeding is not straight forward without aDNA data. Here, we have obtained shotgun genome sequence data from a sixteenth century pig from Northeastern Spain (Montsoriu castle), the ancient pig was obtained from an extremely well-preserved and diverse assemblage...

  20. Dicty_cDB: AFB504 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available turgidum haplotype B DNA ... 42 0.029 EU159420_1( EU159420 |pid:none) Triticum turgidum haplotype B DNA...turgidum haplotype A DNA ... 42 0.029 EU159417_1( EU159417 |pid:none) Triticum monococcum haplotype A DN...tauschii haplotype D DNA ... 42 0.029 EU159419_1( EU159419 |pid:none) Triticum turgidum haplotype A DNA